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  1. Evaluation of nevirapine and/or hydroxyurea with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanckenberg, Daniel H.; Wood, Robin; Horban, Andrzej; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Trocha, Hanna; Halota, Waldemar; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Fatkenheuer, G.; Jessen, Heiko; Lange, Joep M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of adding nevirapine (NVP) and/or hydroxyurea (HU) to a triple nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimen in terms of efficacy and tolerability. Methods: HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive adults were randomized, using a factorial design, to add

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of "AZT-HEPT", "AZT-pyridinone", and "ddC-HEPT" conjugates as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikis, R; Dollé, V; Guillaumel, J; Dechaux, E; Note, R; Nguyen, C H; Legraverend, M; Bisagni, E; Aubertin, A M; Grierson, D S; Monneret, C

    2000-05-18

    To test the concept that HIV reverse transcriptase could be effectively inhibited by "mixed site inhibitors", a series of seven conjugates containing both a nucleoside analogue component (AZT 1, ddC 2) and a nonnucleoside type inhibitor (HEPT analogue 12, pyridinone 27) were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to block HIV replication. The (N-3 and C-5)AZT-HEPT conjugates 15, 22, and 23 displayed 2-5 microM anti-HIV activity, but they had no effect on the replication of HIV-2 or the HIV-1 strain with the Y181C mutation. The (C-5)AZT-pyridinone conjugates 34-37 were found to be inactive. In marked contrast, the ddC-HEPT molecule 26 displayed the same potency (EC(50) = 0.45 microM) against HIV-1 (wild type and the Y181C nevirapine-resistant strain) and HIV-2 in cell culture. No synergistic effect was observed for these bis-substrate inhibitors, suggesting that the two individual inhibitor components in these molecules do not bind simultaneously in their respective sites. Interestingly, however, the results indicate that the AZT-HEPT conjugates and the ddC-HEPT derivative 26 inhibit reverse transcriptase (RT) in an opposite manner. One explanation for this difference is that the former compounds interact preferentially with the hydrophobic pocket in RT, whereas 26 (after supposed triphosphorylation) inhibits RT through binding in the catalytic site.

  3. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione analogues as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase associated ribonuclease H and polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Vernekar, Sanjeev Kumar V; Chen, Yue-Lei; Miller, Lena; Huber, Andrew D; Myshakina, Nataliya; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Parniak, Michael A; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-06-16

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) remains the only virally encoded enzymatic function not clinically validated as an antiviral target. 2-Hydroxyisoquinoline-1,3-dione (HID) is known to confer active site directed inhibition of divalent metal-dependent enzymatic functions, such as HIV RNase H, integrase (IN) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B polymerase. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a few C-5, C-6 or C-7 substituted HID subtypes as HIV RNase H inhibitors. Our data indicate that while some of these subtypes inhibited both the RNase H and polymerase (pol) functions of RT, potent and selective RNase H inhibition was achieved with subtypes 8-9 as exemplified with compounds 8c and 9c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Design, synthesis and biological evaluations of N-Hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,4-diones as inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanala, Jayakanth; Kirby, Karen A; Huber, Andrew D; Casey, Mary C; Wilson, Daniel J; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2017-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only HIV enzymatic function not targeted by current antiviral drugs. Although various chemotypes have been reported to inhibit HIV RNase H, few have shown significant antiviral activities. We report herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel N-hydroxy thienopyrimidine-2,3-dione chemotype (11) which potently and selectively inhibited RNase H with considerable potency against HIV-1 in cell culture. Current structure-activity-relationship (SAR) identified analogue 11d as a nanomolar inhibitor of RNase H (IC 50  = 0.04 μM) with decent antiviral potency (EC 50  = 7.4 μM) and no cytotoxicity (CC 50  > 100 μM). In extended biochemical assays compound 11d did not inhibit RT polymerase (pol) while inhibiting integrase strand transfer (INST) with 53 fold lower potency (IC 50  = 2.1 μM) than RNase H inhibition. Crystallographic and molecular modeling studies confirmed the RNase H active site binding mode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity

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    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine’s potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V. Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  6. HIV-1 Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanangamudi, Murugesan; Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Design of inhibitors for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition (HIV-1 RT) is one of the successful chemotherapies for the treatment of HIV infection. Among the inhibitors available for HIV-1 RT, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) have shown to be very promising......: The conformation dependent-alignment based (CoMFA and CoMSIA) methods have been proven very successful ligand based strategy in the drug design. Here, CoMFA and CoMSIA studies reported for structurally distinct NNRTIs including thiazolobenzimidazole, dipyridodiazepinone, 1,1,3-trioxo [1,2,4]-thiadiazine...

  7. IL-15 STIMULATED NATURAL KILLER CELLS CLEAR HIV-1 INFECTED CELLS FOLLOWING LATENCY REVERSAL EX VIVO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carolina; Abad-Fernandez, Maria; Tuyishime, Marina; Pollara, Justin J; Ferrari, Guido; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Margolis, David M

    2018-03-28

    Current efforts towards HIV eradication include approaches to augment immune recognition and elimination of persistently infected cells following latency reversal. Natural killer (NK) cells, the main effectors of the innate immune system, recognize and clear targets using different mechanisms than CD8 + T cells, offering an alternative or complementary approach for HIV clearance strategies. We assessed the impact of IL-15 treatment on NK cell function and the potential of stimulated NK cells to clear the HIV reservoir. We measured NK cell receptor expression, antibody-dependent cell-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytotoxicity, IFN-γ production and antiviral activity in autologous HIV replication systems. All NK cell functions were uniformly improved by IL-15, and more importantly, IL-15-treated NK cells were able to clear latently HIV infected cells after exposure to vorinostat, a clinically relevant latency reversing agent. We also demonstrate that NK cells from HIV infected individuals aviremic on antiretroviral therapy can be efficiently stimulated with IL-15. Our work opens a promising line of investigation towards future immunotherapies to clear persistent HIV infection using NK cells. IMPORTANCE In the search for an HIV cure, strategies to enhance immune function to allow recognition and clearance of HIV infected cells following latency reversal are being evaluated. Natural killer (NK) cells possess characteristics that can be exploited for immunotherapy against persistent HIV infection. We demonstrate that NK cells from HIV-positive donors can be strongly stimulated with IL-15, improving their antiviral and cytotoxic potential, and more importantly, clearing HIV infected cells after latency reversal with a clinically relevant drug. Our results encourage further investigation to design NK cell-based immunotherapies to achieve HIV eradication. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. The Depsipeptide Romidepsin Reverses HIV-1 Latency In Vivo.

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    Ole S Søgaard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologically-induced activation of replication competent proviruses from latency in the presence of antiretroviral treatment (ART has been proposed as a step towards curing HIV-1 infection. However, until now, approaches to reverse HIV-1 latency in humans have yielded mixed results. Here, we report a proof-of-concept phase Ib/IIa trial where 6 aviremic HIV-1 infected adults received intravenous 5 mg/m2 romidepsin (Celgene once weekly for 3 weeks while maintaining ART. Lymphocyte histone H3 acetylation, a cellular measure of the pharmacodynamic response to romidepsin, increased rapidly (maximum fold range: 3.7–7.7 relative to baseline within the first hours following each romidepsin administration. Concurrently, HIV-1 transcription quantified as copies of cell-associated un-spliced HIV-1 RNA increased significantly from baseline during treatment (range of fold-increase: 2.4–5.0; p = 0.03. Plasma HIV-1 RNA increased from <20 copies/mL at baseline to readily quantifiable levels at multiple post-infusion time-points in 5 of 6 patients (range 46–103 copies/mL following the second infusion, p = 0.04. Importantly, romidepsin did not decrease the number of HIV-specific T cells or inhibit T cell cytokine production. Adverse events (all grade 1–2 were consistent with the known side effects of romidepsin. In conclusion, romidepsin safely induced HIV-1 transcription resulting in plasma HIV-1 RNA that was readily detected with standard commercial assays demonstrating that significant reversal of HIV-1 latency in vivo is possible without blunting T cell-mediated immune responses. These finding have major implications for future trials aiming to eradicate the HIV-1 reservoir.clinicaltrials.gov NTC02092116.

  9. Design, synthesis and antiviral evaluation of novel heteroarylcarbothioamide derivatives as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated RNase H and RDDP functions.

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    Corona, Angela; Onnis, Valentina; Deplano, Alessandro; Bianco, Giulia; Demurtas, Monica; Distinto, Simona; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Alcaro, Stefano; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-08-31

    In the continuous effort to identify new HIV-1 inhibitors endowed with innovative mechanisms, the dual inhibition of different viral functions would provide a significant advantage against drug-resistant variants. The HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is the only viral-encoded enzymatic activity that still lacks an efficient inhibitor. We synthesized a library of 3,5-diamino-N-aryl-1H-pyrazole-4-carbothioamide and 4-amino-5-benzoyl-N-phenyl-2-(substituted-amino)-1H-pyrrole-3-carbothioamide derivatives and tested them against RNase H activity. We identified the pyrazolecarbothioamide derivative A15, able to inhibit viral replication and both RNase H and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) RT-associated activities in the low micromolar range. Docking simulations hypothesized its binding to two RT pockets. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments showed that, with respect to wt RT, V108A substitution strongly reduced A15 IC50 values (12.6-fold for RNase H inhibition and 4.7-fold for RDDP), while substitution A502F caused a 9.0-fold increase in its IC50 value for RNase H, not affecting the RDDP inhibition, reinforcing the hypothesis of a dual-site inhibition. Moreover, A15 retained good inhibition potency against three non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant enzymes, confirming a mode of action unrelated to NNRTIs and suggesting its potential as a lead compound for development of new HIV-1 RT dual inhibitors active against drug-resistant viruses. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Ex vivo analysis identifies effective HIV-1 latency–reversing drug combinations

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    Laird, Gregory M.; Bullen, C. Korin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Martin, Alyssa R.; Hill, Alison L.; Durand, Christine M.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Reversal of HIV-1 latency by small molecules is a potential cure strategy. This approach will likely require effective drug combinations to achieve high levels of latency reversal. Using resting CD4+ T cells (rCD4s) from infected individuals, we developed an experimental and theoretical framework to identify effective latency-reversing agent (LRA) combinations. Utilizing ex vivo assays for intracellular HIV-1 mRNA and virion production, we compared 2-drug combinations of leading candidate LRAs and identified multiple combinations that effectively reverse latency. We showed that protein kinase C agonists in combination with bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 or histone deacetylase inhibitors robustly induce HIV-1 transcription and virus production when directly compared with maximum reactivation by T cell activation. Using the Bliss independence model to quantitate combined drug effects, we demonstrated that these combinations synergize to induce HIV-1 transcription. This robust latency reversal occurred without release of proinflammatory cytokines by rCD4s. To extend the clinical utility of our findings, we applied a mathematical model that estimates in vivo changes in plasma HIV-1 RNA from ex vivo measurements of virus production. Our study reconciles diverse findings from previous studies, establishes a quantitative experimental approach to evaluate combinatorial LRA efficacy, and presents a model to predict in vivo responses to LRAs. PMID:25822022

  11. Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel pyrrolyl aryl sulfones: HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors active at nanomolar concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Silvestri, R; Pagnozzi, E; Bruno, B; Novellino, E; Greco, G; Massa, S; Ettorre, A; Loi, A G; Scintu, F; La Colla, P

    2000-05-04

    Pyrrolyl aryl sulfones (PASs) have been recently reported as a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors acting at the non-nucleoside binding site of this enzyme (Artico, M.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 1996, 39, 522-530). Compound 3, the most potent inhibitor within the series (EC(50) = 0.14 microM, IC(50) = 0.4 microM, and SI > 1429), was then selected as a lead compound for a synthetic project based on molecular modeling studies. Using the three-dimensional structure of RT cocrystallized with the alpha-APA derivative R95845, we derived a model of the RT/3 complex by taking into account previously developed structure-activity relationships. Inspection of this model and docking calculations on virtual compounds prompted the design of novel PAS derivatives and related analogues. Our computational approach proved to be effective in making qualitative predictions, that is in discriminating active versus inactive compounds. Among the compounds synthesized and tested, 20 was the most active one, with EC(50) = 0.045 microM, IC(50) = 0.05 microM, and SI = 5333. Compared with the lead 3, these values represent a 3- and 8-fold improvement in the cell-based and enzyme assays, respectively, together with the highest selectivity achieved so far in the PAS series.

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcripts.

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    Kate N Bishop

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a host cytidine deaminase that, in the absence of Vif, restricts HIV-1 replication and reduces the amount of viral DNA that accumulates in cells. Initial studies determined that A3G induces extensive mutation of nascent HIV-1 cDNA during reverse transcription. It has been proposed that this triggers the degradation of the viral DNA, but there is now mounting evidence that this mechanism may not be correct. Here, we use a natural endogenous reverse transcriptase assay to show that, in cell-free virus particles, A3G is able to inhibit HIV-1 cDNA accumulation not only in the absence of hypermutation but also without the apparent need for any target cell factors. We find that although reverse transcription initiates in the presence of A3G, elongation of the cDNA product is impeded. These data support the model that A3G reduces HIV-1 cDNA levels by inhibiting synthesis rather than by inducing degradation.

  13. NMR structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase thumb subdomain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharaf, Naima G. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Brereton, Andrew E. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Byeon, In-Ja L. [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States); Andrew Karplus, P. [Oregon State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, 2011 Ag & Life Sciences Bldg (United States); Gronenborn, Angela M., E-mail: amg100@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology and Pittsburgh Center for HIV Protein Interactions (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The solution NMR structure of the isolated thumb subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has been determined. A detailed comparison of the current structure with dozens of the highest resolution crystal structures of this domain in the context of the full-length enzyme reveals that the overall structures are very similar, with only two regions exhibiting local conformational differences. The C-terminal capping pattern of the αH helix is subtly different, and the loop connecting the αI and αJ helices in the p51 chain of the full-length p51/p66 heterodimeric RT differs from our NMR structure due to unique packing interactions in mature RT. Overall, our data show that the thumb subdomain folds independently and essentially the same in isolation as in its natural structural context.

  14. The emerging profile of cross-resistance among the nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

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    Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2014-07-31

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection. For example: (1) nevirapine is used to prevent mother-to-child transmission; (2) the ASPIRE (MTN 020) study will test whether a vaginal ring containing dapivirine can prevent HIV-1 infection in women; (3) a microbicide gel formulation containing the urea-PETT derivative MIV-150 is in a phase I study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and acceptability; and (4) a long acting rilpivirine formulation is under-development for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Given their widespread use, particularly in resource-limited settings, as well as their low genetic barriers to resistance, there are concerns about overlapping resistance between the different NNRTIs. Consequently, a better understanding of the resistance and cross-resistance profiles among the NNRTI class is important for predicting response to treatment, and surveillance of transmitted drug-resistance.

  15. Review The Emerging Profile of Cross-Resistance among the Nonnucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

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    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infection. For example: (1 nevirapine is used to prevent mother-to-child transmission; (2 the ASPIRE (MTN 020 study will test whether a vaginal ring containing dapivirine can prevent HIV-1 infection in women; (3 a microbicide gel formulation containing the urea-PETT derivative MIV-150 is in a phase I study to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and acceptability; and (4 a long acting rilpivirine formulation is under-development for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Given their widespread use, particularly in resource-limited settings, as well as their low genetic barriers to resistance, there are concerns about overlapping resistance between the different NNRTIs. Consequently, a better understanding of the resistance and cross-resistance profiles among the NNRTI class is important for predicting response to treatment, and surveillance of transmitted drug-resistance.

  16. Review The Emerging Profile of Cross-Resistance among the Nonnucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2014-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are widely used to treat HIV-1-infected individuals; indeed most first-line antiretroviral therapies typically include one NNRTI in combination with two nucleoside analogs. In 2008, the next-generation NNRTI etravirine was approved for the treatment of HIV-infected antiretroviral therapy-experienced individuals, including those with prior NNRTI exposure. NNRTIs are also increasingly being included in strategies to prevent HIV-1 infectio...

  17. Strand transfer and elongation of HIV-1 reverse transcription is facilitated by cell factors in vitro.

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    David Warrilow

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis.

  18. Novel Latency Reversal Agents for HIV-1 Cure.

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    Spivak, Adam M; Planelles, Vicente

    2018-01-29

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has rendered HIV-1 infection a treatable illness; however, ART is not curative owing to the persistence of replication-competent, latent proviruses in long-lived resting T cells. Strategies that target these latently infected cells and allow immune recognition and clearance of this reservoir will be necessary to eradicate HIV-1 in infected individuals. This review describes current pharmacologic approaches to reactivate the latent reservoir so that infected cells can be recognized and targeted, with the ultimate goal of achieving an HIV-1 cure.

  19. Interaction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H with an acylhydrazone inhibitor.

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    Gong, Qingguo; Menon, Lakshmi; Ilina, Tatiana; Miller, Lena G; Ahn, Jinwoo; Parniak, Michael A; Ishima, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase is a bifunctional enzyme, having both DNA polymerase (RNA- and DNA-dependent) and ribonuclease H activities. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been an exceptionally important target for antiretroviral therapeutic development, and nearly half of the current clinically used antiretrovirals target reverse transcriptase DNA polymerase. However, no inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H are on the market or in preclinical development. Several drug-like small molecule inhibitors of reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H have been described, but little structural information is available about the interactions between reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H and inhibitors that exhibit antiviral activity. In this report, we describe NMR studies of the interaction of a new ribonuclease H inhibitor, BHMP07, with a catalytically active HIV-1 reverse transcriptase ribonuclease H domain fragment. We carried out solution NMR experiments to identify the interaction interface of BHMP07 with the ribonuclease H domain fragment. Chemical shift changes of backbone amide signals at different BHMP07 concentrations clearly demonstrate that BHMP07 mainly recognizes the substrate handle region in the ribonuclease H fragment. Using ribonuclease H inhibition assays and reverse transcriptase mutants, the binding specificity of BHMP07 was compared with another inhibitor, dihydroxy benzoyl naphthyl hydrazone. Our results provide a structural characterization of the ribonuclease H inhibitor interaction and are likely to be useful for further improvements of the inhibitors. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

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    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs.

  1. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

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    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  2. Biophysical Insights into the Inhibitory Mechanism of Non-Nucleoside HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

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    Nicolas Sluis-Cremer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT plays a central role in HIV infection. Current United States Federal Drug Administration (USFDA-approved antiretroviral therapies can include one of five approved non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs, which are potent inhibitors of RT activity. Despite their crucial clinical role in treating and preventing HIV-1 infection, their mechanism of action remains elusive. In this review, we introduce RT and highlight major advances from experimental and computational biophysical experiments toward an understanding of RT function and the inhibitory mechanism(s of NNRTIs.

  3. Potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors target HIV-1 Gag-Pol.

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    Anna Figueiredo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs target HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT by binding to a pocket in RT that is close to, but distinct, from the DNA polymerase active site and prevent the synthesis of viral cDNA. NNRTIs, in particular, those that are potent inhibitors of RT polymerase activity, can also act as chemical enhancers of the enzyme's inter-subunit interactions. However, the consequences of this chemical enhancement effect on HIV-1 replication are not understood. Here, we show that the potent NNRTIs efavirenz, TMC120, and TMC125, but not nevirapine or delavirdine, inhibit the late stages of HIV-1 replication. These potent NNRTIs enhanced the intracellular processing of Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins, and this was associated with a decrease in viral particle production from HIV-1-transfected cells. The increased polyprotein processing is consistent with premature activation of the HIV-1 protease by NNRTI-enhanced Gag-Pol multimerization through the embedded RT sequence. These findings support the view that Gag-Pol multimerization is an important step in viral assembly and demonstrate that regulation of Gag-Pol/Gag-Pol interactions is a novel target for small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 production. Furthermore, these drugs can serve as useful probes to further understand processes involved in HIV-1 particle assembly and maturation.

  4. Reversible Thrombocytopenia after Gabapentin in an HIV-Positive Patient

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    Mohammed Basith

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gabapentin has become increasingly used in psychiatric practice specifically for anxiety disorders. Even though gabapentin is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat anxiety, physicians sometimes use it as an alternative to benzodiazepines in patients with a history of substance abuse. Gabapentin is also prescribed when individuals are at risk of thrombocytopenia which is not considered a side effect. Among patients at risk of thrombocytopenia are those positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Here we present a case of an HIV-positive man who presented for inpatient psychiatric care with severe anxiety and a history of alcohol and benzodiazepine abuse. In this patient, gabapentin worsened thrombocytopenia after repeated exposure to this medication. We suggest caution when considering gabapentin for patients with preexisting low platelet counts, as there seems to be a risk for worsening thrombocytopenia with this antiepileptic in the presence of HIV infection.

  5. Evolving uses of oral reverse transcriptase inhibitors in the HIV-1 epidemic: From treatment to prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.K. Gupta (Ravindra); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); S. Manicklal (Sheetal); M.A. Wainberg (Mark)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe HIV epidemic continues unabated, with no highly effective vaccine and no cure. Each new infection has significant economic, social and human costs and prevention efforts are now as great a priority as global antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale up. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the

  6. Identification of a methylated oligoribonucleotide as a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Boyan; Bocquin, Anne; Gabus, Caroline; Avilov, Sergey; Mély, Yves; Agopian, Audrey; Divita, Gilles; Gottikh, Marina; Witvrouw, Myriam; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    Upon HIV-1 infection of a target cell, the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) copies the genomic RNA to synthesize the viral DNA. The genomic RNA is within the incoming HIV-1 core where it is coated by molecules of nucleocapsid (NC) protein that chaperones the reverse transcription process. Indeed, the RT chaperoning properties of NC extend from the initiation of cDNA synthesis to completion of the viral DNA. New and effective drugs against HIV-1 continue to be required, which prompted us to search for compounds aimed at inhibiting NC protein. Here, we report that the NC chaperoning activity is extensively inhibited in vitro by small methylated oligoribonucleotides (mODN). These mODNs were delivered intracellularly using a cell-penetrating-peptide and found to impede HIV-1 replication in primary human cells at nanomolar concentrations. Extensive analysis showed that viral cDNA synthesis was severely impaired by mODNs. Partially resistant viruses with mutations in NC and RT emerged after months of passaging in cell culture. A HIV-1 molecular clone (NL4.3) bearing these mutations was found to replicate at high concentrations of mODN, albeit with a reduced fitness. Small, methylated ODNs such as mODN-11 appear to be a new type of highly potent inhibitor of HIV-1.

  7. A376S in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers increased risk of virological failure to nevirapine therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes, Roger; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Bannister, Wendy; Kisic, Mónica; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pou, Christian; Bellido, Rocío; Betancor, Gilberto; Bogner, Johannes; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Clotet, Bonaventura; Lundgren, Jens; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Iacomi, F.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Finazzi, R.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; d'Arminio, A.; Rozentale, B.; Aldins, P.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Reiss, P.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Brunn, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Prokopowicz, D.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, E.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Persson, P. O.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; Lundgren, J.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Kirk, O.; Mocroft, A.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Ellefson, M.; Podlekareva, D.; Kjaer, J.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Kowalska, J.; Tverland, J.; Fischer, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical relevance of mutations in the connection subdomain and the ribonuclease (RNase) H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is uncertain. The risk of virological failure to nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was evaluated in NNRTI-naive patients who

  8. HDAC inhibition induces HIV-1 protein and enables immune-based clearance following latency reversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guoxin; Swanson, Michael; Talla, Aarthi

    2017-01-01

    Promising therapeutic approaches for eradicating HIV include transcriptional activation of provirus from latently infected cells using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and immune-mediated clearance to purge reservoirs. Accurate detection of cells capable of producing viral antigens and virions......, and the measurement of clearance of infected cells, is essential to assessing therapeutic efficacy. Here, we apply enhanced methodology extending the sensitivity limits for the rapid detection of subfemtomolar HIV gag p24 capsid protein in CD4+ T cells from ART-suppressed HIV+ individuals, and we show viral protein...... induction following treatment with LRAs. Importantly, we demonstrate that clinical administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis; vorinostat and panobinostat) induced HIV gag p24, and ex vivo stimulation produced sufficient viral antigen to elicit immune-mediated cell killing using anti-gp120/CD3...

  9. Durability evaluation of reversible solid oxide cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; O'Brien, Robert C.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  10. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K Bialek

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs, act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR, for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  11. Early initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy fails to reverse immunovirological abnormalities in gut-associated lymphoid tissue induced by acute HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tincati, Camilla; Biasin, Mara; Bandera, Alessandra; Violin, Michela; Marchetti, Giulia; Piacentini, Luca; Vago, Gian Luca; Balotta, Claudia; Moroni, Mauro; Franzetti, Fabio; Clerici, Mario; Gori, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    During the acute phase of HIV infection, large CD4+ T-cell depletion occurs in the gastrointestinal tract. The kinetics of CD4+ T-cell decrease and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-mediated immune reconstitution were evaluated. Rectosigmoid colonic (RSC) biopsies and blood samples of nine patients with acute HIV infection were collected. CD4+ T-cell count, HIV RNA, intracellular HIV DNA and messenger RNA cytokine expression were evaluated before and after 6 months of HAART. All nine patients presented symptomatic retroviral infection. Early HAART was associated with a sustained and comparable reduction of HIV RNA in plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and RSC biopsies. HIV DNA decreased in PBMCs, but was only marginally reduced in RSC biopsies. Comparisons between reduction rates of HIV DNA in these two compartments confirmed that HIV DNA clearance was less efficient in RSC biopsies compared with PBMCs. Assessment of immunological profiles in PBMCs and RSC biopsies showed that the T-helper (Th)1-like/Th2-like ratio was sharply decreased in RSC biopsies and increased in PBMCs throughout the study period. A persistent Th2-like profile was detected in RSC biopsies. Efficient clearing of HIV DNA observed in PBMCs correlated with the establishment of a more favourable Th1-like profile. A less efficient clearance of intracellular HIV DNA following early introduction of HAART is associated with persistent immunological impairment in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which is reflected by the skewed expression of cytokines in this reservoir. The present study shows that early initiation of HAART, in the short-term, is not effective in containing the establishment of HIV infection and in reversing associated immunological GALT abnormalities.

  12. Protein-mediated antagonism between HIV reverse transcriptase ligands nevirapine and MgATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xunhai; Mueller, Geoffrey A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2013-06-18

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) play a central role in the treatment of AIDS, but their mechanisms of action are incompletely understood. The interaction of the NNRTI nevirapine (NVP) with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is characterized by a preference for the open conformation of the fingers/thumb subdomains, and a reported variation of three orders of magnitude between the binding affinity of NVP for RT in the presence or absence of primer/template DNA. To investigate the relationship between conformation and ligand binding, we evaluated the use of methionine NMR probes positioned near the tip of the fingers or thumb subdomains. Such probes would be expected to be sensitive to changes in the local environment depending on the fractions of open and closed RT. Comparisons of the NMR spectra of three conservative mutations, I63M, L74M, and L289M, indicated that M63 showed the greatest shift sensitivity to the addition of NVP. The exchange kinetics of the M63 resonance are fast on the chemical shift timescale, but become slow in the presence of NVP due to the slow binding of RT with the inhibitor. The simplest model consistent with this behavior involves a rapid open/closed equilibrium coupled with a slow interaction of the inhibitor with the open conformation. Studies of RT in the presence of both NVP and MgATP indicate a strong negative cooperativity. Binding of MgATP reduces the fraction of RT bound to NVP, as indicated by the intensity of the NVP-perturbed M230 resonance, and enhances the dissociation rate constant of the NVP, resulting in an increase of the open/closed interconversion rate, so that the M63 resonance moves into the fast/intermediate-exchange regime. Protein-mediated interactions appear to explain most of the affinity variation of NVP for RT. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sequence Quality Analysis Tool for HIV Type 1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, Allison K.; Wu, Mingham; Bennett, Diane; Parkin, Neil; Wu, Zhijin; Hogan, Joseph W.; Kantor, Rami

    2012-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy is increasing globally and drug resistance evolution is anticipated. Currently, protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence generation is increasing, including the use of in-house sequencing assays, and quality assessment prior to sequence analysis is essential. We created a computational HIV PR/RT Sequence Quality Analysis Tool (SQUAT) that runs in the R statistical environment. Sequence quality thresholds are calculated from a large dataset (46,802...

  14. Polyurethane intravaginal ring for controlled delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kavita M; Pearce, Serena M; Poursaid, Azadeh E; Aliyar, Hyder A; Tresco, Patrick A; Mitchnik, Mark A; Kiser, Patrick F

    2008-10-01

    Women-controlled methods for prevention of male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV-1 are urgently needed. Providing inhibitory concentrations of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors to impede the replication of the virus in the female genital tissue offers a mechanism for prophylaxis of HIV-1. To this end, an intravaginal ring device that can provide long duration delivery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of HIV-1, was developed utilizing a medical-grade polyether urethane. Monolithic intravaginal rings were fabricated and sustained release with cumulative flux linear with time was demonstrated under sink conditions for a period of 30 days. The release rate was directly proportional to the amount of drug loaded. Another release study conducted for a week utilizing liposome dispersions as sink conditions, to mimic the partitioning of dapivirine into vaginal tissue, also demonstrated release rates constant with time. These results qualify polyether urethanes for development of intravaginal rings for sustained delivery of microbicidal agents. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  15. HIV Latency Reversing Agents have diverse effects on Natural Killer Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garrido

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to clear persistent HIV infection, and achieve a durable therapy-free remission of HIV disease, extensive pre-clinical studies and early pilot clinical trials are underway to develop and test agents that can reverse latent HIV infection and present viral antigen to the immune system for clearance. It is therefore critical to understand the impact of latency reversing agents (LRAs on the function of immune effectors needed to clear infected cells. We assessed the impact of LRAs on the function of natural killer (NK cells, the main effector cells of the innate immune system. We studied the effects of three histone deacetylase inhibitors (SAHA or vorinostat, romidepsin and panobinostat and two protein kinase C (PKC agonists (prostratin and ingenol on the antiviral activity, cytotoxicity, cytokine secretion, phenotype and viability of primary NK cells. We found that ex vivo exposure to vorinostat had minimal impact on all parameters assessed, while panobinostat caused a decrease in NK cell viability, antiviral activity and cytotoxicity. Prostratin caused NK cell activation and interestingly, improved antiviral activity. Overall, we found that LRAs can alter the function and fate of NK cells, and these effects must be carefully considered as strategies are developed to clear persistent HIV infection.

  16. Trade-off between synergy and efficacy in combinations of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Dixit, Narendra M

    2018-02-01

    Eradicating HIV-1 infection is difficult because of the reservoir of latently infected cells that gets established soon after infection, remains hidden from antiretroviral drugs and host immune responses, and retains the capacity to reignite infection following the cessation of treatment. Drugs called latency-reversing agents (LRAs) are being developed to reactivate latently infected cells and render them susceptible to viral cytopathicity or immune killing. Whereas individual LRAs have failed to induce adequate reactivation, pairs of LRAs have been identified recently that act synergistically and hugely increase reactivation levels compared to individual LRAs. The maximum synergy achievable with LRA pairs is of clinical importance, as it would allow latency-reversal with minimal drug exposure. Here, we employed stochastic simulations of HIV-1 transcription and translation in latently infected cells to estimate this maximum synergy. We incorporated the predominant mechanisms of action of the two most promising classes of LRAs, namely, protein kinase C agonists and histone deacetylase inhibitors, and quantified the activity of individual LRAs in the two classes by mapping our simulations to corresponding in vitro experiments. Without any adjustable parameters, our simulations then quantitatively captured experimental observations of latency-reversal when the LRAs were used in pairs. Performing simulations representing a wide range of drug concentrations, we estimated the maximum synergy achievable with these LRA pairs. Importantly, we found with all the LRA pairs we considered that concentrations yielding the maximum synergy did not yield the maximum latency-reversal. Increasing concentrations to increase latency-reversal compromised synergy, unravelling a trade-off between synergy and efficacy in LRA combinations. The maximum synergy realizable with LRA pairs would thus be restricted by the desired level of latency-reversal, a constrained optimum we elucidated with

  17. Reverse electrodialysis : evaluation of suitable electrode systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.; Saakes, M.; Metz, S. J.; Harmsen, G. J.

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a method for directly extracting electrical energy from salinity gradients, especially from sea and river water. For the commercial implementation of RED, the electrode system is a key component. In this paper, novel electrode systems for RED were compared with

  18. Evaluating Reverse Supply Chain Efficiency: Manufacturer's Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, M.; Tiwari, M. K.; Wong, K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to illustrate the use of fuzzy data envelopment analysis (DEA) in analyzing reverse supply chain (RSC) performance from the manufacturer's perspective. By using an alternative alpha-cut approach, the fuzzy DEA model was converted into a crisp linear programming problem, thereby...... usually ensures an environmentally friendly supply chain network, companies which have implemented RSC techniques since a longer duration do not necessarily have a more efficient supply chain in general....

  19. Naringin Reverses Hepatocyte Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Associated with HIV-1 Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors-Induced Metabolic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwafeyisetan O. Adebiyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs have not only improved therapeutic outcomes in the treatment of HIV infection but have also led to an increase in associated metabolic complications of NRTIs. Naringin’s effects in mitigating NRTI-induced complications were investigated in this study. Wistar rats, randomly allotted into seven groups (n = 7 were orally treated daily for 56 days with 100 mg/kg zidovudine (AZT (groups I, II III, 50 mg/kg stavudine (d4T (groups IV, V, VI and 3 mL/kg of distilled water (group VII. Additionally, rats in groups II and V were similarly treated with 50 mg/kg naringin, while groups III and VI were treated with 45 mg/kg vitamin E. AZT or d4T treatment significantly reduced body weight and plasma high density lipoprotein concentrations but increased liver weights, plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol compared to controls, respectively. Furthermore, AZT or d4T treatment significantly increased oxidative stress, adiposity index and expression of Bax protein, but reduced Bcl-2 protein expression compared to controls, respectively. However, either naringin or vitamin E significantly mitigated AZT- or d4T-induced weight loss, dyslipidemia, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis compared to AZT- or d4T-only treated rats. Our results suggest that naringin reverses metabolic complications associated with NRTIs by ameliorating oxidative stress and apoptosis. This implies that naringin supplements could mitigate lipodystrophy and dyslipidemia associated with NRTI therapy.

  20. Mutation V111I in HIV-2 reverse transcriptase increases the fitness of the nucleoside analogue-resistant K65R and Q151M viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Deuzing (Ilona); C. Charpentier (Charlotte); D.J. Wright (David Justin); S. Matheron (Sophie); J. Paton (Jack); D. Frentz (Dineke); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); P.V. Coveney (Peter); D. Descamps (Diane); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); N. Beerens (Nancy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractInfection with HIV-2 can ultimately lead to AIDS, although disease progression is much slower than with HIV-1. HIV-2 patients are mostly treated with a combination of nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) and protease inhibitors designed for HIV-1. Many studies have

  1. Molecular Docking Studies of Marine Diterpenes as Inhibitors of Wild-Type and Mutants HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. T. de Souza

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIDS is a pandemic responsible for more than 35 million deaths. The emergence of resistant mutations due to drug use is the biggest cause of treatment failure. Marine organisms are sources of different molecules, some of which offer promising HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitory activity, such as the diterpenes dolabelladienotriol (THD, IC50 = 16.5 µM, (6R-6-hydroxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (HDD, IC50 = 10 µM and (6R-6-acetoxydichotoma-3,14-diene-1,17-dial (ADD, IC50 = 35 µM, isolated from a brown algae of the genus Dictyota, showing low toxicity. In this work, we evaluated the structure-activity relationship (SAR of THD, HDD and ADD as anti HIV-1 RT, using a molecular modeling approach. The analyses of stereoelectronic parameters revealed a direct relationship between activity and HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital-LUMO (Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital gap (ELUMO–EHOMO, where antiviral profile increases with larger HOMO-LUMO gap values. We also performed molecular docking studies of THD into HIV-1 RT wild-type and 12 different mutants, which showed a seahorse conformation, hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds with important residues of the binding pocket. Based on in vitro experiments and docking studies, we demonstrated that mutations have little influence in positioning and interactions of THD. Following a rational drug design, we suggest a modification of THD to improve its biological activity.

  2. A Rough Set-Based Model of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Resistome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kierczak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a viral enzyme crucial for HIV-1 replication. Currently, 12 drugs are targeted against the RT. The low fidelity of the RT-mediated transcription leads to the quick accumulation of drug-resistance mutations. The sequence-resistance relationship remains only partially understood. Using publicly available data collected from over 15 years of HIV proteome research, we have created a general and predictive rule-based model of HIV-1 resistance to eight RT inhibitors. Our rough set-based model considers changes in the physicochemical properties of a mutated sequence as compared to the wild-type strain. Thanks to the application of the Monte Carlo feature selection method, the model takes into account only the properties that significantly contribute to the resistance phenomenon. The obtained results show that drug-resistance is determined in more complex way than believed. We confirmed the importance of many resistance-associated sites, found some sites to be less relevant than formerly postulated and— more importantly—identified several previously neglected sites as potentially relevant. By mapping some of the newly discovered sites on the 3D structure of the RT, we were able to suggest possible molecular-mechanisms of drug-resistance. Importantly, our model has the ability to generalize predictions to the previously unseen cases. The study is an example of how computational biology methods can increase our understanding of the HIV-1 resistome.

  3. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  4. Evaluation of Socio-Demographic Characteristics of HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Socio-Demographic Characteristics of HIV/AIDS Patients in a Tertiary Hospital. ... Journal of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences. Journal Home ... Keywords: Socio-demographics, HIV/AID, Retrospective, Teaching hospital ...

  5. Complete inactivation of HIV-1 using photo-labeled non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Adan; Quesada, Jorge; Anderson, Dallas; Goldstein, Allan; Fossum, Theresa; Colby-Germinario, Susan; Wainberg, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that a photo-labeled derivative of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) dapivirine termed DAPY, when used together with exposure to ultraviolet light, was able to completely and irreversibly inactivate both HIV-1 RT activity as well as infectiousness in each of a T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Control experiments using various concentrations of DAPY revealed that a combination of exposure to ultraviolet light together with use of the specific, high affinity photo-labeled compound was necessary for complete inactivation to occur. This method of HIV RT inactivation may have applicability toward preservation of an intact viral structure and warrants further investigation in regard to the potential of this approach to elicit a durable, broad protective immune response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Class 1-Selective Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors Enhance HIV Latency Reversal while Preserving the Activity of HDAC Isoforms Necessary for Maximal HIV Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikos, Thomas D; Painter, Mark M; Sebastian Kettinger, Nadia T; Terry, Valeri H; Collins, Kathleen L

    2018-03-15

    Combinations of drugs that affect distinct mechanisms of HIV latency aim to induce robust latency reversal leading to cytopathicity and elimination of the persistent HIV reservoir. Thus far, attempts have focused on combinations of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) despite the knowledge that HIV gene expression is regulated by class 1 histone deacetylases. We hypothesized that class 1-selective HDIs would promote more robust HIV latency reversal in combination with a PKC agonist than pan-HDIs because they preserve the activity of proviral factors regulated by non-class 1 histone deacetylases. Here, we show that class 1-selective agents used alone or with the PKC agonist bryostatin-1 induced more HIV protein expression per infected cell. In addition, the combination of entinostat and bryostatin-1 induced viral outgrowth, whereas bryostatin-1 combinations with pan-HDIs did not. When class 1-selective HDIs were used in combination with pan-HDIs, the amount of viral protein expression and virus outgrowth resembled that of pan-HDIs alone, suggesting that pan-HDIs inhibit robust gene expression induced by class 1-selective HDIs. Consistent with this, pan-HDI-containing combinations reduced the activity of NF-κB and Hsp90, two cellular factors necessary for potent HIV protein expression, but did not significantly reduce overall cell viability. An assessment of viral clearance from in vitro cultures indicated that maximal protein expression induced by class 1-selective HDI treatment was crucial for reservoir clearance. These findings elucidate the limitations of current approaches and provide a path toward more effective strategies to eliminate the HIV reservoir. IMPORTANCE Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, HIV evades eradication in a latent form that is not affected by currently available drug regimens. Pharmacologic latency reversal that leads to death of cellular reservoirs has been proposed as a strategy for

  7. The RNA binding protein HuR does not interact directly with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and does not affect reverse transcription in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gronenborn Angela M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lemay et al recently reported that the RNA binding protein HuR directly interacts with the ribonuclease H (RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT and influences the efficiency of viral reverse transcription (Lemay et al., 2008, Retrovirology 5:47. HuR is a member of the embryonic lethal abnormal vision protein family and contains 3 RNA recognition motifs (RRMs that bind AU-rich elements (AREs. To define the structural determinants of the HuR-RT interaction and to elucidate the mechanism(s by which HuR influences HIV-1 reverse transcription activity in vitro, we cloned and purified full-length HuR as well as three additional protein constructs that contained the N-terminal and internal RRMs, the internal and C-terminal RRMs, or the C-terminal RRM only. Results All four HuR proteins were purified and characterized by biophysical methods. They are well structured and exist as monomers in solution. No direct protein-protein interaction between HuR and HIV-1 RT was detected using NMR titrations with 15N labeled HuR variants or the 15N labeled RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. Furthermore, HuR did not significantly affect the kinetics of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro, even on RNA templates that contain AREs. Conclusions Our results suggest that HuR does not impact HIV-1 replication through a direct protein-protein interaction with the viral RT.

  8. Structural and Preclinical Studies of Computationally Designed Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors for Treating HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudalkar, Shalley N.; Beloor, Jagadish; Chan, Albert H.; Lee, Won-Gil; Jorgensen, William L.; Kumar, Priti; Anderson, Karen S.

    2017-02-06

    The clinical benefits of HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are hindered by their unsatisfactory pharmacokinetic (PK) properties along with the rapid development of drug-resistant variants. However, the clinical efficacy of these inhibitors can be improved by developing compounds with enhanced pharmacological profiles and heightened antiviral activity. We used computational and structure-guided design to develop two next-generation NNRTI drug candidates, compounds I and II, which are members of a class of catechol diethers. We evaluated the preclinical potential of these compounds in BALB/c mice because of their high solubility (510 µg/ml for compound I and 82.9 µg/ml for compound II), low cytotoxicity, and enhanced antiviral activity against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 RT and resistant variants. Additionally, crystal structures of compounds I and II with WT RT suggested an optimal binding to the NNRTI binding pocket favoring the high anti-viral potency. A single intraperitoneal dose of compounds I and II exhibited a prolonged serum residence time of 48 hours and concentration maximum (Cmax) of 4000- to 15,000-fold higher than their therapeutic/effective concentrations. These Cmax values were 4- to 15-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations observed in MT-2 cells. Compound II showed an enhanced area under the curve (0–last) and decreased plasma clearance over compound I and efavirenz, the standard of care NNRTI. Hence, the overall (PK) profile of compound II was excellent compared with that of compound I and efavirenz. Furthermore, both compounds were very well tolerated in BALB/c mice without any detectable acute toxicity. Taken together, these data suggest that compounds I and II possess improved anti-HIV-1 potency, remarkable in vivo safety, and prolonged in vivo circulation time, suggesting strong potential for further development as new NNRTIs for the potential treatment of HIV infection.

  9. A376S in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers increased risk of virological failure to nevirapine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paredes, Roger; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Bannister, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Background. The clinical relevance of mutations in the connection subdomain and the ribonuclease (RNase) H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is uncertain. Methods. The risk of virological failure to nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) was evaluated...... in NNRTI-naive patients who started NNRTIs in the EuroSIDA study after July 1997 according to preexisting substitutions in the connection subdomain and the RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. An observed association between A376S and virological failure was further investigated by testing in vitro NNRTI...... = .013). A376S conferred selective low-level nevirapine resistance in vitro, and led to greater affinity for double-stranded DNA. Conclusions. The A376S substitution in the connection subdomain of HIV-1 RT causes selective nevirapine resistance and confers an increased risk of virological failure...

  10. Prediction of mutational tolerance in HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase using flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Humphris-Narayanan

    Full Text Available Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model.

  11. 4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, MK-8591: a novel HIV-1 reverse transcriptase translocation inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Martin; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2018-07-01

    4'-Ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) with a novel mechanism of action, unique structure, and amongst NRTIs, unparalleled anti-HIV-1 activity. We will summarize its structure and function, antiviral activity, resistance profile, and potential as an antiretroviral for use in the treatment and preexposure prophylaxis of HIV-1 infection. EFdA is active against wild-type (EC50 as low as 50 pmol/l) and most highly NRTI-resistant viruses. The active metabolite, EFdA-triphosphate, has been shown to have a prolonged intracellular half-life in human and rhesus (Rh) blood cells. As a result, single drug doses tested in simian immunodeficiency virus mac251-infected Rh macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals exhibited robust antiviral activity of 7-10 days duration. Preclinical studies of EFdA as preexposure prophylaxis in the Rh macaque/simian/human immunodeficiency virus low-dose intrarectal challenge model have shown complete protection when given in clinically relevant doses. EFdA is a novel antiretroviral with activity against both wild-type and NRTI-resistant viruses. As a result of the prolonged intracellular half-life of its active moiety, it is amenable to flexibility in dosing of at least daily to weekly and perhaps longer.

  12. HIV Salvage Therapy Does Not Require Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Karen T; Smeaton, Laura M; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Andrade, Adriana; Eron, Joseph J; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Johnson, Victoria A; Klingman, Karin L; Ritz, Justin; Hodder, Sally; Santana, Jorge L; Wilkin, Timothy; Haubrich, Richard H

    2015-12-15

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are often included in antiretroviral regimens in treatment-experienced patients in the absence of data from randomized trials. To compare treatment success between participants who omit versus those who add NRTIs to an optimized antiretroviral regimen of 3 or more agents. Multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00537394). Outpatient HIV clinics. Treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection and viral resistance. Open-label optimized regimens (not including NRTIs) were selected on the basis of treatment history and susceptibility testing. Participants were randomly assigned to omit or add NRTIs. The primary efficacy outcome was regimen failure through 48 weeks using a noninferiority margin of 15%. The primary safety outcome was time to initial episode of a severe sign, symptom, or laboratory abnormality before discontinuation of NRTI assignment. 360 participants were randomly assigned, and 93% completed a 48-week visit. The cumulative probability of regimen failure was 29.8% in the omit-NRTIs group versus 25.9% in the add-NRTIs group (difference, 3.2 percentage points [95% CI, -6.1 to 12.5 percentage points]). No significant between-group differences were found in the primary safety end points or the proportion of participants with HIV RNA level less than 50 copies/mL. No deaths occurred in the omit-NRTIs group compared with 7 deaths in the add-NRTIs group. Unblinded study design, and the study may not be applicable to resource-poor settings. Treatment-experienced patients with HIV infection starting a new optimized regimen can safely omit NRTIs without compromising virologic efficacy. Omitting NRTIs will reduce pill burden, cost, and toxicity in this patient population. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Boehringer Ingelheim, Janssen, Merck, ViiV Healthcare, Roche, and Monogram Biosciences (LabCorp).

  13. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol

  14. Structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant: insights into the inhibitor resistance of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and the structure of the nucleotide-binding pocket of Hepatitis B virus polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tamura, Noriko; Yasutake, Yoshiaki, E-mail: y-yasutake@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2-17-2-1 Tsukisamu-Higashi, Toyohira, Sapporo, Hokkaido 062-8517 (Japan)

    2015-10-23

    The structure of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase Q151M mutant was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å in space group P321. Hepatitis B virus polymerase (HBV Pol) is an important target for anti-HBV drug development; however, its low solubility and stability in vitro has hindered detailed structural studies. Certain nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NRTIs) such as tenofovir and lamivudine can inhibit both HBV Pol and Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RT, leading to speculation on structural and mechanistic analogies between the deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP)-binding sites of these enzymes. The Q151M mutation in HIV-1 RT, located at the dNTP-binding site, confers resistance to various NRTIs, while maintaining sensitivity to tenofovir and lamivudine. The residue corresponding to Gln151 is strictly conserved as a methionine in HBV Pol. Therefore, the structure of the dNTP-binding pocket of the HIV-1 RT Q151M mutant may reflect that of HBV Pol. Here, the crystal structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M, determined at 2.6 Å resolution, in a new crystal form with space group P321 is presented. Although the structure of HIV-1 RT Q151M superimposes well onto that of HIV-1 RT in a closed conformation, a slight movement of the β-strands (β2–β3) that partially create the dNTP-binding pocket was observed. This movement might be caused by the introduction of the bulky thioether group of Met151. The structure also highlighted the possibility that the hydrogen-bonding network among amino acids and NRTIs is rearranged by the Q151M mutation, leading to a difference in the affinity of NRTIs for HIV-1 RT and HBV Pol.

  15. Sequence quality analysis tool for HIV type 1 protease and reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Allison K; Wu, Mingham; Bennett, Diane; Parkin, Neil; Wu, Zhijin; Hogan, Joseph W; Kantor, Rami

    2012-08-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy is increasing globally and drug resistance evolution is anticipated. Currently, protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequence generation is increasing, including the use of in-house sequencing assays, and quality assessment prior to sequence analysis is essential. We created a computational HIV PR/RT Sequence Quality Analysis Tool (SQUAT) that runs in the R statistical environment. Sequence quality thresholds are calculated from a large dataset (46,802 PR and 44,432 RT sequences) from the published literature ( http://hivdb.Stanford.edu ). Nucleic acid sequences are read into SQUAT, identified, aligned, and translated. Nucleic acid sequences are flagged if with >five 1-2-base insertions; >one 3-base insertion; >one deletion; >six PR or >18 RT ambiguous bases; >three consecutive PR or >four RT nucleic acid mutations; >zero stop codons; >three PR or >six RT ambiguous amino acids; >three consecutive PR or >four RT amino acid mutations; >zero unique amino acids; or 15% genetic distance from another submitted sequence. Thresholds are user modifiable. SQUAT output includes a summary report with detailed comments for troubleshooting of flagged sequences, histograms of pairwise genetic distances, neighbor joining phylogenetic trees, and aligned nucleic and amino acid sequences. SQUAT is a stand-alone, free, web-independent tool to ensure use of high-quality HIV PR/RT sequences in interpretation and reporting of drug resistance, while increasing awareness and expertise and facilitating troubleshooting of potentially problematic sequences.

  16. Design and synthesis of N₁-aryl-benzimidazoles 2-substituted as novel HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Anna-Maria; Ferro, Stefania; De Luca, Laura; Lo Surdo, Giuseppa; Morreale, Francesca; Pannecouque, Christophe; Balzarini, Jan; Chimirri, Alba

    2014-02-15

    A series of novel N1-aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Some of them proved to be effective in inhibiting HIV-1 replication at submicromolar and nanomolar concentration acting as HIV-1 non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), with low cytotoxicity. The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these new derivatives was discussed and rationalized by docking studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reverse survival method of fertility estimation: An evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Spoorenberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the most part, demographers have relied on the ever-growing body of sample surveys collecting full birth history to derive total fertility estimates in less statistically developed countries. Yet alternative methods of fertility estimation can return very consistent total fertility estimates by using only basic demographic information. Objective: This paper evaluates the consistency and sensitivity of the reverse survival method -- a fertility estimation method based on population data by age and sex collected in one census or a single-round survey. Methods: A simulated population was first projected over 15 years using a set of fertility and mortality age and sex patterns. The projected population was then reverse survived using the Excel template FE_reverse_4.xlsx, provided with Timæus and Moultrie (2012. Reverse survival fertility estimates were then compared for consistency to the total fertility rates used to project the population. The sensitivity was assessed by introducing a series of distortions in the projection of the population and comparing the difference implied in the resulting fertility estimates. Results: The reverse survival method produces total fertility estimates that are very consistent and hardly affected by erroneous assumptions on the age distribution of fertility or by the use of incorrect mortality levels, trends, and age patterns. The quality of the age and sex population data that is 'reverse survived' determines the consistency of the estimates. The contribution of the method for the estimation of past and present trends in total fertility is illustrated through its application to the population data of five countries characterized by distinct fertility levels and data quality issues. Conclusions: Notwithstanding its simplicity, the reverse survival method of fertility estimation has seldom been applied. The method can be applied to a large body of existing and easily available population data

  18. Trends of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene of HIV type 1 isolates from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohd; Malik, Abida; Rizvi, Meher; Rai, Arvind

    2014-04-01

    A major cause of failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the presence of drug-resistance-associated mutations in the polymerase gene of HIV-1. The paucity of data regarding potential drug resistance to reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) prompted us to carry out this study. This information will shed light on the extent of drug resistance already present in HIV strains and will give future directions in patient treatment and in drug design. Drug resistance genotyping of a partial reverse transcriptase gene was done in 103 HIV-1-infected patients, including the ART-naive and ART-experienced population. The drug resistance pattern was analyzed using the Stanford HIV-DR database, the IAS-USA mutation list and the REGA algorithm-v8.0. Subtyping was done using the REGA HIV-1 subtyping tool-v2.01. The majority of our sequences (96 %) were found to be subtype C, and four (3.8 %) were subtype A1. Significant prevalence of DR mutations (28 %) was observed in the RT gene. Major amino acid substitutions were seen at positions 41, 90, 98, 103, 106, 108, 138, 181, 184, 190, 215, and 219, which confer high/intermediate levels of resistance to most RTIs, independently or together. Our results show that there is an urgent need to tailor ART drug regimens to the individual to achieve optimum therapeutic outcome in North India.

  19. Intravaginal ring delivery of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor TMC 120 as an HIV microbicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfson, A David; Malcolm, R Karl; Morrow, Ryan J; Toner, Clare F; McCullagh, Stephen D

    2006-11-15

    TMC 120 (Dapivirine) is a potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that is presently being developed as a vaginal HIV microbicide. To date, most vaginal microbicides under clinical investigation have been formulated as single-dose semi-solid gels, designed for application to the vagina before each act of intercourse. However, a clear rationale exists for providing long-term, controlled release of vaginal microbicides in order to afford continuous protection against heterosexually transmitted HIV infection and to improve user compliance. In this study we report on the incorporation of various pharmaceutical excipients into TMC 120 silicone, reservoir-type intravaginal rings (IVRs) in order to modify the controlled release characteristics of the microbicide. The results demonstrate that TMC 120 is released in zero-order fashion from the rings over a 28-day period and that release parameters could be modified by the inclusion of release-modifying excipients in the IVR. The hydrophobic liquid excipient isopropyl myristate had little effect on steady-state daily release rates, but did increase the magnitude and duration of burst release in proportion to excipient loading in the IVR. By comparison, the hydrophobic liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) had little effect on TMC 120 release parameters. A hydrophilic excipient, lactose, had the surprising effect of decreasing TMC 120 burst release while increasing the apparent steady-state daily release in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on previous cell culture data and vaginal physiology, TMC120 is released from the various ring formulations in amounts potentially capable of maintaining a protective vaginal concentration. It is further predicted that the observed release rates may be maintained for at least a period of 1 year from a single ring device. TMC 120 release profiles and the mechanical properties of rings could be modified by the physicochemical nature of hydrophobic and hydrophilic excipients

  20. Evaluation of HIV Surveillance System in Rivers State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rivers State has been reported to have the highest HIV prevalence of all the thirty-six states in Nigeria. HIV surveillance system generates information for timely and appropriate public health action. Evaluation of the surveillance system is vital in ensuring that the purpose of the surveillance system is being met.

  1. Evaluation of the Positive Prevention HIV/STD Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of Positive Prevention, a theory-based, HIV/STD prevention education curriculum for high school youth. Three hundred fifty-three students participated in a longitudinal experimental design to determine the impact of the curriculum on HIV/AIDS knowledge, self-efficacy to abstain from sex, self-efficacy of…

  2. Vpx overcomes a SAMHD1-independent block to HIV reverse transcription that is specific to resting CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Stegmann, Lena; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Ambiel, Ina; Trotard, Maud; Martin, Margarethe; Burggraf, Manja; Lenzi, Gina M; Lejk, Helena; Pan, Xiaoyu; Fregoso, Oliver I; Lim, Efrem S; Abraham, Libin; Nguyen, Laura A; Rutsch, Frank; König, Renate; Kim, Baek; Emerman, Michael; Fackler, Oliver T; Keppler, Oliver T

    2017-03-07

    Early after entry into monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and resting CD4 T cells, HIV encounters a block, limiting reverse transcription (RT) of the incoming viral RNA genome. In this context, dNTP triphosphohydrolase SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) has been identified as a restriction factor, lowering the concentration of dNTP substrates to limit RT. The accessory lentiviral protein X (Vpx) proteins from the major simian immunodeficiency virus of rhesus macaque, sooty mangabey, and HIV-2 (SIVsmm/SIVmac/HIV-2) lineage packaged into virions target SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation, increase intracellular dNTP pools, and facilitate HIV cDNA synthesis. We find that virion-packaged Vpx proteins from a second SIV lineage, SIV of red-capped mangabeys or mandrills (SIVrcm/mnd-2), increased HIV infection in resting CD4 T cells, but not in macrophages, and, unexpectedly, acted in the absence of SAMHD1 degradation, dNTP pool elevation, or changes in SAMHD1 phosphorylation. Vpx rcm/mnd-2 virion incorporation resulted in a dramatic increase of HIV-1 RT intermediates and viral cDNA in infected resting CD4 T cells. These analyses also revealed a barrier limiting HIV-1 infection of resting CD4 T cells at the level of nuclear import. Single amino acid changes in the SAMHD1-degrading Vpx mac239 allowed it to enhance early postentry steps in a Vpx rcm/mnd-2-like fashion. Moreover, Vpx enhanced HIV-1 infection of SAMHD1-deficient resting CD4 T cells of a patient with Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. These results indicate that Vpx, in addition to SAMHD1, overcomes a previously unappreciated restriction for lentiviruses at the level of RT that acts independently of dNTP concentrations and is specific to resting CD4 T cells.

  3. Dideoxynucleoside HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitors and drug-related hepatotoxicity: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapadula Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report regards the case of a 43 year-old HIV-positive woman who developed an episode of serious transaminase elevation during stavudine-including antiretroviral therapy. Diagnostic assessment ruled out hepatitis virus co-infection, alcohol abuse besides other possible causes of liver damage. No signs of lactic acidosis were present. Liver biopsy showed portal inflammatory infiltrate, spotty necrosis, vacuoles of macro- and micro-vesicular steatosis, acidophil and foamy hepatocytes degeneration with organelles clumping, poorly formed Mallory bodies and neutrophil granulocytes attraction (satellitosis. A dramatic improvement in liver function tests occurred when stavudine was discontinued and a new antiretroviral regimen with different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was used. The importance of considering hepatotoxicity as an adverse event of HAART including stavudine, even in absence of other signs of mitochondrial toxicity should therefore be underlined. Liver biopsy may provide further important information regarding patients with severe transaminase elevation, for a better understanding of the etiology of liver damage.

  4. Performance of 3 Rapid Tests for Discrimination Between HIV-1 and HIV-2 in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Bjarnason Obinah, Magnús Pétur; Jespersen, Sanne

    2014-01-01

    As HIV-2 is intrinsically resistant to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, it is mandatory to discriminate between HIV types before initiating antiretroviral treatment. Guinea-Bissau has the world's highest prevalence of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. We evaluated ...... (agreement 90.9%) and SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 (agreement 84.5%). Our results underscore the need for evaluation of tests in relevant populations before implementation....

  5. Evaluation of HIV antigen /antibody combination ELISAs for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: a total of 600 blood samples were included in the evaluation. ... as an alternative confirmatory testing strategy for screening of donated blood at the National and Zonal blood transfusion centres and in lab diagnosis of HIV infection.

  6. Critical evaluation of reverse engineering tool Imagix 4D!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rashmi; Patel, Ravindra; Kothari, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of legacy codes is difficult to understand. Various commercial reengineering tools are available that have unique working styles, and are equipped with their inherent capabilities and shortcomings. The focus of the available tools is in visualizing static behavior not the dynamic one. Therefore, it is difficult for people who work in software product maintenance, code understanding reengineering/reverse engineering. Consequently, the need for a comprehensive reengineering/reverse engineering tool arises. We found the usage of Imagix 4D to be good as it generates the maximum pictorial representations in the form of flow charts, flow graphs, class diagrams, metrics and, to a partial extent, dynamic visualizations. We evaluated Imagix 4D with the help of a case study involving a few samples of source code. The behavior of the tool was analyzed on multiple small codes and a large code gcc C parser. Large code evaluation was performed to uncover dead code, unstructured code, and the effect of not including required files at preprocessing level. The utility of Imagix 4D to prepare decision density and complexity metrics for a large code was found to be useful in getting to know how much reengineering is required. At the outset, Imagix 4D offered limitations in dynamic visualizations, flow chart separation (large code) and parsing loops. The outcome of evaluation will eventually help in upgrading Imagix 4D and posed a need of full featured tools in the area of software reengineering/reverse engineering. It will also help the research community, especially those who are interested in the realm of software reengineering tool building.

  7. Zidovudine (AZT monotherapy selects for the A360V mutation in the connection domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica H Brehm

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated in vitro that zidovudine (AZT selects for A371V in the connection domain and Q509L in ribonuclease H (RNase H domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT which, together with the thymidine analog mutations D67N, K70R and T215F, confer greater than 100-fold AZT resistance. The goal of the current study was to determine whether AZT monotherapy in HIV-1 infected patients also selects the A371V, Q509L or other mutations in the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 RT.Full-length RT sequences in plasma obtained pre- and post-therapy were compared in 23 participants who received AZT monotherapy from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group study 175. Five of the 23 participants reached a primary study endpoint. Mutations significantly associated with AZT monotherapy included K70R (p = 0.003 and T215Y (p = 0.013 in the polymerase domain of HIV-1 RT, and A360V (p = 0.041 in the connection domain of HIV-1 RT. HIV-1 drug susceptibility assays demonstrated that A360V, either alone or in combination with thymidine analog mutations, decreased AZT susceptibility in recombinant viruses containing participant-derived full-length RT sequences or site-directed mutant RT. Biochemical studies revealed that A360V enhances the AZT-monophosphate excision activity of purified RT by significantly decreasing the frequency of secondary RNase H cleavage events that reduce the RNA/DNA duplex length and promote template/primer dissociation.The A360V mutation in the connection domain of RT was selected in HIV-infected individuals that received AZT monotherapy and contributed to AZT resistance.

  8. An evaluation of the SD Bioline HIV/syphilis duo test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jeffrey; Goheen, Joshua; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Barnes, Mathilda; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2018-01-01

    Many health agencies now recommend routine HIV and syphilis testing for pregnant women and most-at-risk populations such as men who have sex with men. With the increased availability of highly sensitive, low cost rapid point-of-care tests, the ability to meet those recommendations has increased, granting wider access to quick and accurate diagnoses. Using blood specimens collected from a Baltimore City Health Department (BCHD) sexually transmitted infection clinic, we evaluated the SD Bioline HIV/Syphilis Duo, a rapid test that simultaneously detects antibodies to HIV and syphilis and has the potential to further benefit clinics and patients by reducing costs, testing complexity, and patient wait times. SD DUO HIV sensitivity and specificity, when compared to BCHD results, were 91.7 and 99.5%, respectively. SD DUO syphilis sensitivity and specificity, when compared to rapid plasma reagin, were 85.7 and 96.8%, respectively, and 69.7 and 99.7%, respectively, when compared to Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA). SD DUO syphilis sensitivity and specificity, when compared to a traditional screening algorithm, improved to 92.3 and 100%, respectively, and improved to 72.9 and 99.7%, respectively, when compared to a reverse screening algorithm. The HIV component of the SD DUO performed moderately well. However, results for the SD DUO syphilis component, when compared to TPPA, support the need for further testing and assessment.

  9. Evaluation of Olfactory and Gustatory Function of HIV Infected Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayotunde James Fasunla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Compliance with medication requires good sense of smell and taste. Objective. To evaluate the olfactory and gustatory function of HIV infected women in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods. A case control study of women comprising 83 HIV infected women and 79 HIV uninfected women. Subjective self-rating of taste and smell function was by visual analogue scale. Olfactory function was measured via olfactory threshold (OT, olfactory discrimination (OD, olfactory identification (OI, and TDI using “Sniffin’ sticks” kits and taste function (Total Taste Strips (TTS score measurement was by taste strips. Results. The mean age of the HIV infected women was 43.67 years ± 10.72 and control was 41.48 years ± 10.99. There was no significant difference in the self-reported assessment of smell (p=0.67 and taste (p=0.84 of HIV infected and uninfected women. Although the mean OT, OD, OI, TDI, and TTS scores of HIV infected and uninfected women were within the normosmic and normogeusic values, the values were significantly higher in the controls (p<0.05. Hyposmia was in 39.7% of subjects and 12.6% of controls while hypogeusia was in 15.7% of subjects and 1.3% of controls. Conclusions. Hyposmia and hypogeusia are commoner among the HIV infected women than the HIV uninfected women and the risk increases with an increased duration of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  10. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwaprem Raj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of posterior circulation to autoregulate. The clinical spectrum and the underlying pathophysiology are still poorly defined. No conclusive evidence has been put forward regarding the relationship between clinical conditions and specific imaging findings of severity or location of oedema. PURPOSE To assess the role of computed tomography in evaluation of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 55 patients referred to the Department of Radio-Diagnosis, with a history of neurological abnormalities, including altered mental function, visual loss, stupor with a predisposing history favouring PRES and followed up for a period of 10 – 30 days. RESULTS 21 patients (38.2% were females. 32 patients (58.1% were in the age group between 21 to 30 years. Predisposing condition; 16 (29.1% presented with pre-eclampsia, 12 (21.8% with post-partum status in altered sensorium, 9 (16.4% with seizures, 7 (12.7% with hypertension, 6 (10.9% with visual disturbances, 4 (7.3% with eclampsia and 1 (1.8% with uraemia. 20 cases (36.4% showed findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome on initial computed tomography examination. 35 cases showed no initial radiological evidence suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Of the 20 cases which showed computed tomographic evidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, recovery was noted in 5 cases (9.1%. Persistence of findings detected on first CT was noted in 13 patients (23.6%. Regional predominance of the lesions was as follows. Frontal lobe (39%, Parietal lobe (32%, Temporal lobe (15% and occipital lobe (15%. CONCLUSION Varied clinical manifestations are associated with anatomical findings recognisable by neuro-imaging as PRES. Prompt imaging is necessary for the recognition of the condition and appropriate

  11. Research on the Environmental Performance Evaluation of Electronic Waste Reverse Logistics Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Chen, Fei-Yang; Tong, Tong

    According to the characteristic of e-waste reverse logistics, environmental performance evaluation system of electronic waste reverse logistics enterprise is proposed. We use fuzzy analytic hierarchy process method to evaluate the system. In addition, this paper analyzes the enterprise X, as an example, to discuss the evaluation method. It's important to point out attributes and indexes which should be strengthen during the process of ewaste reverse logistics and provide guidance suggestions to domestic e-waste reverse logistics enterprises.

  12. Combined evaluation of sexually transmitted infections in HIV-infected pregnant women and infant HIV transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiahong; Yeganeh, Nava; Camarca, Margaret; Morgado, Mariza G.; Watts, D. Heather; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Joao, Esau; Gray, Glenda; Theron, Gerhard; Santos, Breno; Fonseca, Rosana; Kreitchmann, Regis; Pinto, Jorge; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Ceriotto, Mariana; Machado, Daisy Maria; Bryson, Yvonne J.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Moye, Jack; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Bristow, Claire C.; Dickover, Ruth; Mirochnick, Mark; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2018-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Treponema pallidum (TP), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may lead to adverse pregnancy and infant outcomes. The role of combined maternal STIs in HIV mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) was evaluated in mother-infant pairs from NICHD HPTN 040. Methodology Urine samples from HIV-infected pregnant women during labor were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for CT, NG, and CMV. Infant HIV infection was determined by serial HIV DNA PCR testing. Maternal syphilis was tested by VDRL and confirmatory treponemal antibodies. Results A total of 899 mother-infant pairs were evaluated. Over 30% had at least one of the following infections (TP, CT, NG, and/or CMV) detected at the time of delivery. High rates of TP (8.7%), CT (17.8%), NG (4%), and CMV (6.3%) were observed. HIV MTCT was 9.1% (n = 82 infants). HIV MTCT was 12.5%, 10.3%, 11.1%, and 26.3% among infants born to women with CT, TP, NG or CMV respectively. Forty-two percent of HIV-infected infants were born to women with at least one of these 4 infections. Women with these infections were nearly twice as likely to have an HIV-infected infant (aOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1–3.0), particularly those with 2 STIs (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 1.5–7.7). Individually, maternal CMV (aOR 4.4 1.5–13.0) and infant congenital CMV (OR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2–7.8) but not other STIs (TP, CT, or NG) were associated with an increased risk of HIV MTCT. Conclusion HIV-infected pregnant women identified during labor are at high risk for STIs. Co-infection with STIs including CMV nearly doubles HIV MTCT risk. CMV infection appears to confer the largest risk of HIV MTCT. Trial registration NCT00099359. PMID:29304083

  13. Diaryltriazine non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potent candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis in the prevention of sexual HIV transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariën, Kevin K; Venkatraj, Muthusamy; Michiels, Johan; Joossens, Jurgen; Vereecken, Katleen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Abdellati, Saïd; Cuylaerts, Vicky; Crucitti, Tania; Heyndrickx, Leo; Heeres, Jan; Augustyns, Koen; Lewi, Paul J; Vanham, Guido

    2013-09-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis and topical microbicides are important strategies in the prevention of sexual HIV transmission, especially since partial protection has been shown in proof-of-concept studies. In search of new candidate drugs with an improved toxicity profile and with activity against common non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant HIV, we have synthesized and investigated a library of 60 new diaryltriazine analogues. From this library, 15 compounds were evaluated in depth using a broad armamentarium of in vitro assays that are part of a preclinical testing algorithm for microbicide development. Antiviral activity was assessed in a cell line, and in primary human cells, against both subtype B and subtype C HIV-1 and against viruses resistant to therapeutic NNRTIs and the candidate NNRTI microbicide dapivirine. Toxicity towards primary blood-derived cells, cell lines originating from the female reproductive tract and female genital microflora was also studied. We identified several compounds with highly potent antiviral activity and toxicity profiles that are superior to that of dapivirine. In particular, compound UAMC01398 is an interesting new candidate that warrants further investigation because of its superior toxicity profile and potent activity against dapivirine-resistant viruses.

  14. Evaluation of nine HIV rapid test kits to develop a national HIV testing algorithm in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orji Bassey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-cold chain-dependent HIV rapid testing has been adopted in many resource-constrained nations as a strategy for reaching out to populations. HIV rapid test kits (RTKs have the advantage of ease of use, low operational cost and short turnaround times. Before 2005, different RTKs had been used in Nigeria without formal evaluation. Between 2005 and 2007, a study was conducted to formally evaluate a number of RTKs and construct HIV testing algorithms. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess and select HIV RTKs and develop national testing algorithms. Method: Nine RTKs were evaluated using 528 well-characterised plasma samples. These comprised 198 HIV-positive specimens (37.5% and 330 HIV-negative specimens (62.5%, collected nationally. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with 95% confidence intervals for all nine RTKs singly and for serial and parallel combinations of six RTKs; and relative costs were estimated. Results: Six of the nine RTKs met the selection criteria, including minimum sensitivity and specificity (both ≥ 99.0% requirements. There were no significant differences in sensitivities or specificities of RTKs in the serial and parallel algorithms, but the cost of RTKs in parallel algorithms was twice that in serial algorithms. Consequently, three serial algorithms, comprising four test kits (BundiTM, DetermineTM, Stat-Pak® and Uni-GoldTM with 100.0% sensitivity and 99.1% – 100.0% specificity, were recommended and adopted as national interim testing algorithms in 2007. Conclusion: This evaluation provides the first evidence for reliable combinations of RTKs for HIV testing in Nigeria. However, these RTKs need further evaluation in the field (Phase II to re-validate their performance.

  15. Transmission mode acoustic time-reversal imaging for nondestructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Sean K.; Devaney, Anthony J.

    2002-11-01

    In previous ASA meetings and JASA papers, the extended and formalized theory of transmission mode time reversal in which the transceivers are noncoincident was presented. When combined with the subspace concepts of a generalized MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm, this theory is used to form super-resolution images of scatterers buried in a medium. These techniques are now applied to ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of parts, and shallow subsurface seismic imaging. Results are presented of NDE experiments on metal and epoxy blocks using data collected from an adaptive ultrasonic array, that is, a ''time-reversal machine,'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Also presented are the results of seismo-acoustic subsurface probing of buried hazardous waste pits at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. [Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.] [Work supported in part by CenSSIS, the Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems, under the Engineering Research Centers Program of the NSF (award number EEC-9986821) as well as from Air Force Contracts No. F41624-99-D6002 and No. F49620-99-C0013.

  16. Evaluation of reversible contraceptive potential of Cordia dichotoma leaves extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaban Bhattacharya

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the safety-risk ratio of steroidal contraceptives, the present work was carried out to evaluate ethno-contraceptive use of Cordia dichotoma G. Forst., Boraginaceae, leaves (LCD. Preliminary pharmacological screening was performed on post-coital female albino rats. The leaves extract (LD50 5.50 g/kg bw showed 100% anti-implantation activity (n=10 at 800 mg/kg dose level. (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (BCD was used as bioavailability enhancer to form LCD-BCD complex, characterized by DLS, SEM and XRD analyses. The LCD-BCD complex (1:1, w/w exhibited 100% pregnancy interception (n=20 at the dose level of 250 mg/kg and also showed strong estrogenic potential with a luteal phase defect. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analyses were carried out. The LCD extract was standardized by a validated HPTLC method and two contraceptive phytoconstituents, apigenin and luteolin were isolated. A detailed pharmacological analyses followed by chronic toxicity study were performed to predict the reversible nature of the developed phytopharmaceutical. The histological and biochemical estimations detected the reversible contraceptive potential after withdrawal. The observations suggested that the developed phyto-pharmaceutical has potential antifertility activity with safety aspects.

  17. Evaluation of reversible contraceptive potential of Cordia dichotoma leaves extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaban Bhattacharya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Considering the safety-risk ratio of steroidal contraceptives, the present work was carried out to evaluate ethno-contraceptive use of Cordia dichotoma G. Forst., Boraginaceae, leaves (LCD. Preliminary pharmacological screening was performed on post-coital female albino rats. The leaves extract (LD50 5.50 g/kg bw showed 100% anti-implantation activity (n=10 at 800 mg/kg dose level. (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (BCD was used as bioavailability enhancer to form LCD-BCD complex, characterized by DLS, SEM and XRD analyses. The LCD-BCD complex (1:1, w/w exhibited 100% pregnancy interception (n=20 at the dose level of 250 mg/kg and also showed strong estrogenic potential with a luteal phase defect. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analyses were carried out. The LCD extract was standardized by a validated HPTLC method and two contraceptive phytoconstituents, apigenin and luteolin were isolated. A detailed pharmacological analyses followed by chronic toxicity study were performed to predict the reversible nature of the developed phytopharmaceutical. The histological and biochemical estimations detected the reversible contraceptive potential after withdrawal. The observations suggested that the developed phyto-pharmaceutical has potential antifertility activity with safety aspects.

  18. Evaluation of four rapid tests for diagnosis and differentiation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in Guinea-Conakry, West Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaillet, Pascale; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Duclos, Nanfack; Moctar, Diallo; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien

    2010-01-01

    With both HIV-1 and HV-2 prevalent in Guinea-Conakry, accurate diagnosis and differentiation is crucial for treatment purposes. Thus, four rapid HIV tests were evaluated for their HIV-1 and HIV-2 diagnostic and discriminative capacity for use in Guinea-Conakry. These included SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), Genie II HIV1/HIV2 (Bio-Rad), First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 (PMC Medical) and Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (Core Diagnostics). Results were compared with gold standard tes...

  19. Evaluation of four rapid tests for diagnosis and differentiation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections in Guinea-Conakry, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillet, Pascale; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Zachariah, Rony; Duclos, Nanfack; Moctar, Diallo; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien

    2010-09-01

    With both HIV-1 and HV-2 prevalent in Guinea-Conakry, accurate diagnosis and differentiation is crucial for treatment purposes. Thus, four rapid HIV tests were evaluated for their HIV-1 and HIV-2 diagnostic and discriminative capacity for use in Guinea-Conakry. These included SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), Genie II HIV1/HIV2 (Bio-Rad), First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 (PMC Medical) and Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 (Core Diagnostics). Results were compared with gold standard tests (INNO-LIA HIV-I/II Score) and NEW LAV BLOT II (Bio-Rad). Four hundred and forty three sequential stored HIV-positive serum samples, of known HIV-type, were evaluated. Genie II HIV1/HIV2, Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 and SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 had 100% sensitivity (95% CI, 98.9-100%) while for First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 this was 99.5% (95% CI, 98.2%-99.9%). In terms of discriminatory capacity, Genie II HIV1/HIV2 identified 382/ 384(99.5%) HIV-1 samples, 49/ 52(95%) HIV-2 and 7/7(100%) HIV-positive untypable samples. Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2 identified 99% HIV-1, 67% HIV-2 and all HIV-positive untypable samples. First Response HIV Card Test 1-2.0 identified 94% HIV-1, 64% HIV-2 and 57% HIV-positive untypable samples. SD-Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 was the worst overall performer identifying 65% HIV-1, 69% HIV-2 and all HIV-positive untypable samples. The use of SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (the current standard in Guinea-Conakry) as a discriminatory HIV test is poor and may be best replaced by Immunoflow HIV1-HIV2. Copyright 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Requirements for DNA strand transfer during reverse transcription in mutant HIV-1 virions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J.; Klaver, B.

    1995-01-01

    Retroviruses convert their RNA genome into a DNA form by means of reverse transcription. According to the current model of reverse transcription, two strand transfer reactions are needed to synthesize a full-length DNA genome. Because reverse transcription is initiated close to the 5' end of the RNA

  1. Standardized comparison of the relative impacts of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations on nucleoside RT inhibitor susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikian, George L; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia-Cancio, Paolo V; Zolopa, Andrew; Robbins, Gregory K; Kagan, Ron; Israelski, Dennis; Shafer, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Determining the phenotypic impacts of reverse transcriptase (RT) mutations on individual nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) has remained a statistical challenge because clinical NRTI-resistant HIV-1 isolates usually contain multiple mutations, often in complex patterns, complicating the task of determining the relative contribution of each mutation to HIV drug resistance. Furthermore, the NRTIs have highly variable dynamic susceptibility ranges, making it difficult to determine the relative effect of an RT mutation on susceptibility to different NRTIs. In this study, we analyzed 1,273 genotyped HIV-1 isolates for which phenotypic results were obtained using the PhenoSense assay (Monogram, South San Francisco, CA). We used a parsimonious feature selection algorithm, LASSO, to assess the possible contributions of 177 mutations that occurred in 10 or more isolates in our data set. We then used least-squares regression to quantify the impact of each LASSO-selected mutation on each NRTI. Our study provides a comprehensive view of the most common NRTI resistance mutations. Because our results were standardized, the study provides the first analysis that quantifies the relative phenotypic effects of NRTI resistance mutations on each of the NRTIs. In addition, the study contains new findings on the relative impacts of thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) on susceptibility to abacavir and tenofovir; the impacts of several known but incompletely characterized mutations, including E40F, V75T, Y115F, and K219R; and a tentative role in reduced NRTI susceptibility for K64H, a novel NRTI resistance mutation.

  2. Impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral therapy on protease and reverse transcriptase genotype: results of a global collaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Kantor

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic differences among HIV-1 subtypes may be critical to clinical management and drug resistance surveillance as antiretroviral treatment is expanded to regions of the world where diverse non-subtype-B viruses predominate.To assess the impact of HIV-1 subtype and antiretroviral treatment on the distribution of mutations in protease and reverse transcriptase, a binomial response model using subtype and treatment as explanatory variables was used to analyze a large compiled dataset of non-subtype-B HIV-1 sequences. Non-subtype-B sequences from 3,686 persons with well characterized antiretroviral treatment histories were analyzed in comparison to subtype B sequences from 4,769 persons. The non-subtype-B sequences included 461 with subtype A, 1,185 with C, 331 with D, 245 with F, 293 with G, 513 with CRF01_AE, and 618 with CRF02_AG. Each of the 55 known subtype B drug-resistance mutations occurred in at least one non-B isolate, and 44 (80% of these mutations were significantly associated with antiretroviral treatment in at least one non-B subtype. Conversely, of 67 mutations found to be associated with antiretroviral therapy in at least one non-B subtype, 61 were also associated with antiretroviral therapy in subtype B isolates.Global surveillance and genotypic assessment of drug resistance should focus primarily on the known subtype B drug-resistance mutations.

  3. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  4. Evaluation of the acerola juice concentrated by reverse osmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Rodrigues dos Santos Gomes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain the acerola juice using separation processes with membranes. The acerola pulp was initially defrosted and treated with 100 ppm of Citrozym Ultra L enzyme at 45ºC for one hour, then ultrafiltrated at 3 bar at 45ºC using 0.1 µm ceramic membrane, and concentrated by reverse osmosis using a spiral membrane of a compound film. The pressures on the reverse osmosis were 20, 30, and 40 bar at environmental temperature, thus, resulting a juice with 9.76, 14.56, and 17.36 ºBrix, respectively. The physicochemical characteristics of the juice were preserved and, studies on evaluation of the public acceptability, showed that 75% of the consumers liked the juice.O objetivo deste trabalho foi à obtenção de suco de acerola utilizando processos de separação com membranas. Combinou-se a ultrafiltração e a osmose inversa, visando a melhoria do processo produtivo, utilizando-se uma tecnologia limpa. Para a acerola, visou-se manter e concentrar significativamente seu teor de vitamina C, obtendo-se um suco com sabor agradável, o mais próximo possível do suco in natura. A polpa de acerola foi inicialmente descongelada e tratada com 100 ppm da enzima Citrozym Ultra L, à 45º C por 1 hora e posteriormente ultrafiltrada a 3 bar na mesma temperatura em membrana cerâmica de 0,1 µm e na seqüência, concentrada por osmose inversa utilizando membrana espiral de filme composto. As pressões na osmose inversa foram 20, 30 e 40 bar em temperatura ambiente, obtendo-se um suco com 9,76, 14,56 e 17,36 ºBrix respectivamente. As características físico-químicas foram preservadas e na avaliação da aceitabilidade, 75% dos consumidores gostaram do suco, indicando boa aceitação.

  5. Small-molecule screening using a human primary cell model of HIV latency identifies compounds that reverse latency without cellular activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hung-Chih; Xing, Sifei; Shan, Liang; O’Connell, Karen; Dinoso, Jason; Shen, Anding; Zhou, Yan; Shrum, Cynthia K.; Han, Yefei; Liu, Jun O.; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    The development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to treat individuals infected with HIV-1 has dramatically improved patient outcomes, but HAART still fails to cure the infection. The latent viral reservoir in resting CD4+ T cells is a major barrier to virus eradication. Elimination of this reservoir requires reactivation of the latent virus. However, strategies for reactivating HIV-1 through nonspecific T cell activation have clinically unacceptable toxicities. We describe here the development of what we believe to be a novel in vitro model of HIV-1 latency that we used to search for compounds that can reverse latency. Human primary CD4+ T cells were transduced with the prosurvival molecule Bcl-2, and the resulting cells were shown to recapitulate the quiescent state of resting CD4+ T cells in vivo. Using this model system, we screened small-molecule libraries and identified a compound that reactivated latent HIV-1 without inducing global T cell activation, 5-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (5HN). Unlike previously described latency-reversing agents, 5HN activated latent HIV-1 through ROS and NF-κB without affecting nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and PKC, demonstrating that TCR pathways can be dissected and utilized to purge latent virus. Our study expands the number of classes of latency-reversing therapeutics and demonstrates the utility of this in vitro model for finding strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. PMID:19805909

  6. HIV-1 reverse transcription initiation: a potential target for novel antivirals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Reverse transcription is an essential step in the retroviral life cycle, as it converts the genomic RNA into DNA. In this review, we describe recent developments concerning the initiation step of this complex, multi-step reaction. During initiation of reverse transcription, a cellular tRNA primer is

  7. Evaluation of liver function tests of HIV positive patients on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver enzymes-alanine and aspartate aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase (AST, ALT and ALP), bilirubin and serum proteins were determined using standard laboratory methods and these parameters were used to evaluate the liver function of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- positive patients receiving ...

  8. Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV treatment programme: Successes, challenges and future needs. ... South African Medical Journal ... targeted mentoring was introduced; this increased the percentage of primary nurses eligible for DoH certificates of clinical competence in NIMART from 12%, ...

  9. Active methamphetamine use is associated with transmitted drug resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in individuals with HIV infection of unknown duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Moini, Niousha; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Pesano, Rick; Lie, Yolanda S; Aiem, Heidi; Butler, David M; Letendre, Scott; Mathews, Wm Christopher; Smith, Davey M

    2007-01-01

    Frequent methamphetamine use among recently HIV infected individuals is associated with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI); however, the reversion time of TDR to drug susceptible HIV may exceed 3 years. We assessed whether recreational substance use is associated with detectable TDR among individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection of unknown duration. Cross-sectional analysis. Subjects were enrolled at the University California, San Diego Early Intervention Program. Demographic, clinical and substance use data were collected using structured interviews. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using GeneSeq, Monogram Biosciences. We analyzed the association between substance use and TDR using bivariate analyses and the corresponding transmission networks using phylogenetic models. Between April 2004 and July 2006, 115 individuals with genotype data were enrolled. The prevalence of alcohol, marijuana and methamphetamine use were 98%, 71% and 64% respectively. Only active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis was independently associated with TDR to NNRTI (OR: 6.6; p=0.002). Despite not knowing the duration of their HIV infection, individuals reporting active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis are at an increased risk of having HIV strains that are resistant to NNRTI.

  10. Active Methamphetamine Use is Associated with Transmitted Drug Resis-tance to Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors in Individuals with HIV Infection of Unknown Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Moini, Niousha; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Pesano, Rick; Lie, Yolanda S; Aiem, Heidi; Butler, David M; Letendre, Scott; Mathews, Wm. Christopher; Smith, Davey M

    2007-01-01

    Background: Frequent methamphetamine use among recently HIV infected individuals is associated with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI); however, the reversion time of TDR to drug susceptible HIV may exceed 3 years. We assessed whether recreational substance use is associated with detectable TDR among individuals newly diagnosed with HIV infection of unknown duration. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Methods: Subjects were enrolled at the University California, San Diego Early Intervention Program. Demographic, clinical and substance use data were collected using structured interviews. Genotypic resistance testing was performed using GeneSeq™, Monogram Biosciences. We analyzed the association between substance use and TDR using bivariate analyses and the corresponding transmission networks using phylogenetic models. Results: Between April 2004 and July 2006, 115 individuals with genotype data were enrolled. The prevalence of alcohol, marijuana and methamphetamine use were 98%, 71% and 64% respectively. Only active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis was independently associated with TDR to NNRTI (OR: 6.6; p=0.002). Conclusion: Despite not knowing the duration of their HIV infection, individuals reporting active methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to HIV diagnosis are at an increased risk of having HIV strains that are resistant to NNRTI. PMID:18923691

  11. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/ AIDS awareness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... HIV/ AIDS awareness programmes: Strengthening outcome indicators. ... within the key priorities highlighted in the current National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, ... of HIV/AIDS and change in attitude and intention towards HIV risk behaviours.

  12. Role of the K101E substitution in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in resistance to rilpivirine and other nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Huang, Wei; Oliveira, Maureen; Han, Yingshan; Quan, Yudong; Petropoulos, Christos J; Wainberg, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to the recently approved nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) rilpivirine (RPV) commonly involves substitutions at positions E138K and K101E in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), together with an M184I substitution that is associated with resistance to coutilized emtricitabine (FTC). Previous biochemical and virological studies have shown that compensatory interactions between substitutions E138K and M184I can restore enzyme processivity and the viral replication capacity. Structural modeling studies have also shown that disruption of the salt bridge between K101 and E138 can affect RPV binding. The current study was designed to investigate the impact of K101E, alone or in combination with E138K and/or M184I, on drug susceptibility, viral replication capacity, and enzyme function. We show here that K101E can be selected in cell culture by the NNRTIs etravirine (ETR), efavirenz (EFV), and dapivirine (DPV) as well as by RPV. Recombinant RT enzymes and viruses containing K101E, but not E138K, were highly resistant to nevirapine (NVP) and delavirdine (DLV) as well as ETR and RPV, but not EFV. The addition of K101E to E138K slightly enhanced ETR and RPV resistance compared to that obtained with E138K alone but restored susceptibility to NVP and DLV. The K101E substitution can compensate for deficits in viral replication capacity and enzyme processivity associated with M184I, while M184I can compensate for the diminished efficiency of DNA polymerization associated with K101E. The coexistence of K101E and E138K does not impair either viral replication or enzyme fitness. We conclude that K101E can play a significant role in resistance to RPV.

  13. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Novel Leu92 Mutant of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with a Selective Deficiency in Strand Transfer Causes a Loss of Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Eytan; Voronin, Nickolay; Kucherenko, Nataly; Hizi, Amnon

    2015-08-01

    The process of reverse transcription (RTN) in retroviruses is essential to the viral life cycle. This key process is catalyzed exclusively by the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) that copies the viral RNA into DNA by its DNA polymerase activity, while concomitantly removing the original RNA template by its RNase H activity. During RTN, the combination between DNA synthesis and RNA hydrolysis leads to strand transfers (or template switches) that are critical for the completion of RTN. The balance between these RT-driven activities was considered to be the sole reason for strand transfers. Nevertheless, we show here that a specific mutation in HIV-1 RT (L92P) that does not affect the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities abolishes strand transfer. There is also a good correlation between this complete loss of the RT's strand transfer to the loss of the DNA clamp activity of the RT, discovered recently by us. This finding indicates a mechanistic linkage between these two functions and that they are both direct and unique functions of the RT (apart from DNA synthesis and RNA degradation). Furthermore, when the RT's L92P mutant was introduced into an infectious HIV-1 clone, it lost viral replication, due to inefficient intracellular strand transfers during RTN, thus supporting the in vitro data. As far as we know, this is the first report on RT mutants that specifically and directly impair RT-associated strand transfers. Therefore, targeting residue Leu92 may be helpful in selectively blocking this RT activity and consequently HIV-1 infectivity and pathogenesis. Reverse transcription in retroviruses is essential for the viral life cycle. This multistep process is catalyzed by viral reverse transcriptase, which copies the viral RNA into DNA by its DNA polymerase activity (while concomitantly removing the RNA template by its RNase H activity). The combination and balance between synthesis and hydrolysis lead to strand transfers that are critical for reverse transcription

  15. Performance evaluation of reverse logistics: A case of LPG agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottala Sri Yogi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Majority of the manufacturing companies are incorporating the practice of reverse logistics in their value chain. In manufacturing processes, the concept of reverse logistics plays a vital role in enhancing the company’s profit margin for sustainable business growth. For every company, there is a need of performance measurement system to be established as successful business tool. However to predict better results, how smartly the inputs for the transformation or business process are being effectively and efficiently used has to be analyzed. Drawing attention to the growing popularity in adapting the best practices of reverse logistics among different manufacturing industries, this paper aims to build a methodology in order to measure the performance of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG agencies. To do so, it has undertaken the Asian emerging market-India as a case study and improved the understanding of performance measurement in reverse logistics to refilling LPG cylinders. Further, it has suggested a framework affecting the implementation of reverse logistics activities and its network.

  16. Evaluation of Salivary Vitamin C and Catalase in HIV Positive and Healthy HIV Negative Control Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Motamayel, Fatemeh; Vaziri-Amjad, Samaneh; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi; Poorolajal, Jalal

    2017-01-01

    Saliva is a complex oral biologic fluid secreted by major and minor salivary glands. Saliva has immunological, enzymatic and antioxidant defense mechanisms. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a life-threatening disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate salivary vitamin C and catalase levels in HIV-positive patients in comparison to a healthy control group. Forty-nine HIV-infected individuals and 49 healthy subjects were selected. Five mL of unstimulated saliva was collected in 5 minutes using a sterilized Falcon tube with Navazesh method. Catalase and vitamin C levels were assessed by spectrophotometric assay. Data were analyzed with STATA 12. Salivary catalase levels were 7.99±2.40 and 8.37±1.81 in the case and control groups, respectively. Catalase level was lower in the case group but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.380). Salivary vitamin C levels in the case and control groups were 3.76±1.92 and 4.87±2.20, respectively (P=0.009). HIV can alter salivary antioxidant capacity as well as vitamin C and catalase levels. Saliva may reflect serum antioxidative changes in these patients. Therefore, further research is necessary on salivary and serum oxidants and the antioxidant changes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences from 382 patients recruited in JJ Hospital of Mumbai, India, between 2002 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Alaka; Jauvin, Valerie; Pinson, Patricia; Jeannot, Anne Cecile; Fleury, Herve J

    2009-06-01

    Analysis of reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences of 382 HIV-1 isolates from untreated and treated patients recruited in JJ Hospital (Mumbai, India) between 2002 and 2008 shows that subtype C is largely predominant (98%) and that non-C sequences cluster with A1, B, CRF01_AE, and CRF06_cpx.

  18. Novel (2,6-difluorophenyl)(2-(phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl) methanones with restricted conformation as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimon, Petr; Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Šaman, David; Stepan, G.; Hu, E.; Lansdon, E. B.; Jansa, P.; Janeba, Zlatko

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 122, Oct 21 (2016), s. 185-195 ISSN 0223-5234 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : diarylpyrimidine (DAPY) * etravirine * human immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ) * non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors * NNRTIs * rilpivirine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.519, year: 2016

  19. Structural studies of series HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-benzimidazoles with different 4-substituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-03-01

    Over the past 10 years, several anti-viral drugs have become available to fight the HIV infection. Antiretroviral treatment reduces the mortality of AIDS. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are specific and potentially nontoxic drugs against AIDS. The crystal structures of five nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are presented here. The structural parameters, especially those describing the angular orientation of the π-electron systems and influencing biological activity, were determined for all of the investigated inhibitors. The chemical character and orientation of the substituent at C4 position of the benzimidazole moiety substantially influences the anti-viral activity. The structural data of the investigated inhibitors is a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions for structure-assisted drug design.

  20. Measuring enzymatic HIV-1 susceptibility to two reverse transcriptase inhibitors as a rapid and simple approach to HIV-1 drug-resistance testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective approaches for HIV drug-resistance testing are highly desirable for managing increasingly expanding HIV-1 infected populations who initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly in resource-limited settings. Non-nucleoside reverse trancriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based regimens with an NRTI backbone containing lamivudine (3TC or emtricitabine (FTC are preferred first ART regimens. Failure with these drug combinations typically involves the selection of NNRTI- and/or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses. Therefore, the availability of simple assays to measure both types of drug resistance is critical. We have developed a high throughput screening test for assessing enzymatic resistance of the HIV-1 RT in plasma to 3TC/FTC and NNRTIs. The test uses the sensitive "Amp-RT" assay with a newly-developed real-time PCR format to screen biochemically for drug resistance in single reactions containing either 3TC-triphosphate (3TC-TP or nevirapine (NVP. Assay cut-offs were defined based on testing a large panel of subtype B and non-subtype B clinical samples with known genotypic profiles. Enzymatic 3TC resistance correlated well with the presence of M184I/V, and reduced NVP susceptibility was strongly associated with the presence of K103N, Y181C/I, Y188L, and G190A/Q. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting resistance were 97.0% and 96.0% in samples with M184V, and 97.4% and 96.2% for samples with NNRTI mutations, respectively. We further demonstrate the utility of an HIV capture method in plasma by using magnetic beads coated with CD44 antibody that eliminates the need for ultracentifugation. Thus our results support the use of this simple approach for distinguishing WT from NNRTI- or 3TC/FTC-resistant viruses in clinical samples. This enzymatic testing is subtype-independent and can assist in the clinical management of diverse populations particularly in resource-limited settings.

  1. Evaluation of Cellular Phenotypes Implicated in Immunopathogenesis and Monitoring Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV/Leprosy Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem Beatriz Wagner; Sales, Anna Maria; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; de Oliveira, Ariane Leite; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Background It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR). However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. Methods/Principal Findings Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%), dropping significantly (pleprosy individuals at risk for IRIS/RR. So, a comparative investigation to leprosy patients at RR should be conducted. PMID:22205964

  2. Probing the mechanistic consequences of 5-fluorine substitution on cytidine nucleotide analogue incorporation by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Adrian S; Schinazi, Raymond F; Murakami, Eisuke; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Shi, Junxing; Zorca, Suzana M; Chu, Chung K; Anderson, Karen S

    2003-05-01

    Beta-D and beta-L-enantiomers of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine analogues are potent chain-terminators and antimetabolites for viral and cellular replication. Seemingly small modifications markedly alter their antiviral and toxicity patterns. This review discusses previously published and recently obtained data on the effects of 5- and 2'-fluorine substitution on the pre-steady state incorporation of 2'-deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate analogues by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in light of their biological activity. The addition of fluorine at the 5-position of the pyrimidine ring altered the kinetic parameters for all nucleotides tested. Only the 5-fluorine substitution of the clinically relevant nucleosides (-)-beta-L-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thia-5-fluorocytidine (L-FTC, Emtriva), and (+)-beta-D-2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluorocytidine (D-D4FC, Reverset), caused a higher overall efficiency of nucleotide incorporation during both DNA- and RNA-directed synthesis. Enhanced incorporation by RT may in part explain the potency of these nucleosides against HIV-1. In other cases, a lack of correlation between RT incorporation in enzymatic assays and antiviral activity in cell culture illustrates the importance of other cellular factors in defining antiviral potency. The substitution of fluorine at the 2' position of the deoxyribose ring negatively affects incorporation by RT indicating the steric gate of RT can detect electrostatic perturbations. Intriguing results pertaining to drug resistance have led to a better understanding of HIV-1 RT resistance mechanisms. These insights serve as a basis for understanding the mechanism of action for nucleoside analogues and, coupled with studies on other key enzymes, may lead to the more effective use of fluorine to enhance the potency and selectivity of antiviral agents.

  3. In Vitro Antioxidant Properties, HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Effects of Traditional Herbal Preparations Sold in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant potentials for fourteen multipurpose traditional herbal preparations sold in South Africa were determined using the DPPH radical scavenging, ferric reducing power and β-carotene-linoleic acid model system, the anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT enzyme inhibitory effects using an ELISA kit and acetylcholinesterase (AChE enzyme inhibition using the microtitre plate assay. Nine of the herbal mixtures (Umzimba omubi, Umuthi wekukhwehlela ne zilonda, Mvusa ukunzi, Umpatisa inkosi, Imbiza ephuzwato, Vusa umzimba, Supreme one hundred, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe® and Ingwe® special muti exhibited higher antioxidant potentials, while only four (Imbiza ephuzwato, Ingwe® muthi mixture, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe® and African potato extractTM showed potent activity against the RT enzyme. Nine mixtures (Imbiza ephuzwato, Umpatisa inkosi, African potato extractTM, Sejeso herbal mixture Ingwe®, Vusa umzimba; Ingwe® muthi mixture, Ibhubezi™, Lion izifozonke Ingwe® and Ingwe® special muti showed AChE enzyme inhibitory activity greater than 50%. The observed activity exhibited by some of the herbal mixtures gives some credence to the manufacturers’ claims and goes part of the way towards validating their use against certain conditions such as oxidative stress, HIV/AIDS proliferation and some mental conditions. It is however, desirable to carry out further studies to determine the effects of mixing plant species/parts in one mixture on the antioxidant potency as well as isolating active constituents from the herbal mixtures.

  4. Probing the communication of deoxythymidine triphosphate in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by communication maps and interaction energy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran

    2017-11-08

    We calculate communication maps for HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT) to elucidate energy transfer pathways between deoxythymidine triphosphate (dTTP) and other parts of the protein. This approach locates energy transport channels from the dTTP to remote regions of the protein via residues and water molecules. We examine the water dynamics near the catalytic site of HIV-1 RT by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that, within the catalytic site, the relaxation of water molecules is similar to that of the hydration water molecules present in other proteins and the relaxation time scale is fast enough to transport energy and helps in communication between dTTP and other residues in the system. To quantify energy transfer, we also calculate the interaction energies of dTTP, 2Mg 2+ , doxy-guanosine nucleotide (DG22) with their surrounding residues by using the B3LYP-D3 method. The results, from classical vibrational energy diffusivity and QM interaction energy, are complementary to identify the important residues involved in the process of polymerization. The positive and negative interactions by dTTP with different types of residues in the catalytic region make the residues transfer energy through vibrational communication.

  5. Computational Analysis of Molecular Interaction Networks Underlying Change of HIV-1 Resistance to Selected Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierczak, Marcin; Dramiński, Michał; Koronacki, Jacek; Komorowski, Jan

    2010-12-12

    Despite more than two decades of research, HIV resistance to drugs remains a serious obstacle in developing efficient AIDS treatments. Several computational methods have been developed to predict resistance level from the sequence of viral proteins such as reverse transcriptase (RT) or protease. These methods, while powerful and accurate, give very little insight into the molecular interactions that underly acquisition of drug resistance/hypersusceptibility. Here, we attempt at filling this gap by using our Monte Carlo feature selection and interdependency discovery method (MCFS-ID) to elucidate molecular interaction networks that characterize viral strains with altered drug resistance levels. We analyzed a number of HIV-1 RT sequences annotated with drug resistance level using the MCFS-ID method. This let us expound interdependency networks that characterize change of drug resistance to six selected RT inhibitors: Abacavir, Lamivudine, Stavudine, Zidovudine, Tenofovir and Nevirapine. The networks consider interdependencies at the level of physicochemical properties of mutating amino acids, eg,: polarity. We mapped each network on the 3D structure of RT in attempt to understand the molecular meaning of interacting pairs. The discovered interactions describe several known drug resistance mechanisms and, importantly, some previously unidentified ones. Our approach can be easily applied to a whole range of problems from the domain of protein engineering. A portable Java implementation of our MCFS-ID method is freely available for academic users and can be obtained at: http://www.ipipan.eu/staff/m.draminski/software.htm.

  6. Enhanced activity of carbosilane dendrimers against HIV when combined with reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs: searching for more potent microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacas-Córdoba E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Enrique Vacas-Córdoba,1–3 Marta Galán,3,4 Francisco J de la Mata,3,4 Rafael Gómez,3,4 Marjorie Pion,1–3 M Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández1–3 1Laboratorio InmunoBiología Molecular, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain; 2Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain; 3Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, (CIBER-BBN, Madrid, Spain; 4Dendrimers for Biomedical Applications Group (BioInDen, University of Alcalá, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Self-administered topical microbicides or oral preexposure prophylaxis could be very helpful tools for all risk groups to decrease the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection rates. Up until now, antiretrovirals (ARVs have been the most advanced microbicide candidates. Nevertheless, the majority of clinical trials has failed in HIV-1 patients. Nanotechnology offers suitable approaches to develop novel antiviral agents. Thereby, new nanosystems, such as carbosilane dendrimers, have been shown to be safe and effective compounds against HIV with great potential as topical microbicides. In addition, because most of the attempts to develop effective topical microbicides were unsuccessful, combinatorial strategies could be a valid approach when designing new microbicides. We evaluated various combinations of anionic carbosilane dendrimers with sulfated (G3-S16 and naphthyl sulfonated (G2-NF16 ended groups with different ARVs against HIV-1 infection. The G3-S16 and G2-NF16 dendrimers showed a synergistic or additive activity profile with zidovudine, efavirenz, and tenofovir in the majority of the combinations tested against the X4 and R5 tropic HIV-1 in cell lines, as well as in human primary cells. Therefore, the combination of ARVs and polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers enhances the antiviral potency of the individual compounds, and our findings support further clinical research on combinational approaches as

  7. An Evaluation of Phylogenetic Methods for Reconstructing Transmitted HIV Variants using Longitudinal Clonal HIV Sequence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rosemary M.; Liang, Richard H.; Harrigan, P. Richard; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A population of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) within a host often descends from a single transmitted/founder virus. The high mutation rate of HIV, coupled with long delays between infection and diagnosis, make isolating and characterizing this strain a challenge. In theory, ancestral reconstruction could be used to recover this strain from sequences sampled in chronic infection; however, the accuracy of phylogenetic techniques in this context is unknown. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, we applied ancestral reconstruction to a large panel of published longitudinal clonal and/or single-genome-amplification HIV sequence data sets with at least one intrapatient sequence set sampled within 6 months of infection or seroconversion (n = 19,486 sequences, median [interquartile range] = 49 [20 to 86] sequences/set). The consensus of the earliest sequences was used as the best possible estimate of the transmitted/founder. These sequences were compared to ancestral reconstructions from sequences sampled at later time points using both phylogenetic and phylogeny-naive methods. Overall, phylogenetic methods conferred a 16% improvement in reproducing the consensus of early sequences, compared to phylogeny-naive methods. This relative advantage increased with intrapatient sequence diversity (P reconstructing ancestral indel variation, especially within indel-rich regions of the HIV genome. Although further improvements are needed, our results indicate that phylogenetic methods for ancestral reconstruction significantly outperform phylogeny-naive alternatives, and we identify experimental conditions and study designs that can enhance accuracy of transmitted/founder virus reconstruction. IMPORTANCE When HIV is transmitted into a new host, most of the viruses fail to infect host cells. Consequently, an HIV infection tends to be descended from a single “founder” virus. A priority target for the vaccine research, these transmitted/founder viruses are

  8. Evaluation Of Algorithms Of Anti- HIV Antibody Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paranjape R.S

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question: Can alternate algorithms be used in place of conventional algorithm for epidemiological studies of HIV infection with less expenses? Objective: To compare the results of HIV sero- prevalence as determined by test algorithms combining three kits with conventional test algorithm. Study design: Cross â€" sectional. Participants: 282 truck drivers. Statistical analysis: Sensitivity and specificity analysis and predictive values. Results: Three different algorithms that do not include Western Blot (WB were compared with the conventional algorithm, in a truck driver population with 5.6% prevalence of HIV â€"I infection. Algorithms with one EIA (Genetic Systems or Biotest and a rapid test (immunocomb or with two EIAs showed 100% positive predictive value in relation to the conventional algorithm. Using an algorithm with EIA as screening test and a rapid test as a confirmatory test was 50 to 70% less expensive than the conventional algorithm per positive scrum sample. These algorithms obviate the interpretation of indeterminate results and also give differential diagnosis of HIV-2 infection. Alternate algorithms are ideally suited for community based control programme in developing countries. Application of these algorithms in population with low prevalence should also be studied in order to evaluate universal applicability.

  9. Transgender HIV prevention: implementation and evaluation of a workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockting, W O; Rosser, B R; Scheltema, K

    1999-04-01

    Virtually no HIV prevention education has specifically targeted the transgender community. To fill this void, a transgender HIV prevention workshop was developed, implemented and evaluated. A 4 h workshop, grounded in the Health Belief Model and the Eroticizing Safer Sex approach, combined lectures, videos, a panel, discussion, roleplay and exercises. Evaluation using a pre-, post- and follow-up test design showed an increase in knowledge and an initial increase in positive attitudes that diminished over time. Due to the small sample size (N = 59) and limited frequency of risk behavior, a significant decrease in unsafe sexual or needle practices could not be demonstrated. However, findings suggested an increase in safer sexual behaviors such as (mutual) masturbation. Peer support improved significantly. Future prevention education should make special efforts to target the more difficult-to-reach, high-risk subgroups of the transgender population.

  10. Developing weighted criteria to evaluate lean reverse logistics through analytical network process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagloel, Teuku Yuri M.; Hakim, Inaki Maulida; Krisnawardhani, Rike Adyartie

    2017-11-01

    Reverse logistics is a part of supply chain that bring materials from consumers back to manufacturer in order to gain added value or do a proper disposal. Nowadays, most companies are still facing several problems on reverse logistics implementation which leads to high waste along reverse logistics processes. In order to overcome this problem, Madsen [Framework for Reverse Lean Logistics to Enable Green Manufacturing, Eco Design 2009: 6th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing, Sapporo, 2009] has developed a lean reverse logistics framework as a step to eliminate waste by implementing lean on reverse logistics. However, the resulted framework sets aside criteria used to evaluate its performance. This research aims to determine weighted criteria that can be used as a base on reverse logistics evaluation by considering lean principles. The resulted criteria will ensure reverse logistics are kept off from waste, thus implemented efficiently. Analytical Network Process (ANP) is used in this research to determine the weighted criteria. The result shows that criteria used for evaluation lean reverse logistics are Innovation and Learning (35%), Economic (30%), Process Flow Management (14%), Customer Relationship Management (13%), Environment (6%), and Social (2%).

  11. Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)--abacavir and didanosine--may each be associated with excess risk of myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of this finding in an independent dataset was explored and plausible biological mechanisms were sought. METHODS...

  12. Structural features in the HIV-1 repeat region facilitate strand transfer during reverse transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Vastenhouw, N. L.; Klasens, B. I.; Huthoff, H.

    2001-01-01

    Two obligatory DNA strand transfers take place during reverse transcription of a retroviral RNA genome. The first strand transfer is facilitated by terminal repeat (R) elements in the viral genome. This strand-transfer reaction depends on base pairing between the cDNA of the 5'R and the 3'R. There

  13. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme in a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate a South African workplace HIV I AIDS peer-education programme running since 1997. Methods. In 2001 a cross-sectional study was done of 900 retail-section employees in three geographical areas. The study measured HIV I AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people living with HIV I AIDS, belief ...

  14. The role of latency reversal agents in the cure of HIV: A review of current data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Kiandokht; Rezaei, Nima; Nasi, Milena; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    The definitive cure for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) infection is represented by the eradication of the virus from the patient's body. To reach this result, cells that are infected but do not produce the virus must become recognizable to be killed by the immune system. For this purpose, drugs defined "latency reverting agents" (LRA) that reactivate viral production are under investigation. A few clinical studies have been performed in HIV-infected patients treated with LRA and combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The strategy is thus to combine cART and LRA to reactivate the virus and unmask latently infected cells that, because of cART, cannot produce a fully competent form of the virus. Unmasked cells can present viral antigens to the immune system, that ultimately recognizes and kills such latently infected cells. This review reports and discusses recent studies that have been published on this topic. Copyright © 2018 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In Vitro Evaluation of Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 as Human Immunodeficiency Virus Microbicides†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herrewege, Yven; Michiels, Jo; Van Roey, Jens; Fransen, Katrien; Kestens, Luc; Balzarini, Jan; Lewi, Paul; Vanham, Guido; Janssen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors UC-781 and TMC120-R147681 (Dapivirine) effectively prevented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in cocultures of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells, representing primary targets in sexual transmission. Both drugs had a favorable therapeutic index. A 24-h treatment with 1,000 nM UC-781 or 100 nM TMC120-R147681 prevented cell-free HIV infection, whereas 10-fold-higher concentrations blocked cell-associated HIV. PMID:14693562

  16. Prediction of the binding mode and resistance profile for a dual-target pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold against HIV-1 integrase and reverse-transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengyuan; Zheng, Guoxun; Fu, Tingting; Li, Xiaofeng; Tu, Gao; Li, Ying Hong; Yao, Xiaojun; Xue, Weiwei; Zhu, Feng

    2018-06-27

    The rapid emergence of drug-resistant variants is one of the most common causes of highly active antiretroviral therapeutic (HAART) failure in patients infected with HIV-1. Compared with the existing HAART, the recently developed pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold targeting both HIV-1 integrase (IN) and reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) is an efficient approach to counteract the failure of anti-HIV treatment due to drug resistance. However, the binding mode and potential resistance profile of these inhibitors with important mechanistic principles remain poorly understood. To address this issue, an integrated computational method was employed to investigate the binding mode of inhibitor JMC6F with HIV-1 IN and RNase H. By using per-residue binding free energy decomposition analysis, the following residues: Asp64, Thr66, Leu68, Asp116, Tyr143, Gln148 and Glu152 in IN, Asp443, Glu478, Trp536, Lys541 and Asp549 in RNase H were identified as key residues for JMC6F binding. And then computational alanine scanning was carried to further verify the key residues. Moreover, the resistance profile of the currently known major mutations in HIV-1 IN and 2 mutations in RNase H against JMC6F was predicted by in silico mutagenesis studies. The results demonstrated that only three mutations in HIV-1 IN (Y143C, Q148R and N155H) and two mutations in HIV-1 RNase H (Y501R and Y501W) resulted in a reduction of JMC6F potency, thus indicating their potential role in providing resistance to JMC6F. These data provided important insights into the binding mode and resistance profile of the inhibitors with a pyrrolyl diketo acid scaffold in HIV-1 IN and RNase H, which would be helpful for the development of more effective dual HIV-1 IN and RNase H inhibitors.

  17. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-10-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir and a three-drug combination of nelfinavir with ZDV and 3TC against an acute HIV-1 strain RF infection of CEM-SS cells in vitro. Quantitative assessment of drug interaction was evaluated by a universal response surface approach (W. R. Greco, G. Bravo, and J. C. Parsons, Pharm. Rev. 47:331-385, 1995) and by the method of M. N. Prichard and C. Shipman (Antiviral Res. 14:181-206, 1990). Both analytical methods yielded similar results and showed that the two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the reverse transcriptase inhibitors ZDV, 3TC, ddI, d4T, and ddC and the three-drug combination with ZDV and 3TC resulted in additive to statistically significant synergistic interactions. In a similar manner, the combination of nelfinavir with the three protease inhibitors resulted in additive (ritonavir and saquinavir) to slightly antagonistic (indinavir) interactions. In all combinations, minimal cellular cytotoxicity was observed with any drug alone and in combination. These results suggest that administration of combinations of the appropriate doses of nelfinavir with other currently approved antiretroviral therapeutic agents in vivo may result in enhanced antiviral activity with no associated increase in cellular cytotoxicity.

  18. Substrate-induced stable enzyme-inhibitor complex formation allows tight binding of novel 2-aminopyrimidin-4(3H)-ones to drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuele, Alberta; Facchini, Marcella; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Artico, Marino; Armand-Ugón, Mercedes; Esté, José A; Maga, Giovanni

    2008-09-01

    We recently reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of 5-alkyl-2-(N,N-disubstituted)amino-6-(2,6-difluorophenylalkyl)-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-4(3H)-ones (F(2)-N,N-DABOs). These compounds are highly active against both wild-type HIV-1 and the K103N, Y181C, and Y188L mutant strains. Herein we present novel 6-(2-chloro-6-fluorophenylalkyl)-N,N-DABO (2-Cl-6-F-N,N-DABO) derivatives and investigate the molecular basis for their high-affinity binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Our results show that the new compounds display higher association rates than the difluoro derivatives toward wild-type HIV-1 RT or drug-resistant RT mutant forms. We also show that they preferentially associate to either the free enzyme or the enzyme-nucleic acid binary complex, and that this binding is stabilized upon formation of the ternary complex between HIV-1 RT and both the nucleic acid and nucleotide substrates. Interestingly, one compound showed dissociation rates from the ternary complex with RT mutants K103N and Y181I 10-20-fold slower than from the corresponding complex with wild-type RT.

  19. Evaluation of simple rapid HIV assays and development of national rapid HIV test algorithms in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyamuya, Eligius F; Aboud, Said; Urassa, Willy K; Sufi, Jaffer; Mbwana, Judica; Ndugulile, Faustin; Massambu, Charles

    2009-02-18

    Suitable algorithms based on a combination of two or more simple rapid HIV assays have been shown to have a diagnostic accuracy comparable to double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or double ELISA with Western Blot strategies. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of five simple rapid HIV assays using whole blood samples from HIV-infected patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors, and to formulate an alternative confirmatory strategy based on rapid HIV testing algorithms suitable for use in Tanzania. Five rapid HIV assays: Determine HIV-1/2 (Inverness Medical), SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc.), First Response HIV Card 1-2.0 (PMC Medical India Pvt Ltd), HIV1/2 Stat-Pak Dipstick (Chembio Diagnostic System, Inc) and Uni-Gold HIV-1/2 (Trinity Biotech) were evaluated between June and September 2006 using 1433 whole blood samples from hospital patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors. All samples that were reactive on all or any of the five rapid assays and 10% of non-reactive samples were tested on a confirmatory Inno-Lia HIV I/II immunoblot assay (Immunogenetics). Three hundred and ninety samples were confirmed HIV-1 antibody positive, while 1043 were HIV negative. The sensitivity at initial testing of Determine, SD Bioline and Uni-Gold was 100% (95% CI; 99.1-100) while First Response and Stat-Pak had sensitivity of 99.5% (95% CI; 98.2-99.9) and 97.7% (95% CI; 95.7-98.9), respectively, which increased to 100% (95% CI; 99.1-100) on repeat testing. The initial specificity of the Uni-Gold assay was 100% (95% CI; 99.6-100) while specificities were 99.6% (95% CI; 99-99.9), 99.4% (95% CI; 98.8-99.7), 99.6% (95% CI; 99-99.9) and 99.8% (95% CI; 99.3-99.9) for Determine, SD Bioline, First Response and Stat-Pak assays, respectively. There was no any sample which was concordantly false positive in Uni-Gold, Determine and SD Bioline assays. An

  20. N348I in the connection domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase confers zidovudine and nevirapine resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Huey Yap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytically active 66-kDa subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT consists of DNA polymerase, connection, and ribonuclease H (RNase H domains. Almost all known RT inhibitor resistance mutations identified to date map to the polymerase domain of the enzyme. However, the connection and RNase H domains are not routinely analysed in clinical samples and none of the genotyping assays available for patient management sequence the entire RT coding region. The British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (the Centre genotypes clinical isolates up to codon 400 in RT, and our retrospective statistical analyses of the Centre's database have identified an N348I mutation in the RT connection domain in treatment-experienced individuals. The objective of this multidisciplinary study was to establish the in vivo relevance of this mutation and its role in drug resistance.The prevalence of N348I in clinical isolates, the time taken for it to emerge under selective drug pressure, and its association with changes in viral load, specific drug treatment, and known drug resistance mutations was analysed from genotypes, viral loads, and treatment histories from the Centre's database. N348I increased in prevalence from below 1% in 368 treatment-naïve individuals to 12.1% in 1,009 treatment-experienced patients (p = 7.7 x 10(-12. N348I appeared early in therapy and was highly associated with thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs M41L and T215Y/F (p < 0.001, the lamivudine resistance mutations M184V/I (p < 0.001, and non-nucleoside RTI (NNRTI resistance mutations K103N and Y181C/I (p < 0.001. The association with TAMs and NNRTI resistance mutations was consistent with the selection of N348I in patients treated with regimens that included both zidovudine and nevirapine (odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.43-4.81. The appearance of N348I was associated with a significant increase in viral load (p < 0.001, which

  1. Structural Insights into HIV Reverse Transcriptase Mutations Q151M and Q151M Complex That Confer Multinucleoside Drug Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kalyan; Martinez, Sergio E.; Arnold, Eddy

    2017-04-10

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is targeted by multiple drugs. RT mutations that confer resistance to nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) emerge during clinical use. Q151M and four associated mutations, A62V, V75I, F77L, and F116Y, were detected in patients failing therapies with dideoxynucleosides (didanosine [ddI], zalcitabine [ddC]) and/or zidovudine (AZT). The cluster of the five mutations is referred to as the Q151M complex (Q151Mc), and an RT or virus containing Q151Mc exhibits resistance to multiple NRTIs. To understand the structural basis for Q151M and Q151Mc resistance, we systematically determined the crystal structures of the wild-type RT/double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)/dATP (complex I), wild-type RT/dsDNA/ddATP (complex II), Q151M RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex III), Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/dATP (complex IV), and Q151Mc RT/dsDNA/ddATP (complex V) ternary complexes. The structures revealed that the deoxyribose rings of dATP and ddATP have 3'-endo and 3'-exo conformations, respectively. The single mutation Q151M introduces conformational perturbation at the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-binding pocket, and the mutated pocket may exist in multiple conformations. The compensatory set of mutations in Q151Mc, particularly F116Y, restricts the side chain flexibility of M151 and helps restore the DNA polymerization efficiency of the enzyme. The altered dNTP-binding pocket in Q151Mc RT has the Q151-R72 hydrogen bond removed and has a switched conformation for the key conserved residue R72 compared to that in wild-type RT. On the basis of a modeled structure of hepatitis B virus (HBV) polymerase, the residues R72, Y116, M151, and M184 in Q151Mc HIV-1 RT are conserved in wild-type HBV polymerase as residues R41, Y89, M171, and M204, respectively; functionally, both Q151Mc HIV-1 and wild-type HBV are resistant to dideoxynucleoside analogs.

  2. Development and customization of a color-coded microbeads-based assay for drug resistance in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lijun; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Shiino, Teiichiro; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Ishida, Takaomi; Gao, George F; Matsushita, Masaki; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Hosoya, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance (DR) of HIV-1 can be examined genotypically or phenotypically. Although sequencing is the gold standard of the genotypic resistance testing (GRT), high-throughput GRT targeted to the codons responsible for DR may be more appropriate for epidemiological studies and public health research. We used a Japanese database to design and synthesize sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) for the detection of wild-type sequences and 6 DR mutations in the clade B HIV-1 reverse transcriptase region. We coupled SSOP to microbeads of the Luminex 100 xMAP system and developed a GRT based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-SSOP-Luminex method. Sixteen oligoprobes for discriminating DR mutations from wild-type sequences at 6 loci were designed and synthesized, and their sensitivity and specificity were confirmed using isogenic plasmids. The PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay was then compared to direct sequencing using 74 plasma specimens from treatment-naïve patients or those on failing treatment. In the majority of specimens, the results of the PCR-SSOP-Luminex DR assay were concordant with sequencing results: 62/74 (83.8%) for M41, 43/74 (58.1%) for K65, 70/74 (94.6%) for K70, 55/73 (75.3%) for K103, 63/73 (86.3%) for M184 and 68/73 (93.2%) for T215. There were a number of specimens without any positive signals, especially for K65. The nucleotide position of A2723G, A2747G and C2750T were frequent polymorphisms for the wild-type amino acids K65, K66 and D67, respectively, and 14 specimens had the D67N mutation encoded by G2748A. We synthesized 14 additional oligoprobes for K65, and the sensitivity for K65 loci improved from 43/74 (58.1%) to 68/74 (91.9%). We developed a rapid high-throughput assay for clade B HIV-1 DR mutations, which could be customized by synthesizing oligoprobes suitable for the circulating viruses. The assay could be a useful tool especially for public health research in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings.

  3. Comparative evaluation of glasses reprocessing and reversible conditioning of calcinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Fission products and minor actinides separated during the spent fuel reprocessing treatment are industrially vitrified on-line and thus confined inside a glass matrix with admittedly durability properties. In the framework of the feasibility of a reversible conditioning, this document examines first the possible alternative ways of conditioning and storage of calcinates before vitrification, which may simplify the reversibility aspect. Such a conditioning must be compatible with the storage process, with a possible extraction of actinides and long-lived fission products, and with the vitrification process if no extraction is performed. Calcinates are pulverulent and comprise an important soluble fraction, a proportion of nitrates of about 30%, and release a high thermal power (17 kW/m 3 ) combined to a low thermal conductivity (0.1 to 0.15 W.m -1 k -1 ). Among the different foreseeable solutions (denitration, mixing with another material, with or without compacting, dissolution inside another material..), the dissolution inside a borate seems to be the most acceptable with respect to the safety, feasibility and vitrification aspects. The thermal aspect of the storage remains complex as a specific container is necessary. In a second part, this report analyzes the possibility to re-extract back the long-lived radionuclides from vitrified wastes. The different possible ways to destroy the glass structure and to transfer the fission products and minor actinides in an aqueous solution compatible with an hydrometallurgical separation process are explored. Two processes are foreseeable: a low temperature dissolution process which requires a preliminary crushing and the handling of huge amounts of acids, and a both high and low temperature process which comprises the following steps: melting, fractionation by water tempering, addition of Na 2 O or sodium tetraborate to make it sensible to hot leaching, separation of fission products and minor actinides, recycling of

  4. Performance evaluation of the Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Christopher; McLaughlin, Lisa; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Ferrera, Carol; Liska, Sally; Myers, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Swenson, Paul; Gadelle, Stephane; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    A multi-center study was conducted to evaluate the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV-1/HIV-2 assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma in adult and pediatric populations. The objectives of the study were to assess assay performance for the detection of acute HIV infections; sensitivity in known HIV positive samples; percent agreement with HIV status; specificity in low and high risk individuals of unknown HIV status; and to compare assay performance to a 3rd generation HIV assay. The evaluation included testing 9150 samples at four U.S. clinical trial sites, using three kit lots. Unlinked samples were from routine testing, repositories or purchased from vendors. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA detection in samples from individuals in two separate populations with acute HIV infection was 95.2% (20/21) and 86.4% (38/44). Sensitivity was 100% (1603/1603) in known antibody positive [HIV-1 Groups M and O, and HIV-2] samples. HIV p24 antigen detection was 100% (53/53) in HIV-1 culture supernatants. HIV-1 seroconversion panel detection improved by a range of 0-20 days compared to a 3rd generation HIV test. Specificity was 99.9% (5989/5996) in low risk, 99.9% (959/960) in high risk and 100% (100/100) in pediatric populations. The GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA significantly reduced the diagnostic window when compared to the 3rd generation screening assay, enabling earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. The performance parameters of the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA are well suited for use in HIV diagnostic settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The development of HEPT-type HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and its implications for DABO family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenmin; Zhan, Peng; Wu, Jingde; Li, Zhenyu; Liu, Xinyong

    2012-01-01

    1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) was discovered as the first HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in 1989. The research on HEPT derivatives (HEPTs) has been lasted for more than 20 years and HEPT family is probably the most investigated NNRTI. Extensive molecular modifications on HEPT have led to many highly potent compounds with broad-resistance spectrum and optimal pharmacokinetic profiles. Moreover, X-crystallographic studies of HEPTs/RT complexes revealed the binding mode of HEPTs and the action mechanism of NNRTI, which has greatly facilitated the design of novel NNRTIs. Recently, the development of HEPTs was accelerated by the application of the "follow-on"-based chemical evolution strategies, such as designed multiple ligands (DMLs) and molecular hybridization (MH). Herein, this article will provide an insight into the development of HEPTs, including structural modifications, crystal structure of RT complexed with HEPTs and its structure-activity relationship (SAR). Additionally, this review also covers the emerging HEPT related dual inhibitors and HEPT-pyridinone hybrids, as well as the contributions of HEPTs to the development of dihydro-alkoxy-benzyl-oxopyrimidine (DABO) family, thus highlighting the importance of HEPTs on the development of NNRTIs.

  6. A trypsin inhibitor from rambutan seeds with antitumor, anti-HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, and nitric oxide-inducing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-01

    Nephelium lappaceum L., commonly known as "rambutan," is a typical tropical tree and is well known for its juicy and sweet fruit which has an exotic flavor. Chemical studies on rambutan have led to the identification of various components such as monoterpene lactones and volatile compounds. Here, a 22.5-kDa trypsin inhibitor (N . lappaceum trypsin inhibitor (NLTI)) was isolated from fresh rambutan seeds using liquid chromatographical techniques. NLTI reduced the proteolytic activities of both trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. Dithiothreitol reduced the trypsin inhibitory activity of NLTI at a concentration of 1 mM, indicating that an intact disulfide bond is essential to the activity. NLTI inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC50 of 0.73 μM. In addition, NLTI manifested a time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on growth in many tumor cells. NLTI is one of the few trypsin inhibitors with nitric oxide-inducing activity and may find application in tumor therapy.

  7. L-Chicoric acid inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integration in vivo and is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, Ryan A.; Lee, Deborah J.; McDougall, Brenda R.; King, Peter J.; Victoria, Joseph; Mao Yingqun; Lei Xiangyang; Reinecke, Manfred G.; Robinson, W. Edward

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN) must covalently join the viral cDNA into a host chromosome for productive HIV infection. L-Chicoric acid (L-CA) enters cells poorly but is a potent inhibitor of IN in vitro. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), L-CA inhibits integration at concentrations from 500 nM to 10 μM but also inhibits entry at concentrations above 1 μM. Using recombinant HIV IN, steady-state kinetic analyses with L-CA were consistent with a noncompetitive or irreversible mechanism of inhibition. IN, in the presence or absence of L-CA, was successively washed. Inhibition of IN diminished, demonstrating that L-CA was reversibly bound to the protein. These data demonstrate that L-CA is a noncompetitive but reversible inhibitor of IN in vitro and of HIV integration in vivo. Thus, L-CA likely interacts with amino acids other than those which bind substrate

  8. In vitro HIV-1 evolution in response to triple reverse transcriptase inhibitors & in silico phenotypic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Rath

    Full Text Available Effectiveness of ART regimens strongly depends upon complex interactions between the selective pressure of drugs and the evolution of mutations that allow or restrict drug resistance.Four clinical isolates from NRTI-exposed, NNRTI-naive subjects were passaged in increasing concentrations of NVP in combination with 1 µM 3 TC and 2 µM ADV to assess selective pressures of multi-drug treatment. A novel parameter inference procedure, based on a stochastic viral growth model, was used to estimate phenotypic resistance and fitness from in vitro combination passage experiments.Newly developed mathematical methods estimated key phenotypic parameters of mutations arising through selective pressure exerted by 3 TC and NVP. Concentrations of 1 µM 3 TC maintained the M184V mutation, which was associated with intrinsic fitness deficits. Increasing NVP concentrations selected major NNRTI resistance mutations. The evolutionary pathway of NVP resistance was highly dependent on the viral genetic background, epistasis as well as stochasticity. Parameter estimation indicated that the previously unrecognized mutation L228Q was associated with NVP resistance in some isolates.Serial passage of viruses in the presence of multiple drugs may resemble the selection of mutations observed among treated individuals and populations in vivo and indicate evolutionary preferences and restrictions. Phenotypic resistance estimated here "in silico" from in vitro passage experiments agreed well with previous knowledge, suggesting that the unique combination of "wet-" and "dry-lab" experimentation may improve our understanding of HIV-1 resistance evolution in the future.

  9. Trans-activation of the 5' to 3' viral DNA strand transfer by nucleocapsid protein during reverse transcription of HIV1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Vincent, A; Gabus, C; de Rocquigny, H; Roques, B

    1993-08-01

    Two DNA strand transfer reactions take place during reverse transcription of the retroviral genome. The first transfer, that of the minus-strand strong stop DNA from the 5' end of the viral RNA to the 3' end, has been studied in vitro with two RNAs mimicking the 5' and 3' regions of the HIV1 genome and with nucleocapsid protein, NCp7, and reverse transcriptase. The results show that NCp7 strongly activates the 5' to 3' DNA strand transfer during reverse transcription while a basic peptide resembling NCp7 is inactive. Activation of the first transfer by several NCp7 derived peptides and the influence of the terminal redundancies (R) present at the 5' and 3' ends of HIV1 RNA were also examined. The first transfer is optimal in the presence of intact NCp7 and necessitates R on both the 5' and 3' RNAs. Sequencing of full length viral DNA products reveals approximately 40% misincorporations at the first nucleotide beyond the transfer point. If such base misincorporations occur during proviral DNA synthesis with possible homologous recombinations it may well contribute to the high level of genetic variability of HIV.

  10. Yeast tRNAPhe expressed in human cells can be selected by HIV-1 for use as a reverse transcription primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Nathan J.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2003-01-01

    All naturally occurring human immune deficiency viruses (HIV-1) select and use tRNA Lys,3 as the primer for reverse transcription. Studies to elucidate the mechanism of tRNA selection from the intracellular milieu have been hampered due to the difficulties in manipulating the endogenous levels of tRNA Lys,3 . We have previously described a mutant HIV-1 with a primer binding site (PBS) complementary to yeast tRNA Phe (psHIV-Phe) that relies on transfection of yeast tRNA Phe for infectivity. To more accurately recapitulate the selection process, a cDNA was designed for the intracellular expression of the yeast tRNA Phe . Increasing amounts of the plasmid encoding tRNA Phe resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of yeast tRNA Phe in the cell. The yeast tRNA Phe isolated from cells transfected with the cDNA for yeast tRNA Phe , or in the cell lines expressing yeast tRNA Phe , were aminoacylated, indicating that the expressed yeast tRNA Phe was incorporated into tRNA biogenesis pathways and translation. Increasing the cytoplasmic levels of tRNA Phe resulted in increased encapsidation of tRNA Phe in viruses with a PBS complementary to tRNA Phe (psHIV-Phe) or tRNA Lys,3 (wild-type HIV-1). Production of infectious psHIV-Phe was dependent on the amount of cotransfected tRNA Phe cDNA. Increasing amounts of plasmids encoding yeast tRNA Phe produced an increase of infectious psHIV-Phe that plateaued at a level lower than that from the transfection of the wild-type genome, which uses tRNA Lys,3 as the primer for reverse transcription. Cell lines were generated that expressed yeast tRNA Phe at levels approximately 0.1% of that for tRNA Lys,3 . Even with this reduced level of yeast tRNA Phe , the cell lines complemented psHIV-Phe over background levels. The results of these studies demonstrate that intracellular levels of primer tRNA can have a direct effect on HIV-1 infectivity and further support the role for PBS-tRNA complementarity in the primer selection process

  11. Parallel screening of drug-like natural compounds using Caco-2 cell permeability QSAR model with applicability domain, lipophilic ligand efficiency index and shape property: A case study of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikin D.; Kumar, Sivakumar Prasanth; Patel, Chirag N.; Shankar, Shetty Shilpa; Pandya, Himanshu A.; Solanki, Hitesh A.

    2017-10-01

    The traditional drug design strategy centrally focuses on optimizing binding affinity with the receptor target and evaluates pharmacokinetic properties at a later stage which causes high rate of attrition in clinical trials. Alternatively, parallel screening allows evaluation of these properties and affinity simultaneously. In a case study to identify leads from natural compounds with experimental HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition, we integrated various computational approaches including Caco-2 cell permeability QSAR model with applicability domain (AD) to recognize drug-like natural compounds, molecular docking to study HIV-1 RT interactions and shape similarity analysis with known crystal inhibitors having characteristic butterfly-like model. Further, the lipophilic properties of the compounds refined from the process with best scores were examined using lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) index. Seven natural compound hits viz. baicalien, (+)-calanolide A, mniopetal F, fagaronine chloride, 3,5,8-trihydroxy-4-quinolone methyl ether derivative, nitidine chloride and palmatine, were prioritized based on LLE score which demonstrated Caco-2 well absorption labeling, encompassment in AD structural coverage, better receptor affinity, shape adaptation and permissible AlogP value. We showed that this integrative approach is successful in lead exploration of natural compounds targeted against HIV-1 RT enzyme.

  12. Keeping your armour intact: how HIV-1 evades detection by the innate immune system: HIV-1 capsid controls detection of reverse transcription products by the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelfait, Jonathan; Seiradake, Elena; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2014-07-01

    HIV-1 infects dendritic cells (DCs) without triggering an effective innate antiviral immune response. As a consequence, the induction of adaptive immune responses controlling virus spread is limited. In a recent issue of Immunity, Lahaye and colleagues show that intricate interactions of HIV capsid with the cellular cofactor cyclophilin A (CypA) control infection and innate immune activation in DCs. Manipulation of HIV-1 capsid to increase its affinity for CypA results in reduced virus infectivity and facilitates access of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS to reverse transcribed DNA. This in turn induces a strong host response. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of recent developments in innate immunity and consider the implications for disease control and vaccine design. © 2014 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Evaluation of cellular phenotypes implicated in immunopathogenesis and monitoring immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV/leprosy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoia-Gripp, Carmem Beatriz Wagner; Sales, Anna Maria; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Santos-Oliveira, Joanna Reis; de Oliveira, Ariane Leite; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Morgado, Mariza Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR). However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%), dropping significantly (p<0,05) during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%). Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells interesting tool identifying HIV/leprosy individuals at risk for IRIS/RR. So, a

  14. Evaluation of cellular phenotypes implicated in immunopathogenesis and monitoring immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in HIV/leprosy cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Beatriz Wagner Giacoia-Gripp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is now evident that HAART-associated immunological improvement often leads to a variety of new clinical manifestations, collectively termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, or IRIS. This phenomenon has already been described in cases of HIV coinfection with Mycobacterium leprae, most of them belonging to the tuberculoid spectrum of leprosy disease, as observed in leprosy reversal reaction (RR. However, the events related to the pathogenesis of this association need to be clarified. This study investigated the immunological profile of HIV/leprosy patients, with special attention to the cellular activation status, to better understand the mechanisms related to IRIS/RR immunopathogenesis, identifying any potential biomarkers for IRIS/RR intercurrence. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighty-five individuals were assessed in this study: HIV/leprosy and HIV-monoinfected patients, grouped according to HIV-viral load levels, leprosy patients without HIV coinfection, and healthy controls. Phenotypes were evaluated by flow cytometry for T cell subsets and immune differentiation/activation markers. As expected, absolute counts of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the HIV-infected individuals changed in relation to those of the leprosy patients and controls. However, there were no significant differences among the groups, whether in the expression of cellular differentiation phenotypes or cellular activation, as reflected by the expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. Six HIV/leprosy patients identified as IRIS/RR were analyzed during IRIS/RR episodes and after prednisone treatment. These patients presented high cellular activation levels regarding the expression of CD38 in CD8+ cells T during IRIS/RR (median: 77,15%, dropping significantly (p<0,05 during post-IRIS/RR moments (median: 29,7%. Furthermore, an increase of cellular activation seems to occur prior to IRIS/RR. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest CD38 expression in CD8+ T cells

  15. Evaluating the Measurement Structure of the Abbreviated HIV Stigma Scale in a Sample of African Americans Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eboneé T.; Yaghmaian, Rana A.; Best, Andrew; Chan, Fong; Burrell, Reginald, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to validate the 10-item version of the HIV Stigma Scale (HSS-10) in a sample of African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Method: One hundred and ten African Americans living with HIV/AIDS were recruited from 3 case management agencies in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Measurement structure of the HSS-10 was evaluated using…

  16. 5-Hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as novel dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H and integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Gao, Ping; Dong, Guanyu; Zhang, Xujie; Cheng, Xiqiang; Ding, Xiao; Wang, Xueshun; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2018-06-18

    We reported herein the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one derivatives as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) ribonuclease H (RNase H) inhibitors using a privileged structure-guided scaffold refining strategy. In view of the similarities between the pharmacophore model of RNase H and integrase (IN) inhibitors as well as their catalytic sites, we also performed IN inhibition assays. Notably, the majority of these derivatives inhibited RNase H and IN at micromolar concentrations. Among them, compound 7a exhibited similar inhibitory activity against RNase H and IN (IC 50 RNase H  = 1.77 μM, IC 50 IN  = 1.18 μM, ratio = 1.50). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported dual HIV-1 RNase H-IN inhibitor based on a 5-hydroxypyrido[2,3-b]pyrazin-6(5H)-one structure. Molecular modeling has been used to predict the binding mode of 7a in complex with the catalytic cores of HIV-1 RNase H and IN. Taken together these results strongly support the feasibility of developing HIV-1 dual inhibitors from analog-based optimization of divalent metal ion chelators. Recently, the identification of dual inhibitors proved to be a highly effective strategy for novel antivirals discovery. Therefore, these compounds appear to be useful leads that can be further modified to develop more valuable anti-HIV-1 molecules with suitable drug profiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of HIV testing recommendations in specialty guidelines for the management of HIV indicator conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lord, E; Stockdale, A J; Malek, R

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: European guidelines recommend HIV testing for individuals presenting with indicator conditions (ICs) including AIDS-defining conditions (ADCs). The extent to which non-HIV specialty guidelines recommend HIV testing in ICs and ADCs is unknown. Our aim was to pilot a methodology in the UK...... are piloting methods to engage with guideline development groups to ensure that patients diagnosed with ICs/ADCs are tested for HIV. We then plan to apply our methodology in other European settings as part of the Optimising Testing and Linkage to Care for HIV across Europe (OptTEST) project....... to review specialty guidelines and ascertain if HIV was discussed and testing recommended. METHODS: UK and European HIV testing guidelines were reviewed to produce a list of 25 ADCs and 49 ICs. UK guidelines for these conditions were identified from searches of the websites of specialist societies...

  18. In vitro and ex vivo evaluations on transdermal delivery of the HIV inhibitor IQP-0410.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony S Ham

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical and in vitro/ex vivo characteristics of the pyrmidinedione IQP-0410 formulated into transdermal films. IQP-0410 is a potent therapeutic anti-HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that would be subjected to extensive first pass metabolism, through conventional oral administration. Therefore, IQP-0410 was formulated into ethyl cellulose/HPMC-based transdermal films via solvent casting. In mano evaluations were performed to evaluate gross physical characteristics. In vitro release studies were performed in both Franz cells and USP-4 dissolution vessels. Ex vivo release and permeability assays were performed on human epidermal tissue models, and the permeated IQP-0410 was collected for in vitro HIV-1 efficacy assays in CEM-SS cells and PBMCs. Film formulation D3 resulted in pliable, strong transdermal films that were loaded with 2% (w/w IQP-0410. Composed of 60% (w/w ethyl cellulose and 20% (w/w HPMC, the films contained < 1.2% (w/w of water and were hygroscopic resulting in significant swelling under humid conditions. The water permeable nature of the film resulted in complete in vitro dissolution and drug release in 26 hours. When applied to ex vivo epidermal tissues, the films were non-toxic to the tissue and also were non-toxic to HIV target cells used in the in vitro efficacy assays. Over a 3 day application, the films delivered IQP-0410 through the skin tissue at a zero-order rate of 0.94 ± 0.06 µg/cm(2/hr with 134 ± 14.7 µM collected in the basal media. The delivered IQP-0410 resulted in in vitro EC50 values against HIV-1 of 2.56 ± 0.40 nM (CEM-SS and 0.58 ± 0.03 nM (PBMC. The film formulation demonstrated no significant deviation from target values when packaged in foil pouches under standard and accelerated environmental conditions. It was concluded that the transdermal film formulation was a potentially viable method of administering IQP-0410 that warrants

  19. Reverse Transcriptase drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 Subtype C infected patients on ART in Karonga District, Malawi

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bansode, Vijay B

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Drug resistance testing before initiation of, or during, antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. High levels of viral resistance circulating within the population will have impact on treatment programs by increasing the chances of transmission of resistant strains and treatment failure. Here, we investigate Drug Resistance Mutations (DRMs) from blood samples obtained at regular intervals from patients on ART (Baseline-22 months) in Karonga District, Malawi. One hundred and forty nine reverse transcriptase (RT) consensus sequences were obtained via nested PCR and automated sequencing from blood samples collected at three-month intervals from 75 HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals in the ART programme. Results Fifteen individuals showed DRMs, and in ten individuals DRMs were seen from baseline samples (reported to be ART naïve). Three individuals in whom no DRMs were observed at baseline showed the emergence of DRMs during ART exposure. Four individuals who did show DRMs at baseline showed additional DRMs at subsequent time points, while two individuals showed evidence of DRMs at baseline and either no DRMs, or different DRMs, at later timepoints. Three individuals had immune failure but none appeared to be failing clinically. Conclusion Despite the presence of DRMs to drugs included in the current regimen in some individuals, and immune failure in three, no signs of clinical failure were seen during this study. This cohort will continue to be monitored as part of the Karonga Prevention Study so that the long-term impact of these mutations can be assessed. Documenting proviral population is also important in monitoring the emergence of drug resistance as selective pressure provided by ART compromises the current plasma population, archived viruses can re-emerge

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase-catalyzed synthesis by intercalated DNA Benzo[a]Pyrene 7,8-Dihydrodiol-9,10-Epoxide adducts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Chary

    Full Text Available To aid in the characterization of the relationship of structure and function for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT, this investigation utilized DNAs containing benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE-modified primers and templates as a probe of the architecture of this complex. BPDE lesions that differed in their stereochemistry around the C10 position were covalently linked to N (6-adenine and positioned in either the primer or template strand of a duplex template-primer. HIV-1 RT exhibited a stereoisomer-specific and strand-specific difference in replication when the BPDE-lesion was placed in the template versus the primer strand. When the C10 R-BPDE adduct was positioned in the primer strand in duplex DNA, 5 nucleotides from the 3΄ end of the primer terminus, HIV-1 RT could not fully replicate the template, producing truncated products; this block to further synthesis did not affect rates of dissociation or DNA binding affinity. Additionally, when the adducts were in the same relative position, but located in the template strand, similar truncated products were observed with both the C10 R and C10 S BPDE adducts. These data suggest that the presence of covalently-linked intercalative DNA adducts distant from the active site can lead to termination of DNA synthesis catalyzed by HIV-1 RT.

  1. Development and Characterization of a Vaginal Film Containing Dapivirine, a Non- nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI), for prevention of HIV-1 sexual transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Ayman; Parniak, Michael A; Dezzuitti, Charlene S; Moncla, Bernard J; Cost, Marilyn R; Li, Mingguang; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2011-06-01

    Dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is a potent and promising anti-HIV molecule. It is currently being investigated for use as a vaginal microbicide in two dosage forms, a semi-solid gel and a silicone elastomer ring. Quick-dissolving films are promising and attractive dosage forms that may provide an alternative platform for the vaginal delivery of microbicide drug candidates. Vaginal films may provide advantages such as discreet use, no product leakage during use, lack of requirement for an applicator for insertion, rapid drug release and minimal packaging and reduced wastage. Within this study the in vitro bioactivity of dapivirine as compared to the NNRTI UC781 was further established and a quick dissolve film was developed for vaginal application of dapivirine for prevention of HIV infection. The developed film was characterized with respect to its physical and chemical attributes including water content, mechanical strength, drug release profile, permeability, compatibility with lactobacilli and bioactivity. The anti-HIV activity of the formulated dapivirine film was confirmed in in vitro and ex vivo models. Importantly the physical and chemical properties of the film as well as its bioactivity were maintained for a period of 18 months. In conclusion, a vaginal film containing dapivirine was developed and characterized. The film was shown to prevent HIV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo and have acceptable characteristics which make this film a promising candidate for testing as vaginal microbicide.

  2. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on triazolinone and pyridazinone, non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2010-06-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are allosteric inhibitors of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Recently a series of Triazolinone and Pyridazinone were reported as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 wild type reverse transcriptase. In the present study, docking and 3D quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) studies involving comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were performed on 31 molecules. Ligands were built and minimized using Tripos force field and applying Gasteiger-Hückel charges. These ligands were docked into protein active site using GLIDE 4.0. The docked poses were analyzed; the best docked poses were selected and aligned. CoMFA and CoMSIA fields were calculated using SYBYL6.9. The molecules were divided into training set and test set, a PLS analysis was performed and QSAR models were generated. The model showed good statistical reliability which is evident from the r2 nv, q2 loo and r2 pred values. The CoMFA model provides the most significant correlation of steric and electrostatic fields with biological activities. The CoMSIA model provides a correlation of steric, electrostatic, acceptor and hydrophobic fields with biological activities. The information rendered by 3D QSAR model initiated us to optimize the lead and design new potential inhibitors.

  3. Humanized mice: models for evaluating NeuroHIV and cure strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Garcia, J Victor

    2018-04-01

    While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic was initially characterized by a high prevalence of severe and widespread neurological pathologies, the development of better treatments to suppress viremia over years and even decades has mitigated many of the severe neurological pathologies previously observed. Despite effective treatment, mild neurocognitive impairment and premature cognitive aging are observed in HIV-infected individuals, suggesting a changing but ongoing role of HIV infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Although current therapies are effective in suppressing viremia, they are not curative and patients must remain on life-long treatment or risk recrudescence of virus. Important for the development and evaluation of a cure for HIV will be animal models that recapitulate critical aspects of infection in vivo. In the following, we seek to summarize some of the recent developments in humanized mouse models and their usefulness in modeling HIV infection of the CNS and HIV cure strategies.

  4. Etravirine and Rilpivirine Drug Resistance Among HIV-1 Subtype C Infected Children Failing Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Regimens in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Shanmugam; Kausalya, Bagavathi; Gomathi, Selvamurthi; Sivamalar, Sathasivam; Pachamuthu, Balakrishnan; Selvamuthu, Poongulali; Pradeep, Amrose; Sunil, Solomon; Mothi, Sarvode N; Smith, Davey M; Kantor, Rami

    2017-06-01

    We have analyzed reverse transcriptase (RT) region of HIV-1 pol gene from 97 HIV-infected children who were identified as failing first-line therapy that included first-generation non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (Nevirapine and Efavirenz) for at least 6 months. We found that 54% and 65% of the children had genotypically predicted resistance to second-generation non-nucleoside RT inhibitors drugs Etravirine (ETR) and Rilpivirine, respectively. These cross-resistance mutations may compromise future NNRTI-based regimens, especially in resource-limited settings. To complement these investigations, we also analyzed the sequences in Stanford database, Monogram weighted score, and DUET weighted score algorithms for ETR susceptibility and found almost perfect agreement between the three algorithms in predicting ETR susceptibility from genotypic data.

  5. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test using venous blood sample has been used for many years in low resource settings for early infant diagnosis of HIV infection in children less than 18 months. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance characteristics of ...

  6. Salinity-gradient power: Evaluation of pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.W.; Veerman, J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Metz, S.J.; Nymeijer, K.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2007-01-01

    A huge potential to obtain clean energy exists from mixing water streams with different salt concentrations. Two membrane-based energy conversion techniques are evaluated: pressure-retarded osmosis and reverse electrodialysis. From the literature, a comparison is not possible since the reported

  7. Taking aim at a moving target: designing drugs to inhibit drug-resistant HIV-1 reverse transcriptases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafianos, Stefan G; Das, Kalyan; Hughes, Stephen H; Arnold, Eddy

    2004-12-01

    HIV undergoes rapid genetic variation; this variation is caused primarily by the enormous number of viruses produced daily in an infected individual. Because of this variation, HIV presents a moving target for drug and vaccine development. The variation within individuals has led to the generation of diverse HIV-1 subtypes, which further complicates the development of effective drugs and vaccines. In general, it is more difficult to hit a moving target than a stationary target. Two broad strategies for hitting a moving target (in this case, HIV replication) are to understand the movement and to aim at the portions that move the least. In the case of anti-HIV drug development, the first option can be addressed by understanding the mechanism(s) of drug resistance and developing drugs that effectively inhibit mutant viruses. The second can be addressed by designing drugs that interact with portions of the viral machinery that are evolutionarily conserved, such as enzyme active sites.

  8. Evaluation of simple rapid HIV assays and development of national rapid HIV test algorithms in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbwana Judica

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suitable algorithms based on a combination of two or more simple rapid HIV assays have been shown to have a diagnostic accuracy comparable to double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or double ELISA with Western Blot strategies. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of five simple rapid HIV assays using whole blood samples from HIV-infected patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors, and to formulate an alternative confirmatory strategy based on rapid HIV testing algorithms suitable for use in Tanzania. Methods Five rapid HIV assays: Determine™ HIV-1/2 (Inverness Medical, SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc., First Response HIV Card 1–2.0 (PMC Medical India Pvt Ltd, HIV1/2 Stat-Pak Dipstick (Chembio Diagnostic System, Inc and Uni-Gold™ HIV-1/2 (Trinity Biotech were evaluated between June and September 2006 using 1433 whole blood samples from hospital patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors. All samples that were reactive on all or any of the five rapid assays and 10% of non-reactive samples were tested on a confirmatory Inno-Lia HIV I/II immunoblot assay (Immunogenetics. Results Three hundred and ninety samples were confirmed HIV-1 antibody positive, while 1043 were HIV negative. The sensitivity at initial testing of Determine, SD Bioline and Uni-Gold™ was 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 while First Response and Stat-Pak had sensitivity of 99.5% (95% CI; 98.2–99.9 and 97.7% (95% CI; 95.7–98.9, respectively, which increased to 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 on repeat testing. The initial specificity of the Uni-Gold™ assay was 100% (95% CI; 99.6–100 while specificities were 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9, 99.4% (95% CI; 98.8–99.7, 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9 and 99.8% (95% CI; 99.3–99.9 for Determine, SD Bioline, First Response and Stat-Pak assays, respectively. There was no any sample which was

  9. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes: Strengthening outcome indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Nelisiwe Maleka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are number of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs in South Africa that use sport as a tool to respond to Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS, however, little is reported about the outcomes and impact of these programmes. The aim of this study is to contribute to a generic monitoring and evaluation framework by improving the options for the use of outcome indicators of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of selected NGOs in South Africa. A qualitative method study was carried out with seven employees of five selected NGOs that integrate sport to deliver HIV/AIDS programmes in South Africa. The study further involved six specialists/experts involved in the field of HIV/AIDS and an official from Sport Recreation South Africa (SRSA. Multiple data collection instruments including desktop review, narrative systematic review, document analysis, one-on-one interviews and focus group interview were used to collect information on outcomes and indicators for sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. The information was classified according to the determinants of HIV/AIDS. The overall findings revealed that the sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of five selected NGOs examined in this study focus on similar HIV prevention messages within the key priorities highlighted in the current National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB of South Africa. However, monitoring and evaluating outcomes of sport-based HIV/AIDS programmes of the selected NGOs remains a challenge. A need exists for the improvement of the outcome statements and indicators for their sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. This study proposed a total of 51 generic outcome indicators focusing on measuring change in the knowledge of HIV/AIDS and change in attitude and intention towards HIV risk behaviours. In addition, this study further proposed a total of eight generic outcome indicators to measure predictors of HIV risk behaviour

  10. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes: Strengthening outcome indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleka, Elma Nelisiwe

    2017-12-01

    There are number of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in South Africa that use sport as a tool to respond to Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS), however, little is reported about the outcomes and impact of these programmes. The aim of this study is to contribute to a generic monitoring and evaluation framework by improving the options for the use of outcome indicators of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of selected NGOs in South Africa. A qualitative method study was carried out with seven employees of five selected NGOs that integrate sport to deliver HIV/AIDS programmes in South Africa. The study further involved six specialists/experts involved in the field of HIV/AIDS and an official from Sport Recreation South Africa (SRSA). Multiple data collection instruments including desktop review, narrative systematic review, document analysis, one-on-one interviews and focus group interview were used to collect information on outcomes and indicators for sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. The information was classified according to the determinants of HIV/AIDS. The overall findings revealed that the sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes of five selected NGOs examined in this study focus on similar HIV prevention messages within the key priorities highlighted in the current National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, STIs and TB of South Africa. However, monitoring and evaluating outcomes of sport-based HIV/AIDS programmes of the selected NGOs remains a challenge. A need exists for the improvement of the outcome statements and indicators for their sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness programmes. This study proposed a total of 51 generic outcome indicators focusing on measuring change in the knowledge of HIV/AIDS and change in attitude and intention towards HIV risk behaviours. In addition, this study further proposed a total of eight generic outcome indicators to measure predictors of HIV risk behaviour. The selected

  11. A new general method for simultaneous fitting of temperature and concentration dependence of reaction rates yields kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for HIV reverse transcriptase specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Ziehr, Jessica L; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2017-04-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated the dominant role of induced fit in enzyme specificity of HIV reverse transcriptase and many other enzymes. However, relevant thermodynamic parameters are lacking, and equilibrium thermodynamic methods are of no avail because the key parameters can only be determined by kinetic measurement. By modifying KinTek Explorer software, we present a new general method for globally fitting data collected over a range of substrate concentrations and temperatures and apply it to HIV reverse transcriptase. Fluorescence stopped-flow methods were used to record the kinetics of enzyme conformational changes that monitor nucleotide binding and incorporation. The nucleotide concentration dependence was measured at temperatures ranging from 5 to 37 °C, and the raw data were fit globally to derive a single set of rate constants at 37 °C and a set of activation enthalpy terms to account for the kinetics at all other temperatures. This comprehensive analysis afforded thermodynamic parameters for nucleotide binding ( K d , Δ G , Δ H , and Δ S at 37 °C) and kinetic parameters for enzyme conformational changes and chemistry (rate constants and activation enthalpy). Comparisons between wild-type enzyme and a mutant resistant to nucleoside analogs used to treat HIV infections reveal that the ground state binding is weaker and the activation enthalpy for the conformational change step is significantly larger for the mutant. Further studies to explore the structural underpinnings of the observed thermodynamics and kinetics of the conformational change step may help to design better analogs to treat HIV infections and other diseases. Our new method is generally applicable to enzyme and chemical kinetics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. 3D-QSAR CoMFA of a series of DABO derivatives as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Monique Araújo; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Cirino, José Jair Vianna; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Castro, Helena Carla; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2008-08-01

    A series of 74 dihydroalkoxybenzyloxopyrimidines (DABOs), a class of highly potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), was retrieved from the literature and studied by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) in order to derive three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models. The CoMFA study has been performed with a training set of 59 compounds, testing three alignments and four charge schemes (DFT, HF, AM1, and PM3) and using defaults probe atom (Csp (3), +1 charge), cutoffs (30 kcal.mol (-1) for both steric and electrostatic fields), and grid distance (2.0 A). The best model ( N = 59), derived from Alignment 1 and PM3 charges, shows q (2) = 0.691, SE cv = 0.475, optimum number of components = 6, r (2) = 0.930, SEE = 0.226, and F-value = 115.544. The steric and electrostatic contributions for the best model were 43.2% and 56.8%, respectively. The external predictive ability (r (2) pred = 0.918) of the resultant best model was evaluated using a test set of 15 compounds. In order to design more potent DABO analogues as anti-HIV/AIDS agents, attention should be taken in order to select a substituent for the 4-oxopyrimidine ring, since, as revealed by the best CoMFA model, there are a steric restriction at the C2-position, a electron-rich group restriction at the C6-position ( para-substituent of the 6-benzyl group), and a steric allowed region at the C5-position.

  13. In Vitro Cross-Resistance Profiles of Rilpivirine, Dapivirine, and MIV-150, Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor Microbicides in Clinical Development for the Prevention of HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    Rilpivirine (RPV), dapivirine (DPV), and MIV-150 are in development as microbicides. It is not known whether they will block infection of circulating nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants. Here, we demonstrate that the activity of DPV and MIV-150 is compromised by many resistant viruses containing single or double substitutions. High DPV genital tract concentrations from DPV ring use may block replication of resistant viruses. However, MIV-150 genital tract concentrations may be insufficient to inhibit many resistant viruses, including those harboring K103N or Y181C. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Etravirine and rilpivirine resistance in HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE-infected adults failing non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Kantipong, Pacharee; Jirajariyavej, Supunnee; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Munsakul, Warangkana; Prasithsirikul, Wisit; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Bowonwattanuwong, Chureeratana; Klinbuayaem, Virat; Petoumenos, Kathy; Hirschel, Bernard; Bhakeecheep, Sorakij; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2011-01-01

    We studied prevalence of etravirine (ETR) and rilpivirine (RPV) resistance in HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE infection with first-line non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) failure. A total of 225 adults failing two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus 1 NNRTI in Thailand with HIV RNA>1,000 copies/ml were included. Genotypic resistance results and HIV-1 subtype were interpreted by Stanford DR database. ETR resistance was calculated by the new Monogram weighted score (Monogram WS; ≥ 4 indicating high-level ETR resistance) and by DUET weighted score (DUET WS; 2.5-3.5 and ≥ 4 resulted in intermediate and reduce ETR response, respectively). RPV resistance interpretation was based on previous reports. Median (IQR) age was 38 (34-42) years, 41% were female and CDC A:B:C were 22%:21%:57%. HIV subtypes were 96% CRF01_AE and 4% B. Antiretrovirals at failure were lamivudine (100%), stavudine (93%), nevirapine (90%) and efavirenz (10%) with a median (IQR) duration of 3.4 (1.8-4.5) years. Median (IQR) CD4(+) T-cell count and HIV RNA were 194 (121-280) cells/mm³ and 4.1 (3.6-4.6) log₁₀ copies/ml, respectively. The common NNRTI mutations were Y181C (41%), G190A (22%) and K103N (19%). The proportion of patients with Monogram WS score ≥ 4 was 61.3%. By DUET WS, 49.8% and 7.5% of patients were scored 2.5-3.5 and ≥4, respectively. Only HIV RNA ≥ 4 log₁₀ copies/ml at failure was associated with both Monogram WS ≥ 4 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.9; P=0.003) and DUET WS ≥ 2.5 (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3; P=0.02). The RVP resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) detected were K101P (1.8%), Y181I (2.7%) and Y181V (3.6%). All patients with RPV mutation had ETR resistance. No E138R/E138K mutations were detected. Approximately 60% of patients had high-level ETR resistance. The role of ETR in second-line therapy is limited in late NNRTI failure settings. RVP RAMs were uncommon, but cross-resistance between ETR and RVP was high.

  15. Early nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors for the treatment of HIV: a brief history of stavudine (D4T) and its comparison with other dideoxynucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John C; Hitchcock, Michael J M; De Clercq, Erik; Prusoff, William H

    2010-01-01

    The occasion of this 25th anniversary issue encouraged us to reminisce about the important history of the discovery of the dideoxynucleoside analogues for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and to chronicle our thoughts about a particular exciting and rewarding period of our scientific careers. Following the identification of the anti-HIV activity of zidovudine (AZT), we participated in the urgent quest to discover optimal treatments of HIV infection and AIDS. A number of previously synthesized nucleoside analogues were comparatively evaluated, and stavudine (D4T) emerged as a promising candidate for development. Following clinical evaluation, D4T became a mainstay of the initial antiretroviral combination therapy, prolonging and saving numerous lives. It has only recently been supplanted by better-tolerated treatments. This article forms part of a special issue of Antiviral Research marking the 25th anniversary of antiretroviral drug discovery and development, vol. 85, issue 1, 2010. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reporting and evaluation of HIV-related clinical endpoints in two multicenter international clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lifson, A; Rhame, F; Bellosa, W

    2006-01-01

    adjudication between reviewers before diagnostic certainty was assigned. CONCLUSION: Important requirements for HIV trials using clinical endpoints include objective definitions of "confirmed" and "probable," a formal reporting process with adequate information and supporting source documentation, evaluation......PURPOSE: The processes for reporting and review of progression of HIV disease clinical endpoints are described for two large phase III international clinical trials. METHOD: SILCAAT and ESPRIT are multicenter randomized HIV trials evaluating the impact of interleukin-2 on disease progression...... and death in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. We report definitions used for HIV progression of disease endpoints, procedures for site reporting of such events, processes for independent review of reported events by an Endpoint Review Committee (ERC), and the procedure...

  17. Factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and continuous use of reversible contraception in a cohort of HIV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva Landolt, Nadia; Ramautarsing, Reshmie Ashmanie; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-07-01

    Effective contraception can be lifesaving by reducing maternal mortality linked to childbirth and unsafe abortion and by reducing vertical and horizontal transmission of HIV, in the case of an HIV-positive woman. This study is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. We assessed factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and the continuous use of reversible contraception in HIV-positive Thai women. We used descriptive statistics to present baseline characteristics and logistic regression to assess the association between contraceptive use and factors in the study. Of 196 women included in the analysis, 87% self-reported always using male condoms and 56% continuously using another effective contraceptive method during the period of the study (12-18 months). The choice of effective contraceptive methods was suboptimal--42% were sterilized, 14% used hormonal contraception and no participant reported the use of an intrauterine device. Sexual activity and past contraceptive use were factors associated positively with current continuous contraceptive use. Live births and lower levels of education were additional factors associated positively with sterilization. Despite high contraceptive use, there are still uncovered contraceptive needs among HIV-positive women in Thailand. HIV-positive women need established specialized family planning services, offering an optimal variety of contraceptive choices and tailored to their individual needs. As sterilization is an irreversible choice, it cannot be a viable alternative for every woman. Due to the positive trend between current and past contraceptive use, we consider that it may be possible to improve family planning programs if they start as early as possible in a woman's life and are continued throughout her sexually active and reproductive years. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparative evaluation of the process of developing and implementing an emergency department HIV testing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiser Sheri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2006 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC HIV testing guidelines recommend screening for HIV infection in all healthcare settings, including the emergency department (ED. In urban areas with a high background prevalence of HIV, the ED has become an increasingly important site for identifying HIV infection. However, this public health policy has been operationalized using different models. We sought to describe the development and implementation of HIV testing programs in three EDs, assess factors shaping the adoption and evolution of specific program elements, and identify barriers and facilitators to testing. Methods We performed a qualitative evaluation using in-depth interviews with fifteen 'key informants' involved in the development and implementation of HIV testing in three urban EDs serving sizable racial/ethnic minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Testing program HIV prevalence ranged from 0.4% to 3.0%. Results Three testing models were identified, reflecting differences in the use of existing ED staff to offer and perform the test and disclose results. Factors influencing the adoption of a particular model included: whether program developers were ED providers, HIV providers, or both; whether programs took a targeted or non-targeted approach to patient selection; and the extent to which linkage to care was viewed as the responsibility of the ED. A common barrier was discomfort among ED providers about disclosing a positive HIV test result. Common facilitators were a commitment to underserved populations, the perception that testing was an opportunity to re-engage previously HIV-infected patients in care, and the support and resources offered by the medical setting for HIV-infected patients. Conclusions ED HIV testing is occurring under a range of models that emerge from local realities and are tailored to institutional strengths to optimize implementation and overcome provider

  19. A retrospective evaluation of proficiency testing, and rapid HIV test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Proficiency testing (PT) has been implemented as a form of External Quality Assurance (EQA) by the National HIV Reference Laboratory in Kenya since 2007 in order to monitor and improve on the quality of HIV testing and counselling HTC services. Objective: To compare concordance between National HIV ...

  20. Laboratory evaluation of the Chembio Dual Path Platform HIV-Syphilis Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille B. Kalou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of rapid diagnostic tests for HIV and syphilis has increased remarkably in the last decade. As new rapid diagnostic tests become available, there is a continuous need to assess their performance and operational characteristics prior to use in clinical settings. Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Chembio Dual Path Platform (DPP® HIV–Syphilis Assay to accurately diagnose HIV, syphilis, and HIV/syphilis co-infection. Method: In 2013, 990 serum samples from the Georgia Public Health Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, United States were characterised for HIV and syphilis and used to evaluate the platform. HIV reference testing combined third-generation Enzyme Immunoassay and Western Blot, whereas reference testing for syphilis was conducted by the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination method and the TrepSure assay. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the DPP assay on this panel by comparing results with the HIV and syphilis reference testing algorithms. Results: For HIV, sensitivity was 99.8% and specificity was 98.4%; for syphilis, sensitivity was 98.8% and specificity was 99.4%. Of the 348 co-infected sera, 344 (98.9% were detected accurately by the DPP assay, but 11 specimens had false-positive results (9 HIV and 2 syphilis due to weak reactivity. Conclusion: In this evaluation, the Chembio DPP HIV–Syphilis Assay had high sensitivity and specificity for detecting both HIV and treponemal antibodies. Our results indicate that this assay could have a significant impact on the simultaneous screening of HIV and syphilis using a single test device for high-risk populations or pregnant women needing timely care and treatment.

  1. The connection domain in reverse transcriptase facilitates the in vivo annealing of tRNALys3 to HIV-1 genomic RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Meijuan

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The primer tRNA for reverse transcription in HIV-1, tRNALys3, is selectively packaged into the virus during its assembly, and annealed to the viral genomic RNA. The ribonucleoprotein complex that is involved in the packaging and annealing of tRNALys into HIV-1 consists of Gag, GagPol, tRNALys, lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS, and viral genomic RNA. Gag targets tRNALys for viral packaging through Gag's interaction with LysRS, a tRNALys-binding protein, while reverse transcriptase (RT sequences within GagPol (the thumb domain bind to tRNALys. The further annealing of tRNALys3 to viral RNA requires nucleocapsid (NC sequences in Gag, but not the NC sequences GagPol. In this report, we further show that while the RT connection domain in GagPol is not required for tRNALys3 packaging into the virus, it is required for tRNALys3 annealing to the viral RNA genome.

  2. Evaluation of the WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gend, Christine L; Haadsma, Maaike L; Sauer, Pieter J J; Schoeman, Cornelius J

    2003-06-01

    The WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection has been designed to be used in countries where diagnostic laboratory resources are limited. We evaluated the WHO case definition to determine whether it is a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children. In addition, clinical features not included in this case definition were recorded. We recorded clinical data from 300 consecutively admitted children in a state hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and tested these children for HIV infection. A total of 222 children were included in the study; 69 children (31.1 per cent) were HIV positive. The sensitivity of the WHO case definition in this study was 14.5 per cent, the specificity was 98.6 per cent. Apart from weight loss and generalized dermatitis, the signs of the WHO case definition were significantly more often seen in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative children. Of the clinical signs not included in the WHO case definition, marasmus and hepatosplenomegaly especially occurred more frequently in HIV-positive children. Based on these findings we composed a new case definition consisting of four signs: marasmus, hepatosplenomegaly, oropharyngeal candidiasis, and generalized lymphadenopathy. HIV infection is suspected in a child presenting with at least two of these four signs. The sensitivity of this case definition was 63.2 per cent, the specificity was 96.0 per cent. We conclude that in this study the WHO case definition was not a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, mainly because its sensitivity was strikingly low. The simplified case definition we propose, proved to be more sensitive than the WHO case definition (63.2 vs. 14.5 per cent), whilst its specificity remained high.

  3. The Perinatal Guidelines Evaluation Project HIV and Pregnancy Study: overview and cohort description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Kathleen A.; Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Fernandez, M. Isabel; Wilson, Tracey E.; Royce, Rachel A.; Koenig, Linda J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The HIV and Pregnancy Study of the Perinatal Guidelines Evaluation Project is a prospective, longitudinal, multisite study established to: (a) assess the implementation of Public Health Service guidelines regarding the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission and (b) evaluate the psychosocial consequences of HIV infection among pregnant women. A distinctive aspect of the study is the use of an HIV-negative comparison group. This article describes the methodology of the study and baseline characteristics of the study sample. Methods and Results. HIV-infected (n = 336) and uninfected (n = 298) pregnant women were enrolled from four geographic areas: Connecticut, North Carolina, Brooklyn, NY, and Miami, FL. The study included three structured face-to-face interviews from late pregnancy to six months postpartum for HIV-infected and uninfected women. Additional self-reports of medication adherence were collected for the HIV-infected participants, and the medical records of infected mothers and their infants were reviewed. Electronic monitoring of medication adherence was conducted for a subset of the infected women. The groups were successfully matched on self-reported characteristics, including HIV-risk behaviors. More than half of the uninfected women reported a high-risk sexual partner. Baseline comparisons indicated that both the HIV-infected and uninfected women had high levels of depressive symptoms, stress, and recent negative life events. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a unique description of the psychosocial and behavioral characteristics of a population of low-income women. The results of this study suggest that HIV infection is one of many stressors faced by the women in this study. PMID:12356998

  4. Increased CDK5 expression in HIV encephalitis contributes to neurodegeneration via tau phosphorylation and is reversed with Roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Christina; Crews, Leslie; Desplats, Paula; Dumaop, Wilmar; Rockenstein, Edward; Achim, Cristian L; Everall, Ian P; Masliah, Eliezer

    2011-04-01

    Recent treatments with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimens have been shown to improve general clinical status in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; however, the prevalence of cognitive alterations and neurodegeneration has remained the same or has increased. These deficits are more pronounced in the subset of HIV patients with the inflammatory condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE). Activation of signaling pathways such as GSK3β and CDK5 has been implicated in the mechanisms of HIV neurotoxicity; however, the downstream mediators of these effects are unclear. The present study investigated the involvement of CDK5 and tau phosphorylation in the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in HIVE. In the frontal cortex of patients with HIVE, increased levels of CDK5 and p35 expression were associated with abnormal tau phosphorylation. Similarly, transgenic mice engineered to express the HIV protein gp120 exhibited increased brain levels of CDK5 and p35, alterations in tau phosphorylation, and dendritic degeneration. In contrast, genetic knockdown of CDK5 or treatment with the CDK5 inhibitor roscovitine improved behavioral performance in the water maze test and reduced neurodegeneration, abnormal tau phosphorylation, and astrogliosis in gp120 transgenic mice. These findings indicate that abnormal CDK5 activation contributes to the neurodegenerative process in HIVE via abnormal tau phosphorylation; thus, reducing CDK5 might ameliorate the cognitive impairments associated with HIVE. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of HIV Surveillance System in Rivers State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sony Computer (Iby)

    HIV surveillance system generates information for timely and appropriate ..... active type of surveillance.14 Nonetheless, it requires training, supervision and motivation ... very effectively.14 The introduction of reward-system could be included.

  6. Psychometric evaluation of the HIV symptom distress scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Linda G.; Wang, Ming-Mei; Testa, Marcia A.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to psychometrically validate the HIV Symptom Distress Scale (SDS), an instrument that can be used to measure overall HIV symptom distress or clinically relevant groups of HIV symptoms. A secondary data analysis was conducted using the Collaborations in HIV Outcomes Research U.S. Cohort (CHORUS). Inclusion criteria required study participants (N=5,521) to have a valid baseline measure of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group Symptom Distress Module, with an SF-12 or SF-36 completed on the same day. Psychometric testing assessed unidimensionality, internal consistency and factor structure using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modeling (SEM). Construct validity examined whether the new measure discriminates across clinical significance (CD4 and HIV viral load). Findings show that the SDS has high reliability (α=0.92), and SEM supports a correlated second-order factor model (physical and mental distress) with acceptable fit (GFI=0.88, AGFI=0.85, NFI=0.99, NNFI=0.99; RMSEA=0.06, [90% CI 0.06 – 0.06]; Satorra Bentler Scaled, C2 =3274.20; p=0.0). Construct validity shows significant differences across categories for HIV-1 viral load (p< 0.001) and CD4 (p< 0.001). Differences in mean SDS scores exist across gender (p< 0.001), race/ethnicity (p< 0.05) and educational attainment (p < 0.001). Hence, the HIV Symptom Distress Scale is a reliable and valid instrument, which measures overall HIV symptoms or clinically relevant groups of symptoms. PMID:22409246

  7. Smartphone-Imaged HIV-1 Reverse-Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP on a Chip from Whole Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Damhorst

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral load measurements are an essential tool for the long-term clinical care of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive individuals. The gold standards in viral load instrumentation, however, are still too limited by their size, cost, and sophisticated operation for these measurements to be ubiquitous in remote settings with poor healthcare infrastructure, including parts of the world that are disproportionately affected by HIV infection. The challenge of developing a point-of-care platform capable of making viral load more accessible has been frequently approached but no solution has yet emerged that meets the practical requirements of low cost, portability, and ease-of-use. In this paper, we perform reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP on minimally processed HIV-spiked whole blood samples with a microfluidic and silicon microchip platform, and perform fluorescence measurements with a consumer smartphone. Our integrated assay shows amplification from as few as three viruses in a ~ 60 nL RT-LAMP droplet, corresponding to a whole blood concentration of 670 viruses per μL of whole blood. The technology contains greater power in a digital RT-LAMP approach that could be scaled up for the determination of viral load from a finger prick of blood in the clinical care of HIV-positive individuals. We demonstrate that all aspects of this viral load approach, from a drop of blood to imaging the RT-LAMP reaction, are compatible with lab-on-a-chip components and mobile instrumentation.

  8. Application of 3D-QSAR, Pharmacophore, and Molecular Docking in the Molecular Design of Diarylpyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Genyan; Wang, Wenjie; Wan, Youlan; Ju, Xiulian; Gu, Shuangxi

    2018-05-11

    Diarylpyrimidines (DAPYs), acting as HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), have been considered to be one of the most potent drug families in the fight against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). To better understand the structural requirements of HIV-1 NNRTIs, three-dimensional quantitative structure⁻activity relationship (3D-QSAR), pharmacophore, and molecular docking studies were performed on 52 DAPY analogues that were synthesized in our previous studies. The internal and external validation parameters indicated that the generated 3D-QSAR models, including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA, q 2 = 0.679, R 2 = 0.983, and r pred 2 = 0.884) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA, q 2 = 0.734, R 2 = 0.985, and r pred 2 = 0.891), exhibited good predictive abilities and significant statistical reliability. The docking results demonstrated that the phenyl ring at the C₄-position of the pyrimidine ring was better than the cycloalkanes for the activity, as the phenyl group was able to participate in π⁻π stacking interactions with the aromatic residues of the binding site, whereas the cycloalkanes were not. The pharmacophore model and 3D-QSAR contour maps provided significant insights into the key structural features of DAPYs that were responsible for the activity. On the basis of the obtained information, a series of novel DAPY analogues of HIV-1 NNRTIs with potentially higher predicted activity was designed. This work might provide useful information for guiding the rational design of potential HIV-1 NNRTI DAPYs.

  9. Evaluation of sequence ambiguities of the HIV-1 pol gene as a method to identify recent HIV-1 infection in transmitted drug resistance surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Emmi; Shao, Wei; Bontell, Irene; Cham, Fatim; Cuong, Do Duy; Wondwossen, Amogne; Morris, Lynn; Hunt, Gillian; Sönnerborg, Anders; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Maldarelli, Frank; Jordan, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Identification of recent HIV infection within populations is a public health priority for accurate estimation of HIV incidence rates and transmitted drug resistance at population level. Determining HIV incidence rates by prospective follow-up of HIV-uninfected individuals is challenging and serological assays have important limitations. HIV diversity within an infected host increases with duration of infection. We explore a simple bioinformatics approach to assess viral diversity by determining the percentage of ambiguous base calls in sequences derived from standard genotyping of HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase. Sequences from 691 recently infected (≤1 year) and chronically infected (>1 year) individuals from Sweden, Vietnam and Ethiopia were analyzed for ambiguity. A significant difference (p<0.0001) in the proportion of ambiguous bases was observed between sequences from individuals with recent and chronic infection in both HIV-1 subtype B and non-B infection, consistent with previous studies. In our analysis, a cutoff of <0.47% ambiguous base calls identified recent infection with a sensitivity and specificity of 88.8% and 74.6% respectively. 1,728 protease and reverse transcriptase sequences from 36 surveys of transmitted HIV drug resistance performed following World Health Organization guidance were analyzed for ambiguity. The 0.47% ambiguity cutoff was applied and survey sequences were classified as likely derived from recently or chronically infected individuals. 71% of patients were classified as likely to have been infected within one year of genotyping but results varied considerably amongst surveys. This bioinformatics approach may provide supporting population-level information to identify recent infection but its application is limited by infection with more than one viral variant, decreasing viral diversity in advanced disease and technical aspects of population based sequencing. Standardization of sequencing techniques and base calling

  10. Indolylarylsulfones as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: new cyclic substituents at indole-2-carboxamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Coluccia, Antonio; Brancale, Andrea; Piscitelli, Francesco; Gatti, Valerio; Maga, Giovanni; Samuele, Alberta; Pannecouque, Christophe; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan; Novellino, Ettore; Silvestri, Romano

    2011-03-24

    New indolylarylsulfone derivatives bearing cyclic substituents at indole-2-carboxamide linked through a methylene/ethylene spacer were potent inhibitors of the WT HIV-1 replication in CEM and PBMC cells with inhibitory concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Against the mutant L100I and K103N RT HIV-1 strains in MT-4 cells, compounds 20, 24-26, 36, and 40 showed antiviral potency superior to that of NVP and EFV. Against these mutant strains, derivatives 20, 24-26, and 40 were equipotent to ETV. Molecular docking experiments on this novel series of IAS analogues have also suggested that the H-bond interaction between the nitrogen atom in the carboxamide chain of IAS and Glu138:B is important in the binding of these compounds. These results are in accordance with the experimental data obtained on the WT and on the mutant HIV-1 strains tested.

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consequences of Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, ... hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National ...

  12. Decrease of vitamin D concentration in patients with HIV infection on a non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colebunders Robert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D is an important determinant of bone health and also plays a major role in the regulation of the immune system. Interestingly, vitamin D status before the start of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been recently associated with HIV disease progression and overall mortality in HIV-positive pregnant women. We prospectively studied vitamin D status in HIV individuals on HAART in Belgium. We selected samples from HIV-positive adults starting HAART with a pre-HAART CD4 T-cell count >100 cells/mm3 followed up for at least 12 months without a treatment change. We compared 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma [25-(OHD] concentration in paired samples before and after 12 months of HAART. 25-(OHD levels are presented using two different cut-offs: Results Vitamin D deficiency was common before HAART, the frequency of plasma 25-(OHD concentrations below 20 ng/ml and 30 below ng/ml was 43.7% and 70.1% respectively. After 12 months on HAART, the frequency increased to 47.1% and 81.6%. HAART for 12 months was associated with a significant decrease of plasma 25-(OHD concentration (p = 0.001. Decreasing plasma 25-(OHD concentration on HAART was associated in the multivariate model with NNRTI-based regimen (p = 0.001 and lower body weight (p = 0.008. Plasma 25-(OHD concentrations decreased significantly in both nevirapine and efavirenz-containing regimens but not in PI-treated patients. Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is frequent in HIV-positive individuals and NNRTI therapy further decreases 25-(OHD concentrations. Consequently, vitamin D status need to be checked regularly in all HIV-infected patients and vitamin D supplementation should be given when needed.

  13. Molecular docking of (5E)-3-(2-aminoethyl)-5-(2- thienylmethylene)-1, 3-thiazolidine-2, 4-dione on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: novel drug acting on enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seniya, Chandrabhan; Yadav, Ajay; Uchadia, Kuldeep; Kumar, Sanjay; Sagar, Nitin; Shrivastava, Priyanka; Shrivastava, Shilpi; Wadhwa, Gulshan

    2012-01-01

    The study of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans and animal models in last 31 years suggested that it is a causative agent of AIDS. This causes serious pandemic public health concern globally. It was reported that the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) played a critical role in the life cycle of HIV. Therefore, inhibition of HIV-1RT enzyme is one of the major and potential targets in the treatment of AIDS. The enzyme (HIV-1RT) was successfully targeted by non nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). But frequent application of NNRTIs led drug resistance mutation on HIV infections. Therefore, there is a need to search new NNRTIs with appropriate pharmacophores. For the purpose, a virtually screened 3D model of unliganded HIV-1RT (1DLO) was explored. The unliganded HIV-1RT (1DLO) was docked with 4-thiazolidinone and its derivatives (ChemBank Database) by using AutoDock4. The best seven docking solutions complex were selected and analyzed by Ligplot. The analysis showed that derivative (5E)-3-(2- aminoethyl)-5-(2- thienylmethylene)-1, 3-thiazolidine-2, 4-dione (CID 3087795) has maximum potential against unliganded HIV-1RT (1DLO). The analysis was done on the basis of scoring and binding ability. The derivative (5E)-3-(2- aminoethyl)-5-(2- thienylmethylene)-1, 3-thiazolidine-2, 4-dione (CID 3087795) indicated minimum energy score and highest number of interactions with active site residue and could be a promising inhibitor for HIV-1 RT as Drug target.

  14. HIV rapid testing in a Veterans Affairs hospital ED setting: a 5-year sustainability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Herschel; Hagedorn, Hildi; Anaya, Henry D

    2014-08-01

    Routine HIV testing in primary care settings is now recommended in the United States. The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has increased the number of patients tested for HIV, but overall HIV testing rates in VA remain low. A proven strategy for increasing such testing involves nurse-initiated HIV rapid testing (HIV RT). The purpose of this work was to use a mixed methodology approach to evaluate the 5-year sustainability of an intervention that implemented HIV RT in a VA emergency department setting in a large, urban VA medical center to reduce missed diagnostic and treatment opportunities in this vulnerable patient population. In-person semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and stakeholders. Interview notes were qualitatively coded for emerging themes. Quarterly testing rates were evaluated for a 5-year time span starting from the launch in July 2008. Findings indicate that HIV RT was sustained by the enthusiasm of 2 clinical champions who oversaw the registered nurses responsible for conducting the testing. The departure of the clinical champions was correlated with a substantial drop-off in testing. Findings also indicate potential strategies for improving sustainability including engaging senior leadership in the project, engaging line staff in the implementation planning from the start to increase ownership over the innovation, incorporating information into initial training explaining the importance of the innovation to quality patient care, providing ongoing training to maintain skills, and providing routine progress reports to staff to demonstrate the ongoing impact of their efforts. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Free Energy-Based Virtual Screening and Optimization of RNase H Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baofeng; D'Erasmo, Michael P; Murelli, Ryan P; Gallicchio, Emilio

    2016-09-30

    We report the results of a binding free energy-based virtual screening campaign of a library of 77 α-hydroxytropolone derivatives against the challenging RNase H active site of the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme of human immunodeficiency virus-1. Multiple protonation states, rotamer states, and binding modalities of each compound were individually evaluated. The work involved more than 300 individual absolute alchemical binding free energy parallel molecular dynamics calculations and over 1 million CPU hours on national computing clusters and a local campus computational grid. The thermodynamic and structural measures obtained in this work rationalize a series of characteristics of this system useful for guiding future synthetic and biochemical efforts. The free energy model identified key ligand-dependent entropic and conformational reorganization processes difficult to capture using standard docking and scoring approaches. Binding free energy-based optimization of the lead compounds emerging from the virtual screen has yielded four compounds with very favorable binding properties, which will be the subject of further experimental investigations. This work is one of the few reported applications of advanced-binding free energy models to large-scale virtual screening and optimization projects. It further demonstrates that, with suitable algorithms and automation, advanced-binding free energy models can have a useful role in early-stage drug-discovery programs.

  16. Reversal of atherogenic lipoprotein profile in HIV-1 infected patients with lipodystrophy after replacing protease inhibitors by nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Negredo, Eugenia; Ribalta, Josep; Paredes, Roger; Ferré, Raimón; Sirera, Guillem; Ruiz, Lidia; Salazar, Juliana; Reiss, Peter; Masana, Lluís; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2002-01-01

    Background: The widespread use of protease inhibitors (PI) has been associated with abnormalities in the lipid profile of HIV-1-infected patients. Treatment simplification approaches in which PI are replaced by nevirapine (NVP) have been shown to improve PI-related toxicity. Objective: To assess the

  17. The safety and pharmacokinetics of a reverse transcriptase inhibitor, 3TC, in patients with HIV infection: a phase I study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R.; Lange, J. M.; Hussey, E. K.; Donn, K. H.; Hall, S. T.; Harker, A. J.; Jonker, P.; Danner, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of the nucleoside analogue, 3TC. A Phase I, open-label, single-centre study. Twenty asymptomatic, HIV-infected male patients with CD4 lymphocyte counts < 500 x 10(6)/l who had not received previous antiretroviral therapy completed the study. Each patient

  18. Field evaluation of a dual rapid diagnostic test for HIV infection and syphilis in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Claire C; Leon, Segundo R; Huang, Emily; Brown, Brandon J; Ramos, Lourdes B; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-05-01

    Screening for HIV and syphilis in key populations is recommended by the WHO to reduce the morbidity, mortality and transmission associated with undiagnosed and untreated infections. Rapid point-of-care tests that can detect multiple infections with a single fingerprick whole blood specimen using a single device are gaining popularity. We evaluated the field performance of a rapid dual HIV and syphilis test in people at high risk of HIV and syphilis infections. Participants included men who have sex with men and transgender women recruited in Lima, Peru. Reference standard testing for detection of HIV and syphilis infections, conducted using blood samples from venipuncture, included Treponema pallidum particle agglutination and fourth-generation HIV enzyme immunoassay for which positive results had a confirmation HIV Western blot test. For the evaluation test, SD BIOLINE HIV/Syphilis Duo test (Standard Diagnostics, Korea), a fingerprick blood specimen was used. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and the exact binomial method was used to determine 95% CIs. A total of 415 participants were recruited for the study. The dual test sensitivity for detection of T. pallidum infection was 89.2% (95% CI 83.5% to 93.5%) and specificity 98.8% (95% CI 96.5% to 99.8%). For detection of HIV infection, the sensitivity of the dual test was 99.1% (95% CI 94.8% to 100%) and specificity 99.4% (95% CI 97.7% to 99.9%). This high performing dual test should be considered for the use in clinical settings to increase uptake of simultaneous testing of HIV and syphilis and accelerate time to treatment for those who need it. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of doravirine, a novel HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, after single and multiple doses in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matt S; Gilmartin, Jocelyn; Cilissen, Caroline; De Lepeleire, Inge; Van Bortel, Luc; Dockendorf, Marissa F; Tetteh, Ernestina; Ancona, June K; Liu, Rachael; Guo, Ying; Wagner, John A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    Doravirine is a novel non-nucleoside inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with potent activity against wild-type virus (95% inhibitory concentration 19 nM, 50% human serum). Doravirine has low potential to cause drug-drug interactions since it is primarily eliminated by oxidative metabolism and does not inhibit or significantly induce drug-metabolizing enzymes. The pharmacokinetics and safety of doravirine were investigated in two double-blind, dose-escalation studies in healthy males. Thirty-two subjects received single doses of doravirine (6-1,200 mg) or matching placebo tablets; 40 subjects received doravirine (30-750 mg) or matching placebo tablets once daily for 10 days. In addition, the effect of doravirine (120 mg for 14 days) on single-dose pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam was evaluated (10 subjects). The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of doravirine was achieved within 1-5 h with an apparent terminal half-life of 12-21 h. Consistent with single-dose pharmacokinetics, steady state was achieved after approximately 7 days of once daily administration, with accumulation ratios (day 10/day 1) of 1.1-1.5 in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUC0-24 h), Cmax and trough plasma concentration (C24 h). All dose levels produced C24 h>19 nM. Administration of 50 mg doravirine with a high-fat meal was associated with slight elevations in AUC time zero to infinity (AUC0-∞) and C24 h with no change in Cmax. Midazolam AUC0-∞ was slightly reduced by coadministration of doravirine (geometric mean ratio 0.82, 90% CI 0.70, 0.97). There was no apparent relationship between adverse event frequency or intensity and doravirine dose. No rash or significant central nervous system events other than headache were reported. Doravirine is generally well tolerated in single doses up to 1,200 mg and multiple doses up to 750 mg once daily for up to 10 days, with a pharmacokinetic profile supportive of once

  20. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1993-01-01

    3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...... by combining many evaluated antiviral agents with AZT. We observed a difference in the degree of synergism depending on the evaluated compound; the results indicate that compounds with the same target in the viral replicative cycle (ddI: 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, didanosine; d4T: 2',3'-dideoxy-2...

  1. Quantifying factors determining the rate of CTL escape and reversion during acute and chronic phases of HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often evades cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses by generating variants that are not recognized by CTLs. However, the importance and quantitative details of CTL escape in humans are poorly understood. In part, this is because most studies looking at escape of HIV from CTL responses are cross-sectional and are limited to early or chronic phases of the infection. We use a novel technique of single genome amplification (SGA) to identify longitudinal changes in the transmitted/founder virus from the establishment of infection to the viral set point at 1 year after the infection. We find that HIV escapes from virus-specific CTL responses as early as 30-50 days since the infection, and the rates of viral escapes during acute phase of the infection are much higher than was estimated in previous studies. However, even though with time virus acquires additional escape mutations, these late mutations accumulate at a slower rate. A poor correlation between the rate of CTL escape in a particular epitope and the magnitude of the epitope-specific CTL response suggests that the lower rate of late escapes is unlikely due to a low efficacy of the HIV-specific CTL responses in the chronic phase of the infection. Instead, our results suggest that late and slow escapes are likely to arise because of high fitness cost to the viral replication associated with such CTL escapes. Targeting epitopes in which virus escapes slowly or does not escape at all by CTL responses may, therefore, be a promising direction for the development of T cell based HIV vaccines.

  2. Evaluation of the combination effect of different antiviral compounds against HIV in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1993-01-01

    by combining many evaluated antiviral agents with AZT. We observed a difference in the degree of synergism depending on the evaluated compound; the results indicate that compounds with the same target in the viral replicative cycle (ddI: 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, didanosine; d4T: 2',3'-dideoxy-2......3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine (AZT), a clinically used anti-HIV compound, was evaluated for antiviral effect on HIV infection in combination with other antiviral compounds in vitro. Interactions were evaluated by the median-effect principle and the isobologram technique. Synergistic effect was obtained...... with the adhesion/penetration process of virus (ConA: Concanavalin A; DS: dextran sulfate) were most potent with AZT when used in rather high concentrations. At this moment in the HIV epidemic, these observations suggest that combinations of antiviral compounds should be evaluated in clinical trials, with the major...

  3. An evaluation on the effect of reversed plastic zone on the fatigue crack opening behavior under 2-D plane stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeon Chang

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue crack opening behavior and the reversed plastic zone sizes is studied. An elastic-plastic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is performed to examine the opening behavior of fatigue crack, where the contact elements are used in the mesh of the crack tip area. The smaller element size than reversed plastic zone size is used for evaluating the distribution of reversed plastic zone. In the author's previous results the FEA could predict the crack opening level, which crack tip elements were in proportion to the theoretical reversed plastic zone size. It is found that the calculated reversed plastic zone size is related to the theoretical reversed plastic zone size and crack opening level. The calculated reversed plastic zone sizes are almost equal to the reversed plastic zone considering crack opening level obtained by experimental results. It can be possible to predict the crack opening level from the reversed plastic zone size calculated by finite element method. We find that the experimental crack opening levels correspond with the opening values of contact nodes on the calculated reversed plastic zone of finite element simulation

  4. Evaluation of HIV counselling and testing, self-disclosure, social support and sexual behaviour change among a rural sample of HIV reactive patients in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Sethosa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate HIV counselling and testing, self-disclosure, social support and sexual behavior change among HIV reactive patients among a rural sample of HIV reactive patients in South Africa. The sample consisted at the post-test counselling exit interview of 55 participants (41 women and 14 men who tested HIV-positive conveniently selected from a rural hospital and at five months follow-up at their homes 47. Results indicated that most patients had an HIV test because of medical reasons. At follow-up only 36% had disclosed their HIV status and half of the participants had had sex without condoms in the past three weeks. Major reason for not disclosing of their HIV status were being afraid of negative reactions, fear of discrimination, fear of violence, concerns about confidentiality and not yet ready. Social support was found to be significantly related to disclosure of HIV status, while counselling context and content and counselling satisfaction were not related with HIV disclosure.

  5. Evaluation of spiral wound reverse osmosis for four radioactive waste processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen Gupta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    A pilot-scale spiral wound reverse osmosis rig was used to treat four significantly different radioactive waste streams, three of which were generated at the Chalk River Laboratories at AECL. These streams included: 1. A chemical decontamination (CD/DC) waste stream which is routinely treated by the plant-scale membrane system at CRL; 2. Reactor waste which is a dilute radioactive waste stream (containing primarily tritium and organic acids), and it an effluent from the operating reactors at AECL; 3. An ion exchange regenerant waste stream which contains a mixture of stream (1) (CD/DC), blended with secondary waste from ion exchange regeneration; 4. Boric acid simulated waste which is a by-product waste of the PWR reactors. This was the only stream treated that was not generated as a waste liquid at AECL. For the first three streams specified above, reverse osmosis was used to remove chemical and radiochemical impurities from the water with efficiencies usually exceeding 99%. In these three cases the 'permeate' or clean water was the product of the process. In the case of stream 4, reverse osmosis was used in a recovery application for the purpose of recycling boric acid back to the reactor, with the concentrate being the 'product'. Reverse osmosis technology was successfully demonstrated for the treatment of all four streams. Prefiltration and oxidation (with photocatalytic continuous oxidation technology) were evaluated as pretreatment alternatives for streams 1, 2, and 3. The results indicated that the effective crossflow velocity through and membrane vessel was more important in determining the extent of membrane fouling than the specific pretreatment strategy employed. (author)

  6. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D; Mislak, Andrea C; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G; Anderson, Karen S

    2014-06-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4'-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3'-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3'-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Trends in risk behaviors among female sex workers in south India: priorities for sustaining the reversal of HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Bimal; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Edwin Sam, Asirvatham; Kumar Pandian, Arvind; Thenmozhi, Mani; Jeyaseelan, Visalakshi

    2013-01-01

    HIV epidemic in India is predominantly concentrated in subgroups of population, such as female sex workers (FSWs) and their clients, whose behavior exposes them to a higher risk of acquiring HIV infection. This paper aims to present the changing patterns of socio-demographic characteristics, behaviors, reported sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and associated factors among FSWs over 11 years. Multistage cluster sampling with probability-proportional-to-size (PPS) method was used in the surveys. A sample of 400 FSWs was studied every year. The mean age and literacy at the baseline level increased significantly over the years. House-based sex increased by 40% from 43.3% in 1997 to 83% in 2008 (p<0.001). Condom use at last sex with one-time clients; consistent condom use (CCU) with one-time and regular clients indicated increasing trends. FSWs reported low levels of condom use at last sex (14.5% in 1997 to 5% in 2008; p<0.001) and CCU (12.6% in 2004 to 3.6% in 2008; p<0.01) with regular partners. FSWs who used condom with one-time clients at last sex reported significantly less STI symptoms. A two-third reduction in genital ulcers was found from 13.1% in 1997 to 4.5% in 2008 (p<0.001). Nonliterate and hotel-based sex workers were 1.6 (1.0-2.5; 95% CI) and 2.2(1.3-3.7; 95% CI) times more likely to have reported STI symptoms. The percentage of FSWs who underwent HIV testing increased (p<0.001); similarly, a 20% increase was found in FSWs who availed counseling services from 65.2% in 1997 to 85.4% in 2008 (p<0.001). Poor, illiterate, and marginalized were more likely to get involved in risky behaviors which suggest the need for structural interventions as part of HIV prevention strategy.

  8. Reverse Link CDMA System Capacity Evaluation for Stratospheric Platform Mobile Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandar Iskandar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose an analysis of reverse link CDMA multispot beam stratospheric platforms (SPF in this paper. The SPF is currently proposed as a novel wireless technology for the development of the next generation fixed and mobile communications. The geometry of this technology is different from that of the terrestrial but rather similar to the satellite based cellular system. However, evaluation on the CDMA system capacity of this technology has not been much reported. This paper addresses all possible multiple access interference analyses including the effects of channel fading and shadowing in order to evaluate the system capacity. Single SPF and multiple SPF model are evaluated under perfect power control and imperfect power control. The results indicate that in SPF systems the reverse link CDMA capacity is significantly reduced because of the power control imperfections. Moreover, in multiple SPF model the interference caused by the users in overlapped region is not trivial. We found that because of this problem the capacity is reduced for both speech and real-time data applications compared with the single SPF model even though the assumption of perfect power control can be made. In order to improve the system capacity we proposed two methods, first is to increase the minimum elevation angle definition for each platform and the second is to employ an adaptive antenna.

  9. Occult HBV infection in HIV-infected adults and evaluation of pooled NAT for HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesha, T R; Boobalan, J; Sivamalar, S; Subashini, D; Solomon, S S; Murugavel, K G; Balakrishnan, P; Smith, D M; Saravanan, S

    2018-01-06

    The study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among HIV-infected persons and to evaluate the use of a pooling strategy to detect occult HBV infection in the setting of HIV infection. Five hundred and two HIV-positive individuals were tested for HBV, occult HBV and hepatitis C and D with serologic and nucleic acid testing (NAT). We also evaluated a pooled NAT strategy for screening occult HBV infection among the HIV-positive individuals. The prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive individuals was 32 (6.4%), and occult HBV prevalence was 10%. The pooling HBV NAT had a sensitivity of 66.7% and specificity of 100%, compared to HBV DNA NAT of individual samples. In conclusion, this study found a high prevalence of occult HBV infection among our HIV-infected population. We also demonstrated that pooled HBV NAT is highly specific, moderately sensitive and cost-effective. As conventional HBV viral load assays are expensive in resource-limited settings such as India, pooled HBV DNA NAT might be a good way for detecting occult HBV infection and will reduce HBV-associated complications. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. K70Q adds high-level tenofovir resistance to "Q151M complex" HIV reverse transcriptase through the enhanced discrimination mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Hachiya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 carrying the "Q151M complex" reverse transcriptase (RT mutations (A62V/V75I/F77L/F116Y/Q151M, or Q151Mc is resistant to many FDA-approved nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs, but has been considered susceptible to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TFV-DF or TDF. We have isolated from a TFV-DF-treated HIV patient a Q151Mc-containing clinical isolate with high phenotypic resistance to TFV-DF. Analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic testing over the course of this patient's therapy lead us to hypothesize that TFV-DF resistance emerged upon appearance of the previously unreported K70Q mutation in the Q151Mc background. Virological analysis showed that HIV with only K70Q was not significantly resistant to TFV-DF. However, addition of K70Q to the Q151Mc background significantly enhanced resistance to several approved NRTIs, and also resulted in high-level (10-fold resistance to TFV-DF. Biochemical experiments established that the increased resistance to tenofovir is not the result of enhanced excision, as K70Q/Q151Mc RT exhibited diminished, rather than enhanced ATP-based primer unblocking activity. Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of the recombinant enzymes demonstrated that addition of the K70Q mutation selectively decreases the binding of tenofovir-diphosphate (TFV-DP, resulting in reduced incorporation of TFV into the nascent DNA chain. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that changes in the hydrogen bonding pattern in the polymerase active site of K70Q/Q151Mc RT may contribute to the observed changes in binding and incorporation of TFV-DP. The novel pattern of TFV-resistance may help adjust therapeutic strategies for NRTI-experienced patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR mutations.

  11. Introducing Catastrophe-QSAR. Application on Modeling Molecular Mechanisms of Pyridinone Derivative-Type HIV Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Lazea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The classical method of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR is enriched using non-linear models, as Thom’s polynomials allow either uni- or bi-variate structural parameters. In this context, catastrophe QSAR algorithms are applied to the anti-HIV-1 activity of pyridinone derivatives. This requires calculation of the so-called relative statistical power and of its minimum principle in various QSAR models. A new index, known as a statistical relative power, is constructed as an Euclidian measure for the combined ratio of the Pearson correlation to algebraic correlation, with normalized t-Student and the Fisher tests. First and second order inter-model paths are considered for mono-variate catastrophes, whereas for bi-variate catastrophes the direct minimum path is provided, allowing the QSAR models to be tested for predictive purposes. At this stage, the max-to-min hierarchies of the tested models allow the interaction mechanism to be identified using structural parameter succession and the typical catastrophes involved. Minimized differences between these catastrophe models in the common structurally influential domains that span both the trial and tested compounds identify the “optimal molecular structural domains” and the molecules with the best output with respect to the modeled activity, which in this case is human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 inhibition. The best molecules are characterized by hydrophobic interactions with the HIV-1 p66 subunit protein, and they concur with those identified in other 3D-QSAR analyses. Moreover, the importance of aromatic ring stacking interactions for increasing the binding affinity of the inhibitor-reverse transcriptase ligand-substrate complex is highlighted.

  12. A new strategy to inhibit the excision reaction catalysed by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: compounds that compete with the template–primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruchaga, Carlos; Anso, Elena; Font, María; Martino, Virginia S.; Rouzaut, Ana; Martinez-Irujo, Juan J.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibitors of the excision reaction catalysed by HIV-1 RT (reverse transcriptase) represent a promising approach in the fight against HIV, because these molecules would interfere with the main mechanism of resistance of this enzyme towards chain-terminating nucleotides. Only a limited number of compounds have been demonstrated to inhibit this reaction to date, including NNRTIs (non-nucleoside RT inhibitors) and certain pyrophosphate analogues. We have found previously that 2GP (2-O-galloylpunicalin), an antiviral compound extracted from the leaves of Terminalia triflora, was able to inhibit both the RT and the RNase H activities of HIV-1 RT without affecting cell proliferation or viability. In the present study, we show that 2GP also inhibited the ATP- and PPi-dependent phosphorolysis catalysed by wild-type and AZT (3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine)-resistant enzymes at sub-micromolar concentrations. Kinetic and direct-binding analysis showed that 2GP was a non-competitive inhibitor against the nucleotide substrate, whereas it competed with the binding of RT to the template–primer (Kd=85 nM). As expected from its mechanism of action, 2GP was active against mutations conferring resistance to NNRTIs and AZT. The combination of AZT with 2GP was highly synergistic when tested in the presence of pyrophosphate, indicating that the inhibition of RT-catalysed phosphorolysis was responsible for the synergy found. Although other RT inhibitors that compete with the template–primer have been described, this is the first demonstration that these compounds can be used to block the excision of chain terminating nucleotides, providing a rationale for their combination with nucleoside analogues. PMID:17355225

  13. Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demonstrated include reduced patient waiting times, less costly ... professional nurses initiating and maintaining HIV-positive patients ... 2 Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, South Africa; and ... nurses following the theoretical part of NIMART training, and to.

  14. Process evaluation of school-based peer education for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2005, a survey was conducted among all the 27 high schools of Aden, which revealed low levels of knowledge on major prevention measures, and a high level of stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV (PLWH). The results served as a baseline for implementing a school-based peer education ...

  15. Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: an evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Seventy-four per cent of patients completed their treatment and 26% were cured, with no defaults or deaths, in the tubercuolosis/HIV integrated cohort. Thirty-eight per cent completed their treatment, 45% were cured, 9% died and another 9% defaulted in the cohort receiving their tuberculosis treatment at a local ...

  16. Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: an evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-25

    Jan 25, 2013 ... Scientific Letter: Integrating tuberculosis/HIV treatment: 479. Vol 55 No 5. SA Fam Pract 2013 treatment outcomes were applied where “cured” refers to patients with sputum conversion and “completed” to patients who completed treatment but did not meet the criteria for cure or failure – this includes patient ...

  17. Evaluation of the Implementation of Family Life and HIV Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Information Science, University of Ibadan and Department of Information Science, University of South Africa, Pretoria3. ; Institute .... the face of increasing incidence and prevalence of. HIV/AIDS .... distribution of the teachers' manual and a student .... Table 1: State Performance on selected indicators of FLHE implementation.

  18. Recommendations for evaluation and management of bone disease in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Todd T; Hoy, Jennifer; Borderi, Marco; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Renjifo, Boris; Vescini, Fabio; Yin, Michael T; Powderly, William G

    2015-04-15

    Thirty-four human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) specialists from 16 countries contributed to this project, whose primary aim was to provide guidance on the screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of bone disease in HIV-infected patients. Four clinically important questions in bone disease management were identified, and recommendations, based on literature review and expert opinion, were agreed upon. Risk of fragility fracture should be assessed primarily using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX), without dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), in all HIV-infected men aged 40-49 years and HIV-infected premenopausal women aged ≥40 years. DXA should be performed in men aged ≥50 years, postmenopausal women, patients with a history of fragility fracture, patients receiving chronic glucocorticoid treatment, and patients at high risk of falls. In resource-limited settings, FRAX without bone mineral density can be substituted for DXA. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy should be followed; adjustment should avoid tenofovir disoproxil fumarate or boosted protease inhibitors in at-risk patients. Dietary and lifestyle management strategies for high-risk patients should be employed and antiosteoporosis treatment initiated. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Characterization of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Associated Mutations in the RNase H Region of HIV-1 Subtype C Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngcapu, Sinaye; Theys, Kristof; Libin, Pieter; Marconi, Vincent C; Sunpath, Henry; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Gordon, Michelle L

    2017-11-08

    The South African national treatment programme includes nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in both first and second line highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens. Mutations in the RNase H domain have been associated with resistance to NRTIs but primarily in HIV-1 subtype B studies. Here, we investigated the prevalence and association of RNase H mutations with NRTI resistance in sequences from HIV-1 subtype C infected individuals. RNase H sequences from 112 NRTI treated but virologically failing individuals and 28 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals were generated and analysed. In addition, sequences from 359 subtype C ART-naive sequences were downloaded from Los Alamos database to give a total of 387 sequences from ART-naive individuals for the analysis. Fisher's exact test was used to identify mutations and Bayesian network learning was applied to identify novel NRTI resistance mutation pathways in RNase H domain. The mutations A435L, S468A, T470S, L484I, A508S, Q509L, L517I, Q524E and E529D were more prevalent in sequences from treatment-experienced compared to antiretroviral treatment naive individuals, however, only the E529D mutation remained significant after correction for multiple comparison. Our findings suggest a potential interaction between E529D and NRTI-treatment; however, site-directed mutagenesis is needed to understand the impact of this RNase H mutation.

  20. Discovery of dapivirine, a nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against both influenza A and B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanmei; Zhang, Jiantao; Musharrafieh, Rami Ghassan; Ma, Chunlong; Hau, Raymond; Wang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant influenza viruses poses a persistent threat to public health. The current prophylaxis and therapeutic interventions for influenza virus infection have limited efficacy due to the continuous antigenic drift and antigenic shift of influenza viruses. As part of our ongoing effort to develop the next generation of influenza antivirals with broad-spectrum antiviral activity and a high genetic barrier to drug resistance, in this study we report the discovery of dapivirine, an FDA-approved HIV nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, as a broad-spectrum antiviral against multiple strains of influenza A and B viruses with low micromolar efficacy. Mechanistic studies revealed that dapivirine inhibits the nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoproteins at the early stage of viral replication. As a result, viral RNA and protein synthesis were inhibited. Furthermore, dapivirine has a high in vitro genetic barrier to drug resistance, and its antiviral activity is synergistic with oseltamivir carboxylate. In summary, the in vitro antiviral results of dapivirine suggest it is a promising candidate for the development of the next generation of dual influenza and HIV antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Process and Outcome Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew B.; Betts, Donna J.; Blausey, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Program evaluation offers an opportunity for improving the implementation and impact of art therapy. This article describes a process and outcomes evaluation of an art therapy program within the mental health services unit of a community-based organization for people living with HIV/AIDS. The aims were to assess utilization patterns and program…

  2. Activities of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor nelfinavir mesylate in combination with reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors against acute HIV-1 infection in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Patick, A K; Boritzki, T J; Bloom, L A

    1997-01-01

    Nelfinavir mesylate (formerly AG1343) is a potent and selective, nonpeptidic inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease that was discovered by protein structure-based design methodologies. We evaluated the antiviral and cytotoxic effects of two-drug combinations of nelfinavir with the clinically approved antiretroviral therapeutics zidovudine (ZDV), lamivudine (3TC), dideoxycytidine (ddC; zalcitabine), stavudine (d4T), didanosine (ddI), indinavir, saquinavir, and ritona...

  3. Nonnucleoside Reverse-transcriptase Inhibitor- vs Ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitor-based Regimens for Initial Treatment of HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Lundh, Andreas; Tendal, Britta

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) cause faster virologic suppression, while ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/r) recover more CD4 cells. However, individual trials have not been powered to compare clinical outcomes. METHODS: ...

  4. Crystallographic Study of a Novel Sub-Nanomolar Inhibitor Provides Insight on the Binding Interactions of Alkenyldiarylmethanes with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) Reverse Transcriptase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Matthew D.; Ho, William C.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hartman, Tracy L.; Watson, Karen M.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Pannecouque, Christophe; De Clercq, Erik; Cushman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Two crystal structures have been solved for separate complexes of alkenyldiarylmethane (ADAM) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) 3 and 4 with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The structures reveal inhibitor binding is exclusively hydrophobic in nature and the shape of the inhibitor-bound NNRTI binding pocket is unique among other reported inhibitor-RT crystal structures. Primarily, ADAMs 3 and 4 protrude from a large gap in the backside of the binding pocket, placing portions of the inhibitors unusually close to the polymerase active site and allowing 3 to form a weak hydrogen bond with Lys223. The lack of additional stabilizing interactions, beyond the observed hydrophobic surface contacts, between 4 and RT is quite perplexing given the extreme potency of the compound (IC50 ≤ nM). ADAM 4 was designed to be hydrolytically stable in blood plasma, and an investigation of its hydrolysis in rat plasma demonstrated it has a significantly prolonged half-life in comparison to ADAM lead compounds 1 and 2. PMID:19775161

  5. The evaluation of a rapid in situ HIV confirmation test in a programme with a high failure rate of the WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derryck B Klarkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concerns about false-positive HIV results led to a review of testing procedures used in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF HIV programme in Bukavu, eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. In addition to the WHO HIV rapid diagnostic test algorithm (RDT (two positive RDTs alone for HIV diagnosis used in voluntary counselling and testing (VCT sites we evaluated in situ a practical field-based confirmation test against western blot WB. In addition, we aimed to determine the false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm compared with our adapted protocol including confirmation testing, and whether weakly reactive compared with strongly reactive rapid test results were more likely to be false positives. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 2864 clients presenting to MSF VCT centres in Bukavu during January to May 2006 were tested using Determine HIV-1/2 and UniGold HIV rapid tests in parallel by nurse counsellors. Plasma samples on 229 clients confirmed as double RDT positive by laboratory retesting were further tested using both WB and the Orgenics Immunocomb Combfirm HIV confirmation test (OIC-HIV. Of these, 24 samples were negative or indeterminate by WB representing a false-positive rate of the WHO two-test algorithm of 10.5% (95%CI 6.6-15.2. 17 of the 229 samples were weakly positive on rapid testing and all were negative or indeterminate by WB. The false-positive rate fell to 3.3% (95%CI 1.3-6.7 when only strong-positive rapid test results were considered. Agreement between OIC-HIV and WB was 99.1% (95%CI 96.9-99.9% with no false OIC-HIV positives if stringent criteria for positive OIC-HIV diagnoses were used. CONCLUSIONS: The WHO HIV two-test diagnostic algorithm produced an unacceptably high level of false-positive diagnoses in our setting, especially if results were weakly positive. The most probable causes of the false-positive results were serological cross-reactivity or non-specific immune reactivity. Our findings show that the OIC-HIV

  6. Identifying undiagnosed HIV in men who have sex with men (MSM) by offering HIV home sampling via online gay social media: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, E; Rossi, M; McCormack, S; McOwan, A

    2016-09-01

    An estimated one in eight men who have sex with men (MSM) in London lives with HIV, of which 16% are undiagnosed. It is a public health priority to minimise time spent undiagnosed and reduce morbidity, mortality and onward HIV transmission. 'Dean Street at Home' provided an online HIV risk self-assessment and postal home HIV sampling service aimed at hard-to-reach, high-risk MSM. This 2-year service evaluation aims to determine the HIV risk behaviour of users, the uptake of offer of home sampling and the acceptability of the service. Users were invited to assess their HIV risk anonymously through messages or promotional banners on several gay social networking websites. Regardless of risk, they were offered a free postal HIV oral fluid or blood self-sampling kit. Reactive results were confirmed in clinic. A user survey was sent to first year respondents. 17 361 respondents completed the risk self-assessment. Of these, half had an 'identifiable risk' for HIV and a third was previously untested. 5696 test kits were returned. 121 individuals had a reactive sample; 82 (1.4% of returned samples) confirmed as new HIV diagnoses linked to care; 14 (0.25%) already knew their diagnosis; and 14 (0.25%) were false reactives. The median age at diagnosis was 38; median CD4 505 cells/µL and 20% were recent infections. 61/82 (78%) were confirmed on treatment at the time of writing. The post-test email survey revealed a high service acceptability rate. The service was the first of its kind in the UK. This evaluation provides evidence to inform the potential roll-out of further online strategies to enhance community HIV testing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-amines as potential HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bode, ML

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ? Discovery Studio 2.5.5). The crystal structures of both the wild-type and K103N mutant forms of HIV-1 RT containing the diarylpyrimidine inhibitor rilpivirine (TMC-278) were used (pdb codes MEE and 3MEG, respectively).27 Etravirine (TMC-125... These drugs act by binding to a lipophilic, non-substrate binding pocket located about 10? from the substrate binding site. Binding induces conformational changes in the catalytic site, slowing catalytic activity markedly.3 About fifty structurally diverse...

  8. Performance measurement for supply chain management and evaluation criteria determination for reverse supply chain management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongar, N. Elif

    2004-12-01

    Today, since customers are able to obtain similar-quality products for similar prices, the lead time has become the only preference criterion for most of the consumers. Therefore, it is crucial that the lead time, i.e., the time spent from the raw material phase till the manufactured good reaches the customer, is minimized. This issue can be investigated under the title of Supply Chain Management (SCM). An efficiently managed supply chain can lead to reduced response time for customers. To achieve this, continuous observation of supply chain efficiency, i.e., a constant performance evaluation of the current SCM is required. Widely used conventional performance measurement methods lack the ability to evaluate a SCM since the supply chain is a dynamic system that requires a more thorough and flexible performance measurement technique. Balanced Scorecard (BS) is an efficient tool for measuring the performance of dynamic systems and has a proven capability of providing the decision makers with the appropriate feedback data. In addition to SCM, a relatively new management field, namely reverse supply chain management (RSCM), also necessitates an appropriate evaluation approach. RSCM differs from SCM in many aspects, i.e., the criteria used for evaluation, the high level of uncertainty involved etc., not allowing the usage of identical evaluation techniques used for SCM. This study proposes a generic Balanced Scorecard to measure the performance of supply chain management while defining the appropriate performance measures for SCM. A scorecard prototype, ESCAPE, is presented to demonstrate the evaluation process.

  9. Evaluating social outcomes of HIV/AIDS interventions: a critical assessment of contemporary indicator frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannell, Jenevieve; Cornish, Flora; Russell, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary HIV-related theory and policy emphasize the importance of addressing the social drivers of HIV risk and vulnerability for a long-term response. Consequently, increasing attention is being given to social and structural interventions, and to social outcomes of HIV interventions. Appropriate indicators for social outcomes are needed in order to institutionalize the commitment to addressing social outcomes. This paper critically assesses the current state of social indicators within international HIV/AIDS monitoring and evaluation frameworks. We analyzed the indicator frameworks of six international organizations involved in efforts to improve and synchronize the monitoring and evaluation of the HIV/AIDS response. Our analysis classifies the 328 unique indicators according to what they measure and assesses the degree to which they offer comprehensive measurement across three dimensions: domains of the social context, levels of change and organizational capacity. The majority of indicators focus on individual-level (clinical and behavioural) interventions and outcomes, neglecting structural interventions, community interventions and social outcomes (e.g. stigma reduction; community capacity building; policy-maker sensitization). The main tool used to address social aspects of HIV/AIDS is the disaggregation of data by social group. This raises three main limitations. Indicator frameworks do not provide comprehensive coverage of the diverse social drivers of the epidemic, particularly neglecting criminalization, stigma, discrimination and gender norms. There is a dearth of indicators for evaluating the social impacts of HIV interventions. Indicators of organizational capacity focus on capacity to effectively deliver and manage clinical services, neglecting capacity to respond appropriately and sustainably to complex social contexts. Current indicator frameworks cannot adequately assess the social outcomes of HIV interventions. This limits knowledge about

  10. [Evaluation of quality of HIV diagnostic procedures in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parczewski, Miłosz; Madaliński, Kazimierz; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; Boroń-Kaczmarska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was quality assessment of HIV diagnostic procedures in Poland, including human and technical resources as well as laboratory practice. Sixty questionnaires were distributed among diagnostic centers to obtain qualitative data. Basing on the survey data serological control using coded panels of HIV-1/2 samples was performed. Thirty-one filled questionnaires were received (50.8%). Surveyed laboratories perform from 350 to 5500 serological screening tests per year. In most of laboratories fourth generation assays are available, while Blood Donation Centers screen the blood both with serological assays and by HIV-RNA detection. Sanitary and Epidemiological Stations and academic laboratories hold the ISO/IEC 17025 or IS0 9001:2001 accreditation, five of the surveyed centers participate in Labquality assurance and two in Quality Control in Molecular Diagnostics programs. Data of control serological testing were received from 21 centers. In the quality control assessment 194 analyses were performed with 91 true negative, 2 false negative, 96 true positive and 5 false positive results. False negative rate of % and false positive rate of 5.2% was noted for this study. Currently, virtually no guidelines related to the HIV-diagnostics quality assurance and control in Poland are in delineated. Development of the national unified quality control system, basing on the central institution is highly desirable. National certification within the frames of the quality control and assurance program should be mandatory for all the diagnostic labs, and aim at improvement of reliability of the result distributed among clinicians and patients.

  11. Preliminary program evaluation of emergency department HIV prevention counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitlinger, Andrea P; Lindsell, Christopher J; Ruffner, Andrew H; Wayne, D Beth; Hart, Kimberly W; Trott, Alexander T; Fichtenbaum, Carl J; Lyons, Michael S

    2011-07-01

    Controversy surrounds the linkage of prevention counseling with emergency department (ED)-based HIV testing. Further, the effectiveness and feasibility of prevention counseling in the ED setting is unknown. We investigate these issues by conducting a preliminarily exploration of several related aspects of our ED's HIV prevention counseling and testing program. Our urban, academic ED provides formal client-centered prevention counseling in conjunction with HIV testing. Five descriptive, exploratory observations were conducted, involving surveys and analysis of electronic medical records and programmatic data focused on (1) patient perception and feasibility of prevention counseling in the ED, (2) patient perceptions of the need to link prevention counseling with testing, and (3) potential effectiveness of providing prevention counseling in conjunction with ED-based HIV testing. Of 110 ED patients surveyed after prevention counseling and testing, 98% believed privacy was adequate, and 97% reported that their questions were answered. Patients stated that counseling would lead to improved health (80%), behavioral changes (72%), follow-up testing (77%), and discussion with partners (74%). However, 89% would accept testing without counseling, 32% were willing to seek counseling elsewhere, and 26% preferred not to receive the counseling. Correct responses to a 16-question knowledge quiz increased by 1.6 after counseling (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 12.0). The program completed counseling for 97% of patients tested; however, 6% of patients had difficulty recalling the encounter and 13% denied received testing. Among patients undergoing repeated testing, there was no consistent change in self-reported risk behaviors. Participants in the ED prevention counseling and testing program considered counseling acceptable and useful, though not required. Given adequate resources, prevention counseling can be provided in the ED, but it is unlikely that all patients benefit

  12. Evaluating Safer Conception Options for HIV-Serodiscordant Couples (HIV-Infected Female/HIV-Uninfected Male: A Closer Look at Vaginal Insemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeoma Mmeje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV serodiscordant couples represent at least half of all HIV-affected couples worldwide. Many of these couples have childbearing desires. Safer methods of conception may allow for pregnancy while minimizing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV. In serodiscordant partnerships with an HIV-infected female and HIV-uninfected male, vaginal insemination of a partner's semen during the fertile period coupled with 100% condom use may be the safest method of conception.

  13. Economic Evaluation of Community-Based HIV Prevention Programs in Ontario: Evidence of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Infections and Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Stephanie K Y; Holtgrave, David R; Bacon, Jean; Kennedy, Rick; Lush, Joanne; McGee, Frank; Tomlinson, George A; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-06-01

    Investments in community-based HIV prevention programs in Ontario over the past two and a half decades are assumed to have had an impact on the HIV epidemic, but they have never been systematically evaluated. To help close this knowledge gap, we conducted a macro-level evaluation of investment in Ontario HIV prevention programs from the payer perspective. Our results showed that, from 1987 to 2011, province-wide community-based programs helped to avert a total of 16,672 HIV infections, saving Ontario's health care system approximately $6.5 billion Canadian dollars (range 4.8-7.5B). We also showed that these community-based HIV programs were cost-saving: from 2005 to 2011, every dollar invested in these programs saved about $5. This study is an important first step in understanding the impact of investing in community-based HIV prevention programs in Ontario and recognizing the impact that these programs have had in reducing HIV infections and health care costs.

  14. Is the HIV sentinel surveillance system adequate in China? Findings from an evaluation of the national HIV sentinel surveillance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bulterys

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: An external evaluation was conducted to assess the performance of the national HIV sentinel surveillance system (HSS, identify operational challenges at national and local levels and provide recommendations for improvement.Methods: The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC Updated Guidelines for Evaluating Public Health Surveillance Systems were followed to assess the key attributes of HSS. Comprehensive assessment activities were conducted, including: using a detailed checklist to review surveillance guidelines, protocols and relevant documents; conducting self-administered, anonymous surveys with 286 local China CDC staff; and carrying out field observations in 32 sentinel sites in four provinces.Results: China has built an extensive HSS with 1888 sentinel sites to monitor HIV epidemic trends by population groups over time. The strengths of HSS lie in its flexibility, simplicity, usefulness and increase in coverage in locations and populations. With its rapid expansion in 2010, HSS faces challenges in maintaining acceptability, timeliness, data quality, representativeness and sustainability.Recommendations: Implementation of the national guidelines should be standardized by strengthening training, monitoring and supervision of all staff involved, including community-based organizations. National surveillance guidelines need to be revised to strengthen data quality and representativeness, particularly to include specific instructions on HIV testing result provision, collection of identifying information, sample size and sampling methods particularly for men who have sex with men (MSM, collection of refusal information, and data interpretation. Sustainability of China’s HSS could be strengthened by applying locally tailored surveillance strategies, strengthening coordination and cooperation among government agencies and ensuring financial and human resources.

  15. Evaluation of lorcaserin on progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes and reversion to euglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesto, Richard; Fain, Randi; Li, Yuhan; Shanahan, William

    2016-05-01

    Lorcaserin is a selective 5-HT2C (5-hydroxytryptamine 2C) receptor agonist indicated for weight management. Here, we assess the impact of lorcaserin on progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes (T2D) and on reversion from prediabetes to euglycemia. This is a post hoc analysis of pooled data from two Phase 3 studies, BLOOM and BLOSSOM (N = 6136), evaluating the impact of lorcaserin on weight and glycemic parameters over 52 weeks in the subpopulation of obese/overweight subjects with prediabetes, alternately defined by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) 100-125 mg/dl or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 5.7-6.4% at baseline. At Week 52, in the subpopulation with prediabetes, nearly twice as many lorcaserin-treated subjects achieved ≥5% weight loss versus placebo (HbA1c: 55.6% vs. 27.5%, p prediabetes, lorcaserin may contribute to weight loss and improve glycemic parameters, and thus may help with preventing progression to T2D and promoting reversion to euglycemia. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifiers are NCT00395135 (BLOOM) and NCT00603902 (BLOSSOM).

  16. Combined solar organic Rankine cycle with reverse osmosis desalination process: Energy, exergy, and cost evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafey, A.S.; Sharaf, M.A. [Department of Engineering Science, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Suez (Egypt)

    2010-11-15

    Organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have unique properties that are well suited to solar power generation. In this work design and performance calculations are performed using MatLab/SimuLink computational environment. The cycle consists of thermal solar collectors (Flat Plate Solar Collector (FPC), or Parabolic Trough Collector (PTC), or Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)) for heat input, expansion turbine for work output, condenser unit for heat rejection, pump unit, and Reverse Osmosis (RO) unit. Reverse osmosis unit specifications used in this work is based on Sharm El-Shiekh RO desalination plant. Different working fluids such as: butane, isobutane, propane, R134a, R152a, R245ca, and R245fa are examined for FPC. R113, R123, hexane, and pentane are investigated for CPC. Dodecane, nonane, octane, and toluene are allocated for PTC. The proposed process units are modeled and show a good validity with literatures. Exergy and cost analysis are performed for saturation and superheated operating conditions. Exergy efficiency, total exergy destruction, thermal efficiency, and specific capital cost are evaluated for direct vapor generation (DVG) process. Toluene and Water achieved minimum results for total solar collector area, specific total cost and the rate of exergy destruction. (author)

  17. Evaluating barriers for reverse logistics implementation under a multiple stakeholders' perspective analysis using grey decision making approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzon, Marina; Govindan, Kannan; Rodriguez, Carlos Manuel Taboada

    2018-01-01

    In the past few decades, an interest in reverse logistics has attracted the attention of industries and also has become a subject of interest for researchers. However, while reverse logistics is becoming a mandatory element of the supply chain in developed countries particularly due to legislation...... issues, the subject is still in a state of infancy in emerging economies such as Brazil. In these connections, impediments to reverse logistics implementation must be considered and analyzed, as well as the many different perspectives from the key stakeholders for their development. The objective...... of this research is to evaluate the interrelationship among reverse logistics barriers from the perspectives of the most important stakeholders in the Brazilian context. For this purpose, a Multi-Criteria Decision Making tool named grey-based Decision Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (grey-DEMATEL) was used...

  18. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: The example of Cabo Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João Filipe G.; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R.; Marshall, Brandon DL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Methods Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Results Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95%CI:1.36–1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95%CI:7.8–8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios targeting FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence. PMID:25838121

  19. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskey, Sarah B.; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings. PMID:27494508

  20. Evaluating Clonal Expansion of HIV-Infected Cells: Optimization of PCR Strategies to Predict Clonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah B Laskey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy, the virus persists indefinitely in a reservoir of latently infected cells. The proliferation of these cells may contribute to the stability of the reservoir and thus to the lifelong persistence of HIV-1 in infected individuals. Because the HIV-1 replication process is highly error-prone, the detection of identical viral genomes in distinct host cells provides evidence for the clonal expansion of infected cells. We evaluated alignments of unique, near-full-length HIV-1 sequences to determine the relationship between clonality in a short region and clonality in the full genome. Although it is common to amplify and sequence short, subgenomic regions of the viral genome for phylogenetic analysis, we show that sequence identity of these amplicons does not guarantee clonality across the full viral genome. We show that although longer amplicons capture more diversity, no subgenomic region can recapitulate the diversity of full viral genomes. Consequently, some identical subgenomic amplicons should be expected even from the analysis of completely unique viral genomes, and the presence of identical amplicons alone is not proof of clonally expanded HIV-1. We present a method for evaluating evidence of clonal expansion in the context of these findings.

  1. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: the example of Cabo Verde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, João Filipe G; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R; Marshall, Brandon D L

    2015-05-01

    We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95 % CI 1.36-1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95 % CI 7.8-8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios prioritizing FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence.

  2. Re-testing and misclassification of HIV-2 and HIV-1&2 dually reactive patients among the HIV-2 cohort of The West African Database to evaluate AIDS collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchounga, Boris K; Inwoley, Andre; Coffie, Patrick A; Minta, Daouda; Messou, Eugene; Bado, Guillaume; Minga, Albert; Hawerlander, Denise; Kane, Coumba; Eholie, Serge P; Dabis, François; Ekouevi, Didier K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction West Africa is characterized by the circulation of HIV-1 and HIV-2. The laboratory diagnosis of these two infections as well as the choice of a first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is challenging, considering the limited access to second-line regimens. This study aimed at confirming the classification of HIV-2 and HIV-1&2 dually reactive patients followed up in the HIV-2 cohort of the West African Database to evaluate AIDS collaboration. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted from March to December 2012 in Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire and Mali among patients classified as HIV-2 or HIV-1&2 dually reactive according to the national HIV testing algorithms. A 5-ml blood sample was collected from each patient and tested in a single reference laboratory in Côte d’Ivoire (CeDReS, Abidjan) with two immuno-enzymatic tests: ImmunoCombII® (HIV-1&2 ImmunoComb BiSpot – Alere) and an in-house ELISA test, approved by the French National AIDS and hepatitis Research Agency (ANRS). Results A total of 547 patients were included; 57% of them were initially classified as HIV-2 and 43% as HIV-1&2 dually reactive. Half of the patients had CD4≥500 cells/mm3 and 68.6% were on ART. Of the 312 patients initially classified as HIV-2, 267 (85.7%) were confirmed as HIV-2 with ImmunoCombII® and in-house ELISA while 16 (5.1%) and 9 (2.9%) were reclassified as HIV-1 and HIV-1&2, respectively (Kappa=0.69; p<0.001). Among the 235 patients initially classified as HIV-1&2 dually reactive, only 54 (23.0%) were confirmed as dually reactive with ImmunoCombII® and in-house ELISA, while 103 (43.8%) and 33 (14.0%) were reclassified as HIV-1 and HIV-2 mono-infected, respectively (kappa= 0.70; p<0.001). Overall, 300 samples (54.8%) were concordantly classified as HIV-2, 63 (11.5%) as HIV-1&2 dually reactive and 119 (21.8%) as HIV-1 (kappa=0.79; p<0.001). The two tests gave discordant results for 65 samples (11.9%). Conclusions Patients with HIV-2 mono-infection are correctly

  3. Evaluations of Structural Interventions for HIV Prevention: A Review of Approaches and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskarpatyoti, Brittany S; Lebov, Jill; Hart, Lauren; Thomas, Jim; Mandal, Mahua

    2018-04-01

    Structural interventions alter the social, economic, legal, political, and built environments that underlie processes affecting population health. We conducted a systematic review of evaluations of structural interventions for HIV prevention in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to better understand methodological and other challenges and identify effective evaluation strategies. We included 27 peer-reviewed articles on interventions related to economic empowerment, education, and substance abuse in LMICs. Twenty-one evaluations included clearly articulated theories of change (TOCs); 14 of these assessed the TOC by measuring intermediary variables in the causal pathway between the intervention and HIV outcomes. Although structural interventions address complex interactions, no evaluation included methods designed to evaluate complex systems. To strengthen evaluations of structural interventions, we recommend clearly articulating a TOC and measuring intermediate variables between the predictor and outcome. We additionally recommend adapting study designs and analytic methods outside traditional epidemiology to better capture complex results, influences external to the intervention, and unintended consequences.

  4. ONIOM DFT/PM3 calculations on the interaction between dapivirine and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y H; Chen, F E

    2007-08-01

    Theoretical investigations of the interaction between dapivirine and the HIV-1 RT binding site have been performed by the ONIOM2 (B3LYP/6-31G (d,p): PM3) and B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) methods. The results derived from this study indicate that this inhibitor dapivirine forms two hydrogen bonds with Lys101 and exhibits strong π-π stacking or H…π interaction with Tyr181 and Tyr188. These interactions play a vital role in stabilizing the NNIBP/dapivirine complex. Additionally, the predicted binding energy of the BBF optimized structure for this complex system is -18.20 kcal/mol.

  5. Recycling of end-of-life reverse osmosis membranes by oxidative treatment: a technical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho de Paula, Eduardo; Gomes, Júlia Célia Lima; Amaral, Míriam Cristina Santos

    2017-07-01

    The adverse impacts caused by the disposal of thousands of tonnes per annum of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes modules have grown dramatically around the world. The objective of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of recycling by chemical oxidation of end-of-life RO membranes for applications in other separation processes with specifications less rigorous. The recycling technique consisted in to cause a membrane exposition with oxidant solutions in order to remove its aromatic polyamide layer and subsequent conversion to a porous membrane. The recycling technique was evaluated by water permeability and salt rejection tests before and after the oxidative treatments. Initially, membranes' chemical cleaning and pretreatment procedures were assessed. Among factors evaluated, the oxidizing agent, its concentration and pH, associated with the oxidative treatment time, showed important influence on the oxidation of the membranes. Results showed that sodium hypochlorite and potassium permanganate are efficient agents for the membrane recycling. The great increased permeability and decreased salt rejection indicated changes on membranes' selective properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle characterization techniques revealed marked changes on the main membranes' physical-chemical properties, such as morphology, roughness and hydrophobicity. Reuse of produced effluents and fouling tendency of recycled membranes were also evaluated.

  6. Evaluation of HIV Risk Reduction and Intervention Programs via Latent Growth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichuan; Siegal, Harvey A.; Falck, Russel S.; Carlson, Robert G.; Rahman, Ahmmed

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates how the latent growth model can be applied to the evaluation of programs targeting HIV risk behavior among drug users. Multigroup piecewise latent growth models were fit to longitudinal data with three repeated response measures. Participants were 430 drug users and their sex partners. (SLD)

  7. Benefits of Multiple Methods for Evaluating HIV Counseling and Testing Sites in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encandela, John A.; Gehl, Mary Beth; Silvestre, Anthony; Schelzel, George

    1999-01-01

    Examines results from two methods used to evaluate publicly funded human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) counseling and testing in Pennsylvania. Results of written mail surveys of all sites and interviews from a random sample of 30 sites were similar in terms of questions posed and complementary in other ways. (SLD)

  8. The Chinese version of monitoring and evaluation system strengthening tool for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capacity building: Development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Chen, Ren; Zhang, Bing; Ma, Ying; Qin, Xia; Hu, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capacity building has become a significant step for HIV prevention and control. The M&E system strengthening tool published by the United Nations Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) was intended to be the most authoritative assessment tool internationally. Facing the fact that the M&E system in China did not function at an optimum level, we considered taking the international standards for reference. By linguistic validating and different stages' discussions and revisions, we came up with the Chinese version of the capacity diagnosis tool with at least 12 components and tested its validity and reliability. The tool turned out to have a sufficiently linguistic validation and proved to be a scientific and feasible instrument which was suitable for China's national conditions.

  9. Evaluating the Impact of Zimbabwe's Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Program: Population-Level Estimates of HIV-Free Infant Survival Pre-Option A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdugan, Raluca; McCoy, Sandra I; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Petersen, Maya; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Mushavi, Angela; Mujuru, Hilda Angela; Mahomva, Agnes; Musarandega, Reuben; Hakobyan, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Cowan, Frances M; Padian, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    We estimated HIV-free infant survival and mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) rates in Zimbabwe, some of the first community-based estimates from a UNAIDS priority country. In 2012 we surveyed mother-infant pairs residing in the catchment areas of 157 health facilities randomly selected from 5 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe. Enrolled infants were born 9-18 months before the survey. We collected questionnaires, blood samples for HIV testing, and verbal autopsies for deceased mothers/infants. Estimates were assessed among i) all HIV-exposed infants, as part of an impact evaluation of Option A of the 2010 WHO guidelines (rolled out in Zimbabwe in 2011), and ii) the subgroup of infants unexposed to Option A. We compared province-level MTCT rates measured among women in the community with MTCT rates measured using program monitoring data from facilities serving those communities. Among 8568 women with known HIV serostatus, 1107 (12.9%) were HIV-infected. Among all HIV-exposed infants, HIV-free infant survival was 90.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 88.7-92.7) and MTCT was 8.8% (95% CI: 6.9-11.1). Sixty-six percent of HIV-exposed infants were still breastfeeding. Among the 762 infants born before Option A was implemented, 90.5% (95% CI: 88.1-92.5) were alive and HIV-uninfected at 9-18 months of age, and 9.1% (95%CI: 7.1-11.7) were HIV-infected. In four provinces, the community-based MTCT rate was higher than the facility-based MTCT rate. In Harare, the community and facility-based rates were 6.0% and 9.1%, respectively. By 2012 Zimbabwe had made substantial progress towards the elimination of MTCT. Our HIV-free infant survival and MTCT estimates capture HIV transmissions during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding regardless of whether or not mothers accessed health services. These estimates also provide a baseline against which to measure the impact of Option A guidelines (and subsequently Option B+).

  10. Options to Expand HIV Viral Load Testing in South Africa: Evaluation of the GeneXpert® HIV-1 Viral Load Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gous

    Full Text Available Expansion of HIV viral load (VL testing services are required to meet increased targets for monitoring patients on antiretroviral treatment. South Africa currently tests >4million VLs per annum in 16 highly centralised, automated high-throughput laboratories. The Xpert HIV-1 VL assay (Cepheid was evaluated against in-country predicates, the Roche Cobas Taqmanv2 and Abbott HIV-1RT, to investigate options for expanding VL testing using GeneXpert's random access, polyvalent capabilities and already established footprint in South Africa with the Xpert MTB/RIF assay (207 sites. Additionally, the performance of Xpert HIV-1VL on alternative, off-label specimen types, Dried Blood Spots (DBS and whole blood, was investigated.Precision, accuracy (agreement and clinical misclassification (1000cp/ml of Xpert HIV-1VL plasma was compared to Taqmanv2 (n = 155 and Abbott HIV-1 RT (n = 145. Misclassification of Xpert HIV-1VL was further tested on DBS (n = 145 and whole blood (n = 147.Xpert HIV-1VL demonstrated 100% concordance with predicate platforms on a standardised frozen, plasma panel (n = 42 and low overall percentage similarity CV of 1.5% and 0.9% compared to Taqmanv2 and Abbott HIV-1 RT, respectively. On paired plasma clinical specimens, Xpert HIV-1VL had low bias (SD 0.32-0.37logcp/ml and 3% misclassification at the 1000cp/ml threshold compared to Taqmanv2 (fresh and Abbott HIV-1 RT (frozen, respectively. Xpert HIV-1VL on whole blood and DBS increased misclassification (upward by up to 14% with increased invalid rate. All specimen testing was easy to perform and compatible with concurrent Xpert MTB/RIF Tuberculosis testing on the same instrument.The Xpert HIV-1VL on plasma can be used interchangeably with existing predicate platforms in South Africa. Whole blood and DBS testing requires further investigation, but polyvalency of the GeneXpert offers a solution to extending VL testing services.

  11. SOCIAL STABILITY AND HIV RISK BEHAVIOR: EVALUATING THE ROLE OF ACCUMULATED VULNERABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Danielle; Latkin, Carl A.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a cumulative and syndromic relationship among commonly co-occurring vulnerabilites (homelessness, incarceration, low-income, residential transition) in association with HIV-related risk behaviors among 635 low-income women in Baltimore. Analysis included descriptive statistics, logistic regression, latent class analysis and latent class regression. Both methods of assessing multidimensional instability showed significant associations with risk indicators. Risk of multiple partners, sex exchange, and drug use decreased significantly with each additional domain. Higher stability class membership (77%) was associated with decreased likelihood of multiple partners, exchange partners, recent drug use, and recent STI. Multidimensional social vulnerabilities were cumulatively and synergistically linked to HIV risk behavior. Independent instability measures may miss important contextual determinants of risk. Social stability offers a useful framework to understand the synergy of social vulnerabilities that shape sexual risk behavior. Social policies and programs aiming to enhance housing and overall social stability are likely to be beneficial for HIV prevention. PMID:21259043

  12. [An evaluation of the China-made HIV antibody test reagents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X W; Zhu, D

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the results of the evaluation of the China-made HIV antibody screening test reagents, including the IF and IE reagents prepared by the Institute of Virology, CAPM, the ELISA reagent prepared by the Shanghai Institute of Biological Products. Based on the results, the sensitivities of the IF and IE are from 91.2% to 96.9%; the specificities, from 94.6% to 97.3%. Due to the low HIV prevalence in China, the predictive values of negative of these reagents are up to 100%; but the predictive values of positive are very low. It is suggested that these reagents can be used for HIV antibody screen testing in China. The package of some reagents should be improved, the price of some reagents should be decreased.

  13. Laboratory evaluation of three dual rapid diagnostic tests for HIV and syphilis in China and Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue-Ping; Ngige, Evelyn; Anyaike, Chukwuma; Ijaodola, Gbenga; Oyelade, Taiwo A; Vaz, Rui Gama; Newman, Lori M; Chen, Xiang-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    To determine the laboratory-based performance and operational characteristics of three dual rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for testing HIV and syphilis. Three dual RDTs (SD Bioline, Chembio, and MedMira) were evaluated using 1514 serum specimens archived at laboratories or collected from clinics in China and Nigeria to determine sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals. Concordance of testing results read by two technicians, stability of testing results read at two time points, and test operation characteristics were also assessed. All three of the evaluated RDTs gave excellent performance with a combined sensitivity ranging from 99.0%-99.6% for HIV and 98.3%-99.0% for syphilis, and a combined specificity ranging from 97.9%-99.0% for HIV and 97.2%-99.6% for syphilis. Concordance of testing results between two technicians and stability of testing results read within and one hour past the recommended reading period showed excellent agreement, with Kappa greater than or equal to 0.98. All the tests were found to be very or fairly easy to use and easy to interpret the results. Further evaluations of these dual RDTs with whole blood in field settings, and more studies on the implication of introduction of these tests in HIV and syphilis control programs are needed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS patients' knowledge on antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Flávia de Castro Almeida

    Full Text Available Lack of information on antiretroviral drugs or the misunderstanding of available information can facilitate incorrect use of such drugs. This can result in non-adherence to the prescribed regimen, leading to a great possibility of a therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to know which information HIV/AIDS patients, who receive their medicines at the pharmacy of a reference hospital in the northeast Brazil, have on the drugs they use, the source of this information and whether there is a need for additional information. A total of 195 HIV/AIDS patients, who were using either zidovudina + lamivudina 300+150mg (AZT+3TC, efavirenz 600mg (EFZ or lopinavir/ritonavir 133.33/33mg (LPV/r, were interviewed. The mean age was 41 years (SD = 9.55 and 70.8% were males. Of the total, 55.4% didn't know the effect of the drug in the organism; 35.9% were unaware of the necessity of taking antiretroviral drugs for the rest of their lives; only 14.4% knew how to proceed when a dosage was missed; 22.1% said they could die and the same number of individuals believed in aggravation of the disease in case of treatment interruption. The majority, 68.2%, considered it very necessary to receive drug information. The results show that there is an apparent lack of general information among users of antiretroviral drugs, and at the same time a need for it. It is necessary that all professionals involved in the health care of the patients agree that an efficient supply of information on prescribed drugs is an ethical component of the treatment that favors and fosters its adherence.

  15. Evaluation of reverse electrodialysis system with various compositions of natural resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kil Sung; Park, Byung Ho; Kim, Duk Han; Kim, Dae Joong [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Salinity gradient power (SGP) has attracted significant attention because of its high potential. In this study, we evaluate reverse electrodialysis (RED) with various compositions of available resources. The polarization curve (I-V characteristics) shows linear behavior, and therefore the power density curve has a parabolic shape. We measure the power density with varying compartment thicknesses and inlet flow rates. The gross power density increases with decreasing compartment thickness and increasing flow rate. The net power density, which is the gross power density minus the pumping power, has a maximum value at a compartment thickness of 0.2 mm and an inlet flow rate of 22.5 mL/min. The power density in RED is also evaluated with compositions of desalination brines, seawater, river water, wastewater, and brackish water. A maximum power density of 1.75W/m{sup 2} is obtained when brine discharged from forward osmosis (FO) and river water are used as the concentrated and the diluted solutions, respectively.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of stone fragments in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy using a time reversal operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used widely in the noninvasive treatment of kidney calculi. The fine fragments less than 2 mm in size can be discharged by urination, which determines the success of ESWL. Although ultrasonic and fluorescent imaging are used to localize the calculi, it's challenging to monitor the stone comminution progress, especially at the late stage of ESWL when fragments spread out as a cloud. The lack of real-time and quantitative evaluation makes this procedure semi-blind, resulting in either under- or over-treatment after the legal number of pulses required by FDA. The time reversal operator (TRO) method has the ability to detect point-like scatterers, and the number of non-zero eigenvalues of TRO is equal to that of the scatterers. In this study, the validation of TRO method to identify stones was illustrated from both numerical and experimental results for one to two stones with various sizes and locations. Furthermore, the parameters affecting the performance of TRO method has also been investigated. Overall, TRO method is effective in identifying the fragments in a stone cluster in real-time. Further development of a detection system and evaluation of its performance both in vitro and in vivo during ESWL is necessary for application.

  17. Purification and Characterization of a White Laccase with Pronounced Dye Decolorizing Ability and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Lepista nuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjuan Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A strain LN07 with high laccase yield was identified as basidiomycete fungus Lepista nuda from which a white laccase without type I copper was purified and characterized. The laccase was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 56 kDa. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was AIGPAADLHIVNKDISPDGF. Besides, eight inner peptide sequences were determined and lac4, lac5 and lac6 sequences were in the Cu2+ combination and conservation zones of laccases. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by the laccase with a half-inhibitory concentration of 0.65 μM. Cu2+ ions (1.5 mM enhanced the laccase production and the optimal pH and temperature of the laccase were pH 3.0 and 50 °C, respectively. The Km and Vmax of the laccase using ABTS as substrate were respectively 0.19 mM and 195 μM. Several dyes including laboratory dyes and textile dyes used in this study, such as Methyl red, Coomassie brilliant blue, Reactive brilliant blue and so on, were decolorized in different degrees by the purified laccase. By LC-MS analysis, Methyl red was structurally degraded by the laccase. Moreover, the laccase affected the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of many pesticides. Thus, the white laccase had potential commercial value for textile finishing and wastewater treatment.

  18. A comparison of the ability of rilpivirine (TMC278 and selected analogues to inhibit clinically relevant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Barry C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently approved anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine (TMC278, Edurant is a nonnucleoside inhibitor (NNRTI that binds to reverse transcriptase (RT and allosterically blocks the chemical step of DNA synthesis. In contrast to earlier NNRTIs, rilpivirine retains potency against well-characterized, clinically relevant RT mutants. Many structural analogues of rilpivirine are described in the patent literature, but detailed analyses of their antiviral activities have not been published. This work addresses the ability of several of these analogues to inhibit the replication of wild-type (WT and drug-resistant HIV-1. Results We used a combination of structure activity relationships and X-ray crystallography to examine NNRTIs that are structurally related to rilpivirine to determine their ability to inhibit WT RT and several clinically relevant RT mutants. Several analogues showed broad activity with only modest losses of potency when challenged with drug-resistant viruses. Structural analyses (crystallography or modeling of several analogues whose potencies were reduced by RT mutations provide insight into why these compounds were less effective. Conclusions Subtle variations between compounds can lead to profound differences in their activities and resistance profiles. Compounds with larger substitutions replacing the pyrimidine and benzonitrile groups of rilpivirine, which reorient pocket residues, tend to lose more activity against the mutants we tested. These results provide a deeper understanding of how rilpivirine and related compounds interact with the NNRTI binding pocket and should facilitate development of novel inhibitors.

  19. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrui; Zhang, Guoqing; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wang, Hexiang

    2010-01-01

    A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA) was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70°C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF7) cells with an IC50 of 56.1 μM and 76.5 μM, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7 μM. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity. PMID:20625408

  20. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanrui Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70∘C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2 and breast cancer (MCF7 cells with an IC50 of 56.1 M and 76.5 M, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7 M. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity.

  1. Experimental evaluation of ontology-based HIV/AIDS frequently asked question retrieval system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Yirsaw; Moeng, Barbara; Mosweunyane, Gontlafetse

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the results of experimental evaluations of an ontology-based frequently asked question retrieval system in the domain of HIV and AIDS. The main purpose of the system is to provide answers to questions on HIV/AIDS using ontology. To evaluate the effectiveness of the frequently asked question retrieval system, we conducted two experiments. The first experiment focused on the evaluation of the quality of the ontology we developed using the OQuaRE evaluation framework which is based on software quality metrics and metrics designed for ontology quality evaluation. The second experiment focused on evaluating the effectiveness of the ontology in retrieving relevant answers. For this we used an open-source information retrieval platform, Terrier, with retrieval models BM25 and PL2. For the measurement of performance, we used the measures mean average precision, mean reciprocal rank, and precision at 5. The results suggest that frequently asked question retrieval with ontology is more effective than frequently asked question retrieval without ontology in the domain of HIV/AIDS.

  2. Reversible reduction of nevirapine plasma concentrations during rifampicin treatment in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteelli, Alberto; Saleri, Nuccia; Villani, Paola; Bonkoungou, Victor; Carvalho, Anna Cristina C; Kouanda, Seni; Sanou, Marie J; Simporé, Jacques; Monno, Laura; Carosi, Giampiero; Regazzi, Mario; Dembele, Mathurin

    2009-09-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) plasma levels are reduced in patients receiving rifampicin (RFM) for tuberculosis (TB) treatment. We determined variations over time of the pharmacokinetic parameters of NVP in patients who receive RFM. HIV-1-infected patients with CD4+ T-lymphocyte count

  3. Community-based interventions that work to reduce HIV stigma and discrimination: results of an evaluation study in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aparna; Nuankaew, Ratana; Mongkholwiboolphol, Nungruthai; Banpabuth, Arunee; Tuvinun, Rachada; Oranop Na Ayuthaya, Pakprim; Richter, Kerry

    2013-11-13

    HIV stigma and discrimination are major issues affecting people living with HIV in their everyday lives. In Thailand, a project was implemented to address HIV stigma and discrimination within communities with four activities: (1) monthly banking days; (2) HIV campaigns; (3) information, education and communication (IEC) materials and (4) "Funfairs." This study evaluates the effect of project interventions on reducing community-level HIV stigma. A repeated cross-sectional design was developed to measure changes in HIV knowledge and HIV-related stigma domains among community members exposed to the project. Two cross-sectional surveys were implemented at baseline (respondent n=560) and endline (respondent n=560). T-tests were employed to assess changes on three stigma domains: fear of HIV infection through daily activity, shame associated with having HIV and blame towards people with HIV. Baseline scales were confirmed at endline, and each scale was regressed on demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge and exposure to intervention activities. No differences were observed in respondent characteristics at baseline and endline. Significant changes were observed in HIV transmission knowledge, fear of HIV infection and shame associated with having HIV from baseline to endline. Respondents exposed to three specific activities (monthly campaign, Funfair and IEC materials) were less likely to exhibit stigma along the dimensions of fear (3.8 points lower on average compared to respondents exposed to none or only one intervention; 95% CI: -7.3 to -0.3) and shame (4.1 points lower; 95% CI: -7.7 to -0.6), net of demographic controls and baseline levels of stigma. Personally knowing someone with HIV was associated with low fear and shame, and females were less likely to possess attitudes of shame compared to males. The multivariate linear models suggest that a combination of three interventions was critical in shifting community-level stigma--monthly campaign, Funfair and IEC

  4. ETV REPORT: EVALUATION OF HYDROMETRICS, INC., HIGH EFFICIENCY REVERSE OSMOSIS (HERO™) INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrometrics, founded in 1979 and located in Helena, MT, manufactures a commercial-ready High Efficiency Reverse Osmosis (HERO™) industrial wastewater treatment system. The system uses a three-stage reverse osmosis process to remove and concentrate metals for recovery while prod...

  5. Moving from the HIV Organ Policy Equity Act to HIV Organ Policy Equity in action: changing practice and challenging stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doby, Brianna L; Tobian, Aaron A R; Segev, Dorry L; Durand, Christine M

    2018-04-01

    The HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act, signed in 2013, reversed the federal ban on HIV-to-HIV transplantation. In this review, we examine the progress in HOPE implementation, the current status of HIV-to-HIV transplantation, and remaining challenges. Pursuant to the HOPE Act, the Department of Health and Human Services revised federal regulations to allow HIV-to-HIV transplants under research protocols adherent to criteria published by the National Institutes of Health. The first HIV-to-HIV kidney and liver transplants were performed at Johns Hopkins in March of 2016. Legal and practical challenges remain. Further efforts are needed to educate potential HIV+ donors and to support Organ Procurement Organizations. As of November 2017, there are 22 transplant centers approved to perform HIV-to-HIV transplants in 10 United Network for Organ Sharing regions. To date, 16 Organ Procurement Organizations in 22 states have evaluated HIV+ donors. The National Institutes of Health-funded HOPE in Action: A Multicenter Clinical Trial of HIV-to-HIV Deceased Donor (HIVDD) Kidney Transplantation Kidney Trial will launch at 19 transplant centers in December of 2017. A HOPE in Action Multicenter HIVDD Liver Trial is in development. Significant progress toward full HOPE implementation has been made though barriers remain. Some challenges are unique to HIV-HIV transplantation, whereas others are amplifications of issues across the current transplant system. In addition to a public health benefit for all transplant candidates in the United States, partnership on the HOPE Act has the potential to address systemic challenges to national donation and transplantation.

  6. Evaluation of the HIV lay counselling and testing profession in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwisongo, Aziza; Mehlomakhulu, Vuyelwa; Mohlabane, Neo; Peltzer, Karl; Mthembu, Jacque; Van Rooyen, Heidi

    2015-07-22

    With the launch of the national HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) campaign in South Africa (SA), lay HIV counsellors, who had been trained in blood withdrawal, have taken up the role of HIV testing. This study evaluated the experiences, training, motivation, support, supervision, and workload of HIV lay counsellors and testers in South Africa. The aim was to identify gaps in their resources, training, supervision, motivation, and workload related to HCT services. In addition it explored their experiences with providing HIV testing under the task shifting context. The study was conducted in eight of South Africa's nine provinces. 32 lay counsellors were recruited from 67 HCT sites, and were interviewed using two questionnaires that included structured and semi-structured questions. One questionnaire focused on their role as HIV counsellors and the other on their role as HIV testers. Ninety-seven percent of counsellors reported that they have received training in counselling and testing. Many rated their training as more than adequate or adequate, with 15.6% rating it as not adequate. Respondents reported a lack of standardised counselling and testing training, and revealed gaps in counselling skills for specific groups such as discordant couples, homosexuals, older clients and children. They indicated health system barriers, including inadequate designated space for counselling, which compromises privacy and confidentiality. Lay counsellors carry the burden of counselling and testing nationally, and have other tasks such as administration and auxiliary duties due to staff shortages. This study demonstrates that HCT counselling and testing services in South Africa are mainly performed by lay counsellors and testers. They are challenged by inadequate work space, limited counselling skills for specific groups, a lack of standardised training policies and considerable administrative and auxiliary duties. To improve HCT services, there needs to be training needs with a

  7. Economic Evaluation of a Hybrid Desalination System Combining Forward and Reverse Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yongjun; Cho, Hyeongrak; Shin, Yonghyun; Jang, Yongsun; Lee, Sangho

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of the forward osmosis (FO)–reverse osmosis (RO) hybrid process; to propose a guideline by which this hybrid process might be more price-competitive in the field. A solution-diffusion model modified with film theory was applied to analyze the effects of concentration polarization, water, and salt transport coefficient on flux, recovery, seawater concentration, and treated wastewater of the FO process of an FO-RO hybrid system. A simple cost model was applied to analyze the effects of flux; recovery of the FO process; energy; and membrane cost on the FO-RO hybrid process. The simulation results showed that the water transport coefficient and internal concentration polarization resistance are very important factors that affect performance in the FO process; however; the effect of the salt transport coefficient does not seem to be large. It was also found that the flux and recovery of the FO process, the FO membrane, and the electricity cost are very important factors that influence the water cost of an FO-RO hybrid system. This hybrid system can be price-competitive with RO systems when its recovery rate is very high, the flux and the membrane cost of the FO are similar to those of the RO, and the electricity cost is expensive. The most important thing in commercializing the FO process is enhancing performance (e.g.; flux and the recovery of FO membranes). PMID:26729176

  8. Evaluation of emerging contaminants in a drinking water treatment plant using electrodialysis reversal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarrón, S; Gernjak, W; Valero, F; Barceló, A; Petrovic, M; Rodríguez-Roda, I

    2016-05-15

    Emerging contaminants (EC) have gained much attention with globally increasing consumption and detection in aquatic ecosystems during the last two decades from ng/L to lower ug/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and related compounds in a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) treating raw water from the Mediterranean Llobregat River. The DWTP combined conventional treatment steps with the world's largest electrodialysis reversal (EDR) facility. 49 different PhACs, EDCs and related compounds were found above their limit of quantification in the influent of the DWTP, summing up to a total concentration of ECs between 1600-4200 ng/L. As expected, oxidation using chlorine dioxide and granular activated carbon filters were the most efficient technologies for EC removal. However, despite the low concentration detected in the influent of the EDR process, it was also possible to demonstrate that this process partially removed ionized compounds, thereby constituting an additional barrier against EC pollution in the product. In the product of the EDR system, only 18 out of 49 compounds were quantifiable in at least one of the four experimental campaigns, showing in all cases removals higher than 65% and often beyond 90% for the overall DWTP process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Reverse-Entry Ion Source Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltash, Michael L.; McCabe, Jacob W.; Patrick, John W.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Russell, David H.

    2018-05-01

    As a step towards development of a high-resolution ion mobility mass spectrometer using the orbitrap mass analyzer platform, we describe herein a novel reverse-entry ion source (REIS) coupled to the higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) cell of an orbitrap mass spectrometer with extended mass range. Development of the REIS is a first step in the development of a drift tube ion mobility-orbitrap MS. The REIS approach retains the functionality of the commercial instrument ion source which permits the uninterrupted use of the instrument during development as well as performance comparisons between the two ion sources. Ubiquitin (8.5 kDa) and lipid binding to the ammonia transport channel (AmtB, 126 kDa) protein complex were used as model soluble and membrane proteins, respectively, to evaluate the performance of the REIS instrument. Mass resolution obtained with the REIS is comparable to that obtained using the commercial ion source. The charge state distributions for ubiquitin and AmtB obtained on the REIS are in agreement with previous studies which suggests that the REIS-orbitrap EMR retains native structure in the gas phase.

  10. Mechanistic evaluation of the pros and cons of digital RT-LAMP for HIV-1 viral load quantification on a microfluidic device and improved efficiency via a two-step digital protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Shen, Feng; McCalla, Stephanie E; Kreutz, Jason E; Karymov, Mikhail A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2013-02-05

    Here we used a SlipChip microfluidic device to evaluate the performance of digital reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (dRT-LAMP) for quantification of HIV viral RNA. Tests are needed for monitoring HIV viral load to control the emergence of drug resistance and to diagnose acute HIV infections. In resource-limited settings, in vitro measurement of HIV viral load in a simple format is especially needed, and single-molecule counting using a digital format could provide a potential solution. We showed here that when one-step dRT-LAMP is used for quantification of HIV RNA, the digital count is lower than expected and is limited by the yield of desired cDNA. We were able to overcome the limitations by developing a microfluidic protocol to manipulate many single molecules in parallel through a two-step digital process. In the first step we compartmentalize the individual RNA molecules (based on Poisson statistics) and perform reverse transcription on each RNA molecule independently to produce DNA. In the second step, we perform the LAMP amplification on all individual DNA molecules in parallel. Using this new protocol, we increased the absolute efficiency (the ratio between the concentration calculated from the actual count and the expected concentration) of dRT-LAMP 10-fold, from ∼2% to ∼23%, by (i) using a more efficient reverse transcriptase, (ii) introducing RNase H to break up the DNA:RNA hybrid, and (iii) adding only the BIP primer during the RT step. We also used this two-step method to quantify HIV RNA purified from four patient samples and found that in some cases, the quantification results were highly sensitive to the sequence of the patient's HIV RNA. We learned the following three lessons from this work: (i) digital amplification technologies, including dLAMP and dPCR, may give adequate dilution curves and yet have low efficiency, thereby providing quantification values that underestimate the true concentration. Careful

  11. Evaluation of chirp reversal power modulation sequence for contrast agent imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novell, A; Sennoga, CA; Escoffre, JM; Chaline, J; Bouakaz, A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant research effort has been focused on the use of chirp for contrast agent imaging because chirps are known to significantly increase imaging contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). New imaging schemes, such as chirp reversal (CR), have been developed to improve contrast detection by increasing non-linear microbubble responses. In this study we evaluated the contrast enhancement efficiency of various chirped imaging sequences in combination with well-established imaging schemes such as power modulation (PM) and pulse inversion (PI). The imaging schemes tested were implemented on a fully programmable open scanner and evaluated by ultrasonically scanning (excitation frequency of 2.5 MHz; amplitude of 350 kPa) a tissue-mimicking flow phantom comprising a 4 mm diameter tube through which aqueous dispersions (dilution fraction of 1/2000) of the commercial ultrasound contrast agent, SonoVue ® were continuously circulated. The recovery of non-linear microbubble responses after chirp compression requires the development and the optimization of a specific filter. A compression filter was therefore designed and used to compress and extract several non-linear components from the received microbubble responses. The results showed that using chirps increased the image CNR by approximately 10 dB, as compared to conventional Gaussian apodized sine burst excitation but degraded the axial resolution by a factor of 1.4, at −3 dB. We demonstrated that the highest CNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CTR) were achievable when CR was combined with PM as compared to other imaging schemes such as PI. (paper)

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain ... brain. Research has shown that HIV causes greater injury to cells in the brain and cognitive impairment ...

  13. Evaluation of a rapid test for HIV antibodies in saliva and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To test whole blood and saliva for HIV antibodies (anti-HIV) using a rapid test strip capillary flow . immunoassay, and to correlate the test strip results with blood specimen results obtained from routine diagnostic antiHIV assays. Design. A prospective pilot study of selected HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals ...

  14. HIV shedding in cervico-vaginal secretions in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardella, Barbara; Roccio, Marianna; Maccabruni, Anna; Mariani, Bianca; Panzeri, Lucia; Zara, Francesca; Spinillo, Arsenio

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of HIV-1 in cervico-vaginal secretions of pregnant as compared to non-pregnant HIV-seropositive women. We compared 43 known HIV seropositive pregnant patients versus 241 age-matched (± 2 years) control non-pregnant HIV-seropositive subjects. In pregnant patients blood and cervico-vaginal samples were obtained during each trimester of pregnancy. In control subjects the same samples were obtained at enrolment. HIV-1 RNA was measured in plasma; proviral HIV-1 DNA, cell-associated and cell-free HIV-1 RNA in cervico-vaginal secretion by competitive polymerase chain reaction (cRT-PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR. The genital shedding of HIV-DNA (22/43 as compared to 79/241, p = 0.02), and cell-free HIV-RNA detection (26/43 as compared to 72/241, p pregnant than in non pregnant women. Pregnancy correlated with a significant positive trend in the cervico-vaginal load of HIV-DNA (Spearman Rho= 0.149, p= 0.012), and cell-free HIV-RNA (Spearman Rho= 0.253, p HIV-RNA transcripts (Spearman Rho = 0.06, p= 0.31). After correction for potential confounders, first trimester pregnant women had increased rates of genital HIV- DNA (odds ratio = 1.94, 95% confidence interval = 1.01 3.78) and cell-free HIV-RNA (odds ratio = 4.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.97 8.41) detection compared to nonpregnant controls. The shedding of genital HIV was increased in pregnant compared to non pregnant subjects, even in patients with undetectable viremia. In this low-risk HIV-positive population the risks of vertical or horizontal transmissions should not be underestimated.

  15. Non Castigat Ridendo Mores: evaluating the effectiveness of humor appeal in printed advertisements for HIV/AIDS prevention in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soscia, Isabella; Turrini, Alex; Tanzi, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of different emotional appeals in HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns using printed advertisements. More specifically, it examines the effectiveness of humor appeal compared with shock and fear appeals. The authors experimentally test the level of attention drawn and the spontaneous recall arising when young Italian adults are shown different HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns. Findings show that humor appeals are less effective than fear and shock appeals, evidencing the failures in HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns in Italy, a country where the former communication strategy has been used in substantive ways. The results also indicate the higher effectiveness of fear appeals (over shock and humor) in printed HIV/AIDS advertising campaigns. The implications of these results for further studies and for improving the design, implementation, and evaluation of HIV/AIDS campaign efforts are also discussed.

  16. Comparative evaluation of glasses reprocessing and reversible conditioning of calcinates; Evaluation comparative de la reprise des verres et du conditionnement reversible des calcinats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boen, R

    2000-01-15

    Fission products and minor actinides separated during the spent fuel reprocessing treatment are industrially vitrified on-line and thus confined inside a glass matrix with admittedly durability properties. In the framework of the feasibility of a reversible conditioning, this document examines first the possible alternative ways of conditioning and storage of calcinates before vitrification, which may simplify the reversibility aspect. Such a conditioning must be compatible with the storage process, with a possible extraction of actinides and long-lived fission products, and with the vitrification process if no extraction is performed. Calcinates are pulverulent and comprise an important soluble fraction, a proportion of nitrates of about 30%, and release a high thermal power (17 kW/m{sup 3}) combined to a low thermal conductivity (0.1 to 0.15 W.m{sup -1} k{sup -1}). Among the different foreseeable solutions (denitration, mixing with another material, with or without compacting, dissolution inside another material..), the dissolution inside a borate seems to be the most acceptable with respect to the safety, feasibility and vitrification aspects. The thermal aspect of the storage remains complex as a specific container is necessary. In a second part, this report analyzes the possibility to re-extract back the long-lived radionuclides from vitrified wastes. The different possible ways to destroy the glass structure and to transfer the fission products and minor actinides in an aqueous solution compatible with an hydrometallurgical separation process are explored. Two processes are foreseeable: a low temperature dissolution process which requires a preliminary crushing and the handling of huge amounts of acids, and a both high and low temperature process which comprises the following steps: melting, fractionation by water tempering, addition of Na{sub 2}O or sodium tetraborate to make it sensible to hot leaching, separation of fission products and minor actinides

  17. Multi-centred mixed-methods PEPFAR HIV care & support public health evaluation: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayers Peter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A public health response is essential to meet the multidimensional needs of patients and families affected by HIV disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In order to appraise curret provision of HIV care and support in East Africa, and to provide evidence-based direction to future care programming, and Public Health Evaluation was commissioned by the PEPFAR programme of the US Government. Methods/Design This paper described the 2-Phase international mixed methods study protocol utilising longitudinal outcome measurement, surveys, patient and family qualitative interviews and focus groups, staff qualitative interviews, health economics and document analysis. Aim 1 To describe the nature and scope of HIV care and support in two African countries, including the types of facilities available, clients seen, and availability of specific components of care [Study Phase 1]. Aim 2 To determine patient health outcomes over time and principle cost drivers [Study Phase 2]. The study objectives are as follows. 1 To undertake a cross-sectional survey of service configuration and activity by sampling 10% of the facilities being funded by PEPFAR to provide HIV care and support in Kenya and Uganda (Phase 1 in order to describe care currently provided, including pharmacy drug reviews to determine availability and supply of essential drugs in HIV management. 2 To conduct patient focus group discussions at each of these (Phase 1 to determine care received. 3 To undertake a longitudinal prospective study of 1200 patients who are newly diagnosed with HIV or patients with HIV who present with a new problem attending PEPFAR care and support services. Data collection includes self-reported quality of life, core palliative outcomes and components of care received (Phase 2. 4 To conduct qualitative interviews with staff, patients and carers in order to explore and understand service issues and care provision in more depth (Phase 2. 5 To undertake document

  18. Nutrition evaluation in HIV seropositive patients using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS (PLWHA) in low-income settings depends onan awareness of the available and reliable tools. Objectives: The study was designed to compare the nutritional status evaluation of PLWHA using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool ...

  19. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jaya, Ziningi; Drain, Paul K.; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. Material and methods We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and couns...

  20. Laboratory Evaluation of the Alere q Point-of-Care System for Early Infant HIV Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Nei-yuan; Dunning, Lorna; Kroon, Max; Myer, Landon

    2016-01-01

    Early infant diagnosis (EID) and prompt linkage to care are critical to minimise the high morbidity and mortality associated with infant HIV infection. Attrition in the "EID cascade" is common; however, point-of-care (POC) EID assays with same-day result could facilitate prompt linkage of HIV-infected infant to treatment. Despite a number of POC EID assays in development, few have been independently evaluated and data on new technologies are urgently needed to inform policy. We compared Alere q 1/2 Detect POC system laboratory test characteristics with the local standard of care (SOC), Roche CAP/CTM HIV-1 qualitative PCR in an independent laboratory-based evaluation in Cape Town, South Africa. Routinely EID samples collected between November 2013 and September 2014 were each tested by both SOC and POC systems. Repeat testing was done to troubleshoot any discrepancy between POC and SOC results. Overall, 1098 children with a median age of 47 days (IQR, 42-117) were included. Birth PCR (age laboratory. The high specificity and thus high positive predictive value would suggest a positive POC result may be adequate for immediate infant ART initiation. While POC testing for EID may have particular utility for birth testing at delivery facilities, the lower sensitivity and error rate requires further attention, as does field implementation of POC EID technologies in other clinical care settings.

  1. Evaluation of using ferrofluid as an interface material for a field-reversible thermal connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Ahmed S.

    conduction heat transfer path. Having started as a student design competition named RevCon Challenge, work was performed to evaluate the use of new field-reversible thermal connectors. The new design proposed by the University of Missouri utilized oil based iron nanoparticles, commonly known as a ferrofluid, as a thermal interface material. By using a liquid type of interface material the channel gap can be reduced to a few micrometers, within machining tolerances, and heat can be dissipated off both sides of the card. The addition of nanoparticles improves the effective thermal conductivity of base fluid. The use of iron nanoparticles allows magnets to be used to hold the fluid in place, so the electronic cards may be easily inserted and removed while keeping the ferrofluid in the cold block channel. The ferrofluid-based design which was investigated has shown lower thermal resistance than the current wedgelock design. These results open the door for further development of electronic cards by using higher heat emitting components without compromising the simplicity of attaching/detaching cards from cooling plates.

  2. Evaluating 5 years' NIMART mentoring in South Africa's HIV treatment programme: Successes, challenges and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Cameron, D

    2017-09-22

    Task shifting has enabled South Africa (SA) to rapidly expand its HIV treatment programme. This has been achieved by training and mentoring primary-care nurses in nurse initiation and management of antiretroviral therapy (NIMART). Five years into its clinical mentoring programme, the Foundation for Professional Development conducted an evaluation that identified improved knowledge, attitudes and confidence perceived by nurses who received NIMART mentoring. Low completion rates for the Department of Health (DoH) NIMART training process were identified and therefore targeted mentoring was introduced; this increased the percentage of primary nurses eligible for DoH certificates of clinical competence in NIMART from 12%, adding a further 30%. There remain a large number of primary nurses who require mentoring in order to complete the NIMART process. For those who have completed the process, there remains a need for ongoing mentoring as SA's HIV programme evolves, complex cases emerge and primary care undergoes change.

  3. Doppler echocardiographic evaluation of HIV-positive patients in different stages of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werneck Guilherme Lobosco

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: To evaluate by Doppler echocardiography (DE early abnormalities of ventricular function in HIV-positive patients, as well as other cardiac abnormalities that can be detected by this method, with special emphasis on mitral valve flow. METHODS: 84 HIV- positive patients, 59 with CD4 cell count >500/mm³ (Group A and 25 with CD4 cell count 500/mm³ had no abnormalities by DE. Patients with a more advanced infection (those with a CD4 cell count <500/mm³, had a significantly abnormal LV systolic function and a higher incidence of pericardial effusion and mitral regurgitation. Mitral valve inflow by Doppler did not indicate diastolic dysfunction.

  4. Ex vivo reversal of effects of rivaroxaban evaluated using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, B.; Würtinger, P.; Streif, W.; Sturm, W.; Fries, D.; Bachler, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In major bleeding events, the new direct oral anticoagulants pose a great challenge for physicians. The aim of the study was to test for ex vivo reversal of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban with various non-specific reversal agents: prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), and fibrinogen concentrate (FI). Methods Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients treated with rivaroxaban. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with rivaroxaban to test the correlation between rivaroxaban concentration and coagulation tests. Patient blood samples were spiked with various concentrations of the above-mentioned agents and analysed using thromboelastometry and thrombin generation. Results When added in vitro, rivaroxaban was significantly (P<0.05) correlated with ROTEM® thromboelastometry EXTEM (extrinsic coagulation pathway) clotting time (CT), time to maximal velocity (MaxV−t), and with all measured thrombin generation parameters. In vivo, CT, MaxV−t, lag time, and peak thrombin generation (Cmax) were significantly correlated with rivaroxaban concentrations. Regarding reversal of rivaroxaban, all tested agents significantly (P<0.05) reduced EXTEM CT, but to different extents: rFVIIa by 68%, aPCC by 47%, PCC by 17%, and FI by 9%. Only rFVIIa reversed EXTEM CT to baseline values. Both PCC (+102%) and aPCC (+232%) altered overall thrombin generation (area under the curve) and increased Cmax (+461% for PCC, +87.5% for aPCC). Conclusions Thromboelastometry and thrombin generation assays do not favour the same reversal agents for rivaroxaban anticoagulation. Controlled clinical trials are urgently needed to establish doses and clinical efficacy of potential reversal agents. Clinical trial registration EudracCT trial no. 213-00474-30. PMID:27623677

  5. [Treatment of proximal humeral fractures by reverse shoulder arthroplasty: mid-term evaluation of functional results and Notching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Elena, J; de la Red-Gallego, M Á; Garcés-Zarzalejo, C; Pascual-Carra, M A; Pérez-Aguilar, M D; Rodríguez-López, T; Alfonso-Fernández, A; Pérez-Núñez, M I

    2015-01-01

    An analysis was made on relationship between Notching and functional and radiographic parameters after treatment of acute proximal humeral fractures with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. A retrospective evaluation was performed on 37 patients with acute proximal humeral fracture treated by reversed shoulder arthroplasty. The mean follow-up was 24 months. Range of motion, intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded. Nerot's classification was used to evaluate Notching. Patient satisfaction was evaluated with the Constant Score (CS). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between Notching and glenosphere position, or functional outcomes. Mean range of elevation, abduction, external and internal rotation were 106.22°, 104.46°, 46.08° and 40.27°, respectively. Mean CS was 63. Notching was present at 12 months in 29% of patients. Statistical analysis showed significance differences between age and CS, age and notching development, and tilt with notching. No statistical significance differences were found between elevation, abduction, internal and external rotation and CS either with scapular or glenosphere-neck angle. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a valuable option for acute humeral fractures in patients with osteoporosis and cuff-tear arthropathy. It leads to early pain relief and shoulder motion. Nevertheless, it is not exempt from complications, and long-term studies are needed to determine the importance of notching. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Administrative integration of vertical HIV monitoring and evaluation into health systems: a case study from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawonga, Mary; Fonn, Sharon; Blaauw, Duane

    2013-01-24

    In light of an increasing global focus on health system strengthening and integration of vertical programmes within health systems, methods and tools are required to examine whether general health service managers exercise administrative authority over vertical programmes. To measure the extent to which general health service (horizontal) managers, exercise authority over the HIV programme's monitoring and evaluation (M&E) function, and to explore factors that may influence this exercise of authority. This cross-sectional survey involved interviews with 51 managers. We drew ideas from the concept of 'exercised decision-space' - traditionally used to measure local level managers' exercise of authority over health system functions following decentralisation. Our main outcome measure was the degree of exercised authority - classified as 'low', 'medium' or 'high' - over four M&E domains (HIV data collection, collation, analysis, and use). We applied ordinal logistic regression to assess whether actor type (horizontal or vertical) was predictive of a higher degree of exercised authority, independent of management capacity (training and experience), and M&E knowledge. Relative to vertical managers, horizontal managers had lower HIV M&E knowledge, were more likely to exercise a higher degree of authority over HIV data collation (OR 7.26; CI: 1.9, 27.4), and less likely to do so over HIV data use (OR 0.19; CI: 0.05, 0.84). A higher HIV M&E knowledge score was predictive of a higher exercised authority over HIV data use (OR 1.22; CI: 0.99, 1.49). There was no association between management capacity and degree of authority. This study demonstrates a HIV M&E model that is neither fully vertical nor integrated. The HIV M&E is characterised by horizontal managers producing HIV information while vertical managers use it. This may undermine policies to strengthen integrated health system planning and management under the leadership of horizontal managers.

  7. Mild desalination demo pilot: New normalization approach to effectively evaluate electrodialysis reversal technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel Bisselink

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Key performance indicators for characterization of nanofiltration performance are well developed, similar key performance indicators for electrodialysis reversal are however underdeveloped. Under the E4Water project Dow Benelux BV and Evides Industriewater BV operate a pilot facility to compare both technologies for their application to mildly desalinate a variety of brackish water streams. Normalized pressure drop, normalized current efficiency and normalized membrane resistance proved to be a useful tool to interpret process performance and to initiate a cleaning procedure if required. The availability of these normalized key performance indicators enables optimization and process monitoring and control of electrodialysis reversal independent of the continuously changing conditions of the feed water.

  8. An evaluation of quality of life and its determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susane Müller Klug Passos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study evaluated the quality of life and its associated factors among people living with HIV/AIDS at a regional reference center for the treatment of HIV/AIDS in southern Brazil. WHOQOL-HIV Bref, ASSIST 2.0, HAD Scale, and a questionnaire were used to assess 625 participants on quality of life, clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, drug use, depression and anxiety. Multivariate analysis was performed through linear regression. The lowest results for quality of life were associated with being female, age (< 47 years, low education levels, low socioeconomic class, unemployment, not having a stable relationship, signs of anxiety and depression, abuse or addiction of psychoactive substances, lack of perceived social support, never taking antiretroviral medication, lipodystrophy, comorbidities, HIV related hospitalizations and a CD4+ cell count less than 350. Psychosocial factors should be included in the physical and clinical evaluation given their strong association with quality of life domains.

  9. Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the D:A:D study: a multi-cohort collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabin, Caroline A; Worm, Signe W; Weber, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    cohort of HIV-infected patients. METHODS: We used Poisson regression models to quantify the relation between cumulative, recent (currently or within the preceding 6 months), and past use of zidovudine, didanosine, stavudine, lamivudine, and abacavir and development of myocardial infarction in 33 347......BACKGROUND: Whether nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors increase the risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals is unclear. Our aim was to explore whether exposure to such drugs was associated with an excess risk of myocardial infarction in a large, prospective observational...... patients enrolled in the D:A:D study. We adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors that are unlikely to be affected by antiretroviral therapy, cohort, calendar year, and use of other antiretrovirals. FINDINGS: Over 157,912 person-years, 517 patients had a myocardial infarction. We found no associations...

  10. Factors associated with the use of irreversible contraception and continuous use of reversible contraception in a cohort of HIV-positive women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kancheva Landolt, Nadia; Ramautarsing, Reshmie Ashmanie; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Effective contraception can be lifesaving by reducing maternal mortality linked to childbirth and unsafe abortion and by reducing vertical and horizontal transmission of HIV, in the case of an HIV-positive woman. This study is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. We assessed factors

  11. Managing dependencies in forest offset projects: toward a more complete evaluation of reversal risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M Cooley; Chrsitopher S Galik; Thomas P Holmes; Carolyn Kousky; Roger M Cooke

    2011-01-01

    Although forest carbon offsets can play an important role in the implementation of comprehensive climate policy, they also face an inherent risk of reversal. If such risks are positively correlated across projects, it can affect the integrity of larger project portfolios and potentially the entire offsets program. Here, we discuss three types of risks that could affect...

  12. Mild desalination demopilot : New normalization approach to effectively evaluate electrodialysis reversal technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisselink, R.; Schepper, W. de; Trampé, J.; Broek, W. van den; Pinel, P.; Krutko, A.; Groot, N.

    2016-01-01

    Key performance indicators for characterization of nanofiltration performance are well developed, similar key performance indicators for electrodialysis reversal are however underdeveloped. Under the E4Water project Dow Benelux BV and Evides Industriewater BV operate a pilot facility to compare both

  13. Evaluation of the toxicity and reversibility profile of the aqueous seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hunteria umbellata (K. Schum.) Hallier f. (family: Apocynaceae) is reputed for the folkloric management of labour, pain and swellings, stomach ulcers, diabetes, obesity, and anaemia, with no scientific report of its toxicity and reversibility profile. The present study was, therefore, aimed at investigating the in vivo toxicity and ...

  14. Histopathologic evaluation of the effects of etodolac in established adjuvant arthritis in rats: evidence for reversal of joint damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichman, B M; Chau, T T; Rona, G

    1987-04-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of hindpaws from control rats with established adjuvant arthritis showed severe alterations in soft tissue and bone, as well as progressive, moderate-to-severe articular changes. Following treatment with etodolac for 28 days, soft tissue and articular changes were rated mild, and bone changes were rated moderate, but with remodeling. These findings indicate that etodolac partially reversed the joint damage in these rats.

  15. Comparison of techniques to evaluate the quantification of Candida spp. in HIV-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Daniella Ferraz; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Soares, Rosangela Maria De Araujo; De Souza, Ivete Pomarico Ribeiro; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to compare techniques used to make a quantified evaluation of Candida spp. in children infected with HIV. Twenty-four HIV-infected children (age 3 to 13) were selected. Three sterilized swabs were used for each child: one for the dorsum of the tongue, one for the hard palate mucosa, and one for the right jugal mucosa; each swab was rubbed for 10 seconds and transferred to sterilized test tubes containing 1 mL of 0.9% saline solution. Candida spp. growth was observed in 95.8% of all samples, including 95.7% of tongue samples (Group T), 87.0% of saliva samples, 56.6% of hard palate mucosa samples (Group P), and 47.8% of right jugal mucosa samples (Group J). There was no statistical difference in Candida spp. growth between saliva samples and Group T samples, although both had higher growth compared to Groups P and J (p < 0.05; chi(2)). Regarding the sensitivity of each site for positive Candida spp. growth, Group T samples showed 69.5%, while saliva samples showed 52.2%, Group P samples showed 21.7%, and Group J samples showed 13.04%, with no significant statistical difference between Group T and saliva; however, both were more sensitive than Groups J and P (p < 0.05, chi(2)). It was concluded that whole stimulated saliva and swabbing the tongue were considered satisfactory for measuring Candida spp. in HIV-infected children.

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of antiviral activities of novel sonochemical silver nanorods against HIV and HSV viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Etemadzade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of novel sonochemical silver nanorods on HIV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 viruses in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Methods: The formation of silver nanorods conjugated with sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (Ag-MES was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. The antiviral activity of this Ag-MES was examined against HIV and HSV-1 virus replication. Results: The characterizations of Ag-MES and physiochemical structure were determined by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. Approximately entire viral replication was inhibited by Ag-MES at 10 µmol/mL concentration. About 90% of HSV virions failed to replicate in the present of this concentration of nanorods. However, HIV showed more sensitivity to Ag-MES than HSV-1. Conclusions: According to the obtained data, the synthesized sonochemical silver nanorod in this study is a promising candidate for further drug discovery investigation.

  17. Evaluation of motor and cognitive development among infants exposed to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kaitiana Martins; de Sá, Cristina Dos Santos Cardoso; Carvalho, Raquel

    2017-02-01

    This study of a prospective and cross-sectional nature compared the motor and cognitive development of HIV-exposed and unexposed infants in their first 18months of age. 40 infants exposed to HIV and antiretroviral therapy (Experimental Group - EG) and 40 unexposed infants (Control Group - CG) participated in the study. They were divided into four age groups of 4, 8, 12 and 18months old, with 10 infants from EG and 10 from CG in each group. The infants were evaluated once on motor and cognitive development by the Bayley Scale of Infant and Toddler Development. Performance category grading and comparisons among scaled score, composite score and percentile rank were held. There was significant group effect for scores in motor and cognitive domains showing lower scores for EG regardless of age. In comparison to the CG, the EG presented lower scores for cognitive domain at 8 and 18months. In the performance categories, all infants were classified at or above the average for motor and cognitive development, except of one EG-18month old infant classified as borderline for motor development. Infants exposed to HIV and antiretroviral therapy own adequate cognitive and motor development in the first 18months. However, the lower scores found, particularly on the 8th and 18th month for cognitive development, may indicate future problems, highlighting the need for systematic follow-up of this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of a needle social marketing strategy to control HIV among injecting drug users in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zunyou; Luo, Wei; Sullivan, Sheena G; Rou, Keming; Lin, Peng; Liu, Wei; Ming, Zhongqiang

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a needle social marketing strategy to reduce needle sharing and hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV transmission among injecting drug users (IDU) in China. Two-armed, prospective, community-randomized prevention trial. Four counties/townships in Guangxi and Guangdong provinces; one randomized to intervention the other to control in each province. Injecting drug users: 823 (443 intervention, 382 control) at baseline and 852 (415 intervention, 407 control) at the second cross-sectional survey 12 months later. A needle social marketing programme, including promotion of safe injection norms and increased access to clean needles over a 12 month period. Cross sectional surveys at baseline and follow-up compared changes in drug using behaviours and HIV and HCV rates in the intervention and control communities. Needle sharing behaviours were similar in the two groups at baseline (68.4 vs. 67.8%), and dropped significantly to 35.3% in the intervention community and remained relatively stable in the control community (62.3%; P marketing can reduce risky injecting behaviour and HIV/HCV transmission among injecting drug users in China and should be expanded.

  19. Reducing HIV risk among transgender women in Thailand: a quasi-experimental evaluation of the sisters program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangta Pawa

    Full Text Available Transgender women are particularly at risk of HIV infection, but little evidence exists on effective HIV prevention strategies with this population. We evaluated whether Sisters, a peer-led program for transgender women, could reduce HIV risks in Pattaya, Thailand. The study used time-location sampling to recruit 308 transgender women in Pattaya into a behavioral survey in 2011. Coarsened exact matching was used to create statistically equivalent groups of program participants and non-participants, based on factors influencing likelihood of program participation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated effects of any program participation and participation by delivery channel on: condom use at last sex; consistent condom and condom/water-based lubricant use in the past 3 months with commercial, casual, and regular partners; and receipt of HIV testing in the past 6 months. Program coverage reached 75% of the population. In a matched sub-sample (n = 238, participation in outreach was associated with consistent condom/water-based lubricant use with commercial partners (AOR 3.22, 95% CI 1.64-6.31. Attendance at the Sisters drop-in center was associated with receiving an HIV test (AOR 2.58, 95% CI 1.47-4.52. Dedicated transgender-friendly programs are effective at reducing HIV risks and require expansion to better serve this key population and improve HIV prevention strategies.

  20. The development of a screening tool to evaluate gross motor function in HIV-infected infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Nicole; Potterton, Joanne; Stewart, Aimee; Becker, Piet

    2011-12-01

    Neurodevelopmental delay or HIV encephalopathy is a stage four disease indicator for paediatric HIV/AIDS according to the World Health Organisation (WHO), and may be used as a criterion for initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To date, the only means of prevention of this condition is early initiation of HAART. Studies which have been carried out in South African clinics have revealed the high prevalence of this condition. In developing countries, commencement of HAART is based on declining virologic and immunologic status, as standardised neurodevelopmental assessment tools are not widely available. A standardised developmental screening tool which is suitable for use in a developing country is therefore necessary in order to screen for neurodevelopmental delay to allow for further assessment and referral to rehabilitation services, as well as providing an additional assessment criterion for initiation of HAART. The infant gross motor screening test (IGMST) was developed for this purpose. The standardisation sample of the IGMST consisted of 112 HIV-infected infants between six and 18 months of age. Item selection for the IGMST was based on the Gross Motor scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID)-III. Content validity was assessed by a panel of experts using a nominal group technique (NGT; agreement >80%). Concurrent validity (n=60) of the IGMST was carried out against the BSID-III, and agreement was excellent (K=0.85). The diagnostic properties of the IGMST were evaluated and revealed: sensitivity 97.4%, specificity 85.7%, positive predictive value (PPV) 92.7%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 94.7%. Reliability testing (n=30) revealed inter-rater reliability as: r=1, test-retest reliability: r=0.98 and intra-rater reliability: r=0.98. The results indicate that the statistical properties of the IGMST are excellent, and the tool is suitable for use within the paediatric HIV setting.

  1. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D.; Mislak, Andrea C.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3′-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3′-hydroxyl-containing RT inh...

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of Reversible and Time-Dependent Inhibitory Effects of Kalanchoe crenata on CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awortwe, Charles; Manda, Vamshi K; Avonto, Cristina; Khan, Shabana I; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Bouic, Patrick J; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Kalanchoe crenata popularly known as "dog's liver" is used in most African countries for the treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma and HIV/AIDS related infections. The evaluation of K. crenata for herb-drug interactions has not been reported. This study therefore aims to evaluate the risk of K. crenata for herb-drug interaction in vitro. Crude methanol and fractions of K. crenata were incubated and preincubated with recombinant human CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Comparative studies were conducted in both human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYP to ascertain the inhibition profile of the crude extract and the various fractions. The cocktail approach of recombinant human CYPs was conducted to confirm the inhibition potential of the fractions in the presence of other CYPs. The results showed significant time-dependent inhibition of tested samples on CYP3A4 with crude methanol (39KC), fractions 45A, 45B and 45D given IC50 fold decrease of 3.29, 2.26, 1.91 and 1.49, respective. Time dependent kinetic assessment of 39KC and 45D showed KI and kinact values for 39KC as 1.77 µg/mL and 0.091 min(-1) while that of 45D were 6.45 µg/mL and 0.024 min(-1), respectively. Determination of kinact based on IC50 calculations yielded 0.015 and 0.04 min(-1) for 39KC and 45D, respectively. Cocktail approach exhibited fold decreases in IC50 for all test fractions on CYP3A4 within the ranges of 2.10 - 4.10. At least one phytoconstituent in the crude methanol extract of Kalanchoe crenata is a reversible and time-dependent inhibitor of CYP3A4.

  3. Chemical evaluation and treatment of ground water for university town Peshawar, Pakistan by reverse osmosis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saddique, M.; Gilani, S.N.; Ishaq, M.; Gul, F.

    2012-01-01

    Present study is focused on the ground water treatment for the University Town Peshawar by reverse osmosis technology, based on the principle of reverse-osmosis pure water and ultra pure water filtration. Water collected from three locations was analyzed. The results showed that the first two water samples were neutral having pH 7.09 and 7.16 comparable with the range (6.50-8.50), while the pH for the water sample getting purified and passed from RO process was 5.33 i.e. slightly acidic. The ionic content of the water sample was low, whereas the conductivity ranged from 624-634 micro S/cm for the first two samples and reduced to 1.37 muS/cm. The parameters investigated are below the safety baseline levels of the national and international standards with the exception of Pb. (author)

  4. Full Viral Suppression, Low-Level Viremia, and Quantifiable Plasma HIV-RNA at the End of Pregnancy in HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroncelli, Silvia; Pirillo, Maria F; Tamburrini, Enrica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pinnetti, Carmela; Degli Antoni, Anna; Galluzzo, Clementina M; Stentarelli, Chiara; Amici, Roberta; Floridia, Marco

    2015-07-01

    There is limited information on full viral suppression and low-level HIV-RNA viremia in HIV-infected women at the end of pregnancy. We investigated HIV-RNA levels close to delivery in women on antiretroviral treatment in order to define rates of complete suppression, low-level viremia, and quantifiable HIV-RNA, exploring as potential determinants some clinical and viroimmunological variables. Plasma samples from a national study in Italy, collected between 2003 and 2012, were used. According to plasma HIV-RNA levels, three groups were defined: full suppression (target not detected), low-level viremia (target detected but HIV-RNA (≥37 copies/ml). Multivariable logistic regression was used to define determinants of full viral suppression and of quantifiable HIV-RNA. Among 107 women evaluated at a median gestational age of 35 weeks, 90 (84.1%) had HIV-RNA HIV-RNA was 109 copies/ml (IQR 46-251), with only one case showing resistance (mutation M184V; rate: 9.1%). In multivariable analyses, women with higher baseline HIV-RNA levels and with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection were significantly more likely to have quantifiable HIV-RNA in late pregnancy. Full viral suppression was significantly more likely with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimens and significantly less likely with higher HIV-RNA in early pregnancy. No cases of HIV transmission occurred. In conclusion, HIV-infected pregnant women showed a high rate of viral suppression and a low resistance rate before delivery. In most cases no target HIV-RNA was detected in plasma, suggesting a low risk of subsequent virological rebound and development of resistance. Women with high levels of HIV-RNA in early pregnancy and those who have concomitant HCV infection should be considered at higher risk of having quantifiable HIV-RNA at the end of pregnancy.

  5. Prevalence of the subclinical sinus disease in HIV positive patients evaluated by the computed tomography versus a control population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, E.; Valette, M.; Ajana, F.; Gerard, Y.; Alfandari, S.; Chidiac, C.; Mouton, Y.

    1997-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of subclinical sinus disease in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cerebral computed tomography scans (CCT) done at the Tourcoing hospital over an 18-month period in 139 HIV-positive patients and 140 control patients without evidence of active sinus disease were reviewed retrospectively. CCTs were evaluated independently by two physicians who were blinded to clinical data. Mucosal thickening and/or a full patients (20/139, 14.4%) than in the controls (8/140, 5.7%) (p=0.016). Mucosal thickening was the most common abnormality in both groups. CD4+cell counts were not correlated with the radiographic abnormalities studies. These radiographic data suggest that subclinical chronic sinusitis independent from the degree of immune deficiency may be more common in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative subjects. (author)

  6. Developing a Motion Comic for HIV/STD Prevention for Young People Ages 15-24, Part 2: Evaluation of a Pilot Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Leigh A; Kachur, Rachel; Castellanos, Ted J; Nichols, Kristen; Mendoza, Maria C B; Gaul, Zaneta J; Spikes, Pilgrim; Gamayo, Ashley C; Durham, Marcus D; LaPlace, Lisa; Straw, Julie; Staatz, Colleen; Buge, Hadiza; Hogben, Matthew; Robinson, Susan; Brooks, John; Sutton, Madeline Y

    2018-03-01

    In the United States, young people (ages 15-24 years) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), due at least in part to inadequate or incorrect HIV/STD-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions (KABI). Comic book narratives are a proven method of HIV/STD prevention communication to strengthen KABI for HIV/STD prevention. Motion comics, a new type of comic media, are an engaging and low-cost means of narrative storytelling. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot six-episode HIV/STD-focused motion comic series to improve HIV/STD-related KABI among young people. We assessed change in HIV/STD knowledge, HIV stigma, condom attitudes, HIV/STD testing attitudes, and behavioral intentions among 138 participants in 15 focus groups immediately before and after viewing the motion comic series. We used paired t-tests and indicators of overall improvement to assess differences between surveys. We found a significant decrease in HIV stigma (p comic intervention improved HIV/STD-related KABI of young adult viewers by reducing HIV stigma and increasing behavioral intentions to engage in safer sex. Our results demonstrate the promise of this novel intervention and support its use to deliver health messages to young people.

  7. Evaluation of HBsAg and anti-HBc assays in saliva and dried blood spot samples according HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Geane Lopes; Cruz, Helena Medina; Potsch, Denise Vigo; May, Silvia Beatriz; Brandão-Mello, Carlos Eduardo; Pires, Marcia Maria Amendola; Pilotto, Jose Henrique; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2017-09-01

    Influence of HIV status in HBV markers detection in saliva and dried blood spots (DBS) was not well established. This study aims to evaluate the performance of optimized commercial immunoassay for identifying HBsAg and anti-HBc in saliva and DBS according HIV status. A sum of 535 individuals grouped as HIV + , HBV + , HIV/HBV + and HIV/HBV- were recruited where 347 and 188 were included for HBsAg and anti-HBc evaluation, respectively. Serum, DBS collected in Whatman 903 paper and saliva obtained using salivette device were analyzed using EIA. Increased sample volume and ROC curve analysis for cut off determination were used for DBS and saliva testing. HBsAg detection in saliva and DBS exhibited sensitivities of 80.9% and 85.6% and specificities of 86.8% and 96.3%. Sensitivity of anti-HBc in saliva and DBS were 82.4% and 76.9% and specificities in saliva and DBS were 96.9% and 91.7%. Low sensitivities were observed for HBsAg (62%) and anti-HBc (47%) detection in saliva of HIV/HBV+ individuals. OD values were also lower for HBsAg detection in DBS and saliva of HIV/HBV+ individuals compared to their serum samples. Statistical significance was found for sensitivities in HBsAg detection between saliva and DBS demonstrating high sensitivity for DBS specimens. In conclusion, HIV status or antiretroviral treatment appears to interfere in the performance of HBsAg and anti-HBc detection in DBS and saliva samples using the adapted commercial EIA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of Blood-Based Antibody Rapid Testing for HIV Early Therapy: A Meta-Analysis of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Huang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWestern blot (WB assay is considered the gold standard test for HIV infection confirmation. However, it requires technical expertise and is quite time-consuming. WHO recommends blood-based rapid diagnosis to achieve same-day test and treatment. However, this rapid testing strategy has not been promoted worldwide due to inadequate research evaluating the effectiveness of rapid tests (RTs as an alternative confirmatory HIV test for WB. This study aims to compare the diagnostic performance of rapid HIV tests compared with WB.MethodsPubMed and Web of Science were searched for publications on rapid HIV tests using blood specimen. A meta-analysis was performed to quantitatively evaluate the diagnostic performance of rapid HIV tests compared with the WB assay in terms of pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC curve, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR.ResultsTwenty articles involving 27,343 fresh specimens for rapid HIV tests were included in the meta-analysis. Regarding Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, area under SROC curve, and DOR derived from six studies were 0.999 (95% CI, 0.956–1.000, 0.999 (95% CI, 0.991–1.00, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.99–1.00, and 1.0 × 106 (95% CI, 2.6 × 104–3.9 × 107 compared with the WB assay, respectively. With respect to Determine HIV-1/2, the pooled sensitivity, specificity area under SROC, and DOR derived from eight studies were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.789–1.000, 0.992 (95% CI, 0.985–0.996, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.99–1.00, and 1.8 × 106 (95% CI 406.049–7.8 × 109 compared with the WB assay, respectively. Regarding two-step serial RTs, the pooled sensitivity, specificity area under SROC, and DOR derived from eight studies were 0.998 (95% CI, 0.991–1.000, 0.998 (95% CI, 0.994–0.999, and 1.00 (95% CI 0.99–1.00 compared with the WB assay, respectively.ConclusionOur meta-analysis results may provide evidenced-based support

  9. Development and formative evaluation of a family-centred adolescent HIV prevention programme in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Maretha; Thurman, Tonya R; Spyrelis, Alexandra; Taylor, Tory M; Nice, Johanna K; Finestone, Michelle

    2018-03-06

    Preventing HIV among young people is critical to achieving and sustaining global epidemic control. Evidence from Western settings suggests that family-centred prevention interventions may be associated with greater reductions in risk behaviour than standard adolescent-only models. Despite this, family-centred models for adolescent HIV prevention are nearly non-existent in South Africa - home to more people living with HIV than any other country. This paper describes the development and formative evaluation of one such intervention: an evidence-informed, locally relevant, adolescent prevention intervention engaging caregivers as co-participants. The programme, originally consisting of 19 sessions for caregivers and 14 for adolescents, was piloted with 12 groups of caregiver-adolescent dyads by community-based organizations (CBOs) in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces. Literature and expert reviews were employed in the development process, and evaluation methods included analysis of attendance records, session-level fidelity checklists and facilitator feedback forms collected during the programme pilot. Facilitator focus group discussions and an implementer programme workshop were also held. Results highlighted the need to enhance training content related to cognitive behavioural theory and group management techniques, as well as increase the cultural relevance of activities in the curriculum. Participant attendance challenges were also identified, leading to a shortened and simplified session set. Findings overall were used to finalize materials and guidance for a revised 14-week group programme consisting of individual and joint sessions for adolescents and their caregivers, which may be implemented by community-based facilitators in other settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recleaning of HEPA filters by reverse flow - evaluation of the underlying processes and the cleaning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibold, H.; Leiber, T.; Doeffert, I.; Wilhelm, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    HEPA filter operation at high concentrations of fine dusts requires the periodic recleaning of the filter units in their service locations. Due to the low mechanical stress induced during the recleaning process the regenration via low pressure reverse flow is a very suitable technique. Recleanability of HEPA filter had been attained for particle diameter >0,4 μm at air velocities up to 1 m/s, but filter clogging occurred in case of smaller particles. The recleaning forces are too weak for particles [de

  11. Structural optimization of N1-aryl-benzimidazoles for the discovery of new non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors active against wild-type and mutant HIV-1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Anna Maria; De Luca, Laura; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Pannecouque, Christophe; Ferro, Stefania

    2018-02-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are recommended components of preferred combination antiretroviral therapies used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. These regimens are extremely effective in suppressing virus replication. Recently, our research group identified some N 1 -aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles as a novel class of NNRTIs. In this research work we report the design, the synthesis and the structure-activity relationship studies of new compounds (20-34) in which some structural modifications have been introduced in order to investigate their effects on reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibition and to better define the features needed to increase the antiviral activity. Most of the new compounds proved to be highly effective in inhibiting both RT enzyme at nanomolar concentrations and HIV-1 replication in MT4 cells with minimal cytotoxicity. Among them, the most promising N 1 -aryl-2-arylthioacetamido-benzimidazoles and N 1 -aryl-2-aryloxyacetamido-benzimidazoles were also tested toward a panel of single- and double-mutants strain responsible for resistance to NNRTIs, showing in vitro antiviral activity toward single mutants L100I, K103N, Y181C, Y188L and E138K. The best results were observed for derivatives 29 and 33 active also against the double mutants F227L and V106A. Computational approaches were applied in order to rationalize the potency of the new synthesized inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Outdated Notion of Antibody Specificity is One of the Major Detrimental Assumptions of the Structure-Based Reverse Vaccinology Paradigm, Which Prevented It from Helping to Develop an Effective HIV-1 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Regenmortel, Marc H V

    2014-01-01

    The importance of paradigms for guiding scientific research is explained with reference to the seminal work of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. A prevalent paradigm, followed for more than a decade in HIV-1 vaccine research, which gave rise to the strategy known as structure-based reverse vaccinology is described in detail. Several reasons why this paradigm did not allow the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are analyzed. A major reason is the belief shared by many vaccinologists that antibodies possess a narrow specificity for a single epitope and are not polyspecific for a diverse group of potential epitopes. When this belief is abandoned, it becomes obvious that the one particular epitope structure observed during the crystallographic analysis of a neutralizing antibody-antigen complex does not necessarily reveal, which immunogenic structure should be used to elicit the same type of neutralizing antibody. In the physical sciences, scientific explanations are usually presented as logical deductions derived from a relevant law of nature together with certain initial conditions. In immunology, causal explanations in terms of a single cause acting according to a law of nature are not possible because numerous factors always play a role in bringing about an effect. The implications of this state of affairs for the rational design of HIV vaccines are outlined. An alternative approach to obtain useful scientific understanding consists in intervening empirically in the immune system and it is suggested that manipulating the system experimentally is needed to learn to control it and achieve protective immunity by vaccination.

  13. Evaluating potential artefacts of photo-reversal on behavioral studies with nocturnal invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Matthew; Imre, Istvan; Wagner, Michael C.; Di Rocco, Richard T.; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant E.

    2016-01-01

    Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L., 1758) are nocturnal, so experiments evaluating their behaviour to chemosensory cues have typically been conducted at night. However, given the brief timeframe each year that adult P. marinus are available for experimentation, we investigated whether P. marinus exposed to a 12 h shifted diurnal cycle (reversed photoperiod) could be tested in a darkened arena during the day and show the same response to chemosensory cues as natural photoperiod P. marinus that were tested during the night. Ten replicates of 10 P. marinus, from each photoperiod, were exposed to deionized water (negative control), 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl, putative predator cue), or P. marinus whole-body extract (conspecific alarm cue). All P. marinus demonstrated a significant avoidance response to both cues. No significant differences were found in avoidance to PEA HCl between photoperiods. Avoidance of P. marinus whole-body extract was significantly stronger in natural compared with reversed photoperiod P. marinus. The use of reversed photoperiod subjects is suitable for examining the presence or absence of avoidance in response to novel chemosensory alarm cues, or the change in the magnitude of antipredator response. Studies investigating the natural magnitude of antipredator response should use natural photoperiod experimental subjects.

  14. Evaluation of the use of reverse osmosis to eliminate natural radionuclides from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Antonio; Palomo, Marta; Ruana, Josep; Peñalver, Alejandra; Aguilar, Carme; Borrull, Francesc

    2013-12-01

    The objective of drinking water treatment plants (DWTP) is to supply the population with tap water that is in optimal condition and in compliance with water quality regulations. In the DWTP of L'Ampolla (Tarragona, Spain), slightly high values of gross alpha activity and the amount of salts in the raw water have been observed. Conventional treatment has reduced these levels only minimally. This study tested a tertiary treatment based on reverse osmosis is tested in an industrial pilot plant (240 m3/day) The efficiency of this pilot plant to reduce the gross alpha and beta activities and the activity of some individual radioisotopes (U(238), U(234), U(235) and Ra(226)) was tested. Results showed that the elimination of alpha emitters was greater than 90%, whereas the elimination of beta emitters was about 35%. Overall, the data provided evidence that the pilot plant is effective for removing different radionuclides that can be present in the incoming water treated. Therefore, tertiary treatment based on reverse osmosis has a positive effect in water quality.

  15. Surface modification of seawater desalination reverse osmosis membranes: Characterization studies & performance evaluation

    KAUST Repository

    Matin, Asif

    2014-06-01

    In this work we report surface modification of commercial reverse osmosis membranes by depositing ultrathin copolymer coatings, which could potentially enhance the biofouling resistance of RO membranes. Hydrophilic monomer hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and a hydrophobic monomer, perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFDA) were copolymerized directly on the active layer of commercial aromatic polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membranes using an initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) technique. Attenuated total reflective Fourier transform infrared spectra (ATR-FTIR) verified the successful modification of the membrane surfaces as a new FTIR adsorption band around 1730cm-1 corresponding to carbonyl groups in the copolymer film appeared after the deposition. X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis also confirmed the presence of the copolymer film on the membrane surface by showing strong fluorine peaks emanating from the fluorinated alkyl side chains of the PFA molecules. Contact angle measurements with deionized water showed the modified membrane surfaces to be initially very hydrophobic but quickly assumed a hydrophilic character within few minutes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) revealed that the deposited films were smooth and conformal as the surface topology of the underlying membrane surface remained virtually unchanged after the deposition. FESEM images of the top surface also showed that the typical ridge-and-valley structure associated with polyamide remained intact after the deposition. Short-term permeation tests using DI water and 2000ppm NaCl water showed that the deposited copolymer coatings had negligible effect on permeate water flux and salt rejection. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Evaluation of outpatients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in a high HIV prevalence setting in Ethiopia: clinical, diagnostic and epidemiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchfeld, Judith; Aderaye, Getachew; Palme, Ingela Berggren; Bjorvatn, Bjarne; Britton, Sven; Feleke, Yewenhareg; Källenius, Gunilla; Lindquist, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In a setting with a high prevalence of HIV we studied (i) the prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and HIV; (ii) clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PTB; and (iii) the usefulness of standard procedures for diagnosing PTB. Of 509 consecutive outpatients evaluated on clinical suspicion of PTB in Addis Ababa, 33.0% were culture-verified as having PTB. PTB patients, non-TB patients and controls were HIV-1-positive in 57.1%, 38.5% and 8.3% of cases, respectively. Predictors for culture-verified PTB were age infection. Diagnosis of PTB based on clinical symptoms, sputum microscopy for acid-fast bacilli and chest radiography was sensitive (86.7%) but unspecific (64.1%). In HIV-positive patients both sensitivity and specificity were significantly lower (p infections are often misinterpreted as smear-negative PTB. HIV screening is therefore warranted not only in cases of verified TB but also as part of the diagnostic work-up in patients with respiratory symptoms suggestive of PTB. Also, increased awareness of, and improved diagnostic tools for, HIV-related pulmonary infections other than PTB are required, together with algorithms for patients with suspected PTB.

  17. Development and evaluation of a phenotypic assay monitoring resistance formation to protease inhibitors in HIV-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Heike; Von der Helm, Klaus; Seelmeir, Sigrid; Weissbrich, Benedikt; Eberle, Josef; Nitschko, Hans

    2003-05-01

    A novel phenotypic assay, based on recombinant expression of the HIV-1-protease was developed and evaluated; it monitors the formation of resistance to protease inhibitors. The HIV-1 protease-encoding region from the blood sample of patients was amplified, ligated into the expression vector pBD2, and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli TG1 cells. The resulting recombinant enzyme was purified by a newly developed one-step acid extraction protocol. The protease activity was determined in presence of five selected HIV protease inhibitors and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) to the respective protease inhibitors determined. The degree of resistance was expressed in terms of x-fold increase in IC(50) compared to the IC(50) value of an HIV-1 wild type protease preparation. The established test system showed a reproducible recombinant expression of each individual patients' HIV-1 protease population. Samples of nine clinically well characterised HIV-1-infected patients with varying degrees of resistance were analysed. There was a good correlation between clinical parameters and the results obtained by this phenotypic assay. For the majority of patients a blind genotypic analysis of the patients' protease domain revealed a fair correlation to the results of the phenotypic assay. In a minority of patients our phenotypic results diverged from the genotypic ones. This novel phenotypic assay can be carried out within 8-10 days, and offers a significant advantage in time to the current employed phenotypic tests.

  18. Evaluation of a cost effective in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping using plasma samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devidas N Chaturbhuj

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Validation of a cost effective in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping using plasma samples. DESIGN: The validation includes the establishment of analytical performance characteristics such as accuracy, reproducibility, precision and sensitivity. METHODS: The accuracy was assessed by comparing 26 paired Virological Quality Assessment (VQA proficiency testing panel sequences generated by in-house and ViroSeq Genotyping System 2.0 (Celera Diagnostics, US as a gold standard. The reproducibility and precision were carried out on five samples with five replicates representing multiple HIV-1 subtypes (A, B, C and resistance patterns. The amplification sensitivity was evaluated on HIV-1 positive plasma samples (n = 88 with known viral loads ranges from 1000-1.8 million RNA copies/ml. RESULTS: Comparison of the nucleotide sequences generated by ViroSeq and in-house method showed 99.41±0.46 and 99.68±0.35% mean nucleotide and amino acid identity respectively. Out of 135 Stanford HIVdb listed HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, partial discordance was observed at 15 positions and complete discordance was absent. The reproducibility and precision study showed high nucleotide sequence identities i.e. 99.88±0.10 and 99.82±0.20 respectively. The in-house method showed 100% analytical sensitivity on the samples with HIV-1 viral load >1000 RNA copies/ml. The cost of running the in-house method is only 50% of that for ViroSeq method (112$ vs 300$, thus making it cost effective. CONCLUSIONS: The validated cost effective in-house method may be used to collect surveillance data on the emergence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource limited countries. Moreover, the wide applications of a cost effective and validated in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance testing will facilitate the decision making for the appropriate management of HIV infected patients.

  19. Evaluation of Different Parameters of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses in HIV Serodiscordant Heterosexual Couples: Humoral Response Potentially Implicated in Modulating Transmission Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Julia Ruiz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As the HIV/AIDS pandemic still progresses, understanding the mechanisms governing viral transmission as well as protection from HIV acquisition is fundamental. In this context, cohorts of HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples (SDC represent a unique tool. The present study was aimed to evaluate specific parameters of innate, cellular and humoral immune responses in SDC. Specifically, plasma levels of cytokines and chemokines, HIV-specific T-cell responses, gp120-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, and HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC activity were assessed in nine HIV-exposed seronegative individuals (ESN and their corresponding HIV seropositive partners (HIV+-P, in eighteen chronically infected HIV subjects (C, nine chronically infected subjects known to be HIV transmitters (CT and ten healthy HIV− donors (HD. Very low magnitude HIV-specific cellular responses were found in two out of six ESN. Interestingly, HIV+-P had the highest ADCC magnitude, the lowest IgA levels and the highest IgG/IgA ratio, all compared to CT. Positive correlations between CD4+ T-cell counts and both IgG/IgA ratios and %ADCC killing uniquely distinguished HIV+-P. Additionally, evidence of IgA interference with ADCC responses from HIV+-P and CT is provided. These data suggest for the first time a potential role of ADCC and/or gp120-specific IgG/IgA balance in modulating heterosexual transmission. In sum, this study provides key information to understand the host factors that influence viral transmission, which should be considered in both the development of prophylactic vaccines and novel immunotherapies for HIV-1 infection.

  20. TO EVALUATE PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AND HIV IN NEWLY-DIAGNOSED MULTIDRUGRESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS ADMITTED FOR PRETREATMENT EVALUATION IN DOTS PLUS CENTRE, THANJAVUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam Kuppusamy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND More than 9 million people fall sick with tuberculosis every year in the world. People with weak immune system as a result of disease like diabetes and HIV are at high risk of developing MDR-TB infection. Proper monitoring and evaluation are needed to control MDR-TB in HIV and diabetes patients. The aim of the study is to find the prevalence of diabetes and HIV among MDR-TB patients admitted for pretreatment evaluation in Dots Plus Centre, Thanjavur Medical College, Tamilnadu. MATERIALS AND METHODS The medical records with datas of 96 patients with MDR-TB who are having diabetes and HIV infection were examined. These cases were diagnosed and registered during January 2015 to December 2015. These patients had drug resistant to first line antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid and rifampicin. Duration of diabetes and HIV infection were noted. Age were categorised in to four groups- 20-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years and above 50 years. The potential risk of association of diabetes, HIV or both with MDR-TB was evaluated by univariate conditional logistic regression model. RESULTS Out of 96 newly-diagnosed MDR-TB patients, prevalence of diabetes is about 34.37%, out of which (84.84% were males and (15.15% were females. Out of 34.37%, 38.54% of patients had controlled diabetes, 61.45% patients had uncontrolled diabetes. Nearly, more than half of diabetes patient falls under uncontrolled diabetes. More number of male patients had diabetes with MDR-TB when compared to females. 10.4% of these persons got oral hypoglycaemic agent and 6.3% got insulin as treatment for diabetes. 1% had irregular treatment with poor compliance. Prevalence of HIV is about 4.16% out of which 75% were males and 25% were females. One patient had both diabetes and HIV with MDR tuberculosis. CONCLUSION In our retrospective study, prevalence of diabetes in MDR-TB patients were more common in males than in females, most of them were in the age groups of 40 years and above

  1. Iterative Evaluation in a Mobile Counseling and Testing Program to Reach People of Color at Risk for HIV--New Strategies Improve Program Acceptability, Effectiveness, and Evaluation Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Freya; Kurth, Ann; Reidy, William; McKnight, Teka; Dikobe, Wame; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from an evaluation that explored the impact of mobile versus clinic-based testing, rapid versus central-lab based testing, incentives for testing, and the use of a computer counseling program to guide counseling and automate evaluation in a mobile program reaching people of color at risk for HIV. The program's…

  2. Systolic function evaluated with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie Scholtz

    2016-11-01

    Objectives: To ascertain whether there were any morphological abnormalities or systolic functional impairments on CMR in untreated asymptomatic HIV-infected patients, compared with HIV-uninfected control individuals. Methods: The CMR studies were performed using a 1.5-T whole-body clinical magnetic resonance 16-channel scanner (Achieva, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands, using a cardiac five-element phased-array receiver coil (SENSE coil. Functional assessment was performed on 36 HIV-infected patients and the findings compared with 35 HIV-uninfected control patients who were matched for age and sex. Results: There was no significant difference in systolic function between the HIV-uninfected and the HIV-infected patients. The left ventricular end diastolic mass (LVEDM was slightly higher in the HIV-infected group, but this was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: No significant differences were found regarding the CMR systolic functional analysis and morphological parameters between the HIV-infected and the healthy volunteers.

  3. Noninvasive evaluation of reverse atrial remodeling after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation by P wave dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuhi; Yodogawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Kenta; Tsuboi, Ippei; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Uetake, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yu-Ki; Hayashi, Meiso; Miyauchi, Yasushi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2017-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) itself creates structural and electrophysiological changes such as atrial enlargement, shortening of refractory period and decrease in conduction velocity, called "atrial remodeling", promoting its persistence. Although the remodeling process is considered to be reversible, it has not been elucidated in detail. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of P wave dispersion in the assessment of reverse atrial remodeling following catheter ablation of AF. Consecutive 126 patients (88 males, age 63.0 ± 10.4 years) who underwent catheter ablation for paroxysmal AF were investigated. P wave dispersion was calculated from the 12 lead ECG before, 1 day, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after the procedure. Left atrial diameter (LAD), left atrial volume index (LAVI), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), transmitral flow velocity waveform (E/A), and tissue Doppler (E/e') on echocardiography, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations, serum creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were also measured. Of all patients, 103 subjects remained free of AF for 1 year follow-up. In these patients, P wave dispersion was not changed 1 day and 1 month after the procedure. However, it was significantly decreased at 3 and 6 months (50.1 ± 14.8 to 45.4 ± 14.4 ms, p < 0.05, 45.2 ± 9.9 ms, p < 0.05, respectively). Plasma BNP concentrations, LAD and LAVI were decreased (81.1 ± 103.8 to 44.8 ± 38.3 pg/mL, p < 0.05, 38.2 ± 5.7 to 35.9 ± 5.6 mm, p < 0.05, 33.3 ± 14.2 to 29.3 ± 12.3 mL/m 2 , p < 0.05) at 6 months after the procedure. There were no significant changes in LVEF, E/A, E/e', serum creatinine, and eGFR during the follow up period. P wave dispersion was decreased at 3 and 6 months after catheter ablation in patients without recurrence of AF. P wave dispersion is useful for assessment of reverse remodeling after catheter ablation of AF.

  4. Impact and economic evaluation of a novel HIV service delivery model in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Ryan K; Petersen, Elizabeth; Tophof, Nora; Dunbar, Elizabeth L; Kalanga, Noel; Nazimera, Lawrence; Mganga, Andrew; Dullie, Luckson; Mukherjee, Joia; Wroe, Emily B

    2017-09-10

    We performed an impact and cost-effectiveness analysis of a novel HIV service delivery model in a high prevalence, remote district of Malawi with a population of 143 800 people. A population-based retrospective analysis of 1-year survival rates among newly enrolled HIV-positive patients at 682 health facilities throughout Malawi, comparing facilities implementing the service delivery model (n = 13) and those implementing care-as-usual (n = 669). Through district-level health surveillance data, we evaluated 1-year survival rates among HIV patients newly enrolled between July 2013 and June 2014 - representing 129 938 patients in care across 682 health facilities - using a multilevel modeling framework. The model, focused on social determinants of health, was implemented throughout Neno District at 13 facilities and compared with facilities in all other districts. Activity-based costing was used to annualize financial and economic costs from a societal perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were expressed as quality-adjusted life-years gained. The national average 1-year survival rate for newly enrolled antiretroviral therapy clients was 78.9%: this rate was 87.9% in Neno District, compared with 78.8% across all other districts in Malawi (P cost of receiving care in Neno district (n = 6541 patients) was $317/patient/year, compared with an estimated $219/patient in other districts. This translated to $906 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Neno District's comprehensive model of care, featuring a strong focus on the community, is $98 more expensive per capita per annum but demonstrates superior 1-year survival rates, despite its remote location. Moreover, it should be considered cost-effective by traditional international standards.

  5. Is a HIV vaccine a viable option and at what price? An economic evaluation of adding HIV vaccination into existing prevention programs in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peerapatanapokin Wiwat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to determine the maximum price at which HIV vaccination is cost-effective in the Thai healthcare setting. It also aims to identify the relative importance of vaccine characteristics and risk behavior changes among vaccine recipients to determine how they affect this cost-effectiveness. Methods A semi-Markov model was developed to estimate the costs and health outcomes of HIV prevention programs combined with HIV vaccination in comparison to the existing HIV prevention programs without vaccination. The estimation was based on a lifetime horizon period (99 years and used the government perspective. The analysis focused on both the general population and specific high-risk population groups. The maximum price of cost-effective vaccination was defined by using threshold analysis; one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The study employed an expected value of perfect information (EVPI analysis to determine the relative importance of parameters and to prioritize future studies. Results The most expensive HIV vaccination which is cost-effective when given to the general population was 12,000 Thai baht (US$1 = 34 Thai baht in 2009. This vaccination came with 70% vaccine efficacy and lifetime protection as long as risk behavior was unchanged post-vaccination. The vaccine would be considered cost-ineffective at any price if it demonstrated low efficacy (30% and if post-vaccination risk behavior increased by 10% or more, especially among the high-risk population groups. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were the most sensitive to change in post-vaccination risk behavior, followed by vaccine efficacy and duration of protection. The EVPI indicated the need to quantify vaccine efficacy, changed post-vaccination risk behavior, and the costs of vaccination programs. Conclusions The approach used in this study differentiated it from other economic evaluations and can be applied for the economic

  6. Is a HIV vaccine a viable option and at what price? An economic evaluation of adding HIV vaccination into existing prevention programs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelahavarong, Pattara; Teerawattananon, Yot; Werayingyong, Pitsaphun; Akaleephan, Chutima; Premsri, Nakorn; Namwat, Chawetsan; Peerapatanapokin, Wiwat; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2011-07-05

    This study aims to determine the maximum price at which HIV vaccination is cost-effective in the Thai healthcare setting. It also aims to identify the relative importance of vaccine characteristics and risk behavior changes among vaccine recipients to determine how they affect this cost-effectiveness. A semi-Markov model was developed to estimate the costs and health outcomes of HIV prevention programs combined with HIV vaccination in comparison to the existing HIV prevention programs without vaccination. The estimation was based on a lifetime horizon period (99 years) and used the government perspective. The analysis focused on both the general population and specific high-risk population groups. The maximum price of cost-effective vaccination was defined by using threshold analysis; one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The study employed an expected value of perfect information (EVPI) analysis to determine the relative importance of parameters and to prioritize future studies. The most expensive HIV vaccination which is cost-effective when given to the general population was 12,000 Thai baht (US$1 = 34 Thai baht in 2009). This vaccination came with 70% vaccine efficacy and lifetime protection as long as risk behavior was unchanged post-vaccination. The vaccine would be considered cost-ineffective at any price if it demonstrated low efficacy (30%) and if post-vaccination risk behavior increased by 10% or more, especially among the high-risk population groups. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were the most sensitive to change in post-vaccination risk behavior, followed by vaccine efficacy and duration of protection. The EVPI indicated the need to quantify vaccine efficacy, changed post-vaccination risk behavior, and the costs of vaccination programs. The approach used in this study differentiated it from other economic evaluations and can be applied for the economic evaluation of other health interventions not available in

  7. Kinematic evaluation of patients with total and reverse shoulder arthroplasty during rehabilitation exercises with different loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, Joelly Mahnic; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Janssen, Thomas W; van der Scheer, Jan W; Alta, Tjarco D; Willems, W Jaap; Veeger, DirkJan H E J

    2012-10-01

    Following shoulder arthroplasty, any well-planned rehabilitation program should include muscle strengthening. However, it is not always clear how different external loads influence shoulder kinematics in patients with shoulder prostheses. The objective of this study was to describe shoulder kinematics and determine the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to total shoulder motion of patients with total and reverse shoulder arthroplasties and of healthy individuals during rehabilitation exercises (anteflexion and elevation in the scapular plane) using different loading conditions (without external load, 1 kg and elastic resistance). Shoulder motions were measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. A force transducer was used to record force signals during loaded conditions using elastic resistance. Statistical comparisons were made using a three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post hoc testing. The scapula contributed more to movement of the arm in subjects with prostheses compared to healthy subjects. The same applies for loaded conditions (1 kg and elastic resistance) relative to unloaded tasks. For scapular internal rotation, upward rotation and posterior tilt no significant differences among groups were found during both exercises. Glenohumeral elevation angles during anteflexion were significantly higher in the total shoulder arthroplasty group compared to the reverse shoulder arthroplasty group. Differences in contribution of the scapula to total shoulder motion between patients with different types of arthroplasties were not significant. However, compared to healthy subjects, they were. Furthermore, scapular kinematics of patients with shoulder arthroplasty was influenced by implementation of external loads, but not by the type of load. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychosocial issues in children and adolescents with HIV infection evaluated with a World Health Organization age-specific descriptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Officioso, Annunziata; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Griso, Giovanna; Storace, Cinzia; Coppini, Simonetta; Longhi, Daniela; Mango, Carmela; Guarino, Alfredo; Badolato, Raffaele; Pisacane, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    After active antiretroviral therapy, children with HIV are clinically well, whereas psychosocial issues continue to influence their quality of life. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) of the World Health Organization evaluates health status and environmental and social factors associated with health. We investigated the efficacy of the ICF to describe the health status and needs of a cohort of children and adolescents with HIV seen at a reference center for pediatric AIDS in Europe. A quantitative analysis of structured interviews was performed. Caregivers of children and adolescents with HIV infection in follow-up at 2 reference centers for pediatric AIDS were enrolled. Four major areas included in the ICF instrument were investigated: impairments of body structures; impairments of body functions; environmental factors; and activity limitations and restrictions to social life. Forty-one families of children with HIV were enrolled. Body structures and functions were marginally impaired, whereas environmental factors and psychosocial issues had a relevant impact on quality of life. Most families considered environmental factors to be "barriers"; these were poverty, unemployment, and single-parent family structure. Activity limitations and social restrictions were also reported in a few cases. Almost all parents reported problems in disclosing their child's HIV status because of the fear of social stigma. Psychosocial issues are part of the well-being of children with HIV. The ICF is a standard tool to evaluate the clinical and psychosocial status of children and adolescents with HIV infection and to measure the impact of therapeutic interventions and strategies on psychosocial functioning.

  9. Total HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture, Yunnan province in 2010: the first systematic evaluation of both health and non-health related HIV/AIDS expenditures in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Duo; Sun, Jiangping; Yakusik, Anna; Chen, Zhongdan; Yuan, Jianhua; Li, Tao; Fu, Jeannia; Khoshnood, Kaveh; Yang, Xing; Wei, Mei; Duan, Song; Bulterys, Marc; Sante, Michael; Ye, Runhua; Xiang, Lifen; Yang, Yuecheng

    2013-01-01

    We assessed HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture, Yunnan Province, one of the highest prevalence regions in China, and describe funding sources and spending for different categories of HIV-related interventions and at-risk populations. 2010 HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture were evaluated based on UNAIDS' National AIDS Spending Assessment methodology. Nearly 93% of total expenditures for HIV/AIDS was contributed by public sources. Of total expenditures, 52.7% was allocated to treatment and care, 24.5% to program management and administration and 19.8% to prevention. Spending on treatment and care was primarily allocated to the treatment of opportunistic infections. Most (40.4%) prevention spending was concentrated on most-at-risk populations, injection drug users (IDUs), sex workers, and men who have sex with men (MSM), with 5.5% allocated to voluntary counseling and testing. Prevention funding allocated for MSM, partners of people living with HIV and prisoners and other confined populations was low compared to the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in these populations. Overall, people living with HIV accounted for 57.57% of total expenditures, while most-at-risk populations accounted for only 7.99%. Our study demonstrated the applicability of NASA for tracking and assessing HIV expenditure in the context of China, it proved to be a useful tool in understanding national HIV/AIDS response from financial aspect, and to assess the extent to which HIV expenditure matches epidemic patterns. Limited funding for primary prevention and prevention for MSM, prisoners and partners of people living with HIV, signal that resource allocation to these key areas must be strengthened. Comprehensive analyses of regional and national funding strategies are needed to inform more equitable, effective and cost-effective HIV/AIDS resource allocation.

  10. Total HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture, Yunnan province in 2010: the first systematic evaluation of both health and non-health related HIV/AIDS expenditures in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Shan

    Full Text Available We assessed HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture, Yunnan Province, one of the highest prevalence regions in China, and describe funding sources and spending for different categories of HIV-related interventions and at-risk populations.2010 HIV/AIDS expenditures in Dehong Prefecture were evaluated based on UNAIDS' National AIDS Spending Assessment methodology.Nearly 93% of total expenditures for HIV/AIDS was contributed by public sources. Of total expenditures, 52.7% was allocated to treatment and care, 24.5% to program management and administration and 19.8% to prevention. Spending on treatment and care was primarily allocated to the treatment of opportunistic infections. Most (40.4% prevention spending was concentrated on most-at-risk populations, injection drug users (IDUs, sex workers, and men who have sex with men (MSM, with 5.5% allocated to voluntary counseling and testing. Prevention funding allocated for MSM, partners of people living with HIV and prisoners and other confined populations was low compared to the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in these populations. Overall, people living with HIV accounted for 57.57% of total expenditures, while most-at-risk populations accounted for only 7.99%.Our study demonstrated the applicability of NASA for tracking and assessing HIV expenditure in the context of China, it proved to be a useful tool in understanding national HIV/AIDS response from financial aspect, and to assess the extent to which HIV expenditure matches epidemic patterns. Limited funding for primary prevention and prevention for MSM, prisoners and partners of people living with HIV, signal that resource allocation to these key areas must be strengthened. Comprehensive analyses of regional and national funding strategies are needed to inform more equitable, effective and cost-effective HIV/AIDS resource allocation.

  11. evaluation of a rapid test for hiv antibodies in saliva and blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To test whole blood and saliva for HIV antibodies. (anti-HIV) using a rapid test strip capillary flow . immunoassay ... Design. A prospective pilot study of selected HIV-positive and ... defined by the underlying illness or condition is illustrated in.

  12. Evaluation of HIV and AIDS knowledge in rural Cameroon men with the use of a questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. Versteegh (Hendt); A. Bakia (Affuenti); H.M. Koopman (Hendrik); V. Kraaij (Vivian); F.G. Versteegh (Florens)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: HIV/AIDS, the most important health problem in Africa, is the leading cause of death on the continent. Ignorance on HIV/AIDS status will hamper treatment and prevention. To investigate the level of HIV/AIDS knowledge among men in a rural area, we performed a questionnaire

  13. HIV cure research community engagement in North Carolina: a mixed-methods evaluation of a crowdsourcing contest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Allison; Farley, Samantha; Blumberg, Meredith; Knight, Kimberley; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa; Muessig, Kate; Rennie, Stuart; Tucker, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a crowdsourcing contest to promote HIV cure research community engagement. Crowdsourcing contests are open calls for community participation to achieve a task, in this case to engage local communities about HIV cure research. Our contest solicited images and videos of what HIV cure meant to people. Contestants submitted entries to IdeaScale, an encrypted online contest platform. We used a mixed-methods study design to evaluate the contest. Engagement was assessed through attendance at promotional events and social media user analytics. Google Analytics measured contest website user-engagement statistics. Text from contest video entries was transcribed, coded and analysed using MAXQDA. There were 144 attendees at three promotional events and 32 entries from 39 contestants. Most individuals who submitted entries were black ( n =31), had some college education ( n =18) and were aged 18-23 years ( n =23). Social media analytics showed 684 unique page followers, 2233 unique page visits, 585 unique video views and an overall reach of 80,624 unique users. Contest submissions covered themes related to the community's role in shaping the future of HIV cure through education, social justice, creativity and stigma reduction. Crowdsourcing contests are feasible for engaging community members in HIV cure research. Community contributions to crowdsourcing contests provide useful content for culturally relevant and locally responsive research engagement.

  14. Evaluation of the concomitant use of two different EIA tests for HIV screening in blood banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otani Marcia M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In 1998, the Brazilian Ministry of Health made it mandatory for all blood banks in the country to screen donated blood for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV concomitantly using two different enzyme immunoassay (EIA tests. Concerned with the best use of available resources, our objective with this study was to evaluate the usefulness of conducting two EIA screening tests instead of just one. METHODS: We analyzed data from 1999 through 2001 obtained by testing 698 191 units of donated blood using two EIA HIV screening tests concomitantly at the Pro-Blood Foundation/Blood Center of São Paulo (Fundação Pró-Sangue/Hemocentro de São Paulo, which is a major blood center in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. All samples reactive in at least one of the two EIA tests were submitted for confirmation by a Western blot (WB test, and the persons who had donated those samples were also asked to return and provide a follow-up sample. RESULTS: Out of the 698 191 blood units that were donated, 2 718 of them (0.4% had to be discarded because they were reactive to at least one of the EIA tests. There were two WB-positive donation samples that were reactive in only one HIV EIA screening test. On their follow-up samples, both donors tested WB-negative. These cases were considered false positive results at screening. Of the 2 718 donors who were asked to return and provide a follow-up sample, 1 576 of them (58% did so. From these 1 576 persons, we found that there were two individuals who had been reactive to only one of the two EIA screening tests and who had also been negative on the WB at screening but who were fully seroconverted on the follow-up sample. We thus estimated that, in comparison to the use of a single EIA screening test, the use of two EIA screening tests would detect only one extra sample out of 410 700 units of blood. CONCLUSIONS: Our data do not support the use of two different, concomitant EIA screening tests for HIV. The great

  15. Evaluating Patient Interest in an Adherence-Focused Smartphone App to Improve HIV Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua W Gaborcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate patient interest in a smartphone mobile application (app to assist in medication adherence. Methods: In January 2014, a 19-question, anonymous, paper survey was distributed to a convenience sample of patients in the reception area of a nonprofit HIV primary care clinic and pharmacy. Results: Of the 101 patients surveyed, 72.3% had a smartphone and 70.3% were interested in downloading and using an adherence app if one was available. If an app was customizable, patients desired appointment reminders (87%, notifications to schedule appointments (85%, refill notifications (83%, medication reminders (79%, and adherence tracked by pharmacy (59%. Conclusions: Results share insights on the potential use of technology to assist an HIV patient population with medication adherence. Conflict of Interest Dr. Jennifer Rodis is the creator and director of the Partner For Promotion (PFP program otherwise she has no additional conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties. All other authors declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties   Type: Student Project

  16. Evaluation of seroepidemiological toxoplasmosis in HIV/AIDS patients in the south of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Augusto Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is considered one of the opportunistic infections for individuals with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS, and is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of neurotoxoplasmosis, ocular toxoplasmosis and antibodies for Toxoplasma gondii in HIV-positive patients attending the SAE (Specialized Assistance Service for HIV/AIDS, as well as to associate their serological profile with epidemiological and clinical data. A total of 250 patients participated in the study from December, 2009 to November, 2010. Serological analysis was performed using the indirect immunofluorescent technique; epidemiological data were gathered by a questionnaire, and clinical history was based on the analysis of medical charts. Prevalence of seropositivity was 80%, with history of neurotoxoplasmosis in 4.8% and of ocular toxoplasmosis in 1.6% of the patients. The Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment (HAART was not used by 32% of the patients, 18.4% of the patients had CD4+ T- lymphocyte count less than 200 cells/mm³ and 96.8% of them were not aware of the modes of disease transmission. These findings led us to conclude that the study population is at high risk of clinical toxoplasmosis, because of both reactivation of infection in the seropositive patients who do not make a regular use of HAART, and primo-infection in seronegative patients worsened by an unawareness of the modes of infection reported in this study.

  17. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  18. Administrative integration of vertical HIV monitoring and evaluation into health systems: a case study from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kawonga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In light of an increasing global focus on health system strengthening and integration of vertical programmes within health systems, methods and tools are required to examine whether general health service managers exercise administrative authority over vertical programmes. Objective: To measure the extent to which general health service (horizontal managers, exercise authority over the HIV programme's monitoring and evaluation (M&E function, and to explore factors that may influence this exercise of authority. Methods: This cross-sectional survey involved interviews with 51 managers. We drew ideas from the concept of ‘exercised decision-space’ – traditionally used to measure local level managers’ exercise of authority over health system functions following decentralisation. Our main outcome measure was the degree of exercised authority – classified as ‘low’, ‘medium’ or ‘high’ – over four M&E domains (HIV data collection, collation, analysis, and use. We applied ordinal logistic regression to assess whether actor type (horizontal or vertical was predictive of a higher degree of exercised authority, independent of management capacity (training and experience, and M&E knowledge. Results: Relative to vertical managers, horizontal managers had lower HIV M&E knowledge, were more likely to exercise a higher degree of authority over HIV data collation (OR 7.26; CI: 1.9, 27.4, and less likely to do so over HIV data use (OR 0.19; CI: 0.05, 0.84. A higher HIV M&E knowledge score was predictive of a higher exercised authority over HIV data use (OR 1.22; CI: 0.99, 1.49. There was no association between management capacity and degree of authority. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a HIV M&E model that is neither fully vertical nor integrated. The HIV M&E is characterised by horizontal managers producing HIV information while vertical managers use it. This may undermine policies to strengthen integrated health system

  19. Reverse Algols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    Reverse Algols, binary systems with a semidetached configuration in which the more massive component is in contact with the critical equipotential surface, are examined. Observational evidence for reverse Algols is presented and the parameters of seven reverse Algols are listed. The evolution of Algols and reverse Algols is discussed. It is suggested that, because reverse Algols represent the premass-reversal semidetached phase of close binary evolution, the evolutionary time scale between regular and reverse Algols is the ratio of the number of confirmed systems of these two Algol types.

  20. Evaluation of potential for reuse of industrial wastewater using metal-immobilized catalysts and reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongyun; Chung, Jinwook

    2015-04-01

    This report describes a novel technology of reusing the wastewater discharged from the display manufacturing industry through an advanced oxidation process (AOP) with a metal-immobilized catalyst and reverse osmosis (RO) in the pilot scale. The reclaimed water generated from the etching and cleaning processes in display manufacturing facilities was low-strength organic wastewater and was required to be recycled to secure a water source. For the reuse of reclaimed water to ultrapure water (UPW), a combination of solid-phase AOP and RO was implemented. The removal efficiency of TOC by solid-phase AOP and RO was 92%. Specifically, the optimal acid, pH, and H2O2 concentrations in the solid-phase AOP were determined. With regard to water quality and operating costs, the combination of solid-phase AOP and RO was superior to activated carbon/RO and ultraviolet AOP/anion polisher/coal carbon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electro-Fenton oxidation of reverse osmosis concentrate from sanitary landfill leachate: Evaluation of operational parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annabel; Labiadh, Lazhar; Ciríaco, Lurdes; Pacheco, Maria José; Gadri, Abdellatif; Ammar, Salah; Lopes, Ana

    2017-10-01

    The electro-Fenton oxidation of a concentrate from reverse osmosis of a sanitary landfill leachate, with an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 42 g L -1 , was carried out using a carbon-felt cathode and a boron doped diamond anode. The influence of the applied current intensity, initial pH and dissolved iron initial concentration on the electro-Fenton process was assessed. For the experimental conditions used, results showed that the initial pH is the parameter that more strongly influences the current efficiency of the electro-Fenton process, being this influence more pronounced on the oxidation rate than on the mineralization rate of the organic matter. The increase in iron initial concentration was found to be detrimental, since the natural amount of iron present in the effluent, 73 mg L -1 of total iron and 61 mg L -1 of dissolved iron, was sufficient to ensure the electro-Fenton process at the applied intensities - 0.2-1.4 A. For the more favourable conditions studied, initial pH of 3 and natural iron concentration, it was found an increase in the organic load and nitrogen removals with the applied current intensity. For the highest current intensity applied, a COD removal of 16.7 g L -1 was achieved after 8-h experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance evaluation of reverse osmosis technology for selected antibiotics removal from synthetic pharmaceutical wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholami Mitra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study addresses the possibility for low pressure reverse osmosis membrane (RE 2521, CSM process to serve as an alternative to remove selected antibiotics (ampicillin and amoxicillin from synthetic wastewater by changing operating conditions such as pH = 3, 6.5 and 10; Pressure = 9, 11 and13 (bar; antibiotic concentration = 10, 255 and 500(mg/L, and temperature = 20, 30 and 40°C. The experiment was designed based on Box-benken, which is a Response Surface methodology design (RSM, using Design Expert software. The concentration of antibiotics was measured by applying a UV-spectrophotometer (Cecil, at the wavelength of 254 nm. Results showed a range of rejection percentage from 73.52% to 99.36% and 75.1% to 98.8%, for amoxicillin and ampicillin, respectively. Considering the solute rejections and the membrane porosity show that the prevailing rejection mechanism of the examined antibiotics by the membrane was the size exclusion effect. The permeate flux for both of the antibiotics was 12–18.73 L/m2.h. Although the permeate flux and antibiotic rejection are influenced by operating pressure, pH, and temperature individually, the interaction between operating parameters did not have noticeable effects. According to the results obtained in this study, the application of RO membrane is recommended for the selected antibiotics to be removed to a considerable degree (up to 95%.

  3. Evaluation of oxidative DNA damage promoted by storage in sperm from sex-reversed rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cerezales, S; Martínez-Páramo, S; Cabrita, E; Martínez-Pastor, F; de Paz, P; Herráez, M P

    2009-03-01

    Short-term storage and cryopreservation of sperm are two common procedures in aquaculture, used for routine practices in artificial insemination reproduction and gene banking, respectively. Nevertheless, both procedures cause injuries affecting sperm motility, viability, cell structure and DNA stability, which diminish reproductive success. DNA modification is considered extremely important, especially when sperm storage is carried out with gene banking purposes. DNA damage caused by sperm storage is not well characterized and previous studies have reported simple and double strand breaks that have been attributed to oxidative events promoted by the generation of free radicals during storage. The objective of this study was to reveal DNA fragmentation and to explore the presence of oxidized bases that could be produced by oxidative events during short-term storage and cryopreservation in sex-reversed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) spermatozoa. Sperm from six males was analyzed separately. Different aliquots of the samples were stored 2h (fresh) or 5 days at 4 degrees C or were cryopreserved. Then spermatozoa were analyzed using the Comet assay, as well as combining this method with digestion with two endonucleases from Escherichia coli (Endonuclease III, that cut in oxidized cytosines, and FPG, cutting in oxidized guanosines). Both storage procedures yielded DNA fragmentation, but only short-term storage oxidative events were clearly detected, showing that oxidative processes affect guanosines rather than cytosines. Cryopreservation increases DNA fragmentation but the presence of oxidized bases was not noticed, suggesting that mechanisms other than oxidative stress could be involved in DNA fragmentation promoted by freezing.

  4. Long-term analysis of resistance development in HIV-1 positive patients treated with protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors: Correlation of the genotype and disease progression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prejdová, Jana; Weber, Jan; Machala, L.; Reiniš, Milan; Linka, M.; Brůčková, M.; Vandasová, M.; Staňková, M.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 1 (2005), 29-36 ISSN 0001-723X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NI6339 Grant - others:5th Framework(XE) QLK2-CT-2001-02360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : HIV * protease inhibitors * resistance development Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.696, year: 2005

  5. Assessing changes in HIV-related legal and policy environments: Lessons learned from a multi-country evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura; Nicholson, Alexandra; Henry, Ian; Saha, Amitrajit; Sellers, Tilly; Gruskin, Sofia

    2018-01-01

    There is growing recognition in the health community that the legal environment-including laws, policies, and related procedures-impacts vulnerability to HIV and access to HIV-related services both positively and negatively. Assessing changes in the legal environment and how these affect HIV-related outcomes, however, is challenging, and understanding of appropriate methodologies nascent. We conducted an evaluation of a UNDP project designed to strengthen legal environments to support the human rights of key populations, in particular LGBT populations, women and girls, affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We analyzed data on activities designed to improve legal environments through a systematic document review and 53 qualitative interviews. The project made substantial strides towards legal change in many places, and examples provide broader lessons for work in this area. Two core pillars appear fundamental: a government-led participatory assessment of the legal environment, and building the capacity of those impacted by and engaged in this work. Systematic attention to human rights is vital: it can help open new spaces for dialogue among diverse stakeholders, foster new collaborations, and ensure local ownership, nuanced understanding of the political landscape, attention to marginalized populations, and accountability for (in)action. Entry points for effecting legal change go beyond "HIV laws" to also include other laws, national policies and strategies. Conducting legal environment assessments, multi-stakeholder dialogues, action planning and related activities, alongside capacity building, can contribute to changes in knowledge and attitudes directly relevant to reforming laws that are found to be harmful. Shorter-term goals along the causal pathway to legal change (e.g. changes in policy) can constitute interim markers of success, and recognition of these can maintain momentum. Increasing understanding of progress towards changes in the legal environment

  6. Assessing changes in HIV-related legal and policy environments: Lessons learned from a multi-country evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition in the health community that the legal environment-including laws, policies, and related procedures-impacts vulnerability to HIV and access to HIV-related services both positively and negatively. Assessing changes in the legal environment and how these affect HIV-related outcomes, however, is challenging, and understanding of appropriate methodologies nascent.We conducted an evaluation of a UNDP project designed to strengthen legal environments to support the human rights of key populations, in particular LGBT populations, women and girls, affected by HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We analyzed data on activities designed to improve legal environments through a systematic document review and 53 qualitative interviews.The project made substantial strides towards legal change in many places, and examples provide broader lessons for work in this area. Two core pillars appear fundamental: a government-led participatory assessment of the legal environment, and building the capacity of those impacted by and engaged in this work. Systematic attention to human rights is vital: it can help open new spaces for dialogue among diverse stakeholders, foster new collaborations, and ensure local ownership, nuanced understanding of the political landscape, attention to marginalized populations, and accountability for (inaction. Entry points for effecting legal change go beyond "HIV laws" to also include other laws, national policies and strategies.Conducting legal environment assessments, multi-stakeholder dialogues, action planning and related activities, alongside capacity building, can contribute to changes in knowledge and attitudes directly relevant to reforming laws that are found to be harmful. Shorter-term goals along the causal pathway to legal change (e.g. changes in policy can constitute interim markers of success, and recognition of these can maintain momentum. Increasing understanding of progress towards changes in the legal

  7. Evaluating Knowledge, Attitudinal, and Behavioral Change Effects from a Multinational HIV/AIDS Education Program for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Garcia, Fe; Apamo, Peter; Mutheu, Lucy; Ndege, Monica; Bois, Iderle

    2010-01-01

    This project tracked the mid-term evaluation processes, practices, and products of a multinational program to reduce at-risk behaviors for HIV/AIDS among children in Kenya, Tanzania, and Haiti. It focused on participant and community perceptions; program effectiveness in promoting abstinence and monogamy decisions; and factors supporting ongoing…

  8. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  9. Prognostic evaluation of DNA index in HIV-HPV co-infected women cervical samples attending in reference centers for HIV-AIDS in Recife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Eduardo Silva Martins

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Persistence of cervical infection caused by human papillomavirus (HPV types with high oncogenic risk may lead to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether, in HIV-positive women, the presence of aneuploidy in cervical cell samples is associated with presence and evolution of CIN. METHODS: The present study had two stages. In the first stage, comprising a cross-sectional study, the association between the presence of aneuploidy seen via flow cytometry and sociodemographic characteristics, habits and characteristics relating to HPV and HIV infection was analyzed. In the second stage, comprising a cohort study, it was investigated whether aneuploidy was predictive of CIN evolution. RESULTS: No association was observed between the presence of aneuploidy and HPV infection, or between its presence and alterations seen in oncotic cytological analysis. On the other hand, aneuploidy was associated with the presence of CIN (p = 0.030 in histological analysis and with nonuse of antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.001. Most of the HIV-positive women (234/272 presented normal CD4+ T lymphocyte counts (greater than 350 cells/mm3 and showed a greater aneuploidy regression rate (77.5% than a progression rate (23.9% over a follow-up of up to two years. CONCLUSION: Although there was an association between the presence of cervical tissue lesions and the DNA index, the latter was not predictive of progression of the cervical lesion. This suggests that progression of the cervical lesion to cancer in HIV-positive women may also be changed through improvement of the immunological state enabled by using antiretroviral therapy.

  10. The diagnostic performance evaluation of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test in southern Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimelis, Techalew; Tadesse, Endale

    2015-04-23

    To determine the diagnostic performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo rapid test. A hospital-based cross-sectional study. This evaluation was conducted at one of the largest hospitals in southern Ethiopia. Serum samples obtained from clients attending the antiretroviral therapy and voluntary counselling and testing centres were used. Sera were originally collected for the purpose of investigating syphilis epidemiology. The performance of the test to detect HIV was evaluated using 400 sera (200 HIV positives and 200 HIV negatives). Also, its performance to detect syphilis was evaluated using 85 syphilis positive and 100 syphilis negative serum samples. Individuals tiebreaker to determine the result. We also used ELISA to resolve discordant HIV results. Syphilis serostatus was determined using the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination assay (TPHA). The respective sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test were 100, 99.5, 99.5 and 100% for HIV and 97.6, 96, 95.4 and 98% for syphilis testing, respectively. In reference to TPHA, the test kit reported 4 false positives and 2 false negative results for syphilis. The κ values were 0.99 for HIV testing and 0.94 for syphilis testing. The excellent performance of the SD BIOLINE HIV/syphilis Duo test to detect HIV as well as syphilis facilitates the integration of syphilis testing and treatment to the already established HIV prevention programme, ultimately contributing to the dual HIV and syphilis elimination goal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. The use of mystery shopping for quality assurance evaluations of HIV/STI testing sites offering services to young gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, José A; Pingel, Emily S; Jadwin-Cakmak, Laura; Meanley, Steven; Alapati, Deepak; Moore, Michael; Lowther, Matthew; Wade, Ryan; Harper, Gary W

    2015-10-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at increased risk for HIV and STI infection. While encouraging HIV and STI testing among YMSM remains a public health priority, we know little about the cultural competency of providers offering HIV/STI tests to YMSM in public clinics. As part of a larger intervention study, we employed a mystery shopper methodology to evaluate the LGBT cultural competency and quality of services offered in HIV and STI testing sites in Southeast Michigan (n = 43).We trained and deployed mystery shoppers (n = 5) to evaluate the HIV and STI testing sites by undergoing routine HIV/STI testing. Two shoppers visited each site, recording their experiences using a checklist that assessed 13 domains, including the clinic's structural characteristics and interactions with testing providers. We used the site scores to examine the checklist's psychometric properties and tested whether site evaluations differed between sites only offering HIV testing (n = 14) versus those offering comprehensive HIV/STI testing (n = 29). On average, site scores were positive across domains. In bivariate comparisons by type of testing site, HIV testing sites were more likely than comprehensive HIV/STI testing clinics to ascertain experiences of intimate partner violence, offer action steps to achieve safer sex goals, and provide safer sex education. The developed checklist may be used as a quality assurance indicator to measure HIV/STI testing sites' performance when working with YMSM. Our findings also underscore the need to bolster providers' provision of safer sex education and behavioral counseling within comprehensive HIV/STI testing sites.

  12. Reverse Engineering and Security Evaluation of Commercial Tags for RFID-Based IoT Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M; Fraga-Lamas, Paula; Suárez-Albela, Manuel; Castedo, Luis

    2016-12-24

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a distributed system of physical objects that requires the seamless integration of hardware (e.g., sensors, actuators, electronics) and network communications in order to collect and exchange data. IoT smart objects need to be somehow identified to determine the origin of the data and to automatically detect the elements around us. One of the best positioned technologies to perform identification is RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), which in the last years has gained a lot of popularity in applications like access control, payment cards or logistics. Despite its popularity, RFID security has not been properly handled in numerous applications. To foster security in such applications, this article includes three main contributions. First, in order to establish the basics, a detailed review of the most common flaws found in RFID-based IoT systems is provided, including the latest attacks described in the literature. Second, a novel methodology that eases the detection and mitigation of such flaws is presented. Third, the latest RFID security tools are analyzed and the methodology proposed is applied through one of them (Proxmark 3) to validate it. Thus, the methodology is tested in different scenarios where tags are commonly used for identification. In such systems it was possible to clone transponders, extract information, and even emulate both tags and readers. Therefore, it is shown that the methodology proposed is useful for auditing security and reverse engineering RFID communications in IoT applications. It must be noted that, although this paper is aimed at fostering RFID communications security in IoT applications, the methodology can be applied to any RFID communications protocol.

  13. Reverse Engineering and Security Evaluation of Commercial Tags for RFID-Based IoT Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago M. Fernández-Caramés

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT is a distributed system of physical objects that requires the seamless integration of hardware (e.g., sensors, actuators, electronics and network communications in order to collect and exchange data. IoT smart objects need to be somehow identified to determine the origin of the data and to automatically detect the elements around us. One of the best positioned technologies to perform identification is RFID (Radio Frequency Identification, which in the last years has gained a lot of popularity in applications like access control, payment cards or logistics. Despite its popularity, RFID security has not been properly handled in numerous applications. To foster security in such applications, this article includes three main contributions. First, in order to establish the basics, a detailed review of the most common flaws found in RFID-based IoT systems is provided, including the latest attacks described in the literature. Second, a novel methodology that eases the detection and mitigation of such flaws is presented. Third, the latest RFID security tools are analyzed and the methodology proposed is applied through one of them (Proxmark 3 to validate it. Thus, the methodology is tested in different scenarios where tags are commonly used for identification. In such systems it was possible to clone transponders, extract information, and even emulate both tags and readers. Therefore, it is shown that the methodology proposed is useful for auditing security and reverse engineering RFID communications in IoT applications. It must be noted that, although this paper is aimed at fostering RFID communications security in IoT applications, the methodology can be applied to any RFID communications protocol.

  14. Reverse Engineering and Security Evaluation of Commercial Tags for RFID-Based IoT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M.; Fraga-Lamas, Paula; Suárez-Albela, Manuel; Castedo, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is a distributed system of physical objects that requires the seamless integration of hardware (e.g., sensors, actuators, electronics) and network communications in order to collect and exchange data. IoT smart objects need to be somehow identified to determine the origin of the data and to automatically detect the elements around us. One of the best positioned technologies to perform identification is RFID (Radio Frequency Identification), which in the last years has gained a lot of popularity in applications like access control, payment cards or logistics. Despite its popularity, RFID security has not been properly handled in numerous applications. To foster security in such applications, this article includes three main contributions. First, in order to establish the basics, a detailed review of the most common flaws found in RFID-based IoT systems is provided, including the latest attacks described in the literature. Second, a novel methodology that eases the detection and mitigation of such flaws is presented. Third, the latest RFID security tools are analyzed and the methodology proposed is applied through one of them (Proxmark 3) to validate it. Thus, the methodology is tested in different scenarios where tags are commonly used for identification. In such systems it was possible to clone transponders, extract information, and even emulate both tags and readers. Therefore, it is shown that the methodology proposed is useful for auditing security and reverse engineering RFID communications in IoT applications. It must be noted that, although this paper is aimed at fostering RFID communications security in IoT applications, the methodology can be applied to any RFID communications protocol. PMID:28029119

  15. Priority setting in HIV/AIDS control in West Java Indonesia: an evaluation based on the accountability for reasonableness framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Noor; Prawiranegara, Rozar; Subhan Riparev, Harris; Siregar, Adiatma; Sunjaya, Deni; Baltussen, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Indonesia has insufficient resources to adequately respond to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and thus faces a great challenge in prioritizing interventions. In many countries, such priority setting processes are typically ad hoc and not transparent leading to unfair decisions. Here, we evaluated the priority setting process in HIV/AIDS control in West Java province against the four conditions of the accountability for reasonableness (A4R) framework: relevance, publicity, appeals and revision, and enforcement. We reviewed government documents and conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews based on the A4R framework with 22 participants of the 5-year HIV/AIDS strategy development for 2008-13 (West Java province) and 2007-11 (Bandung). We found that criteria for priority setting were used implicitly and that the strategies included a wide range of programmes. Many stakeholders were involved in the process but their contribution could be improved and particularly the public and people living with HIV/AIDS could be better engaged. The use of appeal and publicity mechanisms could be more transparent and formally stated. Public regulations are not yet installed to ensure fair priority setting. To increase fairness in HIV/AIDS priority setting, West Java should make improvements on all four conditions of the A4R framework. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  16. Benchmarking HIV health care: from individual patient care to health care evaluation. An example from the EuroSIDA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podlekareva Daria N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV patients based on four key indicators. Methods Four indicators of health care were assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of: 1 combination antiretroviral therapy (cART; 2 chemoprophylaxis; 3 frequency of laboratory monitoring; and 4 virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART. Results 7097 EuroSIDA patients were included from Northern (n = 923, Southern (n = 1059, West Central (n = 1290 East Central (n = 1366, Eastern (n = 1964 Europe, and Argentina (n = 495. Patients in Eastern Europe with a CD4 3 were less likely to initiate cART and Pneumocystis jiroveci-chemoprophylaxis compared to patients from all other regions, and less frequently had a laboratory assessment of their disease status. The proportion of patients with virological response was highest in Northern, 89% vs. 84%, 78%, 78%, 61%, 55% in West Central, Southern, East Central Europe, Argentina and Eastern Europe, respectively (p Conclusions This assessment of HIV health care utilization revealed pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for the assessment and benchmarking of the clinical management of HIV patients in any setting worldwide.

  17. Evaluation of epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features and mortality of 144 HIV/AIDS cases in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Burcu; Yetkin, Meltem A; Bastug, Aliye; But, Ayşe; Aslaner, Halide; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2018-03-22

    Background The number of HIV/AIDS cases in Turkey is increasing rapidly, as is the number of cases worldwide. The aim of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of the clinical and laboratory findings and epidemiological features of HIV/AIDS patients to obtain useful data on the epidemic type and transmission routes associated with Turkey and to identify risk factors for mortality. Methods The patient records of 144 HIV-infected patients who were admitted to our clinic between 2000 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of the cases (55%) were diagnosed due to the detection of anti-HIV-positive individuals without clinical symptoms. The mean CD4 + lymphocyte count on first admission was 108 cells/μL for those admitted before 2009 and 265 cells/μL for those admitted after 2009 (p = 0.003). When the pre- and post-2009 groups were compared for the status of the disease, 55.6 and 44.4% of patients were in the AIDS stage, respectively (p = 0.04). The most noted opportunistic infection was mycobacterial, and throughout the follow-up, 31.2% of the cases were fatal. Conclusions Early diagnosis of HIV infection can have a direct impact on prognosis and survival. Therefore, screening laboratory investigations should be extended, particularly in high-risk groups.

  18. Evaluation of preventive measures for mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Aracaju, State of Sergipe, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Mara Dolce de Lemos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The main route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in children is from mother to child. The preventive measures established for the Aids Clinical Trial Group protocol 076 (ACTG 076 significantly reduces HIV vertical transmission rates. This study aims to evaluate the implementation of the ACTG 076 protocol in the maternity units of State of Sergipe, Brazilian northeast. METHODS: This is a descriptive, retrospective study with a quantitative approach, with HIV positive women and children exposed, attending a Maternity reference for high-risk pregnancies. Data were obtained from patient records registered in the years 1994 to 2010. RESULTS: Amongst the 110 pregnant women and exposed newborns, the ACTG 076 protocol was fully utilized in only 31.8% of the participants. During the prenatal period, zidovudine (ZDV was taken by 79.1% of the pregnant women. Only 49.1% of HIV seropositive patients used ZDV during delivery. Two (1.8% children were considered infected and 50 (45.5% do not have a conclusive diagnosis to date. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant deficiencies in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, including lack of compliance with the three phases of the ACTG 076 protocol; inadequacies in prenatal care; inappropriate mode of delivery and lack of adequate follow up of exposed children.

  19. High HIV incidence in men who have sex with men attending for postexposure prophylaxis: a service evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, G; McCormack, C; Fearnley, J; McOwan, A

    2017-05-01

    There are limited outcome data for men who have sex with men (MSM) who have received HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). The objective of this service evaluation was to determine HIV incidence and repeat PEP use among MSM PEP recipients in London, UK. Retrospective electronic case-note review of all MSM who were prescribed PEP between January and April 2013 at a central London sexual health service. 530 MSM received PEP between 1 January and 30 June 2013. Of these, 449 had more than 30 days subsequent follow-up at our service. Median age was 31 years. PEP indication was unprotected anal intercourse, 98% (receptive 88% and insertive 10%) and other, 2%. Up to 1 November 2015, total follow-up was 756 person-years. 183 users received repeat PEP. The total number of repeat PEP courses was 442. 57 MSM newly acquired HIV: the HIV incidence was 7.6 per 100 person-years. PEP was associated with a high risk of subsequent HIV seroconversion in this cohort; this group may be appropriate candidates for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Evaluating the effect of HIV prevention strategies on uptake of HIV counselling and testing among male most-at-risk-populations in Nigeria; a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebajo, Sylvia; Eluwa, George; Njab, Jean; Oginni, Ayo; Ukwuije, Francis; Ahonsi, Babatunde; Lorenc, Theo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three strategies in increasing uptake of HIV counselling and testing (HCT) among male most-at-risk-population (M-MARPs) using programmatic data. HIV prevention strategies were evaluated in a cross-sectional analysis. Three HCT strategies were implemented between July 2009 and July 2012 among men who have sex with men (MSM) and people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in four states in Nigeria. The first strategy (S1), involved key opinion leaders (KOLs) who referred M-MARPs to health facilities for HCT. The second strategy (S2) involved KOLs referring M-MARPs to nearby mobile HCT teams while the third (S3) involved mobile M-MARPs peers conducting the HCT. χ(2) statistics were used to test for differences in the distribution of categorical variables across groups while logistic regression was used to measure the effect of the different strategies while controlling for confounding factors. A total of 1988, 14 726 and 14 895 M-MARPs were offered HCT through S1, S2 and S3 strategies, respectively. Overall, S3 (13%) identified the highest proportion of HIV-positive M-MARPs compared with S1 (9%) and S2 (3%), p≤0.001. Also S3 (13%) identified the highest proportion of new HIV diagnosis compared with S1 (8%) and S2 (3%), respectively, p≤0.001. When controlled for age, marital status and occupation, MSM reached via S3 were 9 times (AOR: 9.21; 95% CI 5.57 to 15.23) more likely to uptake HCT when compared with S1 while PWIDs were 21 times (AOR: 20.90; 95% CI 17.33 to 25.21) more likely to uptake to HCT compared with those reached via S1. Peer-led HCT delivered by S3 had the highest impact on the total number of M-MARPs reached and in identifying HIV-positive M-MARPs and new testers. Training M-MARPs peers to provide HCT is a high impact approach in delivering HCT to M-MARPs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. HIV: Treatment and Comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rokx (Casper)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractClinicians worldwide strive to improve HIV care for their patients. Antiretroviral therapy prevents HIV related mortality and is lifelong. A clinical evaluation of these treatment strategies is necessary to identify strategies that may jeopardize treatment effectiveness and patient

  2. Evaluating complications of local anesthesia administration and reversal with phentolamine mesylate in a portable pediatric dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G; Riley, Amah E; Milbee, Sarah; Bastin, Meghan R; Price, Maylyn E; Ladson, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to identify and quantify complications with local anesthetic administration and reversal on consecutive patients seen for comprehensive dental care in a school-based, portable dental clinic, and includes data on the patients seen by the participating portable dental providers. In 923 dental visits where local anesthetic was administered, a standardized form was used to gain further information and identify any complications; this was accompanied by a questionnaire for the student's teacher, in order to quantify the student's distraction and disruption ratings following the dental visit. After statistical analysis of the 923 consecutive cases, the overall complication rate was 5.3%. All of the complications were considered to be mild or moderate, and there were no severe event reports. The complications encountered most frequently (n = 49) were associated with self-inflicted soft tissue injury. The results of this study indicate that comprehensive care with local anesthesia delivered by a school-based portable dental clinic has a low risk of complications. Whereas safe administration of dental care is achievable with or without phentolamine mesylate as a local anesthetic reversal agent, its use was determined to improve safety outcomes. Three factors appeared to directly increase the incidence of complications: the administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block, attention deficit disorder, and obesity. Teacher evaluations demonstrated that children receiving care by a portable dental team were able to reorient back to classwork and were not disruptive to classmates.

  3. Evaluation of the treatment of reverse osmosis concentrates from municipal wastewater reclamation by coagulation and granular activated carbon adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying-Xue; Yang, Zhe; Ye, Tao; Shi, Na; Tian, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from municipal wastewater reclamation reverse osmosis (mWRRO) contains elevated concentrations of contaminants which pose potential risks to aquatic environment. The treatment of ROC from an mWRRO using granular activated carbon (GAC) combined pretreatment of coagulation was optimized and evaluated. Among the three coagulants tested, ferric chloride (FeCl3) presented relatively higher DOC removal efficiency than polyaluminium chloride and lime at the same dosage and coagulation conditions. The removal efficiency of DOC, genotoxicity, and antiestrogenic activity concentration of the ROC could achieve 16.9, 18.9, and 39.7 %, respectively, by FeCl3 coagulation (with FeCl3 dosage of 180.22 mg/L), which can hardly reduce UV254 and genotoxicity normalized by DOC of the DOM with MW activity were completely eliminated by the GAC adsorption. The results suggest that GAC adsorption combined pretreatment of FeCl3 coagulation as an efficient method to control organics, genotoxicity, and antiestrogenic activity in the ROC from mWRRO system.

  4. Evaluation of 'see-see and treat' strategy and role of HIV on cervical cancer prevention in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandin Sven

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is scant information on whether Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV seropositivity has an influence on the outcome of treatment of precancerous cervical lesions using cryotherapy. We studied the prevalence of cervical abnormalities detectable by visual inspection and cervical lesions diagnosed by colposcopy according to HIV serostatus and described the outcomes of cryotherapy treatment. Methods Trained nurses examined women not previously screened for cervical cancer using visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA and Lugol's iodine (VILI in two family planning/post natal clinics in Kampala, Uganda, from February 2007 to August 2008. Women with abnormal visual inspection findings were referred for colposcopic evaluation and HIV testing. Women with precancerous cervical lesions detected at colposcopy were treated mainly by cryotherapy, and were evaluated for treatment outcome after 3 months by a second colposcopy. Results Of the 5 105 women screened, 834 presented a positive screening test and were referred for colposcopy. Of these 625 (75% returned for the colposcopic evaluation and were tested for HIV. For the 608 (97.5% women in the age range 20-60 years, colposcopy revealed 169 women with cervical lesions: 128 had inflammation, 19 had low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL, 13 had high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL, 9 had invasive cervical cancer and 2 had inconclusive findings. Detection rates per 1 000 women screened were higher among the older women (41-60 years compared to women aged 20-40 years. They were accordingly 55% and 20% for inflammation, 10% and 2% for LGSIL, 5% and 2% for HGSIL, 6% and 1% for invasive cervical cancer. Of the 608 women, 103 (16% were HIV positive. HIV positivity was associated with higher likelihood of inflammation (RR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4. Conclusions Detection rates were higher among older women 41-60 years. Visual inspection of the cervix uteri with acetic acid

  5. HIV testing in Europe: Evaluating the impact, added value, relevance and usability of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC)'s 2010 HIV testing guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ann K; Sperle, Ida; Raben, Dorthe; Amato-Gauci, Andrew J; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Jakobsen, Stine Finne; Tavoschi, Lara

    2017-11-01

    An evaluation of the 2010 ECDC guidance on HIV testing, conducted in October 2015-January 2016, assessed its impact, added value, relevance and usability and the need for updated guidance. Data sources were two surveys: one for the primary target audience (health policymakers and decision makers, national programme managers and ECDC official contact points in the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries and one for a broader target audience (clinicians, civil society organisations and international public health agencies); two moderated focus group discussions  (17 participants each); webpage access data; a literature citation review; and an expert consultation (18 participants) to discuss the evaluation findings. Twenty-three of 28 primary target audience and 31 of 51 broader target audience respondents indicated the guidance was the most relevant when compared with other international guidance. Primary target audience respondents in 11 of 23 countries reported that they had used the guidance in development, monitoring and/or evaluation of their national HIV testing policy, guidelines, programme and/or strategy, and 29 of 51 of the broader target audience respondents reported having used the guidance in their work. Both the primary and broader target audience considered it important or very important to have an EU/EEA-level HIV testing guidance (23/28 and 46/51, respectively). The guidance has been widely used to develop policies, guidelines, programmes and strategies in the EU/EEA and should be regularly updated due to continuous developments in the field in order to continue to serve as an important reference guidance in the region.

  6. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Hermans, Sabine; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Auerbach, Brandon; Semeere, Aggrey; Sempa, Joseph; Ssennono, Mark; Ssewankambo, Fred; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness in Uganda of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods The cost-effectiveness of ART was evaluated on the assumption that ART reduces the risk of an HIV-positive pregnant

  7. Probing the molecular mechanism of action of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) using pre-steady-state kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftuoglu, Yagmur; Sohl, Christal D.; Mislak, Andrea C.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    The novel antiretroviral 4′-ethynyl-2-fluoro-2′-deoxyadenosine (EFdA) is a potent nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NRTI). Unlike other FDA-approved NRTIs, EFdA contains a 3′-hydroxyl. Pre-steady-state kinetics showed RT preferred incorporating EFdA-TP over native dATP. Moreover, RT slowly inserted nucleotides past an EFdA-terminated primer, resulting in delayed chain termination with unaffected fidelity. This is distinct from KP1212, another 3′-hydroxyl-containing RT inhibitor considered to promote viral lethal mutagenesis. New mechanistic features of RT inhibition by EFdA are revealed. PMID:24632447

  8. Impact evaluation of HIV/AIDS education in rural Henan province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ben-Yan; Xiang, Yuan-Xi; Zhao, Rui; Feng, Zhan-Chun; Liang, Shu-Ying; Wang, Yu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, there is a trend of HIV prevalence transmitting from high-risk group to average-risk group in China. Rural China is the weak link of HIV prevention, and rural areas of Henan province which is one of the most high-risk regions in China have more than 60% of the AIDS patients in the province. Thus, improving the HIV awareness and implementing health education become the top-priority of HIV/AIDS control and prevention. A multistage sampling was designed to draw 1129 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) and 1168 non-PLWHAs in 4 prevalence counties of Henan province. A health promoting and social-psychological support model was constructed to improve the health knowledge of participants. Chi-square tests and unconditional logistic regression were performed to determine the intervention effect and influencing factors. All groups had misunderstandings towards the basic medical knowledge and the AIDS transmission mode. Before the intervention, 59.3% of the HIV/AIDS patients and 74.6% of the healthy people had negative attitudes towards the disease. There was statistically significant difference in the improvement of knowledge, attitude and action with regards to HIV prevention before and after intervention (Peducation level (OR=1.910) were found to have better HIV/AIDS health knowledge, whereas older PLWHAs (OR=0.961) were less likely to have better HIV/AIDS health knowledge. However, the intervention effect was associated with the expertise of doctors and supervisors, the content and methods of education, and participants' education level. It was concluded that health education of HIV/AIDS which positively influences the awareness and attitude of HIV prevention is popular in rural areas, therefore, a systematic and long-term program of HIV control and prevention is urgently needed in rural areas.

  9. mTOR inhibition in macrophages of asymptomatic HIV+ persons reverses the decrease in TLR4-mediated TNFα release through prolongation of MAPK pathway activation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Han, Xinbing; Llano, Juliana; Bole, Medhavi; Zhou, Xiuqin; Swan, Katharine; Anandaiah, Asha; Nelson, Benjamin; Patel, Naimish R.; Reinach, Peter S.; Koziel, Henry; Tachado, Souvenir D.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediated signaling is significantly impaired in macrophages from HIV+ persons predominantly due to altered MyD88-dependent pathway signaling caused in part by constitutive activation of PI3K. Here we assessed in these macrophages if the blunted increase in TLR4-mediated TNFα release induced by lipid A are associated with PI3K-induced upregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR inhibition with rapamycin enhanced TLR4-mediated TNFα release, but instead suppressed anti-inflammatory IL-10 release. Targeted gene silencing of mTOR in macrophages resulted in lipid A-induced TNFα and IL-10 release patterns similar to those induced by rapamycin. Rapamycin restored MyD88-IRAK interaction in a dose-dependent manner. Targeted gene silencing of MyD88 (shRNA) and mTOR (RNAi) inhibition resulted in TLR4-mediated p70s6K activation and enhanced TNFα release, whereas IL-10 release was inhibited in both silenced and non-silenced HIV+ macrophages. Furthermore, mTOR inhibition augmented lipid A-induced TNFα release through enhanced and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 MAP kinases, which was associated with time-dependent MKP-1 destabilization. Taken together, impaired TLR4-mediated TNFα release in HIV+ macrophages is attributable in part to mTOR activation by constitutive PI3K expression in a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These changes result in MKP-1 stabilization, which shortens and blunts MAP kinase activation. mTOR inhibition may serve as a potential therapeutic target to upregulate macrophage innate immune host defense responsiveness in HIV+ persons. PMID:22025552

  10. An outdated notion of antibody specificity is one of the major detrimental assumptions of the structure-based reverse vaccinology paradigm which prevented it from helping to develop an effective HIV-1 vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc H V Van Regenmortel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of paradigms for guiding scientific research is explained with reference to the seminal work of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn. A prevalent paradigm, followed for more than a decade in HIV-1 vaccine research, which gave rise to the strategy known as structure-based reverse vaccinology is described in detail. Several reasons why this paradigm did not allow the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine are analyzed. A major reason is the belief shared by many vaccinologists that antibodies possess a narrow specificity for a single epitope and are not polyspecific for a diverse group of potential epitopes. When this belief is abandoned, it becomes obvious that the one particular epitope structure observed during the crystallographic analysis of a neutralizing antibody-antigen complex does not necessarily reveal which immunogenic structure should be used to elicit the same type of neutralizing antibody.In the physical sciences, scientific explanations are usually presented as logical deductions derived from a relevant law of nature together with certain initial conditions. In immunology, causal explanations in terms of a single cause acting according to a law of nature are not possible because numerous factors always play a role in bringing about an effect. The implications of this state of affairs for the rational design of HIV vaccines are outlined. An alternative approach to obtain useful scientific understanding consists in intervening empirically in the immune system and it is suggested that manipulating the system experimentally is needed to learn to control it and achieve protective immunity by vaccination.

  11. First-line HIV treatment: evaluation of backbone choice and its budget impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The gradual increase of persons living with HIV, mainly due to the reduced mortality achieved with effective antiretroviral therapies, calls for increased rationality and awareness in health resources consumption also during the early illness phases. Aim of this work is the estimation of the budget impact related to the variation in backbone prescribing trends in naïve patients.METHODS: Target population is the number of patients starting antiretroviral therapy each year, according to the Italian HIV surveillance registry, excluding patients receiving non-authorized or non-recommended regimens. We modeled 3-year mortality and durability rates on a dynamic cohort, basing on international literature. A prevalent patients analysis has also been conducted, for which the model is fed by a closed cohort consisting of all the patients without experience of virologic failure. The aim of this collateral analysis is to estimate the difference in current annual expenditures if the past prescription trends for patients starting therapy would have led to the evaluated hypothetical scenarios. Current Italian market shares of triple regimens containing first-choice or alternative backbones (tenofovir/emtricitabine, abacavir/lamivudine, tenofovir/lamivudine and zidovudine/lamivudine are compared to three hypothetical scenarios (base-case, minimum and maximum in which increasing shares of patients eligible to abacavir/lamivudine start first line treatment with this backbone. Annual cost for each regimen comprises drugs acquisition under hospital pricing rules, monitoring exams and preventive tests, valued basing on regional reimbursement tariffs.RESULTS: According to current prescribing trends, in the next three years about 13,000 patients starting HIV therapy will receive tenofovir/emtricitabine (83% of the target population, and minor portions other regimens (9% abacavir/lamivudine, 8% zidovudine/lamivudine. Patients that would be eligible to

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in animal modil with acute ischemic brain infarction : evaluation of reversible brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Woo Mok; Chang, Han Won; Cho, Inn Ho; Hah, Jung Sang; Sung, Eon Gi

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether the analysis of abnormally high signal intensities in ischemic tissue, as revealed by diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) can be used to evaluate reversible brain lesions in a cat model of acute ischemia. Ten cats were divided into two groups of five (Group I and Group II), and in all animals the middle cerebral artery was temporarily occluded. Group I underwent T2-DWI 30 minutes after occlusion, and Group II 120 minutes after occlusion. In both groups, DWI was performed one hour and 24 hours after reperfusion (at one hour, non-T2-weighted; at 24 hours, T2-weighted). Both occlusion and reperfusion were monitored by 99m TC-ECD brain perfusion SPECT. All animals were sacrificed 24 hours later and their brain tissue was stained with TTC. Signal intensity ratios (SIR, signifying average signal intensity within the region of interest divided by that in the contralateral, nonischemic, homologous region) of the two groups, as seen on DWI were compared. The percentage of hemispheric lesions occurring in the two groups was also compared. SIR after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was 1.29 in Group I and 1.59 in Group II. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, SIR in Group I was higher than in Group II (p<0.01). After occlusion and reperfusion, the percentage of hemispheric lesions in Group I was less than in Group II. For the latter, the percentage of these lesions revealed by TTC staining and T2-weighted imaging was 48% and 59%, respectively, findings distinctly different from those for Group I. In addition, in group I, infarction was revealed by neither TTC staining nor T2-weighted imaging (p<0.01). The use of DWI to evaluate signal intensity ratios can help determine whether or not brain injury after temporary cerebral ischemia is reversible

  13. Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

  14. [Total reverse shoulder replacement. Evaluation of the clinical results and complications in a series of 52 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Sánchez, L; Mesa-Mateo, A; Barrionuevo-Sánchez, F J; García-Benítez, B; Expósito-Triano, S

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical results and analyse the complications of total reverse shoulder replacement performed in our centre over an 8 year period. A retrospective study was conducted on 50 patients (52 shoulders), with a mean age of 70.15 years (range 51 to 84 years) between December 2004 and December 2012, who received a total reverse shoulder replacement, all performed by the same surgeon. The results have been evaluated according to clinical data, radiography study, a satisfaction scale, and the Constant scale, with a minimum follow-up of 16 months. Five of the cases (9.62%) had been intervened due to fractures of the proximal end of the humerus, 6 cases (11.53%) as surgical consequence of a prosthesis revision, 10 cases (19.23%) due to fracture sequelae, and 30 cases (59.62%) were patients with arthropathy due to a massive fracture of the rotator cuff. After a mean follow up of 35.78 months (range, 16-82), satisfactory clinical results were obtained in 80% of cases, with a mean preoperative Constant of 27.7 points, and reaching 67.1 points 12 months after the operation. On the visual analogue scale, 8.25 points were obtained before the surgery, which decreased to 2.25 points 12 months later. The complications rate was 15.38%, which were due to an intra-operative fracture (1.92%), deep infection (3.84%), instability (3.84%), and early mechanical loosening (3.84%). Scapular notching was observed in the radiographic study in 9 (17.3%) cases. After the results obtained, it could be said that total reverse shoulder replacement achieved encouraging results in the short term for the treatment of glenohumeral arthrosis and massive tears of the rotary cuff. On analysing our series, it can be seen that the complications rate is much higher when it is used to treat fracture sequelae in which there is a loss of proximal humerus bone stock. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV/AIDS Policy-Making in Iran: Part 2- from Formulation to Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Khodayari Zarnaq

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Achieving an appropriate policy needs an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of policy-making process. This study aimed to analyze HIV/AIDS policy-making process in Iran. Material and Methods: This is a qualitative/exploratory study. Data were collected through document review and semi-structured interview. Non-probability sampling was used for selecting documents and research participants. We used framework analysis approach assisted by MAXQDA for analyzing qualitative data. Results: AIDS policy is formulated in two specific ways within national work group in the format of national strategic plan and drug damage reduction committee. The main problem of the policy process is fragmentation and lack of comprehensiveness. Country approach of the policy implementation is top-down. The main duty of country committee and its sub-committees facing with some challenges is generating interaction between the relevant organizations. Despite the specific structure of evaluation process, it suffers from challenges such as lack of required implementation power, lack of resource anticipation, weakness in systematic and comprehensiveness evaluation and not-enough cooperation among plan’s stakeholders. Conclusion: It is obvious that policy-making in this area is completely governmental and the role of non-governmental organizations and civil servants is neglected. It seems that reform in AIDS policy-making structure and process can solve most of the problems of implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

  16. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  17. Innovation in Evaluating the Impact of Integrated Service-Delivery: The Integra Indexes of HIV and Reproductive Health Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Susannah H; Ploubidis, George B; Sloggett, Andy; Church, Kathryn; Obure, Carol D; Birdthistle, Isolde; Sweeney, Sedona; Warren, Charlotte E; Watts, Charlotte; Vassall, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The body of knowledge on evaluating complex interventions for integrated healthcare lacks both common definitions of 'integrated service delivery' and standard measures of impact. Using multiple data sources in combination with statistical modelling the aim of this study is to develop a measure of HIV-reproductive health (HIV-RH) service integration that can be used to assess the degree of service integration, and the degree to which integration may have health benefits to clients, or reduce service costs. Data were drawn from the Integra Initiative's client flow (8,263 clients in Swaziland and 25,539 in Kenya) and costing tools implemented between 2008-2012 in 40 clinics providing RH services in Kenya and Swaziland. We used latent variable measurement models to derive dimensions of HIV-RH integration using these data, which quantified the extent and type of integration between HIV and RH services in Kenya and Swaziland. The modelling produced two clear and uncorrelated dimensions of integration at facility level leading to the development of two sub-indexes: a Structural Integration Index (integrated physical and human resource infrastructure) and a Functional Integration Index (integrated delivery of services to clients). The findings highlight the importance of multi-dimensional assessments of integration, suggesting that structural integration is not sufficient to achieve the integrated delivery of care to clients--i.e. "functional integration". These Indexes are an important methodological contribution for evaluating complex multi-service interventions. They help address the need to broaden traditional evaluations of integrated HIV-RH care through the incorporation of a functional integration measure, to avoid misleading conclusions on its 'impact' on health outcomes. This is particularly important for decision-makers seeking to promote integration in resource constrained environments.

  18. Innovation in Evaluating the Impact of Integrated Service-Delivery: The Integra Indexes of HIV and Reproductive Health Integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah H Mayhew

    Full Text Available The body of knowledge on evaluating complex interventions for integrated healthcare lacks both common definitions of 'integrated service delivery' and standard measures of impact. Using multiple data sources in combination with statistical modelling the aim of this study is to develop a measure of HIV-reproductive health (HIV-RH service integration that can be used to assess the degree of service integration, and the degree to which integration may have health benefits to clients, or reduce service costs.Data were drawn from the Integra Initiative's client flow (8,263 clients in Swaziland and 25,539 in Kenya and costing tools implemented between 2008-2012 in 40 clinics providing RH services in Kenya and Swaziland. We used latent variable measurement models to derive dimensions of HIV-RH integration using these data, which quantified the extent and type of integration between HIV and RH services in Kenya and Swaziland. The modelling produced two clear and uncorrelated dimensions of integration at facility level leading to the development of two sub-indexes: a Structural Integration Index (integrated physical and human resource infrastructure and a Functional Integration Index (integrated delivery of services to clients. The findings highlight the importance of multi-dimensional assessments of integration, suggesting that structural integration is not sufficient to achieve the integrated delivery of care to clients--i.e. "functional integration".These Indexes are an important methodological contribution for evaluating complex multi-service interventions. They help address the need to broaden traditional evaluations of integrated HIV-RH care through the incorporation of a functional integration measure, to avoid misleading conclusions on its 'impact' on health outcomes. This is particularly important for decision-makers seeking to promote integration in resource constrained environments.

  19. Reverse Osmosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    many applications, one of which is desalination of seawater. The inaugural Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded in 1901 to van 't Hoff for his seminal work in this area. The present article explains the principle of osmosis and reverse osmosis. Osmosis and Reverse Osmosis. As the name suggests, reverse osmosis is the ...

  20. T lymphocytes among HIV-infected and -uninfected infants: CD4/CD8 ratio as a potential tool in diagnosis of infection in infants under the age of 2 years

    OpenAIRE

    Bikoue Arsene; Gwanzura Christine; Tobaiwa Ocean; Rusakaniko Simbarashe; Nathoo Kusum J; Katzenstein David A; Zijenah Lynn S; Nhembe Margaret; Matibe Petronella; Janossy George

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Serologic tests for HIV infection in infants less than 18 months do not differentiate exposure and infection since maternally acquired IgG antibodies may be detected in infants. Thus, the gold standard for diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants under the age of 2 years is DNA or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. There is an urgent need to evaluate alternative and cost effective laboratory methods for early diagnosis of infant HIV-1 infection as well as iden...

  1. Economic evaluation of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis strategies: protocol for a methodological systematic review and quantitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavorn, Kednapa; Kugathasan, Howsikan; Tan, Darrell H S; Moqueet, Nasheed; Baral, Stefan D; Skidmore, Becky; MacFadden, Derek; Simkin, Anna; Mishra, Sharmistha

    2018-03-15

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretrovirals is an efficacious and effective intervention to decrease the risk of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) acquisition. Yet drug and delivery costs prohibit access in many jurisdictions. In the absence of guidelines for the synthesis of economic evaluations, we developed a protocol for a systematic review of economic evaluation studies for PrEP by drawing on best practices in systematic reviews and the conduct and reporting of economic evaluations. We aim to estimate the incremental cost per health outcome of PrEP compared with placebo, no PrEP, or other HIV prevention strategies; assess the methodological variability in, and quality of, economic evaluations of PrEP; estimate the incremental cost per health outcome of different PrEP implementation strategies; and quantify the potential sources of heterogeneity in outcomes. We will systematically search electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase) and the gray literature. We will include economic evaluation studies that assess both costs and health outcomes of PrEP in HIV-uninfected individuals, without restricting language or year of publication. Two reviewers will independently screen studies using predefined inclusion criteria, extract data, and assess methodological quality using the Philips checklist, Second Panel on the Cost-effectiveness of Health and Medicines, and the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research recommendations. Outcomes of interest include incremental costs and outcomes in natural units or utilities, cost-effectiveness ratios, and net monetary benefit. We will perform descriptive and quantitative syntheses using sensitivity analyses of outcomes by population subgroups, HIV epidemic settings, study designs, baseline intervention contexts, key parameter inputs and assumptions, type of outcomes, economic perspectives, and willingness to pay values. Findings will guide future economic evaluation of PrEP strategies in terms of

  2. Evaluation of an HIV-risk reduction programme for first-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results indicated that HIV-related knowledge; condom knowledge and risk perception were enhanced by the HIV- related risk reduction programme. However, there is a need for improvement, especially with regard to attitudes towards condoms since some students still had negative attitudes even after the intervention ...

  3. Evaluation of the clinical management of HIV-infected patients by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although private sector doctors are the backbone of treatment service in many countries, caring for patients with HIV entails a whole new set of challenges and difficulties. The few studies done on the quality of care of HIV patients, in the private sector in developing countries, have highlighted some problems ...

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of Two Interventions for Educator Training in HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Wei; Gow, Jeff; Akintola, Olagoke; Pauly, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two different methods to teach educators about HIV/AIDS. Sixty educators were selected from eight schools in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, to undergo HIV/AIDS training using an interactive CD-ROM intervention. Another sixty educators from other schools were selected to undergo a two-day Life Skills…

  5. HIV/AIDS response in Rivers State, Nigeria: an evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Over the years Rivers State of Nigeria has witnessed a rising trend in HIV/AIDS infection. In 2006, the State Action Committee on AIDS commenced the implementation of a Strategic Response Plan to prevent and mitigate the effect of HIV/AIDS by 2009. Aim : To verify the extent of achievement of the Strategic ...

  6. HIV epidemic drivers in South Africa: A model-based evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV prevalence differs substantially between South Africa's provinces, but the factors accounting for this difference are poorly understood. Objectives: To estimate HIV prevalence and incidence trends by province, and to identify the epidemiological factors that account for most of the variation between provinces ...

  7. V3-serotyping programme evaluated for HIV-1 variation in the Netherlands and Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf F de; Akker R van den; Valk M; Bakker M; Goudsmit J; Loon AM van; VIR; UVA/HRL

    1995-01-01

    To obtain insight into the variation of the HIV-1 V3 neutralization domain of variants circulating in the Netherlands, 126 Dutch, 70 Curacao and 45 African serum samples from HIV-1 infected individuals were screened for antibody reactivity to a set of 16 to 17 mer synthetic peptides, representing

  8. Kericho CLinic-based ART Diagnostic Evaluation (CLADE: design, accrual, and baseline characteristics of a randomized controlled trial conducted in predominately rural, district-level, HIV clinics of Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick K Sawe

    Full Text Available Prospective clinical trial data regarding routine HIV-1 viral load (VL monitoring of antiretroviral therapy (ART in non-research clinics of Sub-Saharan Africa are needed for policy makers.CLinic-based ART Diagnostic Evaluation (CLADE is a randomized, controlled trial (RCT evaluating feasibility, superiority, and cost-effectiveness of routine VL vs. standard of care (clinical and immunological monitoring in adults initiating dual nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+non-NRTI ART. Participants were randomized (1:1 at 7 predominately rural, non-research, district-level clinics of western Kenya. Descriptive statistics present accrual patterns and baseline cohort characteristics.Over 15 months, 820 adults enrolled at 7 sites with 86-152 enrolled per site. Monthly site enrollment ranged from 2-92 participants. Full (100% informed consent compliance was independently documented. Half (49.9% had HIV diagnosed through voluntary counseling and testing. Study arms were similar: mostly females (57.6% aged 37.6 (SD = 9.0 years with low CD4 (166 [SD = 106] cells/m3. Notable proportions had WHO Stage III or IV disease (28.7%, BMI <18.5 kg/m2 (23.1%, and a history of tuberculosis (5.6% or were receiving tuberculosis treatment (8.2% at ART initiation. In the routine VL arm, 407/409 (99.5% received baseline VL (234,577 SD = 151,055 copies/ml. All participants received lamivudine; 49.8% started zidovudine followed by 38.4% stavudine and 11.8% tenofovir; and, 64.4% received nevirapine as nNRTI (35.6% efavirenz.A RCT can be enrolled successfully in rural, non-research, resource limited, district-level clinics in western Kenya. Many adults presenting for ART have advanced HIV/AIDS, emphasizing the importance of universal HIV testing and linkage-to-care campaigns.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01791556.

  9. Progress in Reversing the HIV Epidemic through Intensified Access to Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from a Nationally Representative Population-Based Survey in Kenya, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Andrea A.; Mukui, Irene; N’gan’ga, Lucy; Katana, Abraham; Koros, Dan; Wamicwe, Joyce; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2014, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) called for 90% of persons living with HIV (PLHIV) to know their status, 90% of these to be on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% of these to be virally suppressed by 2020 (90-90-90). It is not clear whether planned ART scale-up in countries whose eligibility criteria for ART initiation are based on recommendations from the 2013 World Health Organization treatment guidelines will be sufficient to meet UNAIDS' new global targets. Materials and Methods Using data from a nationally representative population-based household survey of persons in Kenya we compared coverage and unmet need associated with HIV diagnosis, ART, and viral suppression among PLHIV aged 15–64 years in 2012 based on criteria outlined in the 2014 national ART guidelines and UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 goals. Estimates were weighted to account for sampling probability and nonresponse. Results Eight in ten PLHIV aged 15–64 years needed ART based on treatment eligibility. Need for treatment based on the national treatment policy was 97.4% of treatment need based on UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 goals, requiring an excess of 24,000 PLHIV to access treatment beyond those eligible for ART to achieve UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 treatment target. The gap in treatment coverage was high, ranging from 43.1% nationally to 52.3% in Nyanza among treatment-eligible PLHIV and 44.6% nationally to 52.4% in Nyanza among all PLHIV. Conclusion Maintaining the current pace of ART scale-up in Kenya will result in thousands of PLHIV unreached, many with high viral load and at-risk of transmitting infection to others. Careful strategies for reaching 90-90-90 will be instrumental in determining whether intensified access to treatment can be achieved to reach all who require ART. PMID:26930291

  10. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against β-Amyloid (1-42-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1 extract of ashwagandha against β-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that β-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to β-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against β-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B induced neuro-pathogenesis.

  11. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev (Merck)

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  12. Retaining clients in an outcome monitoring evaluation study: HIV prevention efforts in community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryce D; Kalayil, Elizabeth J; Patel-Larson, Alpa; Chen, Brenda; Vaughan, Marla

    2012-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP) conducted outcome monitoring studies on evidence-based interventions (EBIs) provided by CDC-funded community-based organizations (CBOs). Critical to the success of outcome monitoring was the ability of CBOs to recruit and retain clients in evaluation studies. Two EBIs, Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex (VOICES/VOCES) and Healthy Relationships, were evaluated using repeated measure studies, which require robust follow-up retention rates to increase the validity and usefulness of the findings. The retention rates were high for both VOICES/VOCES CBOs (95.8% at 30 days and 91.1% at 120 days), and Healthy Relationships CBOs (89.5% at 90 days and 83.5% at 180 days). This paper presents an overview of the retention of clients, challenges to follow-up, and strategies developed by CBOs to achieve high retention rates. These strategies and rates are discussed within the context of the CBOs' target populations and communities. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy to stage liver fibrosis and evaluate reversal after fibrotic stimulus withdrawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xin; Guo, Qiyong; Shi, Yu; Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Yang, Zhiguang; Cao, Li; Liu, Changping; Zhao, Zhoushe; Xin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scintigraphy using 99mTc-3PRGD2 targeting integrin αvβ3 could assess activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Liver fibrogenesis is intimately associated with activation of HSCs, and the fibrolytic process is accompanied by the reduction of the activated HSCs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility of this method to assess the severity of liver fibrosis and the reversal after the fibrotic stimulus withdrawal. Methods: Liver fibrosis of different stages was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) injection for 2, 4 and 6 weeks (n = 6 for each time point). Another 6 rats with 8-week TAA administration (the 8-week group) and 6 rats which were injected with TAA for 6 weeks, and then withdrawn of TAA for 2 weeks (spontaneous recovery rats, SRR) were designed. The ratios of radioactivity detected in the liver vs. the heart at 30 min post-injection of 99m Tc-3PRGD2 (L/H30 min ), the collagen proportionate area (CPA), the protein and mRNA levels of integrin α v , integrin β 3 were analyzed and compared among groups. Results: The Ishak stage scores of the livers in the control and 2, 4, 6-week groups increased when the TAA administration period was extended. L/H30 min increased with the upgrading of liver fibrosis and the differences between each pair of groups were statistically significant (p 30 min in the 8-week group was similar to that in the 6-week group (p > 0.05), but was significantly higher than that in the SRR group (p = 0.005). Conclusions: Scintigraphy using 99m Tc-3PRGD2 may provide a non-invasive method for grading liver fibrosis and assessing liver fibrosis reversal.

  14. Evaluation of inadequate anti-retroviral treatment in patients with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Carvalho da Fonseca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Since the emergence of antiretroviral therapy, the survival of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus has increased. Non-adherence to this therapy is directly related to treatment failure, which allows the emergence of resistant viral strains. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive study of the antiretroviral dispensing records of 229 patients from the Center for Health Care, University Hospital, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil, was conducted between January and December 2009. RESULTS: The study aimed to evaluate patient compliance and determine if there was an association between non-adherence and the therapy. Among these patients, 63.8% were men with an average age of 44.0 ± 9.9 years. The most used treatment was a combination of 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors with 1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (55.5% or with 2 protease inhibitors (28.8%. It was found that patients taking lopinavir/ritonavir with zidovudine and lamivudine had a greater frequency of inadequate treatment than those taking atazanavir with zidovudine and lamivudine (85% and 83.3%, respectively. Moreover, when the combination of zidovudine/ lamivudine was used, the patients were less compliant (χ2 = 4.468, 1 degree of freedom, p = 0.035. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients failed to correctly adhere to their treatment; therefore, it is necessary to implement strategies that lead to improved compliance, thus ensuring therapeutic efficacy and increased patient survival.

  15. A human rights-focused HIV intervention for sex workers in Metro Manila, Philippines: evaluation of effects in a quantitative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urada, Lianne A; Simmons, Janie; Wong, Betty; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; Condino-Enrera, Gerlita; Hernandez, Laufred I; Simbulan, Nymia Pimentel; Raj, Anita

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated a brief human rights-focused HIV community mobilization intervention for sex workers in the Philippines, a country with one of the fastest rising number of HIV cases worldwide. Five single-session group interventions to reduce sexual risk and increase HIV testing among 86 sex workers in Manila were evaluated with pre-post-test data via Wilcoxon's signed-ranks and Mann-Whitney tests. The 4-h intervention, Kapihan (August-November, 2013), integrated human rights with HIV skill-building. Demographic data, violence/trafficking victimization, human rights knowledge, and intentions to HIV test and treat were collected. Participants were median aged 23; female (69 %); had children (55; 22 % had 3+ children); used drugs (past 3 months: 16 %); sexually/physically abused by clients (66 %); 20 % street sex workers ever took an HIV test. Pre-post-test scores significantly improved in knowledge of HIV (z = -8.895, p research participants (z = -5.081, p test (z = -4.868, p test for HIV.

  16. Is a HIV vaccine a viable option and at what price? An economic evaluation of adding HIV vaccination into existing prevention programs in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Leelahavarong, Pattara; Teerawattananon, Yot; Werayingyong, Pitsaphun; Akaleephan, Chutima; Premsri, Nakorn; Namwat, Chawetsan; Peerapatanapokin, Wiwat; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aims to determine the maximum price at which HIV vaccination is cost-effective in the Thai healthcare setting. It also aims to identify the relative importance of vaccine characteristics and risk behavior changes among vaccine recipients to determine how they affect this cost-effectiveness. Methods A semi-Markov model was developed to estimate the costs and health outcomes of HIV prevention programs combined with HIV vaccination in comparison to the existing HIV...

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Zimbabwe’s Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Program: Population-Level Estimates of HIV-Free Infant Survival Pre-Option A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdugan, Raluca; McCoy, Sandra I.; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Petersen, Maya; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Mushavi, Angela; Mujuru, Hilda Angela; Mahomva, Agnes; Musarandega, Reuben; Hakobyan, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Cowan, Frances M.; Padian, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We estimated HIV-free infant survival and mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) rates in Zimbabwe, some of the first community-based estimates from a UNAIDS priority country. Methods In 2012 we surveyed mother-infant pairs residing in the catchment areas of 157 health facilities randomly selected from 5 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe. Enrolled infants were born 9–18 months before the survey. We collected questionnaires, blood samples for HIV testing, and verbal autopsies for deceased mothers/infants. Estimates were assessed among i) all HIV-exposed infants, as part of an impact evaluation of Option A of the 2010 WHO guidelines (rolled out in Zimbabwe in 2011), and ii) the subgroup of infants unexposed to Option A. We compared province-level MTCT rates measured among women in the community with MTCT rates measured using program monitoring data from facilities serving those communities. Findings Among 8568 women with known HIV serostatus, 1107 (12.9%) were HIV-infected. Among all HIV-exposed infants, HIV-free infant survival was 90.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 88.7–92.7) and MTCT was 8.8% (95% CI: 6.9–11.1). Sixty-six percent of HIV-exposed infants were still breastfeeding. Among the 762 infants born before Option A was implemented, 90.5% (95% CI: 88.1–92.5) were alive and HIV-uninfected at 9–18 months of age, and 9.1% (95%CI: 7.1–11.7) were HIV-infected. In four provinces, the community-based MTCT rate was higher than the facility-based MTCT rate. In Harare, the community and facility-based rates were 6.0% and 9.1%, respectively. Conclusion By 2012 Zimbabwe had made substantial progress towards the elimination of MTCT. Our HIV-free infant survival and MTCT estimates capture HIV transmissions during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding regardless of whether or not mothers accessed health services. These estimates also provide a baseline against which to measure the impact of Option A guidelines (and subsequently Option B+). PMID:26248197

  18. The case for addressing gender and power in sexuality and HIV education: a comprehensive review of evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Nicole A

    2015-03-01

    Curriculum-based sexuality and HIV education is a mainstay of interventions to prevent STIs, HIV and unintended pregnancy among young people. Evidence links traditional gender norms, unequal power in sexual relationships and intimate partner violence with negative sexual and reproductive health outcomes. However, little attention has been paid to analyzing whether addressing gender and power in sexuality education curricula is associated with better outcomes. To explore whether the inclusion of content on gender and power matters for program efficacy, electronic and hand searches were conducted to identify rigorous sexuality and HIV education evaluations from developed and developing countries published between 1990 and 2012. Intervention and study design characteristics of the included interventions were disaggregated by whether they addressed issues of gender and power. Of the 22 interventions that met the inclusion criteria, 10 addressed gender or power, and 12 did not. The programs that addressed gender or power were five times as likely to be effective as those that did not; fully 80% of them were associated with a significantly lower rate of STIs or unintended pregnancy. In contrast, among the programs that did not address gender or power, only 17% had such an association. Addressing gender and power should be considered a key characteristic of effective sexuality and HIV education programs.

  19. Using digital communication technology fails to improve longitudinal evaluation of an HIV prevention program aimed at Indian truck drivers and cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, John A; Kondareddy, Divya; Gandham, Sabitha; Dude, Annie M

    2012-07-01

    HIV prevention programs for truck drivers and cleaners (TDC) in India are limited. Longitudinal follow-up presents an obstacle to program effectiveness evaluation. We asked 3,028 TDC in a truck-driver HIV prevention program in Hyderabad to leave a cellular telephone number; we contacted participants 6 months after the intervention to assess sexual risk behavior change. Married, older, and better educated participants were more likely to leave phone numbers. Only 6.5% of TDC were reachable after 6 months. Longitudinal follow-up of this mobile sub-population remains a challenge, and more effective methods for evaluating HIV prevention programs are needed.

  20. A Novel Aspartic Protease with HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Fresh Fruiting Bodies of the Wild Mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Xiu Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel aspartic protease with HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity was isolated and characterized from fruiting bodies of the wild mushroom Xylaria hypoxylon. The purification protocol comprised distilled water homogenization and extraction step, three ion exchange chromatographic steps (on DEAE-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and CM-cellulose in succession, and final purification was by FPLC on Superdex 75. The protease was adsorbed on all the three ion exchangers. It was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 43 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE and FPLC. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was HYTELLSQVV, which exhibited no sequence homology to other proteases reported. The activity of the protease was adversely affected by Pepstatin A, indicating that it is an aspartic protease. The protease activity was maximal or nearly so in the pH range 6–8 and in the temperature range 35–60°C. The purified enzyme exhibited HIV-1 RT inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 8.3 μM, but was devoid of antifungal, ribonuclease, and hemagglutinating activities.

  1. Geometrically and conformationally restrained cinnamoyl compounds as inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase: synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Di Santo, R; Costi, R; Novellino, E; Greco, G; Massa, S; Tramontano, E; Marongiu, M E; De Montis, A; La Colla, P

    1998-10-08

    Various cinnammoyl-based structures were synthesized and tested in enzyme assays as inhibitors of the HIV-1 integrase (IN). The majority of compounds were designed as geometrically or conformationally constrained analogues of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and were characterized by a syn disposition of the carbonyl group with respect to the vinylic double bond. Since the cinnamoyl moiety present in flavones such as quercetin (inactive on HIV-1-infected cells) is frozen in an anti arrangement, it was hoped that fixing our compounds in a syn disposition could favor anti-HIV-1 activity in cell-based assays. Geometrical and conformational properties of the designed compounds were taken into account through analysis of X-ray structures available from the Cambridge Structural Database. The polyhydroxylated analogues were prepared by reacting 3,4-bis(tetrahydropyran-2-yloxy)benzaldehyde with various compounds having active methylene groups such as 2-propanone, cyclopentanone, cyclohexanone, 1,3-diacetylbenzene, 2, 4-dihydroxyacetophenone, 2,3-dihydro-1-indanone, 2,3-dihydro-1, 3-indandione, and others. While active against both 3'-processing and strand-transfer reactions, the new compounds, curcumin included, failed to inhibit the HIV-1 multiplication in acutely infected MT-4 cells. Nevertheless, they specifically inhibited the enzymatic reactions associated with IN, being totally inactive against other viral (HIV-1 reverse transcriptase) and cellular (RNA polymerase II) nucleic acid-processing enzymes. On the other hand, title compounds were endowed with remarkable antiproliferative activity, whose potency correlated neither with the presence of catechols (possible source of reactive quinones) nor with inhibition of topoisomerases. The SARs developed for our compounds led to novel findings concerning the molecular determinants of IN inhibitory activity within the class of cinnamoyl-based structures. We hypothesize that these compounds bind to IN featuring the

  2. Investing in communities: evaluating the added value of community mobilization on HIV prevention outcomes among FSWs in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Anne Sebert; Galavotti, Christine; Hastings, Philip; Narayanan, Pradeep; Saggurti, Niranjan

    2014-04-01

    Community mobilization often requires greater time and resource investments than typical interventions, yet few evaluations exist to justify these investments. We evaluated the added benefit of community mobilization on HIV prevention outcomes among female sex workers (FSWs) using a composite measure of volunteer participation in program committees by FSWs. After adjusting for treatment propensity, we used multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) to test our program theory. We hypothesized that stronger community mobilization would be associated with increased levels of consistent condom use and with increased levels of perceived fairness, mediated by psychosocial processes. Community mobilization had an indirect effect on consistent condom use mediated through social cohesion and an indirect effect on perceived fairness mediated by collective efficacy. Our results suggest higher levels of community mobilization help improve condom use and reduce perceived discrimination beyond the effects of the core HIV intervention program. We recommend further testing of this model.

  3. Evaluation of bone alterations in the jaws of HIV-infected menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Vieira Caputo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has caused a reduction in mortality, thus contributing to an increase in the number of women with HIVࢧAIDS who reach the climacteric period, experience decline in ovarian function, and develop complications of viral infection and HAART, which can accelerate bone loss. The aim of this study was to detect possible alterations in the jaws of HIV-infected women by panoramic radiography. The study comprised a total of 120 women above 40 years of age who were divided into the following two groups: women who are HIV positive (Group I and women with no known HIV infection (Group II. Measurement of the following three radiomorphometric indexes was performed by panoramic radiography: Mental Index (MI, Panoramic Mandibular Index (PMI and Antegonial Depth (AD. A total of 70% of women in the control group and 50% of women in the HIV group were in the postmenopausal period, and the average values of both MI (p = 0.0054 and AD (p < 0.0001 for this period were lower in the HIV group than in the control group. For patients who were in the premenopausal period, the average AD was lower in the HIV group than in the control group (p = 0.0003. Despite the difference in the average age between groups, greater bone resorption in the mandible was found in the group of HIV-positive women.

  4. Administrative integration of vertical HIV monitoring and evaluation into health systems: a case study from South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kawonga, Mary; Fonn, Sharon; Blaauw, Duane

    2013-01-01

    Background: In light of an increasing global focus on health system strengthening and integration of vertical programmes within health systems, methods and tools are required to examine whether general health service managers exercise administrative authority over vertical programmes. Objective: To measure the extent to which general health service (horizontal) managers, exercise authority over the HIV programme’s monitoring and evaluation (M&E) function, and to explore factors that may i...

  5. The Antiviral Activity of Approved and Novel Drugs against HIV-1 Mutations Evaluated under the Consideration of Dose-Response Curve Slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Chang

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify common HIV-1 mutation complexes affecting the slope of inhibition curve, and to propose a new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope to evaluate phenotypic resistance.Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis, we constructed 22 HIV-1 common mutation complexes. IC50 and slope of 10 representative approved drugs and a novel agent against these mutations were measured to determine the resistance phenotypes. The values of new parameter incorporating both the IC50 and the slope of the inhibition curve were calculated, and the correlations between parameters were assessed.Depending on the class of drug, there were intrinsic differences in how the resistance mutations affected the drug parameters. All of the mutations resulted in large increases in the IC50s of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The effects of the mutations on the slope were the most apparent when examining their effects on the inhibition of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors. For example, some mutations, such as V82A, had no effect on IC50, but reduced the slope. We proposed a new concept, termed IIPatoxic, on the basis of IC50, slope and the maximum limiting concentrations of the drug. The IIPatoxic values of 10 approved drugs and 1 novel agent were calculated, and were closely related to the IIPmax values (r > 0.95, p < 0.001.This study confirms that resistance mutations cannot be accurately assessed by IC50 alone, because it tends to underestimate the degree of resistance. The slope parameter is of very importance in the measurement of drug resistance and the effect can be applied to more complex patterns of resistance. This is the most apparent when testing the effects of the mutations on protease inhibitors activity. We also propose a new index, IIPatoxic, which incorporates both the IC50 and the slope. This new index could complement current IIP indices, thereby enabling predict the

  6. A technical and economic evaluation of reverse osmosis nuclear desalination as applied at the Muria site in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, J.R.; Davies, K.; Vu, T.D.; Aryono, N.A.; Peryoga, Y.

    1998-01-01

    effects on the other. In co-operation with BPPT of Indonesia, CANDESAL and AECL have performed an evaluation of this nuclear desalination concept to establish the design, performance and economic characteristics of a large scale reverse osmosis seawater desalination plant coupled with a CANDU reactor, operating under conditions appropriate to the Muria site in Indonesia. The results of the evaluation are discussed herein. (author)

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Efficacy of Promoting a Home-Based HIV Self-Testing with Online Counseling on Increasing HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixin; Lau, Joseph T F; Ip, Mary; Ho, Shara P Y; Mo, Phoenix K H; Latkin, Carl; Ma, Yee Ling; Kim, Yoona

    2018-01-01

    We developed an innovative home-based HIV self-testing (HIVST) service that included mailing of a free HIVST kit, and providing online real-time instructions and pre-test/post-test counseling (HIVST-OIC). The present parallel-group and non-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of promoting HIVST-OIC in increasing HIV testing rate among 430 men who have sex with men (MSM), with access to online live-chat applications in Hong Kong. At month 6, as compared to the control group, the intervention group reported significantly higher prevalence of HIV testing of any type (89.8 vs. 50.7%; relative risk (RR): 1.77; p strong potential in increasing prevalence of HIV testing and reducing sexual risk behaviors. Implementation research is warranted.

  8. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors as potential colorectal microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carolina; Cranage, Martin; McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter; Shattock, Robin J

    2009-05-01

    We investigated whether reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (RTI) can be combined to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of colorectal tissue ex vivo as part of a strategy to develop an effective rectal microbicide. The nucleotide RTI (NRTI) PMPA (tenofovir) and two nonnucleoside RTI (NNRTI), UC-781 and TMC120 (dapivirine), were evaluated. Each compound inhibited the replication of the HIV isolates tested in TZM-bl cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and colorectal explants. Dual combinations of the three compounds, either NRTI-NNRTI or NNRTI-NNRTI combinations, were more active than any of the individual compounds in both cellular and tissue models. Combinations were key to inhibiting infection by NRTI- and NNRTI-resistant isolates in all models tested. Moreover, we found that the replication capacities of HIV-1 isolates in colorectal explants were affected by single point mutations in RT that confer resistance to RTI. These data demonstrate that colorectal explants can be used to screen compounds for potential efficacy as part of a combination microbicide and to determine the mucosal fitness of RTI-resistant isolates. These findings may have important implications for the rational design of effective rectal microbicides.

  9. Evaluation of coronary features of HIV patients presenting with ACS: The CUORE, a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyracchia, Mattia; De Lio, Giulia; Montrucchio, Chiara; Omedè, Pierluigi; d'Ettore, Gabriella; Calcagno, Andrea; Vullo, Vincenzo; Cerrato, Enrico; Pennacchi, Mauro; Sardella, Gennaro; Manga, Pravin; GrossoMarra, Walter; Vullo, Francesco; Fedele, Francesco; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Moretti, Claudio; Vachiat, Ahmed; Bonora, Stefano; Rinaldi, Mauro; Mancone, Massimo; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio

    2018-05-05

    The risk of recurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) in HIV patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is well known, but there is limited evidence about potential differences in coronary plaques compared to non-HIV patients. In this multicenter case-control study, HIV patients presenting with ACS, with intravascular-ultrasound (IVUS) data, enrolled between February 2015 and June 2017, and undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), were retrospectively compared to non-HIV patients presenting with ACS, before and after propensity score with matching, randomly selected from included centers. Primary end-point was the prevalence of multivessel disease. Secondary end-points were the prevalence of abnormal features at IVUS, the incidence of major-acute-cardiovascular-events (MACE), a composite end point of cardiovascular death, MI, target lesion revascularization (TLR), stent thrombosis (ST), non-cardiac death and target vessel revascularization (TVR). For each end-point, a subgroup analysis was conducted in HIV patients with CD4 cell count <200/mm 3 . Before propensity score, 66 HIV patients and 120 non-HIV patients were selected, resulting in 20 and 40 after propensity score. Patients with multivessel disease were 11 and 17, respectively (p = 0.56). IVUS showed a lower plaque burden (71% vs. 75%, p < 0.001) and a higher prevalence of hyperechoic non-calcified plaques (100% vs. 35%, p < 0.05) in HIV patients; a higher prevalence of hypoechoic plaques (7% vs. 0%, p < 0.05), a higher incidence of MACE (17.4% vs. 9.1% vs. l'8.0%, p < 0.05), MI recurrence (17.2% vs. 0.0% vs. 2.3%, p < 0.05), and ST (6.7% vs. 0.3% vs. 03%, p < 0.05) in HIV patients with CD4 < 200/mm 3 . Our study may provide a part of the pathophysiological basis of the differences in coronary arteries between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients, suggesting that the former present with peculiar morphological features at IVUS, even after adjustment for clinical variables

  10. Evaluation of Calypte AWARE HIV-1/2 OMT antibody test as a screening test in an Indian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingole N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Integrated counselling and testing centres (ICTC provide counselling and blood testing facilities for HIV diagnosis. Oral fluid tests provide an alternative for people whodo not want blood to be drawn. Also, it avoids the risk of occupational exposure. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of Calypte AWARE HIV-1/2 OMT antibody test as a screening test in an Indian setting. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out after ethics committee approval in 250 adult ICTC clients. Blood was collected and tested from these clients for HIV diagnosis as per routine policy and the results were considered as the gold standard. Also, after another written informed consent, oral fluid was collected from the clients and tested for the presence of HIV antibodies. Twenty five clients who had and 25 clients who had not completed their secondary school education (Group A and Group B, respectively were also asked to perform and interpret the test on their own and their findings and experiences were noted. Result: The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the oral fluid antibody test were 100%, 98.51%, 94.11% and 100%, respectively. Seventy six percent of clients preferred oral fluid testing. Group B found it difficult to perform the test as compared to Group A and this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: Oral fluid testing can be used as a screening test for HIV diagnosis; however, confirmation of reactive results by blood-based tests is a must.

  11. Reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor resistant mutations in art treatment naïve and treated HIV-1 infected children in India A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bure,

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of first line and second line antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the quality of life and survival of the HIV-1 infected individuals. Extension of this therapy in children has similar effect. However the emergence of drug selected resistance has hampered the response to the therapy. A database of prevalence of drug resistance mutations in the Indian children both ART naïve and treated will help in deciding the appropriate regimen for the individual patient as well as formulating the policies regarding the composition of drugs included in the fixed dose combinations and its periodic review by analysis of the information that is made available from time to time. This will enable us to utilize our limited resources in most prudent way.

  12. Molecular evaluation of hepatitis E in HIV infected patients in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Ataei

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: On the results of this study, there is no chance for having hepatitis E infection in Iranian HIV patients. Therefore, it seems that, hepatitis E is not an important problem in this group of patients in Iran.

  13. Evaluation of an HIV/AIDS peer education programme South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV I AIDS peer-education programme for its employees aimed at addressing the growing ..... m:JI education intervention in a mining community reports essentially no effect.17 ... yet to be determined. Such data are crucial for the development.

  14. Monitoring and evaluation of sport-based HIV/AIDS awareness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elma Nelisiwe Maleka

    2016-12-20

    Dec 20, 2016 ... information on outcomes and indicators for sport-based HIV/AIDS ..... The following strategies according to Creswell (2009) were used to ...... of integration of maternal, neonatal and child health and nutrition, family plan-.

  15. An evaluation of HIV elite controller definitions within a large seroconverter cohort collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Ashley D; Meyer, Laurence; Prins, Maria

    2014-01-01

    ratios ranged from 12.5-19.0 for non-ECs compared to ECs). CONCLUSIONS: ECs are rare, less likely to progress to clinical disease, but may eventually lose control. We suggest definitions requiring individuals to have consecutive undetectable HIV-RNA measurements for ≥ six months or otherwise with >90......BACKGROUND: Understanding the mechanisms underlying viral control is highly relevant to vaccine studies and elite control (EC) of HIV infection. Although numerous definitions of EC exist, it is not clear which, if any, best identify this rare phenotype. METHODS: We assessed a number of EC...... definitions used in the literature using CASCADE data of 25,692 HIV seroconverters. We estimated proportions maintaining EC of total ART-naïve follow-up time, and disease progression, comparing to non-EC. We also examined HIV-RNA and CD4 values and CD4 slope during EC and beyond (while ART naïve). RESULTS...

  16. A study of the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the HIV overview of problems evaluation system (HOPES) in assessing the quality of life of patients with AIDS and symptomatic HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, J. B.; Sprangers, M. A.; Aaronson, N. K.; Lange, J. M.; van Dam, F. S.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, reliability, validity and responsiveness of the HIV Overview of Problems Evaluation System (HOPES) in a Dutch sample. The HOPES was administered three times in a one-year period to a sample of 106 outpatients with a symptomatic

  17. An Evaluation of Active Learning Causal Discovery Methods for Reverse-Engineering Local Causal Pathways of Gene Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sisi; Kemmeren, Patrick; Aliferis, Constantin F.; Statnikov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of causal pathways that implicate diseases and vital cellular functions is a fundamental problem in biomedicine. Discovery of the local causal pathway of a target variable (that consists of its direct causes and direct effects) is essential for effective intervention and can facilitate accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Recent research has provided several active learning methods that can leverage passively observed high-throughput data to draft causal pathways and then refine the inferred relations with a limited number of experiments. The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of the performance of active learning methods for local causal pathway discovery in real biological data. Specifically, 54 active learning methods/variants from 3 families of algorithms were applied for local causal pathways reconstruction of gene regulation for 5 transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Four aspects of the methods’ performance were assessed, including adjacency discovery quality, edge orientation accuracy, complete pathway discovery quality, and experimental cost. The results of this study show that some methods provide significant performance benefits over others and therefore should be routinely used for local causal pathway discovery tasks. This study also demonstrates the feasibility of local causal pathway reconstruction in real biological systems with significant quality and low experimental cost. PMID:26939894

  18. Evaluation of a duplex reverse-transcription real-time PCR assay for the detection of encephalomyocarditis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shaomin; Underwood, Darren; Driver, Luke; Kistler, Carol; Diallo, Ibrahim; Kirkland, Peter D

    2018-06-01

    We evaluated a fluorogenic probe-based assay for the detection of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) by comparing a set of published primers and probe to a new set of primers and probe. The published reagents failed to amplify a range of Australian isolates and an Italian reference strain of EMCV. In contrast, an assay based on 2 new sets of primers and probes that were run in a duplex reverse-transcription real-time PCR (RT-rtPCR) worked well, with high amplification efficiency. The analytical sensitivity was ~100-fold higher than virus isolation in cell culture. The intra-assay variation was 0.21-4.90%. No cross-reactivity was observed with a range of other porcine viruses. One hundred and twenty-two clinical specimens were tested simultaneously by RT-rtPCR and virus isolation in cell culture; 72 specimens gave positive results by RT-rtPCR, and 63 of these were also positive by virus isolation. Of 245 archived cell culture isolates of EMCV that were tested in the RT-rtPCR, 242 samples were positive. The new duplex RT-rtPCR assay is a reliable tool for the detection of EMCV in clinical specimens and for use in epidemiologic investigations.

  19. Evaluation of the Epidemiological Impact of Harm Reduction Programs on HIV in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    UNAIDS; World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Vietnam s HIV epidemic is concentrated, both in specific behavioral sub-populations and geographic regions. The key populations at higher risk for HIV infection in Vietnam are female sex workers (FSW) and their clients; injecting drug users (IDU); and men who have sex with men (MSM). Vietnam identified harm reduction interventions for IDU and FSW as a key component of its last 5-year Natio...

  20. Evaluation du test rapide oral aware™ omt HIV 1/2 pour le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chaque participant a fourni un échantillon de fluide oral pour la réalisation du test Aware™ OMT HIV-1/2 et du sang testé suivant l'algorithme séquentiel de tests ELISAs Murex® HIV-1.2.0 (Laboratoires Abbott, Japon) et Test ELISA peptidique maison du CeDReS. Résultats : la sensibilité, la spécificité, la Valeur Prédictive ...

  1. Towards discovering dual functional inhibitors against both wild type and K103N mutant HIV-1 reverse transcriptases: molecular docking and QSAR studies on 4,1-benzoxazepinone analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenshan; Zheng, Mingyue; Du, Li; Shen, Jianhua; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang

    2006-05-01

    To find useful information for discovering dual functional inhibitors against both wild type (WT) and K103N mutant reverse transcriptases (RTs) of HIV-1, molecular docking and 3D-QSAR approaches were applied to a set of twenty-five 4,1-benzoxazepinone analogues of efavirenz (SUSTIVA®), some of them are active against the two RTs. 3D-QSAR models were constructed, based on their binding conformations determined by molecular docking, with r 2 cv values ranging from 0.656 to 0.834 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. The models were then validated to be highly predictive and extrapolative by inhibitors in two test sets with different molecular skeletons. Furthermore, CoMFA models were found to be well matched with the binding sites of both WT and K103N RTs. Finally, a reasonable pharmacophore model of 4,1-benzoxazepinones were established. The application of the model not only successfully differentiated the experimentally determined inhibitors from non-inhibitors, but also discovered two potent inhibitors from the compound database SPECS. On the basis of both the 3D-QSAR and pharmacophore models, new clues for discovering and designing potent dual functional drug leads against HIV-1 were proposed: (i) adopting positively charged aliphatic group at the cis-substituent of C3; (ii) reducing the electronic density at the position of O4; (iii) positioning a small branched aliphatic group at position of C5; (iv) using the negatively charged bulky substituents at position of C7.

  2. Implementing and evaluating a regional strategy to improve testing rates in VA patients at risk for HIV, utilizing the QUERI process as a guiding framework: QUERI Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Matthew B; Bowman, Candice; Hoang, Tuyen; Anaya, Henry; Osborn, Teresa; Gifford, Allen L; Asch, Steven M

    2008-03-19

    We describe how we used the framework of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) to develop a program to improve rates of diagnostic testing for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This venture was prompted by the observation by the CDC that 25% of HIV-infected patients do not know their diagnosis - a point of substantial importance to the VA, which is the largest provider of HIV care in the United States. Following the QUERI steps (or process), we evaluated: 1) whether undiagnosed HIV infection is a high-risk, high-volume clinical issue within the VA, 2) whether there are evidence-based recommendations for HIV testing, 3) whether there are gaps in the performance of VA HIV testing, and 4) the barriers and facilitators to improving current practice in the VA.Based on our findings, we developed and initiated a QUERI step 4/phase 1 pilot project using the precepts of the Chronic Care Model. Our improvement strategy relies upon electronic clinical reminders to provide decision support; audit/feedback as a clinical information system, and appropriate changes in delivery system design. These activities are complemented by academic detailing and social marketing interventions to achieve provider activation. Our preliminary formative evaluation indicates the need to ensure leadership and team buy-in, address facility-specific barriers, refine the reminder, and address factors that contribute to inter-clinic variances in HIV testing rates. Preliminary unadjusted data from the first seven months of our program show 3-5 fold increases in the proportion of at-risk patients who are offered HIV testing at the VA sites (stations) where the pilot project has been undertaken; no change was seen at control stations. This project demonstrates the early success of the application of the QUERI process to the development of a program to improve HIV testing rates. Preliminary unadjusted results show that the coordinated use of

  3. Implementing and evaluating a regional strategy to improve testing rates in VA patients at risk for HIV, utilizing the QUERI process as a guiding framework: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborn Teresa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe how we used the framework of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI to develop a program to improve rates of diagnostic testing for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. This venture was prompted by the observation by the CDC that 25% of HIV-infected patients do not know their diagnosis – a point of substantial importance to the VA, which is the largest provider of HIV care in the United States. Methods Following the QUERI steps (or process, we evaluated: 1 whether undiagnosed HIV infection is a high-risk, high-volume clinical issue within the VA, 2 whether there are evidence-based recommendations for HIV testing, 3 whether there are gaps in the performance of VA HIV testing, and 4 the barriers and facilitators to improving current practice in the VA. Based on our findings, we developed and initiated a QUERI step 4/phase 1 pilot project using the precepts of the Chronic Care Model. Our improvement strategy relies upon electronic clinical reminders to provide decision support; audit/feedback as a clinical information system, and appropriate changes in delivery system design. These activities are complemented by academic detailing and social marketing interventions to achieve provider activation. Results Our preliminary formative evaluation indicates the need to ensure leadership and team buy-in, address facility-specific barriers, refine the reminder, and address factors that contribute to inter-clinic variances in HIV testing rates. Preliminary unadjusted data from the first seven months of our program show 3–5 fold increases in the proportion of at-risk patients who are offered HIV testing at the VA sites (stations where the pilot project has been undertaken; no change was seen at control stations. Discussion This project demonstrates the early success of the application of the QUERI process to the development of a program to improve HIV testing rates

  4. Image evaluation of HIV encephalopathy: a multimodal approach using quantitative MR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Paulo T.C.; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cervi, Maria C. [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Antonio Carlos [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hospital das Clinicas da FMRP-USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    A multimodal approach of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can demonstrate brain changes not detectable only with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare conventional MRI and MR quantitative techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and relaxometry and to determine whether quantitative techniques are more sensitive than conventional imaging for brain changes caused by HIV infection. We studied prospectively nine HIV positive children (mean age 6 years, from 5 to 8 years old) and nine controls (mean age 7.3 years; from 3 to 10 years), using MRS and relaxometry. Examinations were carried on 1.5-T equipment. HIV-positive patients presented with only minor findings and all control patients had normal conventional MR findings. MRS findings showed an increase in choline to creatine (CHO/CRE) ratios bilaterally in both frontal gray and white matter, in the left parietal white matter, and in total CHO/CRE ratio. In contrast, N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/CRE) ratios did not present with any significant difference between both groups. Relaxometry showed significant bilateral abnormalities, with lengthening of the relaxation time in HIV positive in many regions. Conventional MRI is not sensitive for early brain changes caused by HIV infection. Quantitative techniques such as MRS and relaxometry appear as valuable tools in the diagnosis of these early changes. Therefore, a multimodal quantitative study can be useful in demonstrating and understanding the physiopathology of the disease. (orig.)

  5. Life skills: evaluation of a theory-driven behavioral HIV prevention intervention for young transgender women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Robert; Johnson, Amy K; Kuhns, Lisa M; Cotten, Christopher; Joseph, Heather; Margolis, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Young transgender women are at increased risk for HIV infection due to factors related to stigma/marginalization and participation in risky sexual behaviors. To date, no HIV prevention interventions have been developed or proven successful with young transgender women. To address this gap, we developed and pilot tested a homegrown intervention "Life Skills," addressing the unique HIV prevention needs of young transgender women aged 16-24 years. Study aims included assessing the feasibility of a small group-based intervention with the study population and examining participant's engagement in HIV-related risk behaviors pre- and 3-months-post-intervention. Fifty-one (N = 51) young transgender women enrolled in the study. Our overall attendance and retention rates demonstrate that small group-based HIV prevention programs for young transgender women are both feasible and acceptable. Trends in outcome measures suggest that participation in the intervention may reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. Further testing of the intervention with a control group is warranted.

  6. Inverse probability weighting in STI/HIV prevention research: methods for evaluating social and community interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, Sheri A.; Shade, Starley B.; Hubbard, Alan E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Intervention effects estimated from non-randomized intervention studies are plagued by biases, yet social or structural intervention studies are rarely randomized. There are underutilized statistical methods available to mitigate biases due to self-selection, missing data, and confounding in longitudinal, observational data permitting estimation of causal effects. We demonstrate the use of Inverse Probability Weighting (IPW) to evaluate the effect of participating in a combined clinical and social STI/HIV prevention intervention on reduction of incident chlamydia and gonorrhea infections among sex workers in Brazil. Methods We demonstrate the step-by-step use of IPW, including presentation of the theoretical background, data set up, model selection for weighting, application of weights, estimation of effects using varied modeling procedures, and discussion of assumptions for use of IPW. Results 420 sex workers contributed data on 840 incident chlamydia and gonorrhea infections. Participators were compared to non-participators following application of inverse probability weights to correct for differences in covariate patterns between exposed and unexposed participants and between those who remained in the intervention and those who were lost-to-follow-up. Estimators using four model selection procedures provided estimates of intervention effect between odds ratio (OR) .43 (95% CI:.22-.85) and .53 (95% CI:.26-1.1). Conclusions After correcting for selection bias, loss-to-follow-up, and confounding, our analysis suggests a protective effect of participating in the Encontros intervention. Evaluations of behavioral, social, and multi-level interventions to prevent STI can benefit by introduction of weighting methods such as IPW. PMID:20375927

  7. Evaluation of reversible interconversion in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography using enantioselective columns in first and second dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Sabrina; Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Grant, Jacob; Lupton, David; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-07-24

    The reversible molecular interconversion behaviour of a synthesised oxime (2-phenylpropanaldehyde oxime; (C6H5)CH(CH3)CHN(OH)) was investigated by both, single dimensional gas chromatography (1D GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). Previous studies on small molecular weight oximes were extended to this larger aromatic oxime (molar mass 149.19gmol(-1)) with interest in the extent of interconversion, enantioselective resolution, and retention time. On a polyethylene glycol (PEG; wax-type) column, a characteristic interconversion zone between two antipodes of E and Z isomers was formed by molecules which have undergone isomerisation on the column (E⇌Z). The extent of interconversion was investigated by varying chromatographic conditions (oven temperature and carrier flow rate) to understand the nature of the behaviour observed. The extent of interconversion was negligible in both enantioselective and methyl-phenylpolysiloxane phase-columns, correlating with the low polarity of the stationary phase. In order to obtain isomerisation along with enantio-resolution, a wax-type and an enantioselective column were coupled in either enantioselective-wax or wax-enantioselective order. The most appropriate column arrangement was selected for study by using a GC×GC experiment with either a wax-phase or phenyl-methylpolysiloxane phase as (2)D column. In addition to evaluation of these fast elution columns, a long narrow-bore enantioselective column (10m) was introduced as (2)D, providing an enantioselective-PEG (coupled-column ensemble: (1)D1+(1)D2)×enantioselective ((2)D) column combination. In this instance, the (1)D1 enantioselective column provides enantiomeric separation of the corresponding enantiomers ((R) and (S)) of (E)- and (Z)-2-phenylpropanaldehyde oxime, followed by E/Z isomerisation in the coupled (1)D2 PEG (reactor) column. The resulting chromatographic interconversion region was modulated and separated into either E/Z isomers

  8. Evaluation of butorphanol, medetomidine and midazolam as a reversible narcotic combination in free-ranging African lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Sandra; Buss, Peter; Joubert, Jenny; Steenkamp, Johan; Shikwambana, Purvance; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of the combination butorphanol, medetomidine and midazolam (BMM) and its reversibility in lions. Prospective clinical trial. Thirty free-ranging lions, 10 male and 20 female, weighing 81-210 kg. Lions were immobilised with butorphanol mean 0.31 ± SD 0.034 mg kg(-1), medetomidine 0.052 ± 0.006 mg kg(-1), midazolam 0.21 ± 0.024 mg kg(-1) and hyaluronidase 1250 IU administered intramuscularly with a dart gun. Upon recumbency, physiological parameters and anaesthetic depth were monitored 10-15 minutes after darting (T1) and repeated every 10 minutes for a further 30 minutes (T2, T3, T4). Arterial blood gas analyses were performed at T1 and T4. At the end of the procedure, 45-60 minutes after initial darting, immobilisation was reversed with naltrexone 0.68 ± 0.082 mg kg(-1), atipamezole 0.26 ± 0.031 mg kg(-1), and flumazenil 0.0032 ± 0.0007 mg kg(-1) administered intravenously and subcutaneously. The BMM combination rapidly induced immobilisation and lateral recumbency was reached within 7.25 ± 2.3 minutes. Median induction score [scored 1 (excellent) to 4 (poor)] was 1.4 (range 1-2). Cardio-respiratory parameters were stable. Heart rate varied from 32 to 72 beats per minute, respiratory rate from 14 to 32 breaths minute(-1) and rectal temperature from 36.6 to 40.3 °C. No sudden arousals were observed. Arterial blood gas analyses revealed a mean pH of 7.33, PaCO(2) of 33 mmHg and PaO(2) of 87 mmHg. Mild to moderate hypoxemia was seen in four lions. Recovery was smooth and lions were walking within 4.4 ± 4.25 minutes. Median recovery score [scored 1 (excellent) to 4 (poor)] was 1.3 (range 1-2). The drug combination proved to be effective in immobilising free-ranging healthy lions of both sexes with minimal cardio-respiratory changes. © 2010 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2010 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  9. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain Prevention Recovery Substance Use and SUDs in LGBT ... choices that ultimately led to an HIV-positive diagnosis. The "After the Party" PSA tells the story ...

  10. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, ... HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS is a disease of the immune system ...

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain Prevention Recovery Substance ... intoxication affect judgment and can lead to unsafe sexual practices, which put people at risk for getting ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Misuse Hepatitis (Viral) HIV/AIDS Mental Health Military Opioid Overdose Reversal with Naloxone (Narcan, Evzio) Pain ... and other tools to send the message to America's youth that using drugs and alcohol even once ...

  13. Development and evaluation of a digital dental modeling method based on grating projection and reverse engineering software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jun; Song, Jun; Chen, Lu; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    For reasons of convenience and economy, attempts have been made to transform traditional dental gypsum casts into 3-dimensional (3D) digital casts. Different scanning devices have been developed to generate digital casts; however, each has its own limitations and disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to develop an advanced method for the 3D reproduction of dental casts by using a high-speed grating projection system and noncontact reverse engineering (RE) software and to evaluate the accuracy of the method. The methods consisted of 3 main steps: the scanning and acquisition of 3D dental cast data with a high-resolution grating projection system, the reconstruction and measurement of digital casts with RE software, and the evaluation of the accuracy of this method using 20 dental gypsum casts. The common anatomic landmarks were measured directly on the gypsum casts with a Vernier caliper and on the 3D digital casts with the Geomagic software measurement tool. Data were statistically assessed with the t test. The grating projection system had a rapid scanning speed, and smooth 3D dental casts were obtained. The mean differences between the gypsum and 3D measurements were approximately 0.05 mm, and no statistically significant differences were found between the 2 methods (P>.05), except for the measurements of the incisor tooth width and maxillary arch length. A method for the 3D reconstruction of dental casts was developed by using a grating projection system and RE software. The accuracy of the casts generated using the grating projection system was comparable with that of the gypsum casts. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Automated image-based assay for evaluation of HIV neutralization and cell-to-cell fusion inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheik-Khalil, Enas; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Özkaya Şahin, Gülsen; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Jansson, Marianne; Carpenter, Anne E; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2014-08-30

    Standardized techniques to detect HIV-neutralizing antibody responses are of great importance in the search for an HIV vaccine. Here, we present a high-throughput, high-content automated plaque reduction (APR) assay based on automated microscopy and image analysis that allows evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay. Neutralization of virus particles is measured as a reduction in the number of fluorescent plaques, and inhibition of cell-cell fusion as a reduction in plaque area. We found neutralization strength to be a significant factor in the ability of virus to form syncytia. Further, we introduce the inhibitory concentration of plaque area reduction (ICpar) as an additional measure of antiviral activity, i.e. fusion inhibition. We present an automated image based high-throughput, high-content HIV plaque reduction assay. This allows, for the first time, simultaneous evaluation of neutralization and inhibition of cell-cell fusion within the same assay, by quantifying the reduction in number of plaques and mean plaque area, respectively. Inhibition of cell-to-cell fusion requires higher quantities of inhibitory reagent than inhibition of virus neutralization.

  15. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Peer Education in Improving HIV Knowledge, Attitude, and Sexual Behaviours among In-School Adolescents in Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleye Abiodun Adeomi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Young people are at the centre of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education in improving HIV knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices among in-school adolescents in Osun State, Nigeria. Methods. This was an intervention study that was carried out among in-school adolescents attending mixed secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study was in three stages: before intervention, intervention, and after intervention. The impact of peer education was evaluated twelve weeks after intervention. Data were collected using pretested semistructured questionnaires and data analysis was done with SPSS version 16. Results. At the preintervention stage, the study and control groups were similar in their sociodemographic characteristics, HIV knowledge, attitude, and preventive practices, including high risk behaviours for HIV/AIDS transmission. After the peer education intervention, those with good knowledge and positive attitudes towards HIV/AIDS increased significantly from 50.0% to 86.7% and from 49.0% to 85.6%, respectively (P<0.05. Conclusion. The study showed that peer education is effective in improving knowledge, attitude, and some preventive practices towards HIV/AIDS among in-school adolescents. Educational programmes about HIV/AIDS should therefore be designed to target this age group putting into consideration their unique characteristics.

  16. A theoretically based evaluation of HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns along the trans-Africa highway in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, K; Cameron, K A; Lapinski, M K; Nzyuko, S

    1998-01-01

    Print HIV/AIDS prevention campaign materials (e.g., posters, pamphlets, stickers) from 10 public health organizations in Kenya were evaluated according to the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM), a health behavior change theory based on the fear appeal literature, at various sites along the Trans-Africa Highway in Kenya. Three groups each of commercial sex workers (CSWs), truck drivers (TDs) and their assistants (ASSTs), and young men (YM) who live and work at the truck stops participated in focus group discussions where reactions to the campaign materials were gathered according to this theoretical base. Reactions to campaign materials varied substantially, according to the poster or pamphlet viewed. Overall, most participants wanted more detailed information about (a) the proper way to use condoms, (b) ideas for how to negotiate condom use with reluctant partners, and (c) accurate information on symptoms of AIDS and what to do once one contracted HIV. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of the campaign materials are reported.

  17. "We Are Now Free to Speak": Qualitative Evaluation of an Education and Empowerment Training for HIV Patients in Namibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen W MacLachlan

    Full Text Available Although numerous studies provide evidence that active patient engagement with health care providers improves critical outcomes such as medication adherence, very few of these have been done in low resource settings. In Namibia, patient education and empowerment trainings were conducted in four antiretroviral (ART clinics to increase patient engagement during patient-provider interactions. This qualitative study supplements findings from a randomized controlled trial, by analyzing data from 10 in-depth patient interviews and 94 training evaluation forms. A blended approach of deductive and inductive coding was used to understand training impact. Findings indicated the trainings increased patients' self-efficacy through a combination of improved HIV-related knowledge, greater communication skills and enhanced ability to overcome complex psychosocial barriers, such as fear of speaking up to providers. This study suggests patient empowerment training may be a powerful method to engage HIV patients in their own care and treatment.

  18. Evaluating the Population Impact on Racial/Ethnic Disparities in HIV in Adulthood of Intervening on Specific Targets: A Conceptual and Methodological Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Chanelle J; Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Cole, Stephen R; Hogan, Joseph W; Lau, Bryan; Moore, Richard D; Mathews, W Christopher; Crane, Heidi M; Drozd, Daniel R; Geng, Elvin; Boswell, Stephen L; Napravnik, Sonia; Eron, Joseph J; Mugavero, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Reducing racial/ethnic disparities in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease is a high priority. Reductions in HIV racial/ethnic disparities can potentially be achieved by intervening on important intermediate factors. The potential population impact of intervening on intermediates can be evaluated using observational data when certain conditions are met. However, using standard stratification-based approaches commonly employed in the observational HIV literature to estimate the potential population impact in this setting may yield results that do not accurately estimate quantities of interest. Here we describe a useful conceptual and methodological framework for using observational data to appropriately evaluate the impact on HIV racial/ethnic disparities of interventions. This framework reframes relevant scientific questions in terms of a controlled direct effect and estimates a corresponding proportion eliminated. We review methods and conditions sufficient for accurate estimation within the proposed framework. We use the framework to analyze data on 2,329 participants in the CFAR [Centers for AIDS Research] Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (2008-2014) to evaluate the potential impact of universal prescription of and ≥95% adherence to antiretroviral therapy on racial disparities in HIV virological suppression. We encourage the use of the described framework to appropriately evaluate the potential impact of targeted interventions in addressing HIV racial/ethnic disparities using observational data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evaluation of Routine HIV Opt-Out Screening and Continuum of Care Services Following Entry into Eight Prison Reception Centers--California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Kimberley D; Eckert, Valorie; Behrends, Czarina N; Wheeler, Charlotte; MacGowan, Robin J; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C

    2016-02-26

    Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) improves health outcomes and prevents HIV transmission. Before 2010, HIV testing was available to inmates in the California state prison system upon request. In 2010, the California Correctional Health Care Services (CCHCS) integrated HIV opt-out screening into the health assessment for inmates entering California state prisons. Under this system, a medical care provider informs the inmate that an HIV test is routinely done, along with screening for sexually transmitted, communicable, and vaccine-preventable diseases, unless the inmate specifically declines the test. During 2012-2013, CCHCS, the California Department of Public Health, and CDC evaluated HIV screening, rates of new diagnoses, linkage to and retention in care, ART response, and post-release linkage to care among California prison inmates. All prison inmates are processed through one of eight specialized reception center facilities, where they undergo a comprehensive evaluation of their medical needs, mental health, and custody requirements for placement in one of 35 state prisons. Among 17,436 inmates who entered a reception center during April-September 2012, 77% were screened for HIV infection; 135 (1%) tested positive, including 10 (0.1%) with newly diagnosed infections. Among the 135 HIV-positive patient-inmates, 134 (99%) were linked to care within 90 days of diagnosis, including 122 (91%) who initiated ART. Among 83 who initiated ART and remained incarcerated through July 2013, 81 (98%) continued ART; 71 (88%) achieved viral suppression (care within 30 days of release were virally suppressed at that time. Only one of nine persons with a viral load test conducted between 91 days and 1 year post-release had viral suppression. Although high rates of viral suppression were achieved in prison, continuity of care in the community remains a challenge. An infrastructure for post

  20. Evaluating the impact of DREAMS on HIV incidence among young women who sell sex: protocol for a non-randomised study in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Bernadette; Hargreaves, James R; Chiyaka, Tarisai; Chabata, Sungai; Mushati, Phillis; Floyd, Sian; Birdthistle, Isolde; Busza, Joanna; Cowan, Frances

    2018-01-31

    "Determined, Resilient, AIDS-free, Mentored and Safe" (DREAMS) is a package of biomedical, social and economic interventions offered to adolescent girls and young women aged 10-24 years with the aim of reducing HIV incidence. In four of the six DREAMS districts in Zimbabwe, DREAMS includes an offer of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (DREAMS+PrEP), alongside interventions to support demand and adherence, to women aged 18-24 who are at highest risk of HIV infection, including young women who sell sex (YWSS). This evaluation study addresses the question: does the delivery of DREAMS+PrEP through various providers reduce HIV incidence among YWSS Zimbabwe? We describe our approach to designing a rigorous study to assess whether DREAMS+PrEP had an impact on HIV incidence. The study design needed to account for the fact that: 1) DREAMS+PrEP was non-randomly allocated; 2) there is no sampling frame for the target population for the evaluation; 3) there are a small number of DREAMS districts (N = 6), and 4) DREAMS+PrEP is being implemented by various providers. The study will use a cohort analysis approach to compare HIV incidence among YWSS in two DREAMS+PrEP districts to HIV incidence among YWSS in non-DREAMS comparison sites. YWSS will be referred to services and recruited into the cohort through a network-based (respondent-driven) recruitment strategy, and followed-up 12- and 24-months after enrolment. Women will be asked to complete a questionnaire and offered HIV testing. Additional complications of this study include identifying comparable populations of YWSS in the DREAMS+PrEP and non-DREAMS comparison sites, and retention of YWSS over the 24-month period. The primary outcome is HIV incidence among YWSS HIV-negative at study enrolment measured by repeat, rapid HIV testing over 24-months. Inference will be based on plausibility that DREAMS+PrEP had an impact on HIV incidence. A process evaluation will be conducted to understand intervention implementation, and

  1. The role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in evaluating the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O.; Mokgoro, Neo P.; Boshomane, Tebatso G.; Sathekge, Mike M. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Nyakale, Nozipho E.; Harry, Lerwine M.; Msomi, Alphonse P. [Inkosi Albert Lithuli Central Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Durban (South Africa); Modiselle, Moshe R. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); KVNR Nuclear and Molecular Imaging, Pretoria (South Africa); Ankrah, Alfred O. [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome following treatment with chemotherapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. A total of 136 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma were studied (mean age ± SD = 32.31 ± 1.39 years, male = 86, female = 50). Advanced disease (stage III and IV) was present in 64% of patients. HIV infection was present in 57 patients while 79 patients were HIV-negative. Baseline F-18 FDG PET/CT was obtained in all patients. SUVmax, MTV and TLG were determined on the baseline scan to evaluate for tumor burden. All patients completed a standard regimen of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD). After a median period of 8 weeks (range = 6 to 17 weeks), a repeat F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was obtained to evaluate response to therapy using Deauville 5-point scoring system. The HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups were similar with regards to age and disease stage. The groups were heterogeneous with respect to gender (p = 0.029). The SUVmax, MTV and TLG of lesions were not significant different between the two groups. Complete response was seen in 72.8% of the study population. Presence of HIV infection was associated with higher rate of treatment failure with 40.4% of the HIV-positive patients having treatment failure while only 17.7% of the HIV-negative patients had treatment failure (p = 0.0034). HIV infection was a significant predictor of response to chemotherapy. Effects of SUVmax, MTV, TLG and Ann Arbor stage of the disease were not statistically significant as predictors of therapy outcome. In a multiple logistic regression, presence of HIV infection still remained an independent predictor of therapy outcome in the presence of other factors such as SUVmax, MTV, TLG and the Ann Arbor stage of the disease. HIV infection is not associated with a higher tumor burden in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. HIV infection is, however, a strong predictor of poor therapy outcome in patients treated with

  2. The role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in evaluating the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O.; Mokgoro, Neo P.; Boshomane, Tebatso G.; Sathekge, Mike M.; Nyakale, Nozipho E.; Harry, Lerwine M.; Msomi, Alphonse P.; Modiselle, Moshe R.; Ankrah, Alfred O.; Wiele, Christophe van de

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of HIV infection on tumor burden and therapy outcome following treatment with chemotherapy in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. A total of 136 patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma were studied (mean age ± SD = 32.31 ± 1.39 years, male = 86, female = 50). Advanced disease (stage III and IV) was present in 64% of patients. HIV infection was present in 57 patients while 79 patients were HIV-negative. Baseline F-18 FDG PET/CT was obtained in all patients. SUVmax, MTV and TLG were determined on the baseline scan to evaluate for tumor burden. All patients completed a standard regimen of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD). After a median period of 8 weeks (range = 6 to 17 weeks), a repeat F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was obtained to evaluate response to therapy using Deauville 5-point scoring system. The HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups were similar with regards to age and disease stage. The groups were heterogeneous with respect to gender (p = 0.029). The SUVmax, MTV and TLG of lesions were not significant different between the two groups. Complete response was seen in 72.8% of the study population. Presence of HIV infection was associated with higher rate of treatment failure with 40.4% of the HIV-positive patients having treatment failure while only 17.7% of the HIV-negative patients had treatment failure (p = 0.0034). HIV infection was a significant predictor of response to chemotherapy. Effects of SUVmax, MTV, TLG and Ann Arbor stage of the disease were not statistically significant as predictors of therapy outcome. In a multiple logistic regression, presence of HIV infection still remained an independent predictor of therapy outcome in the presence of other factors such as SUVmax, MTV, TLG and the Ann Arbor stage of the disease. HIV infection is not associated with a higher tumor burden in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma. HIV infection is, however, a strong predictor of poor therapy outcome in patients treated with

  3. Evaluation of HIV-1 rapid tests and identification of alternative testing algorithms for use in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kitandwe, Paul Kato; Lutalo, Tom; Kigozi, Aminah; Watera, Christine; Nanteza, Mary Bridget; Hughes, Peter; Musinguzi, Joshua; Opio, Alex; Downing, Robert; Mbidde, Edward Katongole

    2018-02-27

    The World Health Organization recommends that countries conduct two phase evaluations of HIV rapid tests (RTs) in order to come up with the best algorithms. In this report, we present the first ever such evaluation in Uganda, involving both blood and oral based RTs. The role of weak positive (WP) bands on the accuracy of the individual RT and on the algorithms was also investigated. In total 11 blood based and 3 oral transudate kits were evaluated. All together 2746 participants from seven sites, covering the four different regions of Uganda participated. Two enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) run in parallel were used as the gold standard. The performance and cost of the different algorithms was calculated, with a pre-determined price cut-off of either cheaper or within 20% price of the current algorithm of Determine + Statpak + Unigold. In the second phase, the three best algorithms selected in phase I were used at the point of care for purposes of quality control using finger stick whole blood. We identified three algorithms; Determine + SD Bioline + Statpak; Determine + Statpak + SD Bioline, both with the same sensitivity and specificity of 99.2% and 99.1% respectively and Determine + Statpak + Insti, with sensitivity and specificity of 99.1% and 99% respectively as having performed better and met the cost requirements. There were 15 other algorithms that performed better than the current one but rated more than the 20% price. None of the 3 oral mucosal transudate kits were suitable for inclusion in an algorithm because of their low sensitivities. Band intensity affected the performance of individual RTs but not the final algorithms. We have come up with three algorithms we recommend for public or Government procurement based on accuracy and cost. In case one algorithm is preferred, we recommend to replace Unigold, the current tie breaker with SD Bioline. We further recommend that all the 18 algorithms that have shown better performance than the current one are made

  4. Using lean manufacturing principles to evaluate wait times for HIV-positive patients in an urban clinic in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe-Wise, Aliza; Reisner, Elizabeth; Sherr, Kenneth; Ojakaa, David; Mbau, Lilian; Kisia, Paul; Muhula, Samuel; Farquhar, Carey

    2017-12-01

    As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment programs expand in Africa, delivery systems must be strengthened to support patient retention. Clinic characteristics may affect retention, but a relationship between clinic flow and attrition is not established. This project characterized HIV patient experience and flow in an urban Kenyan clinic to understand how these may affect retention. We used Toyota's lean manufacturing principles to guide data collection and analysis. Clinic flow was evaluated using value stream mapping and time and motion techniques. Clinic register data were analyzed. Two focus group discussions were held to characterize HIV patient experience. Results were shared with clinic staff. Wait times in the clinic were highly variable. We identified four main barriers to patient flow: inconsistent patient arrivals, inconsistent staffing, filing system defects, and serving patients out of order. Focus group participants explained how clinic operations affected their ability to engage in care. Clinic staff were eager to discuss the problems identified and identified numerous low-cost potential solutions. Lean manufacturing methodologies can guide efficiency interventions in low-resource healthcare settings. Using lean techniques, we identified bottlenecks to clinic flow and low-cost solutions to improve wait times. Improving flow may result in increased patient satisfaction and retention.

  5. PEPFAR support of alcohol-HIV prevention activities in Namibia and Botswana: a framework for investigation, implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenshaw, M; Deluca, N; Adams, R; Parry, C; Fritz, K; Du Preez, V; Voetsch, K; Lekone, P; Seth, P; Bachanas, P; Grillo, M; Kresina, T F; Pick, B; Ryan, C; Bock, N

    2016-01-01

    The association between harmful use of alcohol and HIV infection is well documented. To address this dual epidemic, the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) developed and implemented a multi-pronged approach primarily in Namibia and Botswana. We present the approach and preliminary results of the public health investigative and programmatic activities designed, initiated and supported by PEPFAR to combat the harmful use of alcohol and its association as a driver of HIV morbidity and mortality from 2008 to 2013. PEPFAR supported comprehensive alcohol programming using a matrix model approach that combined the socio-ecological framework and the Alcohol Misuse Prevention and Intervention Continuum. This structure enabled seven component objectives: (1) to quantify harmful use of alcohol through rapid assessments; (2) to develop and evaluate alcohol-based interventions; (3) to promote screening programs and alcohol abuse resource services; (4) to support stakeholder networks; (5) to support policy interventions and (6) structural interventions; and (7) to institutionalize universal prevention messages. Targeted PEPFAR support for alcohol activities resulted in several projects to address harmful alcohol use and HIV. Components are graphically conceptualized within the matrix model, demonstrating the intersections between primary, secondary and tertiary prevention activities and individual, interpersonal, community, and societal factors. Key initiative successes included leveraging alcohol harm prevention activities that enabled projects to be piloted in healthcare settings, schools, communities, and alcohol outlets. Primary challenges included the complexity of multi-sectorial programming, varying degrees of political will, and difficulties monitoring outcomes over the short duration of the program.

  6. Novinky v léčbě HIV infekce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krečmerová, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2012), s. 18-21 ISSN 1801-2434 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV * AIDS * cART * HAART * tenofovir * reverse transcriptase * HIV protease * mikrobicides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  7. An economic evaluation of conception strategies for heterosexual serodiscordant couples where the male partner is HIV-positive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchumanan, Michelle; Coyte, Peter C; Loutfy, Mona

    2015-01-01

    To conduct an economic evaluation of the three commonly used interventions that reduce sexual HIV transmission when an HIV-negative female aims to conceive with an HIV-positive male on combination antiretroviral therapy (condomless sex restricted to timed ovulation [CS], sperm washing with intrauterine insemination [SW] and condomless sex restricted to timed ovulation with pre-exposure prophylaxis [CS-PrEP]). As SW and CS-PrEP are only privately available for pregnancy planning for this population in Canada, this study was conducted to inform policy decisions concerning potential public health insurance coverage, as well as to inform fertility counselling in settings with adequate combination antiretroviral therapy access globally. We developed a cohort Markov model with a lifetime horizon and used the perspective of Ontario's Ministry of Health (MOH). Input parameters were drawn from literature, the MOH's Schedule of Benefits and a time trade-off questionnaire designed for this study. Outcome measures included quality-adjusted life-years and incremental cost-effectiveness. Costs and benefits were discounted at annual rates of 3%. Costs were reported in Canadian 2013 dollars and an exchange rate of 1 USD to 1.066 CND was applied where necessary. Sensitivity analysis assessed the uncertainty of model parameters. The base case analysis found that CS-PrEP and SW were each more costly and less effective at conception than CS. The results were robust in the sensitivity analysis and suggest that CS is the dominant conception strategy in this population. Neither CS-PrEP nor SW represent better value for money relative to CS as a conception option for HIV-discordant couples with positive male partners. Based on these findings, CS-PrEP and SW cannot be recommended for public-funding in developed countries.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinda, Sheila N; Ondoa, Pascale; Obuku, Ekwaro A; Kliphuis, Aletta; Egau, Isaac; Bronze, Michelle; Kasambula, Lordwin; Schuurman, Rob; Spieker, Nicole; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Kityo, Cissy

    2016-01-01

    WHO recommends regular viral load (VL) monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS). We evaluated a simple, low-cost, qualitative viral-failure assay (VFA) on dried blood spots (DBS) in three clinical settings in Uganda. We conducted a cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV-1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS) and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref) as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml). 496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%-87.1%), 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%-96.4%), 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%-92%) and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively. VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second-line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV-1 treatment in RLS.

  9. Clinical Evaluation of an Affordable Qualitative Viral Failure Assay for HIV Using Dried Blood Spots in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila N Balinda

    Full Text Available WHO recommends regular viral load (VL monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART for timely detection of virological failure, prevention of acquired HIV drug resistance (HIVDR and avoiding unnecessary switching to second-line ART. However, the cost and complexity of routine VL testing remains prohibitive in most resource limited settings (RLS. We evaluated a simple, low-cost, qualitative viral-failure assay (VFA on dried blood spots (DBS in three clinical settings in Uganda.We conducted a cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study in three HIV/AIDS treatment centres at the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda. The VFA employs semi-quantitative detection of HIV-1 RNA amplified from the LTR gene. We used paired dry blood spot (DBS and plasma with the COBASAmpliPrep/COBASTaqMan, Roche version 2 (VLref as the reference assay. We used the VFA at two thresholds of viral load, (>5,000 or >1,000 copies/ml.496 paired VFA and VLref results were available for comparative analysis. Overall, VFA demonstrated 78.4% sensitivity, (95% CI: 69.7%-87.1%, 93% specificity (95% CI: 89.7%-96.4%, 89.3% accuracy (95% CI: 85%-92% and an agreement kappa = 0.72 as compared to the VLref. The predictive values of positivity and negativity among patients on ART for >12 months were 72.7% and 99.3%, respectively.VFA allowed 89% of correct classification of VF. Only 11% of the patients were misclassified with the potential of unnecessary or late switch to second-line ART. Our findings present an opportunity to roll out simple and affordable VL monitoring for HIV-1 treatment in RLS.

  10. Efavirenz or nevirapine in three-drug combination therapy with two nucleoside or nucleotide-reverse transcriptase inhibitors for initial treatment of HIV infection in antiretroviral-naïve individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Mursleen, Sara; Irlam, James H; Spaulding, Alicen B; Rutherford, George W; Siegfried, Nandi

    2016-12-10

    The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the morbidity and mortality due to HIV infection. The World Health Organization (WHO) ART guidelines focus on three classes of antiretroviral drugs, namely nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) and protease inhibitors. Two of the most common medications given as first-line treatment are the NNRTIs, efavirenz (EFV) and nevirapine (NVP). It is unclear which NNRTI is more efficacious for initial therapy. This systematic review was first published in 2010. To determine which non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, either EFV or NVP, is more effective in suppressing viral load when given in combination with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors as part of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and children. We attempted to identify all relevant studies, regardless of language or publication status, in electronic databases and conference proceedings up to 12 August 2016. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov to 12 August 2016. We searched LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and the Web of Science from 1996 to 12 August 2016. We checked the National Library of Medicine (NLM) Gateway from 1996 to 2009, as it was no longer available after 2009. We included all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared EFV to NVP in people with HIV without prior exposure to ART, irrespective of the dosage or NRTI's given in combination.The primary outcome of interest was virological success. Other primary outcomes included mortality, clinical progression to AIDS, severe adverse events, and discontinuation of therapy for any reason. Secondary outcomes were change in CD4 count, treatment failure

  11. Development and evaluation of a real-time one step Reverse-Transcriptase PCR for quantitation of Chandipura Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandale Babasaheb V

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chandipura virus (CHPV, a member of family Rhabdoviridae was attributed to an explosive outbreak of acute encephalitis in children in Andhra Pradesh, India in 2003 and a small outbreak among tribal children from Gujarat, Western India in 2004. The case-fatality rate ranged from 55–75%. Considering the rapid progression of the disease and high mortality, a highly sensitive method for quantifying CHPV RNA by real-time one step reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time one step RT-PCR using TaqMan technology was developed for rapid diagnosis. Methods Primers and probe for P gene were designed and used to standardize real-time one step RT-PCR assay for CHPV RNA quantitation. Standard RNA was prepared by PCR amplification, TA cloning and run off transcription. The optimized real-time one step RT-PCR assay was compared with the diagnostic nested RT-PCR and different virus isolation systems [in vivo (mice in ovo (eggs, in vitro (Vero E6, PS, RD and Sand fly cell line] for the detection of CHPV. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time one step RT-PCR assay was evaluated with diagnostic nested RT-PCR, which is considered as a gold standard. Results Real-time one step RT-PCR was optimized using in vitro transcribed (IVT RNA. Standard curve showed linear relationship for wide range of 102-1010 (r2 = 0.99 with maximum Coefficient of variation (CV = 5.91% for IVT RNA. The newly developed real-time RT-PCR was at par with nested RT-PCR in sensitivity and superior to cell lines and other living systems (embryonated eggs and infant mice used for the isolation of the virus. Detection limit of real-time one step RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR was found to be 1.2 × 100 PFU/ml. RD cells, sand fly cells, infant mice, and embryonated eggs showed almost equal sensitivity (1.2 × 102 PFU/ml. Vero and PS cell-lines (1.2 × 103 PFU/ml were least sensitive to CHPV infection. Specificity of the assay was found to be 100% when RNA from other viruses or healthy

  12. Peer-based education and the integration of HIV and Sexual and Reproductive Health services for young people in Vietnam: evidence from a project evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Anh D; Ha, Toan H; Rule, John; Dang, Chinh V

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports changes in behavioral outcomes related to the use of HIV testing service of a project that employed peer-based education strategies and integration of HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) and Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services targeting young people aged 15-24 across 5 provinces in Vietnam. A pre-test/post-test, non-experimental evaluation design was used. Data were collected from cross-sectional surveys of youth and client exit interviews at project supported SRH clinics conducted at baseline and again at 24 months following implementation. The baseline samples consisted of 813 youth and 399 exit clients. The end line samples included 501 youths and 399 exit clients. Z test was used to assess changes in behavioral outcomes. Results show that there was a significant increase (p<0.05) in the percentage of youth who wanted to obtain a HIV test (from 33% to 51%), who had ever had a test (from 7.5% to 15%), and who had a repeat test in the last 12 months (from 54.5% to 67.5%). Exit client interviews found a nearly five-fold increase in the percentage of clients seeking HIV VCT in their current visit (5.0% vs. 24.5%) and almost two-fold increase in the percentage of those having their last test at a project supported clinic (9.3% vs. 17.8%). There were also positive changes in some aspects of youth HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and risk perceptions. This study provides preliminary evidence regarding the benefits of the integration of HIV VCT-SRH services in terms of increased access to HIV services and testing in Vietnam. Benefits of peer-based education regarding increased HIV knowledge were also identified. Further investigations, including experimental studies with assessment of health outcomes and the uptake of HIV testing services, are required to better elucidate the effectiveness and challenges of this intervention model in Vietnam.

  13. Evaluation of two reverse passive haemagglutination techniques and a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, H [Beijing Medical College (China); Coulepis, A G; Gust, I D [Fairfield Hospital for Communicable Diseases, Melbourne (Australia)

    1972-08-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of two commercially available reverse passive haemagglutination tests (Hepatest and Raphadex B) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen, were compared with the most widely used radioimmunoassay (Ausria II-125). A selected group of 282 sera were tested: these included the Australian hepatitis B reference panel, and a batch of 257 sera collected from patients with acute hepatitis B, chronic carriers of hepatitis B surface antigen and two populations in which hepatitis B virus infection is known to be endemic. The two reverse passive haemagglutination techniques were of comparable sensitivity but slightly less sensitive than radioimmunoassay. While radioimmunoassay still remains the test of choice for blood transfusion services, the reverse passive haemagglutination techniques are of great value for smaller laboratories and for field studies because of their longer shelf life, the absence of radioactive reagents and the lack of need to acquire a gammacounter.

  14. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

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    Bin Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST, T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA, and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p < 0.0001. Compared to the reverse algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  15. An evaluation of HIV elite controller definitions within a large seroconverter cohort collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olson, Ashley D.; Meyer, Laurence; Prins, Maria; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Gurdasani, Deepti; Guiguet, Marguerite; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Amornkul, Pauli; Babiker, Abdel; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Porter, Kholoud; del Amo, Julia; Bucher, Heiner C.; Chêne, Geneviève; Hamouda, Osamah; Pillay, Deenan; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Olson, Ashley; Coughlin, Kate; Walker, Sarah; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Muga, Roberto; Kelleher, Tony; Cooper, David; Grey, Pat; Finlayson, Robert; Bloch, Mark; Ramacciotti, Tim; Gelgor, Linda; Smith, Don; Zangerle, Robert; Gill, John; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Vanhems, Philippe; Ghosn, Jade; Boufassa, Faroudy; Kücherer, Claudia; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Paparizos, V.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Geskus, Ronald; van der Helm, Jannie; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Reiss, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying viral control is highly relevant to vaccine studies and elite control (EC) of HIV infection. Although numerous definitions of EC exist, it is not clear which, if any, best identify this rare phenotype. We assessed a number of EC definitions used in the

  16. SOMOS: Evaluation of an HIV Prevention Intervention for Latino Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Miriam Y.; Spieldenner, Andrew R.; DeLeon, Dennis; Nieto, Bolivar X.; Stroman, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Latino gay men face multiple barriers to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention, in particular a lack of intervention programs that integrate prevention messages with cultural norms and address issues of social marginalization from multiple communities (gay community and Latino community), homophobia and racism. In order to address these…

  17. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a National Primary School HIV Intervention in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant…

  18. Systematic evaluation of matrix effects in hydrophilic interaction chromatography versus reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periat, Aurélie; Kohler, Isabelle; Thomas, Aurélien; Nicoli, Raul; Boccard, Julien; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Schappler, Julie; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-03-25

    Reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is the gold standard technique in bioanalysis. However, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) could represent a viable alternative to RPLC for the analysis of polar and/or ionizable compounds, as it often provides higher MS sensitivity and alternative selectivity. Nevertheless, this technique can be also prone to matrix effects (ME). ME are one of the major issues in quantitative LC-MS bioanalysis. To ensure acceptable method performance (i.e., trueness and precision), a careful evaluation and minimization of ME is required. In the present study, the incidence of ME in HILIC-MS/MS and RPLC-MS/MS was compared for plasma and urine samples using two representative sets of 38 pharmaceutical compounds and 40 doping agents, respectively. The optimal generic chromatographic conditions in terms of selectivity with respect to interfering compounds were established in both chromatographic modes by testing three different stationary phases in each mode with different mobile phase pH. A second step involved the assessment of ME in RPLC and HILIC under the best generic conditions, using the post-extraction addition method. Biological samples were prepared using two different sample pre-treatments, i.e., a non-selective sample clean-up procedure (protein precipitation and simple dilution for plasma and urine samples, respectively) and a selective sample preparation, i.e., solid phase extraction for both matrices. The non-selective pretreatments led to significantly less ME in RPLC vs. HILIC conditions regardless of the matrix. On the contrary, HILIC appeared as a valuable alternative to RPLC for plasma and urine samples treated by a selective sample preparation. Indeed, in the case of selective sample preparation, the compounds influenced by ME were different in HILIC and RPLC, and lower and similar ME occurrence was generally observed in RPLC vs. HILIC for urine and plasma samples

  19. Intracytoplasmic maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription complexes determines their capacity to integrate into chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashanchi Fatah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early events of the HIV-1 life cycle include entry of the viral core into target cell, assembly of the reverse transcription complex (RTCs performing reverse transcription, its transformation into integration-competent complexes called pre-integration complexes (PICs, trafficking of complexes into the nucleus, and finally integration of the viral DNA into chromatin. Molecular details and temporal organization of these processes remain among the least investigated and most controversial problems in the biology of HIV. Results To quantitatively evaluate maturation and nuclear translocation of the HIV-1 RTCs, nucleoprotein complexes isolated from the nucleus (nRTC and cytoplasm (cRTC of HeLa cells infected with MLV Env-pseudotyped HIV-1 were analyzed by real-time PCR. While most complexes completed reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, some got into the nucleus before completing DNA synthesis. The HIV-specific RNA complexes could get into the nucleus when reverse transcription was blocked by reverse transcriptase inhibitor, although nuclear import of RNA complexes was less efficient than of DNA-containing RTCs. Analysis of the RTC nuclear import in synchronized cells infected in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle showed enrichment in the nuclei of RTCs containing incomplete HIV-1 DNA compared to non-synchronized cells, where RTCs with complete reverse transcripts prevailed. Immunoprecipitation assays identified viral proteins IN, Vpr, MA, and cellular Ini1 and PML associated with both cRTCs and nRTCs, whereas CA was detected only in cRTCs and RT was diminished in nRTCs. Cytoplasmic maturation of the complexes was associated with increased immunoreactivity with anti-Vpr and anti-IN antibodies, and decreased reactivity with antibodies to RT. Both cRTCs and nRTCs carried out endogenous reverse transcription reaction in vitro. In contrast to cRTCs, in vitro completion of reverse transcription in nRTCs did not increase their

  20. Evaluation of a reverse-hybridization StripAssay for the detection of genetic polymorphisms leading to acenocoumarol sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialeraki, Argyri; Markatos, Christos; Grouzi, Elisabeth; Merkouri, Efrosyni; Travlou, Anthi; Politou, Marianna

    2010-04-01

    Acenocoumarol is mainly catabolized by CYP2C9 isoform of cytochrome P450 (CYP) liver complex and exerts its anticoagulant effect through the inhibition of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase (VKOR). The most important genetic polymorphisms which lead to an impaired enzymatic activity and therefore predispose to acenocoumarol sensitivity, are considered to be CYP2C9*2 (Arg144Cys), CYP2C9*3 (Ile359Leu) and VKORC1-1639G>A, respectively. In this study we compared the results of the PGXThrombo StripAssay kit (ViennaLab Diagnostics,Vienna, Austria) with direct DNA sequencing and in house Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (RFLP) for the detection of the aforementioned Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). The reverse hybridization StripAssay was found to be equally effective with RFLP and direct DNA sequencing for the detection of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms, respectively. The comparison of the RFLP reference method with the reverse hybridization StripAssay for the detection of VKORC1-1639 G>A polymorphism showed that the reverse hybridization StripAsssay might misclassify some A/A homozygotes as heterozygotes. Optimization of the hybridization procedures may eliminate the extra low signal band observed in some samples at the reverse hybridization StripAssay and improve its diagnostic value.

  1. Relationship of HIV Reservoir Characteristics with Immune Status and Viral Rebound Kinetics in an HIV Therapeutic Vaccine Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jonathan Z.; Heisey, Andrea; Ahmed, Hayat; Wang, Hongying; Zheng, Lu; Carrington, Mary; Wrin, Terri; Schooley, Robert T.; Lederman, Michael M.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the impact of therapeutic HIV vaccination on the HIV reservoir, and assess the relationship of the viral reservoir with HIV-specific immune status and viral rebound kinetics. Design Retrospective analysis of ACTG A5197, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a therapeutic rAd5 HIV-1 gag vaccine. Methods Participants received vaccine/placebo at weeks 0, 4, and 26 prior to a 16-week analytic treatment interruption (ATI) at week 38. Cell-associated HIV-1 RNA and DNA (CA-RNA and CA-DNA) and HIV-1 residual viremia (RV) were quantified at weeks 0, 8, and 38. HIV-specific CD4+/CD8+ activity were assessed by an intracellular cytokine staining assay. Results At study entry, CA-RNA and CA-DNA levels were correlated inversely with the numbers of HIV-specific CD4+ interferon-γ-producing cells (CA-RNA: r = −0.23, P=0.03 and CA-DNA: r = −0.28, P<0.01, N=93). Therapeutic HIV vaccination induced HIV-specific CD4+ activity, but did not significantly affect levels of CA-RNA or CA-DNA. Vaccine recipients with undetectable RV at week 8 had higher frequencies of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ interferon-γ-producing cells (undetectable versus detectable RV: 277 versus 161 CD4+ cells/106 lymphocytes, P=0.03 and 1326 versus 669 CD8+ cells/106 lymphocytes, P=0.04). Pre-ATI CA-RNA and CA-DNA were associated with post-ATI plasma HIV set point (CA-RNA: r = 0.51, P<0.01 and CA-DNA: r = 0.47, P<0.01). Conclusions Vaccine-induced T-cell responses were associated with a modest transient effect on RV, but more potent immune responses and/or combination treatment with latency-reversing agents are needed to reduce the HIV reservoir. HIV reservoir measures may act as biomarkers of post-ATI viral rebound kinetics. PMID:25254301

  2. Antimicrobial and toxicological evaluation of the leaves of Baissea axillaries Hua used in the management of HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agoreyo Freddy O

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent diarrhea is a common endemic disease with high incidence among the Africans including Nigerians. It also represents a frequent opportunistic disease in people living with HIV. Diarrhea represents one of the most distressful and persistent symptoms of HIV/AIDS, which may or may not be accompanied by an infection. The leaves decoction of Baissea axillaries Hua (Apocynaceae is used by traditional herbalists in Edo state, Nigeria for the management of people living with HIV/AIDS. Determination of its antimicrobial activity and toxicological profile will provide supportive scientific evidence in favour of its continuous usage. Method Chemical and chromatographic tests were employed in phytochemical investigations. Inhibitory activities of aqueous and ethanolic extracts against clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis were compared with Togamycin (Spectinomycin. Our report includes minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC against the test organisms. Toxicological evaluation was determined by administering 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of extracts on male Wister rats for 14 days with normal saline as control. The kidneys, liver, heart and testis tissues were examined. Results Phytochemical studies revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, and cyanogenetic glycosides. The extracts inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus to varying extents, but only the ethanolic extract inhibited growth in Streptococcus faecalis. The LD50 of the extract in mice was above 5000 mg/kg body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Toxicological evaluation showed mere ballooning degeneration of the liver at 250 mg/kg while at 500 mg/kg there was tissue necrosis. The low and high doses showed ill-defined leydig cells in the testis and no remarkable changes in the heart and kidneys. Conclusion Extracts of Baissea axillaries have

  3. Empty rituals? A qualitative study of users' experience of monitoring & evaluation systems in HIV interventions in western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Anuprita; Teedon, Paul; Cornish, Flora

    2016-11-01

    In global health initiatives, particularly in the context of private philanthropy and its 'business minded' approach, detailed programme data plays an increasing role in informing assessments, improvements, evaluations, and ultimately continuation or discontinuation of funds for individual programmes. The HIV/AIDS literature predominantly treats monitoring as unproblematic. However, the social science of audit and indicators emphasises the constitutive power of indicators, noting that their effects at a grassroots level are often at odds with the goals specified in policy. This paper investigates users' experiences of Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) systems in the context of HIV interventions in western India. Six focus groups (totalling 51 participants) were held with employees of 6 different NGOs working for government or philanthropy-funded HIV interventions for sex workers in western India. Ten donor employees were interviewed. Thematic analysis was conducted. NGO employees described a major gap between what they considered their "real work" and the indicators used to monitor it. They could explain the official purposes of M&E systems in terms of programme improvement and financial accountability. More cynically, they valued M&E experience on their CVs and the rhetorical role of data in demonstrating their achievements. They believed that inappropriate and unethical means were being used to meet targets, including incentives and coercion, and criticised indicators for being misleading and inflexible. Donor employees valued the role of M&E in programme improvement, financial accountability, and professionalising NGO-donor relationships. However, they were suspicious that NGOs might be falsifying data, criticised the insensitivity of indicators, and complained that data were under-used. For its users, M& E appears an 'empty ritual', enacted because donors require it, but not put to local use. In this context, monitoring is constituted as an instrument of

  4. Flazinamide, a novel β-carboline compound with anti-HIV actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunhua; Tang Jianguo; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Dong Zejun; Du Li; Shen Xu; Liu Jikai; Zheng Yongtang

    2007-01-01

    A β-carboline compound, flazin isolated from Suillus granulatus has been shown weak anti-HIV-1 activity. Based on the structure of flazin, flazinamide [1-(5'- hydromethyl-2'-furyl)-β-carboline-3-carboxamide] was synthesized and its anti-HIV activities were evaluated in the present study. The cytotoxicity of flazinamide was about 4.1-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide potently reduced syncytium formation induced by HIV-1IIIB with EC50 value of 0.38 μM, the EC50 of flazinamide was about 6.2-fold lower than that of flazin. Flazinamide also inhibited HIV-2ROD and HIV-2CBL-20 infection with EC50 values of 0.57 and 0.89 μM, respectively. Flazinamide reduced p24 antigen expression in HIV-1IIIB acute infected C8166 and in clinical isolated strain HIV-1KM018 infected PBMC, with EC50 values of 1.45 and 0.77 μM, respectively. Flazinamide did not suppress HIV-1 replication in chronically infected H9 cells. Flazinamide blocked the fusion between normal cells and HIV-1 or HIV-2 chronically infected cells. It weakly inhibited activities of recombinant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease or integrase at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the conversion of the carboxyl group in 3 position of flazin markedly enhanced the anti-viral activity (TI value increased from 12.1 to 312.2) and flazinamide might interfere in the early stage of HIV life cycle

  5. Evaluating bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans: use of different criteria for identifying airway reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello, Rita; Vidal, Paula Cristina; Sarria, Edgar Enrique; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Mocelin, Helena Teresinha; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is a clinical entity that has been classified as constrictive, fixed obstruction of the lumen by fibrotic tissue. However, recent studies using impulse oscillometry have reported bronchodilator responses in PIBO patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate bronchodilator responses in pediatric PIBO patients, comparing different criteria to define the response. We evaluated pediatric patients diagnosed with PIBO and treated at one of two pediatric pulmonology outpatient clinics in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Spirometric parameters were measured in accordance with international recommendations. We included a total of 72 pediatric PIBO patients. The mean pre- and post-bronchodilator values were clearly lower than the reference values for all parameters, especially FEF25-75%. There were post-bronchodilator improvements. When measured as mean percent increases, FEV1 and FEF25-75%, improved by 11% and 20%, respectively. However, when the absolute values were calculated, the mean FEV1 and FEF25-75% both increased by only 0.1 L. We found that age at viral aggression, a family history of asthma, and allergy had no significant effects on bronchodilator responses. Pediatric patients with PIBO have peripheral airway obstruction that is responsive to treatment but is not completely reversible with a bronchodilator. The concept of PIBO as fixed, irreversible obstruction does not seem to apply to this population. Our data suggest that airway obstruction is variable in PIBO patients, a finding that could have major clinical implications. A bronquiolite obliterante pós-infecciosa (BOPI) é uma entidade clínica que tem sido classificada como obstrução fixa e constritiva do lúmen por tecido fibrótico. Entretanto, estudos recentes utilizando oscilometria de impulso relataram resposta ao broncodilatador em pacientes com BOPI. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resposta broncodilatadora em pacientes pediátricos com

  6. Evaluating research and impact: a bibliometric analysis of research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Rosas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006-2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed.

  7. Transitioning a Large Scale HIV/AIDS Prevention Program to Local Stakeholders: Findings from the Avahan Transition Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bennett

    Full Text Available Between 2009-2013 the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation transitioned its HIV/AIDS prevention initiative in India from being a stand-alone program outside of government, to being fully government funded and implemented. We present an independent prospective evaluation of the transition.The evaluation drew upon (1 a structured survey of transition readiness in a sample of 80 targeted HIV prevention programs prior to transition; (2 a structured survey assessing institutionalization of program features in a sample of 70 targeted intervention (TI programs, one year post-transition; and (3 case studies of 15 TI programs.Transition was conducted in 3 rounds. While the 2009 transition round was problematic, subsequent rounds were implemented more smoothly. In the 2011 and 2012 transition rounds, Avahan programs were well prepared for transition with the large majority of TI program staff trained for transition, high alignment with government clinical, financial and managerial norms, and strong government commitment to the program. One year post transition there were significant program changes, but these were largely perceived positively. Notable negative changes were: limited flexibility in program management, delays in funding, commodity stock outs, and community member perceptions of a narrowing in program focus. Service coverage outcomes were sustained at least six months post-transition.The study suggests that significant investments in transition preparation contributed to a smooth transition and sustained service coverage. Notwithstanding, there were substantive program changes post-transition. Five key lessons for transition design and implementation are identified.

  8. Tu Amigo Pepe: Evaluation of a Multi-media Marketing Campaign that Targets Young Latino Immigrant MSM with HIV Testing Messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorio, Rosa; Norton-Shelpuk, Pamela; Forehand, Mark; Montaño, Daniel; Stern, Joshua; Aguirre, Joel; Martinez, Marcos

    2016-09-01

    Latino immigrant men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for HIV and delayed diagnosis in the United States. This paper describes the evaluation of a pilot of the Tu Amigo Pepe, a multimedia HIV testing campaign aimed at Latino MSM in Seattle, WA particularly targeting immigrants who may not identify as gay, ages 18-30 years old. The 16-week campaign included Spanish-language radio public service announcements (PSAs), a Web site, social media outreach, a reminder system using mobile technology, print materials and a toll-free hotline. In developing the PSAs, the Integrated Behavioral Model was used as a framework to reframe negative attitudes, beliefs and norms towards HIV testing with positive ones as well as to promote self-efficacy towards HIV testing. The campaign had a significant and immediate impact on attitudes, beliefs, norms and self-efficacy towards HIV testing as well as on actual behavior, with HIV testing rates increasing over time.

  9. Economic evaluation of HIV testing for men who have sex with men in community-based organizations - results from six European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelman, Julian; Rosado, Ricardo; Amri, Omar; Morel, Stéphane; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Chanos, Sophocles; Cigan, Bojan; Lobnik, Miha; Fuertes, Ricardo; Pichon, François; Kaye, Per Slaaen; Agustí, Cristina; Fernàndez-López, Laura; Lorente, Nicolas; Casabona, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The non-decreasing incidence of HIV among men who have sex with men (MSM) has motivated the emergence of Community Based Voluntary Counselling and Testing (CBVCT) services specifically addressed to MSM. The CBVCT services are characterized by facilitated access and linkage to care, a staff largely constituted by voluntary peers, and private not-for-profit structures outside the formal health system institutions. Encouraging results have been measured about their effectiveness, but these favourable results may have been obtained at high costs, questioning the opportunity to expand the experience. We performed an economic evaluation of HIV testing for MSM at CBVCT services, and compared them across six European cities. We collected retrospective data for six CBVCT services from six cities (Copenhagen, Paris, Lyon, Athens, Lisbon, and Ljubljana), for the year 2014, on the number of HIV tests and HIV reactive tests, and on all expenditures to perform the testing activities. The total costs of CBVCTs varied from 54,390€ per year (Ljubljana) to 245,803€ per year (Athens). The cost per HIV test varied from to 41€ (Athens) to 113€ (Ljubljana). The cost per HIV reactive test varied from 1966€ (Athens) to 9065€ (Ljubljana). Our results show that the benefits of CBVCT services are obtained at an acceptable cost, in comparison with the literature (values, mostly from the USA, range from 1600$ to 16,985$ per HIV reactive test in clinical and non-clinical settings). This result was transversal to several European cities, highlighting that there is a common CBVCT model, the cost of which is comparable regardless of the epidemiological context and prices. The CBVCT services represent an effective and "worth it" experience, to be continued and expanded in future public health strategies towards HIV.

  10. Scaling-up access to antiretroviral therapy for children: a cohort study evaluating care and treatment at mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke H van Dijk

    Full Text Available Travel time and distance are barriers to care for HIV-infected children in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Decentralization of care is one strategy to scale-up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART, but few programs have been evaluated. We compared outcomes for children receiving care in mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia.Outcomes were measured within an ongoing cohort study of HIV-infected children seeking care at Macha Hospital, Zambia from 2007 to 2012. Children in the outreach clinic group received care from the Macha HIV clinic and transferred to one of three outreach clinics. Children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group received care at Macha HIV clinic and reported Macha Hospital as the nearest healthcare facility.Seventy-seven children transferred to the outreach clinics and were included in the analysis. Travel time to the outreach clinics was significantly shorter and fewer caretakers used public transportation, resulting in lower transportation costs and fewer obstacles accessing the clinic. Some caretakers and health care providers reported inferior quality of service provision at the outreach clinics. Sixty-eight children received ART at the outreach clinics and were compared to 41 children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group. At ART initiation, median age, weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ and CD4(+ T-cell percentages were similar for children in the hospital-affiliated and outreach clinic groups. Children in both groups experienced similar increases in WAZ and CD4(+ T-cell percentages.HIV care and treatment can be effectively delivered to HIV-infected children at rural health centers through mobile ART teams, removing potential barriers to uptake and retention. Outreach teams should be supported to increase access to HIV care and treatment in rural areas.

  11. Evaluation of a Nutritional Support Intervention in Malnourished HIV-Infected Children in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesson, Julie; Coulibaly, Aba; Sylla, Mariam; NʼDiaye, Clémentine; Dicko, Fatoumata; Masson, David; Leroy, Valériane

    2017-10-01

    We assessed a nutritional support intervention in malnourished HIV-infected children in a HIV-care program of the University Hospital Gabriel Touré, Bamako, Mali. All HIV-infected children younger than 15 years were diagnosed for malnutrition between 07 and 12, 2014. Malnutrition was defined according to the WHO growth standards with Z-scores. Two types were studied: acute malnutrition (AM) and chronic malnutrition (CM). All participants were enrolled in a 6-month prospective interventional cohort, receiving Ready-To-Use Therapeutic Food, according to type of malnutrition. The nutritional intervention was offered until child growth reached -1.5 SD threshold. Six-month probability to catch up growth (>-2 SD) was assessed for AM using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox model. Among the 348 children screened, 198 (57%) were malnourished of whom 158 (80%) children were included: 97 (61%) for AM (35 with associated CM) and 61 (39%) with CM. Fifty-nine percent were boys, 97% were on antiretroviral therapy, median age was 9.5 years (Interquartile Range: 6.7-12.3). Among children with AM, 74% catch-up their growth at 6-month; probability to catch-up growth was greater for those without associated CM (adjusted Hazard Ratio = 1.97, CI 95%: 1.13 to 3.44). Anemia decreased significantly from 40% to 12% at the end of intervention (P nutritional screening and care in the pediatric HIV-care package is needed to optimize growth and prevent metabolic disorders.

  12. A new class of potential chloroquine-resistance reversal agents for Plasmodia: syntheses and biological evaluation of 1-(3'-diethylaminopropyl)-3-(substituted phenylmethylene)pyrrolidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, S; Srivastava, P; Roy, K; Pandey, V C; Bhaduri, A P

    2000-09-07

    1-(3'-Diethylaminopropyl)-3-(substituted phenylmethylene)pyrrolidines were synthesized and evaluated for CQ-resistant reversal activity. In general the compounds of the series elicit better biological response than their phenylmethyl analogues. The most active compound 4b has been evaluated in vivo in detail, and the results are presented. The possible mode of action of the compounds of this series is by inhibition of the enzyme heme oxygenase, thereby increasing the levels of heme and hemozoin, which are lethal to the parasite.

  13. Synthesis and Anti-HIV-1 Evaluation of New Sonogashira-Modified Emivirine (MKC-442) Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danel, Krzystof; Jørgensen, Per Trolle; La Colla, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The MKC-442 analogue 6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyluracil substituted with a (propargyloxo)methyl group at N(1) has previously been found highly active against HIV-1. The C C bond in the substituent at N(1) is here utilized in a series of chemical reactions in order to develop new agents with hig......The MKC-442 analogue 6-(3,5-dimethylbenzyl)-5-ethyluracil substituted with a (propargyloxo)methyl group at N(1) has previously been found highly active against HIV-1. The C C bond in the substituent at N(1) is here utilized in a series of chemical reactions in order to develop new agents...... with higher activity against HIV-1-resistant mutants. The syntheses involved Pd-catalyzed C,C-coupling reactions, addition of disulfides, and click chemistry on the terminal C C bond as well as addition of bromine to the so formed internal C C bonds. Sonogashira coupling were performed with silyl...

  14. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1-infected patients in Asia: results from the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-04-15

    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of a Web-based HIV testing programme in Abruzzo Region on the prevention of late HIV presentation and associated mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennio Polilli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a Web-based testing programme in terms of the prevention of late HIV presentation. The clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with HIV via the Web-based testing programme were compared to those of patients diagnosed in parallel via standard diagnostic care procedures. Methods: This study included the clinical and demographic data of newly diagnosed HIV patients enrolled at the study clinic between February 2014 and June 2017. These patients were diagnosed either via standard diagnostic procedures or as a result of the Web-based testing programme. Results: Eighty-eight new cases of HIV were consecutively enrolled; their mean age was 39.1 ± 13.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (67% were diagnosed through standard diagnostic procedures and 29 (33% patients came from the Web-based testing programme. Late presentation (62% vs. 34%, p = 0.01 and AIDS-defining conditions at presentation (13 vs. 1, p = 0.02 were significantly more frequent in the standard care group than in the Web-based group; four of 13 patients with AIDS diagnosed under standard diagnostic procedures died, versus none in the Web-based testing group (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Web-based recruitment for voluntary and free HIV testing helped to diagnose patients with less advanced HIV disease and no risk of death, from all at-risk groups, in comparison with standard care testing. Keywords: AIDS, HIV, Late presentation, Voluntary and free testing, HIV diagnosis, Sexually transmitted infections

  16. Sustainability of donor programs: evaluating and informing the transition of a large HIV prevention program in India to local ownership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bennett

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is the holy grail of many development projects, yet there is limited evidence about strategies that effectively support transition of programs from donor funding to national governments. The first phase of Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (2003–2009, aimed to demonstrate an HIV/AIDS prevention program at scale, primarily targeted at high-risk groups. During the second phase (2009–2013, this large-scale program will be transitioned to its natural owners: the Government of India and local communities. This paper describes the evaluation design for the Avahan transition strategy.A detailed logic model for the transition was developed. The Avahan transition strategy focuses on three activities: 1 enhancing capacities among communities, non-governmental organizations (NGOs, and government entities, in line with India's national AIDS control strategy; 2 aligning technical and managerial aspects of Avahan programs with government norms and standards; and 3 promoting and sustaining commitment to services for most-at-risk populations. It is anticipated that programs will then transfer smoothly to government and community ownership, become institutionalized within the government system, and support a sustained HIV/AIDS response.The research design evaluates the implementation and effectiveness of 1 activities undertaken by the program; 2 intermediate effects including the process of institutionalization and the extent to which key Avahan organizational procedures and behaviors are integrated into government systems; and 3 overarching effects namely the impact of the transition process on the sustained delivery of HIV/AIDS prevention services to high-risk groups. Both qualitative and quantitative research approaches are employed so that the evaluation will both assess outcomes and explain why they have occurred.It is unusual for donor-supported projects in low- and middle

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the impact of a Web-based HIV testing programme in Abruzzo Region on the prevention of late HIV presentation and associated mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polilli, Ennio; Sozio, Federica; Di Stefano, Paola; Clerico, Luigi; Di Iorio, Giancarlo; Parruti, Giustino

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the efficacy of a Web-based testing programme in terms of the prevention of late HIV presentation. The clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with HIV via the Web-based testing programme were compared to those of patients diagnosed in parallel via standard diagnostic care procedures. This study included the clinical and demographic data of newly diagnosed HIV patients enrolled at the study clinic between February 2014 and June 2017. These patients were diagnosed either via standard diagnostic procedures or as a result of the Web-based testing programme. Eighty-eight new cases of HIV were consecutively enrolled; their mean age was 39.1±13.0 years. Fifty-nine patients (67%) were diagnosed through standard diagnostic procedures and 29 (33%) patients came from the Web-based testing programme. Late presentation (62% vs. 34%, p=0.01) and AIDS-defining conditions at presentation (13 vs. 1, p=0.02) were significantly more frequent in the standard care group than in the Web-based group; four of 13 patients with AIDS diagnosed under standard diagnostic procedures died, versus none in the Web-based testing group (pWeb-based recruitment for voluntary and free HIV testing helped to diagnose patients with less advanced HIV disease and no risk of death, from all at-risk groups, in comparison with standard care testing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.