WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluation co-operation volume

  1. Nuclear data standards - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.; Shibata, K.; Vonach, H.; Hambsch, F.J.; Chen, Z.; Hofmann, H.M.; Oh, S.Y.; Badikov, S.A.; Gai, E.V.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Smith, D.L.; Hale, G.M.; Kawano, T.; Larson, N.M.

    2006-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries) and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries is organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by Subgroup 7, which was in charge of producing new evaluated neutron cross-section standards. When starting the project, there was a general consensus on the need to update these standards, as significant improvements had been made to the experimental database since 1991 when the last evaluation of these standards was performed. The present work was accomplished through efficient collaboration between a task force of the US Cross-section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Subgroup 7 of the Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. Work is reported on the results of an international effort to evaluate the neutron cross-section standards. The evaluations include the H(n,n), 6 Li(n,t), 10 B(n,α), 10 B(n,α1γ), 197 Au(n,γ), 235 U(n,f) and 238 U(n,f) standard reactions. Evaluations were also produced for the non-standard 238 U(n,γ) and 239 Pu

  2. Actinide data in the thermal energy range - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Henri; Weigmann, H.; Sowerby, M.; Mattes, Margarete; Matsunobu, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Halsall, M.J.; Weston, L.; Deruytter, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by a Subgroup investigating actinide data in the thermal energy range. Thermal nuclear constants for the primary actinides have been extensively studies, but the most recent evaluations are not in full agreement with thermal reactor calculations. The objective of the Subgroup was to identify the origin of these differences and to reassess the recent evaluations. A considerable effort was devoted to the η of U-235, where analysis of lattice temperature coefficient measurements has suggested an energy dependent shape below thermal energy

  3. Comparison of evaluated data for chromium-52, iron-56 and nickel-58 - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.Y.; Larson, Duane C.; Hetrick, David M.; Vonach, Herbert; Maino, G.; Menapace, Enzo; Mengoni, I.; Asami, T.; Chiba, Satoshi; Shibata, Keiichi Kanagawa; Iijima, S.; Yamamuro, N.; Kopecky, J.

    1992-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report is issued by a Subgroup investigating discrepancies in different evaluations of the major structural materials. The isotopes selected are Chromium-52, Iron-56 and Nickel-58. Graphical overlay comparisons between cross-sections, and also energy-angle correlated particle distributions, in different evaluated libraries was performed. Benefits from these comparisons include information useful for improving structural material evaluations in individual data libraries, for assessing differences associated with present-day evaluation techniques and for development of techniques for graphical representation of the energy-angle correlated data

  4. Generation of covariance files for iron-56 and natural iron - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vonach, Herbert; Gruppelaar, Harm; Santamarina, Alain; Froehner, Fritz; Hasegawa, Akira; Kanda, Yukinori; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Kopecky, J.; Fu, C.Y.; Hetrick, David M.; Larson, Duane C.; Peelle, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The following report was issued by a Subgroup investigating different methodologies to produce covariance data. These data are required to assess uncertainties in design parameters and to refine the use of nuclear data both in fission and fusion reactor applications. It was agreed to limit the scope to covariance data for Iron-56 and natural iron in view of their importance as structural materials in reactors and particularly for fusion reactor shielding applications

  5. Plutonium-239 fission cross-section between 1 and 100 keV - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, E.; Salvatores, M.; Derrien, H.; Lagrange, Ch.; Kawai, M.; Nakajima, J.; Takano, H.; Weston, L.W.; Young, P.G.; Wagemans, C.

    1994-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The following report was issued by a Subgroup investigating the fission cross-section of Plutonium-239 in the energy range 1 to 100 keV. This cross section is of particular importance for fast reactor applications, such as k eff , sodium void reactivity coefficient and control rod worth. An analysis of recent experimental data by L. Weston et al. give significantly lower cross-section values that the simultaneous evaluation performed by W. Poenitz for the ENDF/B-VI library. The objective of the subgroup was to resolve this discrepancy. One experimental program and one evaluation one have been agreed upon: The experimental program which essentially aims at normalisation checking has been performed in Geel and Oak Ridge. It supports an upward re-normalisation by ∼3.1%. The evaluation program has not been completed and even, as a consequence of the experimental results, loses a part of its justification. But some acquired results are important and can be used for future 239 Pu evaluations. The JEFF-2

  6. Cross-section fluctuations and self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.; Larson, Duane C.; Tagesen, Siegfried; Petrizzi, Luigi; Hasegawa, Akira; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Hogenbirk, Alfred; Weigmann, H.

    1995-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). NEA/NSC Subgroup 15 has had the task to assess self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance range of structural materials, in particular their importance at various energies, and possible ways to deal with them in shielding and activation work. The principal results achieved are summarised briefly, in particular: - New data base consisting of high-resolution transmission data measured at Oak Ridge and Geel; - Improved theoretical understanding of cross-section fluctuations, including their prediction, that has been derived from the Hauser-Feshbach theory; - Benchmark results on the importance of self-shielding in iron at various energies; - Consequences for information storage in evaluated nuclear data files; - Practical utilisation of self-shielding information from evaluated files. Benchmark results as well as the Hauser-Feshbach theory show that self-shielding effects are important up to a 4-or 5-MeV neutron energy. Fluctuation factors extracted from high-resolution total cross-section data can be

  7. International co-operation in nuclear data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordborg, C.

    2003-01-01

    The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation serves as a forum for the exchange of information on required improvements to evaluated nuclear data libraries used in all nuclear application areas. The main objective is to identify the major discrepancies in existing evaluated data libraries and to resolve these discrepancies in specifically established expert groups. The long-term goal is to have converging evaluated data libraries. This co-operative effort is very successful. It has resolved a number of outstanding nuclear data problems and has issued 15 reports in support of the studies undertaken jointly. (author)

  8. IAEA technical co-operation with least developed Member States. Special evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The main purposes of this evaluation were to: Review the overall situation with regard to IAEA technical co-operation with least developed Member States, including specific conditions in nuclear-related activities prevailing in these countries, approaches and practices used by the IAEA in providing assistance to LDCs, and the main results of the co-operation in question. Identify any adjustments to technical co-operation with LDC Member States that may strengthen this activity

  9. Upcrowding energy co-operatives - Evaluating the potential of crowdfunding for business model innovation of energy co-operatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Mathias Georg; Jovanović, Tanja; Voigt, Kai-Ingo

    2017-08-01

    Practice and theory have proven the relevance of energy co-operatives for civic participation in the energy turnaround. However, due to a still low awareness and changing regulation, there seems an unexploited potential of utilizing the legal form 'co-operative' in this context. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the crowdfunding implementation in the business model of energy co-operatives in order to cope with the mentioned challenges. Based on a theoretical framework, we derive a Business Model Innovation (BMI) through crowdfunding including synergies and differences. A qualitative study design, particularly a multiple-case study of energy co-operatives, was chosen to prove the BMI and to reveal barriers. The results show that although most co-operatives are not familiar with crowdfunding, there is strong potential in opening up predominantly local structures to a broader group of members. Building on this, equity-based crowdfunding is revealed to be suitable for energy co-operatives as BMI and to accompany other challenges in the same way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality assurance and the sub-contract interface: co-operative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.; Rippon, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The CEGB standard QA 42-1 quality assurance programme requires purchasers to establish supplier selection and assessment procedures either by previous continuous record of supplying identical or equivalent material satisfactorily, or by an evaluation of the sub-contractors quality system. In order to avoid the multiple evaluations that the latter would involve for projects such as nuclear power stations, which concern a hierarchy of organisations, the idea of co-operative evaluations was suggested. The requirements involved in establishing co-operative evaluations are discussed. Some potential difficulties which have been identified from experience are described. (U.K.)

  11. Experimental evaluation of a co-operative driving setup based on inter-vehicle communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallouzi, R.; Verdult, V.; Hellendoorn, H.; Ploeg, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a co-operative longitudinal controller for a cluster of vehicles with inter-vehicle communication (IVC). By applying IVC a smooth traffic flow can be realized. The proposed controller can actively control the throttle, the brake and the gears of the

  12. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme in Chile, 1981-1991. Country programme evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Agency support for nuclear activities in Chile dates back to the early 1960s. During the last ten years, the period covered by this evaluation, this support has considerably expanded. In the period 1981-1991, 62 Agency projects with allotments amounting to over $7 million were completed or are under implementation. Through this co-operation Chile has received 360 man-months of expert services, $3.4 million worth of equipment, and 105 fellowships for some 390 man-months of training. In addition, 262 Chileans attended 219 Agency regional and interregional training courses, and Chilean institutions were awarded 40 research contracts worth over $325,000. This evaluation covers ten years of Agency technical co-operation with Chile, during which 35 projects were completed and 27 are still being implemented. Eight major sectors received assistance: general atomic energy development; nuclear physics; nuclear raw materials; nuclear engineering and technology; nuclear techniques in agriculture; nuclear medicine; hydrology; and nuclear safety. The evaluation concluded that, overall, the Agency's technical co-operation activities have, in keeping with the national priorities concerning peaceful nuclear applications, contributed substantially to the establishment of Chile's nuclear scientific and technical infrastructure, and played a major role in Chile's efforts to introduce nuclear applications in a number of sectors of the economy, with many benefits for broader national development objectives. Another strength of the Agency's programme with Chile is the high level of commitment and dedication that was noted in the great majority of recipient institutions, and in particular at the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, CChEN. Mention should also be made of the fact that bureaucracy appears to be less severe than in some other developing countries, and that constraints that frequently affect other countries, such as insufficient counterpart commitment and lack of continuity of

  13. Processing covariance data for the resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation, V. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, M.; Leal, L.C.; Wiarda, D.; Jacqmin, R.; Kodeli, I.; ); Chiba, G.; Shibata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Oh, S.; Nikolaev, M.; Kahler, A.C. Jr.; Kawano, T.; Arcilla, R.

    2014-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The working party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are ENDF (United States), JEF/EFF (NEA Data Bank member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Cooperation with evaluation projects of non- OECD countries is organized through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the work performed by WPEC Subgroup 28 (SG28) on issues pertinent to the methodology used to process covariance data in the resonance region. Specifically, SG28 has developed the requisite processing methods needed to process resonance parameter covariance data, generate cross-section covariance data files and demonstrate the use of covariance data in radiation transport analyses. The work performed by SG28 and documented in this report addresses the following tasks: - Produce resonance parameter covariance evaluation for 235 U; - Develop resonance parameter covariance processing methods in widely used processing systems (e.g., NJOY, AMPX, etc.); - Use the updated cross-section processing systems to generate covariance data files for use in radiation transport analyses. In addition, use sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses to demonstrate the propagation of the covariance data in specific radiation transport applications

  14. Quality assurance and the sub-contract interface: co-operative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchill, G.F.; Rippon, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    A common feature of all contemporary Quality Assurance Standards is the requirement for organisations, when carrying out purchasing activities, to select their suppliers on the basis of either a proven record or demonstrated quality capability. In particular the C.E.G.B. Standard QA42-1 Quality Assurance Programme, which the C.E.G.B. will apply to their future major projects, requires purchasers to establish supplier selection and assessment procedures using one or other of the following methods: (a) a previous continuous record of supplying identical or equivalent material to a satisfactory standard; or (b) an evaluation of the sub-contractor's quality assurance system to determine his ability to satisfy the procurement requirements. Co-operative evaluations, where there are several suppliers, are discussed. (author)

  15. Evaluation of nuclear data for radiation shielding by model calculations and international co-operation aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G.; Menapace, E.

    2001-01-01

    The matter is reviewed, also following previous discussions at ICRS-9, concerning evaluation and related theoretical activities on nuclear data for radiation shielding within the framework of international co-operation initiatives, according to recognised needs and priorities. Both cross-section data.- for reactions induced by neutrons and photons - and nuclear structure data have been considered. In this context, main contributions and typical results are presented from theoretical and evaluation activities at the ENEA Applied Physics Division, especially concerning neutron induced reaction data up to 20 MeV and photonuclear reaction data such as photon absorption and (gamma,n) cross-sections. Relevant aspects of algebraic nuclear models and of evaporation and pre-equilibrium models are discussed. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of experience and trends in international co-operation in nuclear safety and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadie, K.B.; Strohl, P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper traces the development of co-operation in nuclear safety technology between the OECD Member countries which began as early as 1965 and is now organised under the auspices of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The principal objective is to exchange and evaluate information on relevant R and D and hence broaden the technical basis for decision-making by licensing authorities in the different countries. The membership of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations combines expertise in nuclear safety R and D and in licensing questions so that licensing procedures in the different countries may be exposed continuously to the influence of overall technological progress. The Committee actively seeks to narrow the differences between administrative procedures and traditional legal practices in Member countries as these affect the licensing of nuclear installations, primarily by assessing and comparing the methods employed. The paper shows how the Committee's working arrangements provide for maximum flexibility: the various co-ordinated programmes are selected after in-depth evaluation of potential areas of priority and are implemented through ad hoc Working Groups, specialist meetings or task forces, or in the form of special studies involving all interested countries. The results, conclusions and recommendations emerging from each programme are reviewed by the Committee before dissemination. Hitherto the greater part of the Committee's activities has been concerned with the safety of light water reactors and related subjects, but more attention is now being given to other topics such as LMFBR safety technology and the safety of fuel cycle facilities, particularly those at the end of the process, the so-called ''back-end'' plants. The paper discusses certain problems and constraints encountered in implementing the programme, some of which stem from Member countries' different degrees of penetration

  17. Evaluation of bilateral and multilateral defence co-operation and assistance / Najaf Gambarov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gambarov, Najaf

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Aserbaidžaani sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikide relvajõududega ja rahvusvaheliste organisatsioonidega 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  18. Evaluation of Georgian military co-operation with partner countries and institutions / George Manjgaladze

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Manjgaladze, George

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Gruusia sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikide relvajõudude ja rahvusvaheliste organisatsioonidega, sh NATO-ga 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  19. Evaluation of bilateral and multilateral defence co-operation and assistance / Arthur Aghabekyan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aghabekyan, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Armeenia sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst välisriikidega ja osalemisest rahvusvahelistes sõjalistes koostööprogrammides 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  20. Summary Record of the Twenty-Sixth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document is the executive summary of WPEC's 26. meeting held in 2014. It presents a brief review of the 2 days meeting in particular the Reports on experimental activities in Europe, Japan, USA and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL) with the discussion of future plans, the Review of final or near-final subgroup reports, the Status of ongoing subgroups, the Proposals for new subgroups and some information about Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community. A list of participants and a list of reports presented at this meeting are attached in appendix

  1. The Agency's technical co-operation programme in the Islamic Republic of Iran 1982-1995 country programme evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This evaluation of the country programme in Iran was requested by the Government of the Islamic Republic of Iran. The main reasons for the evaluation were the desire to determine the results of the Agency's TC programme in Iran since 1982 (the post-revolution period) and how they are being utilized, and to identify specific areas for future co-operation. The evaluation included a two-week field mission during November/December 1995, integrated by three outside experts and one Agency staff member. Figs, tabs

  2. Evaluation of a "no-cost" Internet technology-based system for teleradiology and co-operative work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, B; Schlaefke, A; Pietsch, M; García, I; Vogl, T J

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of a no-cost system based on standard Internet technology components for teleradiology. The system was composed of free software (communication, DICOM viewer, compression) and standard off-the-shelf hardware components. For different image (CR, CT, MR) and network types (LAN and ISDN) the File Transfer, Audio and Video Conference, and Co-operative Work properties were examined and compared with the literature referring to standard complete packages and dedicated teleradiology systems. The main advantages of the no-cost system are: price; ease of use; independence from specific hardware; and potential connection to any possible partner. The performance of the File Transfer and the Audio and Video Conference was comparable to the other system groups with slight disadvantages in the usability. For Co-operative Work the employed "application sharing" technology does not meet the clinical requirements, which applies identically to the standard complete packages. Here the specialized systems prove superior, although they are proprietary. With minimal restraints the evaluated no-cost solution can be used for File Transfer and Conference scenarios. The usage for Co-operative Work with ISDN is not recommended, unless for the purpose of gaining experience or when dealing with small amounts of cases or images.

  3. Evaluation of a ''no-cost'' Internet technology-based system for teleradiology and Co-operative Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, B.; Schlaefke, A.; Pietsch, M.; Garcia, I.; Vogl, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of a no-cost system based on standard Internet technology components for teleradiology. The system was composed of free software (communication, DICOM viewer, compression) and standard off-the-shelf hardware components. For different image (CR, CT, MR) and network types (LAN and ISDN) the File Transfer, Audio and Video Conference, and Co-operative Work properties were examined and compared with the literature referring to standard complete packages and dedicated teleradiology systems. The main advantages of the no-cost system are: price; ease of use; independence from specific hardware; and potential connection to any possible partner. The performance of the File Transfer and the Audio and Video Conference was comparable to the other system groups with slight disadvantages in the usability. For Co-operative Work the employed ''application sharing'' technology does not meet the clinical requirements, which applies identically to the standard complete packages. Here the specialized systems prove superior, although they are proprietary. With minimal restraints the evaluated no-cost solution can be used for File Transfer and Conference scenarios. The usage for Co-operative Work with ISDN is not recommended, unless for the purpose of gaining experience or when dealing with small amounts of cases or images. (orig.)

  4. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this part the are reviewed: Co-operation with IAEA; Participation of the Slovakia on the 41 st session of the General Conference; The comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization; Co-operation with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development; co-operation with the European Commission; Fulfillment of obligations resulting from the international contracting documents

  5. Twenty-eighth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; ); Danon, Yaron; Herman, Mike; ); Dunn, Mike; ); Kahler, Albert Skip; ); Jacqmin, Robert; ); Plompen, Arjan; ); Fukahori, Tokio; ); Harada, Hideo; ); Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; ); Grudzevich, Oleg; ); Ge, Zhigang; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng; Koning, Arjan; ); Mills, Robert; ); Mcnabb, Dennis; ); Palmiotti, Giuseppe; ); Noguere, Gilles; ); Leal, Luiz; ); Cabellos, Oscar; )

    2016-01-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 28. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document is the summary record of the meeting. It presents: 1 - The reports on experimental activities: Experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects were reviewed. Detailed information about the experimental activities is given in the reports and view-graphs presented at the meeting. 2 - The review of final or near-final subgroup reports. Results and conclusions of completed or near-completed subgroups were discussed. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 3 - The status of ongoing subgroups. Activities of ongoing subgroups were presented. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. 4 - The proposals for new subgroups. The subgroup proposal was reviewed by WPEC. Detailed information about this proposal is given in the document. 5 - The forthcoming meetings of interest. The documents presented at the twenty-eight WPEC meeting are presented in the annex 2: Annex 2.1 Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation - WPEC; Annex 2.2 WPEC Long-term mandate (updated and extended) on a 'Expert Group on the High Priority Request

  6. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Within the Union Nations (UN) framework, the Slovak Republic participated in following activities on environment protection co-operation: UN European Economic Commission, UN Industrial Development Organization, UN Development Programme, UN Human Habitat Organization, UN Environment Programme, and UN Commission on Sustainable Development. Relevant activities of the Slovak Republic in these co-operations as well as in European Union and OECD activities are reviewed. International conventions and other forms of multilateral co-operation, bilateral co-operation, and international programmes and projects in which the Slovak Republic took participate are presented

  7. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1996, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) ensured the Slovak Republic (SR) obligations with relation to the international agreements and with the SR membership in the IAEA.International co-operation has been ensured on the basis of the bilateral international agreements. With the Ministry of Foreign Affairs co-operation, the SR fulfilled its financial obligations to this organization in due time and in the full scope. Representing Central and Eastern Europe interest in the Board of Governors, the SR participation in the highest executive in the highest executive authority was finished in 1996.The Board of Governors Vice-chairman position was executed by NRA SR Chairman. 5 national and 6 regional technical co-operation and assistance projects were realized in 1996. 12 organizations participated in these projects and accordingly 104 experts took part in training programmes, scientific visits or as the mission members abroad. Besides, Slovak experts participated at work of technical advisory and consultation groups with the significant assistance. In the framework of IAEA co-operation, the SR was visited by 11 expert missions formed by 28 experts from 19 countries including IAEA. Slovak organizations, namely institutes of the Academy of Sciences, Slovak research centres and universities participated in IAEA scientific and research activities through NRA SR. 15 scientific contracts in total were approved and realized and these contracts are utilized as supplementary financing of the own scientific and research projects. Other international co-operation and regional co-operation activities of the NRA SR in 1996 are reviewed

  8. Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC), NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Danon, Yaron; Dunn, Mike; Herman, Mike; Kahler, Albert; Fischer, Ulrich; Jacqmin, Robert; Koning, Arjan; Plompen, Arjan; Fukahori, Tokio; Harada, Hideo; Igashira, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Osamu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Golashvili, Tengiz; Ignatiev, Victor; Ignatyuk, Anatoly; Oleynik, Dimitry S.; Sinitsa, Valentin; Ge, Zhigang; Trkov, Andrej; De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Kawano, Toshihiko; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Mills, Robert; Mcnabb, Dennis; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Cabellos, Oscar; ); Lee, Young-Ouk; Kim, Do Heon; Ruan, Xichao; Wu, Haicheng

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. This document brings together the available documents and presentations relative to this meeting: the agenda, the Summary record of the previous meeting held on May 2014, the Reports (slides) on experimental activities from Europe, Japan, USA, Russia and China, the Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL), the presentation from Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files) and from Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections). The document ends with a preliminary proposal for a New Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(α,β): Measurement, Evaluation and Application)

  9. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities in international co-operation carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. Professionality of the Bohunice NPPs staff was highly appreciated by inviting them to be the OSART team members

  10. Marketing co-operatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.J. Hendrikse (George); C.P. Veerman (Cees)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractMarketing co-operatives (MCs) are analysed from an incomplete contracting perspective. The requirement of the domination of control by the members of a MC is a threat to the survival of a MC in markets where the level of asset specificity at the processing stage of production is

  11. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 27. meeting, NEA Headquarters, 21-22 May 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 27. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document brings together the available documents of the meeting: 1 - The Proposed agenda, the list of participants and the Summary record of the previous meeting, May 2014 (Report NEA-SEN-NSC-WPEC--2014-2); 2 - The Reports on experimental activities: Europe (NEA DB), Japan, USA, Russia, China; 3 - Some Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, BROND/ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, and TENDL; 4 - The Status of some subgroups: Subgroup 35 (Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range); Subgroup 36 (Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region); Subgroup 37 (Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies); Subgroup 38 (A modern nuclear database structure beyond the ENDF format); Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files); Subgroup 40 (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) Pilot Project); Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections); Subgroup C (High

  12. Evaluation of a ''no-cost'' Internet technology-based system for teleradiology and Co-operative Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, B.; Schlaefke, A.; Pietsch, M.; Garcia, I. [Department of Information and Communication Technology, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of a no-cost system based on standard Internet technology components for teleradiology. The system was composed of free software (communication, DICOM viewer, compression) and standard off-the-shelf hardware components. For different image (CR, CT, MR) and network types (LAN and ISDN) the File Transfer, Audio and Video Conference, and Co-operative Work properties were examined and compared with the literature referring to standard complete packages and dedicated teleradiology systems. The main advantages of the no-cost system are: price; ease of use; independence from specific hardware; and potential connection to any possible partner. The performance of the File Transfer and the Audio and Video Conference was comparable to the other system groups with slight disadvantages in the usability. For Co-operative Work the employed ''application sharing'' technology does not meet the clinical requirements, which applies identically to the standard complete packages. Here the specialized systems prove superior, although they are proprietary. With minimal restraints the evaluated no-cost solution can be used for File Transfer and Conference scenarios. The usage for Co-operative Work with ISDN is not recommended, unless for the purpose of gaining experience or when dealing with small amounts of cases or images. (orig.)

  13. Co-operation and Self-Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2008-07-01

    structures. This today culminates in global problems such as the ecological crisis, high risk technologies, poverty, unemployment, wars, armed conflicts, terrorism, etc. In order to solve these problems our social systems need re-design in terms of ecological sustainability, alliance technology, participatory economy, participatory democracy, and participatory culture. Participation is an integrated notion that is based on co-operation, selfdetermination, and inclusion in multiple dimensions. A system can be considered as participatory if power in the system is distributed in such a way that all members and concerned individuals can own the system co-operatively and can produce, decide and live in the system co-operatively. Participation is frequently understood in the very narrow sense of concerned people taking somehow part in decision processes. Such an understanding is limited to the political dimension and says nothing about the scope and dimension of participation. There are several dimensions of participation in a social system or in society: producing, owning, consuming (economic dimension, deciding, goal-setting, evaluating (political dimension, forming knowledge/norms/values/images/visions, communicating, networking, self-realizing (cultural dimension. Participation in each of these ten dimensions can be low, medium or high/full. The participation matrix describes the degree of participation in an organization/society with the help of the three dimensions of economy, politics and culture and an analysis of the scope of participation (economic, political, cultural.

  14. Family co-operation programme description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peine, H A; Terry, T

    1990-01-01

    Current parenting practices indicate a continuing trend towards less family interaction. Institutional attempts to intervene with parents often fail. The 'Family Co-operation Programme' provides a tangible method for families and schools to work together in preventing alcohol and drug abuse, by utilising the positive influence of the home and strengthening family relationships. The Board of Education for the State of Utah has tested and is currently implementing a unique, low-cost, alternative to impact on the home. Utilising a K-12 alcohol/drug abuse school-based curriculum, the child, based on his/her inclass training, becomes the resource for family co-operation activities. These include training in coping skills, decision-making, resistance to peer persuasion, increased self-esteem and alcohol/drug information. Grade level materials go home with the child, who returns a requested parent evaluation. Data for over one thousand families show the positive impact of the activities.

  15. Development and field evaluation of animal feed supplementation packages. Proceedings of the final review meeting of an IAEA Technical Co-operation Regional AFRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    Inadequate nutrition is one of the major constraints limiting livestock production in African countries. The ruminants in the smallholder sector depend on natural pasture and fibrous crop residues for their survival, growth, reproduction and production. Since quality and quantity of the natural pasture vary with season, animals dependent on it are subjected to nutritional stress in the dry season when feed resources are senesced and in short supply leading to decreased animal productivity. The main objective of the IAEA Technical Co-operation Regional AFRA Project 11-17 (RAF/5/041) was the improvement of ruminant livestock production in AFRA Member States. It had two main components: (a) the development and dissemination of cost-effective and sustainable feed supplementation packages which are based on locally available feed resources; and (b) establishment of the 'Self-coating Radioimmunoassay' technique for measuring progesterone in the milk and blood of ruminants. The project has developed a number of feed supplementation packages using feed resources available on-farm and by-products from agro-industrial processes. The packages involve the use of multi-nutrient blocks containing molasses and urea or poultry litter, ensilage of fibrous crop residues with poultry litter, leguminous fodder, mineral blocks etc. These packages have been evaluated on-station and on-farm to assess their potential to enhance productivity of ruminants. The cost-benefit ratio for feeding supplementation packages has been established. As a result of their use, income of the farmers has been shown to increase substantially. Needless to say, the scientists, agricultural extension officers, policy makers and the governments must work hand-in-hand to capitalize on this and ensure wider application and extension of the packages, and develop strategies for sustaining them. Radioimmunoassay for progesterone has been used in this project mainly for the assessment of ovarian activity in order to

  16. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC). Presentations and documents submitted to the 28. meeting, OECD Headquarters, Conference Centre, Paris, France, 9-13 May 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    The NEA's nuclear data evaluation co-operation activities involve the following evaluation projects: ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan), ROSFOND/BROND (Russia), JEFF (other Data Bank member countries) and CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The working party was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, measurements, nuclear model calculations, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint evaluation and/or measurement efforts. The 28. Meeting of the WPEC was the occasion to review the experimental activities, the evaluation projects and the Status of subgroups. This document brings together the available documents of the meeting: 1 - The Reports on experimental activities: Europe (NEA DB), Japan, USA, China; 2 - Some Brief progress reports from the evaluation projects: ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, BROND/ROSFOND, CENDL, IAEA, TENDL; 3 - The Status of subgroups: Subgroup 37 (Improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies); Subgroup 38 (A modern nuclear database structure beyond the ENDF format); Subgroup 39 (Methods and approaches to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data files); Subgroup 40 (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) Pilot Project); Subgroup 41 (Improving nuclear data accuracy of 241 Am and 237 Np capture cross-sections); Subgroup 42 (Thermal Scattering Kernel S(a,b): Measurement, Evaluation and Application); Subgroup C (High Priority Request List - HPRL); New Subgroups were proposed and presented: 43 - Code infrastructure to support a general nuclear database structure; WPEC long-term sub-group proposal: International standard for a general nuclear database structure

  17. Agricultural Co-Operatives in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tefera, Delelegne A.; Bijman, Jos; Slingerland, Maja A.

    2017-01-01

    To what extent can co-operatives strengthen rural development in sub-Saharan Africa? This paper explores the development of agricultural co-operatives in Ethiopia, particularly the changes in economic functions. Co-operative development in Ethiopia has been strongly influenced by various political

  18. Co-ordinated Evaluation of Plutonium-239 in the Resonance Region - A report by the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Saint Jean, Cyrille; Noguere, Gilles; Peneliau, Yannick; Bernard, David; Serot, Olivier; McKnight, Richard D.; Leal, Luiz Carlos; Derrien, Herve; Kahler, Albert C.

    2014-04-01

    The Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) has been established under the aegis of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between the members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The WPEC determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The parties to the project are: BROND (Russian Federation), ENDF (United States), JENDL (Japan) and JEFF (other NEA Data Bank member countries), as well as CENDL (China) in close co-operation with the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report has been issued by the WPEC Subgroup 34 with a view to solving a general discrepancy when calculating criticality benchmarks with plutonium, using the most recent evaluated data libraries. This international effort enabled the delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV. The large fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicities were correctly reproduced with a phenomenological decomposition of the multiplicity that involved the two-step (n,γf) process. Performances of the new 239 Pu evaluation were tested over a broad set of integral data (ICSBEP, mock-up experiments performed in the CEA facilities and in power reactors). An overall good agreement was achieved between the calculations and the experimental results. The international effort performed in the framework of this Subgroup enabled delivery of a single set of resonance parameters up to 2.5 keV able to provide good C/E results over a broad set of integral data. The resonance analysis has been performed

  19. Women and International Intellectual Co-Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The article explores ways in which intellectual co-operation at the League of Nations [SDN] provided a space for the engagement of culturally elite women in intellectual co-operation circles in Geneva, Paris and a range of national contexts stretching across Europe, Latin America and Asia. It discusses the language of the "international mind" and…

  20. Activities and co-operations in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Dunjiu

    1991-01-01

    The items of activities and co-operations in 1990 are listed. It includes the meetings held by CNDC at home, the international meetings held in China, the international meetings, workshop or training course attended by chinese scientists and other activities and co-operations related to CNDC

  1. Obstetric care: competition or co-operation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Meijer, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of co-operation within maternity and obstetric care between midwives, general practitioners (GPs) and obstetricians. DESIGN: descriptive correlational study. SETTING: The Netherlands. Policy is towards more co-operation between

  2. The Co-Operative: Good with Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Max

    2015-01-01

    The article is a summary of a small-scale research project which considers the formation of Co-operative Trust Schools. This was carried out in 2013 at a time when the number of schools becoming Academies and Trust Schools through the Co-operative College was burgeoning. Through questionnaire, interview, documentary analysis and exploration of…

  3. Co-operatives and Normative Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten; Jagd, Søren

    1992-01-01

    This paper explores the conditions for applying normative control in co-operatives. For normative control to be effective two conditions are found particularly important: Individuals must be morally involved and the organization must have a system of making it possible to link common norms...... and individual action. If these conditions are not fulfilled, as may be the case in many co-operatives, normative control cannot be expected to work. The problems of normative control in co-operatives may then not be caused by the use of normative control as such, but may instead be a problem of securing...

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This report on the International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities in 1992 contains an overview of the general issues involved, including both in-house and external developments, resources and delivery, and evaluation of programs; an overview by field of activity and by division within the Agency; an overview by geographic area, distinguishing (i) Africa, (ii) Asia and the Pacific, (iii) Latin America, (iv) and the Middle East and Europe; an overview by component (i.e., experts, equipment, fellowships, training courses, sub-contracts and miscellaneous); and an overview by fund technical assistance and co-operation fund, extrabudgetary resources, United Nations Development Program (UNDP), assistance in kind. It also contains a profile on technical co-operation activities in Latin America. Projects concluded during 1992 are listed together with a description of their achievements. It concludes with implementation summaries. 10 figs, 9 tabs

  5. Co-operative approaches to regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huigen, Hans; Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

    1997-01-01

    The case studies in this occasional paper are about ways in which governments and businesses are seeking to address economic and social problems by using new forms of co-operation that are different...

  6. Agricultural Productivity, Co-Operatives and Organisational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Huria: Journal of the Open University of Tanzania ... can enhance productivity and increase farmers' income by bringing financial services closer. ... of Kimuli Agricultural Marketing Co-operative Society (AMCOS) and Muungano Savings and ...

  7. Twenty-Fourth Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation, 24-25 May 2012, NEA Headquarters, 12 boulevard des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux, France - Summary record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives the summary record of the past 24. Meeting of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation: review of the experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects (NEA Data Bank member countries, Japan, USA, China, Russia), brief progress reports from the evaluation projects and discussion of future plans (ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, TENDL, BROND, CENDL, IAEA), review of final or near-final subgroup reports (subgroups 27 (Prompt photon production from fission products), 28 (Processing of covariance data), 29 (U-235 capture cross-section in the keV to MeV energy region), 31 (Meeting nuclear data needs for advanced reactor systems)), status of ongoing subgroups (subgroups C (High priority request list for nuclear data), 33 (Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance), 34 (Coordinated evaluation of 239 Pu in the resonance region), 35 (Scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range), 36 (Reporting and usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region)), proposals for new subgroups, discussions on the opportunity to create a World Wide Evaluated Nuclear Data File/Library, information on conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community

  8. Why do health and social care providers co-operate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raak, Arno; Paulus, Aggie; Mur-Veeman, Ingrid

    2005-09-28

    Within Europe, although there are numerous examples of poor co-ordination in the delivery of integrated care, many providers do co-operate. We wanted to know why providers are moved to co-operate. In terms of systematic research, this is a new field; researchers have only begun to theorise about the rationales for co-operation. Practically, the issue of achieving co-operation attracts much attention from policymakers. Understanding the reasons for co-operation is a prerequisite for developing effective policy in support of integrated care. Our aim is to explore the comparative validity of different theoretical perspectives on the reasons for co-operation, to indicate directions for further study and for policy making. We used data from three successive studies to perform pattern matching with six established theoretical perspectives: transaction costs economics, strategic choice theory, resource dependence theory, learning theory, stakeholder theory and institutional theory. Insights from the studies were compared for validating purposes (triangulation). The first study concerned the evaluation of the Dutch 'National Home Health Care Programme' according to the case study methodology. The second and third studies were surveys among project directors: questionnaires were based on the concepts derived from the first study. Researchers should combine normative institutional theory, resource dependence theory and stakeholder theory into one perspective, in order to study relationship formation in health and social care. The concept of institutions (rules) is the linchpin between the theories. Policy makers must map the institutions of stakeholders and enable integrated care policy to correspond with these institutions as much as possible.

  9. Opting for co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    In 1986, after several attempts by a federal crown corporation to site a low-level radioactive waste management facility in Ontario, the federal government established an independent task force to advise it on a less confrontational approach. The Siting Process Task Force recommended the Cooperative Siting Process, which is based on voluntary participation of local communities in a collaborative joint decision making manner. Acting on this recommendation, the Minister of Energy appointed a new Siting Task Force in 1988 to implement the first three phases of the five-phase process. The Task Force was to promote an examination of scientific and public reports prepared for the Siting Process Task Force; draft guidelines for siting and impact management; outline the basic guidelines to address costs associated with different waste management techniques, distances travelled, compensation packages, site evaluation and rehabilitation; conduct regional and community information and consultation meetings; use the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Office as one of its technical advisers; and report within 18 months on the process itself, volunteer communities, disposal options, terms of reference for negotiations with the volunteer communities, and detailed cost implications of implementing the defined options. This report contains the results of the Task Force's operations, outlining the process, describing communities that have volunteered to be low level waste management sites, presenting cost estimates for the remaining phases of the process and for disposal, and listing recommendations for completing the Cooperative Siting Process

  10. Co-operatives as heating entrepreneurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkasalo, M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of heating entrepreneurship functioning in the form of a co operative is to make the use of the wood chips competitive primarily through district heating of municipal centres. When compared with the conventional heating mode the reliability of chip delivery and the remuneration paid to the co-operative for attending to the running of the heating centres are considered to be the competitive advantages. The system has proven to be a working one; one indication of this is its growing application in the country. In the spring of the year 2000 there were 26 chip-based energy co-operative active in Finland. The first time that the use of bioenergy underwent a powerful rise was in the 1970s as a consequence of the oilcrises. Subsequently the enthusiasm shown to this energy form subsided. Then in the early 1990s, biofuels once again became a subject of interest mainly due to environmental issues, the restructuring of rural areas and silvicultural reasons. With the past decades' experiences forming the basis, the development needs associated with the use of bioenergy were in fresh memory and they were addressed on a wide font. Boiler technology related to solid fuels evolved rapidly and the least successful manufacturers had been eliminated by the recession. In the case of co-operative heating entrepreneurship, the commonest form neither the district heating centre nor the system of heat-transfer pipes belong to co-operative society. The co-operative is responsible only for the delivery of the fuel and for looking after the heating plant. Remuneration is generally based on the amount of energy leaving the district heating plant. Thus the heat dissipated at the heating plant is the co-operative's problem and the heat dissipated during transfer are the energy buyer's problem. The investor in the equipments usually the local municipality or an energy utility. In some cases the co-operative owns the equipments well, in which case it is correct to speak of

  11. The Shanghai Co-operation Organisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Splidsboel

    New regional organisations are always interesting to follow as they will tell us more about the things that make or break this type of co-operation. Originally established as “The Shanghai Five” in 1996, The Shanghai Co-operation Organisation (SCO) has been successful at reducing tension between...... the member states but it has since found it very hard to come up with a more ambitious agenda. Mutual suspicion and zero-sum thinking clearly run deep and the continued development of the organisation has suffered as a result of this. All told, the SCO is much more façade than real policy substance....

  12. International relations and co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the international relations and co-operation of the UJD are presented. International community is aware of the fact that nuclear energy shall be used exclusively for peaceful purposes and on condition of high standard of nuclear safety. Therefore, the long-term aim of UJD in the area of international relations is to maintain and develop internationally recognised system of state supervision upon the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to reach internationally accepted level of nuclear safety in the Slovak Republic. There are many important international treaties (Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Convention on Nuclear Safety, etc.) to which slovakia is a party. In order to meet the obligations of these treaties UJD has the main aim for contribute to the process of international disarmament, and to a mutually advantageous co-operation. By means of the most important international organisations (e.g. International Atomic Energy Agency) the Slovak Republic actively participates in the international co-operation. Under the leadership of UJD, Slovak institutions participate in many projects and activities which have the aim to improve the safety of nuclear international obligations. In addition, UJD actively participates in the integration process of the Slovak Republic into European and Trans-Atlantic structures. Since 1993 the co-operation with the European Commission and the Nuclear Energy Agency of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD/NEA) has been successfully implemented. Besides multilateral co-operation UJD attaches extraordinary importance to bilateral co-operation, in particular with neighbouring countries. Regular meetings of senior Slovak experts with foreign experts are organised, with the aim to exchange the newest experiences and information on peaceful use of nuclear energy. Also in

  13. Co-operatives in the Cultural Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Sandoval

    2015-04-01

    The roundtable discussed the potentials and limits of worker co-operatives as an alternative way of organizing cultural work. It explored how worker co-operation might contribute to new collaborative forms of cultural production; how they do, or might, strengthen a 'cultural commons'; and the role cultural co-ops play in the wider context of movements for workers' rights. Questions that were discussed include: To what extent can worker co-operatives be a means to confront precariousness and individualisation in work in the cultural sector? Do worker co-ops open up new possibilities for the collaborative production of cultural commons? What role can worker co-operatives play within a broader movement for creating more just, equal and humane cultural work and an alternative to capitalist economies? Where lies the boundary between neoliberal calls for self-help and individual responsibility and a radical co-op movement? What is the relation between worker co-ops and other forms of progressive politics such as the union movements, social protests and civil society activism? Can cultural co-ops contribute to reinventing the meaning and practice of work in the 21st century? About the speakers: Marisol Sandoval is a Lecturer at the Department of Culture and Creative Industries at City University London. Her research critically deals with questions of power, responsibility, commodification, exploitation, ideology and resistance in the global culture industry. Jo Littler is Senior Lecturer at City University London's Department of Culture and Creative Industries. Her work explores questions of culture and power from an interdisciplinary, cultural studies-informed perspective. Rhiannon Colvin after graduating in 2010 to find the world of work competitive and brutal, Rhiannon founded AltGen to empower young graduates to get together and create their own work. http://www.altgen.org.uk/ Tara Mulqueen is a PhD candidate at Birkbeck College School of Law. Her thesis concerns the

  14. Advancing regional co-operation in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksoudi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA's regional co-operation programme in Africa was initiated in 1983, with two regional projects dealing with hydrology and insect physiology and biochemistry. The paper describes the structure of this Regional Programme, the sources of finance and the projects currently in operation in agriculture and hydrology. 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Nordic Model of Subregional Co-Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzela Joanna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nordic co-operation is renowned throughout the world and perceived as the collaboration of a group of countries which are similar in their views and activities. The main pillars of the Nordic model of co-operation are the tradition of constitutional principles, activity of public movements and organisations, freedom of speech, equality, solidarity, and respect for the natural environment. In connection with labour and entrepreneurship, these elements are the features of a society which favours efficiency, a sense of security and balance between an individual and a group. Currently, the collaboration is a complex process, including many national, governmental and institutional connections which form the “Nordic family”.

  16. Transnational Research Co-operation: Opportunities and Challenges for transnational research co-operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the NGOs have a lot of international experience (mainly in Denmark and Germany) as partners in different co-operation projects. Almost all the NGOs have recognized the important role of the scientific information in their activity. NGOs also feel the need for an easy access to required information...... for transnational co-operation like: an investigation/project concerning the driving forces behind urban development,or a co-operation in the field of wastewater reuse and minimization of wastewater loads and discharge, or a service page (internet) to search for potential partners. The governmental institutions...... in order to improve transnational cooperation are identified to be: • Search for national/international project partners • Access to existent co-operation projects or networks • Develop in common project proposals on themes requested by community groups • Exchange information/good operational practices...

  17. NEA international co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This text is consecrated at the international co-operative projects of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of reactor safety (Halden reactor project, Loft project, studies on the damaged Three Mile Island unit-2 reactor, inspection of reactor steel components, incident reporting system) and in the field of radioactive waste management (Stripa project, geochemical data bases, Alligator river project, seabed disposal of high-level radioactive waste, decommissioning of nuclear facilities)

  18. Co-operation in nuclear development: The case of Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroen, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hungary became a Member of the IAEA in 1957 and has participated in the programme of technical assistance and co-operation from its start in 1958. By the end of 1976, Hungary ranked as the fifteenth largest recipient of IAEA technical assistance. Since then, there has been a significant increase in overall technical co-operation activities, and by the end of 1988 a total of over US $9.5 million of assistance had been received by Hungary, making it the fifth largest recipient of all Member States. In view of this situation, a special evaluation review was carried out in 1989 of the IAEA's technical co-operation programme in Hungary over the period 1976-1989. This evaluation review has shown that, simultaneously with the increase in the IAEA's support, there has been a rapid development in Hungary of the national nuclear infrastructure and this has permitted the country to absorb and utilize the assistance provided to the maximum extent. 7 figs

  19. AFRA. African Regional Co-operative Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This publication provides an outline of the African Regional Co-operation Agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology (AFRA). The agreement stems from an initiative of several African member states of the IAEA to get the agency to help establish an African regional arrangement which would be similar to arrangements which were already in place in the Asian and Latin American regions. Through this regional approach to development, AFRA seeks to accelerate moves toward self-sufficiency in scientific disciplines and appropriate technologies by coordinating intellectual and physical resources and disseminating innovative methods and practices in a cost-effective manner

  20. International solar energy research co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P.; Peippo, K.; Konttinen, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    Finland has participated in several IEA activities during 1996-97. HUT coordinates the activities, but practical participation in collaborative actions take place both in industrial companies and research organisations. Neste Ltd has directly participated in several tasks and information of results has been disseminated more widely to Finnish industries and organisations. Co-operation projects covered here are: (1) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 1 `Information dissemination`, (2) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 3 `Use of Photovoltaic systems in Stand Alone and Island Applications`, (3) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 7 `Photovoltaics in built environment`, (4) IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 16 `Photovoltaics in buildings` and (5) IEA Working Group `Materials in Solar Thermal Collectors`

  1. Case Writing Projects in Co-Operation with Companies and Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Lars; Asplund, Carl-Johan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the process and evaluation of case writing projects in co-operation with companies and organizations in a course for engineering students. The case writing projects could provide an illustration and example framework for working with companies in constructing cases. Normally cases are constructed for teaching purposes in higher education. However, in order to get closer co-operation and more interest from the companies the authors encouraged the student...

  2. Romanian-Danish Environmental Co-operation. Co-operation development 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy has, since 1991, through the Danish Environmental Support Fund, contributed towards protecting the environment and nature in Central and Eastern European countries and has helped to limit regional as well as global pollution. The Romanian Ministry of Waters, Forests and Environmental Protection and the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy initiated the co-operation in 1993 and an official Agreement was signed in 1994. This publication describes the co-operation between the two countries in the field of the environment in the hope that this will give both the general public of Romania and the international community a better understanding of the work being accomplished. It also gives an overview of the 19 projects developed within this framework, which has a total Danish grant of DKK 77.9 million. (au)

  3. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakr, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    In 1975 Tanzania became the newest African Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency, bringing the total African membership of the Agency up to 25 countries. The other African Member States are: Algeria; United Republic of Cameroon; Egypt; Ethiopia; Gabon; Ghana; Ivory Coast; Kenya; Liberia; Libyan Arab Republic; Madagascar; Mali; Mauritius; Morocco; Niger; Nigeria; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Africa; Sudan; Tunisia; Uganda; Zaire; Zambia. Membership of the Agency entitles these countries to receive assistance both from the Regular Programme of the Agency and from UNDP resources, while non-Member States in the region only receive Agency assistance financed from the latter source. Any attempt to look at the technical co-operation programme in Africa must start by stressing the wide differences between African countries in their level of scientific and technical development ranging from countries with advanced atomic energy programmes to countries just crossing the threshold towards the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Perhaps the most striking and marked difference is in the quality and number of nuclear energy scientists and technologists available. In view of this, the technical assistance programme in the African context has been a selective one, guided by considerations of pragmatism and responsiveness to particular requirements of the different individual countries and not by any doctrinaire or ready-made strategy for assistance. (author)

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1985. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    balance was a source of concern; this situation has now been brought under control. Expert component implementation increased further. With regard to the TACF, the expert component accounted for most of the year-end earmarkings in previous years, but in 1985 it accounted for only A3.8%, on a par with the percentage of the earmarkings for equipment. During the period 1981-85, there was a 93% increase in the number of purchase orders processed by the Field Procurement Section and a 63% increase in the volume of equipment purchased. During the same period, the number of experts recruited rose by 158% and that of expert assignments by 214%. The number of fellows increased by 7% and that of visiting scientists by 506%. Also, the number of training courses doubled, the number of participants increasing by 86%. From 1980 to 1985 the total volume of technical assistance delivered by the Agency increased by 79%; during the same period, expenditures under the Regular Budget for technical co-operation servicing grew by 18%. The Secretariat is examining how it can best handle the future increases which it expects in the total volume of Agency technical assistance within a frame of severe Regular Budget constraints. The Evaluation Section is playing an important role in Agency efforts to enhance the effectiveness of the technical co-operation programme. Over 500 interim implementation reports were completed in 1985, and 50 mid-project and end-of-project evaluations were conducted. Two evaluations of major processes (equipment provision and group training) were also carried out

  5. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  6. Ignalina plant licensing process, international co-operation and assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystedt, P.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge for Lithuania as a country with regained independence was to perform a licensing review in a way never done before in the country and in a time schedule that was extremely short. The work included establishing of the licensing base, strengthening the regulatory authority and organising the technical support, establish and implement a safety improvement program, production of the safety case and review of the safety case, and to derive a conclusion regarding whether to issue a licence or not. This was to be done together with other tasks, such as implementation of modifications included in the safety improvement programme at Ignalina, implementation of a new storage for spent fuel and, most important of all, to manage the operational safety at the plant. The achievements are impressive seen in view of the point of start and in view of the time and resources that have been available. Lithuania has put forward a unique safety documentation of an RBMK reactor and presented an in-depth safety evaluation in full openness to Western experts, giving the unique possibility to compare the safety of the Ignalina reactors to Western standards. The co-operation that has been established between Lithuania and Western experts through different assistance programmes is of outmost value, for all involved parties. Co-operation should continue as one element of the challenges for the future

  7. Strategic Stakeholder Communication and Co-operation in Environmental Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2002-01-01

    in this process is strategic stakeholder relationships like communication and co-operation. The paper addresses this topic based on a proposed approach for identifying and evaluating the influence from various groups of stakeholders as well as the findings from recent surveys of environmental management......Ever since the introduction of the first major Danish environmental protection law in 1974, environmental regulation has been instrumental in pushing industry towards adopting environmentally less harmful behaviour. However, since the early 1990s, pressure from a growing number of other...... stakeholders, such as for example customers, NGO's, neighbours, etc., has increasingly driven industry towards incorporating environmental considerations in their decisions and activities to an extent which justifies placing Danish companies at the cutting edge of industrial greening. An essential element...

  8. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Thailand 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Thailand carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  9. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Sri Lanka 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Sri Lanka carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  10. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bolivia 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bolivia carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  11. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Panama 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Panama carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bangladesh 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bangladesh carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  13. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Panama 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Panama carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  14. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Guatemala 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Guatemala carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  15. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Iceland 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Iceland carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  16. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bangladesh 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bangladesh carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  17. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Cyprus 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Cyprus carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  18. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Albania 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Albania carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  19. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Indonesia 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Indonesia carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  20. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Poland 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Poland carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  1. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Romania 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Romania carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  2. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Viet Nam 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Viet Nam carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  3. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the Philippines 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Philippines carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with The Philippines 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in The Philippines carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  5. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Greece 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Greece carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  6. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Dominican Republic 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Dominican Republic carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  7. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Nicaragua 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Nicaragua carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  8. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Afghanistan 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Afghanistan carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  9. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Jamaica 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Jamaica carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  10. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Ecuador 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Ecuador carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  11. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with El Salvador 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in El Salvador carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  12. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Nigeria 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Nigeria carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  13. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Bolivia 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Bolivia carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  14. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Colombia 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Colombia carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  15. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Portugal 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Portugal carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  16. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Pakistan 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Pakistan carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  17. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Myanmar 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Myanmar carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  18. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Malaysia 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Malaysia carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  19. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Jordan 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Jordan carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  20. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Mongolia 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Mongolia carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  1. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Egypt 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Egypt carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  2. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Paraguay 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Paraguay carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  3. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Mexico 1986-1996 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Mexico carried out during 1986-1996. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  4. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Paraguay 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Paraguay carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  5. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Hungary 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Hungary carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  6. Strengthening political co-operation through multilateral disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekeus, R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Sweden discussed how the multilateral disarmament concept has contributed and still can contribute to strengthen political co-operation. This approach is the opposite to the usual question on how to achieve multilateral disarmament through political co-operation

  7. Technical co-operation for nuclear safety in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.; Giuliani, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Agency's programme on technical co-operation for nuclear safety is, largely, responsive in character and the Agency's response is tailored to needs identified by developing countries. However, the Agency's assistance alone is not sufficient: technical co-operation can only be successful and is most effective when there is also a strong input from the counterpart body participating in a particular project. The commitment of national governments is fundamental to success. Technical co-operation is most fruitful if the Agency's assistance capabilities and the recipient country's co-operation capabilities match. Co-operation activities mostly take the form of single projects hosted by individual institutions within a single country; regional and inter-regional projects are also important

  8. A proposed new mechanism for research and development co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.

    2001-01-01

    Scientists in developing countries sometimes lack knowledge of recent developments, co-operation with advanced countries, and government appreciation of the importance and quality of their work. The present IAEA mechanisms like CRPs and TC projects are very helpful but do not fully meet R and D co-operation needs of these scientists. A new complementary mechanism of co-operation among the Member States is proposed that would utilize IAEA services through a suitable agreement. The IAEA could help to evaluate joint R and D proposals, to provide an example legal agreement, to monitor progress, to disseminate the results, and, in some cases, to administer joint funds. This new mechanism would be similar to ITER, but on a smaller scale, and applicable to all fields of nuclear R and D. (author)

  9. SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS). Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szendroe, G.; Grapengiesser, S.; Johansson, Gunnar

    1999-04-01

    SSI's International Development Co-operation (SIUS), the Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe, has since its start in 1992 been granted SEK 109 million by the Swedish government. The projects are accessed, planned and performed in close co-operation with partner organisations in Eastern Europe. This report presents the financial status and a summary of the projects, their status and distribution over the countries and project areas. The presentation is updated as of December 1998

  10. Sustainability indicators - a tool for regional co-operation

    OpenAIRE

    Koitka, Heike

    2002-01-01

    Sustainability indicators are more than just numbers. Besides their main function of illustrating the complex vision of sustainability they could support some factors for success of regional co-operation through their development. Today the discussion on indicators and co-operation is mainly separated from each other. Sustainability indicators are developed on all spatial levels from neighbourhoods up to the United Nations. In some cases the indicators are developed but remain unused. Regiona...

  11. International co-operation. Key issue paper no. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    In accordance with guidance provided by the Steering Group, this report assesses the adequacy and effectiveness of international co-operation relating to the nuclear fuel cycle, with a view toward identifying any needed new forms or arrangements for co-operation. In more specific terms, the Steering Committee`s guidance identified the following questions: Is the existing international framework sufficient for: the safe and secure operation of the fuel cycle; the economic and orderly development of the world`s nuclear energy systems (or their phase-out should this take place); international co-operation in R and D; international co-operation in industrial activities? Are there places where these requirements overlap or interact so as to impede activities which are desirable? Can new forms of co-operation be foreseen which would make it easier to implement any of the fuel cycle options in a safe, secure and responsible way? Are there other new forms of international co-operation which would affect the fuel cycle, e.g. regional institutions; international plutonium management regime and/or storage? Finally: What is the appropriate role of IAEA in any of these?.

  12. Co-operative learning and adaptive instruction in a mathematics curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwel, J.; Herfs, P.G.P.; Mertens, E.H.M.; Perrenet, J.Chr.

    1994-01-01

    The AGO 12 to 16 Project (the acronym AGO stands for the Dutch equivalent of 'Adaptive Instruction and Co-operative Learning') seeks to develop and evaluate a mathematics curriculum which is suitable for mixed-ability groups in secondary education. The research questions we will address here are,

  13. Cartalk 2000: development of a co-operative ADAS based on vehicle-to-vehicle communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, P.L.J.; Hallouzi, R.; Dagli, I.; Cseh, C.; Schäfers, L.; Nelisse, M.W.; Bruin, D. de

    2003-01-01

    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) benefit from using vehicle-to-vehicle communication. In the 5th framework EC project CarTALK2000 co-operative ADAS are designed, tested and evaluated with respect to increasing traffic safety, efficiency and driving comfort. Communication based longitudinal

  14. China and CERN renew their Co-operation Agreement

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Liu Yanhua, Chinese Vice Minister of Science and Technology, and Dr. Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN, sign a new Co-operation Agreement between the Government of the People's Republic of China and CERN. During his visit to CERN on 17 February, Liu Yanhua, Vice Minister of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China, signed a new Co-operation Agreement with the Laboratory. The Agreement, which is valid for a period of five years and renewable, lays down the framework for the development of scientific and technological co-operation between CERN and China. This includes China's participation, as a non-Member State, in CERN's research projects as well as its main programmes. Robert Aymar and Liu Yanhua underlined that this Agreement will provide an excellent framework for close co-operation on the LHC Programme and Grid and accelerator technologies. Scientific co-operation between China and CERN is nothing new, as Chinese physicists already took part in the LEP experiments. Today, CERN's C...

  15. New co-operation agreement between CERN and JINR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer (left) and JINR Director Alexei Sissakian (right). On Thursday 28 January, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer and JINR Director Alexei Sissakian signed a new enlarged co-operation agreement to continue and enhance the scientific and technical co-operation of the two institutes in the field of high-energy physics. CERN and JINR have a long and successful history of collaboration extending back to the earliest days of their existence. The first informal meeting on international co-operation in the field of high-energy accelerators took place at CERN in 1959. It was attended by senior scientists from the United States, the USSR (including JINR) and CERN. Both JINR and CERN have played the role of a bridge between East and West for decades, contributing to the development of international scientific co-operation. In 1992 JINR signed a co-operation agreement with CERN that included an important number of protocols covering JINR’s participation in the construction of th...

  16. International co-operation through scientific and technical nuclear societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning Muntzing, L.

    1983-01-01

    As an international organization the American Nuclear Society (ANS) has played an active role in international co-operation of nuclear technology exchange since its establishment in 1954. The ANS has a membership of over 13,000 individuals, of whom approximately 1200 live overseas in forty countries. To carry out the goals of the Society, local sections have been established. Currently the ANS maintains 48 local sections in the United States of America and 8 overseas local sections in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. The ANS also has formal agreements for co-operation with The Asociacion Argentina de Tecnologia Nuclear (AATN), the Israel Nuclear Society (INS), and the Chinese Nuclear Society (CNS). In 1977 the Japan Atomic Energy Society (JAES), the European Nuclear Society (ENS), and the ANS co-operation in sponsoring the First International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT I) in Tehran, Iran. In 1982, the Second International Conference on Transfer of Nuclear Technology (ICONTT II), Buenos Aires, Argentina, was sponsored through the co-operation of the AATN, the ENS and the ANS. The ANS and its overseas sections sponsor the Pacific Basin Conference approximately every three years to discuss nuclear matters of concern to the countries around the Pacific Ocean. In 1981 the ANS held a Nuclear Technology Exhibit in Beijing, the People's Republic of China. In addition to meetings, the ANS is extensively involved in the co-operative exchange of applied nuclear research information through its publications. Nuclear Technology, a technical journal, is published monthly under joint ownership of the ENS and the ANS. The ANS has been a leader in voluntary standards development since 1958. In its dedication to the co-operation of international nuclear technology the ANS maintains a comprehensive international exchange of nuclear standards

  17. 25. Meeting of the NEA NSC Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation (WPEC) - Summary Record (23-24 May 2013, NEA Headquarters, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France) - NEA-SEN-NSC-WPEC--2013-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    This document summarized the content of the previous WPEC meeting held on 23-24 May 2013 at the NEA Headquarters. Experimental nuclear data activities of relevance to the evaluation projects were reviewed. Detailed information about the experimental activities is given in the reports and view graphs presented at the meeting (list in Annex 2). Progress in the major nuclear data evaluation projects was presented. Detailed information about the status of the evaluated nuclear data libraries is also given in the reports and view graphs presented at the meeting (see Annex 2). Results and conclusions of completed or near-completed subgroups were discussed. A summary table of all subgroup status is given in Annex 3. Activities of ongoing subgroups were presented. A summary table of all subgroup status is also given in Annex 3. Two new subgroup proposals were reviewed by WPEC. Detailed information about these proposals is given in the documents and view graphs presented at the meeting (list in Annex 2). Other points discussed at the 25. Meeting: presentation of the main WPEC objectives and working methods; Renewal of the WPEC mandate for the period 2013-2016; Conferences and meetings of interest to the nuclear data community; Time and place of next meeting

  18. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    benefits of PIM, a concept of Co-operative Intelligent Memory (CIM) was developed by the intelligent system group of University of Hertfordshire, based on the previously developed Co-operative Pseudo Intelligent Memory (CPIM). This paper provides an overview on previous works (CPIM, CIM) and realization......In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potential...

  19. SMEs and their co-operation with academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Jean Michel; Strömqvist, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation between SMEs and Academia can be a win-win situation when each partner understands the constraints of the other. SMEs are often leaders in innovation; therefore more ready to share interest in research. They are flexible and dynamic. They need a short feed-back to sustain their co-operation. Academia is often more long-term oriented and more question- than answer-oriented. A code of conduct can ease the relationship because it can anticipate the potential problems.

  20. Evaluation of the comparative growth and reproductive performance of West African dwarf goats in the western highlands of Cameroon[(AFRA - African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedonkeng Pamo, E; Tendonkeng, F; Kadjio, J T.T.; Kwami, H N; Taboum, R K; Kana, J R; Tegodjeu, A [University of Dschang, FASA, Department of Animal Sciences, Dschang (Cameroon)

    2002-06-01

    On-farm and on-station evaluations of the comparative growth performance of West African Dwarf Goats supplemented at an iso-nitrogenous level (6 g/animal/day) with leguminous browse Calliandra calothyrsus, Leucaena leucocephala, or Gliricidia sepium, or with cotton seed cake, were conducted around Dschang in the Western Highlands of Cameroon and at the University Experimental Farm. The animals were weighed every 21 days during the rainy season and every 14 days during the dry season for three months to evaluate their response to supplementation. Cotton seed cake, L. leucocephala, C. calothyrsus were the most accepted supplements. The weight gain of the animals fed with these supplements was significantly higher compared to that of the control animals. Mean weight of animals supplemented with G. sepium was not significantly different (P>0.05) from that of the control group during the rainy season. The average daily weight gains during the rainy period were 20.6, 19.1, 13.8, 4.5, and 3.1 g for L. leucocephala, cotton seed cake, C. calothyrsus, G. sepium and the control animals respectively, during the rainy season and 19.9, 16.1 and 1.7 g for cotton seed cake, L. leucocephala and the control animal respectively, during the dry season. Progesterone profiles were low and were unaffected by supplementation during the dry season. (author)

  1. "A model co-operative country": Irish-Finnish co-operative contacts at the turn of the twentieth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilson, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural co-operative societies were widely discussed across late nineteenth-century Europe as a potential solution to the problems of agricultural depression, land reform and rural poverty. In Finland, the agronomist Hannes Gebhard drew inspiration from examples across Europe in founding the...... that even before the First World War it was Finland, not Ireland, that had begun to be regarded as ‘a model co-operative country’....... between Irish and Finnish co-operators around the turn of the century, and examines the ways in which the parallels between the two countries were constructed and presented by those involved in these exchanges. I will also consider the reasons for the divergence in the development of cooperation, so...

  2. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1984. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The year 1984 can be described as one during which efforts were made to increase momentum in the development co-operation between the Agency and its Member States while continuing to improve the quality of the technical assistance rendered. For the first time, the adjusted programme exceeded $50 million. During the year, changes were introduced in the administration of the programme in line with recommendations endorsed by the Board in 1983 at the end of its first technical co-operation policy review. In 1984, when the new technical co-operation policies were applied, there were three principal aims. First, the flow of Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund resources was to be improved; by decreasing accumulated unobligated balances, an optimum level of resource utilization was to be attained by 1986. Second, procedures for the procurement of goods and services were to be streamlined in order to permit substantial increases in programme delivery. Third, systematic project evaluation was to lead to a number of specific actions that would increase the effectiveness of the Agency's development assistance. With regard to the first aim, implementation increased by 44% over the 1983 level, passing the $30 million mark in October and reaching $36.6 million by the end of the year. Of this amount, $31.8 million related to the implementation of activities programmed for 1984. Therefore, an increase in total resources of only 4% was accompanied by an increase in current-year implementation of 34%. As a result, the upward trend in the unobligated balance was checked, and earmarkings against the TACF actually decreased. The implementation rate against the TACF rose from 58% in 1983 to 65% in 1984, reaching the level that had been set as a target. If this performance can be maintained in 1985, it will be possible to reach the optimum level of TACF resource utilization one year earlier than originally expected. As regards the second aim, streamlined procedures introduced in

  3. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  4. Natural gas co-operation in the Baltic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Co-operation between the gas companies in the Baltic Region has been in place for several years. The overview given in this paper shows that the co-operation has been developed in trade, investments, privatisation and participation in the restructuring process. Finally, through a broad technical co-operation, significant efforts are made to establish common operational practices, codes and standards and the integrity of gas transmission pipelines. The Baltic Region, from a resource and gas interconnection point of view, enjoys a strategic position in the future development of the gas industry in Europe. The Baltic gas sector represents an interesting and growing gas market with the significant gas storage capacity. The region is also located strategically for planned gas interconnections and could serve as a transit corridor for the future gas supplies from western Siberia or the North Sea. This co-operation in the region is being supported by international regulations and agreements such as the Energy Charter between the European Union and the central and east European countries. However, at present the gas industry in the Baltic Region seems to be ahead of these international agreements. It may well be seen that trade arrangements such as Third Party Access are implemented directly by market forces rather than through international agreements. The regional development may thus be a driving force for the implementation of the Internal Energy Market for the gas industry

  5. Co-Operative Processes: An Approach From Social Constructionism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosking, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Keynote address to the 7th International Conference on Multi-Organisational Partnerships and Co-operative Strategy. Leuven, Belgium, July 6th-8th, 2000 Organisational worlds increasingly are felt to be fragmented, equivocal, and constantly changing. ’Today’s’ knowledge may be found to be more

  6. Military co-operation with South Caucasus countries / Rafal Seniuch

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seniuch, Rafal

    2003-01-01

    Ettekanne Poola ja Lõuna-Kaukaasia vabariikide vahelisest sõjalis-poliitilisest koostööst 22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO"

  7. International co-operation and the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    di Primio, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    The transfer of technology from developed countries is usually done through industrial enterprises. The local industrialization of imported technology does not necessarily imply that full benefit is extracted from its application. A pre-established scientific and technical infrastructure is needed to understand and incorporate it, and to develop methods for improvement and use at the industrial level, in the frame of national conditions. The transference of nuclear technology has recently shown new concepts for implementation. It is becoming a rule that massive industrial nuclear technology transfer to developing nations is tied to a requirement for simultaneous assistance in creating or promoting the infrastructure. An example of international co-operation to meet this requirement is the Argentine-German Agreement for the Peaceful Applications of Nuclear Energy. Since 1971 this has been used to strengthen the scientific and technical programmes of the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission in the relevant fields of industrial applications. The objectives and implementation of the agreement are described: co-operative actions were initially directed to the infrastructure needed to support the nuclear fuel cycle industry. The results achieved during the period 1971-1976 are critically analysed. This analysis has influenced the selection of future co-operative projects as well as the extension of the co-operation to other nuclear fields of common interest. (author)

  8. Supersurveillance, Democracy, and Co-Operation--The Challenge for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, John

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores pedagogies of surveillance and counter pedagogies of radical democracy and co-operative practice and their implications for continuing professional development (CPD). Teachers have had to respond to an increasing naturalisation of surveillance in schools. However, this naturalisation can be countered by drawing upon the emergent…

  9. Meeting Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems. A report by the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee - NEA-NSC-WPEC-DOC--2014-446

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, H.; Shibata, K.; Nishio, K.; Plompen, A.; Hambsch, F.J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; ); Igashira, M.; Gunsing, F.; Ledoux, X.; Palmiotti, G.; Haight, R.; Ullmann, J.; Tovesson, F.; Nelson, R.; Herman, M.; Hoblit, S.; Pronyaev, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Junghans, A.; Calviani, M.; ); Schmidt, K.H.; ); Otsuka, N.; ); Dupont, E.; )

    2014-01-01

    To meet the requirement of accurate nuclear data for developing advanced nuclear systems, pertinent efforts in the fields of experiments and evaluations are still required and indispensable. As described in Section 3, there are striking technical advancements in nuclear data measurement methods. For example, high-intensity-pulsed neutrons generated by spallation reaction at CERN in Europe, LANSCE in USA, and J-PARC in Japan are available to obtain high-precision neutron TOF data. Finer corrections of traditional techniques are also possible by using recent Monte Carlo simulation techniques or refining existing data reduction codes such as REFIT, SAMMY etc. New concept of detectors and innovative methods using inverse reactions have also been developed and applied for nuclear data measurements. By using these state-of-art techniques, further improvements of nuclear data accuracy are expected. It is understood that the experimental result is the best estimate of the value of the measurement, and that all components of uncertainty contribute to the total uncertainty. However, some systematic effects are sometimes unrecognised and not discussed in published papers. It should be noted that only the known systematic effects are corrected and took into account in the total uncertainty. Some recommendations of collaborative path forward to meet the needs were summarised in Section 4. In order to obtain accurate nuclear data, it is important to measure nuclear data precisely and identify the unrecognised systematic effects as much as possible. Double-check experiments are indispensable to verify the results. International collaborations are effective in guaranteeing the independence of experiments. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of such collaboration, an appropriate framework should be established, where serious and detailed scientific discussions are possible

  10. Promoting regional energy co-operation in South Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Leena; Misra, Neha

    2007-01-01

    Energy is a key ingredient of the socio-economic development of any region. South Asia is not only one of the fastest growing regions in the world; it is also one of the poorest, which thus puts energy at the very heart of the development process in the region. This paper looks at the challenges faced by the South Asia sub-region for economic co-operation (SASEC) comprised of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India and Nepal, and also at the role of greater regional energy co-operation therein. The region is characterized by pressures of growing economies and increasing population. While the per capita energy consumption is one of the lowest in the world, energy intensity continues to be very high. A large portion of the population lacks access to modern sources of energy and depends on traditional sources that are not only inefficient but also have severe health and environmental problems associated with them. Increasing oil import dependency and huge investment needs for energy market development pose a further challenge. The region has a good resource potential and tremendous scope for energy co-operation, which can play a key role in addressing many of these energy security concerns and in putting it on the path of sustainable development. It is ironic that the record in the area has been so limited and that too in the most basic form of co-operation, i.e. bilateral arrangements between countries. This paper puts forth a multi-pronged strategy for sub-regional energy co-operation encompassing softer options aimed at confidence building to more substantial and larger scale co-operation efforts. Delays in decision making to ensure stronger and mutually beneficial co-operation efforts are associated with high costs not only to the energy sector but also for the entire development agenda. With the precarious energy situation in the region and unprecedented increases in international oil prices seen in recent times, it is high time for policy makers, financing institutions, NGOs

  11. Securing co-operation from persons supplying statistical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubenque, M. J.; Blaikley, R. M.; Harris, F. Fraser; Lal, R. B.; Neurdenburg, M. G.; Hernández, R. de Shelly

    1954-01-01

    Securing the co-operation of persons supplying information required for medical statistics is essentially a problem in human relations, and an understanding of the motivations, attitudes, and behaviour of the respondents is necessary. Before any new statistical survey is undertaken, it is suggested by Aubenque and Harris that a preliminary review be made so that the maximum use is made of existing information. Care should also be taken not to burden respondents with an overloaded questionnaire. Aubenque and Harris recommend simplified reporting. Complete population coverage is not necessary. Neurdenburg suggests that the co-operation and support of such organizations as medical associations and social security boards are important and that propaganda should be directed specifically to the groups whose co-operation is sought. Informal personal contacts are valuable and desirable, according to Blaikley, but may have adverse effects if the right kind of approach is not made. Financial payments as an incentive in securing co-operation are opposed by Neurdenburg, who proposes that only postage-free envelopes or similar small favours be granted. Blaikley and Harris, on the other hand, express the view that financial incentives may do much to gain the support of those required to furnish data; there are, however, other incentives, and full use should be made of the natural inclinations of respondents. Compulsion may be necessary in certain instances, but administrative rather than statutory measures should be adopted. Penalties, according to Aubenque, should be inflicted only when justified by imperative health requirements. The results of surveys should be made available as soon as possible to those who co-operated, and Aubenque and Harris point out that they should also be of practical value to the suppliers of the information. Greater co-operation can be secured from medical persons who have an understanding of the statistical principles involved; Aubenque and

  12. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    In the perioperative period, anesthesiologists and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses routinely prepare and administer small-volume IV injections, yet the accuracy of delivered medication volumes in this setting has not been described. In this ex vivo study, we sought to characterize the degree to which small-volume injections (≤0.5 mL) deviated from the intended injection volumes among a group of pediatric anesthesiologists and pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses. We hypothesized that as the intended injection volumes decreased, the deviation from those intended injection volumes would increase. Ten attending pediatric anesthesiologists and 10 pediatric PACU nurses each performed a series of 10 injections into a simulated patient IV setup. Practitioners used separate 1-mL tuberculin syringes with removable 18-gauge needles (Becton-Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to aspirate 5 different volumes (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mL) of 0.25 mM Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescent dye constituted in saline (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) from a rubber-stoppered vial. Each participant then injected the specified volume of LY fluorescent dye via a 3-way stopcock into IV tubing with free-flowing 0.9% sodium chloride (10 mL/min). The injected volume of LY fluorescent dye and 0.9% sodium chloride then drained into a collection vial for laboratory analysis. Microplate fluorescence wavelength detection (Infinite M1000; Tecan, Mannedorf, Switzerland) was used to measure the fluorescence of the collected fluid. Administered injection volumes were calculated based on the fluorescence of the collected fluid using a calibration curve of known LY volumes and associated fluorescence.To determine whether deviation of the administered volumes from the intended injection volumes increased at lower injection volumes, we compared the proportional injection volume error (loge [administered volume/intended volume]) for each of the 5 injection volumes using a linear

  13. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1987. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This report is part of a wide range of documentation which the Agency provides to Member States on its technical co-operation activities at various times during the year. It is, in particular, complemented by the achievement reporting submitted to the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Committee of the Board in the annual implementation reports that give the status of the technical co-operation programmes as at 30 September in each year. Following the 1986 Technical Co-operation Seminar and based on continuing consultations with Member States various steps to improve the quality of the programme were taken in 1987: for example, new project request forms and management plans were introduced and preparatory assistance was expanded. Office automation was intensified and the computerized data base covering technical co-operation was enhanced further. Work continues on the adaptation of data provided by the new Financial Information and Control System (FIGS) to the needs of the technical co-operation programmes and vice-versa. While several problems have still to be overcome, it has on the whole, been possible in this report to re-establish data comparability with previous years. Evaluation has become an integral part of the Agency's technical cooperation activities. In addition to on-going mid-project and end-of-project evaluations, expert services and fellowships were evaluated in 1987 and the first country programme evaluation was also undertaken. During 1987, a total of 962 projects were operational and 64 training courses were held. These activities involved 1808 expert assignments while 1975 persons received training abroad. Of the provisions in the 1987 total adjusted programme, one half was earmarked for equipment, while the other half was equally divided between ear markings for experts and for training. Of the Agency's technical co-operation resources in 1987, 72.5% came from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, 13.7% from extra budgetary

  14. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Syrian Arab Republic 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Syrian Arab Republic carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  15. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Cote d'Ivoire 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Cote d'Ivoire carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  16. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the People's Republic of China 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in the People's Republic of China carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  17. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the Republic of Korea 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in the Republic of Korea carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  18. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the Islamic Republic of Iran 1985-1995 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in the Islamic Republic of Iran carried out during 1985-1995. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  19. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the Islamic Republic of Iran 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in the Islamic Republic of Iran carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  20. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with the United Arab Emirates 1984-1994 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in the United Arab Emirates carried out during 1984-1994. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  1. IAEA technical co-operation activities in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The desire to extend the many benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology to all countries led as long ago as 1957 to the establishment of the IAEA and to immediate introduction of a technical co-operation programme. In the more than thirty years that have passed since that time, the potential applications of nuclear techniques have greatly expanded. Over the period, many of the applications have moved from research laboratories into hospitals, farms and industrial enterprises. The direct resources made available to the IAEA by its Member States to support technology transfer processes have grown rapidly since the late 1950s. The current trends in the technical co-operation activities of the IAEA and some examples of projects supported by the IAEA are briefly presented in this document

  2. BANKING SYSTEM STABILITY: COMMERCIAL AND CO-OPERATIVE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru-Cristian OANEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Commercial banks and co-operative banks are credit institutions, but there are some differences between the main operations proceeded by each of them. Based on these specific characteristics, we want to identify the manner in which financial crisis affected their activity. As we all know, the financial crisis had a major impact in the United States, the “natal” country of the crisis, because great banks such as Lehman Brothers or Merrill Lynch have bankrupted. Even if the Romanian banking system was not affected by such catastrophic situations, surely the financial crisis had a significant impact on it. This topic is worth to be analysed, because we would be able to identify the risk differences between these two types of business: commercial banks versus co-operative banks.

  3. IAEA technical co-operation and the NPT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez Ocon, C.

    1985-01-01

    The IAEA technical co-operation programme promotes nuclear techniques and technologies in the developing countries. The Statute, the NPT, and the Revised Guiding Principles all reflect the desire of countries to foster an international climate where it will be unacceptable for a non-nuclear-weapon State to indulge in the development of military nuclear technology and reprehensible for States possessing this technology to offer it to others

  4. International co-operation in the field of wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    The use of wind energy is expanding rapidly worldwide. At the end of 1996 over 6000 MW was installed and the annual increase has during the last years exceeded 1000 MW. The development is also reaching more and more countries. In order to maintain technical and commercial development international co-operation is needed to secure cost-effectiveness, reliability and safety of the technology. International recommendations, harmonisation and standardisation is promoted by several international organizations like IEA, IEC and the classification organisations

  5. Assuring nuclear energy's future through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson, P.

    1999-01-01

    It is invited lecture as the introduction to the sixt international meeting entitled Nuclear Energy in Central Europe. Good commercial operation, public information and education are needed to win the confidence of the public, and to attract young people to take over the industry's founding generation. Stimulating international co-operation and transfer of best practices can assure this happens across the whole of the Europian nuclear industry

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy: An interdisciplinary co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerwein, W.; Hideghety, K.; Rassow, J.; Moss, R.L.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Heimans, J.; Gabel, D.; Vries, M.J. de; Touw, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The international (European) undertaking in BNCT in the Netherlands has required close scrutiny of the organisational structure required to establish BNCT facilities. The multidisciplinary co-operation and the tasks of the participants in the hospital (Radiation Oncologist, Medical Physicist, Pharmacist and other medical and paramedical staff) and those attached to the reactor) are described. The organisational structure and regulatory aspects required for the international functioning of the Petten treatment facility are provided for guidance to new projects in this field. (author)

  7. Outlook for the IAEA's technical co-operation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiei, Massoud

    1998-01-01

    This is a slide presentation dealing with the following subjects: - the IAEA's programmes; - the technical co-operation programme; - past trends in the TC programme; - new initiatives in TC; - TC programme profile; - perspectives for the future. The major programmes conducted by IAEA are concerning: - nuclear power and fuel cycle; - nuclear applications; - nuclear, radiation and waste safety, nuclear verification and security material; - management of technical co-operation; - policy making, coordination and support. In relation with the IAEA role in development process the author presents the legal framework for TC, the programme structure, and programme areas, resources, budgets, cycle, approval and implementation. Two plots regarding the recipients with and without NPP's are displayed for the period 1980-1994. Also, according to the status of the member states (without and with nuclear power programme) the programme priorities are presented. For the first case these are: radiation and waste safety, food and agriculture, water resources management human health and nutrition, human resources development, environmental protection and industrial applications. For the second case there are mentioned: radiation and nuclear safety, nuclear power operation and maintenance management, radioactive waste management, environment protection and sustainable energy options. Concerning the regional distribution the following figures are given for 1997: West Asia, 9%; Europe, 18%; Inter-regional, 11%; Africa, 24%; Latin America, 21%; East Asia and Pacific, 17%. In conclusion, the hope is expressed that the value of Technical Co-operation Programme would be seen not only in the successful transfer of technology but also, in the way that the nuclear technologies may satisfy demands for sustainable development by having a lasting impact on the life of the majority in a cost effective and environmentally sound manner

  8. [Evaluation of tidal volume delivered by ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Yan, Yong; Cao, Desen

    2014-12-01

    To study the ways which ensure the delivery of enough tidal volume to patients under various conditions close to the demand of the physician. The volume control ventilation model was chosen, and the simulation lung type was active servo lung ASL 5000 or Michigan lung 1601. The air resistance, air compliance and lung type in simulation lungs were set. The tidal volume was obtained from flow analyzer PF 300. At the same tidal volume, the displaying values of tidal volume of E5, Servo i, Evital 4, and Evital XL ventilators with different lung types of patient, compliance of gas piping, leakage, gas types, etc. were evaluated. With the same setting tidal volume of a same ventilator, the tidal volume delivered to patients was different with different lung types of patient, compliance of gas piping, leakage, gas types, etc. Reducing compliance and increasing resistance of the patient lungs caused high peak airway pressure, the tidal volume was lost in gas piping, and the tidal volume be delivered to the patient lungs was decreased. If the ventilator did not compensate to leakage, the tidal volume delivered to the patient lungs was decreased. When the setting gas type of ventilator did not coincide with that applying to the patient, the tidal volume be delivered to the patient lungs might be different with the setting tidal volume of ventilator. To ensure the delivery of enough tidal volume to patients close to the demand of the physician, containable factors such as the compliance of gas piping, leakage, and gas types should be controlled.

  9. An evaluation of the volume and concentration of alcoholic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    objective of this study was to evaluate the volume and alcohol concentration of ... Keywords: Alcohol content, Standard drink measure,. Sales regulation, Port .... 1993. 9. Stockwell T, Blaze-Temple D, Walker C. The effect of. 'standard drink' ...

  10. CO2 for refrigeration. Co-operation with Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredesen, Arne M.

    2000-01-01

    NTNU and SINTEF Energy Research, Norway, have co-operated closely with universities in Indonesia on the use of CO2 as a working fluid in refrigeration systems. The Asian market is the largest in the world and so it is very important to use environmentally friendly working fluids. In Indonesia, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) plays a leading role in the efforts to meet the national emission goals. For economical reasons, Indonesia considers natural working fluids such as CO2 rather than the new expensive synthetic ones

  11. HPC Co-operation between industry and university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhle, R.

    2003-01-01

    The full text of publication follows. Some years ago industry and university were using the same kind of high performance computers. Therefore it seemed appropriate to run the systems in common. Achieved synergies are larger systems to have better capabilities, to share skills in operating and using the system and to have less operating cost because of larger scale of operations. An example for a business model which allows that kind of co-operation would be demonstrated. Recently more and more simulations especially in the automotive industry are using PC clusters. A small number of PC's are used for one simulation, but the cluster is used for a large number of simulations as a throughput device. These devices are easily installed on the department level and it is difficult to achieve better cost on a central site, mainly because of the cost of the network. This is in contrast to the scientific need which still needs capability computing. In the presentation, strategies will be discussed for which cooperation potential in HPC (high performance computing) still exists. These are: to install heterogeneous computer farms, which allow to use the best computer for each application, to improve the quality of large scale simulation models to be used in design calculations or to form expert teams from industry and university to solve difficult problems in industry applications. Some examples of this co-operation are shown

  12. International co-operation in the field of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1988-10-01

    Operational safety in nuclear power plants is without doubt a field where international co-operation is in constant progress. Accounting for over 80 per cent of the 400 reactors in service throughout the world, the menber countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) are constantly striving to improve the exchange and use of the wealth of information to be gained not just from power plant accidents and incidents but from the routine operation of these facilities. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) helps the Steering Committee for Nuclear Energy to meet the NEA's objectives in the safety field, namely: - to promote co-operation between the safety bodies of member countries - to contribute to the safety and regulation of nuclear activities. The CSNI relies on the technical back-up of several different working groups made up of experts appointed by the member countries. For the past three years I have had the honour of chairing Principal Working Group 1 (PWG 1), which deals with operating experience and human factor. It is in this capacity that I will attempt to outline the group's various activities and its findings illustrated by a few examples

  13. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning

  14. International co-operation on decommissioning - Achievements of the NEA Co-operative programme 1985-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities is attracting a growing interest in all countries where an increasing number of plants are reaching the end of their operational life and will have to be decommissioned in the next few years. In response to this interest, the NEA set up in 1985 an international programme of technical co-operation between decommissioning projects in eight OECD countries. This report describes the programme and the participating projects, reviews the experiences accumulated during the first five-year term of this international undertaking, and discusses what remains to be done

  15. Co-operation and Competition in Regional Economic Development Associated with Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Competition and co-operation appear in many different social venues. The author gives a variety of examples of co-operative behaviour in economics, politics, research, and everyday life activities such as sports. These four diverse examples illustrate the variety of forms that co-operation may take such as tacit co-operation, incremental co-operation, deep co-operation, etc. The links with the form of democracy (adversary democracy or consensual democracy) are also pointed. However, as with so many other things in life, the key is to the question of co-operation or competition is balance. Co-operation and competition are dialectical opposites. They create and maintain and define each other; they each are incomplete without the other

  16. Technical Assistance in Evaluating Career Education Projects. Final Report. Volume I: Summary Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, A. Jackson; And Others

    This document contains the first of five volumes reporting the activities and results of a career education evaluation project conducted to accomplish the following two objectives: (1) to improve the quality of evaluations by career education projects funded by the United States Office of Career Education (OCE) through the provision of technical…

  17. Do co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? : the case of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Liv

    1998-01-01

    Do co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? The Case of Tanzania May co-operative organisations be said to perform a role of any importance in processes of democratisation? The objective of my thesis is to answer this question theoretically and to illustrate with the case of Tanzania. It can thus be formulated in two parts; one theoretical and one empirical; May co-operative organisations contribute to a process of democratisation? Do co-operative organi...

  18. Radiological evaluation of lung volume among Koreans with silicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Byung Chull

    1975-01-01

    1. Radiological evaluation of lung volumes was carried out thirty Korean males patients with silicosis, and following results were obtained. 2. The mean radiological lung volume among those patients was 7,587 ml. 3. When compared with the group of normal Korean male adults ranging from 31 to 55 years of age, the mean lung volume was increased by 2,346 ml. 4. The lung volume of these patients was even slightly larger than that of the group of Korean athletes of all ages. 5. On the other hand, the vital capacity in patients with silicosis was markedly diminished, the mean vital capacity being 2,909 ml. 6. The patients with silicosis also revealed emphysematous changes in the lung as well as increased residual volumes. The vital capacity was smallest in the latest stage.

  19. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1986. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    major role in Agency training activities. Close to one fifth of these activities depended on this type of assistance in 1986. From 1980 to 1986, the total volume of the technical assistance delivered by the Agency increased by 112.3%; during the same period, the staff of the Department of Technical Co-operation engaged in technical co-operation activities grew by 12.2%. The views of Member States expressed during the 1986 Policy Review Seminar and subsequent discussions will guide the future programme. Major emphasis will be placed on project quality. In its efforts to ensure that technical co-operation projects are consonant with Member States' development priorities, the Agency will seek to strengthen its co-operation with UNDP and other organizations of the United Nations system, particularly as regards programming and project formulation

  20. Self-reliance through regional co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glubrecht, H.

    1975-01-01

    Article 52 of the Charter of the United Nations is concerned with the usefulness of Regional Arrangements which 'are appropriate for regional action'. Such arrangements need not be considered only with regard to their political aspects but also as organizational structures which can be helpful in the development of science and technology in less developed countries. The definition of a 'Region' can be difficult, but is easier if scientific rather than political co-operation is intended. The International Atomic Energy Agency has undertaken a first step in this direction through its Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology in South and Southeast Asia, the Pacific and the Far East (RCA) which has been signed by six countries so far. This Agreement leaves it to the Member States to initiate cooperative projects. The IAEA will take steps to establish the project if at least three Member States are willing to participate. The implementation of the project will be defined by negotiations with the Member States and the IAEA will only play the role of a co-ordinator. Annual meetings of representatives of those countries which are parties of the RCA and of others from the region which might be interested in joining the Agreement provide the possibility of a continuing exchange of new ideas. Regional activities are also undertaken by means of 'Co-ordinated Research Programmes', which mostly include some co-operation with LDCs. The RCA has initiated two new ideas, that of carrying out the projects exclusively by the countries of the region and that of taking the step from co-ordination to cooperation by means of continuous and intensive exchange of information as well as of personnel. Its main objective is to aim at a reasonable division of labour between the parties and to use expensive equipment jointly. It is to be hoped that this venture will lead to an increasing degree of self-reliance within the

  1. Technical co-operation report for 1997. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    This report covers the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities during 1997, gives examples of the most significant accomplishments during the year and sets out the status of resources and delivery of the TC programme. The document outlines the steps taken to strengthen planning, design, monitoring and evaluation of TC projects. It also describes how the programme's operational base is being broadened to form new partnerships, using Country Programme Frameworks and Thematic Planning to meet the Member States' priority needs and expand project impact.

  2. Technical co-operation report for 1997. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    This report covers the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities during 1997, gives examples of the most significant accomplishments during the year and sets out the status of resources and delivery of the TC programme. The document outlines the steps taken to strengthen planning, design, monitoring and evaluation of TC projects. It also describes how the programme's operational base is being broadened to form new partnerships, using Country Programme Frameworks and Thematic Planning to meet the Member States' priority needs and expand project impact

  3. An Effect of the Co-Operative Network Model for Students' Quality in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanthaphum, Udomsin; Tesaputa, Kowat; Weangsamoot, Visoot

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed: 1) to study the current and desirable states of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality in Thai primary schools, 2) to develop a model of the co-operative network in developing the learners' quality, and 3) to examine the results of implementation of the co-operative network model in the primary school.…

  4. Co-operatives in chains: institutional restructuring in the Dutch fruit and vegetables industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.J. Bijman (Jos); G.W.J. Hendrikse (George)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCo-operatives play a major role in the agricultural and food industry. Co-operatives, by the very nature, are producer-oriented firms. As market conditions for food products have changed in recent decades, the question is raised whether co-operatives are still efficient organisations for

  5. Protocol to co-operation agreement with Iran

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A Co-operation Agreement between CERN and Iran will be signed in the coming weeks within the framework of the decisions taken by the Committee of Council and Council in June 1989. In view of implementing this Agreement, a Protocol between CERN and the International Scientific Meetings Office of the Ministry of Science of the Islamic Republic of Iran has been drawn up. It concerns the participation of scientific Institutions of Iran in the CMS Collaboration where CERN is acting on behalf of this Collaboration. This Protocol incorporates the agreement between CMS and ISMO on the Iranese contribution. It does not involve any financial commitment for CERN. The Protocol mainly addresses the status of the Iranese scientists at CERN, the supply by ISMO of the support tables for CMS, as well as the usual provisions concerning delivery and customs, guarantees, responsibilities, intellectual property and disputes. This Protocol is submitted to the Finance Committee for information.

  6. New Zealand signs up to co-operate with CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    On 4 December 2003 a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between CERN and the government of New Zealand was signed in the presence of Peter Hamilton, New Zealand's ambassador to Switzerland. This MoU concerns the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy particle physics between Ernest Rutherford's birthplace and CERN, which now hosts one of the world's most ambitious scientific endeavours, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).    In anticipation of the MoU, two New Zealand universities (the University of Auckland and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch) have already joined the CMS collaboration to work on pixel detectors, where they can benefit from the expertise of the pixel group at the Paul Scherrer Institute. These detectors are not only valuable in high-energy particle physics, but also serve medical applications.

  7. Radioactive waste: from national programmes to community co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves

    1981-01-01

    An important community programme for the management and storage of waste was introduced 5 years ago although research and development has been carried out on a wide basis for 20 years. There is in fact no contradiction in this, but knowledge of the composition of waste has evolved with the development of nuclear energy, requirements have become stricter while the number of possible handling methods tends to result in postponement of decisions. According to the author, a thorough community co-operation in this field should make it easier to easier to known what to choose and also to decide on the course to be taken. It should also facilitate the obtaining of a consensus of opinion -acceptable to every-one- in relation to the management of radioactive waste [fr

  8. Bench test evaluation of volume delivered by modern ICU ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyazidi, Aissam; Thille, Arnaud W; Carteaux, Guillaume; Galia, Fabrice; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2010-12-01

    During volume-controlled ventilation, part of the volume delivered is compressed into the circuit. To correct for this phenomenon, modern ventilators use compensation algorithms. Humidity and temperature also influence the delivered volume. In a bench study at a research laboratory in a university hospital, we compared nine ICU ventilators equipped with compensation algorithms, one with a proximal pneumotachograph and one without compensation. Each ventilator was evaluated under normal, obstructive, and restrictive conditions of respiratory mechanics. For each condition, three tidal volumes (V (T)) were set (300, 500, and 800 ml), with and without an inspiratory pause. The insufflated volume and the volume delivered at the Y-piece were measured independently, without a humidification device, under ambient temperature and pressure and dry gas conditions. We computed the actually delivered V (T) to the lung under body temperature and pressure and saturated water vapour conditions (BTPS). For target V (T) values of 300, 500, and 800 ml, actually delivered V (T) under BTPS conditions ranged from 261 to 396 ml (-13 to +32%), from 437 to 622 ml (-13 to +24%), and from 681 to 953 ml (-15 to +19%), respectively (p ventilators.

  9. Evaluation of renal volume by ultrasonography in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... contrast media. It is also readily available, cheap and easily reproducible to a large extent. Renal length and volume are important parameters in clinical settings, such as the evaluation and follow up of patients with kidney transplants, renal artery stenosis, recurrent urinary tract infection and vesico ureteral ...

  10. Regulatory co-operation: The next decade. Annex III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryder, E.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power has great potential to help satisfy the increased demands for electrical energy and allay concerns about the environmental damage done by electric power generation due to fossil fuels. Experience has shown that the cautious approach to nuclear power development, dictated by the knowledge of the destructive power that could be released by an accident, has been justified. The cooperation fostered by the IAEA has helped designers, constructors, operators and regulators share data and experiences and this has helped to ensure that basic standards and procedures are in place in all countries with nuclear power programmes. But, the reminders of the need for greater care provided by the two major reactor accidents in the last dozen years and doubts in the minds of the general public have reinforced the need for further co-operation in the next decade. National regulators will have to play their full part in the development of international standards which will not only lead to the necessary levels of safety but be widely recognized as doing so

  11. Energy Technology Initiatives - Implementation Through Multilateral Co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-15

    New technologies will be critical in addressing current global energy challenges such as energy security. More must be done, however, to push forward the development and deployment of the technologies we need today and will need in the future. Government leaders have repeatedly underlined the crucial role of industry and businesses in advancing energy technologies and the importance of strong collaboration among all stakeholders to accelerate technology advances. To attain these goals, increased co-operation between industries, businesses and government energy technology research is indispensable. The public and private sectors must work together, share burdens and resources, while at the same time multiplying results and outcomes. The 42 multilateral technology initiatives (Implementing Agreements) supported by the IEA are a flexible and effective framework for IEA member and non-member countries, businesses, industries, international organisations and non-government organisations to research breakthrough technologies, to fill existing research gaps, to build pilot plants, to carry out deployment or demonstration programmes -- in short to encourage technology-related activities that support energy security, economic growth and environmental protection. This publication highlights the significant accomplishments of the IEA Implementing Agreements.

  12. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.M.

    1982-03-01

    The economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic wastes are evaluated by comparing the costs of reduction of the wastes with the savings possible in transportation and disposal. A general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings is developed, an initial set of cost data is established, conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste are developed. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled, newly generated and retrievably stored DOE transuranic wastes. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal and transportation savings, and volume reduction techniques and costs. Section IV contains the results and conclusions of the study. The major conclusions drawn from the study are: For DOE sites with a small amount of waste requiring disposal ( 3 /year) the cost of volume reduction is greater than the transportation and disposal savings from volume reduction provided the waste requires little additional preparation to meet transportation and disposal criteria. Wastes that do not meet these criteria require site specific economic analysis outside the general evaluations of this study. For Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, incineration and metal shredding are cost-effective, provided a facility is to be constructed as a consequence of repackaging the fraction of stored waste which may require repackaging and immobilizing chemical process waste to meet disposal criteria

  13. Performance Measurement Using Balanced Scorecard Concept On Co-Operatives Implication In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to apply the concept of balanced scorecards in measurement of co-operatives performance based on vision and mission. So far the assessment of co-operative performance in Indonesia is not take into account the social hold co-operative while co-operatives carrying a dual mission. Research conducted in in North Sumatera Province in Indonesia. The sample consisting of one hundred co-operatives that are still active run annual members meeting. Co-operative performance was assessed based on its fourth perspective i.e. membership financial internal process and learning amp growth. The indicator key of cooperative performance was determined by taking into account the performance assessment on co-operatives as articulated of State Minister for Co-operatives and SMEs No.129KEPMKUMKMXI2002 and the regulations of the State Minister for Co-operatives and SME No.06PerM.KUKMV2006. Therefore this research were contributed a method in assessing co-operative performance using Balanced Scorecard concept with the four perspective namely membership perspective financial perspective internal process perspective and learning amp growth perspective.

  14. Institutionalising co-operation : a study of the Elysée treaty and Franco-German co-operation 1963-1993

    OpenAIRE

    Sverdrup, Bjørn Otto

    1994-01-01

    "INSTITUTIONALISING CO-OPERATION. A STUDY OF THE ELYSÉE TREATY AND FRANCO-GERMAN CO-OPERATION 1963-93" In 1963, France and Germany completed 'The Franco-German Treaty on Organization and Principles of Co-operation', the so-called Elysée Treaty. The Elysée Treaty, and its protocols, are in this study viewed as a political institution, hence the Elysée Treaty will be referred to as the Franco-German institution. This study seeks to answer the question of how the Franco-German institution has...

  15. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  16. Overcoming decommissioning challenges through client/laboratory co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, Mike; Gray, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accelerated decommissioning projects of the type underway at the former gaseous diffusion plant at BNG Capenhurst, UK, involve characterisation and radiochemical fingerprinting of a variety of unusual materials derived from legacy wastes. The project management and technical challenges that can occur during such a program can be successfully surmounted if a close working relationship between the client and the analytical laboratory is achieved. The Capenhurst Integrated Decommissioning Program (IDP) is an example of how such co-operation can reduce costs and time scales by providing the analytical laboratory with key sample and technical information prior to the shipping of the samples to the lab. This ensures that challenges associated with unusual sample matrices can be anticipated and dealt with at an early stage in the project. Gamma spectrometry is the most common analytical technique when analysing samples for radioactive content as it is non-destructive, relatively inexpensive and fast. However, accurate measurement generally requires samples of a known density to be counted in calibrated geometries. This becomes a challenge as many legacy wastes comprise materials of uneven geometry and/or varying density, as has been the case during the Capenhurst IDP. Liaising with the client to ensure a representative sub-sample of the material is taken on-site, and a series of additional checks when analysing the sample ensure that accurate results are obtained even for non-routine materials. Often it is only one or two radionuclides that dominate the radioactive inventory for legacy wastes. (authors)

  17. International co-operation in use of computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, T D [Medical Computing Centre, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1966-06-15

    National and international co-operation takes on concreteness in the exchange of programmes and research results . On a practical level and for the exchange of actual techniques the diversity between computers and computer languages may offer almost overwhelming obstacles which can be overcome but not without considerable effort. If computing centres have similar constellations of hardware, then the exchange of programmes is of course routine. We were able to exchange programmes with the Cancer Institute Board at Melbourne, Australia. It turned out that our programmes, although developed for a {sup 60}Co teletherapy beam unit (Model Eldorado A), could be fitted to the dose distribution from the Melbourne 4-MeV linear accelerator with the change of a few constants. The work of fitting the equations themselves was done by the Melbourne group. Once the new constants were found it was a simple matter of transcribing our programme on a reel of magnetic tape and returning it to Melbourne. Treatment centres may have access to different computers. However, it is becoming increasingly true that different computers will be able to accept programmes written in many languages. Language compatibility makes it possible t o take programmes and to rewrite them, at a very small cost, to fit another computer. Very often the only changes that have to be introduced are of 'input-output' instructions . If this is the case , then a copy of the flow diagram and a print-out of the source programme is usually all that is needed to make a programme operational on a different machine. But even here we have found it desirable t o send a programmer along so that resolution of detailed problems may be expedited. In this way we exchanged programmers with the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at St. Louis, Missouri to make our own external beam methods compatible with their computer and to make their interstitial and intracavitary programmes operational on ours.

  18. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    perspective however, there are probably substantial resources available for response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The problem is that during an emergency, these resources are not where they are needed. Most resources are under authority control in the respective countries, but if all countries would commit themselves to contribute to such assistance arrangements between countries and invoke all resources available and efficiently co-ordinate and route them to where they are mostly needed, the international community and individual States would achieve a better and more efficient response to emergencies. Resources could in this respect be everything that is needed to respond to an emergency, e.g. equipment, expertise, assessment capabilities or other services. These arrangements should be global arrangements as bi-lateral or regional arrangements are only adequate for some scenarios. The Convention an Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention an Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency established in 1986 are at present acceded by approx. 85 IAEA Member States. These conventions constitute the framework of international co-operation on response to nuclear and radiological emergencies between States and describe the obligations and mechanisms of international notification and assistance. The conventions recognize the need for a co-ordinating and facilitating body in this co-operation and the IAEA has been given this role. The conventions an Assistance and Early Notification provide a good framework for achieving international co-operation an nuclear emergency response. It has however been recognised that the implementation of these conventions needs to be improved. This is the responsibility of acceding states. To efficiently share information between many states, it is necessary to establish a standard international communication platform for information exchange with a communication strategy and standardization

  19. A review of IAEA's technical co-operation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Technical Co-operation (TC) Programme is part of the Agency's mandate 'to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' The IAEA's role under this Programme is that of a scientific and technical agency making a discrete but significant contribution to sustainable development goals through the transfer of nuclear science and technology. TC is a high impact programme focusing on development needs with about 800 active projects annually with a budget of over $70M, 30% of which is targeted on training and capacity building in over 100 Member States. Since 1970, over 80,000 scientists and specialists from developing countries have been trained in nuclear science and technology and in nuclear power and safety. A number of trends in the world at large will be likely to influence the Agency's TC programme in the next several years: The use of nuclear technologies in developing countries is growing as local infrastructures improve and technology transfer increases, especially among developing countries; Some countries and institutions are becoming more self-reliant as viable markets develop for nuclear technology, based on an increased awareness of their benefits; As facilities age, safe strategies for life extension and for decommissioning are assuming increasing importance, while there is some renewed positive attention to nuclear power in several parts of the world. Concern is increasing related to the potential for malicious acts involving nuclear facilities or unsecured nuclear and other radioactive material. As the nuclear workforce ages, the management of nuclear knowledge is gaining increasing importance, including the need to maintain the safety and security of nuclear installations and their continued reliable operation. It is difficult to forecast precisely how these trends will influence the assistance requested by Member States, but it is already clear that there will be increased

  20. Experience and co-operation in the development of nuclear engineering education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, D.; Gladieux, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents various aspects of the international co-operation set up at the Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (INSTN) for developing the nuclear engineering education in a European framework, with the Tempus programmes, or worldwide, through the IAEA technical co-operation programme. As such co-operation mainly relies on the courses established in the INSTN for national purposes, a short presentation of them is made first. (author)

  1. Handbook for the experimental open-pool irradiation facility of the Letaba Co-operative Limited, at Tzaneen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.; Entwistle, B.; Gawn, P.D.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed technical description of the experimental food irradiator which was jointly established by the Atomic Energy Board and the Letaba Co-operative Limited at Tzaneen, is presented. The commissioning of the irradiator, the dosimetry and plant operating procedures are discussed. Attention is paid to the regulatory control of such an irradiator and a hazards evaluation and appropriate action to be taken is provided [af

  2. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajay Vedaraj, I. S.; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B. V. A.

    2014-07-01

    After industrial robots came into existence during 1960, the technology of robotics with the design and analysis of robots in various forms in industries as well as in domestic applications were developed. Nowadays, along with the automotive sector the robots are producing a great impact in the form of quality and production rate to register their existence reliable in various other sectors also. Robotic technology has undergone various phase translations from being tortured as humanoids to the present day manipulators. Depending upon the various forms of its existence, robot manipulators are designed as serial manipulators and parallel manipulators. Individually both types can be proved effective though both have various drawbacks in design and the kinematic analysis. The versatility of robots can be increased by making them work in an environment where the same work volume is shared by more than one manipulator. This work volume can be identified as co-operative work volume of those manipulators. Here the interference of manipulators in the work volume of other manipulators is possible and is made obstacle free. The main advantage of co-operative manipulators is that when a number of independent manipulators are put together in a cooperative work envelope the efficiency and ability to perform tasks is greatly enhanced. The main disadvantage of the co-operative manipulators lies in the complication of its design even for a simple application, in almost all fields. In this paper, a cooperative design of robot manipulators to work in co-operative work environment is done and analysed for its efficacy. In the industrial applications when robotic manipulators are put together in more numbers, the trajectory planning becomes the tough task in the work cell. Proper design can remove the design defects of the cooperative manipulators and can be utilized in a more efficient way. In the proposed research paper an analysis is made on such a type of cooperative manipulator

  3. Analysis on the Load Carrying Mechanism Integrated as Heterogeneous Co-operative Manipulator in a Walking Wheelchair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedaraj, I S Rajay; Jain, Ritika; Rao, B V A

    2014-01-01

    After industrial robots came into existence during 1960, the technology of robotics with the design and analysis of robots in various forms in industries as well as in domestic applications were developed. Nowadays, along with the automotive sector the robots are producing a great impact in the form of quality and production rate to register their existence reliable in various other sectors also. Robotic technology has undergone various phase translations from being tortured as humanoids to the present day manipulators. Depending upon the various forms of its existence, robot manipulators are designed as serial manipulators and parallel manipulators. Individually both types can be proved effective though both have various drawbacks in design and the kinematic analysis. The versatility of robots can be increased by making them work in an environment where the same work volume is shared by more than one manipulator. This work volume can be identified as co-operative work volume of those manipulators. Here the interference of manipulators in the work volume of other manipulators is possible and is made obstacle free. The main advantage of co-operative manipulators is that when a number of independent manipulators are put together in a cooperative work envelope the efficiency and ability to perform tasks is greatly enhanced. The main disadvantage of the co-operative manipulators lies in the complication of its design even for a simple application, in almost all fields. In this paper, a cooperative design of robot manipulators to work in co-operative work environment is done and analysed for its efficacy. In the industrial applications when robotic manipulators are put together in more numbers, the trajectory planning becomes the tough task in the work cell. Proper design can remove the design defects of the cooperative manipulators and can be utilized in a more efficient way. In the proposed research paper an analysis is made on such a type of cooperative manipulator

  4. Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) materials coating evaluation, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Weightless Environment Training Facility Material Coating Evaluation project has included preparing, coating, testing, and evaluating 800 test panels of three differing substrates. Ten selected coating systems were evaluated in six separate exposure environments and subject to three tests for physical properties. Substrate materials were identified, the manner of surface preparation described, and exposure environments defined. Exposure environments included immersion exposure, cyclic exposure, and field exposure. Cyclic exposures, specifically QUV-Weatherometer and the KTA Envirotest were found to be the most agressive of the environments included in the study when all three evaluation criteria are considered. This was found to result primarily from chalking of the coatings under ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Volumes 2 and 3 hold the 5 appendices to this report.

  5. Integrated co-operative governance in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Nealer

    2011-07-01

    Keywords:Sustainable development, governance, co-operative governance, integrated,organising, and communication. Disciplines:Public Administration, Public Management, Social Welfare, Environmental Management, Municipal public service delivery, Social Development, Organisational Behaviour, Co-operative Governance, Communication, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Organisational Development

  6. Comparative study on membership legislation in Canadian and Chinese agricultural co-operative laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Zhihong; GUO Xiangyu

    2007-01-01

    For centuries, groups of people desiring to supply themselves with goods, to market their products, or to obtain services of various kinds on a co-operative basis, have made increasing use of co-operative associations to achieve these purposes. During the period, legislation designed especially for the incorporation and conduct of such associations has been enacted by different counties.Since a co-operative is established and carried on by and for the use of its members, this essay makes a comparison between Canadian and Chinese co-operative laws in terms of membership in the aspects of qualifications, rights and obligations and withdrawal of membership, so as to probe the function of co-operative legislation and find some enlightment from it.

  7. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on British Nuclear Fuels' (BNFL) wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement, are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as management, financial R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by BNFL in the co-operation with other organizations over several years in both major and much smaller agreements, illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the present status of these organizations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for international co-operation to succeed. (author)

  8. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices.

  9. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Literature review. Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, K.; Kaye, R.D.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations were undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. A team of human factors specialists, assisted by a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation therapists, conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. A function and task analysis was performed initially to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of workplace environment, system-user interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices. To further acquire an in-depth and up-to-date understanding of the practice of teletherapy in support of these evaluations, a systematic literature review was conducted. Factors that have a potential impact on the accuracy of treatment delivery were of primary concern. The present volume is the literature review. The volume starts with an overview of the multiphased nature of teletherapy, and then examines the requirement for precision, the increasing role of quality assurance, current conceptualizations of human error, and the role of system factors such as the workplace environment, user-system interfaces, procedures, training, and organizational practices

  10. Integral dose and evaluation of irradiated tissue volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivachenko, T.P.; Kalina, V.K.; Belous, A.K.; Gaevskij, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    Two parameters having potentialities of radiotherapy planning improvement are under consideration. One of these two parameters in an integral dose. An efficiency of application of special tables for integral dose estimation is noted. These tables were developed by the Kiev Physician Improvement Institute and the Cybernetics Institute of the Ukrainian SSR Academy of Science. The meaning of the term of ''irradiated tissue volume'' is specified, and the method of calculation of the irradiated tissue effective mass is considered. It is possible to evaluate with higher accuracy tolerance doses taking into account the irradiated mass

  11. Use of ultrasound for gastric volume evaluation after ingestion of different volumes of isotonic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The current preoperative fasting guidelines allow fluid intake up to 2 h before surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastric volume of volunteers after an overnight fast and compare it with the gastric volume 2 h after ingestion of 200 and 500 mL of isotonic solution, by means of ultrasound assessment. Method: Eighty volunteers underwent gastric ultrasound at three times: after 8 h of fasting; 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL isotonic saline, followed by the first scan; and on another day, 2 h after ingestion of 500 mL of the same solution after an overnight fast. The evaluation was quantitative (antrum area and gastric volume, and the ratio of participants’ gastric volume/weight and qualitative (absence or presence of gastric contents on right lateral decubitus and supine positions. A p-value  0.05. Five volunteers (6.25% had a volume/weight over 1.5 mL kg−1 at fasting and 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL and 6 (7.5% after 500 mL. Qualitatively, the presence of gastric fluid occurred in more volunteers after fluid ingestion, especially 500 mL (18.7%, although not statistically significant. Conclusion: Ultrasound assessment of gastric volume showed no significant difference, both qualitative and quantitative, 2 h after ingestion of 200 mL or 500 mL of isotonic solution compared to fasting, although gastric fluid content has been identified in more volunteers, especially after ingestion of 500 mL isotonic solution. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: As diretrizes recentes de jejum pré-operatório permitem a ingestão de líquidos até 2 horas antes da cirurgia. O objetivo do presente estudo foi, por meio de ultrassonografia gástrica, avaliar o volume gástrico de voluntários após jejum noturno e comparar com o volume gástrico duas horas após a ingestão de 200 e 500 ml de solução isotônica. Método: Foram submetidos à ultrassonografia gástrica 80 voluntários em três momentos

  12. Technical Assistance in Evaluating Career Education Projects. Final Report. Volume II: Final Career Education Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, A. Jackson; And Others

    This document contains the second of five volumes reporting the activities and results of a career education evaluation project conducted to accomplish the following two objectives: (1) to improve the quality of evaluations by career education projects funded by the United States Office of Career Education (OCE) through the provision of technical…

  13. Latin-American Co-operation in Biotechnology Programme: Industrial penicillin amidase for 6 amino penicillanic acid production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Montoya C.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates technological and economic transference related to the Production of Penicillin Amidase for use in 6 Amine Penicillanic acid (6-APA Production Project, wich is a part of the United Nations1 Regional Biotechnology Programme for Latin America and the Caribbean. This paper analyses the evolution of international cooperation by looking at the project's development. The methodology used includes analysis of: the project's development; participant and budgetary goals; results; copyright; project conditions; and sale of biocatalyst and 6-APA. All technical objectives were achieved; international co-operation, as well as co-operation between Industry and University were successful. Technological transference to the pilot plant was effective; many students involved in the project were simultaneously taking M.Sc. and Ph.D's courses. Nevertheless, neither the technology necessary for the biocatalyst's manufacture nor the biocatalyst itself were used. Analysis of the project has provided some orientation concerning those internal and external problems which arose during the development and sale of biotechnology in our countries and has tried to propose some alternatives for taking advantage of international co-operation.

  14. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators

  15. Technical co-operation report for 2000. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report covers three separate topics. Part one fulfills the Agency's obligation under the General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/18 to report on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation. It covers the period from 1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001. The report examines the finalization of the 2001-2002 technical co-operation programme and several key concepts of the Technical Co-operation Strategy such as Partners in Development, Technical Co-operation among Developing Countries, and the continuing evolution of Regional Resource Centres. Reflecting an important trend in the technical co-operation programme, which was mandated by the General Conference, the report describes the results achieved in several programmes in least developed countries. Part two reports on the major achievements of the technical co-operation programme in 2000 in the different regions of the world. Part three presents a summary of the financial and non-financial parameters of the technical co-operation programme. The supplement to the report provides a more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements and non-financial indicators.

  16. Ideological leaning and praxis of housing co-operatives in South Africa: Matters arising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jimoh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social movements came about as a result of dissatisfaction felt by society from the status quo. They present their grievances through demonstrations, strikes, riots, occupation of land, boycott of business or by the development of social and economic alternatives such as self-help schemes or saving clubs. In South Africa, people join housing co-operatives because it takes a long time to wait for the Reconstruction Development Project (RDP houses promised by the Government. The leaning of 5 housing co-operatives was examined within the context of ideology and praxis that are components of triad model. This was done through multi-case study whereby the chairpersons of the housing co-operatives were interviewed using structured interview format. Findings from the study indicated that all the housing co-operatives were not open and voluntary; also, the housing co-operatives were not administered the same way. In all, efforts were put in by the housing co-operatives in engendering the ideology of co-operatives on one hand and the government on the other hand in providing the necessary subsidy so that the gap in the housing deficit could be bridged since this fitted its policy on housing. 

  17. Ideological leaning and praxis of housing co-operatives in South Africa: Matters arising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Jimoh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Social movements came about as a result of dissatisfaction felt by society from the status quo. They present their grievances through demonstrations, strikes, riots, occupation of land, boycott of business or by the development of social and economic alternatives such as self-help schemes or saving clubs. In South Africa, people join housing co-operatives because it takes a long time to wait for the Reconstruction Development Project (RDP houses promised by the Government. The leaning of 5 housing co-operatives was examined within the context of ideology and praxis that are components of triad model. This was done through multi-case study whereby the chairpersons of the housing co-operatives were interviewed using structured interview format. Findings from the study indicated that all the housing co-operatives were not open and voluntary; also, the housing co-operatives were not administered the same way. In all, efforts were put in by the housing co-operatives in engendering the ideology of co-operatives on one hand and the government on the other hand in providing the necessary subsidy so that the gap in the housing deficit could be bridged since this fitted its policy on housing.

  18. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory historical dose evaluation: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, S.J.

    1991-08-01

    The methodology and results are presented for an evaluation of potential radiation doses to a hypothetical individual who may have resided at an offsite location with the highest concentration of airborne radionuclides near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Volume 1 contains a summary of methods and results. The years of INEL operations from 1952 to 1989 were evaluated. Radiation doses to an adult, child, and infant were estimated for both operational (annual) and episodic (short-term) airborne releases from INEL facilities. Atmospheric dispersion of operational releases was modeled using annual average meteorological conditions. Dispersion of episodic releases was generally modeled using actual hourly wind speed and direction data at the time of release. 50 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs

  19. Evaluation of mean platelet volume in localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahali, Anil Gulsel; Su, Ozlem; Emiroglu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kaya, Mehmet Onur; Onsun, Nahide

    2017-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by sclerosis of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Platelets play an important role in inflammation. Following activation, platelets rapidly release numerous mediators and cytokines, which contribute to inflammation. To evaluate whether there was any relation between localized scleroderma and platelet parameters. Forty-one patients with localized scleroderma were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects. The mean platelet volume level in the patient group was 9.9 ± 1.3 fl and in the control group was 7.6 ± 1.1 fl. This difference was statistically significant (pscleroderma. Platelet parameters may be used as markers for evaluating disease severity and inflammatory processes. Thus, there is a need for more detailed and prospective studies.

  20. Proceedings of International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    This proceedings are for the International Symposium on Energy Co-operation in North-East Asia, organized by Korea Energy Economics Institute, Institute of Energy Economics, Japan, and United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, held on June 2001 at Sheraton Walker Hill Hotel in Seoul, Korea. The major themes discussed are following: 1.Energy Profile, Outlook and Perspectives on Regional Co-operation in Northeast Asia 2.Future Challenges in the Energy Sector in Northeast Asia 3.Perspectives of Energy Co-operation in Northeast Asia.

  1. Success and failure of firms' innovation co-operations: The role of intermediaries and reciprocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, U.; Meder, A.; Wolf, T.

    2011-01-01

    attempts to fill this gap by investigating the possible presence of two problems in co-operation: the lack of intermediation and of reciprocity. Based on data gathered for firms in two German regions and one French region, we find that the success of co-operation projects depends on the perceived...... importance, rather than on the perceived quality, of intermediate actors. Hence, the major problem for intermediating suitable partners is more related to communication than it is a programmatic issue. Trust and reciprocity in co-operation between firms is found to be relevant ex-post in the sense of being...

  2. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    stroke volume was calculated as the difference between end-diastolic and end-systolic volume and compared to left ventricular stroke volume and to stroke volume determined simultaneously by a classical indicator dilution technique. There was good agreement between right ventricular stroke volume......Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...... determined by MRI and by the indicator dilution method and between right and left ventricular stroke volume determined by MRI. Thus, MRI gives reliable values not only for left ventricular volumes, but also for right ventricular volumes. By MRI it is possible to obtain volumes from both ventricles...

  3. Review of progress in quantitative nondestructive evaluation. Volume 8A and Volume 8B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.O.; Chimenti, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Volume 8 contains the edited papers presented at the 1988 Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation meeting. The 288 papers discuss such topics as fundamental techniques as acoustic testing, eddy current testing, and x-ray radiography; advanced techniques using x-ray computed tomography and laser ultrasonics; interpretive signal and image processing using expert systems and adaptive analysis; NDE probes and sensors and NDE systems and instrumentation; materials process control and inspection reliability including human factors. Materials discussed range from electronic circuit materials, coatings, adhesive bonds, smart structures, composite materials, welded joints, ferrous materials, and steels and alloys. Stress, texture, structural and fracture properties of materials are characterized using various NDE techniques. Applications to reactor, aircraft, and space vehicle components are investigated

  4. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  5. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The text of the Agency's agreement for co-operation with the Organization of African Unity (OAU) is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The agreement entered into force on 26 March 1969

  6. Organization for security and co-operation in Europe mission to Georgia / Joe McDonagh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    McDonagh, Joe

    2003-01-01

    22.-23. septembrini 2003 Vilniuses toimunud seminaril "South Caucasus: making the best use of external assistance for stability building and for co-operation with NATO" esitatud ettekanne OSCE missiooni tegevusest Gruusias

  7. A study of personality of leader and style of his co-operation in sporting command

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolar I.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The personality features of leader of sporting command and style of his co-operation are considered. The problems of adjusting and optimization of co-operation of leader and other players of command are selected in achievement of the set team purpose. 37 skilled sportsmen-handballers took part in research. An informal structure is exposed in commands, leaders and followers are certain. The quantitative indexes of personality features of leader, follower of sporting command are certain. Style of co-operation of leader and follower (prevailing and goodwill and quality is exposed personalities which will be realized by them in a sporting command. It is set that in interpersonality co-operation a leader will realize dominant style, and follower equal will realize dominant and benevolent styles.

  8. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, Henk L.M.; Van der Tak, Casper M.

    1996-01-01

    The standard view is that situations where no transborder environmental externalities occur are most efficiently dealt with by national environmental policies rather than by international co-operation. Though this may be the general case, non-coordinated national policies do not always produce the most efficient international allocation. This paper presents four cases in which the allocative outcome of non-coordinated domestic policy choices can be improved upon by international environmental co-operation. The first case refers to the use of environmental policy as a strategic trade instrument. The other cases refer to the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs and increasing returns to scale. The form of international environmental co-operation should be adapted to the situation. Formal international agreements between countries are characterised by high transaction costs and may not always be the most efficient form of co-operation

  9. Co-operation Between Science Teachers and Mathematics Teachers. Volumes 1-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Alan, Ed.

    This document contains six separate works, titled: (1) Functions and Physics; (2) Links Between Geography and Mathematics; (3) Our Inheritance: Common Ground for the Mathematics and Biology Teacher; (4) Mathematics and Chemistry: The Classroom Interface; (5) Mathematical Modeling; and (6) Mathematical Modeling with Calculus. This series of…

  10. Team Learning: Through the Relational Dynamics of Co-operation and Rivalry in Team Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lotz, Maja

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I explore the constructive links between co-operation, rivalry, and learning within the structure of team communities. Drawing upon social learning theory, the main purpose of this paper is to argue that both co-operation and rivalry are important triggers for mobilizing learning processes within and between teams. However, social learning theory tends to disregard the positive aspects of rivalry. Consequently, this paper will argue for the need to extend social learning theory ...

  11. Local and Sustainable Food Supply: The Role of European Retail Consumer Co-operatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hingley

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  This paper investigates the rationale for local and sustainable food systems and retailer co-operatives as their entry points within local conditions. Emphasis is on localised food networks and connection between socially as well as environmentally sustainable production, distribution and consumption. Investigated is the premise that co-operative organisational structures, for reasons of their long-term socially responsible origins are at the forefront of development of local and sustainable food systems and are thereby in a position to offer a specific contribution to market development. Two key research questions are proposed: Firstly, is there a pre-determination of co-operatives to issues of sustainable and local food sourcing given the historical and practical context of their ethical/socially responsible and stakeholder-based business model? Secondly, do co-ops express support for re-localising food systems and what contribution do they make concerning sustainable food and their relationships with local food suppliers? The method of investigation is through a two country retailer co-operative sector analysis and comparison (Finland and Italy. The enquiry is qualitative and exploratory in nature in the form of an embedded, multiple case design. The paper makes practical and theoretical contribution to knowledge concerning interpretation of ‘localness’ in food, the role of co-operatives and the co-operative ethos in sustainable food systems and the development of the local food economy. Results of the study show a positive relationship between co-operative ethos and (social sustainability in local food, but the de-centralised nature of retailer co-operation also provides a barrier to replication of good practice.

  12. Regional co-operation in radioactive waste management from an IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is intended to be a lead in to a Round Table discussion on Regional Co-operation in Radioactive Waste Management at the International Conference on N uclear Option in Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids , which will be held from 19 to 22 June 2000 in Dubrovnik, Croatia. The Round Table discussion will focus on international co-operation in the Eastern European region

  13. Competition and Co-operation between Stock Exchanges in Europe - Legal Aspects and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig; Clausen, Nis Jul

    2002-01-01

    The article analysis why and how European Stock Exchanges enters into alliances. On the background of alliances as Norex, Euronext and the planned iX the different areas and types of co-operation is discussed.......The article analysis why and how European Stock Exchanges enters into alliances. On the background of alliances as Norex, Euronext and the planned iX the different areas and types of co-operation is discussed....

  14. Calibration of automatic performance measures - speed and volume data: volume 2, evaluation of the accuracy of approach volume counts and speeds collected by microwave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of approach volumes and free flow approach speeds collected by the Wavetronix : SmartSensor Advance sensor for the Signal Performance Metrics system of the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT), : using the field ...

  15. Preliminary evaluation of alternative waste form solidification processes. Volume II. Evaluation of the processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This Volume II presents engineering feasibility evaluations of the eleven processes for solidification of nuclear high-level liquid wastes (HHLW) described in Volume I of this report. Each evaluation was based in a systematic assessment of the process in respect to six principal evaluation criteria: complexity of process; state of development; safety; process requirements; development work required; and facility requirements. The principal criteria were further subdivided into a total of 22 subcriteria, each of which was assigned a weight. Each process was then assigned a figure of merit, on a scale of 1 to 10, for each of the subcriteria. A total rating was obtained for each process by summing the products of the subcriteria ratings and the subcriteria weights. The evaluations were based on the process descriptions presented in Volume I of this report, supplemented by information obtained from the literature, including publications by the originators of the various processes. Waste form properties were, in general, not evaluated. This document describes the approach which was taken, the developent and application of the rating criteria and subcriteria, and the evaluation results. A series of appendices set forth summary descriptions of the processes and the ratings, together with the complete numerical ratings assigned; two appendices present further technical details on the rating process

  16. The NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning. A Decade of Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Co-operative Programme for the Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information Concerning Nuclear Installation Decommissioning (CPD) is a joint undertaking according to Article 5 of the Statute of the NEA. Concluded in 1985, the Agreement of the 23 participating organisations constituting the CPD has been continuously extended with the current programme period lasting until 2009. This report provides information about the participants, structure and achievements of the Co-operative Programme. The objective of the CPD is to acquire information and share operational experience from the conduct of 42 current decommissioning projects, such as project description and design, data resulting from the execution of decommissioning projects, and associated research and development results. The information generated in the project is protected by confidentiality provisions, which allow for a frank and open exchange of experiences, on a 'give and take' basis. The information exchange also ensures that the best internationally available experience is available and that safe, environmentally friendly and cost effective methods are employed in all decommissioning projects. The Co-operative Programme is implemented by a Management Board (MB) representing the participating organisations and a Technical Advisory Group (TAG) for the information exchange between the individual decommissioning projects. The latter benefits from the support of a Programme Co-ordinator financed by the Programme. The projects in the Programme have a broad range of characteristics and cover various types of reactors and fuel facilities. The Programme now covers 26 reactors, 8 reprocessing plants and 8 fuel facility projects, representing a wide selection of facility types in each category. Also, all three stages of decommissioning - from active dismantling to safe-store and to completed decommissioning back to 'green field conditions' - are represented. Over the 20 years of experience of the Co-operative

  17. Evaluation of pharyngeal volume and compliance of OSAHS patients using 3D CT and volume measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Zhijie

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic properties such as baseline caliber and compliance of the upper airway are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).The author attempted using imaging methods to evaluate both baseline caliber and compliance in normal individuals and OSAHS patients, and to localize the obstructive sites in OSAHS patients. Critical closing pressure (P crit ) and minimally effective therapeutical pressure (P eff ) were measured and computed tomography (CT) scan of pharynx was performed during wakefulness and drug-induced sleep with P crit , 0 cm H 2 O and P eff being given through a nose mask system. 7 normal individuals (age, 32.2±6.5 y's and body mass index, 23.6±5.4 kg/m 2 ) and 13 OSAHS patients (age, 33.3±6.4 y's and body mass index, 25.9±6.0 kg/m 2 ) were studied. 3D images of pharyngeal airway were reconstructed, and volume of each subdivision of pharynx was measured. Volume, average area and compliance of each subdivision were compared between the two groups. On an air-mode view of 3D image, the outline of pharynx was shown as transparent tubal structure, on which the narrowing collapse of airway at any level or any direction can be easily identified. Anatomy of pharynx could be easily understood on the virtual endoscopic mode. During wakefulness, the average area of the upper (1.20±0.26 cm 2 vs. 1.57±0.17 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 2.58±0.27 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 1.45±0.18 cm 2 , P 2 vs. 2.44±0.26 cm 2 ). The compliance of the middle part (0.28±0.15/cmH 2 O vs. 0.13±0.07/cmH 2 O, P<0.05) of pharynx was significantly higher in OSAHS patients than in normal individuals. The data suggested that OSAHS patients have a narrower and more collapsible pharynx compared to the normal subjects. The method of the present study is valid to evaluate both morphology and function of the upper airway. (author)

  18. Evaluation of ultrasonic volume- and underclad indications at long distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, W.; Schmitz, V.; Bernus, L. von; Kroening, M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis techniques are applied in UT examinations if the standard examination provides unacceptable indications and more exact parameters are required for the fracture mechanics evaluation. The necessity for analysis techniques is particularly great where long distances are involved, i.e. when sensitivity is too limited for crack tip detection or when focusing at the reflector location is insufficient, in order to correct the results of the standard examination, which are often too conservative. There are manual analysis procedures, using focusing transducers or time of flight reconstruction methods, and mechanized, computer-assisted procedures, based on the synthetic aperture principle. ALOK and SAFT measurements were performed by the IzfP (NDE Institute) and KWU on volume flaws and findings near the cladding. The results show that, compared with manual measurements, the computer-assisted methods have the advantage that the complete B-scan representation enables better interpretation of the examination interpretation of the examination results, thereby avoiding evaluation errors in individual cases. ALOK reconstructions have the advantage that they can be interpreted in the same way as a manual analysis, thus facilitating for the UT examiner the transition from the manual to the computer-assisted imaging method. Better image reproduction is a feature of the L SAFT reconstructions. Virtual independence from examination parameters is also advantageous. (orig.)

  19. Co-operative effects in tumorigenicity. The microcystin example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedmak, B.; Suput, D.

    2002-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have been implicated in many deaths of livestock, wildlife and human throughout the world. They produce a broad range of biologically active substances including proteinase inhibitors, endotoxins (LPS), which are generally present in gram-negative bacteria, and a variety of other toxic compounds. These substances are released in the water environment during the senescence of the bloom and can penetrate in the water supply system. Little attention has been paid to possible synergistic interactions between these biologically active substances in tumor promotion and tumor initiation. With few exceptions, the vast majority of experiments used for the human risk assessment of cyanobacteria have been performed using purified microcystins. To evaluate liver injuries such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma high doses of pure microcystins have been used. The present paper presents an attempt to verify the possible synergistic effects of different biologically active substances we have tested the toxic effects of lyophilized hepatotoxic cyanobacteria in comparison to the effects produced by the same amounts of purified microcystins. (author)

  20. VVER operational safety improvements: lessons learnt from European co-operation and future research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdera, F.; Vasa, I.; Zd'arek, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper summarises involvement of Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) in the areas which are directly related to Reactor Operational Safety and Plant Life Management, it also gives an idea how results of the research projects can be used to enhance safety of VVER reactors. These issues are for many years subject of a wide international co-operation effort, covered by such programmes as PHARE, OECD/NEA TACIS, 5th Framework Programme. Nuclear Research Institute participated in the majority of these programmes and projects, which allowed us to evaluate benefits (especially for VVER reactors) of the projects already finalised or running, as well as to formulate so-called 'future research needs', which possibly may be pursued within 6th Framework Programme. The paper highlights the main features of some projects our Institute was and is involved in, emphasising the most important results, expectations and future needs. It also very briefly, deals with some general and particular lessons learnt within these projects and their application to VVER reactors, especially as to their safety improvement. The paper also mentions VVER-focused projects and activities, co-ordinated by the OECD, which should enable to extend multilateral contacts already existing between organisations of the EU countries to include organisations from Russia, USA, Japan and possibly some other countries

  1. Co-operation and Phase Behavior under the Mixed Updating Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen; Li Yao-Sheng; Xu Chen

    2015-01-01

    We present a model by considering two updating rules when the agents play prisoner's dilemma on a square lattice. Agents can update their strategies by referencing one of his neighbors of higher payoffs under the imitation updating rule or directly replaced by one of his neighbors according to the death-birth updating rule. The frequency of co-operation is related to the probability q of occurrence of the imitation updating or the death-birth updating and the game parameter b. The death-birth updating rule favors the co-operation while the imitation updating rule favors the defection on the lattice, although both rules suppress the co-operation in the well-mixed population. Therefore a totally co-operative state may emerge when the death-birth updating is involved in the evolution when b is relatively small. We also obtain a phase diagram on the q-b plane. There are three phases on the plane with two pure phases of a totally co-operative state and a totally defective state and a mixing phase of mixed strategies. Based on the pair approximation, we theoretically analyze the phase behavior and obtain a quantitative agreement with the simulation results. (paper)

  2. The co-operative model as a means of stakeholder management: An exploratory qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Hammond

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The South African economy has for some time been characterised by high unemployment, income inequality and a skills mismatch, all of which have contributed to conflict between business, government and labour. The co-operative model of stakeholder management is examined as a possible mitigating organisational form in this high-conflict environment. International experience indicates some success with co-operative models but they are not easy to implement effectively and face severe obstacles. Trust and knowledge sharing are critical for enabling a co-operative model of stakeholder management, which requires strong governance and adherence to strict rules. The model must balance the tension between optimisation of governance structures and responsiveness to members' needs. Furthermore, support from social and political institutions is necessary. We find barriers to scalability which manifest in the lack of depth of business skills, negative perception of the co-operative model by external stakeholders, government ambivalence, and a lack of willingness on the part of workers to co-operate for mutual benefit.

  3. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper draws on B.N.F.L.'s wide experience of international collaboration in nuclear fuel process activities to examine the pros and cons of international agreements. Initially, the factors that influence the need to co-operate, the extent of possible co-operation and the alternative types of agreement are reviewed. Next, the benefits, problems and risks associated with each function, such as managmenet, financial, R and D, marketing and operations that could be covered within the scope of an international agreement, are examined in detail. The paper continues by calling upon specific experience obtained by B.N.F.L. in co-operation with other organisations over several years in operating both major and much smaller agreements illustrating the rationale behind the co-operation, the resolution of 'teething' troubles and the current status of these organisations. In conclusion, the paper comments upon the effectiveness of collaboration agreements and identifies several requirements for internation co-operation to succeed

  4. Realities of technical co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, A.; Villaros, P.; Naudet, G.

    1978-01-01

    The decision to develop the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, especially the generation of electricity, is usually based - particularly in the developing countries - on numerous considerations, mainly of an economic and political nature. Since the resources of nuclear technology are concentrated, relatively speaking, in the advanced countries, the use of nuclear energy by countries that have decided to go nuclear is based on effective co-operation between the exporting and importing countries. The present paper is intended as an additional contribution to consideration of the realities of such co-operation. The authors first mention the specific features of nuclear development, after which they consider, on the basis thereof, the different forms of co-operation required for the transfer of technological knowhow, and the conditions determining the effectiveness of such transfer. This effectiveness is not linked solely to the competence of the personnel concerned or to smooth organizational procedures, but also to decisive socio-psychological factors. Having analysed these factors, the authors examine the salient problems of co-operation arising during the process of nuclear development. Co-operation ever better adapted to the purpose and taking human considerations into account will enable importing countries to acquire the nuclear knowhow that will promote their economic and social development. (author)

  5. Implementing energy efficiency: Challenges and opportunities for rural electric co-operatives and small municipal utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elizabeth J.; Plummer, Joseph; Fischlein, Miriam; Smith, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    Challenges in implementing demand side management (DSM) programs in rural electric co-operatives and small municipal utilities are not well understood, yet these organizations sell roughly 15% of electricity in the US, many are more coal-intensive than investor-owned utilities (IOUs), and they are politically important-rural electric co-operatives cover about 75% of the US land area and municipal utilities are found in every state except Hawaii. We provide a background on rural co-operatives and municipal utilities in the context of the US electric sector and highlight the challenges and opportunities of implementing DSM programs in these institutions. Where past studies of utility DSM have mostly focused on IOUs or consisted of qualitative case studies of municipal utilities with exemplary DSM performance, this study makes a unique contribution to the DSM literature by systematically analyzing an entire co-operative and municipal utility population in Minnesota through the use of a survey. In doing so, we provide policy recommendations relevant to energy planners and policy makers to support DSM in rural electric co-operatives and municipal utilities

  6. International co-operation in the nuclear field - past, present and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1978-01-01

    On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of its creation, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (NEA/OECD) held a symposium in Paris on 1 and 2 February 1978. Some 200 participants from the 23 Member countries of the NEA as well as representatives of the Commission of European Communities, FORATOM and the IAEA attended the symposium. At a panel discussion at the symposium, led by Dr. Sigvard Eklund, Director General of the IAEA, the future of international co-operation between advanced nations in the nuclear field was discussed. While recognizing that nuclear energy is at present going through a period of uncertainty pending resolution of the intertwined problems of gaining public confidence and of non-proliferation, the panel expressed its strong confidence in the future of nuclear power, and the vital contribution it would make, particularly between now and the end of the century. During the meeting, a critical review was made of the way in which international co-operation has evolved since the early stages of peaceful nuclear development, and of the influence on this co-operation of the changing relationship between government and industry. The contribution of international co-operation - and its limitations - was carefully scrutinized, notably in the crucial area of the nuclear fuel cycle

  7. Human-Capital based Governance Structure, Success Factors and Barriers to Effective Governance: Co-operatives in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohana Othman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-operatives comprise the crucial third engine of growth for the Malaysian economy after the public and private sectors. This study investigates the human capital based governance structure, success factors and barriers to effective governance of co-operatives in Malaysia. Questionnaires were distributed to the top 100 co-operatives listed in the Malaysian Co-operative Societies Commission website. Analysis of the responses to the questionnaires showed that human capital based co-operatives governance comprise members’ participation, independence of the board, depth of expertise and competencies of directors and other characteristics of the board. This study also identified branding as the most important success factor ahead of competitiveness and proximity. Malaysia’s economy is projected to continue relying significantly on the performance of co-operatives. Thus, it is incumbent for greater attention to be given towards an effective governance that results in successful co-operatives.

  8. O espaço da cooperativa "amigos do meio ambiente": cooperativa de trabalho ou cooperfraude? "Friends of the environment" co-operative: work co-operative or fraud co-operative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirla Patrícia Weber Sterchile

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é resultado de pesquisa acadêmica que tem como objeto de estudo-pesquisa "A forma de existir e de ser da Cooperativa dos Agentes Ambientais de Santa Helena 'Amigos do Meio Ambiente' e sua imbricação na Usina de Beneficiamento de Resíduos Sólidos do município de Santa Helena-PR". Verificando o cotidiano profissional, o descontentamento de trabalhadores catadores de matérias recicláveis, o incentivo do gestor municipal para a instalação da usina e a formação da cooperativa, aliado aos postulados do capitalismo, em sua fase tardia, propusemos desconstruir e reconstruir o movimento do objeto em questão a partir da pesquisa teórica e empírica. Para coletar os dados utilizando a técnica de gravação, recorremos à análise documental e à observação. Após esse processo descrevemos e analisamos os conteúdos presentes. Concluímos em nosso estudo-pesquisa, que a Cooperativa - "Amigos do Meio Ambiente", é uma "cooperfraude", legitimada pelo Estado, que suprime os princípios do cooperativismo e exime o capital da raiz da exploração da força de trabalhoThis article resulted from a research aiming at "The form of existence and being of the Co-operative of Environmental Agents from St. Helena - 'Friends of the Environment' - and its imbrication in the Processing Plant of Solid Waste in the city of Santa Helena-PR". Checking the professional practice, the dissatisfaction of workers who collect recycling materials and the City Hall's encouragement to install the plant and to form the Co-operative, together with the tenets of capitalism in its late stage, we proposed to deconstruct and reconstruct the motion of the object studied from the empirical research. After analyzing our data we concluded that the "Friends of the Environment" Co-operative is a "fraud co-operative" legitimized by the State, that suppressed the principles of co-operativism and exempted the capital from the root of exploitation of the workforce

  9. Evaluating the agreement between tumour volumetry and the estimated volumes of tumour lesions using an algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubender, Ruediger P. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lynghjem, Julia; D' Anastasi, Melvin; Graser, Anno [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker; Modest, Dominik P. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Department of Medical Oncology, Munich (Germany); Mansmann, Ulrich R. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Sartorius, Ute; Schlichting, Michael [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the agreement between tumour volume derived from semiautomated volumetry (SaV) and tumor volume defined by spherical volume using longest lesion diameter (LD) according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or ellipsoid volume using LD and longest orthogonal diameter (LOD) according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Twenty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the CIOX trial were included. A total of 151 target lesions were defined by baseline computed tomography and followed until disease progression. All assessments were performed by a single reader. A variance component model was used to compare the three volume versions. There was a significant difference between the SaV and RECIST-based tumour volumes. The same model showed no significant difference between the SaV and WHO-based volumes. Scatter plots showed that the RECIST-based volumes overestimate lesion volume. The agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume, evaluated by intraclass correlation, showed nearly perfect agreement. Estimating the volume of metastatic lesions using both the LD and LOD (WHO) is more accurate than those based on LD only (RECIST), which overestimates lesion volume. The good agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume enables a reasonable approximation of three-dimensional tumour burden. (orig.)

  10. Critical evaluation of blood volume measurements during hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasselaar, Judith J; van der Sande, Frank M; Franssen, Casper F M

    2012-01-01

    Devices that continuously measure relative blood volume (RBV) changes during hemodialysis (HD) are increasingly used for the prevention of dialysis hypotension and fine-tuning of dry weight. However, RBV measurements are subject to various limitations. First, RBV devices provide information on relative blood volume changes but not on absolute blood volume. Since blood volume varies with the hydration status, identical reductions of RBV may result in very different absolute blood volumes at the end of HD. Second, RBV changes underestimate the change of total blood volume due to translocation of lower-hematocrit blood from the microcirculation to the central circulation. Third, changes in posture before and during HD, food intake, exercise, and administration of intravenous fluids may influence the validity of the RBV measurement. Fourth, results obtained by various RBV devices show large interdevice differences. Finally, although a fall in blood volume is an important factor in dialysis hypotension, frank dialysis hypotension only occurs when the cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms can no longer compensate for the reduction in blood volume. Therefore, the dialysis staff should not exclusively focus on RBV, but also search for opportunities in the dialysis prescription to facilitate cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms, e.g. by lowering dialysate temperature. In the opinion of the authors, routine RBV monitoring should be used with caution until the major conceptual and methodological problems that are inherent to the indirect RBV estimation are clarified. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Finnish experience on emergency preparedness co-operation work and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovijarvi, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. According to the 'Security Strategy for Society' the responsibilities are shared across society and the normal division of duties shall be maintained unchanged as far as possible in all situations. While the competent authority is always in charge of making decisions other administrative sectors may be cooperation partners. This applies to the representatives of business community and organization as well. The first regional co-operation group for NPP emergency preparedness consisting of the representatives of regional rescue service, NPP licensee and STUK was established in 2008 to develop the external rescue plan, arrange training etc. Today co-operation groups are working for both Finnish emergency planning zones. Examples of the co-operation results are discussed in the presentation. (author)

  12. Regional co-operation in the nuclear field: The Nordic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    Experience from 25 years of co-operation in the nuclear field between the Nordic countries is described. A pragmatic approach with a minimum of formalism is used. The co-operation takes place mainly through ''horizontal'' channels between corresponding bodies in the different countries - safety authorities, research institutions, electricity producers, etc. In addition, a ''vertical'' co-ordination between these different circles is accomplished through a Nordic Liaison Committee. The experience shows that valuable results can be obtained, mainly through rationalization and improved use of resources. Difficulties, which are inherent in international co-operation, can be reduced, provided that there is a strong political will, an efficient system to promote contacts, and a flexible financing scheme. Apart from the benefits obtained in each of the countries - whether or not it has its own nuclear power - particular advantages accrue when a ''Nordic group'' can present co-ordinated viewpoints on the international scene. (author)

  13. Towards an effective co-operation between companies and occupational safety and health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Drift, Dorine Willy

    2002-01-01

    In the Dutch Working Conditions Act, every employer is required to organize preventive occupational safety and health services (OSH-Services). The OSH-Services need to have a certification that can be compared with ISO-9000. This article is focused on the question: How can companies and OSH-Services co-operate more effectively to obtain a better OSH management system inside the companies? To answer this question, TNO has developed an approach to support organisations in the health care branch to obtain a better service from their OSH-Service. TNO has chosen to focus on supporting the companies, because of the recognition that the effectiveness of OSH-Services has been found in effects on their customers, the companies. As a result of the research project a stepwise approach with several tools was developed. After the development phase, parts of the approach and the tools were used in several other consultancy projects. Evaluative studies have not been performed yet. However, from the development activities and several consultancy projects some remarkable evaluative findings can be given. The approach can be useful for companies and OSH-Services to make their goals and expectations more explicit. The approach also helps to make the management of companies clear that their own behaviour is relevant to the achievement of their goals in occupational health and safety policy, in addition to the services provided by the OSH-Service and their professionals. The approach cannot fulfil the possible need for qualification of OSH professionals. However, the approach can make the OSH professionals clear in what way they have qualification needs.

  14. Trust and the successful coordination of SME co-operation – an empirical study in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the role of trust and test the impact of trust on performance in the context of co-operation between small- and medium-sized enterprises (‘SMEs’ in a transition country. Based on a sample of 122 Slovenian SMEs, an analysis based on OLS regression reveals that trust does have a strong impact on performance. We thereby identify trust as a powerful co-ordinating mechanism for SME relationships involving co-operation in transition economies.

  15. SSI`s International Development Co-operation (SIUS). Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szendroe, G.; Grapengiesser, S.; Johansson, Gunnar

    1999-04-01

    SSI`s International Development Co-operation (SIUS), the Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe, has since its start in 1992 been granted SEK 109 million by the Swedish government. The projects are accessed, planned and performed in close co-operation with partner organisations in Eastern Europe. This report presents the financial status and a summary of the projects, their status and distribution over the countries and project areas. The presentation is updated as of December 1998

  16. NATO, Libya operations and intelligence co-operation – a step forward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Adam David Morgan

    2011-01-01

    developments can be opened up for some further analysis, forming the main focus of this article. Ultimately, this article concludes that, over time and albeit while gradual, we have seen what can be regarded as ‘a step forward’ in co-operative intelligence activities in Libya. Although several pressing......"With the ‘fall’ of Tripoli towards the end of August 2011, it has become increasingly apparent that the intelligence co-operation witnessed in Libya during the NATO campaign performed an increasingly important role in realizing operational and strategic ‘successes’. These recent intelligence...

  17. The economic and social significance of RCA regional co-operative projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    The regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) is an established and valuable instrument between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Member States in South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific or Far East for assisting in the transfer of modern technology to areas having economic and social importance to the region. The purpose of this review is to identify on-going or planned work which is designed to help achieve this goal. Currently approved RCA Regional Co-operative Research Projects are listed

  18. Stereolithographic volume evaluation of healing and shaping after rhinoplasty operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlidede, Soner; Turgut, Gürsel; Gönen, Emre; Kayali, Mahmut Ulvi; Baş, Lütfü

    2009-07-01

    Nasal edema and volume changes are unavoidable processes during the healing period after rhinoplasty. Various applications were reported regarding the prevention of early edema; however, the literature shows no study focused on the course of the nasal edema and volume changes up-to-date. We aimed to study the nasal volume changes during the first year of postoperative healing period and to form a recovery and volume change diagram with the obtained data. We prepared standard frames and nasal molds of 7 rhinoplasty patients at regular time intervals (preoperative period and at the postoperative 1st, 2nd, 4th, 8th, 12th, 24th, and 52nd weeks). Plaster nasal models were created by using these molds. Volumes of models were measured by computed tomographic scanning and three-dimensional image processing programs. According to our results, the nasal edema reaches its maximum level at the postoperative fourth week and then rapidly decreases until its minimum level at the eighth week. In contrast with the general opinion, the nasal volume begins to increase smoothly reaching to a level minimally below the preoperative value by the end of the first year.

  19. A novel model for extending international co-operation in science and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, S.J.; Ji-zehn, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE (ISSN 1009-3095, Monthly) 2004 Vol. 5 No. 3 p.358-364 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------A novel model for extending international co-operation in science and educationDE BOER Sirp J.1, QIU Ji-zhen 2(1International

  20. Effects of a Co-operative Learning Strategy on Ninth-Graders' Understanding of Human Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyibo, Kola; Evans, Hermel G.

    2002-01-01

    Looks at the effect of teaching strategies on a group's attitude toward biology and understanding human nutrition. Used an experimental group that participated in co-operative learning and a control group taught using the lecture method. Involves ninth graders (n=156) from two high schools in Jamaica. (Author/YDS)

  1. Financial Instruments and Conflicts of Interest: Application to French Agricultural Co-operatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Declerck

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural co-operatives' governance and economic projects are often misunderstood by external financial investors. The risk of conflicts of interest plays a role in these misunderstandings in the way retained earnings, returns to agricultural products brought by co-op member and returns to equity capital. Such risks are identified and answers are proposed.

  2. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-02-07

    The texts of the Agency's agreements for co-operation with the regional inter-governmental organizations listed below, together with the respective protocols authenticating them, are reproduced in this document in the order in which the agreements entered into force, for the information of all Members of the Agency.

  3. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: What Happened Next

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Urban, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an update on what has happened over recent months with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's proposal for an International Early Learning Study, and review responses to the proposed International Early Learning Study, including the concerns that have been raised about this new venture in…

  4. The IAEA technical Co-operation a partner in development in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Saiedi, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Public Information

    1995-10-01

    Each country was to find means of achieving sustainable development, and for this, technology within a framework of regional and international co-operation are of utmost importance. The IAEA plays a major role in promoting nuclear technologies for development. Highlights of the IAEA`s technical cooperation programme are given in this paper.

  5. Environmental Engineering Education (E3) in the Gulf Co-Operation Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Majeed; Coskuner, Gulnur

    2007-01-01

    The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Countries (GCC)--Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates--are facing enormous environmental challenges associated with rapid urbanisation and industrialisation, especially in the last three decades, due to its role as a global hydrocarbon energy centre. None of these…

  6. Architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust building automation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernier, F.; Ploennigs, J.; Pesch, D.; Lesecq, S.; Basten, T.; Boubekeur, M.; Denteneer, T.J.J.; Oltmanns, F.; Lehmann, M.; Mai, Linh Tuan; Mc Gibney, A.; Rea, S.; Pacull, F.; Guyon-Gardeux, C.; Ducreux, L.F.; Thior, S.; Hendriks, M.; Verriet, J.H.; Fedor, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems (BAS) proposed by the EC funded FP7 SCUBA1 project. We describe the current situation in monitoring and control systems and outline the typical stakeholders involved in the

  7. Architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernier, F.; Ploennigs, J.; Pesch, D.; Lesecq, S.; Basten, T.; Boubekeur, M.; Denteneer, D.; Oltmanns, F.; Bonnard, F.; Lehmann, M.; Mai, T.L.; McGibney, A.; Rea, S.; Pacull, F.; Guyon-Gardeux, C.; Ducreux, L.F.; Thior, S.; Hendriks, M.; Verriet, J.; Fedor, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the architecture for self-organizing, co-operative and robust Building Automation Systems (BAS) proposed by the EC funded FP7 SCUBA1 project. We describe the current situation in monitoring and control systems and outline the typical stakeholders involved in the

  8. The IAEA technical Co-operation a partner in development in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Saiedi, A.

    1995-01-01

    Each country was to find means of achieving sustainable development, and for this, technology within a framework of regional and international co-operation are of utmost importance. The IAEA plays a major role in promoting nuclear technologies for development. Highlights of the IAEA's technical cooperation programme are given in this paper

  9. Beyond Public and Private: A Framework for Co-operative Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Neary

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Universities in the UK are increasingly adopting corporate governance structures, a consumerist model of teaching and learning, and have the most expensive tuition fees in the world (McGettigan, 2013; OECD, 2015. This article discusses collaborative research that aimed to develop and define a conceptual framework of knowledge production grounded in co-operative values and principles. The main findings are outlined relating to the key themes of our research: knowledge, democracy, bureaucracy, livelihood, and solidarity. We consider how these five ‘catalytic principles’ relate to three identified routes to co-operative higher education (conversion, dissolution, or creation and argue that such work must be grounded in an adequate critique of labour and property, i.e. the capital relation. We identify both the possible opportunities that the latest higher education reform in the UK affords the co-operative movement as well as the issues that arise from a more marketised and financialised approach to the production of knowledge (HEFCE, 2015. Finally, we suggest ways that the co-operative movement might respond with democratic alternatives that go beyond the distinction of public and private education.

  10. Are University Co-Operative Education Students Safe? Perceptions of Risk to Students on Work Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhook, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    As students venture off campus for university-sponsored activities, are they at risk, given that universities are better able to control risk factors on campus than they can for their off-campus activities? Co-operative education is a formalized and longstanding academic program that often sees students spend upwards of a third of their time off…

  11. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The texts of the Agency's agreements for co-operation with the regional inter-governmental organizations listed below, together with the respective protocols authenticating them, are reproduced in this document in the order in which the agreements entered into force, for the information of all Members of the Agency

  12. Incentives to strengthen international co-operation in R and D for advanced nuclear power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balthesen, E.; Bakunyaev, A.D.; Gibson, I.H.; Hosemann, J.P.; Tavoni, R.; Versteegh, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the need for International Co-operation in R and D for Advanced Reactors in order to maintain options for the future deployment of nuclear power against the current background of declining R and D capability in Europe

  13. A mixture of "cheats" and "co-operators" can enable maximal group benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Craig MaClean

    Full Text Available Is a group best off if everyone co-operates? Theory often considers this to be so (e.g. the "conspiracy of doves", this understanding underpinning social and economic policy. We observe, however, that after competition between "cheat" and "co-operator" strains of yeast, population fitness is maximized under co-existence. To address whether this might just be a peculiarity of our experimental system or a result with broader applicability, we assemble, benchmark, dissect, and test a systems model. This reveals the conditions necessary to recover the unexpected result. These are 3-fold: (a that resources are used inefficiently when they are abundant, (b that the amount of co-operation needed cannot be accurately assessed, and (c the population is structured, such that co-operators receive more of the resource than the cheats. Relaxing any of the assumptions can lead to population fitness being maximized when cheats are absent, which we experimentally demonstrate. These three conditions will often be relevant, and hence in order to understand the trajectory of social interactions, understanding the dynamics of the efficiency of resource utilization and accuracy of information will be necessary.

  14. The energy sector in Northeast Asia : new projects, delivery systems and prospects for co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the needs and opportunities for energy co-operation in Northeast Asia, with particular reference to development of resources in eastern Russia, Siberia and the Far East to supply energy to consumers in Northeast Asia. Given the high projected demand for energy resources, Japan, South Korea and China are compelled to consider diversifying their energy supplies and developing new links with eastern Russia. The environmental degradation caused by coal burning in China is another incentive for looking for sources of natural gas in Eurasia. Russia and Japan are concentrating on the Sakhalin oil and gas projects. China and Russia have agreed to work closely in the energy sector, focusing on a pipeline from the natural gas field near Irkutsk. The challenges lies in developing a co-ordinated approach to energy resource development and use, by modifying energy policies and long-term supply outlooks. Another challenge lies in the fact that private investors and intergovernmental co-operation are required to build an expensive cross-border infrastructure to transport natural gas, electricity and oil. Co-operation is also required to improve energy efficiency, modernize existing facilities and promote cleaner sources of energy, energy conservation and environmental protection. This report examined forecasted energy demand and imports in Northeast Asia and identified opportunities for co-operation. refs., tabs

  15. Microcredit management in Ghana : development of co-operative credit unions among the Dagaaba

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheneti, Yeshanew

    2007-01-01

    "This thesis focuses on the historical development, the organizational management and the role of credit unions among the Dagaaba in the Upper West Region of Ghana. Co-operative credit unions are well-established financial institutions, with a capacity to mobilize local savings and provide

  16. IEP (Individualized Educational Program) Co-operation between Optimal Support of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Akio; Ogoshi, Sakiko; Mitsuhashi, Yoshinori; Araki, Chikahiro

    A key aspect of the optimal support of students with special needs is co-ordination and co-operation between school, home and specialized agencies. Communication between these entities is of prime importance and can be facilitated through the use of a support system implementing ICF guidelines as outlined. This communication system can be considered to be a preventative rather than allopathic support.

  17. Shariah Governance Framework For Islamic Co-Operatives As An Integral Social Insitution In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Issyam Itam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, Islamic cooperatives are recognized as providers of some form of Islamic financial service similar to Islamic Banks and Takaful Operators. An Islamic Co-operative refers to a co-operative conducting activities and businesses based on Shariah principles. Being a non-banking financial institution, its main objective is to enhance social economic welfare of its members. As a form of captive social institution, it enables the less economically privileged members of society to pool resources as a cooperative. Malaysia is spearheading the Islamic banking and finance industry globally by having in place a proper and well-designed legal and regulatory framework for Islamic Financial Institutions, which includes the area of Shariah governance. However, the Shariah governance framework for the Islamic Co-operative in Malaysia is still in its infancy stage. In this paper, this area will be given focus and properly highlighted. Later, comparison will be made with the Shariah governance framework for the Islamic financial institutions. This paper will conclude that the requirements with regard to Shariah governance for the Islamic Co-operative are flexible and not as strict as required for the Islamic financial institutions.

  18. Organized network for supporting the amateur-scientist co-operation in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, V.; Haukka, H.; Oksanen, A.; Hentunen, V.-P.

    2014-04-01

    PROAM network is a working group of Ursa Astronomical Association [1] for supporting Finnish amateur astronomers participating to co-operation projects between professional and amateur astronomers. The network relays the information on projects, maintains professional contacts and arranges training on technical skills for research work.

  19. Tianwan Nuclear Power Station. An Example for Chinese - Russian - German Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidowitzsch, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Tianwan NPS is the first NPP worldwide, equipped completely with digital control systems. The DCS platforms TELEPERM XS and TELEPERM XP fulfill all automation tasks from reactor protection to water treatment system. The screen-based OM690 system offers a modern HMI for NPP operation. The Tianwan NPS Main IC project is an example of successful multi-cultural co-operation

  20. Socialité et co-operation dans l'oeuvre de Charles Goodwin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    2016-01-01

    As a linguistic anthropologist, Goodwin elaborates a conceptual and methodological framework to describe the organization of human activities and conducts. The central notion of « co-operation » accounts for what is at stake in ordinary conversation as well as in professional practices, cultural...

  1. The Texts of the Agency's Co-operation Agreements with Regional Intergovernmental Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The texts of the Agency's agreements for co-operation with the regional inter-governmental organizations listed below, together with the respective protocols authenticating them, are reproduced in this document in the order in which the agreements entered into force, for the information of all Members of the Agency [es

  2. International Co-Operation in Control Engineering Education Using Online Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jim; Schaedel, Herbert M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the international co-operation experience in teaching control engineering with laboratories being conducted remotely by students via the Internet. This paper describes how the students ran the experiments and their personal experiences with the laboratory. A tool for process identification and controller tuning based on…

  3. The NEA co-operative programme on decommissioning decontamination and demolition of concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berton, Marie-Anne; Estivie, David; Cantrel, Eric; Moeller, Joerg; Ondaro, Manuel; Ooms, Bart; Wittenauer, Stefan; Burton, Bob

    2011-01-01

    In response to growing interest in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency set up the Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning in 1985. Its basic scope is to facilitate the exchange of scientific and technical information between major decommissioning projects. Participation in the Programme has expanded significantly over the years to include organisations from 13 countries. Currently, about 60 projects participate in the Programme. The Programme is executed under an agreement between the participating organisations and companies. A progress report is issued every five years on the CPD and includes a brief description of each project. The most recent report is entitled A Decade of Progress. The projects are divided into two groups: reactor projects (60%) and fuel facility projects (40%). A complete list of the different projects and their country of residence can be found in Annex 1. Many of the early projects in the Programme focused on experimental or prototype plants, however, a number of projects for the decommissioning of commercial facilities (power generation, fuel and reprocessing plants) have recently joined the Programme. Limited feedback on concrete clean-up operations has been available until now due to the lengthy time frame of decommissioning projects and the fact that building demolition occurs in the very late stages of the project. Some of the early projects in the Programme are now complete or nearing completion, making available significant data and experience. This experience and lessons learnt can be applied to the further development of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) clean-up processes. This report aims to supplement the previous NEA report dedicated to decontamination techniques and to provide project engineers and/or project leaders involved in concrete infrastructure clean-up with: - Guidelines for setting up appropriate and adequate strategies, taking into consideration the international

  4. Technical co-operation report for 2002. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    General Conference resolution GC(46)/RES/10 reiterated the need to strengthen the technical co- operation programme and requested the Director General to report to the Board of Governors periodically and to the General Conference at its forty-seventh (2003) session on the implementation of resolution GC(46)/RES/10. Part A of this report responds to the General Conference resolution by providing an overview of the progress achieved in technical co-operation policies, strategies, working relations, and internal management during the period 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2003, as well as the major new challenges facing the technical co-operation programme. Part B reports on operational activities and programme performance at the country and regional levels during the calendar year 2002, and Part C reviews the use of financial and human resources in the programme at an aggregate level. As part of its efforts to refine policies for improving programme development, the Agency reviewed the Technical Co-operation Strategy in 2002. The resulting document, The Technical Co-operation Strategy: the 2002 Review (document GOV/INF/2002/8/Mod.1), states that the strategic goal originally identified in the Strategy in 1997 remains valid, and defines four objectives to guide the technical co-operation programme: applying the central criterion (strong government commitment), developing strategic partnerships, increasing the level of funding for technical co-operation, and promoting greater sustainability and self-reliance of nuclear institutions. In line with the Technical Co-operation Strategy, one of the key features of the Agency.s work in 2002 was continuing consultations with Member States at both the policy and operational levels on the management of the ongoing technical co-operation programme and on planning for future activities. The dialogue with Member States aimed at clarifying the strategic objectives and key tools for the utilization of resources to achieve maximum

  5. Reports on memorial lecture meetings on co-operative application finish of the SF cyclotron and its result reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The SF cyclotron at the Institute for Nuclear Study (INS) of University of Tokyo began its co-operative application in 1997 to continue its smooth operation during 21 years reaching March, 1997. Together with improvement of INS organization on April, 1997, it was transferred to the Center for Nuclear Study School of Science, University of Tokyo, INS continued a co-operative research for two years thereafter with Tanashi campus of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization also established on April, 1997. This co-operative research was finished without accident at the end of March, 1999, to close history of co-operative application of cyclotron during 23 years. This report contains 15 memorial lecture and convivial meeting reports at the co-operative application finish of cyclotron and some results of co-operative applications and experiments, during 23 years. (G.K.)

  6. Political Economy of Tradeable Permits. Competitiveness, Co-operation and Market Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convery, F.J.; Dunne, L.; Redmond, L.; Ryan, L.B.

    2003-01-01

    of our workshop series with publication of these proposals was fortuitous, and provided a continuing deliberative thread to our workshops as they unfolded. The formal withdrawal from the Kyoto Process by the US added another dimension which was incorporated into the research agenda. Our brief did not confine us to climate change or indeed to Europe, but inevitably much of our focus was shaped by these developments. In Venice, Egenhofer (2001) provided a very comprehensive 'state of the art' as regards the theory and (especially) the practise of emissions trading, and its links with other policy instruments, notably taxation. As regards the latter, he notes that 'On a practical level, taxation increasingly is used as a stick to convince industry to accept cap and trade emissions trading programmes'. Typically, firms accepting an absolute cap and participation in cap-and-trade programmes are exempted from environmental or carbon taxes as evidenced in the UK where companies accepting to participate in the ET scheme are exempted up to 80% of the UK climate change levy. The criteria applied in the evaluation of emissions trading are typified by the paper by Boemare and Quirion (2001). They assess the Commission's proposal in some detail, and touch on 10 other schemes from a variety of perspectives, including number of participants and spatial coverage and permit allocation. For each theme, they set out the relevant theoretical framework and its implications, and then assess practise. The parts of their template which address competitiveness, co- operation and market power provides a convenient framework into which to incorporate some of the relevant political economy issues that were addressed in the research literature presented at the workshops

  7. Political Economy of Tradeable Permits. Competitiveness, Co-operation and Market Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Convery, F.J.; Dunne, L.; Redmond, L.; Ryan, L.B. [Department of Environmental Studies, University College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2003-07-01

    occurrence of the initiation of our workshop series with publication of these proposals was fortuitous, and provided a continuing deliberative thread to our workshops as they unfolded. The formal withdrawal from the Kyoto Process by the US added another dimension which was incorporated into the research agenda. Our brief did not confine us to climate change or indeed to Europe, but inevitably much of our focus was shaped by these developments. In Venice, Egenhofer (2001) provided a very comprehensive 'state of the art' as regards the theory and (especially) the practise of emissions trading, and its links with other policy instruments, notably taxation. As regards the latter, he notes that 'On a practical level, taxation increasingly is used as a stick to convince industry to accept cap and trade emissions trading programmes'. Typically, firms accepting an absolute cap and participation in cap-and-trade programmes are exempted from environmental or carbon taxes as evidenced in the UK where companies accepting to participate in the ET scheme are exempted up to 80% of the UK climate change levy. The criteria applied in the evaluation of emissions trading are typified by the paper by Boemare and Quirion (2001). They assess the Commission's proposal in some detail, and touch on 10 other schemes from a variety of perspectives, including number of participants and spatial coverage and permit allocation. For each theme, they set out the relevant theoretical framework and its implications, and then assess practise. The parts of their template which address competitiveness, co- operation and market power provides a convenient framework into which to incorporate some of the relevant political economy issues that were addressed in the research literature presented at the workshops.

  8. Volume measurement of the leg with the depth camera for quantitative evaluation of edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyomitsu, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kamijo, Naohiro; Ogawa, Keiko; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    Volume measurement of the leg is important in the evaluation of leg edema. Recently, method for measurement by using a depth camera is proposed. However, many depth cameras are expensive. Therefore, we propose a method using Microsoft Kinect. We obtain a point cloud of the leg by Kinect Fusion technique and calculate the volume. We measured the volume of leg for three healthy students during three days. In each measurement, the increase of volume was confirmed from morning to evening. It is known that the volume of leg is increased in doing office work. Our experimental results meet this expectation.

  9. Technical co-operation report for 2002. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    General Conference resolution GC(46)/RES/10 reiterated the need to strengthen the technical co- operation programme and requested the Director General to report to the Board of Governors periodically and to the General Conference at its forty-seventh (2003) session on the implementation of resolution GC(46)/RES/10. Part A of this report responds to the General Conference resolution by providing an overview of the progress achieved in technical co-operation policies, strategies, working relations, and internal management during the period 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2003, as well as the major new challenges facing the technical co-operation programme. Part B reports on operational activities and programme performance at the country and regional levels during the calendar year 2002, and Part C reviews the use of financial and human resources in the programme at an aggregate level. As part of its efforts to refine policies for improving programme development, the Agency reviewed the Technical Co-operation Strategy in 2002. The resulting document, The Technical Co-operation Strategy: the 2002 Review (document GOV/INF/2002/8/Mod.1), states that the strategic goal originally identified in the Strategy in 1997 remains valid, and defines four objectives to guide the technical co-operation programme: applying the central criterion (strong government commitment), developing strategic partnerships, increasing the level of funding for technical co-operation, and promoting greater sustainability and self-reliance of nuclear institutions. In line with the Technical Co-operation Strategy, one of the key features of the Agency.s work in 2002 was continuing consultations with Member States at both the policy and operational levels on the management of the ongoing technical co-operation programme and on planning for future activities. The dialogue with Member States aimed at clarifying the strategic objectives and key tools for the utilization of resources to achieve maximum

  10. Critical Evaluation of Blood Volume Measurements during Hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dasselaar, Judith J.; van der Sande, Frank M.; Franssen, Casper F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Devices that continuously measure relative blood volume (RBV) changes during hemodialysis (HD) are increasingly used for the prevention of dialysis hypotension and fine-tuning of dry weight. However, RBV measurements are subject to various limitations. First, RBV devices provide information on

  11. Evaluation of surface quality by Fractal Dimension and Volume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental and simulation results have enabled to show than the large diameter ball under low loads and medium feed speeds, favors the elimination of peaks and reduction of fractal dimension whence quality improvement of surface. Keywords: burnishing, volume parameters, fractal dimension, experimental designs ...

  12. Letter to editor Platelet volume evaluation in patients with sepsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I have read the article published by Guclu et al. with a great interest.1 They examined platelet indices in patients with sepsis. Mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet distribution width (PDW) were significantly higher in patients with sepsis than in controls. MPV and PDW were significantly higher in patients with severe ...

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  14. International co-operation in the supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievering, N.F. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Recent changes in the United States' nuclear policy, in recognition of the increased proliferation risk, have raised questions of US intentions in international nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle service co-operation. This paper details those intentions in relation to the key elements of the new policy. In the past, the USA has been a world leader in peaceful nuclear co-operation with other nations and, mindful of the relationships between civilian nuclear technology and nuclear weapon proliferation, remains strongly committed to the Non-Proliferation Treaty, IAEA safeguards and other elements concerned with international nuclear affairs. Now, in implementing President Carter's nuclear initiatives, the USA will continue its leading role in nuclear fuel and fuel-cycle co-operation in two ways, (1) by increasing its enrichment capacity for providing international LWR fuel supplies and (2) by taking the lead in solving the problems of near and long-term spent fuel storage and disposal. Beyond these specific steps, the USA feels that the international community's past efforts in controlling the proliferation risks of nuclear power are necessary but inadequate for the future. Accordingly, the USA urges other similarly concerned nations to pause with present developments and to join in a programme of international co-operation and participation in a re-assessment of future plans which would include: (1) Mutual assessments of fuel cycles alternative to the current uranium/plutonium cycle for LWRs and breeders, seeking to lessen proliferation risks; (2) co-operative mechanisms for ensuring the ''front-end'' fuel supply including uranium resource exploration, adequate enrichment capacity, and institutional arrangements; (3) means of dealing with short-, medium- and long-term spent fuel storage needs by means of technical co-operation and assistance and possibly establishment of international storage or repository facilities; and (4) for reprocessing plants, and related fuel

  15. Treatment plan evaluation using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and spatial dose-volume histogram (zDVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Das, Indra J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The dose-volume histogram (DVH) has been accepted as a tool for treatment-plan evaluation. However, DVH lacks spatial information. A new concept, the z-dependent dose-volume histogram (zDVH), is presented as a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning to provide the spatial variation, as well as the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest. Materials and Methods: Three-dimensional dose calculations were carried out with various plans for three disease sites: lung, breast, and prostate. DVHs were calculated for the entire volume. A zDVH is defined as a differential dose-volume histogram with respect to a computed tomographic (CT) slice position. In this study, zDVHs were calculated for each CT slice in the treatment field. DVHs and zDVHs were compared. Results: In the irradiation of lung, DVH calculation indicated that the treatment plan satisfied the dose-volume constraint placed on the lung and zDVH of the lung revealed that a sizable fraction of the lung centered about the central axis (CAX) received a significant dose, a situation that warranted a modification of the treatment plan due to the removal of one lung. In the irradiation of breast with tangential fields, the DVH showed that about 7% of the breast volume received at least 110% of the prescribed dose (PD) and about 11% of the breast received less than 98% PD. However, the zDVHs of the breast volume in each of seven planes showed the existence of high-dose regions of 34% and 15%, respectively, of the volume in the two caudal-most planes and cold spots of about 40% in the two cephalic planes. In the treatment planning of prostate, DVHs showed that about 15% of the bladder and 40% of the rectum received 102% PD, whereas about 30% of the bladder and 50% of the rectum received the full dose. Taking into account the hollow structure of both the bladder and the rectum, the dose-surface histograms (DSH) showed larger hot-spot volume, about

  16. Preoperative evaluation of liver volume parameters in living related donors by spiral computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, M.; Pacho, R.; Pruszynski, B.; Paluszkiewicz, R.; Hevelke, P.; Krawczyk, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess the use of spiral computed tomography in the evaluation of the volume of the liver, its lobes, and selected segments in the preoperative period and to validate the used measurements. Thirty five potential donors (15 women and 20 men) aged 21-65 years were included. Based on the CT liver findings in the venous-portal phase and segment division of the liver according Couinaud the liver volume was calculated manually be a planimetric method, after making outlines of all liver sections. The volumes of lobes and selected segments were assessed by the same technique. The volumes of the resected liver segments calculated based on the CT findings were compared with appropriate measurements made during the operation. The total liver volume ranged between 804 and 1842 cm 3 (mean - 1456 cm 3 , standard deviation [SD] - 247). The volume of the right liver lobe including caudate lobe was 555 cm 3 to 1382 cm 3 (mean - 1024, SD - 186) that is in average 70.4% of the total liver volume. The volume of the left liver lobe ranged between 156 and 778 cm 3 (mean - 431, SD - 123) that is in average 29.6% of the total liver volume. The volume of segments 2+3 was 72 to 426 cm 3 (mean - 237 cm 3 , SD - 79) that is in average 16.2% of the total liver volume. The volume of the segment 4 ranged between 84 and 366 cm 3 (mean - 196, SD - 70) that is in average 13.4% of the total liver volume. CT makes possible to assess the volume of the liver, of its lobes and selected segments and it is an important modality for the classification of method of operation (segmentectomy, left hepatectomy, right hepatectomy). This method is accurate and reproducible. The liver part volumes calculated preoperatively in the majority of cases revealed to be smaller than in reality in average of 12.1%. (author)

  17. Regional long-term co-operation in the field of nuclear and radiation emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladek, V.; Metke, E.; Janko, K.; Hohenberg, J. K.; Hofer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally covered by methodical and coordinative activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Member States of the IAEA and by the European Commission (EC) in EU Member and EU Accession Countries. However, the regional harmonisation of emergency arrangements is an important trend of emergency preparedness. The present paper gives a couple of illustrative examples for a regional co-operation in the field of emergency preparedness in Central Europe and an overview on international exercises in this region. The penultimate section contains an outlook on future activities regarding regional co-operation in Central Europe. The following topics have been suggested inter alia: the harmonisation of intervention criteria and countermeasures, co-ordination in the field of information of the public, comprehensive bi lateral and multilateral exercises, exchange of experts between the national nuclear emergency centres and inter-comparison calculations of the computer codes. (authors)

  18. Local climate activities in co-operation between municipality, civil society and science shop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    The Science Shop at DTU co-operates with the local municipal administration and the local branch of an environmental NGO about climate change. The co-operation was initiated by a proposal to the Science Shop from the municipal administration. Since the Science Shop requests civil society...... involvement in projects it was proposed to involve the local branch of the environmental NGO. The starting point was topics developed by the administration and the NGO together and announced to students as part of the Science Shop project supply. The focus is climate impact of local activities and strategies...... are initiated and co-ordinated by a group with members from municipal administration, the local NGO and the Science Shop. All projects have involved student projects, but most projects have also contributed to ongoing research activities. The projects up till now have focused on the municipal food supply...

  19. Cross-border Co-operation and Policy Networks in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trémolières, Marie; Walther, Olivier

    This publication examines how policy actors involved in cross-border co-operation contribute to the regional integration process in West Africa. It uses a pioneering methodology, known as social network analysis, to visualise the formal and informal relationships between actors involved in cross...... West Africa to develop cross-border initiatives in a number of ways. Combining these two analyses with the perceptions of regional policy makers as to which border areas they consider as priorities for regional integration, the publication concludes with the analytical foundations for more effective......-border policy networks, showing that borders have notable and diverse impacts on exchanges of information and the relative power of networks. The report then analyses a range of regional indicators of co-operation potential, visually demonstrating that borders can also affect the ability of sub-regions within...

  20. Technical co-operation report for 1999. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities in 1999 and covers three separate topics. Part I reports on the Strengthening of TC and looks at the elements of the TC Strategy and how they contributed to the TC Programme. Part II reports on the major achievements of the TC Programme in 1999 in different regions of the world. In addition to reviewing some of the results of national and regional activities in each region - including activities under Regional Co-operation Agreements - this section looks at three interregional projects, and provides highlights of selected projects that were closed in 1999. Part III presents a technical discussion of the financial parameters of the TC Programme. A more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements, and non-financial indicators is provided in a Supplement to this report.

  1. Technical co-operation report for 1999. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities in 1999 and covers three separate topics. Part I reports on the Strengthening of TC and looks at the elements of the TC Strategy and how they contributed to the TC Programme. Part II reports on the major achievements of the TC Programme in 1999 in different regions of the world. In addition to reviewing some of the results of national and regional activities in each region - including activities under Regional Co-operation Agreements - this section looks at three interregional projects, and provides highlights of selected projects that were closed in 1999. Part III presents a technical discussion of the financial parameters of the TC Programme. A more detailed review of resources and contributions, disbursements, and non-financial indicators is provided in a Supplement to this report

  2. Power corrupts co-operation: cognitive and motivational effects in a double EEG paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanso, Riam; Hewstone, Miles; Hawkins, Erin; Waszczuk, Monika; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of interpersonal power on co-operative performance. We used a paired electro-encephalogram paradigm: pairs of participants performed an attention task, followed by feedback indicating monetary loss or gain on every trial. Participants were randomly allocated to the power-holder, subordinate or neutral group by creating different levels of control over how a joint monetary reward would be allocated. We found that power was associated with reduced behavioural accuracy. Event-related potential analysis showed that power-holders devoted less motivational resources to their targets than did subordinates or neutrals, but did not differ at the level of early conflict detection. Their feedback potential results showed a greater expectation of rewards but reduced subjective magnitude attributed to losses. Subordinates, on the other hand, were asymmetrically sensitive to power-holders' targets. They expected fewer rewards, but attributed greater significance to losses. Our study shows that power corrupts balanced co-operation with subordinates.

  3. Allograft cytotoxicity co-operation between alloimmune T cells and macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Jones, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    T cells from the spleens of C57BL 10 (H-2sup(b)) mice 7 to 12 days after immunization with P815Y (H-2sup(d)) mastocytoma cells have been shown to co-operate synergistically with an adherent component of non-immune starch induced peritoneal cells in the cytostasis of target cells. Although significant values for synergy could be obtained using the ( 125 I) UdR incorporation assay to measure cytostasis, normal peritoneal cells were incapable of co-operating with T cells in cytolysis as measured by 51 Cr release from pre-labelled target cells. Initially, the synergistic interaction was immunologically specific, but non-specific activity could be induced by challenge with specific antigen. (author)

  4. Action plan for Nordic energy co-operation 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Action Plan for Nordic Energy Co-operation 2006-2009 is targeted at creating a visible and sustainable contribution to solving the most important and politically most relevant energy policy challenges faced by the Nordic region. The plan concentrates on three main areas: Energy markets; Sustainable energy system; and Nordic impact on the international agenda. The Action Plan is the energy sector's contribution to the implementation of the Nordic strategy 'Sustainable Development - New Bearing for the Nordic Countries' and to a number of the Nordic Council's recommendations for the development of the Nordic energy sector. An important element of the implementation of the action plan is on-going contact and information sharing between the Nordic Energy Policy co-operation and the Nordic Energy Research. The continues dialogue between the Nordic Council of Energy Ministers and The Nordic Council on future energy policy challenges will likewise be an important part of the political process. (BA)

  5. Fermi motion versus co-operative effects in subthreshold pion and energetic gamma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, J.

    1986-06-01

    Various reaction mechanisms proposed to explain the production of pions at 'sub-threshold' energies and of energetic gammas are examined. They range from the nucleon-nucleon single collision mechanism to a co-operative multi-nucleon process. With a shell model prescription for the initial state energies the single collision picture cannot explain the data. The participation of many nucleons in the pion production process appears to be necessary. We present a statistical model which demands the co-operative action of several of the target and projectile nucleons in the pion production process. The formation of composite fragments alongside with the produced pion is seen to be vital to understand the experimental data within this model. (orig.)

  6. Asian regional co-operative project on food irradiation: Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    These Proceedings include the final reports of work performed by different institutions under the scope of Phase II of the Asian Regional Co-operative Project on Food Irradiation. The topics covered include the disinfestation and decontamination of stored products; improvements in the hygiene of processed seafood; insect disinfestation of fruits; and sprout inhibition of root crops. The individual presentations are indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. International co-operation: a condition for further development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenet, P.

    1994-01-01

    For two main reasons, loss of confidence in nuclear energy and loss of competitiveness, nuclear programmes are in recession, although the very high level of safety and reliability of NPP operation. Efficient co-operation among nuclear operators world wide in order to reach the highest possible standard everywhere. The mission of WANO is to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of NPPs by exchanging information and encouraging comparison, emulation and communication among its members. (author)

  8. Activities co-operations on nuclear data in China in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Dunjiu

    1992-01-01

    The activities and co-operations on nuclear data in 1991 are introduced briefly. The meetings which were held by CNDC in 1991 are listed. The international meetings, workshops or training courses in the nuclear data field which were attended by chinese scientists in 1991 are presented. The international meeting held in China, the international cooperation projects during 1985 ∼ 1991 and the foreign scientists in nuclear fields visited CNDC/CIAE in 1991 are also described

  9. Co-operation of digital nonlinear equalizers and soft-decision LDPC FEC in nonlinear transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Takahito; Oda, Shoichiro; Hoshida, Takeshi; Aoki, Yasuhiko; Tao, Zhenning; Rasmussen, Jens C

    2013-12-30

    We experimentally and numerically investigated the characteristics of 128 Gb/s dual polarization - quadrature phase shift keying signals received with two types of nonlinear equalizers (NLEs) followed by soft-decision (SD) low-density parity-check (LDPC) forward error correction (FEC). Successful co-operation among SD-FEC and NLEs over various nonlinear transmissions were demonstrated by optimization of parameters for NLEs.

  10. Introductory statement at the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Committee of the Board of Governors. Vienna, 17 November 2003 [As delivered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2003-01-01

    The IAEA's technical co-operation (TC) programme is focused on putting advanced science to work to meet the economic and social needs of developing countries. The TC planning process is briefly discussed, including recent evaluation results; highlighting of a number of key activities; and reviewing the current status of TC implementation and funding. The areas of activity include: The use of radiotherapy in cancer treatment; isotope hydrology; monitoring coastal and marine environment; plant breeding applications. Program implementation as well as program funding is discussed. The Agency is also working to reinforce technical co-operation among developing countries (TCDC), that is, the pooling of resources and expertise in areas of mutual benefit. It is stated that the TC programme has become a powerful tool for transferring nuclear science and technology to developing countries. But only if we work together in partnership can we ensure the success of the programme. I look forward to the continuation and further development of that partnership

  11. Experiences in Regional Cross Border Co-operation in River Management. Comparing Three Cases at the Dutch–German Border

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, M.A.; Verwijmeren, J.A.; Lulofs, K.; Feld, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cross border co-operation is increasingly viewed as an obvious and logical consequence of an integrated perspective on river management. Consequently, we would expect an increase of cross border co-operation and collaboration in EU member states, through joint planning, co-management or

  12. 'Co-operation and Communism cannot work side by side': Organized Consumers and the Early Cold War in Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Peter

    2018-04-02

    This article contributes to a better understanding of labour anti-communism in Britain through an exploration of the evolution of ideas and attitudes within the co-operative movement during the early Cold War. It demonstrates that the period witnessed an increasingly rigid separation of co-operation from communism and argues that this separation made it harder for activists within the co-operative movement to imagine a total or utopian alternative to capitalism. Drawing particularly on a close reading of the co-operative press as well as other sources, the study is divided into three main parts. The first section discusses sympathy among co-operators for the achievements of the Soviet Union, which increased during the war against fascism. The article then moves on to consider the continuing dialogue between British co-operators and their counterparts in European communist states and how international tensions shaped co-operators' views. The final major section explores the hardening of attitude towards communism after Marshall Aid was declared in June 1947, and underlines the role played by figures such as A. V. Alexander and Jack Bailey who worked with the Information Research Department at the Foreign Office to spread anti-communism within the movement. The conclusion reflects, more speculatively, on what implications this shift may have had for the medium and long-term decline of co-operation and the hegemony of capitalist consumerism post-war.

  13. Institutional and scientific co-operation, networking and capacity building in the field of food safety and quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Meerdink, G.; Banati, D.; Marvin, H.J.P.; Kuiper, H.A.; Houtman, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper explains the situation in Hungary and The Netherlands regarding scientific co-operation, networking and capacity building in the field of food quality and safety. Specific details are given about institutional co-operation including exchanges between staff and students, collaborative

  14. Evaluation of the accuracy of ventricular volume measurement by ultrafast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei; Dai Ruping; Guo Yuyin

    1997-01-01

    The authors evaluated the accuracy of ventricular volume measured by ultrafast CT (UFCT); and (2) compared the value of ventricular volume derived from long- and short-axis view. Fourteen human left ventricular casts and 15 right ventricular casts were scanned by Imatron C-150 scanner along both the long- and short-axis. The scan protocol was similar to that used in vivo. Eight 7 mm-thick slices were obtained from each cast for both long- and short-axis views. Ventricular volume was determined by the modified Simpson's rule provided by Inamtron Inc. The actual volumes of the ventricular casts were determined by the amount of water displacement by the cast. The actual volumes for left and right ventricles were 55.57 +- 28.91 ml and 64.23 +- 24.51 ml, respectively, the left and right ventricular volumes determined by UFCT were 66.50 +- 33.04 ml and 76.47 +-28.70 ml from long-axis view, and 60.36 +- 29.90 ml and 75.36 +- 28.73 ml from short-axis view, respectively. The measurements by UFCT were significantly greater than the actual volumes of the casts, both for the left and right ventricles (P 0.990). Both left and right ventricular volumes can be determined by UFCT with identical accuracy for both long- and short-axis views in calculating ventricular volume; however, overestimation of ventricular volume by UFCT should be noted

  15. The evaluation of gallbladder contractibility for volume measurement by helical 3D-CT-cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Katsuro; Kimura, Hideaki; Kayashima, Yasuyo; Suemoto, Kouichiro; Makihata, Hiroshi; Maruhashi, Akira; Ohya, Toshihide; Ito, Katsuhide; Shen, Yun.

    1997-01-01

    As a new application of helical (spiral) scan, volume measurement has received a significant interest. Although it is important to evaluate gallbladder contractibility to decide on a treatment plan for a gallbladder lesion, qualitative analysis of gallbladder contractibility is very difficult owing to the fact that the volume of gallbladder can not be measured using usual DIC examination (plain X-P and tomography). In this study, the accuracy of volume measurement of helical CT was checked firstly by gallbladder phantom experiments. Then 128 cases of volume measurement of helical 3D CT Cholangiography (DIC-CT) were performed. Under the conditions of optimized scan technique (3 mm TH, 3 mm/s, 1 mm recon interval, Hispeed, GEMS), the difference of contractibility was obtained between clinical cases with and without thick wall. The experiment has shown that helical 3D CT volume measurement is very simple and highly accurate method which is useful for the evaluation of gallbladder contractibility. (author)

  16. Technical co-operation report for 2001. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Using nuclear technology as an effective tool for development is the challenge faced by the Agency's technical co-operation programme. This was the subject of the 4th IAEA Scientific Forum, entitled 'Nuclear technology for sustainable development: serving human needs,' which was held in conjunction with the 45th General Conference in September 2001. Opening the Forum, Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Harvard University emphasized the importance of developing mechanisms to mobilize science and technology to meet the growing challenge of serving human needs in a sustainable manner and commended the Agency for its achievements in this regard. This report provides information on how the technical co-operation programme has responded to that challenge over the past year. One of the highlights of the technical co-operation programme in 2001 was the launching of the Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in October. This represented the culmination of years of effort by African Member States, working in partnership with the Agency and the Organization for African Unity (OAU), and was an important milestone in the progress of applying the sterile insect technique (SIT) to the area-wide eradication of the tsetse fly in Africa. It is a good example of how science and technology can contribute to socio-economic development with a direct impact at the community level. The level of Member States' pledges to the Technical Co-operation Fund (TCF) for 2001, more than $59 million, was the second highest ever. This represented a rate of attainment of 80.01% (as of 31 March 2002), thus achieving the target set by the General Conference for that year. The extra budgetary contributions, more than $7 million, were the highest in ten years. These contributions, together with payments of assessed programme costs and other income, meant that total new resources for the year reached $71.1 million. In December 2000, the Board approved an

  17. Technical co-operation report for 2001. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Using nuclear technology as an effective tool for development is the challenge faced by the Agency's technical co-operation programme. This was the subject of the 4th IAEA Scientific Forum, entitled 'Nuclear technology for sustainable development: serving human needs,' which was held in conjunction with the 45th General Conference in September 2001. Opening the Forum, Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Harvard University emphasized the importance of developing mechanisms to mobilize science and technology to meet the growing challenge of serving human needs in a sustainable manner and commended the Agency for its achievements in this regard. This report provides information on how the technical co-operation programme has responded to that challenge over the past year. One of the highlights of the technical co-operation programme in 2001 was the launching of the Pan-African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC) in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, in October. This represented the culmination of years of effort by African Member States, working in partnership with the Agency and the Organization for African Unity (OAU), and was an important milestone in the progress of applying the sterile insect technique (SIT) to the area-wide eradication of the tsetse fly in Africa. It is a good example of how science and technology can contribute to socio-economic development with a direct impact at the community level. The level of Member States' pledges to the Technical Co-operation Fund (TCF) for 2001, more than $59 million, was the second highest ever. This represented a rate of attainment of 80.01% (as of 31 March 2002), thus achieving the target set by the General Conference for that year. The extra budgetary contributions, more than $7 million, were the highest in ten years. These contributions, together with payments of assessed programme costs and other income, meant that total new resources for the year reached $71.1 million. In December 2000, the Board approved an

  18. Economic evaluation of closure CAP barrier materials Volume I and Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    This study prepared by the Site Geotechnical Services (SGS) and Environmental Restoration (ER) departments of the WSRC evaluates a generic closure cover system for a hazardous waste site, using 10 different surface areas, ranging from 0.1 acre to 80 acres, and 12 barrier materials. This study presents a revision to the previous study (Rev. 0) published in June 1993, under the same title. The objective of this study was to revise the previous study by incorporating four additional site sizes into the evaluation process and identifying the most cost-effective barrier material for a given closure cover system at the SRS

  19. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II

  20. Strengthening the Radiation Protection System in Cuba (SRPS - Cuba). A co-operation project between Cuban and Swedish institutions, February 2001 - June 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Prendes, Miguel; Zerquera, Juan Tomas

    2004-02-01

    This project results from the co-operation between a number of Cuban and Swedish institutions. It started in February 2001 and ended in June 2003 and was made possible thanks to the contributions of the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency (SIDA), the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Cuba (CPHR), and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The overall objective was to strengthen the radiation protection system in Cuba, and in this way contribute with the control and reduction of risks to man and the environment from exposures to ionizing radiation. The project focused on four priority areas: 1) Protection of workers and patients exposed to radiation in radiation practices; 2) Preparedness for response to an emergency situation; 3) Environmental radiological protection; and, 4) Exposure to radiation in areas with high levels of natural radioactivity. The present report summarizes the findings of the whole project period, providing an overview of the overall achievements, as well as listing its deliverables. The results of an evaluation of the project, conducted during the final workshop, are also included. The report ends with a list of generic and specific conclusions and recommendations for implementation of the project's achievements and for further development of co-operation.

  1. Strengthening the Radiation Protection System in Cuba (SRPS - Cuba). A co-operation project between Cuban and Swedish institutions, February 2001 - June 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Larsson, Carl-Magnus; Prendes, Miguel; Zerquera, Juan Tomas

    2004-02-01

    This project results from the co-operation between a number of Cuban and Swedish institutions. It started in February 2001 and ended in June 2003 and was made possible thanks to the contributions of the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency (SIDA), the Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Cuba (CPHR), and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The overall objective was to strengthen the radiation protection system in Cuba, and in this way contribute with the control and reduction of risks to man and the environment from exposures to ionizing radiation. The project focused on four priority areas: 1) Protection of workers and patients exposed to radiation in radiation practices; 2) Preparedness for response to an emergency situation; 3) Environmental radiological protection; and, 4) Exposure to radiation in areas with high levels of natural radioactivity. The present report summarizes the findings of the whole project period, providing an overview of the overall achievements, as well as listing its deliverables. The results of an evaluation of the project, conducted during the final workshop, are also included. The report ends with a list of generic and specific conclusions and recommendations for implementation of the project's achievements and for further development of co-operation

  2. Co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the development of different reactor types, including certain aspects of their nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasenkov, A.; Barbur, I.; Barchenkov, A.; Molnar, L.; Tolpygo, V.; Khake, V.; Shcherbinin, B.

    1977-01-01

    The report gives an account of the problems of the projected development of atomic power and evaluates its role in the fuel and power complex and long-range development of interconnected power systems of the CMEA member countries. The report emphasizes the importance of scientific and technical co-operation in the creation of thermal and fast-neutron power reactors with 1000-1500MW(e) units, and in the elaboration of nuclear plants for heating services. The positive experience of the international scientific and research group of scientists of the CMEA member countries carrying out reactor-physics studies on critical assemblies is mentioned. The report contains basic conclusions from the forecasts for nuclear power in the CMEA member countries up to 1990, including forecasting methodology; the role of nuclear power plants in saving natural and enriched uranium for a projected period; and the impact of nuclear power development rates on its structure (thermal and fast reactor ratio). It lists the impacts of scientific and technical co-operation of the CMEA member countries on the fuel cycle, including the transport of spent nuclear fuel, its recovery, reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal. Particular effects of co-operation of the CMEA member countries on the radiation safety of nuclear power plants and environmental protection are analysed. The report notes the role of the international economic associations Interatomenergo and Interatominstrument in the accelerated development of nuclear power. (author)

  3. Sigmoid Colon Elongation Evaluation by Volume Rendering Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla SENAYLI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid colons have various measurements, shapes, and configurations for individuals. In this subject there are rare clinical trials to answer the question of sigmoidal colon maldevelopment predicting a risk for volvulus. Therefore, sigmoid colon measurement may be beneficial to decide for volvulus. In a study, sigmoid colon diameters were evaluated during abdominal surgeries and it was found that median length was 47 cm and median vertical mesocolon length was 13 cm. We report a 14-year-old female patient who has a sigmoidal colon measured as nearly 54 cm. We used tomographic equipments for this evaluation. We know that MRI technique was used for this purpose but, there has not been data for MRI predicting the sigmoidal volvulus. We hope that our findings by this evaluation can contribute to insufficient literature of sigmoidal elongation. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 71-73

  4. Postprandial hepatic volume change: spiral CT evaluation in case of liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Kwang Suk; Moon, Jang Il; Ko, Myong Kwan; Byun, Joo Nam; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Young Chol; Oh, Jae Hee

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of evaluating liver cirrhosis through the measurement of liver volume. In a control group(20 normal subjects) and 20 cirrhotic patients, variations in liver volume before and after a meal were obtained. A case-control study was conducted between the two groups. In the control group, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 67-186ml. Mean increased liver volume was 119.3ml, the range of percentage increase was 6-12.4% and the mean percentage increase was 9.89%. In cirrhotic patients, the range of increased liver volume after the meal was 1-20ml. Mean increase liver volume was 6.9ml, the range of percentage increase was 0-1.9% and the mean percentage increase was 0.65%. Compared with the control group, cirrhotic patients showed a much smaller increase in liver volume(p<0.01). Difference in variation of liver volume between a control group and cirrhotic patients before and after a meal can be used for the evaluation of liver cirrhosis

  5. Evaluation of R and D volume 2 number 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, F.; Cheah, C.; Dalpe, R.; O'Brecht, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Canadian newsletter on the evaluation of research and development. This issue contains an econometric assessment of the impact of Research and Development programs, the choosing of the location of pharmaceutical Research and Development, the industry's scientific publications, the standards as a strategic instrument, and how much future Research and Development can an organization justify

  6. HTGR plant availability and reliability evaluations. Volume II. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, G.J.; Hannaman, G.W.; Jacobsen, F.K.; Stokely, R.J.

    1976-12-01

    Information is presented in the following areas: methodology of identifying components and systems important for availability studies, failure modes and effects analyses, quantitative evaluations, comparison with experience, estimated cost of plant unavailability, and probabilistic use of interest formulas for rare events

  7. The ethics of conducting a co-operative inquiry with vulnerable people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen R; Lathlean, Judith A

    2004-09-01

    Mental health services users have been calling for greater participation in clinical research. Participation in this context means research 'with' rather than 'on' groups of people. Conducting a co-operative inquiry involving the participation of vulnerable individuals as co-researchers, in particular those with a history of mental health problems, places an obligation on researchers to articulate and justify sound ethical procedures. The aim of this paper is to consider how the ethical issues encountered when conducting participative research with vulnerable people can be addressed in the implementation of a co-operative inquiry with users of mental health services. The study was based on personal reflection and a critical review of associated literature obtained from a database search using Boolean logic. The findings, presented under the headings of the four prima facie moral principles, suggest the need for researchers using participative approaches to demonstrate the humanistic attributes required for engaging and working with people over a period of time. These include building and maintaining trusting relationships, assessing competence to participate, managing interpersonal and group dynamics and making complex collaborative decisions about participants' continued participation in a study. When using a co-operative inquiry approach involving vulnerable individuals, researchers need to demonstrate clearly how a balance between autonomy and paternalism will be achieved, how risks will be anticipated and managed and how fairness will be maintained throughout all procedures. Researchers using participative approaches need to have developed a level of personal insight and self-awareness through access to supervision which focuses on sources of unintended manipulation and interpersonal dynamics that may arise at the inception of a study and throughout its course. Researchers and ethics committees have a shared responsibility to ensure that vulnerable people are

  8. SIRU utilization. Volume 1: Theory, development and test evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musoff, H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory, development, and test evaluations of the Strapdown Inertial Reference Unit (SIRU) are discussed. The statistical failure detection and isolation, single position calibration, and self alignment techniques are emphasized. Circuit diagrams of the system components are provided. Mathematical models are developed to show the performance characteristics of the subsystems. Specific areas of the utilization program are identified as: (1) error source propagation characteristics and (2) local level navigation performance demonstrations.

  9. Evaluation of dose-volume histograms after prostate seed implantation. 4-year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoinkis, C.; Lehmann, D.; Winkler, C.; Herrmann, T.; Hakenberg, O.W.; Wirth, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: permanent interstitial brachytherapy by seed implantation is a treatment alternative for low-volume low-risk prostate cancer and a complex interdisciplinary treatment with a learning curve. Dose-volume histograms are used to assess postimplant quality. The authors evaluated their learning curve based on dose-volume histograms and analyzed factors influencing implantation quality. Patients and methods: since 1999, 38 patients with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were treated at the authors' institution with seed implantation using palladium-103 or iodine-125, initially using the preplan method and later real-time planning. Postimplant CT was performed after 4 weeks. The dose-volume indices D90, V100, V150, the D max of pre- and postplans, and the size and position of the volume receiving the prescribed dose (high-dose volume) of the postplans were evaluated. In six patients, postplan imaging both by CT and MRI was used and prostate volumes were compared with preimplant transrectal ultrasound volumes. The first five patients were treated under external supervision. Results: patients were divided into three consecutive groups for analysis of the learning curve (group 1: n = 5 patients treated under external supervision; group 2: n = 13 patients; group 3: n = 20 patients). D90 post for the three groups were 79.3%, 74.2%, and 99.9%, the V100 post were 78.6%, 73.5%, and 88.2%, respectively. The relationship between high-dose volume and prostate volume showed a similar increase as the D90, while the relationship between high-dose volume lying outside the prostate and prostate volume remained constant. The ratio between prostate volumes from transrectal ultrasound and CT imaging decreased with increasing D90 post , while the preplanning D90 and V100 remained constant. The different isotopes used, the method of planning, and the implanted activity per prostate volume did not influence results. Conclusion: a learning curve characterized by an increase

  10. A New Space for a New Generation: The Rise of Co-operatives Amongst Young People in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Sally Ann

    2011-01-01

    One of the most pressing challenges for the co-operative movement today is how it can engage with and support the aspirations of young people. A new paper, A New Space For a New Generation: The Rise of Co-operatives Amongst Young People in Africa, by doctoral researcher Sally Hartley, highlights some of the innovative ways in which this engagement is being fostered in Africa today and how co-operatives provide not just opportunities for gaining an income but play a vital educational role. \\ud...

  11. Celebrating Co-operation among Saskatchewan’s Libraries: The Multitype Library Board, 1996-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Shires

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Saskatchewan’s Multitype Library Board (MLB celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2016. It was established under the passage of the provincial government’s The Libraries Co- operation Act in 1996 to facilitate the co-operative development of the multitype library system in Saskatchewan. This legislation is unique in Canada. The MLB is a Minister of Education Advisory Board and it provides a forum to promote and facilitate co-operation among over 320 public libraries in 10 provincial systems, 25 post-secondary libraries, 755 school libraries, several special libraries, and other information providers. Major milestones of the MLB include helping to eliminate the Provincial Sales Tax on library subscriptions, establishing a provincial digitization plan, and creating a cross-sector database licensing program that has resulted in a projected value of 14.8 million dollars to Saskatchewan users in 2014. The development of the MLB and the impact of the programs it has initiated will be discussed, and recommendations for developing a collaborative initiative will be provided. Le Multitype Library Board (MLB de Saskatchewan fête son 20e anniversaire en 2016. Il était établi sous l’Acte The Libraries Co-operation du parti Libéral en 1996 pour faciliter le développement coopératif du système de bibliothèque Multitype en Saskatchewan. Cette législation est unique au Canada. Le MLB est un comité consultatif du ministère de l’Éducation et il fournit un forum pour promouvoir et faciliter la coopération entre plus de 320 bibliothèques publiques dans dix systèmes provinciaux, 25 bibliothèques postsecondaires, 755 bibliothèques scolaires, plusieurs bibliothèques spéciales, et d’autres fournisseurs d’informations. Les étapes importantes du MLB comprennent, à aider à éliminer les taxes de vente provinciale sur les abonnements aux bibliothèques, à établir un plan provincial de numérisation, et à créer un programme de licence

  12. Technical co-operation report for 1998. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities during 1998 and highlights most significant accomplishments. Part I of this report reviews the strengthening of TC, both in financial aspects and through implementation of the TC strategy. Part II reviews extensively the actual output of the TC programme; it looks at each geographic region, and reports on the results of national, regional and, where applicable, interregional activities in those regions. Part III presents a technical discussion of the financial parameters of the TC programme and ends with financial implementation summaries

  13. Technical co-operation report for 1998. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report presents the IAEA Technical Co-operation (TC) activities during 1998 and highlights most significant accomplishments. Part I of this report reviews the strengthening of TC, both in financial aspects and through implementation of the TC strategy. Part II reviews extensively the actual output of the TC programme; it looks at each geographic region, and reports on the results of national, regional and, where applicable, interregional activities in those regions. Part III presents a technical discussion of the financial parameters of the TC programme and ends with financial implementation summaries.

  14. Technical Co-operation Report for 1996. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Agency's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme made further progress during 1996 in implementing recent initiatives to strengthen efficiency and effectiveness. These initiatives seek to maximize the developmental contribution of counterpart institutions by emphasizing the management of technology to solve social and economic problems. The new direction has been embodied in the term ''Partners in Development''. The Partners in Development approach is reflected in last year's Report to the Board of Governors and the General Conference on Strengthening of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities, which provided an update on ongoing activities and elaborated new initiatives. The 1995 Technical Cooperation Report focused on the progress in implementing these initiatives. Next year, the Secretariat plans to combine the TC Report with the Report on Strengthening of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Activities in order to improve the clarity, consistency and economy of these presentations. Establishing a development partnership with Member States is the central goal of a new Strategy for TC. The refinement of this strategy required considerable effort during 1996, when the process first began to define objectives, targets and the means of accomplishing them. Alongside internal consultations, the role of SAGTAC became instrumental in reaching consensus on the main elements of the strategy. Future efforts include the formulation of implementation plans for the strategy. Once completed, the strategy will be presented to the TACC and Board in 1997. Reflecting these developments, section A of this Report presents the basic features of the TC Strategy, and the approach to be taken to achieve its objectives. The Strategy addresses among others the recommendations contained in resolution GC(40)/RES/13 on the Strengthening of Technical Co-operation: activities to improve the scientific and technological capabilities of developing countries; to achieve sustainable

  15. US evaluation of volume brain lesions produced by high-intensity focused US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chua, R.V.; Chua, G.T.; Fry, F.J.; Franklin, T.D.; Wills, E.R.; Hastings, J.S.; Sanghui, N.T.

    1987-01-01

    Eighteen volume brain lesions produced by high-intensity focused US in the right cerebral hemispheres of research canines were evaluated by diagnostic US from immediately after ablation up to 62 days later. Animals were killed and perfused for whole-brain recovery. US evaluation of whole-brain specimens was performed. Histologic analysis of brain sections verified lesion placement, size, and tissue response to US. These sections were compared with US studies for correlation data. Correlation data suggest that US visualization may aid in accurate placement of volume brain lesions and in evaluation of effects of high-intensity focuses US in normal brain

  16. Technical evaluation of Aerojet Energy Conversion Company's topical report on a mobile volume reduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henscheid, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes EG and G Idaho's review of Aerojet Energy Conversion Company's (AECC's) topical report on a Mobile Volume Reduction System. The review evaluated compliance with pertinent codes, standards and regulations. The initial review was discussed with AECC by EG and G Idaho and the NRC, and all outstanding issues resolved before this final evaluation was made

  17. Technical evaluation of the ATI volume reduction and bitumen solidification topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henscheid, J.W.; Young, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes EG and G Idaho's review of the Associated Technologies Inorporated (ATI) topical report on a Volume Reduction and Bitumen Solidification System. The review evaluated compliance with pertinent codes, standards and regulations. The initial review was discussed with ATI, and all outstanding issues resolved before this final evaluation was made

  18. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  19. Energy Extension Service Pilot Program: evaluation report after two years. Volume I. Evaluation summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    The EES pilot program was initiated in August 1977, when 10 states were selected on a competitive basis for participation. The pilot states (Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) devoted the first 6 months to start-up activities. This document is a follow-up report to the three volume Evaluation Summary of the first year of the pilot EES program published in September 1979. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the impacts and costs of the two years of the pilot program, and to check the consistency of findings over the two year period. The analysis addresses the following: (1) were the impact findings of Year I and Year II consistent, or did Year I and Year II attitudes and behavior vary. If variation existed, could it be attributed to program changes as the EES progressed from a start-up phase (Year I) to more normal service delivery (Year II); and (2) did costs of service delivery change (again reflecting start-up and normal service delivery costs). Did cost changes affect conclusions about the relative cost effectiveness of delivering services to different target audiences.

  20. Evaluation of R and D volume 2 number 3; Evaluation de la R-D. Volume 2, Numero 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, F; Cheah, C; Dalpe, R; O` Brecht, M [eds.

    1994-12-31

    A Canadian newsletter on the evaluation of research and development. This issue contains an econometric assessment of the impact of Research and Development programs, the choosing of the location of pharmaceutical Research and Development, the industry`s scientific publications, the standards as a strategic instrument, and how much future Research and Development can an organization justify.

  1. Role of Ultrasound Volume Measurements of Testes in Evaluation of Infertile Men with Azoospermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Seo, Ju Tae; Chun, Yi Keong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the usefulness of ultrasound determined testicular volume in the evaluation of the infertile men with azoospermia. A computerized search from October 2005 to June 2010 generated a list of 45 infertile men with azoospermia (mean age, 34 years: age range, 26-44 years) who underwent both scrotal ultrasound and testis biopsy. Ultrasound determined testicular volumes were compared between infertile men with obstructive azoospermia and those with non-obstructive azoospermia. Testicular volume for obstructive azoospermia ranged from 6.4 ml to 26.9 ml, with a median volume of 14.0 ml. This volume was significantly larger than that of those with non-obstructive azoospermia, which ranged from 1.0 ml to 12.8 ml, with a median volume of 6.1 ml (p < 0.001). The area under the ROC curve for distinguishing non-obstructive azoospermia from obstructive azoospermia using testicular volume was 0.91. A cutoff value of less than or equal to 11.4 ml could distinguish non-obstructive azoospermia from obstructive azoospermia, with a sensitivity of 94.1% (95% CI; 71.3-99.9%) and a specificity of 73.3% (95% CI; 54.1-87.7%). Ultrasound-determined testicular volume can be helpful in the differentiation of obstructive azoospermia from non-obstructive azoospermia

  2. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  3. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deuk Hee; Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm 3 which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way

  4. Scientific co-operation with IAEA in the field of marine radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bologa, S.Alexandru

    1998-01-01

    A short presentation of the communication presented in the Seminar on public information on peaceful uses of nuclear energy, NUCInfo'98, is given. It is emphasized the formation of RMRI specialists, its scientific co-operations with IAEA between 1986-1998 and participations in related scientific events. In the domain of specialists' formation there are mentioned the participation of members of the Institute in the training courses on marine radioecology, in the regional course on strategies and methodologies for applied marine radioactivity and environmental isotope studies for the Black Sea, and in the inter-regional course devoted to determination of radionuclides in environmental samples, held in 1986, 1994 and 1997, respectively. In the field of research co-operation there are presented the achievements obtained in the framework of five programs dealing mainly with monitoring of marine water, sediment and biota radioactivity in Romanian sector of Black Sea. Also reported are the participations and the contributions in the international scientific events devoted to marine environmental studies and the contributions to international databases

  5. Energy technology and opportunities for East-West co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, S.

    1991-01-01

    The private sector is probably the principal Western actor in Central and Eastern Europe. The accelerated political reforms in the East have improved the prospects for Western partners to invest in the energy sector and collaborate on energy technology development and transfer while taking advantage of the specific local benefits offered. These benefits are primarily found on the energy production side where the specific knowledge of the Western partner may be employed for the development of energy markets in the East. Conversely, the Central and Eastern European countries appear to be looking to co-operation with Western partners to provide them with access to capital, technology and organizational know-how, as well as, to Western markets. The primary long-term economic aim of Central and Eastern European governments must be to promote a market based economy. This requires not merely the definition of an official energy price system, but also the presence of legal and other institutions to establish property rights, civil contractual laws, trade policy and framework conditions for the free development of market forces and private enterprise. The IEA, International Energy Agency, as an example of the effectiveness of international co-operation, may be in the position to provide some assistance on technical and policy matters

  6. Power corrupts co-operation: cognitive and motivational effects in a double EEG paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanso, Riam; Hewstone, Miles; Hawkins, Erin; Waszczuk, Monika; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of interpersonal power on co-operative performance. We used a paired electro-encephalogram paradigm: pairs of participants performed an attention task, followed by feedback indicating monetary loss or gain on every trial. Participants were randomly allocated to the power-holder, subordinate or neutral group by creating different levels of control over how a joint monetary reward would be allocated. We found that power was associated with reduced behavioural accuracy. Event-related potential analysis showed that power-holders devoted less motivational resources to their targets than did subordinates or neutrals, but did not differ at the level of early conflict detection. Their feedback potential results showed a greater expectation of rewards but reduced subjective magnitude attributed to losses. Subordinates, on the other hand, were asymmetrically sensitive to power-holders’ targets. They expected fewer rewards, but attributed greater significance to losses. Our study shows that power corrupts balanced co-operation with subordinates. PMID:23160813

  7. Center for Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe: a platform for co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomik, L.; Kichev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents a summary of the current status and the activities of the Centre of Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe (CENS). The CENS is a non-profit and independent association supported by the Swiss and Slovak Governments. The main mission of the CENS is to provide an independent platform for technical co-operation between the regulatory authorities of the Western and Eastern countries. The key partners of the CENS are the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (HSK), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the US Department of Energy (US DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD), the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Germany and the Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), France. The CENS programs for 2003-2004 are presented. It can be considered as a complement to the IAEA activities in the area of short-term and event urgent planning. CENS projects as an example are presented. CENS proposals for co-operation with the Bulgarian institutions are made in connection with the topics of the forum round table discussions

  8. A voice from the high wire: Public involvement in a co-operative siting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, D.J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The author is a public consultation and communications consultant to the Siting Task Force (STF), Low level Radioactive Waste Management. The STF is a Canadian government-appointed yet independent body implementing a voluntary, co-operative siting process for a long term storage or disposal facility for 1 million cubic metres of LLRW. The presentation will document the experiences of and lessons learned by the author during her role developing and implementing a public involvement program for the process. The Co-operative Siting Process is a new approach to siting controversial facilities. It is based on the belief that communities should accept such a facility in their backyard and not be forced against their will on technical or political grounds. A formal 'ground rules-up-front' process was developed and is now being carried out, with completion slated for April, 1995. Putting these rules and theories into practice has resulted in significant changes being made to the work plan for technical activities, and in a sober second look at the intricacies involved in planning and carrying out a thorough and efficient public involvement program that remain practical and cost-effective. There is a delicate balancing act between meaningful public participation that lays the foundation for trust, confidence and consensus, and public involvement that can result in the process being side-tracked and legitimate solutions and technical activities becoming mired in political and personal agendas

  9. Military Training and Education: an Opportunity for V4 Co-Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan ŠUPLATA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Visegrad Group needs success stories if its defence co-operation is to develop. The recent differences between Poland and the rest of the region, as well as the closing window of opportunity to improve interoperability through the ISAF mission, make the hunger for concrete examples of co-operation even more urgent. Education and training projects are not only comparatively easily to implement in terms of time and money, but also represent a way of bringing the region’s civilian and military leaders closer together in terms of strategic thinking. Regional defence collaboration is also one of the ways to materialize NATO’s Smart Defence agenda. For the whole region, the way to keep Visegrad defence cooperation alive is not straightforward and certain, but it is likely to prove rewarding in the long term. It presents not only a chance to keep the whole region better prepared militarily, but also to build a more cohesive strategic awareness, thanks to intensive communication at all levels.

  10. Outcomes from the regional Co-operation in the Area of the Safety Analysis Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Mavko, B.; Prosek, A.; Debrecin, N.; Bajs, T.

    2000-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out the Co-ordinated Research Program (CRP) ON V alidation of Accident and Safety Analysis Methodology'' in the period between 1995 and 1998. Three areas of interest identified by the participants referred to the pressurised water reactors of Western and Eastern type (PWR and WWER type). The specific areas of attention were: system behaviour of the primary and secondary loops (PS area), the containment response (CO area) and the severe accidents (SA area). During the CRP it became clear that the technology advancements, the available tools (i.e. codes) and the experimental databases in the above areas are quite different. At the conclusion of the CRP, all objectives of the program have been reached. This paper presents the summary of the regional co-operation in this framework. The CRP activities focused on the codes and expertise available at the participating organisations. This overview therefore summarises their experience related to the state-of-the-art in the field of computational accident analysis. In addition, the paper proposes the recommendations for future activities related to the code usage, the user effects and code development. In pursuing of these goals special attention is given to the importance of the international co-operation. (author)

  11. Safety management in multiemployer worksites in the manufacturing industry: opinions on co-operation and problems encountered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenonen, Sanna; Vasara, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Co-operation between different parties and effective safety management play an important role in ensuring safety in multiemployer worksites. This article reviews safety co-operation and factors complicating safety management in Finnish multiemployer manufacturing worksites. The paper focuses on the service providers' opinions; however, a comparison of the customers' views is also presented. The results show that safety-related co-operation between providers and customers is generally considered as successful but strongly dependent on the partner. Safety co-operation is provided through, e.g., training, orientation and risk analysis. Problems encountered include ensuring adequate communication, identifying hazards, co-ordinating work tasks and determining responsibilities. The providers and the customers encounter similar safety management problems. The results presented in this article can help companies to focus their efforts on the most problematic points of safety management and to avoid common pitfalls.

  12. The effect of interviewer experience, attitudes, personality and skills on respondent co-operation with face-to-face surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Jäckle, Annette; Lynn, Peter; Sinibaldi, Jennifer; Tipping, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    "This paper examines the role of interviewers' experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation, conditional on contact. The authors take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers' behavior and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous studies of the association between doorstep behavior and co-operation have not directly addressed the role of personality traits and int...

  13. IAEA's technical co-operation programme and its role in assisting member states in the safe utilisation of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this contribution the author deals with the technical co-operation projects of the IAEA. The Agency's technical co-operation programme is a most welcome mechanism for the transfer of nuclear technology, and to developing countries it is certainly the most attractive side of the Agency, since it is through this programme that the IAEA can contribute to the solution of their problems through the provision of know-how, technology and training. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of the accuracy of volume determination on the orbit and eyeball using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, Anson; Fung, Karl; Yap, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study reports a calibration carried out on phantoms simulating the orbit and eyeball to evaluate the accuracy of volumetric determination using MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) images. Methods: Ten tailor-made spherical silicon balls ranging in size from 5 to 14 cm 3 and 10 silicon moulds of orbits from 10 human dried skulls were used to simulate the eyes and orbits, respectively. The CISS (Constructive interference in steady state, TR/TE = 16/8 ms) T2-weighted sequence was taken using a Siemens MRI scanner. The volume of each phantom was computed and compared with the known physical volumes. Results: The computed and physical volumes were highly correlated for both eyeball (r = 0.997) and the orbit (r = 0.992) phantoms. Coefficients of variation of the computed and physical volumes were low. Consequently, it is possible to apply a calibration value to the computed volume to derive the physical volume with a high level of confidence. Conclusion: We conclude that with appropriate calibration, it is viable to use MRI DICOM images to derive the volume of the eyeball and the orbit

  15. Evaluation of the accuracy of volume determination on the orbit and eyeball using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, Anson [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Fung, Karl [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: orkarl@polyu.edu.hk; Yap, Maurice [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: This study reports a calibration carried out on phantoms simulating the orbit and eyeball to evaluate the accuracy of volumetric determination using MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) images. Methods: Ten tailor-made spherical silicon balls ranging in size from 5 to 14 cm{sup 3} and 10 silicon moulds of orbits from 10 human dried skulls were used to simulate the eyes and orbits, respectively. The CISS (Constructive interference in steady state, TR/TE = 16/8 ms) T2-weighted sequence was taken using a Siemens MRI scanner. The volume of each phantom was computed and compared with the known physical volumes. Results: The computed and physical volumes were highly correlated for both eyeball (r = 0.997) and the orbit (r = 0.992) phantoms. Coefficients of variation of the computed and physical volumes were low. Consequently, it is possible to apply a calibration value to the computed volume to derive the physical volume with a high level of confidence. Conclusion: We conclude that with appropriate calibration, it is viable to use MRI DICOM images to derive the volume of the eyeball and the orbit.

  16. Computer-generated display system guidelines. Volume 2. Developing an evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    Volume 1 of this report provides guidance to utilities on the design of displays and the selection and retrofit of a computer-generated display system in the control room of an operating nuclear power plant. Volume 2 provides guidance on planning and managing empirical evaluation of computer-generated display systems, particularly when these displays are primary elements of computer-based operator aids. The guidance provided is in terms of a multilevel evaluation methodology that enables sequential consideration of three primary issues: (1) compatibility; (2) understandability; and (3) effectiveness. The evaluation process approaches these three issues with a top-down review of system objectives, functions, tasks, and information requirements. The process then moves bottom-up from lower-level to higher-level issues, employing different evaluation methods at each level in order to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of the evaluation process

  17. Co-operation with Eastern Europe countries taking ENAC as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.

    1994-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, the European Community launched an ambitious programme of nuclear safety assistance. The purpose of this programme is to improve the safety of the Nuclear Power stations in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union plants. It was felt in the Western European nuclear industry that the emphasis should be on finding practical solutions to improve the most urgent problems. To achieve this objective, the nuclear industry in Western Europe founded a consortium called ENAC (European Nuclear Assistance Consortium) comprising companies form seven European countries ( Great Britain, France, Germany, Spain, Belgium, Italy, Netherlands). The co-operation between theses companies and the Russian designers would ensure that the solutions developed meet the approval of all interested parties. This presentation outlines the overall objectives of ENAC. 2 tabs., 1 fig

  18. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Kenya, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With almost $3.9 million of Agency support received, Kenya ranks 39th among all recipients of technical assistance during the period 1958-1991. Almost half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of the equipment (44%), followed by training (33%) and expert services (23%). Two-thirds of the funds available were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (66%), while extra-budgetary contributions accounted for 18%, in-kind contributions for 14%, and UNDP for 2% of the resources. With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the four major areas have been general atomic energy development (30%), agriculture (22%), nuclear medicine and nuclear safety (13% each)

  19. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Niger, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With some $1.5 million of Agency support received, Niger ranks 65th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. About two-thirds of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (62%), complemented by expert services (26%) and training (12%). Almost the entire resources utilized were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (96%), with only a small share made available through assistance in kind (4%). With regard to project disbursements by sector, the four major areas have been agriculture (34%), general atomic energy development (31%), hydrology (18%) and nuclear safety (12%)

  20. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Sierra Leone, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $1.1 million of Agency support received, Sierra Leone ranks 70th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. Almost equal shares of the assistance during the past ten years have been provided in the form of equipment (40%) and expert services (37%), while the share of the training component was 23%. The best part of the resources was provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (96%), the remaining 4% was made available through assistance in kind. During the past ten years, project activities - and disbursements - have concentrated exclusively on three major areas: nuclear medicine (52%), general atomic energy development (25%) and agriculture (23%)

  1. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Cameroon, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $1.3 million of Agency support received, Cameroon ranks 68th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (61%), followed by expert services (24%) and training (15%). The best part of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (90%); the remaining ten per cent were made available through extrabudgetary contributions (8%) and assistance in kind (2%). With regard to project disbursements by sector, the four major areas have been nuclear physics and chemistry (38%), agriculture (23%), nuclear medicine (14%) and hydrology (13%)

  2. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Mali, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $2.7 million of Agency support received, Mali ranks 51st among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (58%), followed by expert services (27%) and training (15%). With a share of 93%, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund has provided the best part of the resources, while only very small shares were made available through extrabudgetary contributions and assistance in kind (5% and 2%, respectively). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the four major areas have been hydrology (31%), nuclear medicine (24%), agriculture (21%) and nuclear raw materials (16%)

  3. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Costa Rica, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $2.8 million of Agency support received, Costa Rica ranks 49th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958-1991. Over half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (52%), followed by expert services (37%) and training (11%). Sixty-two per cent of the resources were made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 37% of the resources were provided by UNDP. The rest was made available through extrabudgetary contributions (5%) and through in-kind assistance (1%). With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been nuclear raw materials (36%), nuclear physics and chemistry (24%) and agriculture (20%). Smaller shares have gone to hydrology (11%) and nuclear medicine (8%)

  4. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Zambia, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $5.5 million of Agency support received, Zambia ranks 33rd among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (61%), followed by expert services (25%) and training (14%). Almost all of the resources made available came from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (93%), with only very small shares provided through extrabudgetary contributions (4%) and assistance in kind (3%). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the largest areas have been agriculture (33%) and general atomic energy development (23%), followed by industry and hydrology (19%), nuclear raw materials (13%) and nuclear safety (6%)

  5. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Algeria, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $3.6 million of Agency support received, Algeria ranks 41st among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958-1991. Seventy per cent of the assistance received during the past ten years has been in the form of equipment, followed by expert services (17%) and training (13%). Almost all of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (97%), the remaining 3% were made available through assistance in kind. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the three major areas have been nuclear physics and chemistry (28%), agriculture (27%) and nuclear medicine (20%)

  6. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Ethiopia, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With some $2.5 million of Agency support received, Ethiopia ranks 54th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (55%), complemented by expert services (16%) and training (29%). The best part of the resources was provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (88%), the remainder was made available through assistance in kind (6%), UNDP and extrabudgetary contributions (3% each). During the past ten years, project disbursements went to four major areas: agriculture (45%), nuclear medicine (35%), nuclear safety (14%) and nuclear engineering and technology (6%)

  7. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Guatemala, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $3 million of Agency support received, Guatemala ranks 46th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. Almost three quarters of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (72%), followed by training (15%) and expert services (13%). Seventy-eight per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, the rest was made available through extrabudgetary contributions (21%) and assistance in kind (1%). With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been nuclear physics and chemistry (37%), agriculture (28%), nuclear medicine (16%) and hydrology (8%). The remaining 11% were shared by general atomic energy development, nuclear raw materials, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear safety

  8. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Mexico, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With almost $7.7 million of Agency support received, Mexico ranks 21st among all recipients of technical assistance during the period 1958 through 1991. The largest share of the assistance received during the past ten years has been in the form of expert services (36%), followed by equipment and training (27% each) and sub-contracts (10%). Almost two-thirds of the funds available were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (65%), the rest was made available through extrabudgetary contributions (21%) and assistance in kind (14%). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector the five major areas have been nuclear safety (34%), nuclear engineering and technology (27%), agriculture (17%), nuclear physics and chemistry (9%), and nuclear techniques in industry and hydrology (9%)

  9. Surface Support Systems for Co-Operative and Integrated Human/Robotic Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    Human and robotic partnerships to realize space goals can enhance space missions and provide increases in human productivity while decreasing the hazards that the humans are exposed to. For lunar exploration, the harsh environment of the moon and the repetitive nature of the tasks involved with lunar outpost construction, maintenance and operation as well as production tasks associated with in-situ resource utilization, make it highly desirable to use robotic systems in co-operation with human activity. A human lunar outpost is functionally examined and concepts for selected human/robotic tasks are discussed in the context of a lunar outpost which will enable the presence of humans on the moon for extended periods of time.

  10. Co-operative planning by utilities and local authorities. A solution to solve climate change?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlenzing, C.; Steidle, T.

    2001-01-01

    Since the deregulation of German energy markets 1998 we can observe diverging planning interests and priorities of the local communities on one side and the local energy utilities on the other side. This seriously endangers the consensus in local energy planning achieved in the past which will be crucial in order to identify and implement effective greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies. This paper presents a co-operative planning approach which embeds systems analysis into a well structured communication, mediation and learning process for decision making. This process is supported by the cooperative modeling system MESAP, a software for energy and environmental planning, which integrates different energy models with an energy information system. This allows to combine traditional local energy planning with the more business oriented view of the utilities. The specific design of MESAP allows for a continuous 'sustainable' planning and monitoring similar to business tools for accounting and controlling in companies. (author)

  11. Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    The third African IRPA 2010 conference on Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures in Africa: Towards Establishing Effective and Sustainable Co-operations and Networks. IAEA's role in radiation protection with focus in Africa. The controlling of exposure to indoor Radon. And Measure of activities and calculation of effective dose of indoor 222 Rn in some dwelling and enclosed areas in Africa - capacity building for radiation protection. It had also address Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy, challenges for advancing medical physic globally, Heath effects and medical applications of non-ionizing radiation, nuclear safety and radiation protection consideration in the design of research and development. The International radiation protection association (IRPA) 2010-2011 strategic plan that address among other issues educations and training activities (2000-2020) and the current UNSCLEAR activities

  12. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Uganda, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $1.6 million of Agency support received, Uganda ranks 61st among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. Almost half of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (47%), complemented by a strong training component (37%), while expert services have received only a relatively small share (16%). Ninety-eight per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, the remaining two per cent were made available through assistance in kind. During the past ten years, project activities - and disbursements - have concentrated exclusively on three major areas: agriculture (64%), nuclear medicine (24%) and nuclear safety (12%)

  13. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Uruguay, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $4.2 million of Agency support received, Uruguay ranks 37th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (67%), followed by expert services (19%) and training (14%). Seventy-three per cent of the resources were provided through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 24% were made available through extrabudgetary contributions. The remaining 3% were provided through assistance in kind, with only an insignificant contribution by UNDP. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been nuclear medicine (35%), agriculture (23%), general atomic energy development (17%), followed by nuclear physics and chemistry (11%) and industry and hydrology (7%)

  14. The NEA Co-Operative Programme on Decommissioning, the First Ten Years 1985-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy (NEA) Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning established the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse in 1992. The Task Group was charged with examining means for maximizing the recovery of valuable materials that partially comprise waste resulting from decommissioning activities. The Task Group also was to examine means for minimising the quantity of waste from such operations. Much of the Task Group's work has been concentrated on metal recycling and reuse. The Task Group's examination and report are the product of experts from seven countries and constitute a synthesis of surveys, analyses, and case studies. The report is intended to provide information and insights, as of the end of 1994, into the practicality and usefulness of release criteria from the perspective of organisations currently engaged in actual decommissioning activities

  15. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Zaire, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $3.9 million of Agency support received, Zaire ranks 38th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (60%), followed by training (24%) and expert services (16%). With a share of 76%, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund has provided more than three quarters of the total resources available, while only small shares were made available through UNDP (11%), extrabudgetary contributions (4%) and assistance in kind (9%). With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, the largest area has been general atomic energy development (26%), followed by agriculture (18%), nuclear safety (18%), nuclear techniques in industry and hydrology (13%), and nuclear physics and chemistry (11%)

  16. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Nigeria, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $9.3 million of Agency support received, Nigeria ranks 14th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. During the past ten years, 44% of this assistance has been provided in the form of equipment, followed by training (27%), expert services (26%) and sub-contracts (3%). With 45% and 44%, respectively, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund and extrabudgetary contributions hold almost equal shares in the total resources made available, while in-kind assistance accounts for 9% and UNDP for 2% of the resources. With regard to project disbursement during the past ten years, by sector, by far the largest area has been agriculture (70%), with significantly smaller shares going to nuclear physics and chemistry (11%), nuclear medicine (8%) and nuclear safety (7%)

  17. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Senegal, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With $2.2 million of Agency support received, Senegal ranks 56th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. More than one-third of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (67%), followed by expert services (21%) and training (12%). Eighty per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 16% were made available by UNDP and about 2% each through extrabudgetary contributions and assistance in kind. With regard to project disbursement by sector, by far the largest area has been agriculture (43%). Smaller shares have gone to general atomic energy development (15%), nuclear physics and chemistry (13%), nuclear medicine and hydrology (11% each), and nuclear safety (7%)

  18. Scintigraphic method for evaluating reductions in local blood volumes in human extremities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blønd, L; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2000-01-01

    in the experiment. Evaluation of one versus two scintigraphic projections, trials for assessment of the reproducibility, a comparison of the scintigraphic method with a water-plethysmographic method and registration of the fractional reduction in blood volume caused by exsanguination as a result of simple elevation......% in the lower limb experiment and 6% in the upper limb experiment. We found a significant relation (r = 0.42, p = 0.018) between the results obtained by the scintigraphic method and the plethysmographic method. In fractions, a mean reduction in blood volume of 0.49+0.14 (2 SD) was found after 1 min of elevation......We introduce a new method for evaluating reductions in local blood volumes in extremities, based on the combined use of autologue injection of 99mTc-radiolabelled erythrocytes and clamping of the limb blood flow by the use of a tourniquet. Twenty-two healthy male volunteers participated...

  19. Sweden's Co-operation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassen, Lars van; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela; Chirman, Inessa; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Karlberg, Olof; Klasen, Haakan; Olsson, Kjell; Sandberg, Viviana; Stenberg, Tor; Turner, Roland; Wickman, Barbro

    2012-11-01

    In 2011, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented co-operation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Lithuania and Moldova, based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security, waste management, nonproliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host countries and the international community as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2011. The project managers from SSM are the cornerstones of our successful work, but all the efforts and dedication by staff members of the facilities and authorities in the mentioned countries are indispensable for the long-term positive outcomes. This report is meant to serve as a detailed account regarding SSM's efforts as part of the Swedish international activities, on which Sweden will report to the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul. The parties to the G-8 Global Partnership have in June 2011 extended the Global Partnership for ten more years, till 2022. Other international frameworks, such as the UNSC Resolution 1540, remain a vibrant instrument by which UN Member States can exchange information on security concerns and request assistance from each other. The projects that SSM implements in Moldova and Georgia have a reference to the aims and purposes of the UNSC Resolution 1540. Much work has been done in the fields of nuclear security and safety, but there are still lots of issues that need to be taken care of. As such, SSM will continue to do its part for nuclear safety and security at the international level, along the lines and priorities set by our Government.

  20. Sweden's Co-operation with Eastern Europe in Radiation Safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassen, Lars van; Andersson, Sarmite; Bejarano, Gabriela; Chirman, Inessa; Delalic, Zlatan; Ekblad, Christer; Karlberg, Olof; Klasen, Haakan; Olsson, Kjell; Sandberg, Viviana; Stenberg, Tor; Turner, Roland; Wickman, Barbro

    2012-03-01

    In 2011, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority implemented co-operation projects in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Lithuania and Moldova, based on instructions from the Swedish Government and agreements with the European Union and the Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency, SIDA. The projects aim at achieving a net contribution to radiation safety (including nuclear safety, nuclear security, waste management, nonproliferation as well as radiation protection and emergency preparedness) for the benefit of the host countries and the international community as well as Sweden. This report gives an overview of all the projects implemented in 2011. The project managers from SSM are the cornerstones of our successful work, but all the efforts and dedication by staff members of the facilities and authorities in the mentioned countries are indispensable for the long-term positive outcomes. This report is meant to serve as a detailed account regarding SSM's efforts as part of the Swedish international activities, on which Sweden will report to the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul. The parties to the G-8 Global Partnership have in June 2011 extended the Global Partnership for ten more years, till 2022. Other international frameworks, such as the UNSC Resolution 1540, remain a vibrant instrument by which UN Member States can exchange information on security concerns and request assistance from each other. The projects that SSM implements in Moldova and Georgia have a reference to the aims and purposes of the UNSC Resolution 1540. Much work has been done in the fields of nuclear security and safety, but there are still lots of issues that need to be taken care of. As such, SSM will continue to do its part for nuclear safety and security at the international level, along the lines and priorities set by our Government

  1. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M. [Economics Department, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  2. An example of nuclear co-operation: The Republic of Korea and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, G.

    1983-01-01

    France and the Republic of Korea are pursuing the same objectives: they have decided to meet a large part of their electricity needs with nuclear power, and thereby increase their independence in energy matters. Both began ambitious national nuclear programmes some years ago, and it is natural that they should whish to co-operate. In November 1980, the Korean Electric Company (KEPCO) signed two contracts with French industry: one with Framatome for the supply of two nuclear islands and two 900 MW(e) PWR units (KNU 9 and 10); and one with Cogema for the supply of enriched uranium. These contracts were supplemented in February 1982 by a third contract, signed with Alsthom-Atlantique for the supply of two conventional islands. The three contracts are enabling the Republic of Korea to diversify its sources of supply and to have access to French experience. Under these projects the envisaged collaboration, which will entail the presence of some hundreds of French engineers in the Republic of Korea and also citizens of the latter in France and thereby forge firm and beneficial links, will apply to the following fields: project organization and management; nuclear engineering proper; manufacture of equipment; and training of staff of the Republic of Korea. However, it is hoped that nuclear co-operation between these two countries will extend much further. The competent French authorities are ready to work with the Republic of Korea to provide in full the setting needed for the development of an ambitious nuclear programme, in particular in aspects such as the adoption of codes and standards, safety authorities, the fuel cycle, and research and development. Finally, French industry is prepared to join the industrial efforts which the Republic of Korea wishes to undertake in order to set up a modern and efficient national industry. (author)

  3. Non-transboundary pollution and the efficiency of international environmental co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kox, H.L.M.; Van der Tak, C.M.

    1995-10-01

    The increased awareness of the transboundary pollution problems resulted in a number of international treaties, such as the Montreal protocol on ozone-depleting substances (1987), and the Basel Convention on hazardous waste (1989). Most authors writing on efficient environmental instruments make a sharp distinction between domestic and transboundary environmental problems. While the former should be abated by domestic environmental instruments, an efficient treatment of the latter requires international instruments. The underlying logic is that in case of non-transboundary pollution both the costs and benefits of environmental policies are strictly domestic, the trade-off between benefits and costs of abatement should also be a strictly domestic issue. In contrast, with transboundary pollution the trade-off between abatement costs and benefits becomes an international issue. In this paper we analyse four cases where international environmental co-ordination is required to achieve an efficient outcome, even though the environmental externality is non-transboundary in nature. Section two sketches the standard view on efficient intervention levels with regard to transborder and non-transborder pollution. In the third section we deal with cases where environmental policy is used in a trade-strategic way. The section pays attention to the motives for using domestic environmental policy as a disguise for trade policies. It will be argued that the resulting allocative efficiency can be improved upon by international co-operation. Sections 4-6 analyse three cases where international co-operation may improve the international outcome on the basis of non-coordinated domestic allocation decisions. These cases refer in particular to the situation of developing countries, when there is a high export dependency on the polluting good in combination with the existence of discrete technologies, set-up costs of environment-friendly technologies, and the existence of increasing

  4. 8 December 1953 - 8 December 1963. Atomic co-operation in the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Full text: Ten years ago, on 8 December 1953, President Eisenhower proposed to the General Assembly of the United Nations measures to build 'a new avenue to peace'. This was the beginning of the idea that international understanding can be fostered through peaceful atomic co-operation in an international organization. Re-reading the President's statement ten years later, one is impressed by the continued urgency of his message. What he said in fact was that the nations of the world were living in the shadow of an overwhelming atomic threat and that steps were necessary, even though modest and untried, to break the impasse between the East and the West in the very field which caused the most profound concern - atomic energy. The International Atomic Energy Agency became an institutional reality in 1957, when the first General Conference met with 56 members. It now has 83 members, and a further five nations will become members as soon as statutory formalities are completed. The activity on the part of the Agency during these six years has gradually expanded, although it has fallen short of earlier hopes in certain areas. Time and patience, however, have been required and 1963 foreshadows further progress. Ten years after the proposal of the idea, scientists and statesmen can look back and be gratified that a contribution has been made to international understanding. Scientists and statesmen can look ahead, hopefully, to a future of increasing activity in this special agency to develop co-operation and agreement in the field of atomic energy. (author)

  5. Co-operation - the way out (introducing the Natural Materials Radiation Control Initiative)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, I.D.

    2002-01-01

    The Natural Materials Radiation Control Initiative (NMRCI), a forum of regulators, advisory bodies and operators in NORM industries from Australia, Brazil, Malaysia, Netherlands, Poland, South Africa and USA, reported on its activities that were aimed at addressing NORM regulatory issues through industry/regulatory co-operation. The objective was to generate comprehensive information on quantifying exposures to both workers and the general public, through the consolidation of existing data and the collection of data from new studies. In its interactions with the IAEA to date, the NMRCI had proposed that it assist in drafting a Safety Report identifying exposure sources and providing information on suggested methods for national regulatory bodies, advisory bodies and NORM industries to make quantitative assessments and to identify how best to meet the requirements of the BSS. It was envisaged that the Safety Report should reflect the principles contained in ICRP recommendations and IAEA Safety Standards, should make maximum use of measured data, and should deal separately with different industries such as phosphates, coal and niobium, taking account of the differences in chemical, physical and radiological properties of the materials as well as differences in work practices. It had been decided that occupational exposure issues should be addressed as a first priority, before moving on to the public exposure arena where waste management issues such as waste disposal and remediation of contaminated sites would be addressed. The NMRCI also aimed to promote co-operation between NORM industries and regulatory authorities on the matter of regulations and their impact on international trade in commodities containing NORM

  6. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-08-01

    Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology.

  7. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-08-01

    Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology

  8. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

  9. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r 2 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm 3 , the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm 3 , using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema

  10. Volume calculations of coarse woody debris; evaluation of coarse woody debris volume calculations and consequences for coarse woody debris volume estimates in forest reserves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijdeven, S.M.J.; Vaessen, O.H.B.; Hees, van A.F.M.; Olsthoorn, A.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Dead wood is recognized as one of the key indicators for sustainable forest management and biodiversity. Accurate assessments of dead wood volume are thus necessary. In this study New volume models were designed based on actual volume measurements of coarse woody debris. The New generic model

  11. Evaluation of Left Atrial Volumes Using Multidetector Computed Tomography: Comparison with Echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gweon, Hye Mi; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Min; Hong, Yoo Jin; Rim, Se Joong

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively assess the relationship between the two different measurement methods for the evaluation of left atrial (LA) volume using cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and to compare the results between cardiac MDCT and echocardiography. Thirty-five patients (20 men, 15 women; mean age, 60 years) underwent cardiac MDCT angiography for coronary artery disease. The LA volumes were measured using two different methods: the two dimensional (2D) length-based (LB) method measured along the three-orthogonal planes of the LA and the 3D volumetric threshold-based (VTB) method measured according to the threshold 3D segmentation of the LA. The results obtained by cardiac MDCT were compared with those obtained by echocardiography. The LA end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes (LAESV and LAEDV) measured by the 2D-LB method correlated well with those measured by the 3DVTB method using cardiac MDCT (r = 0.763, r = 0.786, p = 0.001). However, there was a significant difference in the LAESVs between the two measurement methods using cardiac MDCT (p < 0.05). The LAESV measured by cardiac MDCT correlated well with measurements by echocardiography (r = 0.864, p = 0.001), however with a significant difference (p < 0.01) in their volumes. The cardiac MDCT overestimated the LAESV by 22% compared to measurements by echocardiography. A significant correlation was found between the two different measurement methods for evaluating LA volumes by cardiac MDCT. Further, cardiac MDCT correlates well with echocardiography in evaluating the LA volume. However, there are significant differences in the LAESV between the two measurement methods using cardiac MDCT and between cardiac MDCT and echocardiography

  12. Co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the developing power reactors of various types, including some aspects of their nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbur, I.; Barchenkov, A.; Molnar, L; Panasenkov, A.; Tolpygo, V.; Hake, V.; Shcherbinin, B.

    1977-01-01

    The report gives an account of the problems of projected development of atomic power and evaluates its role in the fuel and power complex and long-range development of interconnected power systems of the CMEA member countries. The report emphasizes the importance of scientific and technical co-operation in the creation of power reactors on thermal and fast neutrons with 1000-1500 MW unit electric capacity as well as in the elaboration of nuclear plants for heating services. It notes the positive experience of the International scientific and research group of scientists of the CMEA member countries carrying out reactor-physical studies on the critical assembly and its contribution to the elaboration of power reactors. The report contains basic conclusions from the development forecast for nuclear power of the CMEA member countries up to 1990 including forecasting methodology; role of nuclear power plants in saving natural and enriched uranium for a projected period; impact of nuclear power development rates on its structure (thermal and fast reactor ratio); relation between the beginning of mass commissioning of nuclear power plants with fast reactors and the integral demand for nuclear fuel; scale of required capacities of fuel cycle services; time dependence of fuel cycle on nuclear fuel requirements. It examines the problems and lists the results of scientific and technical co-operation of the CMEA member countries in the field of fuel cycle, including the transport of spent nuclear fuel, its recovery, reprocessing and radioactive waste disposal. Particular questions of co-operation of the CMEA member countries to secure radiation safety of nuclear power plants and environmental protection are analyzed. The report notes the role of international economic associations - ''Interatomenergo'' and ''Interatominstrument'' - in the accelerated development of nuclear power on the basis of cooperation and specialization in the manufacture of equipment for nuclear power

  13. Equivalent uniform dose concept evaluated by theoretical dose volume histograms for thoracic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, J L; Lorchel, F; Perrot, Y; Aletti, P; Noel, A; Wolf, D; Courvoisier, P; Bosset, J F

    2007-03-01

    The goal of our study was to quantify the limits of the EUD models for use in score functions in inverse planning software, and for clinical application. We focused on oesophagus cancer irradiation. Our evaluation was based on theoretical dose volume histograms (DVH), and we analyzed them using volumetric and linear quadratic EUD models, average and maximum dose concepts, the linear quadratic model and the differential area between each DVH. We evaluated our models using theoretical and more complex DVHs for the above regions of interest. We studied three types of DVH for the target volume: the first followed the ICRU dose homogeneity recommendations; the second was built out of the first requirements and the same average dose was built in for all cases; the third was truncated by a small dose hole. We also built theoretical DVHs for the organs at risk, in order to evaluate the limits of, and the ways to use both EUD(1) and EUD/LQ models, comparing them to the traditional ways of scoring a treatment plan. For each volume of interest we built theoretical treatment plans with differences in the fractionation. We concluded that both volumetric and linear quadratic EUDs should be used. Volumetric EUD(1) takes into account neither hot-cold spot compensation nor the differences in fractionation, but it is more sensitive to the increase of the irradiated volume. With linear quadratic EUD/LQ, a volumetric analysis of fractionation variation effort can be performed.

  14. Evaluation of the BD BACTEC FX blood volume monitoring system as a continuous quality improvement measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorevits, L; Van den Abeele, A-M

    2015-07-01

    The yield of blood cultures is proportional to the volume of blood cultured. We evaluated an automatic blood volume monitoring system, recently developed by Becton Dickinson within its BACTEC EpiCenter module, that calculates mean volumes of negative aerobic bottles and generates boxplots and histograms. First, we evaluated the filling degree of 339 aerobic glass blood cultures by calculating the weight-based volume for each bottle. A substantial amount of the bottles (48.3%) were inadequately filled. Evaluation of the accuracy of the monitoring system showed a mean bias of -1.4 mL (-15.4%). Additional evaluation, using the amended software on 287 aerobic blood culture bottles, resulted in an acceptable mean deviation of -0.3 mL (-3.3%). The new software version was also tested on 200 of the recently introduced plastic bottles, which will replace the glass bottles in the near future, showing a mean deviation of +2.8 mL (+26.7%). In conclusion, the mean calculated volumes can be used for the training of a single phlebotomist. However, filling problems appear to be masked when using them for phlebotomist groups or on wards. Here, visual interpretation of boxplots and histograms can serve as a useful tool to observe the spread of the filling degrees and to develop a continuous improvement program. Re-adjustment of the software has proven to be necessary for use with plastic bottles. Due to our findings, BD has developed further adjustments to the software for validated use with plastic bottles, which will be released soon.

  15. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  16. Nuclear weapons research in Sweden. The co-operation between civilian and military research, 1947 - 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonter, Thomas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History

    2002-05-01

    The Swedish nuclear weapons research began as early as 1945, shortly after the first atomic bombs fell over Japan. The assignment to look into the new weapon of mass destruction went to the Swedish National Defence Research Establishment (FOA). Admittedly, the main aim of the research initiated at that time was to find out how Sweden could best protect itself against a nuclear weapon attack. However, from the outset FOA was interested in investigating the possibilities of manufacturing what was then called an atomic bomb. A co-operation between FOA and AB Atomenergi (AE), which was created in 1947 in order to be responsible for the industrial development of civilian nuclear energy, was initiated. AE made several technical investigations within this co-operation regarding choice of reactors and preconditions for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. The first purpose of this report is therefore to investigate how this co-operation emerged and what consequences it had for the project to produce basic information for the Swedish manufacture of nuclear weapons. In general terms, the finding of this report is that FOA was responsible for the overall nuclear weapons research. For this reason, FOA was in charge of the construction of the nuclear device and the studies of its effects. Additionally, AE should deliver basic information of a possible production of weapons-grade plutonium and investigate the possibilities of a production or a procurement of inspection-free heavy water (i.e. without inspections by the supplying country). AE should also build a reprocessing plant and manufacture fuel elements to be used in the reactors for a production of weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, it is important to emphasise that both FOA and AE conducted plutonium research. The reason why FOA conducted this research was that the plutonium had to be in metallic form in order to be used in a nuclear weapons device. Therefore, FOA carried out research with the purpose of producing

  17. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  18. Co-operation between Slovenia and Croatia in the low- and intermediate level radioactive waste repository project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.; Tomse, P.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the LILW repository project development in Slovenia and Croatia from the viewpoint of co-operation of national agencies for radioactive waste management - ARAO in Slovenia and APO in Croatia. The project performance, as well as the co-operation itself, are based on the fact that NPP Krsko, sited in Slovenia, is the joint venture facility of both countries, which are consequently obliged to find a proper solution for final disposal of operational and decommissioning radioactive waste generated by the plant. The main aspects of the project development in both countries, such as LILW repository site selection and characterisation, development of repository conceptual design, performance assessment/safety analysis procedures and public participation, are presented in the paper. Based on separate descriptions of the project development in Slovenia and Croatia respectively, the main aspects of co-operation between ARAO and APO are elaborated.(author)

  19. Volume and health outcomes: evidence from systematic reviews and from evaluation of Italian hospital data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Laura; Fusco, Danilo; Acampora, Anna; Bontempi, Katia; Rosa, Alessandro Cesare; Colais, Paola; Cruciani, Fabio; D'Ovidio, Mariangela; Mataloni, Francesca; Minozzi, Silvia; Mitrova, Zuzana; Pinnarelli, Luigi; Saulle, Rosella; Soldati, Salvatore; Sorge, Chiara; Vecchi, Simona; Ventura, Martina; Davoli, Marina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improving quality and effectiveness of healthcare is one of the priorities of health policies. Hospital or physician volume represents a measurable variable with an impact on effectiveness of healthcare. An Italian law calls for the definition of «qualitative, structural, technological, and quantitative standards of hospital care». There is a need for an evaluation of the available scientific evidence in order to identify qualitative, structural, technological, and quantitative standards of hospital care, including the volume of care above or below which the public and private hospitals may be accredited (or not) to provide specific healthcare interventions. OBJECTIVES To identify conditions/interventions for which an association between volume and outcome has been investigated. To identify conditions/interventions for which an association between volume and outcome has been proved. To analyze the distribution of Italian health providers by volume of activity. To measure the association between volume of care and outcomes of the health providers of the Italian National Health Service (NHS). METHODS Systematic review An overview of systematic reviews was performed searching PubMed, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library up to November 2016. Studies were evaluated by 2 researchers independently; quality assessment was performed using the AMSTAR checklist. For each health condition and outcome, if available, total number of studies, participants, high volume cut-off values, and metanalysis have been reported. According to the considered outcomes, health topics were classified into 3 groups: positive association: a positive association was demonstrated in the majority of studies/participants and/or a pooled measure (metanalysis) with positive results was reported; lack of association: both studies and/or metanalysis showed no association; no sufficient evidence of association: both results of single studies and metanalysis do not allow to draw firm conclusions

  20. Danish environmental support fund for Eastern Europe. Co-operation development 1991-1996 and programme priority areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The publication gives an account of environmental co-operation between Denmark and 12 countries in Eastern Europe. The basis of co-operation is a country programme, describing present and future priority areas in the recipient countries, as an expression of common understanding between the Danish Environmental Protection Agency and the Ministry of Environment in the recipient countries. The publication also describe the environmental efforts made in 1991-1996 under the Danish Environmental Support Fund for Eastern Europe (DESF) administered by the DEPA. (au)

  1. Metabolic tumour volumes measured at staging in lymphoma: methodological evaluation on phantom experiments and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meignan, Michel; Sasanelli, Myriam; Itti, Emmanuel; Casasnovas, Rene Olivier; Luminari, Stefano; Fioroni, Federica; Coriani, Chiara; Masset, Helene; Gobbi, Paolo G.; Merli, Francesco; Versari, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a bulky tumour at staging on CT is an independent prognostic factor in malignant lymphomas. However, its prognostic value is limited in diffuse disease. Total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) determined on 18 F-FDG PET/CT could give a better evaluation of the total tumour burden and may help patient stratification. Different methods of TMTV measurement established in phantoms simulating lymphoma tumours were investigated and validated in 40 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Data were processed by two nuclear medicine physicians in Reggio Emilia and Creteil. Nineteen phantoms filled with 18 F-saline were scanned; these comprised spherical or irregular volumes from 0.5 to 650 cm 3 with tumour-to-background ratios from 1.65 to 40. Volumes were measured with different SUVmax thresholds. In patients, TMTV was measured on PET at staging by two methods: volumes of individual lesions were measured using a fixed 41 % SUVmax threshold (TMTV 41 ) and a variable visually adjusted SUVmax threshold (TMTV var ). In phantoms, the 41 % threshold gave the best concordance between measured and actual volumes. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect. In patients, the agreement between the reviewers for TMTV 41 measurement was substantial (ρ c = 0.986, CI 0.97 - 0.99) and the difference between the means was not significant (212 ± 218 cm 3 for Creteil vs. 206 ± 219 cm 3 for Reggio Emilia, P = 0.65). By contrast the agreement was poor for TMTV var . There was a significant direct correlation between TMTV 41 and normalized LDH (r = 0.652, CI 0.42 - 0.8, P 41 , but high TMTV 41 could be found in patients with stage 1/2 or nonbulky tumour. Measurement of baseline TMTV in lymphoma using a fixed 41% SUVmax threshold is reproducible and correlates with the other parameters for tumour mass evaluation. It should be evaluated in prospective studies. (orig.)

  2. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos, E-mail: kontopodisn@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece); Metaxa, Eleni, E-mail: emmetaxa@gmail.com [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Papaharilaou, Yannis, E-mail: yannisp@iacm.forth.gr [Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Georgakarakos, Efstratios, E-mail: efstratiosgeorg@gmail.com [Vascular Surgery Department, “Demokritus” University of Thrace Medical School, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Tsetis, Dimitris, E-mail: tsetis@med.uoc.gr [Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Ioannou, Christos V., E-mail: ioannou@med.uoc.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Crete Medical School, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness.

  3. Value of volume measurements in evaluating abdominal aortic aneurysms growth rate and need for surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Metaxa, Eleni; Papaharilaou, Yannis; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Tsetis, Dimitris; Ioannou, Christos V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether indices other than the traditionally used abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximum diameter, such as AAA volume, intraluminal thrombus (ILT) thickness and ILT volume, may be superior to evaluate aneurismal enlargement. Materials and methods: Thirty-four small AAAs (initially presenting a maximum diameter <5.5 cm which is the threshold for surgical repair) with an initial and a follow-up CT were examined. Median increase and percentile annual change of these variables was calculated. Correlation between growth rates as determined by the new indices under evaluation and those of maximum diameter were assessed. AAAs were divided according to outcome (surveillance vs. elective repair after follow-up which is based on the maximum diameter criterion) and according to growth rate (high vs. low) based on four indices. Contingency between groups of high/low growth rate regarding each of the four indices on one hand and those regarding need for surgical repair on the other was assessed. Results: A strong correlation between growth rates of maximum diameter and those of AAA and ILT volumes could be established. Evaluation of contingency between groups of outcome and those of growth rate revealed significant associations only for AAA and ILT volumes. Subsequently AAAs with a rapid volumetric increase over time had a likelihood ratio of 10 to be operated compared to those with a slower enlargement. Regarding increase of maximum diameter, likelihood ratio between AAAs with rapid and those with slow expansion was only 3. Conclusion: Growth rate of aneurysms regarding 3Dimensional indices of AAA and ILT volumes is significantly associated with the need for surgical intervention while the same does not hold for growth rates determined by 2Dimensional indices of maximum diameter and ILT thickness

  4. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pvolume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviationpulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  5. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Madagascar, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $3.5 million of Agency support received, Madagascar ranks 42nd among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (55%), followed by expert services (32%) and training (13%). With a share of 69%, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund has provided more than two-thirds of the total resources available, while 29% were made available through UNDP and 2% through assistance in kind. Extrabudgetary contributions accounted for less than one per cent. With regard to project disbursements during the past ten years, by sector, by far the largest area has been nuclear raw materials (66%), followed by nuclear physics and chemistry (18%). Only small shares have gone to nuclear safety (7%), agriculture (5%) and nuclear engineering and technology (4%)

  6. International co-operation for reactor safety: the World Association of Nuclear Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckered, T.

    1989-01-01

    On 5 and 6 October 1987, senior representatives of most of the world's nuclear operators met in Paris with Lord Marshall of the UK Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) as Chairman. They resolved to strengthen the existing links and co-operation among nuclear operators by setting up the World Association of Nuclear Operators (Wano). The mission of the association is to be: 'to maximize the safety and reliability of the operation of nuclear power stations by exchanging information, encouraging comparison and stimulating emulation among nuclear power station operators.' The formation of Wano presents some information technology problems of a rather special kind that have to be solved before Wano can begin operation. The representatives at the Paris meeting therefore appointed a steering committee under Lord Marshall's chairmanship to formulate detailed proposals. The leaders of the world's nuclear operators will meet again in Moscow on 15-17 May 1989 in order to ratify the steering committee proposals and appoint the first Wano Board of Governors. A small interim secretariat is already working in London. (author)

  7. Employing Multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Co-Operative Path Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdana Habib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we work to develop a path planning solution for a group of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs using a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP approach. Co-operation among team members not only helps reduce mission time, it makes the execution more robust in dynamic environments. However, the problem becomes more challenging as it requires optimal resource allocation and is NP-hard. Since UAVs may be lost or may suffer significant damage during the course of the mission, plans may need to be modified in real-time as the mission proceeds. Therefore, multiple UAVs have a better chance of completing a mission in the face of failures. Such military operations can be treated as a variant of the Multiple Depot Vehicle Routing Problem (MDVRP. The proposed solution must be such that m UAVs start from multiple source locations to visit n targets and return to a set of destination locations such that (1 each target is visited exactly by one of the chosen UAVs (2 the total distance travelled by the group is minimized and (3 the number of targets that each UAV visits may not be less than K or greater than L.

  8. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Sudan, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $5.7 million of Agency support received, Sudan ranks 31st among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 through 1991. Over the past ten years, almost equal shares of this assistance were provided in the form of equipment (46%) and training (42%), and only a small percentage was provided in the form of expert services (12%). The best part of the resources was made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (77%), while in-kind and extrabudgetary contributions account for 13% and 10% of the resources, respectively. With regard to project disbursement during the past ten years, by sector, the two largest areas have been general atomic energy development (37%) and agriculture (21%), followed by nuclear medicine (14%). Smaller shares (6% each) have gone to nuclear physics and chemistry, nuclear engineering and technology, hydrology, and nuclear safety

  9. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Peru, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $12.6 million of Agency support received, Peru ranks 4th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991, whereby it ranked as high as 2nd in each of the four years 1982 through 1985. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (59%), followed by expert services (29%) and training (12%). Forty-five per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 29% of the resources were made available through extrabudgetary contributions, and 21% by UNDP. The remaining 5% were provided in kind. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest areas have been agriculture (27%), general atomic energy development (17%), nuclear raw materials (14%), nuclear medicine (12%) and industry and hydrology (11%). Nuclear safety, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear physics and chemistry have each received less than ten per cent of the assistance provided

  10. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Brazil, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $17 million of Agency support received, Brazil ranks 2nd among all recipients of technical assistance during the period 1958 through 1991. Over half of the assistance received during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (51%), complemented by expert services (34%) and training (15%). Almost two-thirds of the funds were made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund (63%), the rest was provided through extrabudgetary contributions (30%), assistance in kind (4%) and UNDP (3%). With regard to total disbursements - by sector - under those projects that were operational during the period 1982 through November 1992, the three major areas have been: general atomic energy development (47%), nuclear safety (22%) and agriculture (13%). During the same period, the country has provided experts and training course lectures for a total of 405 assignments, and has hosted 178 fellowships and scientific visits as well as 46 regional and interregional training events with a total of 603 participants

  11. Adenosinergic Immunosuppression by Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Requires Co-Operation with T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkelä, Erja; Laitinen, Anita; Räbinä, Jarkko; Valkonen, Sami; Takatalo, Maarit; Larjo, Antti; Veijola, Johanna; Lampinen, Milla; Siljander, Pia; Lehenkari, Petri; Alfthan, Kaija; Laitinen, Saara

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have the capacity to counteract excessive inflammatory responses. MSCs possess a range of immunomodulatory mechanisms, which can be deployed in response to signals in a particular environment and in concert with other immune cells. One immunosuppressive mechanism, not so well-known in MSCs, is mediated via adenosinergic pathway by ectonucleotidases CD73 and CD39. In this study, we demonstrate that adenosine is actively produced from adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) by CD73 on MSCs and MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). Our results indicate that although MSCs express CD39 at low level and it colocalizes with CD73 in bulge areas of membranes, the most efficient adenosine production from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires co-operation of MSCs and activated T cells. Highly CD39 expressing activated T cells produce AMP from ATP and MSCs produce adenosine from AMP via CD73 activity. Furthermore, adenosinergic signaling plays a role in suppression of T cell proliferation in vitro. In conclusion, this study shows that adenosinergic signaling is an important immunoregulatory mechanism of MSCs, especially in situations where ATP is present in the extracellular environment, like in tissue injury. An efficient production of immunosuppressive adenosine is dependent on the concerted action of CD39-positive immune cells with CD73-positive cells such as MSCs or their EVs. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  12. Feasibility analysis for a SolarShare co-operative in the City of Toronto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigham, M.; Gipe, P.

    2007-01-01

    This report provided details of a feasibility study conducted to assess a business model for a solar electric co-operative within the City of Toronto. The study focused on the development of a rooftop array of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels. A portfolio of potential partners and projects representing approximately 4 MW was identified. Economic and financial models were used to determine the viability of the SolarShare rooftop design. Various tariffs and subsidies currently available for the development of renewable energy projects were reviewed. Despite growing environmental awareness and enthusiasm for solar energy projects amongst Toronto inhabitants, the analysis demonstrated that rooftop PV projects in Ontario are not profitable without a reduction in the costs of $3,500 to $5000 kW, subsidies, or an increase in tariff payments under the province's standard offer contract program. Revenues derived from energy sales under the SolarShare program were approximately half of what was required to undertake a profitable investment in solar PV. Recommendations for building profitable PV systems using a staged approach were included. 27 refs., 16 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Project financing consequences on cogeneration: industrial plant and municipal utility co-operation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundberg, Gunnel; Sjoedin, J.Joergen

    2003-01-01

    The liberalisation of the European electricity market influences investment decisions in combined heat and power plants. Energy companies modify their business strategies and their criteria for investments in power generation capacity. In this paper, the gains from a co-operation between a paper mill and municipal utility are studied. We find that a widened system boundary, including both the industrial plant and the district heating company, increases cost-effectiveness by 7-11%, compared to a situation with two separately optimised systems. Furthermore, optimal investments are strongly influenced by the actors' different required returns. With a relatively low required rate of return on energy investments, typical for a municipally owned utility, the most profitable investment is a wood chips-fuelled cogeneration plant. With a higher rate of return on capital, typical for a competitive industry, the optimal investment is mainly a heat-only steam boiler. Finally, some general influences on required rate of return caused by electricity market deregulation are observed. Whilst tending to increase companies' required returns, deregulation may, besides extending the outlet for locally generated electricity, also obstruct long-term high-cost investments such as cogeneration based on conventional technology

  14. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Cuba, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With almost $8.2 million of Agency support received, Cuba ranks 19th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991, whereby it ranked as high as 3rd in 1982 and 4th in 1984. Over three quarters of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (81%), followed by expert services (10%) and training (9%). Seventy-one per cent of the resources were made available through the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, while 28% of the resources were provided by UNDP. The remaining 1% was made available through extrabudgetary and in-kind contributions. With regard to project disbursements by sector, the largest areas have been general atomic energy development (36%), agriculture (20%), nuclear physics and chemistry (10%) and nuclear safety (10%). Industry and hydrology, nuclear engineering and technology, and nuclear medicine have each received less than ten per cent of the assistance provided

  15. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Ghana, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $6.5 million of Agency support received, Ghana ranks 29th among all recipients of technical assistance in the period 1958 - 1991. More than half of the assistance during the past ten years has been provided in the form of equipment (53%), followed by training through fellowships and scientific visits (34%) and expert services (13%). Seventy-four per cent of the resources were provided by the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, 13% through assistance in kind, 11% through extrabudgetary contributions, and 2% by UNDP. It should be noted that the share for extrabudgetary contributions includes an amount of $250,000 made available by the Ghanaian Government for the purchase of equipment by the Agency under a funds-in-trust arrangement. With regard to project disbursement by sector, the largest share has gone to agriculture (36%), followed by nuclear physics and chemistry (21%), nuclear medicine (16%), industry and hydrology (14%) and nuclear engineering and technology (9%)

  16. Effect of Oral Midazolam Premedication on Children's Co-operation Before General Anesthesia in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Nasser; Shahtusi, Mina; Haj Norousali Tehrani, Maryam; Nazari, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Premedication is expedient in reducing the psychological trauma from recalling the unpleasant pre-anesthetic phases, hence, inducing a trouble-free anesthesia. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of oral midazolam in co-operation of the subjects before general anesthesia and in recalling the pre-anesthetic phases, performed on children candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia. In this prospective clinical trial study, 62 healthy non-cooperative children, candidate for dental treatment under general anesthesia, were randomly divided into study and control groups. The children received 20ml orange juice, 20 minutes before starting the anesthesia. The juice of the test group contained 0.5mg/kg of midazolam and that of the control group included no medication. The induction and the maintenance process of anesthesia were similar in both groups. The manner of subjects when separated from parents, their cooperation during intravenous catheterization, and recalling the pre-anesthetic events were recorded. Data were analyzed by adopting chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. Most of the children in the test group had a comfortable separation from parents, restful IV catheterization and 90% of the subjects did not recall the pre-anesthetic events. Under the circumstances of this study, it could be concluded that 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam premedication is effective for comfortable separation of children from parents and restful IV catheterization and also forgetting the pre-anesthetic events.

  17. [Does co-operation research provide approaches to explain the changes in the German hospital market?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, C; Leidl, R

    2004-11-01

    The German hospital market faces an extensive process of consolidation. In this change hospitals consider cooperation as one possibility to improve competitiveness. To investigate explanations of changes in the German hospital market by theoretical approaches of cooperation research. The aims and mechanism of the theories, their relevance in terms of contents and their potential for empirical tests were used as criteria to assess the approaches, with current and future trends in the German hospital market providing the framework. Based on literature review, six theoretical approaches were investigated: industrial organization, transaction cost theory, game theory, resource dependency, institutional theory, and co-operative investment and finance theory. In addition, the data needed to empirically test the theories were specified. As a general problem, some of the theoretical approaches set a perfect market as a precondition. This precondition is not met by the heavily regulated German hospital market. Given the current regulations and the assessment criteria, industrial organization as well as resource-dependency and institutional theory approaches showed the highest potential to explain various aspects of the changes in the hospital market. So far, none of the approaches investigated provides a comprehensive and empirically tested explanation of the changes in the German hospital market. However, some of the approaches provide a theoretical background for part of the changes. As this dynamic market is economically of high significance, there is a need for further development and empirical testing of relevant theoretical approaches.

  18. The Agency's Technical Co-operation programme with Egypt, 1982-1992. Country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The country programme summary reported here is one in the series of such studies being undertaken of the Agency's TC programme with Member States. With over $22.2 million of Agency support received, Egypt ranks first among all recipients of technical assistance, not only for the period 1958 - 1991, but also held this rank in each of the five years 1982 through 1986 and in 1988. More than half of this assistance has been provided in the form of equipment (57%), followed by expert services (19%), training (17%) and sub-contracts (7%). With 42% and 43%, respectively, the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund and extrabudgetary contributions hold almost equal shares in the total resources available, while in-kind assistance accounts for 9% and UNDP for 6% of the resources. With regard to project disbursement during the past ten years, by sector, the two largest areas have been nuclear safety (34%) and agriculture (33%), followed by nuclear engineering and technology (11%). Smaller shares - from 4% to 7% each-- have gone to industry and hydrology, nuclear medicine, nuclear physics and chemistry, and general atomic energy development

  19. Long-term results of preventive embolization of renal angiomyolipomas: evaluation of predictive factors of volume decrease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocquelet, A.; Cornelis, F.; Le Bras, Y.; Meyer, M.; Tricaud, E.; Lasserre, A.S.; Grenier, N. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pellegrin, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Urology and Vascular Imaging, Bordeaux (France); Ferriere, J.M.; Robert, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pellegrin, Urology Service, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of selective arterial embolization (SAE) of angiomyolipomas based on the percentage volume reduction after embolization and to identify predictive factors of volume decrease. Patients receiving prophylactic SAE of renal angiomyolipomas were included retrospectively over 3 years. The volume change after SAE and haemorrhagic or surgical events were recorded. Initial tumour volume, percentage tumour fat content, mean tumour density, embolic agent used, number of angiomyolipomas and tuberous sclerosis disease were evaluated as predictive factors of volume decrease. A total of 19 patients with 39 angiomyolipomas were included with median follow-up of 28 months (interquartile range 21-37 months). All treatments were technically successful (92 % primary and 8 % secondary). No distal bleeding or any increase in size or surgical nephrectomy after SAE was recorded. Mean volume reduction was 72 % (±24 %). Volumes before SAE (R{sup 2} = 0.276; p = 0.001), percentage fat content (R{sup 2} = 0.612; p < 0.0001) and mean angiomyolipoma density (R{sup 2} = 0.536; p < 0.0001) were identified as predictive factors of volume decrease. In multivariate regression, only percentage fat content influenced volume decreases. SAE is an efficient treatment for angiomyolipoma devascularisation and volume reduction. A significant reduction of volume is modulated by the initial volume and tissue composition of the tumour. (orig.)

  20. Main results of ten years co-operation with Nis in the field of physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salewski, P.; Gutschmidt, W.

    2001-01-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), the Russian Federation (RF) and the New Independent States (NIS) have been working closely together since 1992 in the field of physical protection. The success of this co-operative work is based on mutually beneficial agreements between corresponding FRG and RF ministries. The main working points of these agreements were a) a mutual exchange of information and experience, and b) assistance in developing licensing and regulatory procedures and guidelines, and c) physical upgrades to Russian nuclear facilities. The first two points have been established by holding seminars, workshops and by on-site instruction. Upgrades of RF nuclear installations, financed by the FRG were performed at: the Bochvar Institute in Moscow, the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow and the Mayak reactor plant in Chelyabinsk. This paper will outline the progress made to date and the GRS procedure for achieving successful co-operation with its RF and NIS counterparts. The major results of ten years cooperation will be shown. The following document describes the experiences gained during the evaluation of security reports by GRS as an external expert organisation in contract with the Supervisory Authorities. (authors)

  1. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste: Volume 3, Site evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M. [eds.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussion of the results for each site.

  2. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste: Volume 3, Site evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 provides details about the site-selection process, the performance-evaluation methodology, and the overall results of the analysis. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussion of the results for each site

  3. Automated planning target volume generation: an evaluation pitting a computer-based tool against human experts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketting, Case H.; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Kalet, Ira; Jacky, Jon; Kromhout-Schiro, Sharon; Hummel, Sharon; Unger, Jonathan; Fagan, Lawrence M.; Griffin, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Software tools are seeing increased use in three-dimensional treatment planning. However, the development of these tools frequently omits careful evaluation before placing them in clinical use. This study demonstrates the application of a rigorous evaluation methodology using blinded peer review to an automated software tool that produces ICRU-50 planning target volumes (PTVs). Methods and Materials: Seven physicians from three different institutions involved in three-dimensional treatment planning participated in the evaluation. Four physicians drew partial PTVs on nine test cases, consisting of four nasopharynx and five lung primaries. Using the same information provided to the human experts, the computer tool generated PTVs for comparison. The remaining three physicians, designated evaluators, individually reviewed the PTVs for acceptability. To exclude bias, the evaluators were blinded to the source (human or computer) of the PTVs they reviewed. Their scorings of the PTVs were statistically examined to determine if the computer tool performed as well as the human experts. Results: The computer tool was as successful as the human experts in generating PTVs. Failures were primarily attributable to insufficient margins around the clinical target volume and to encroachment upon critical structures. In a qualitative analysis, the human and computer experts displayed similar types and distributions of errors. Conclusions: Rigorous evaluation of computer-based radiotherapy tools requires comparison to current practice and can reveal areas for improvement before the tool enters clinical practice

  4. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 1: Volumes I--III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared in partial fulfillment of Task 2 of MITRE contract AT(49-24)-0376 for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment. Among the equipment parameters evaluated, as appropriate, are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation are listed

  5. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 2: Volumes IV--VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared for use by U.S. NRC. Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment (NUREG-0274). Among the equipment parameters evaluated are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation is listed. The following categories of equipment are covered: surveillance and alarm assessment components, contraband detection components, automated response components, general purpose display components, and general purpose communication components

  6. Cardiac variation of inferior vena cava: new concept in the evaluation of intravascular blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Tomida, Makoto; Ando, Takehiro; Sen, Kon; Inokuchi, Ryota; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Nakajima, Susumu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Yahagi, Naoki

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of the intravascular blood volume is an important assessment in emergency and critical care medicine. Measurement of the inferior vena cava (IVC) respiratory variation by ultrasound echography is useful, but it entails subjective problems. We have hypothesized that IVC cardiac variation is also correlated with intravascular blood volume and analyzed it automatically using computer software of two kinds, later comparing the results. Snakes, software to track boundaries by curve line continuity, and template matching software were incorporated into a computer with an ultrasound machine to track the short-axis view of IVC automatically and analyze it with approximation by ellipse. Eight healthy volunteers with temporary mild hypovolemia underwent echography before and after passive leg raising and while wearing medical anti-shock trousers. IVC cardiac variation was visually decreased by both leg raising and medical anti-shock trousers. The collapse index (maximum - minimum/maximum) of area during three cardiac beats was decreased showing a good relationship to fluid load simulations; 0.24 ± 0.03 at baseline versus 0.11 ± 0.01 with leg raising and 0.12 ± 0.01 with medical anti-shock trousers. In conclusion, IVC cardiac variation has the potential to provide an evaluation of water volume. It presents some advantages in mechanical analysis over respiratory variation. At the very least, we need to exercise some caution with cardiac variation when evaluating respiratory variation.

  7. Student Perceptions of Social Learning Space: Designing and Implementing a Co-Operative Assessment Task in Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Depaz, Iris; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from a case study of co-operative, group-based assessment in Pharmacology for second-year undergraduates at The University of Queensland, Australia. Students enrolled in the 2005 Bachelor of Science and 2006 Bachelor of Pharmacy degree programs, were early users of the university's new Collaborative Teaching and Learning Centre…

  8. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Peter; Dahlberg, Gunilla; Grieshaber, Susan; Mantovani, Susanna; May, Helen; Pence, Alan; Rayna, Sylvie; Swadener, Beth Blue; Vandenbroeck, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is initiating the International Early Learning Study, a cross-national assessment of early learning outcomes involving the testing of 5-year-old children in participating countries. The authors use this colloquium to inform members of the early childhood community about this project and to…

  9. Strategy-Based Development of Teacher Educators' ICT Competence through a Co-operative Staff Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, Jari; Lattu, Matti; Juuti, Kalle; Meisalo, Veijo

    2006-01-01

    An ICT strategy and an implementation plan for teacher education were created in a co-operative process. Visions and expectations of staff members and students were registered by questionnaires and by making notes during sessions in which the strategy was created. Thereafter, an implementation document, where the staff development programme and…

  10. The Effect of Interviewer Experience, Attitudes, Personality and Skills on Respondent Co-operation with Face-to-Face Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Jäckle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of interviewers' experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills in determining survey co-operation, conditional on contact. We take the perspective that these characteristics influence interviewers' behaviour and hence influence the doorstep interaction between interviewer and sample member. Previous studies of the association between doorstep behaviour and co-operation have not directly addressed the role of personality traits and inter-personal skills and most have been based on small samples of interviewers. We use a large sample of 842 face-to-face interviewers working for a major survey institute and analyse co-operation outcomes for over 100,000 cases contacted by those interviewers over a 13-month period. We find evidence of effects of experience, attitudes, personality traits and inter-personal skills on co-operation rates. Several of the effects of attitudes and inter-personal skills are explained by differences in experience, though some independent effects remain. The role of attitudes, personality and skills seems to be greatest for the least experienced interviewers.

  11. The Effects of 10 Communication Modes on the Behavior of Teams During Co-Operative Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochsman, Richard B.; Chapanis, Alphonse

    1974-01-01

    Sixty teams of two college students each solved credible "real world" problems co-operatively. Conversations were carried on in one of 10 modes of communication: (1) typewriting only, (2) handwriting only, (3) handwriting and typewriting, (4) typewriting and video, (5) handwriting and video, (6) voice only, (7) voice and typewriting, (8) voice and…

  12. FY 1998 New Sunshine Project. International co-operative project (Summary); 1998 nendo new sunshine keikaku. Kokusai kyoryoku jigyo (sogoban)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Described herein are the basic plans for the international co-operative projects for development of technologies for commercialization of photovoltaic power systems (e.g., IEA co-operative programme on Photovoltaic Power Systems), and the minutes of the FY 1997 and 1998 meetings of the Solar Energy Technology International Research Co-operative Committee. Japan is responsible for implementing the following projects for promoting international cooperation for, e.g., IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS): research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange, introduction promotion, etc. for IEA/PVPS Programme; and research and development, demonstration, analysis, information exchange, introduction promotion, etc. for IEA/Solar Heating and Cooling Programme. Japan is also implementing the co-operative projects for the photovoltaic power systems with the Summit participants, based on Science and Technology Working Group established by the Versailles Summit, technology cooperation with, e.g., Australia, and bilateral information exchange and technological survey projects with those countries which have already developed solar energy systems, e.g., USA, France, Spain and Italy. (NEDO)

  13. Is the Ownership Structure Model a Decisive Determinant of Co-Operatives' Financial Success? A Financial Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogeras, N.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Kuikman, J.; Doumpos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. In this paper, the financial/ownership structures of agribusiness co-operatives (co-ops) are analyzed in order to examine whether new co-op models perform better than the more traditional ones. The assessment procedure introduces a new financial decision-aid approach, which is based on

  14. From Library Co-operation to Consortia: Comparing Experiences in the European Union with the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien van Borm

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Copeter is one of the few Tempus/Tacis projects about consortium building: bringing libraries together in a consortium in order to achieve common goals. This article will attempt to answer three main questions: 1. What factors create good library co-operation? 2. What are the conditions for success? 3. Is the Copeter consortium fulfilling these requirements?

  15. Evaluation of axillary dose coverage following whole breast radiotherapy: Variation with the breast volume and shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Artur; Gomes Pereira, Helena; Azevedo, Isabel; Gomes, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the axillary dose coverage in patients treated with tridimensional whole breast radiotherapy (3D-WBRT), according to the breast volume and shape in treatment position. Background: Several studies have demonstrated an insufficient dose contribution to the axillary levels, using 3D-WBRT, remaining unclear whether the breast volume and shape can influence it. Materials and methods: We retrospectively delineated the axillary levels on planning CT-images of 100 patients, treated with 3D-WBRT along 2012 in our institution. To estimate the shape we established an anatomic CT-based interval, defined as the Thoracic Extent (TE). The breast volume matched its CTV. Mean dose levels and V95 (volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose) were evaluated. Results: Mean axillary level I (A1), II (A2) and III (A3) volume was 56.1 cc, 16.5 cc and 18.9 cc, respectively, and mean doses were 43.9 Gy, 38.6 Gy and 19.5 Gy. For breast volumes of <800 cc, 800–999 cc, 1000–1199 cc and >1200 cc, mean A1 V95 was 38%, 51%, 61.2% and 57.2% whereas median A2 V95 was 8.3%, 13.4%, 19.4% and 28% respectively. Regarding shape, where the breast relative position to the TE was categorized in intervals between 31% and 40%, 41% and 50%, 51% and 60%, and 61% and 70%, mean A1 V95 was 38.7%, 43.1%, 51.1% and 77.3% whereas mean A2 V95 was 6.1%, 11.2%, 17.1% and 37% respectively. Conclusions: We observed inadequate dose coverage to all axillary levels, even after applying a sub-analysis accounting for different breast volumes and shapes. Although higher doses were associated with the more voluminous and pendulous breasts, axillary coverage with 3D-WBRT seems to be inefficient, regardless of the breast morphology

  16. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  17. An evaluation of volume-based morphometry for prediction of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schmitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Voxel-based morphometry from conventional T1-weighted images has proved effective to quantify Alzheimer's disease (AD related brain atrophy and to enable fairly accurate automated classification of AD patients, mild cognitive impaired patients (MCI and elderly controls. Little is known, however, about the classification power of volume-based morphometry, where features of interest consist of a few brain structure volumes (e.g. hippocampi, lobes, ventricles as opposed to hundreds of thousands of voxel-wise gray matter concentrations. In this work, we experimentally evaluate two distinct volume-based morphometry algorithms (FreeSurfer and an in-house algorithm called MorphoBox for automatic disease classification on a standardized data set from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Results indicate that both algorithms achieve classification accuracy comparable to the conventional whole-brain voxel-based morphometry pipeline using SPM for AD vs elderly controls and MCI vs controls, and higher accuracy for classification of AD vs MCI and early vs late AD converters, thereby demonstrating the potential of volume-based morphometry to assist diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  19. Developing and Evaluating Prototype of Waste Volume Monitoring Using Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathhan Arief, Mohamad; Lumban Gaol, Ford

    2017-06-01

    In Indonesia, especially Jakarta have a lot of garbage strewn that can be an eyesore and also cause pollution that can carry diseases. Garbage strewn can cause many things, one of her dues is bins are overflowing due to the full so it can not accommodate the waste dumped from other people. Thus, the author created a new method for waste disposal more systematic. In creating new method requires a technology to supports, then the author makes a prototype for waste volume monitoring. By using the internet of things prototype of waste volume monitoring may give notification to the sanitary agency that waste in the trash bin needs to be disposal. In this study, conducted the design and manufactured of prototype waste volume monitoring using LinkItONE board based by Arduino and an ultrasonic sensor for appliance senses. Once the prototype is completed, evaluation in order to determine whether the prototype will function properly. The result showed that the expected function of a prototype waste volume monitoring can work well.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  1. The Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization : implications for Northeast Asian regional security co-operation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper identifies opportunities for co-operation on regional development and security in the North Pacific region. The Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) was created in 1993 during bilateral negotiations between the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (US-DPRK) over North Korea's alleged nuclear weapons program. The negotiations resulted in an agreement to freeze North Korea's known nuclear weapons program in return for the construction of two proliferation-resistant 100 MWe light water reactors (LWR) in North Korea, and the provision of 500,000 tons of heavy fuel oil per year until the completion of the LWR construction as compensation for lost energy production capacity resulting from the shutting down of North Korea's nuclear reactors. The author described the activities of KEDO and examined its internal dynamics. The unique circumstances that produced the Agreed Framework and KEDO in response to a major international crisis of the nuclear program in the DPRK were also highlighted along with the US-DPRK bilateral agreement and the multilateral institution involving the United States, South Korea, Japan and the European Union. Financial support from Australia and Canada was discussed along with the mechanism for engaging North Korea in regularized interaction and technical cooperation. It was concluded that KEDO's record of successes and failures is mixed. The energy security issue has been identified as an area that could result in conflict among Northeast Asian countries which are increasingly dependent on oil supplies from the Middle East. In response, numerous multilateral financing mechanisms have been developed to promote joint business opportunities that exploit natural gas resources in the Russian Far East to address Japanese, Korean and Chinese energy needs. 35 refs

  2. IAEA Technical Co-operation activities: Asia and the Pacific. Workshop on training nuclear laboratory technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeed, S.S.

    1976-01-01

    The workshop was held to exchange information on existing facilities and programmes in Asia and the Pacific for training nuclear laboratory technicians, to identify future training needs and to assess the need for IAEA's involvement in this field. As the participants outlined the requirements for nuclear laboratory technician training and the facilities available in their respective countries, it became evident that, in addition to the training of radioisotope laboratory technicians, they also wished to review the need for technician training for the operation of nuclear power plants and industrial application of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the workshop were extended accordingly. The opening address by Chang Suk Lee, the Korean Vice Minister of Science and Technology, noted the valuable contribution to quality control and other industrial uses that nuclear techniques have made in his country. He also reviewed the application of nuclear techniques in Korean agriculture and medicine. The participants explored various forms of co-operation that could be established between countries of the region. Exchange programmes, not only for students but also for expert teachers, and the exchange or loan of equipment were suggested. It was felt that some generalized training courses could be organized on a regional basis, and two countries advocated the setting up of a regional training centre. One suggestion was to arrange regional training courses in special fields that would move from one country to another. The need was felt for periodic regional meetings on training methods, course content and other questions relating to training of laboratory technicians. The IAEA was requested to act as a clearinghouse for information on available training facilities in the region and to advise on the curricula for technician training courses. The Agency was also asked to organize short courses for the training of instructors of technicians in the various fields of atomic

  3. Co-operation for weapon technology transfers and technological/economic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, K.

    1995-01-01

    This report proposes the basic philosophy of security export controls and future directions thereof, taking into account global changes in the security environment. We hope that appropriate policies based on the proposals will be implemented expeditiously. When the government implements security export control policy, it is most essential to obtain the understanding and co-operation of the general public, as well as exporters. It is also important to closely co-ordinate efforts within the government, including information sharing among the ministries and agencies concerned. Moreover, the government should make efforts to raise the effectiveness of policy measures by fully explaining Japanese security export control policy to other countries, and taking a leading role in international efforts for co-ordination. The proposals in this report provide an overview of future security export controls. Needless to say, there is the need for further and more detailed consideration of individual policy measures. Especially in introducing new controls to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles, it is necessary to conduct deliberations taking into full consideration the actual situation surrounding transactions, and to provide a sufficient lead-time. Moreover, it is expected that there will be further, major changes in the international security environment, including the countries of concern. It will be necessary to reexamine security export control policy, recognizing that those changes will alter the premises of such policy. Finally, we wish to state the hope that this report, the first attempt, by the Industrial Structure Council, to focus Japanese thinking on security export controls will act as a catalyst in deepening public understanding of security export controls, and enhancing Japanese security export controls

  4. Portal blood flow volume measurement in schistosomal patients: evaluation of Doppler ultrasonography reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Colleoni, Ramiro

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of Doppler ultrasonography in the measurement of portal blood flow volume in schistosomal patients. Materials and methods: Prospective, transversal, observational and self-paired study evaluating 21 patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to Doppler ultrasonography performed by three independent observers for measurement of portal blood flow. Pairwise interobserver agreement was calculated by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient, paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Interobserver agreement was excellent. Intraclass correlation ranged from 80.6% to 93.0% (IC at 95% [65.3% ; 95.8%]), with the Pearson's correlation coefficient ranging between 81.6% and 92.7% with no statistically significant interobserver difference regarding the mean portal blood flow volume measured by Doppler ultrasonography (p = 0.954 / 0.758 / 0.749). Conclusion: Doppler ultrasonography has demonstrated to be a reliable method for measuring the portal blood flow volume in patients with portal hypertension secondary to schistosomiasis, with a good interobserver agreement. (author)

  5. Portal blood flow volume measurement in schistosomal patients: evaluation of Doppler ultrasonography reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Alberto Ribeiro de Souza; Santos, Jose Eduardo Mourao; Moulin, Danilo Sales; Shigueoka, David Carlos; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: ar.leao@uol.com.br; Colleoni, Ramiro [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Gastroenterologia

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of Doppler ultrasonography in the measurement of portal blood flow volume in schistosomal patients. Materials and methods: Prospective, transversal, observational and self-paired study evaluating 21 patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to Doppler ultrasonography performed by three independent observers for measurement of portal blood flow. Pairwise interobserver agreement was calculated by means of the intraclass correlation coefficient, paired t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Interobserver agreement was excellent. Intraclass correlation ranged from 80.6% to 93.0% (IC at 95% [65.3% ; 95.8%]), with the Pearson's correlation coefficient ranging between 81.6% and 92.7% with no statistically significant interobserver difference regarding the mean portal blood flow volume measured by Doppler ultrasonography (p = 0.954 / 0.758 / 0.749). Conclusion: Doppler ultrasonography has demonstrated to be a reliable method for measuring the portal blood flow volume in patients with portal hypertension secondary to schistosomiasis, with a good interobserver agreement. (author)

  6. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  7. Evaluation Methodology. The Evaluation Exchange. Volume 11, Number 2, Summer 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Julia, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This is the third issue of "The Evaluation Exchange" devoted entirely to the theme of methodology, though every issue tries to identify new methodological choices, the instructive ways in which people have applied or combined different methods, and emerging methodological trends. For example, lately "theories of change" have gained almost…

  8. Wetlands Research Program. Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1. Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    activities (Shahane 1982). Models for quan- tifying the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al... Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech- relationship of blue

  9. Wetlands Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1: Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al. 198 1I/*L). 28. Direct Alteration (predictor for...Manage. 7:151-153. York. Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech

  10. Evaluation of PET/MRI for Tumor Volume Delineation for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kyle; Mullins, Brandon T; Falchook, Aaron D; Lian, Jun; He, Kelei; Shen, Dinggang; Dance, Michael; Lin, Weili; Sills, Tiffany M; Das, Shiva K; Huang, Benjamin Y; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), combined positron emitted tomography and CT (PET/CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used in head and neck radiation planning. Hybrid PET/MRI has garnered attention for potential added value in cancer staging and treatment planning. Herein, we compare PET/MRI vs. planning CT for head and neck cancer gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. We prospectively enrolled patients with head and neck cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation to 60-70 Gy using IMRT. We performed pretreatment contrast-enhanced planning CT and gadolinium-enhanced PET/MRI. Primary and nodal volumes were delineated on planning CT (GTV-CT) prospectively before treatment and PET/MRI (GTV-PET/MRI) retrospectively after treatment. GTV-PET/MRI was compared to GTV-CT using separate rigid registrations for each tumor volume. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) metric evaluating spatial overlap and modified Hausdorff distance (mHD) evaluating mean orthogonal distance difference were calculated. Minimum dose to 95% of GTVs (D95) was compared. Eleven patients were evaluable (10 oropharynx, 1 larynx). Nine patients had evaluable primary tumor GTVs and seven patients had evaluable nodal GTVs. Mean primary GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 13.2 and 14.3 cc, with mean intersection 8.7 cc, DSC 0.63, and mHD 1.6 mm. D95 was 65.3 Gy for primary GTV-CT vs. 65.2 Gy for primary GTV-PET/MRI. Mean nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 19.0 and 23.0 cc, with mean intersection 14.4 cc, DSC 0.69, and mHD 2.3 mm. D95 was 62.3 Gy for both nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI. In this series of patients with head and neck (primarily oropharynx) cancer, PET/MRI and CT-GTVs had similar volumes (though there were individual cases with larger differences) with overall small discrepancies in spatial overlap, small mean orthogonal distance differences, and similar radiation doses.

  11. Metabolic tumour volumes measured at staging in lymphoma: methodological evaluation on phantom experiments and patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Paris-Est University, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, EAC CNRS 7054, Hopital Henri Mondor AP-HP, Creteil (France); Sasanelli, Myriam; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopital Henri Mondor and Paris-Est University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Casasnovas, Rene Olivier [CHU Le Bocage, Department of Hematology, Dijon (France); Luminari, Stefano [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Diagnostic, Clinic and Public Health Medicine, Modena (Italy); Fioroni, Federica [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Medical Physics, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Coriani, Chiara [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Radiology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Masset, Helene [Henri Mondor Hospital, Department of Radiophysics, Creteil (France); Gobbi, Paolo G. [University of Pavia, Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Hematology, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Versari, Annibale [Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    The presence of a bulky tumour at staging on CT is an independent prognostic factor in malignant lymphomas. However, its prognostic value is limited in diffuse disease. Total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) determined on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT could give a better evaluation of the total tumour burden and may help patient stratification. Different methods of TMTV measurement established in phantoms simulating lymphoma tumours were investigated and validated in 40 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Data were processed by two nuclear medicine physicians in Reggio Emilia and Creteil. Nineteen phantoms filled with {sup 18}F-saline were scanned; these comprised spherical or irregular volumes from 0.5 to 650 cm{sup 3} with tumour-to-background ratios from 1.65 to 40. Volumes were measured with different SUVmax thresholds. In patients, TMTV was measured on PET at staging by two methods: volumes of individual lesions were measured using a fixed 41 % SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub 41}) and a variable visually adjusted SUVmax threshold (TMTV{sub var}). In phantoms, the 41 % threshold gave the best concordance between measured and actual volumes. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect. In patients, the agreement between the reviewers for TMTV{sub 41} measurement was substantial (ρ {sub c} = 0.986, CI 0.97 - 0.99) and the difference between the means was not significant (212 ± 218 cm{sup 3} for Creteil vs. 206 ± 219 cm{sup 3} for Reggio Emilia, P = 0.65). By contrast the agreement was poor for TMTV{sub var}. There was a significant direct correlation between TMTV{sub 41} and normalized LDH (r = 0.652, CI 0.42 - 0.8, P <0.001). Higher disease stages and bulky tumour were associated with higher TMTV{sub 41}, but high TMTV{sub 41} could be found in patients with stage 1/2 or nonbulky tumour. Measurement of baseline TMTV in lymphoma using a fixed 41% SUVmax threshold is reproducible and correlates with the other parameters for tumour mass evaluation

  12. Design and implementation of co-operative control strategy for hybrid AC/DC microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Rasel

    This thesis is mainly divided in two major sections: 1) Modeling and control of AC microgrid, DC microgrid, Hybrid AC/DC microgrid using distributed co-operative control, and 2) Development of a four bus laboratory prototype of an AC microgrid system. At first, a distributed cooperative control (DCC) for a DC microgrid considering the state-of-charge (SoC) of the batteries in a typical plug-in-electric-vehicle (PEV) is developed. In DC microgrids, this methodology is developed to assist the load sharing amongst the distributed generation units (DGs), according to their ratings with improved voltage regulation. Subsequently, a DCC based control algorithm for AC microgrid is also investigated to improve the performance of AC microgrid in terms of power sharing among the DGs, voltage regulation and frequency deviation. The results validate the advantages of the proposed methodology as compared to traditional droop control of AC microgrid. The DCC-based control methodology for AC microgrid and DC microgrid are further expanded to develop a DCC-based power management algorithm for hybrid AC/DC microgrid. The developed algorithm for hybrid microgrid controls the power flow through the interfacing converter (IC) between the AC and DC microgrids. This will facilitate the power sharing between the DGs according to their power ratings. Moreover, it enables the fixed scheduled power delivery at different operating conditions, while maintaining good voltage regulation and improved frequency profile. The second section provides a detailed explanation and step-by-step design and development of an AC/DC microgrid testbed. Controllers for the three-phase inverters are designed and tested on different generation units along with their corresponding inductor-capacitor-inductor (LCL) filters to eliminate the switching frequency harmonics. Electric power distribution line models are developed to form the microgrid network topology. Voltage and current sensors are placed in the proper

  13. Evaluation of Neonatal Lung Volume Growth by Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Melissa A; Walkup, Laura L; Tkach, Jean A; Higano, Nara S; Lim, Foong Yen; Haberman, Beth; Woods, Jason C; Kingma, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate postnatal lung volume in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and determine if a compensatory increase in lung volume occurs during the postnatal period. Using a novel pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging method for imaging neonatal lungs, the postnatal lung volumes in infants with CDH were determined and compared with prenatal lung volumes obtained via late gestation magnetic resonance imaging. Infants with left-sided CDH (2 mild, 9 moderate, and 1 severe) were evaluated. The total lung volume increased in all infants, with the contralateral lung increasing faster than the ipsilateral lung (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 3.0 mL/week vs 3.4 ± 2.1 mL/week, P = .005). In contrast to prenatal studies, the volume of lungs of infants with more severe CDH grew faster than the lungs of infants with more mild CDH (Spearman's ρ=-0.086, P = .01). Although the contralateral lung volume grew faster in both mild and moderate groups, the majority of total lung volume growth in moderate CDH came from increased volume of the ipsilateral lung (42% of total lung volume increase in the moderate group vs 32% of total lung volume increase in the mild group, P = .09). Analysis of multiple clinical variables suggests that increased weight gain was associated with increased compensatory ipsilateral lung volume growth (ρ = 0.57, P = .05). These results suggest a potential for postnatal catch-up growth in infants with pulmonary hypoplasia and suggest that weight gain may increase the volume growth of the more severely affected lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of anterior pituitary gland volume in childhood using three-dimensional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marziali, Simone; Gaudiello, Fabrizio; Ferone, Ernesto; Colangelo, Vittorio; Floris, Roberto; Simonetti, Giovanni; Bozzao, Alessandro; Scire, Giuseppe; Simonetti, Alessandra; Boscherini, Brunetto

    2004-01-01

    Background: Three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) is a reliable tool for the evaluation of anatomical volumes. Volumetric measurement of the normal anterior pituitary gland in childhood has been performed in the past by 2D-MRI calculations, but has inherent inaccuracies. Objective: To obtain accurate normal anterior pituitary gland volume in childhood using 3D-MRI coronal sections. Materials and methods: The anterior pituitary gland was measured using coronal T1-weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences (section thickness 0.75 mm). The study group was composed of 95 prepubertal children (age range 2 months-10 years) with clinically normal pituitary function and no pituitary or brain abnormalities. Results: A measurement error of 0.2-0.4% was assessed by using a phantom study. Volumetric evaluation of the anterior pituitary gland showed progressive growth of the gland from a mean 131±24 mm 3 at 2-12 months, to 249±25 mm 3 at 1-4 years and 271±29 mm 3 at 5-10 years. Conclusions: These data may be useful for paediatricians in the evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine diseases, in particular growth hormone deficiency. (orig.)

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of localized skin cooling on nasal airway volume by acoustic rhinometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagiwa, M; Hilberg, O; Pedersen, O F; Lundqvist, G R

    1990-04-01

    Ten healthy subjects (four men and six women) were subjected to localized skin cooling by submersion for 5 min of both feet and, in another experiment, one hand and forearm into ice-cold water. Repeated measurements of nasal cavity volumes by a new method, acoustic rhinometry, showed characteristic patterns ranging from marked increases in volumes lasting the entire exposure period to transient monophasic or biphasic responses to no change at all. The pattern in individual subjects was reproducible with the two methods of cooling, and it could be characterized by five types when related to baseline measurements during the preexposure period. Because of large minute-to-minute variations, probably determined by local differences and fluctuations in blood flow in tissues through the nose, evaluation of induced changes in the nasal cavity volume cannot be based on single measurements as has frequently been done in the past by using rhinomanometry as the experimental method. The mechanisms behind the characteristic patterns in immediate human nasal response to local skin cooling challenge remains to be explored.

  17. A prospective evaluation of hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory deficits following cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting Martin; Grimm, Jimm; McIntyre, Riley; Anderson-Keightly, Heather; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Hales, Russell K; Moore, Joseph; Vannorsdall, Tracy; Redmond, Kristin J

    2017-11-01

    To prospectively evaluate hippocampal radiation dose volume effects and memory decline following cranial irradiation. Effects of hippocampal radiation over a wide range of doses were investigated by combining data from three prospective studies. In one, adults with small cell lung cancer received hippocampal-avoidance prophylactic cranial irradiation. In the other two, adults with glioblastoma multiforme received neural progenitor cell sparing radiation or no sparing with extra dose delivered to subventricular zone. Memory was measured by the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 6 months after radiation. Dose-volume histograms were generated and dose-response data were fitted to a nonlinear model. Of 60 patients enrolled, 30 were analyzable based on HVLT-R DR testing completion status, baseline HVLT-R DR and intracranial metastasis/recurrence or prior hippocampal resection status. We observed a dose-response of radiation to the hippocampus with regard to decline in HVLT-R DR. D50% of the bilateral hippocampi of 22.1 Gy is associated with 20% risk of decline. This prospective study demonstrates an association between hippocampal dose volume effects and memory decline measured by HVLT-R DR over a wide dose range. These data support a potential benefit of hippocampal sparing and encourage continued trial enrollment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Noninvasive measurement of cardiopulmonary blood volume: evaluation of the centroid method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, F.M.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary blood volume (CPV) and mean pulmonary transit time (MTT) determined by radionuclide measurements (Tc-99m HSA) were compared with values obtained from simultaneous dye-dilution (DD) studies (indocyanine green). The mean transit time was obtained from radionuclide curves by two methods: the peak-to-peak time and the interval between the two centroids determined from the right and left-ventricular time-concentration curves. Correlation of dye-dilution MTT and peak-to-peak time was significant (r = 0.79, p < 0.001), but its correlation with centroid-derived values was better (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). CPV values (using the centroid method for radionuclide technique) correlated significantly with values derived from dye-dilution curves (r = 0.74, p < 0.001). Discrepancies between the two were greater the more rapid the circulation (r = 0.61, p < 0.01), suggesting that minor inaccuracies of dye-dilution methods, due to positioning or delay of the system, can become magnified in hyperkinetic conditions. The radionuclide method is simple, repeatable, and noninvasive, and it provides simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics. Further, calculation of the ratio of cardiopulmonary to total blood volume can be used as an index of overall venous distensibility and relocation of intravascular blood volume

  19. Development of renewable energetics needs knowledge, skills and co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmet, Henn; Tiit, Valdur

    2000-01-01

    develop tight co-operation with all the interested institutions and people. We hope that for the time of the next conference already the Estonian Renewable Energetics Council will be established to fulfil this task successfully. We have also good conditions to develop mutually useful international co-operation. The Estonian Agricultural University is pleased that we could give our share to the success of the conference that took place in our beautiful new main building in Tartu and that we could support the publishing of the present transactions. We hope that we are also in the future able to give our contribution for the development of renewable energetics

  20. Computer-aided design evaluation of harvestable mandibular bone volume: a clinical and tomographic human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdugo, Fernando; Simonian, Krikor; Raffaelli, Luca; D'Addona, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate and compare the volume of bone graft material that can be safely harvested from the mandibular symphysis and rami using a computer-aided design (CAD) software program. Preoperative computerized tomography scans from 40 patients undergoing bone augmentation procedures were analyzed. Symphysis and rami cross sections were mapped using a CAD software program (AutoCAD(®), Autodesk, Inc., San Rafael, CA, USA) to evaluate the bone volume that can be safely harvested. CAD calculations were contrasted to intrasurgical measurements in a subgroup of 20 individuals. CAD calculations yielded a safe harvestable osseous volume of 1.44 cm(3) ± 0.49 for the symphysis and 0.82 cm(3) ± 0.21 for each ramus (p < .0001, confidence interval [CI] 95%: 0.47-0.78). These measurements were significantly lower (p < .0001) than the bone volumes harvested intrasurgically for both symphysis and ramus, respectively (2.40 cm(3) ± 0.50 vs. 2.65 cm(3) ± 0.45). CAD calculations of harvestable symphysis and ramus bone translated into an average of 2.40 cm(3) ± 0.50 (range: 1.80-3.10 cm(3)) and 2.65 cm(3) ± 0.45 (range: 1.90-3.50) of particulate bone graft intrasurgically, respectively. Ramus cortical was significantly thicker than the symphysis cortical, 2.9 ± 0.4 mm versus 2.19 mm ± 0.4 mm (p < .0001, CI 95%: 0.45-1.03). The symphysis and rami are good harvesting sources to obtain dense corticocancellous bone. The significant volumetric CAD differences between the symphysis and ramus seem to balance out intrasurgically and may be due to the greater cortical bone volume at the ramus area. It is plausible to harvest an average of 7.70 cm(3) from the symphysis and rami alone. The use of a CAD software program can enhance surgical treatment planning prior to bone transplantation. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Co-operative Inquiry Into Generating, Describing, and Transforming Knowledge About De-escalation Practices in Mental Health Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berring, Lene Lauge; Hummelvoll, J. K.; Pedersen, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    De-escalation is concerned with managing violent behaviour without resorting to coercive measures. Co-operative Inquiry provided the conceptual basis for generating knowledge regarding de-escalation practices in acute mental health care settings. The research included service users and staff memb...... transforming violence management. Neighbouring mental health communities’ involvement strengthened the transformation process and assisted in validating the research results. © 2016, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.......De-escalation is concerned with managing violent behaviour without resorting to coercive measures. Co-operative Inquiry provided the conceptual basis for generating knowledge regarding de-escalation practices in acute mental health care settings. The research included service users and staff...... members as co-researchers and knowledge was generated in dynamic research cycles around an extended epistemology of knowing: experiential, presentational, propositional, and practical. Through this process, co-researchers became de-escalation learners, implementing de-escalation practices while...

  2. International co-operation in safety matters within the framework of the Commission of the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinck, W.; Balz, W.; Essler, W.; Tolley, B.; Gabolde, J.

    1981-01-01

    European Community (EC) countries realize that their energy demand cannot be met without a nuclear component, which is almost a necessity owing to its major economic advantages. Two typical areas where the Commission has stimulated intense international co-operation are as follows: The first broad area deals with efforts towards a gradual harmonization of regulatory health and safety practices and requirements for reactors of an industrially developed type, more specifically (light) water-cooled reactors. The second area concerns joint research programmes and co-ordination activities in research on nuclear safety (LWRs and LMFBRs). These two broad areas are closely interconnected. Information is also given on the existing network of bilateral and multilateral arrangements for the exchange of information of interest to the EC. In conclusion, some problems are highlighted where improvements could be made or where it seems crucial that increased international co-operation and especially agreement should come about. (author)

  3. The regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.

    1978-01-01

    The history of the Agreement, known as the RCA, is given and the operation of the Agreement, its achievements and current projects are described. The Agreement entered into force in 1972 for a period of five years and has been extended for an additional five years. Any IAEA Member State in the area of South Asia, South East Asia, the Pacific and the Far East may become a party to the Agreement. The purpose of the Agreement is to promote and co-ordinate research, development and training projects in nuclear science and technology through co-operation between the appropriate national institutions and with the assistance of the IAEA. The current RCA co-operative projects cover a broad spectrum of technologies and interests, among which are: food and agriculture, medicine, environmental research, industrial applications, training, research reactor use including radioisotope production, and physical research such as nuclear data programs

  4. Co-operation and economic relationship as determinants for competitiveness in the food sector: the Spanish wheat to bread chain

    OpenAIRE

    de Magistris, Tiziana; Gracia, Azucena

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the impact of co-operation amongst stakeholders of the food chain on enterprise competitiveness. The analysis focuses on the Spanish wheat to bread chain. A theoretical model is developed which covers the main components that define competitiveness (profitability, turnover, market share, customer loyalty and product quality), quality supply chain relationship (trust, commitment and satisfaction) and the main factors explaining supply chain relation...

  5. Inter-Firm Co-Operative Strategies In The Context Of Discontinuous Technological Change. The Case Of The Uk Optical Communications Systems Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spedale-Latimer (Simona)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAt times of discontinuous technological change co-operation represents a viable strategy for both incumbents and new-entrants, provided that the choice of co-operation is consistent with the firm's business strategy (market-pull vs. technology-push) and with its degree of organizational

  6. A European union (EU) co-operation program: Integral, innovative, industrial product design and development, I3PD(2) and project led education (PLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Hvid

    2007-01-01

    and society. Other primary objectives are to ensure high-quality research and education and to enhance technology transfer and to stimulate industry-university partnerships within the EU and stimulate Inter-University co-operation programmes. In this project we are focusing on the importance of curriculum...... development, teachers mobility, exchange of students and industrial co-operation....

  7. Developing a regulatory framework for the financial, management performance and social reporting systems for co-operatives in developing countries: A case study of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Nieman

    2016-08-01

    Findings: The research performed showed that existing reporting frameworks and practices do not meet the reporting requirements of co-operatives in all aspects because of the different nature of co-operatives as opposed to shareholder-owned entities.

  8. The Text of the Agreement of 8 July Extending the Asian Regional Co-Operative Project on Food Irradiation. Extension Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The text of the Agreement to Extend the Agreement of 23 May 1980 Establishing the Asian Regional Co-operative Project on Food Irradiation within the framework of the Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology of 1972, as extended in 1977 and in 1982, is reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  9. Decision making and co-operation between stakeholders within the process of sick leave. A case study in a Danish municipality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Kristina; Andersen, John Sahl; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    . The motivation for co-operation was low due to low status of social medical issues, lack of feedback and lack of trust. The co-operation was characterized by sequential task integration. The stakeholders encountered difficulties when reciprocal task integration was needed. The decision making was affected...

  10. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  11. Climate protection in Germany`s bilateral development co-operation with the People`s Republic of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.

    1996-12-31

    For globally sustainable development to be achieved, three concerns are central: productive economic growth, social justice and ecological sustainability. Development co-operation supports the realisation of these three goals in partner countries by helping to alleviate poverty, promote economic growth through private-sector development and protect vital natural resources. The aim of globally sustainable development can only be achieved if industrial countries too implement necessary reforms and structural adjustments at every level. Co-operation efforts with partners must therefore be complemented by coherent policies at home. This is a matter of credibility, but also of developmental far-sightedness. Internal reforms in the industrial countries secure financial leeway for their providing foreign assistance in the longer term. Environmental and resource protection as a focal point of Germany`s development co-operation with the PRC aims to preserve vital natural resources, shape economic development in their partner countries in an ecologically sound manner and put China in a position to participate in global endeavours to protect the environment. Climate protection measures figure prominently in this area. This is justified given China`s share of global CO{sub 2} emissions and the potential for energy-saving measures and measures to increase power intensity. This potential is derived primarily from the possibility of using energy-efficient technologies, increasing the relatively low energy prices and making use of renewable sources of energy.

  12. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries, and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years, waste management has received increased attention at the national level and also internationally, to harmonize to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems, covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short-term but also the longer-term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority, particularly regarding high-level waste and alpha-bearing wastes. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high-level radioactive waste. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities. (author)

  13. Evaluation of maximum voided volume in Korean children by use of a 48-h frequency volume chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kim, Kyung Do; Kim, Young Sig; Kim, Jun Mo; Moon, Du Geon; Park, Sungchan; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Jae Min; Cho, Won Yeol

    2012-08-01

    Study Type - Diagnostic (validating cohort). Level of Evidence 2a. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The relationship between the maximum voided volume followed a linear curve. The formula presented, bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11], is thought to be a reasonable one for Korean children. Korean children have a smaller bladder capacity than that reported in previous Western studies. • To develop practical guidelines for the prediction of normal bladder capacity in Korean children measured by a frequency volume chart (FVC), maximum voided volume (MVV) is an important factor in the diagnosis of children with abnormal voiding function. • In all, 298 children, aged 3-13 years, with no history of voiding disorders volunteered for the study. The MVV was determined in 219 subjects by use of a completely recorded FVC. • Linear regression analysis was used to define the exact relationship between age and bladder capacity. An approximate formula related age to bladder capacity as follows: bladder capacity (mL) = 12 ×[age (years) + 11]. • The relationship between the MVV measured by a FVC by age (3-13 years) of Korean children followed a linear curve. • When applied to normal voiding patterns, the formula presented appears to be a reasonable one for Korean children. © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  14. Evaluation of bias-correction methods for ensemble streamflow volume forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hashino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble prediction systems are used operationally to make probabilistic streamflow forecasts for seasonal time scales. However, hydrological models used for ensemble streamflow prediction often have simulation biases that degrade forecast quality and limit the operational usefulness of the forecasts. This study evaluates three bias-correction methods for ensemble streamflow volume forecasts. All three adjust the ensemble traces using a transformation derived with simulated and observed flows from a historical simulation. The quality of probabilistic forecasts issued when using the three bias-correction methods is evaluated using a distributions-oriented verification approach. Comparisons are made of retrospective forecasts of monthly flow volumes for a north-central United States basin (Des Moines River, Iowa, issued sequentially for each month over a 48-year record. The results show that all three bias-correction methods significantly improve forecast quality by eliminating unconditional biases and enhancing the potential skill. Still, subtle differences in the attributes of the bias-corrected forecasts have important implications for their use in operational decision-making. Diagnostic verification distinguishes these attributes in a context meaningful for decision-making, providing criteria to choose among bias-correction methods with comparable skill.

  15. Introducing the Jacobian-volume-histogram of deforming organs: application to parotid shrinkage evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo; Liberini, Simone; Faggiano, Elena; Rizzo, Giovanna; Dell'Oca, Italo; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of elastic registration between images taken during radiotherapy is a measure of inter-fraction local deformation. The histogram of the Jacobian values (Jac) within an organ was introduced (JVH-Jacobian-volume-histogram) and first applied in quantifying parotid shrinkage. MVCTs of 32 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy for head-neck cancers were collected. Parotid deformation was evaluated through elastic registration between MVCTs taken at the first and last fractions. Jac was calculated for each voxel of all parotids, and integral JVHs were calculated for each parotid; the correlation between the JVH and the planning dose-volume histogram (DVH) was investigated. On average, 82% (±17%) of the voxels shrinks (Jac 50% (Jac < 0.5). The best correlation between the DVH and the JVH was found between V10 and V15, and Jac < 0.4-0.6 (p < 0.01). The best constraint predicting a higher number of largely compressing voxels (Jac0.5<7.5%, median value) was V15 ≥ 75% (OR: 7.6, p = 0.002). Jac and the JVH are promising tools for scoring/modelling toxicity and for evaluating organ/contour variations with potential applications in adaptive radiotherapy.

  16. Supporting the Co-operative Organisation of Rational Energy Use (SCORE). Bulgaria Country Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    SCORE stands for Supporting the Co-operative Organisation of Rational Energy Use. It aims at assisting the social transformation in the Central and Eastern European countries by creating self-supporting structures that are able to stimulate the efficient use of energy in end-user sectors. This document aims at presenting an in-depth institutional analysis of the energy efficiency situation in Bulgaria, including the current situation with regard to energy supply, consumption and environmental aspects, as well as an analysis of energy efficiency policies, instruments and organisations. Also, the document identifies problems related to energy efficiency in Bulgaria and indicates the areas of actions for an integrated SCORE programme in Bulgaria. The input for this process was provided by a survey among the main actors in the field, consisting of a questionnaire and interviews and a review of available information. The results were discussed in a workshop attended by the main stakeholders. The main characteristics of the Bulgarian energy sector are summarised in chapter 2. They indicate a high dependency on imported resources, a low quality of domestic fuels, a relatively high energy intensity of production and a low efficiency at supply and demand side with consider able potential for improvement. The restructuring of the sector has started but the process is far from completed. In the main towns heat is mainly supplied by district heating generated partly in co-generation plants. Gas distribution for public and residential buildings is quickly developing. In Chapter 3 the existing policies and actors are described and a 'roadmap' for energy efficiency actors is given. This provides the basis for defining the priorities for energy efficiency improvements presented in Chapter 4, by analysing the tools, policy instruments and organisations. Barriers and priority actions were defined in relation to the national policy level, the institutional structure, financial and

  17. Evaluation of methods for MR imaging of human right ventricular heart volumes and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauhiainen, T.; Jaervinen, V.M.; Hekali, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of two different imaging directions in the evaluation of human right ventricular (RV) heart volumes and mass with MR imaging; to compare breath-hold vs. non-breath-hold imaging in volume analysis; and to compare turbo inversion recovery imaging (TIR) with gradient echo imaging in RV mass measurement. Material and Methods: We examined 12 healthy volunteers (age 27-59 years). Breath-hold gradient echo MR imaging was performed in two imaging planes: 1) perpendicular to the RV inflow tract (RVIT view), and 2) in the transaxial view (TA view). The imaging was repeated in the TA view while the subjects were breathing freely. To analyze RV mass using TIR images, the RV was again imaged at end-diastole using the two views. The RV end-diastolic cavity (RVEDV) and muscle volume as well as end-systolic cavity volume (RVESV) were determined with the method of discs. All measurements were done blindly twice to assess repeatability of image analysis. To assess reproducibility of the measurements, 6 of the subjects were imaged twice at an interval of 5-9 weeks. Results: RVEDV averaged 133.2 ml, RVESV 61.5 ml and the RVmass 46.2 g in the RVIT view and 119.9 ml, 56.9 ml and 38.3 g in the TA view, respectively. The volumes obtained with breath-holding were slightly but not significantly smaller than the volumes obtained during normal breathing. There were no marked differences in the RV muscle mass obtained with gradient echo imaging compared to TIR imaging in either views. Repeatability of volume analysis was better in TA than RVIT view: the mean differences were 0.7±4.0 ml and 5.4±14.0 ml in end-diastole and 1.6±3.1 ml and 1.5±13.9 ml in end-systole, respectively. Repeatability of mass analysis was good in both TIR and cine images in the RVIT view but slightly better in TIR images: 0.5±2.4 g compared to 0.8±2.9 g in cine images. Reproducibility of imaging was good, mean differences for RVEDV and RVESV were 1.0±4.8 ml and 0.8±2.8 ml

  18. Substantial interobserver variation of thyroid volume and function by visual evaluation of thyroid (99m)Tc scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soelberg, Kerstin; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    (99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy is much used in the evaluation of patients with nodular goitre. We investigated the ability of experienced observers to estimate the thyroid 24-h (131)I uptake (RAIU) and the thyroid volume by visual evaluation of the scintigram.......(99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy is much used in the evaluation of patients with nodular goitre. We investigated the ability of experienced observers to estimate the thyroid 24-h (131)I uptake (RAIU) and the thyroid volume by visual evaluation of the scintigram....

  19. Model-based segmentation in orbital volume measurement with cone beam computed tomography and evaluation against current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Maximilian E H; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Friese, Karl-Ingo; Becker, Matthias; Wolter, Franz-Erich; Lichtenstein, Juergen T; Stoetzer, Marcus; Rana, Majeed; Essig, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective determination of the orbital volume is important in the diagnostic process and in evaluating the efficacy of medical and/or surgical treatment of orbital diseases. Tools designed to measure orbital volume with computed tomography (CT) often cannot be used with cone beam CT (CBCT) because of inferior tissue representation, although CBCT has the benefit of greater availability and lower patient radiation exposure. Therefore, a model-based segmentation technique is presented as a new method for measuring orbital volume and compared to alternative techniques. Both eyes from thirty subjects with no known orbital pathology who had undergone CBCT as a part of routine care were evaluated (n = 60 eyes). Orbital volume was measured with manual, atlas-based, and model-based segmentation methods. Volume measurements, volume determination time, and usability were compared between the three methods. Differences in means were tested for statistical significance using two-tailed Student's t tests. Neither atlas-based (26.63 ± 3.15 mm(3)) nor model-based (26.87 ± 2.99 mm(3)) measurements were significantly different from manual volume measurements (26.65 ± 4.0 mm(3)). However, the time required to determine orbital volume was significantly longer for manual measurements (10.24 ± 1.21 min) than for atlas-based (6.96 ± 2.62 min, p < 0.001) or model-based (5.73 ± 1.12 min, p < 0.001) measurements. All three orbital volume measurement methods examined can accurately measure orbital volume, although atlas-based and model-based methods seem to be more user-friendly and less time-consuming. The new model-based technique achieves fully automated segmentation results, whereas all atlas-based segmentations at least required manipulations to the anterior closing. Additionally, model-based segmentation can provide reliable orbital volume measurements when CT image quality is poor.

  20. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  1. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  2. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Function and task analysis. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R. [Hughes Training, Inc., Falls Church, VA (United States); Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Systems Technology

    1995-07-01

    As a treatment methodology, teletherapy selectively destroys cancerous and other tissue by exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. Sources of radiation are either a radioactive isotope, typically Cobalt-60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator. Records maintained by the NRC have identified instances of teletherapy misadministration where the delivered radiation dose has differed from the radiation prescription (e.g., instances where fractions were delivered to the wrong patient, to the wrong body part, or were too great or too little with respect to the defined treatment volume). Both human error and machine malfunction have led to misadministrations. Effective and safe treatment requires a concern for precision and consistency of human-human and human-machine interactions throughout the course of therapy. The present study is the first part of a series of human factors evaluations for identifying the root causes that lead to human error in the teletherapy environment. The human factors evaluations included: (1) a function and task analysis of teletherapy activities, (2) an evaluation of the human-system interfaces, (3) an evaluation of procedures used by teletherapy staff, (4) an evaluation of the training and qualifications of treatment staff (excluding the oncologists), (5) an evaluation of organizational practices and policies, and (6) an identification of problems and alternative approaches for NRC and industry attention. The present report addresses the function and task analysis of teletherapy activities and provides the foundation for the conduct of the subsequent evaluations. The report includes sections on background, methodology, a description of the function and task analysis, and use of the task analysis findings for the subsequent tasks. The function and task analysis data base also is included.

  3. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Function and task analysis. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I.

    1995-07-01

    As a treatment methodology, teletherapy selectively destroys cancerous and other tissue by exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. Sources of radiation are either a radioactive isotope, typically Cobalt-60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator. Records maintained by the NRC have identified instances of teletherapy misadministration where the delivered radiation dose has differed from the radiation prescription (e.g., instances where fractions were delivered to the wrong patient, to the wrong body part, or were too great or too little with respect to the defined treatment volume). Both human error and machine malfunction have led to misadministrations. Effective and safe treatment requires a concern for precision and consistency of human-human and human-machine interactions throughout the course of therapy. The present study is the first part of a series of human factors evaluations for identifying the root causes that lead to human error in the teletherapy environment. The human factors evaluations included: (1) a function and task analysis of teletherapy activities, (2) an evaluation of the human-system interfaces, (3) an evaluation of procedures used by teletherapy staff, (4) an evaluation of the training and qualifications of treatment staff (excluding the oncologists), (5) an evaluation of organizational practices and policies, and (6) an identification of problems and alternative approaches for NRC and industry attention. The present report addresses the function and task analysis of teletherapy activities and provides the foundation for the conduct of the subsequent evaluations. The report includes sections on background, methodology, a description of the function and task analysis, and use of the task analysis findings for the subsequent tasks. The function and task analysis data base also is included

  4. Evaluation of pulmonary disease using static lung volumes in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Pioggia, Giovanni; Caramella, Davide; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Zangani, Marta; Chinellato, Iolanda; Maggi, Fabrizio; Tezza, Giovanna; Macchia, Pierantonio; Boner, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    In primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) lung damage is usually evaluated by high-resolution CT (HRCT). To evaluate whether HRCT abnormalities and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were better predicted by spirometry or plethysmography. A cross-sectional study performed in consecutive patients with PCD who underwent sputum culture, spirometry, plethysmography and HRCT within 48 h. Principal component analysis and soft computing were used for data evaluation. Fifty patients (26 children) were studied. P aeruginosa infection was found in 40% of the patients and bronchiectasis in 88%. There was a correlation between infection with P aeruginosa and extent of bronchiectasis (p=0.009; r =0.367) and air-trapping (p=0.03; r =0.315). Moreover, there was an association between infection with P aeruginosa and residual volume (RV) values >150% (p=0.04) and RV/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio >140% (p=0.001), but not between infection with P aeruginosa and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))<80%, or forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF(25-75%))<70% or FEV(1)/FVC<70% (<80% in children). Severity of the total lung impairment on chest HRCT directly correlated with RV when expressed as per cent predicted (p=0.003; r =0.423), and RV/TLC (p<0.001; r =0.513) or when expressed as z scores (p=0.002, r =0.451 and p<0.001, r =0.536 respectively). Principal component analysis on plethysmographic but not on spirometry data allowed recognition of different severities of focal air trapping, atelectasis and extent of bronchiectasis. Plethysmography better predicts HRCT abnormalities than spirometry. Whether it might be a useful test to define populations of patients with PCD who should or should not have HRCT scans requires further longitudinal studies.

  5. Scintigraphic and MR perfusion imaging in preoperative evaluation for lung volume reduction surgery. Pilot study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johkoh, Takeshi; Mueller, N.L.; Kavanagh, P.V

    2000-01-01

    To compare MR perfusion imaging with perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary emphysema being considered for lung volume reduction surgery. Six patients with pulmonary emphysema and two normal individuals were evaluated by MR perfusion imaging, perfusion scintigraphy, and selective bilateral pulmonary angiography. MR images were obtained with an enhanced fast gradient recalled echo with three-dimensional Fourier transformation technique (efgre 3D) (6.3/1.3; flip angle, 30 deg C; field of view, 45-48 cm; matrix, 256 x 160). The presence or absence of perfusion defects in each segment was evaluated by two independent observers. Using angiography as the gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR perfusion imaging in detecting focal perfusion abnormalities were 90%, 87%, and 89%, respectively, while those of perfusion scintigraphy were 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of MR perfusion imaging was significantly higher than that of scintigraphy (p<0.001, McNemar test). There was good agreement between two observers for MR perfusion imaging (kappa statistic, 0.66) and only moderate agreement for perfusion scintigraphy (kappa statistic, 0.51). MR perfusion imaging is superior to perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal perfusion in patients with pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  6. First impressions of 3D visual tools and dose volume histograms for plan evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattray, G.; Simitcioglu, A.; Parkinson, M.; Biggs, J.

    1999-01-01

    Converting from 2D to 3D treatment planning offers numerous challenges. The practices that have evolved in the 2D environment may not be applicable when translated into the 3D environment. One such practice is the methods used to evaluate a plan. In 2D planning a plane by plane comparison method is generally practiced. This type of evaluation method would not be appropriate for plans produced by a 3D planning system. To this end 3D dose displays and Dose Volume Histograms (DVHs) have been developed to facilitate the evaluation of such plans. A survey was conducted to determine the impressions of Radiation Therapists as they used these tools for the first time. The survey involved comparing a number of plans for a small group of patients and selecting the best plan for each patient. Three evaluation methods were assessed. These included the traditional plane by plane, 3D dose display, and DVHs. Those surveyed found the DVH to be the easiest of the three methods to use, with the 3D display being the next easiest. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  7. Importance of evaluation of uncertainties on the measurement of natural gas and petroleum volumes; Importancia da avaliacao das incertezas na medicao dos volumes de petroleo e gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Filho, Jose Alberto Pinheiro da; Oliveira, Thiago Barra Vidal de; Mata, Josaphat Dias da [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], Emails: jose.pinheiro@petrobras.com.br, thiagovidal@petrobras.com.br, josaphat@petrobras.com.br; Val, Luiz Gustavo do [Instituto de Qualidade e Metrologia (IQM), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: gdoval.iqm@petrobras.com.br

    2009-07-01

    The measurement is considered as the 'cash register' of the enterprises, increasing the accuracy and the exigence at each step when come close to the delivery points, where the 0.1 % of differences are discussed. The work presents the approach used in the evaluation of measurement uncertainties in the volumes obtained of petroleum and natural gas at the processes of production in Brazil, and in the international level as well.

  8. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section

  9. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Characterization; robotics/automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate theses problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part B of Volume 3 and contains the Characterization and Robotics/Automation sections

  10. Y-12 Plant remedial action Technology Logic Diagram: Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part A, Remedial action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Remedial Action Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) problems at the Y-12 Plant to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to remedial action (RA) activities. The TLD consists of three volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the rankings of remedial technologies. Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 contains the TLD data sheets. This report is Part A of Volume 3 and contains the Remedial Action section.

  11. Evaluation of plasma eosinophil count and mean platelet volume in patients with coronary slow flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The pathophysiology of coronary slow flow has not been clearly defined, although multiple abnormalities including arteritis, endothelial dysfunction, and atherothrombosis, have been reported. It is known that eosinophils play an important role in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombosis. We aimed to compare the eosinophil counts of coronary slow flow patients versus healthy controls. METHODS: This study included 50 coronary slow flow patients (19 males, mean age 65.6±13.7 years and 30 healthy controls (10 males, mean age 57.86±11.6 years. These participants were evaluated using concurrent routine biochemical tests as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte, and eosinophil counts and mean platelet volume (MPV, which were obtained from the whole blood count. These parameters were compared between groups. RESULTS: The baseline characteristics of the study groups were comparable. The coronary slow flow patients had a higher mean platelet volume and eosinophil count than the control group (8.38±0.86 vs 6.28±1.6 fL and 0.31±0.42 vs 0.09±0.05; p<0.001 and 0.008, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated a relationship between eosinophil count and MPV in patients with coronary slow flow.

  12. Evaluation of the effect of Islamic fasting on lung volumes and capacities in the healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Seyyed-Ali J; Kabir, Ali; Moghimi, Ali; Chehrei, Ali; Rad, Mohammad B

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the changes in pulmonary volumes during and after Islamic fasting. It is a cohort study conducted on 117 healthy subjects selected on a random basis from employees, professors and students of Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 1999 and January 2000. All of them underwent spirometry 10 days prior to Ramadan, 2 times during Ramadan, and one time 10 days post-Ramadan. In first visit, in addition to spirometry they underwent medical examination to make sure they are healthy. All of their spirometries and background information were collected. Repeated measurements analysis of variance method was used to compare the measurements. Approximately 69% of subjects were male and the mean age was 23.9 years. Mean fasting time was 27.8 days. The mean difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) was significant between the 4 visits (p=0.01). The mean FEV1% increased both during fasting and after Ramadan (p=0.017). The mean vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate values increased during Ramadan significantly (p=0.043, pvolumes and might improve pulmonary function. This finding seems to be relevant to the changes in weight during Ramadan.

  13. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of a coating material for an implantable bladder volume sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Kim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As the applications for implantable medical devices have increased, the need for biocompatible packaging materials has become important. Recently, we reported an implantable sensor for real-time monitoring of the changes in bladder volume, which necessitated finding a safe coating material for use in bladder tissue. At present, materials like polyethylene glycol (PEG, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and parylene-C are used in biomedical devices or as coating materials, owing to their excellent safety in various medical fields. However, few studies have assessed their safety in bladder tissue, therefore, we evaluated the biocompatibility of PEG, PDMS and parylene-C in the bladder. All three materials turned out to be safe in in vitro tests of live/dead staining and cell viability. In vivo tests with hematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescence staining with MAC387 showed no persistent inflammation. Therefore, we consider that the three materials are biocompatible in bladder tissue. Despite this safety, however, PEG has biodegradable characteristics and thus is not suitable for use as packaging. We suggest that PDMS and parylene-C can be used as safe coating materials for the implantable bladder volume sensor reported previously.

  14. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 2, Thermal-hydraulic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, P.D.; Davis, C.B.; Callow, R.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Dobbe, C.A.; Beelman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research program to develop a methodology to assess the operational performance of Babcock and Wilcox plants and to apply this methodology on a trial basis. The methodology developed for analyzing Babcock and Wilcox plants integrated methods used in both thermal-hydraulics and human factors and compared results with information used in the assessment of risk. The integrated methodology involved an evaluation of a selected plant for each pressurized water reactor vendor during a limited number of transients. A plant was selected to represent each vendor, and three transients were identified for analysis. The plants were Oconee Unit 1 for Babcock and Wilcox, H.B. Robinson Unit 2 for Westinghouse, and Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 for Combustion Engineering. The three transients were a complete loss of all feedwater, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, and a steam-generator overfill with auxiliary feedwater. Included in the integrated methodology was an assessment of the thermal-hydraulic behavior, including event timing, of the plants during the three transients. Thermal-hydraulic results are presented in this volume (Volume 2) of the report. 26 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Nuclear power performance and safety. V.3. Safety and international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Performance and Safety, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Austria Centre Vienna (ACV) in Vienna, Austria, from 28 September to 2 October 1987. The objective of the Conference was to promote an exchange of worldwide information on the current trends in the performance and safety of nuclear power and its fuel cycle, and to take a forward look at the expectations and objectives for the 1990s. This objective was accomplished through presentation and discussion of about 200 papers at the Conference. Almost 500 participants and observers from 40 countries and 12 organizations discussed three major questions which were posed as the focus of this Conference: (1) What are the current trends and major issues with regard to performance and safety of nuclear power, the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management? (2) What steps are being taken or need to be taken to resolve outstanding issues in order to improve the performance of nuclear power with assured safety? (3) What performance objectives and achievements can be anticipated for the 1990s? All presentations of this Conference were divided into six volumes. This is Volume 3 which is devoted to the problems of safety and international cooperation. All presentations of Volume 3 were divided into four sessions as follows: the need for safety in nuclear power programmes (4 papers); international cooperation in nuclear safety (6 papers); technical aspects in plant safety (7 papers); approaches to safety (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 20 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. European Commission and IAEA Celebrate 30 Years Co-operation on Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    reprocessing plant in Japan and is now being installed in other facilities in Europe - Secure Sealing: During the last 30 years, the Seal and Identification Laboratory (SILab) of the JRC developed and produced ultrasonic bolt seals requested by the IAEA in order to seal underwater nuclear spent fuel assemblies. In 2011, after a training session at JRC in Ispra, Italy, a joint team of inspectors from the IAEA and EURATOM Safeguards and the European Commission's Directorate-General for Energy successfully sealed the first nuclear fuel bundles produced by the Cernavoda II reactor in Romania. Joint Research Centre (JRC): The JRC is the European Commission's in-house science service. Its mission is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of European Union policies. The JRC serves the common interest of the Member States, while being independent of special interests, whether private or national. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA): The IAEA serves as the world's foremost intergovernmental forum for scientific and technical co-operation in the peaceful use of nuclear technology. Established as an autonomous organization under the United Nations (UN) in 1957, the IAEA carries out programmes to maximize the useful contribution of nuclear technology to society while verifying its peaceful use. (IAEA)

  17. Free-volume study of ethylene - vinyl alcohol copolymer evaluated through positronium lifetime measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Hong-ling Li; Ujihira, Y.; Nomura, K.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Nishihara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The free-volume, of size ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 nm in radius, in an ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer was estimated using positronium lifetime measurement to elucidate the dependence of oxygen permeability on the free-volume size and fraction, on the ethylene content and on the crystallinity. The permeability and the free-volume fraction with varying the ethylene content were well related and the relation was interpreted based on the free-volume theory near below and above the glass transition temperature. On the other hand, the crystallinity significantly influenced the fraction of the amorphous region, where the free-volume hole exists, along with a slight change of the free-volume size. The variation of the permeability with the crystalline degree cannot be explained from the averaged free-volume fraction estimated by the whole volume of the polymer, but the permeability correlated with the free-volume size apparently. (author)

  18. Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, E.C.

    1998-05-01

    On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

  19. Development of computer program for the economic evaluation of the volume reduction system for the low-level radwaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin Yeong

    1994-02-01

    This study provides the basis for investigating the benefits of purchasing volume reduction equipment and includes the establishment of a volume reduction data base, the creation of the volume reduction cost analysis computer program PEEVR (Program of Economic Evaluation for the Volume Reduction), and a generic analysis designed to identify the major costs influencing the economics of the various equipment options. In treating the plant types and the wastes, this study considers that condensate polishing system is included or not in PWR and precoat condensate polishing system, deep bed condensate polishing system in BWR and the 5 waste streams, i.e., compatible trash (COTRASH), ion exchange resin (IXRESIN), concentrate liquid (CONCLIQ), filter sludge (FSLUDGE), non compatible trash (COTRASH). This study uses the PVRR and LRR methods to create cost analysis and performs sensitivity analysis for the each cost variable and shows that future burial costs increases are the major factors in the economic evaluation

  20. Development of computer program for the economic evaluation of the volume reduction system for the low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jin Yeong; Lee, Kun Jai

    1994-01-01

    This study provides the basis for investigating the benefits of purchasing volume reduction equipment and includes the establishment of a volume reduction data base, the creation of the volume reduction cost analysis computer program PEEVR (Program of Economic Evaluation for the Volume Reduction), and a generic analysis designed to identify the major costs influencing the economics of the various equipment options. In treating the plant types and the wastes, this study considers that condensate polishing system is included or not in PWR and precoatcondensate polishing system, deep bed condensate polishing system in BWR and the 5 waste streams, i. e., compactibIe trash (COTRASH), ion exchange resin (IXRESIN), concentrate liquid (CONCLIQ), filter sludge (FSLUDGE), non compactible trash (COTRASH). This study uses the PVRR and LRR methods to create cost analysis and performs sensitivity analysis for the each cost variables and shows that future burial costs increases are the major factors in the economic evaluation

  1. The SSAC (State System of Accounting and Control) of Argentina: possible areas to increase co-operation with ABACC and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Laura B.; Vicens, Hugo E.; Maceiras, Elena; Saavedra, Analia D.; Valentino, Lucia I.; Llacer, Carlos D.; Mairal, Maria L.; Fernandez Moreno, Sonia

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with one of the measures identified in the program 93+2 to enhance international safeguards effectiveness and efficiency. This measure is related to increase co-operation between the IAEA and the SSAC in the implementation of safeguards. It is recognized that an effective SSAC could contribute to better safeguards. During the discussion to strengthen the safeguards system different levels of co-operation between the IAEA and SSAC were identified, depending on their features and capabilities. To start assessing the possibility of increasing this co-operation, a 'SSAC Questionnaire' was submitted by the IAEA to Member States, EURATOM and ABACC. At present, those questionnaires are being assessed by the IAEA in order to identify areas for further co-operation. One important aspect is the increased co-operation level that might be achieved when the Additional Protocol becomes an integral part of the safeguard agreements. Another one refers to the methodology that IAEA might employ to audit the quality and performance of the SSAC regarding the different levels of such co-operation. This paper will also describe the features of the SSAC of Argentina emphasizing its capabilities and the various areas that might be considered to increase further co-operation with ABACC and the IAEA. (author)

  2. Improving motor reliability in nuclear power plants: Volume 1, Performance evaluation and maintenance practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W.E.; Taylor, J.H.; Sugarman, A.C.; Sheets, M.W.

    1987-11-01

    This report constitutes the first of the three volumes under this NUREG. The report presents recommendations for developing a cost-effective program for performance evaluation and maintenance of electric motors in nuclear power plants. These recommendations are based on current industry practices, available techniques for monitoring degradation in motor components, manufacturer's recommendations, operating experience, and results from two laboratory tests on aged motors. Two laboratory test reports on a small and a large motor are presented in separate volumes of this NUREG. These provide the basis for the various functional indicators recommended for maintenance programs in this report. The overall preventive maintenance program is separated into two broad areas of activity aimed at mitigating the potential effects of equipment aging: Performance Evaluation and Equipment Maintenance. The latter involves actually maintaining the condition of the equipment while the former involves those activities undertaken to monitor degradation due to aging. These monitoring methods are further categorized into periodic testing, surveillance testing, continuous monitoring and inspections. This study focuses on the methods and procedures for performing the above activities to maintain the motors operationally ready in a nuclear facility. This includes an assessment of various functional indicators to determine their suitability for trending to monitor motor component condition. The intrusiveness of test methods and the present state-of-the-art for using the test equipment in a plant environment are discussed. In conclusion, implementation of the information provided in this report, will improve motor reliability in nuclear power plants. The study indicates the kinds of tests to conduct, how and when to conduct them, and to which motors the tests should be applied. 44 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs

  3. Evaluation of patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery: Ancillary information available from computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Desai, Sujal R.; Wells, Athol U.; Koyama, Hiroshi; Eastick, Sian; Schmidt, Maria A.; Charrier, Clare L.; Gatehouse, Peter D.; Goldstraw, Peter; Pepper, John R.; Geddes, Duncan M.; Hansell, David M.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: A number of imaging techniques have been used for the pre-operative assessment of patients for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). We evaluated whether data currently acquired from perfusion scintigrams and cine MR of the diaphragm are obtainable from high resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients taking part in a randomized controlled trial of LVRS against maximal medical therapy were evaluated. HRCT examinations (n= 30) were scored for (i) the extent and distribution of emphysema; (ii) the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature; and (iii) diaphragmatic contour, apparent defects and herniation. On scintigraphy, (n28), perfusion of the lower thirds of both lungs, as a proportion of total lung perfusion (LZ/T PERF ), was expressed as a percentage of predicted values (derived from 10 normal control subjects). On cine MR (n= 25) hemidiaphragmatic excursion and coordination were recorded. RESULTS: Extensive emphysema was present on HRCT (60% ± 13.2%). There was strong correlation between the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature on HRCT and on perfusion scanning (r s = 0.85, P< 0.00005). Hemidiaphragmatic incoordination on MR was weakly associated with hemidiaphragmatic eventration on HRCT (P0.04). CONCLUSION: The strong correlation between lung perfusion assessed by HRCT and lung perfusion on scintigraphy suggests that perfusion scintigraphy is superfluous in the pre-operative evaluation of patients with emphysema for LVRS. Cleverley, J.R. (2000)

  4. Numerical evaluation of acoustic characteristics and their damping of a thrust chamber using a constant-volume bomb model

    OpenAIRE

    Jianxiu QIN; Huiqiang ZHANG; Bing WANG

    2018-01-01

    In order to numerically evaluate the acoustic characteristics of liquid rocket engine thrust chambers by means of a computational fluid dynamics method, a mathematical model of an artificial constant-volume bomb is proposed in this paper. A localized pressure pulse with a very high amplitude can be imposed on specified regions in a combustion chamber, the numerical procedure of which is described. Pressure oscillations actuated by the released constant-volume bomb can then be analyzed via Fas...

  5. Evaluation of fourier transform profilometry performance: quantitative waste volume determination under simulated Hanford waste tank conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ping-Rey; Leone, Teresa; Long, Zhiling; Mott, Melissa A.; Perry Norton, O.; Okhuysen, Walter P.; Monts, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford Site is currently in the process of an extensive effort to empty and close its radioactive single-shell and double-shell waste storage tanks. Before this can be accomplished, it is necessary to know how much residual material is left in a given waste tank and the chemical makeup of the residue. The objective of Mississippi State University's Institute for Clean Energy Technology's (ICET) efforts is to develop, fabricate, and deploy inspection tools for the Hanford waste tanks that will (1) be remotely operable; (2) provide quantitative information on the amount of wastes remaining; and (3) provide information on the spatial distribution of chemical and radioactive species of interest. A collaborative arrangement has been established with the Hanford Site to develop probe-based inspection systems for deployment in the waste tanks. ICET is currently developing an in-tank inspection system based on Fourier Transform Profilometry, FTP. FTP is a non-contact, 3-D shape measurement technique. By projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view angle, FTP is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution (and hence volume distribution) of the target surface, thus reproducing the profile of the target accurately under a wide variety of conditions. Hence FTP has the potential to be utilized for quantitative determination of residual wastes within Hanford waste tanks. We have completed a preliminary performance evaluation of FTP in order to document the accuracy, precision, and operator dependence (minimal) of FTP under conditions similar to those that can be expected to pertain within Hanford waste tanks. Based on a Hanford C-200 series tank with camera access through a riser with significant offset relative to the centerline, we devised a testing methodology that encompassed a range of obstacles likely to be encountered 'in tank'. These test objects were inspected by use

  6. Remote handling techniques in decommissioning - A report of the NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning (CPD) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchardt, Ralf; Denissen, Luc; Desbats, Philippe; Jeanjacques, Michel; Nokhamzon, Jean-Guy; Valentin, Pierre; Slater, Steve; Valencia, Luis; Wittenauer, Stephan; Yamauchi, Toyoaki; Burton, Bob

    2011-01-01

    The NEA Co-operative Programme for the Exchange of Scientific and Technical Information Concerning Nuclear Installation Decommissioning Projects (CPD) is a joint undertaking of a limited number of organisations actively executing on planning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The objective of the CPD is to acquire information from operational experience in decommissioning nuclear installations that is useful for future projects. Although part of the information exchanged within CPD is confidential in nature and is restricted to programme participants, experience of general interest gained under the programme's auspices is released for broader use. Such information is brought to the attention of all NEA members through regular reports to the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC), as well as through published studies. This report describes generic results obtained by a CPD Task Group analysing the needs for remote technologies. The existing technologies able to meet these needs, the lessons learned and showing where improvements or further developments should be made in this domain. During the D and D process, the handling of highly radioactive materials, the deployment of tools and sensors and the dismantling of components built from many different materials can be a long, labor-intensive process that has the potential for high exposure rates, heat stress and injury to personnel. Mobile robotics systems provide solutions to these hazards. Such remote handling systems are required to perform tasks within budget and on schedule while justifying the expense by a saving in cumulative doses received by project personnel. To reach this goal, the following are additional factors that need to be evaluated when preparing a project: - System and peripherals must be operator-friendly. Ideally, the system must be designed to allow personnel currently available for the D and D project to become trained as operators within a reasonable time frame. - The

  7. Present trends in radioactive waste management policies in OECD countries and related international co-operative efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years waste management has received increased attention not only at the national level but also internationally in order to harmonise to some extent the policies and practices to be followed and to continue to achieve a high safety standard in this field. In particular, discussions are taking place between OECD Member countries on the definition of objectives, concepts and strategies for radioactive waste management with a view to presenting coherent overall systems covering not only the treatment and storage aspects for the short term but also the longer term problems of disposal in the context of a rapidly developing nuclear fuel cycle. The technical, administrative, legal and financial aspects of the waste management problems are being discussed and various approaches are envisaged for the future. In addition to the discussion of policies and practices, a significant effort is also being initiated on research and development. The disposal problem has been given priority particularly as far as high level waste and alpha bearing wastes are concerned. Close international co-operation has been initiated in this sector as well as on the conditioning of high level radioactive waste. As a result of these efforts an international R and D programme is being established at the site of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the incorporation of high level waste into metal matrices. Increased co-operation is also taking place concerning other waste management problems such as the management of gaseous waste, alpha waste and cladding hulls and the question of dismantling and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The paper describes in detail the results achieved so far through this co-operation between OECD Member countries and presents current plans for future activities [fr

  8. Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the Republic of Turkey for co-operation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    By Act No. 3258 of 11 February 1986 the Turkish National Assembly approved ratification of the Agreement of 18 June 1985 between the Government of Turkey and the Government of Canada for Co-operation in the Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy. The Agreement covers nuclear co-operation in industry agriculture, electricity generation, etc, and provides the legal framework for such co-operation. It lays down the general provisions for transfer of nuclear facilities, materials and technology between the two Parties and specifies the areas concerned. The Agreement provides that all the activities within its scope shall be carried out for exclusively peaceful purposes. (NEA) [fr

  9. A study on the international nuclear Co-operation and the nuclear technology self-reliance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa Sup

    1993-02-01

    To setup a basement for the national nuclear technology strategy, the reorganization of the world structure and the environmental issues are analyzed. And with regards to the self-reliance of nuclear technology, the method for the settlement of the national nuclear infrastructure and the method to strengthen our role in international nuclear community through the co-operation with IAEA is suggested. Also the status and strategy of major nuclear pushing countries are investigated. And followed by this, national nuclear technology status and strategy are analyzed. (Author)

  10. Regulator and industry Co-operation on safety research: challenges and opportunities. Final report and answers to questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    A Group has been set up by the CSNI to identify and review the issues which hinder closer co-operation on research between regulators and industry, and to propose possible ways for resolving such issues while maintaining regulatory independence in decision-making. The Group has analyzed the potential advantages and disadvantages of regulator-industry collaboration in safety research and has also provided indications on how to overcome possible difficulties that can arise from such collaboration. The Group focused in particular on the issue of regulator independence, on means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry

  11. Co-operation Agreement for the promotion of nuclear science and technology in Latin America and the Caribbean (ARCAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Co-operation Agreement for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean (ARCAL) which was opened for signature on 25 September 1998 and shall come into force after deposit of the instrument of ratification by ten Member States. It shall remain in force for ten years, and may be extended by periods of five years if the Member States so agree. By 15 september 1999, there were 14 Signatories to the above Agreement

  12. Text of an African regional co-operative agreement for research, development and training related to nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As of 1 September 1994, notifications of acceptance of the African Regional Co-operative Agreement for Research, Development and Training Related to Nuclear Science and Technology (see INFCIRC/377), in accordance with Article XIII thereof, had been received by the Director General from the Governments of: Tunisia, Egypt, Algeria, Nigeria, Madagascar, Libya, Morocco, Kenya, Sudan, Ghana, Tanzania, Mauritius, Cameroon, South Africa, Zaire, Ethiopia, Zambia, Niger. The Agreement entered into force on 4 April 1990, the date of receipt of the third notification of acceptance

  13. Economic Co-operation Across the Finnish-Russian Border - Factors of Sluggish Development and Success of Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Rautio, V.; Tykkylaeinen, M.

    2000-01-01

    The post-Cold War era in Europe in the 1990s has caused people to recognize the complexity of economic development and economic co-operation. The opening of borders has not always meant an increase cross-border economic activities in general. On the contrary, the adverse socio-economic development of many border areas has been unanticipated. The Finnish-Russian border is one example of this dissonance. This paper analyses the operation of Finnish companies in economic activities in Russ...

  14. Strategies for the co-operation between power generation facilities and power sales organisations in the European electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammert, U.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how the public utilities in Hannover, Germany, have developed a strategy for the operation of their power generation facilities and power distribution network as independent yet co-operating units. Three models that were examined are described: 'free-sailing', where generation and distribution were kept completely independent, the 'wedding' model, where they were closely tied together and 'Enercity', a mixture of both models. The various rules necessary and the degrees of freedom needed to implement the 'Enercity' model are discussed, as are the advantages it offers to both the power generation and the sales units

  15. International co-operation and the future of nuclear power. European Nuclear Congress '98, Nice, 26 October 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the joint Opening Session of the European Nuclear Congress'98 (ENC) and RECOD in Nice, France, on 26 october 1998. The conference emphasized the importance of strengthened international co-operation in all areas relevant to the safe and peaceful use of nuclear energy, especially for power generation. As the only intergovernmental global organization dedicated to nuclear science and technology, the role of the IAEA is to serve as the international focal point for standard setting, independent analysis, technology transfer and oversight and verification

  16. Volume-dependent hemodynamic effects of blood collection in canine donors - evaluation of 13% and 15% of total blood volume depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUI R.F. FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no consensus regarding the blood volume that could be safely donated by dogs, ranging from 11 to 25% of its total blood volume (TBV. No previous studies evaluated sedated donors.Aim: To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of blood collection from sedated and non-sedated dogs and to understand if such effects were volume-dependent.Materials and Methods: Fifty three donations of 13% of TBV and 20 donations of 15% TBV were performed in dogs sedated with diazepam and ketamine. Additionally, a total of 30 collections of 13% TBV and 20 collections of 15% TBV were performed in non-sedated dogs. Non-invasive arterial blood pressures and pulse rates were registered before and 15 min after donation. Results: Post-donation pulse rates increased significantly in both sedated groups, with higher differences in the 15% TBV collections. Systolic arterial pressures decreased significantly in these groups, while diastolic pressures increased significantly in 13% TBV donations. Non-sedated groups revealed a slight, but significant, SBP decrease. No clinical signs related to donations were registered.Conclusion: These results suggest that the collection of 15% TBV in sedated donors induces hemodynamic variations that may compromise the harmlessness of the procedure, while it seems to be a safe procedure in non-sedated dogs.

  17. Evaluation of single right atrial volume and function with magnetic resonance imaging in children with hypoplastic left heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijarnsorn, Chodchanok [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Mahidol University, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Myers, Kimberley; Patton, David J. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Noga, Michelle; Crawley, Cinzia; Tham, Edythe [University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Standardized methods to evaluate atrial properties in single ventricles are lacking. To determine the feasibility of quantifying right atrial volumes and function in hypoplastic left heart using MRI. We studied 15 infants with hypoplastic left heart prior to Glenn surgery (mean age 4.2 months [standard deviation 0.3]) who underwent cardiac MRI with evaluation of atrial volumes and emptying fraction using monoplane two-chamber, monoplane four-chamber, and biplane methods, all of which were compared to the atrial short-axial oblique stack method. We compared atrial end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and emptying fraction among these methods. We analyzed reproducibility of the methods using Bland-Altman plots. Both four-chamber and biplane methods showed high correlations for atrial end-diastolic volume (r = 0.7 and r = 0.8, respectively; P < 0.01) and end-systolic volume (r = 0.8 and r = 0.9, respectively; P < 0.01) with small mean differences (-0.2 ± 2.9 standard deviation [SD] ml and -0.8 ± 1.6 ml, respectively, for atrial end-diastolic volume and -0.8 ± 1.5 ml and -0.9 ± 0.9 ml, respectively, for atrial end-systolic volume). The short-axial oblique method was the most reproducible, followed by the four-chamber method. MRI assessment of atrial volume and function is feasible in hypoplastic left heart and might provide further insight into single-ventricle mechanics. (orig.)

  18. Use of Hi-resolution data for evaluating accuracy of traffic volume counts collected by microwave sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K. Chang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, the Utah Department of Transportation has developed the signal performance metrics (SPMs system to evaluate the performance of signalized intersections dynamically. This system currently provides data summaries for several performance measures, one of them being turning movement counts collected by microwave sensors. As this system became public, there was a need to evaluate the accuracy of the data placed on the SPMs. A large-scale data collection was carried out to meet this need. Vehicles in the Hi-resolution data from microwave sensors were matched with the vehicles by ground-truth volume count data. Matching vehicles from the microwave sensor data and the ground-truth data manually collected required significant effort. A spreadsheet-based data analysis procedure was developed to carry out the task. A mixed model analysis of variance was used to analyze the effects of the factors considered on turning volume count accuracy. The analysis found that approach volume level and number of approach lanes would have significant effect on the accuracy of turning volume counts but the location of the sensors did not significantly affect the accuracy of turning volume counts. In addition, it was found that the location of lanes in relation to the sensor did not significantly affect the accuracy of lane-by-lane volume counts. This indicated that accuracy analysis could be performed by using total approach volumes without comparing specific turning counts, that is, left-turn, through and right-turn movements. In general, the accuracy of approach volume counts collected by microwave sensors were within the margin of error that traffic engineers could accept. The procedure taken to perform the analysis and a summary of accuracy of volume counts for the factor combinations considered are presented in this paper.

  19. RainMan - A methodology for the evaluation of decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitetti, B.; Mantero, G.; Orlandi, S.; Scarsi, G.; Brusa, L.; Ruggeri, G.; Dionisi, M.; Farina, A.; Grossi, G.

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this study, promoted by ANPA, the Italian Nuclear Regulatory Body, carried out with ANSALDO and in close co-operation with SOGIN, was to define a methodology for the evaluation of the inventory of the amount of radioactive waste produced during the NPPs decommissioning activities, in terms of both volume and radioactivity content, and estimate the solid materials suitable for release from the regulatory control. The simulation code RainMan, developed within this project, allows, according to a selected scenario, for the evaluation of the solid materials that could be cleared and the volumes of the L-MLW that should be sent to a disposal facility. (author)

  20. Image quality and volume computed tomography air kerma index (Cvol) evaluation in Recife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida

    2008-01-01

    The Computed Tomography (CT) is an important diagnostic imaging method, widely used. However, in spite of all the advantages and technologic advances within the CT scanners, the tomographic procedures result in high absorbed doses to patients. The main objective of this work was to perform a dosimetric study of CT scanners located at Recife and to evaluate the image quality on CT examinations in these equipment. The volume CT air kerma index (C VOL ) and air kerma length product (P KL,CT ) were estimated. These values were calculated using normalized weighted air kerma indexes in CT standard dosimetry phantoms ( n C W ), supplied by ImPACT group for several CT scanners, and the scan parameters of routine head, routine chest and hi-resolution chest CT exams performed at 20 institutions. The irradiation parameters of 15 adult patients for each CT procedure were registered at six participating centres, at which the phantom from the American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation protocol was used for the image quality measurements. For routine head exams, the C VOL values varied between 12 and 58 mGy (at the posterior fossa) and 15 to 58 mGy (at the cerebrum) and the P KL,CT , from 150 to 750 mGy·cm. The C VOL values for routine chest procedures varied from 3 to 26 mGy and the P KL,CT , between 120 and 460 mGy·cm. In relation to Hi-resolution chest exams, C VOL values were from 1.0 to 2.7 mGy and the P KL,CT values varied between 24 and 67 mGy·cm. The image quality evaluations results showed that almost all scanners presented at least one inadequacy. One of the equipment presented faults at 70% of the tests. With regard to the image noise, only two scanners presented acceptable results. From these results, it is possible to conclude that the volume CT air kerma index values are lower than the European reference levels. However, the image quality of these CT scanners does not attend the ACR requirements, suggesting the need to implement quality assurance