WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluating guided relaxation

  1. Relaxation guided imagery reduces motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Ilana; Benyakov, Orna; Erikh, Ilana; Nassar, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Motor fluctuations in Parkinson's disease (PD) cause major disabling symptoms. We aimed to assess the efficacy of relaxation guided imagery in PD patients with motor fluctuation. In a prospective pilot, case cohort, PD patients underwent (i) a relaxation session with relaxation guided imagery, and (ii) a control session of relaxing music. Three-day diaries were completed at baseline and after each intervention. Subsequently, patients received discs for home listening-a relaxation guided imagery disc and a relaxing music disc. After three months the patients were interviewed by phone. Twenty one PD patients participated and 19 completed this study. There was a significant increase in the percent of "on" time after listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc as compared with baseline (from 47.7% to 62.8%, 95% CI 5.26-25.03, p = 0.005). Relaxing music caused no significant change in percent of "on" time from baseline (from 47.7% to 53.0%, p = 0.161). Although all sessions were performed in "on" state, there was a significant decrease in UPDRS motor subscores after each of the two sessions as compared with the UPDRS score before the session (relaxation guided imagery mean reduction -3.81 p = 0.0002 and after relaxing music mean reduction -1.95, p = 0.001), significantly more so after the relaxation guided imagery (p = 0.020). After 3 months listening to the relaxation guided imagery disc increased "on" time from baseline by 12.6% (95% CI 3.19-28.39, p = 0.111) but this did not reach statistical significance. In this pilot study we showed that relaxation guided imagery is a promising treatment for PD.

  2. Parkinson's disease tremor is diminished with relaxation guided imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Ilana; Benyakov, Orna; Erikh, Ilana; Suraiya, Suheir; Schiller, Yitzhak

    2009-10-30

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may have pronounced tremor that exacerbates during stress. To determine whether PD tremor improves with relaxation guided imagery (RGI) and relaxing music. Twenty patients with PD with moderate to severe tremor participated in sessions where relaxation techniques were implemented. Tremor was objectively monitored using an accelerometer. RGI dramatically decreased tremor in all 20 patients (baseline 270.38 +/- 85.82 vs. RGI 35.57 +/- 43.90 movements per minute P music significantly reduced tremor but to a lesser degree than RGI (220.04 +/- 106.53 movements per minute P = 0.01). Self-relaxation had no significant effect on tremor. RGI can supplement conventional medical treatments for tremor in patients with PD on best medical treatment. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Relationship between relaxation by guided imagery and performance of working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, J A; Hudetz, A G; Klayman, J

    2000-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that relaxation by guided imagery improves working-memory performance of healthy participants. 30 volunteers (both sexes, ages 17-56 years) were randomly assigned to one of three groups and administered the WAIS-III Letter-Number Sequencing Test before and after 10-min. treatment with guided imagery or popular music. The control group received no treatment. Groups' test scores were not different before treatment. The mean increased after relaxation by guided imagery but not after music or no treatment. This result supports the hypothesis that working-memory scores on the test are enhanced by guided imagery and implies that human information processing may be enhanced by prior relaxation.

  4. Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Glutting, Joseph J; Glanz, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. General community. Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Five principles developed by American Evaluation Associ intended to guide professional practice of evaluators & to inform evaluation clients and the general public about principles they can expect to be upheld by professional evaluators.

  6. Relaxation Therapy with Guided Imagery for Postoperative Pain Management: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Márcia Marques Dos Santos; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Guimarães; da Cruz, Luciana Falcão; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-12-14

    To identify the evidence in the literature about relaxation therapy with guided imagery for postoperative pain management. Integrative review. PubMed, Lilacs, Cochrane, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Cinahl, between August 2006 and December 2016. Descriptors: Postoperative Pain, Imagery (Psychotherapy) and Guided Imagery. original studies published in English, Spanish and Portuguese. 291 studies were identified and eight were selected. Descriptive data analysis, presented in detail, with a summary of the knowledge produced in each study. In the primary studies included, the use of guided imagery associated with other complementary therapies was highlighted: hand and foot "M" technique, education on postoperative pain management with analgesic drugs, relaxation exercises, respiration exercises, meditation, soothing biorhythmic music combined with positive and encouraging assertions and music with nature sounds. The knowledge synthesis resulting from this study indicates that evidence could be identified on the use of guided imagery associated with relaxation therapy as a complementary approach to drug analgesia in postoperative pain control strengthens its indication for nursing practice. This evidence, however, demonstrates that the quality of the use of this therapy is limited, and it is necessary to carry out new randomized clinical studies to fill the existing gaps in this topic. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery and deep diaphragmatic breathing on quality of life in elderly with breast or prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mohsen; Dehghan, Mojtaba; Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Hazini, Abdolrahim

    2017-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of elderly and an increase in the number of cases of cancer by age, cancer is a common problem in the elderly. For elderly patients with cancer, the disease and its treatment can have long-term negative effects on their quality of life (QoL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation, body image and deep diaphragmatic breathing on the QoL in the elderly with cancer. This study was a randomized controlled trial in which 50 elderly patients with breast or prostate cancer were randomized into study and control groups. Progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and deep diaphragmatic breathing were given to the study group, but not to the control group. The effect of the progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery and deep diaphragmatic breathing was measured at three different time points. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and QoL Questionnaire-Core questionnaires was completed before, after and 6 weeks after the intervention for the patients in both groups simultaneously. The data were analyzed by SPSS. There was statistically significant improvement in QoL (P progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery and deep diaphragmatic breathing intervention. The findings indicated that concurrent application of progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and deep diaphragmatic breathing would improve QoL in the elderly with breast or prostate cancer.

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  9. Patients' perceptions of the effectiveness of guided imagery and progressive muscle relaxation interventions used for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Hau, Hannah; Wanta, Britt; Bumpus, Molly

    2008-08-01

    Relaxation and guided imagery are useful strategies for cancer pain; however, their effects vary from patient to patient. Patients' perceptions of these treatments and factors that contribute to their effectiveness have not previously been described. Data from interviews conducted after a trial of guided imagery and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) interventions were analyzed to compare patients' perceptions of treatment effects with observed changes in pain scores, and to explore patients' ideas about factors that contributed to the effectiveness of each intervention. Post-study interviews were conducted with 26 hospitalized patients with cancer pain who had completed trials of guided imagery and PMR. In most cases, participants' perceptions of treatment effects matched observed changes in pain scores. Participants described treatment and patient characteristics that influenced effectiveness of the interventions such as active involvement in the intervention, guided instructions, providing a source of distraction, stimulating relaxation, individual abilities and preferences, and pain qualities.

  10. Evaluation of a closed-loop muscle relaxation control system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld, DJ; Proost, JH; Wierda, JMKH

    Automatic muscle relaxation control may reduce anesthesiologists' workload freeing them for other patient care requirements. In this report we describe a muscle relaxation controller designed for routine clinical application using rocuronium and the train-of-four count. A muscle relaxation monitor

  11. Effect of psychological intervention in the form of relaxation and guided imagery on cellular immune function in normal healthy subjects. An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Kristensen, J S; Hokland, P

    1991-01-01

    The present study measured the effects of relaxation and guided imagery on cellular immune function. During a period of 10 days 10 healthy subjects were given one 1-hour relaxation procedure and one combined relaxation and guided imagery procedure, instructing the subjects to imagine their immune...... system becoming very effective. Even though no major changes in the composition of the major mononuclear leukocyte subsets could be demonstrated a significant increase in natural killer function was demonstrated. These data suggest that relaxation and guided imagery might have a beneficial effect...

  12. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...

  13. Trusted Product Evaluations. A Guide for Vendors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1990-01-01

    Trusted Product Evaluations: A Guide for Vendors describes procedures for conducting business with the Information Systems Security Organization within the National Security Agency using the Trusted Product Evaluation Program...

  14. Software Metrics Capability Evaluation Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budlong, Faye

    1995-01-01

    ...: disseminating information regarding the U.S. Air Force Policy on software metrics, providing metrics information to the public through CrossTalk, conducting customer workshops in software metrics, guiding metrics technology adoption programs...

  15. Making evaluations matter: a practical guide for evaluators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, C.S.L.; Vugt, van S.M.; Wigboldus, S.A.; Williams, B.; Woodhill, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This guide is primarily for evaluators working in the international development sector. It is also useful for commissioner of evaluations, evaluation managers and M&E officers. The guide explains how to make evaluations more useful. It helps to better understand conceptual issues and appreciate

  16. Evaluating Snoezelen for relaxation within chronic pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pat

    This experimental study investigated the use of Snoezelen - a sensory environment purported to produce relaxation - against traditional relaxation within the pain clinic setting. The variables measured included pain, anxiety, depression, coping, self-efficacy and disability. Assessments were carried out at three time intervals on a range of symptoms designed to reflect the multidimensional nature of the chronic pain experience, including pain intensity and quality, anxiety, depression, coping, confidence and quality of life. The experimental group experienced significant reductions in pain (sensory score P=0.002), and an improvement in self-efficacy (P=0.02) and sickness impact for the following scales: physical (P=0.009), psychosocial (P=0.009), recreation (P=0.001), sleep (P=0.001) and sickness impact total (P=0.001). The control group experienced significant improvements in sickness impact scales of psychosocial (P=0.05), sleep (P=0.01) and sickness impact total (P=0.004). The findings suggest that Snoezelen environments are as effective as, if not slightly better than, teaching relaxation within the traditional pain clinic environment for this group of patients.

  17. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro Daniel E; Weydert Joy A; Acra Sari A; Monheim Cynthia J; Chambers Andrea S; Ball Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, an...

  18. Guide for Commissioning Evaluations | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institution. Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Institution Country. Australia. Institution Website. http://rmit.edu.au. Related content. IDRC and BetterEvaluation launch an interactive guide to manage evaluations. IDRC's support of BetterEvaluation, an international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory, ...

  19. The effect of guided relaxation and exercise imagery on self-reported leisure-time exercise behaviors in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Giacobbi, Peter R; Glutting, Joseph J

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-wk intervention that used guided relaxation and exercise imagery (GREI) to increase self-reported leisure-time exercise behavior among older adults. A total of 93 community-dwelling healthy older adults (age 70.38 ± 8.15 yr, 66 female) were randomly placed in either a placebo control group or an intervention group. The intervention group received instructions to listen to an audio compact disk (CD) containing a GREI program, and the placebo control group received an audio CD that contained 2 relaxation tracks and instructions to listen to music of their choice for 6 wk. Results revealed that listening to a GREI CD for 6 wk significantly increased self-reported leisure-time exercise behaviors (p = .03). Further exploration of GREI and its effects on other psychological variables related to perceived exercise behaviors may substantiate its effectiveness.

  20. Investigative Journalism Techniques. Evaluation Guide Number 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Mark

    Noting that program evaluators can profit by adopting the investigative journalist's goal of discovering hidden information, this guide explores the journalist's investigative process--without its element of suspicion--and discusses how components of this process can be applied to program evaluation. After listing the major characteristics of the…

  1. Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

  2. Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

  3. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...

  4. An evaluation of two Mexican food guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacardi-Gascon, M; Jiménez-Cruz, A; Jones, E

    2002-03-01

    In Mexico, the food guide developed by The National Institute of Nutrition for the Mexican population is 'The Pyramid of Health'. In the northwestern Mexican state of Baja California, the Nutrition Institute of Baja California (INUBAC) developed and validated another food guide. This guide, named 'The Apple of Health', is based on current nutrition research and the typical food patterns. The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare (1) the graphical impact, (2) the understanding of the overall message, and (3) the ability to apply the information from both food guides, using a diet design score and focus group interviews, among women from two different education levels living in Baja California. Results showed that mean diet design percentage scores obtained by the participants using The Pyramid of Health were 64.1 and using The Apple of Health 76.7. No statistical difference was found between the two education levels. The majority of the focus group participants expressed that the most appealing food guide was The Apple of Health because of its color and graphic art. However, the Pyramid was more familiar to the participants. The study subjects strongly recommended The Apple of Health food guide as an educational tool for the whole family.

  5. Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET) Users Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincock, Layne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This document is the users guide to using the Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET). SET is a tool for comparing multiple fuel cycle options against a common set of criteria and metrics. It does this using standard multi-attribute utility decision analysis methods.

  6. Utility of recorded guided imagery and relaxing music in reducing patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Murad; Roongpisuthipong, Wanjarus; Kim, Natalie A; Goyal, Amita; Swary, Jillian H; Brindise, Renata T; Iyengar, Sanjana; Pace, Natalie; West, Dennis P; Polavarapu, Mahesh; Yoo, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Guided imagery and music can reportedly reduce pain and anxiety during surgery, but no comparative study has been performed for cutaneous surgery to our knowledge. We sought to determine whether short-contact recorded guided imagery or relaxing music could reduce patient pain and anxiety, and surgeon anxiety, during cutaneous surgical procedures. Subjects were adults undergoing excisional surgery for basal and squamous cell carcinoma. Randomization was to guided imagery (n = 50), relaxing music (n = 54), or control group (n = 51). Primary outcomes were pain and anxiety measured using visual analog scale and 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Secondary outcomes were anxiety of surgeons measured by the 6-item short-form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and physical stress of patients conveyed by vital signs, respectively. There were no significant differences in subjects' pain, anxiety, blood pressure, and pulse rate across groups. In the recorded guided imagery and the relaxing music group, surgeon anxiety was significantly lower than in the control group. Patients could not be blinded. Short-contact recorded guided imagery and relaxing music appear not to reduce patient pain and anxiety during excisional procedures under local anesthetic. However, surgeon anxiety may be reduced when patients are listening to such recordings. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Correction of astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty by relaxing incision with compression suture: a comparison between the guiding effect of photokeratoscope and of computer-assisted videokeratography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Ming; Su, Chuan-Yi; Lin, Chang-Ping

    2003-07-01

    To report the results of astigmatism correction after penetrating keratoplasty by relaxing incision with compression suture and to compare the guiding ability of a photokeratoscope with that of computer-assisted videokeratography. In the two independent retrospective series, 11 eyes received a relaxing incision with compression suture guided by photokeratoscope or computer-assisted videokeratography. In 22 eyes, the relaxing incision with compression suture showed a mean 56% reduction in astigmatism and 78% reduction in vector-calculated astigmatism. The mean postoperative visual acuity was improved 2.92 Landolt lines. The 11 eyes in which treatment was guided by photokeratoscope demonstrated a mean reduction of 50% and 71% in astigmatism and vector-calculated astigmatism, respectively, and visual acuity increased 2.44 Landolt lines. Another 11 eyes in which treatment was guided by computer-assisted videokeratography achieved a mean reduction of 67% and 90% in astigmatism and vector-calculated astigmatism, respectively, together with 3.41 Landolt lines improvement in visual acuity. There were no significant differences in astigmatism correction and visual acuity improvement between the two groups. The results demonstrate that the relaxing incision with compression suture is an effective and safe procedure for correcting high astigmatism after penetrating keratoplasty. The two instruments have no significant difference in their guiding capacities for this procedure.

  8. Pharmacological Evaluations for the Relaxant Effect of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the blocking of calcium by the hydroalcoholic extract of Tapinanthus dodoneifolius (Tapidod), \\"in vitro\\", on rat trachea. To evaluate this effect, the contractile activity of tracheal chains from Wistar Kyoto rats was isometrically recorded. On the isolated tracheal rings the extract ...

  9. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation behaviour in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of individual biologic components in relaxation curves obtained in vivo may increase the specificity of tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, the potential of biexponential curve analysis was evaluated in T1 and T2 measurements on the human...

  10. Comparing the Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery on sleep quality in primigravida women referring to Mashhad health care centers-1393

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Golmakani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Decreased sleep quality is a common complaint during pregnancy. Relaxation is one of the non-pharmaceutical treatments for sleep disorders. Different techniques could have different impacts on various biological and mental stressors. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on the sleep quality of primigravida women. Methods:This three-group clinical trial was conducted on 100 primigravida women, referring to Mashhad health care centers in 2014. All women, who met the inclusion criteria, were randomly assigned to three groups: progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and control groups. The intervention groups performed the exercises twice a day for a period of four weeks at home after two sessions of relaxation training (held during two weeks. Then, the quality of sleep was measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. For data analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, paired t-test, and post-hoc test were performed, using SPSS version 11.5. Results: The total score of sleep quality and its components (except use of sleep medication was significantly lower after the intervention, compared to the pre-intervention period in progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery groups (P

  11. Effects of guided imagery with relaxation training on anxiety and quality of life among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Maya C; Reicher-Atir, Rebecca; Levy, Sigal; Haramati, Sara; Wengrower, Dov; Israeli, Eran; Goldin, Eran

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) impacts quality of life (QoL). Psychological factors influence the course of the disease and should be targeted for intervention. Our study was a prospective, randomised control trial. Fifty-six outpatients were randomly chosen and allocated to a treatment group or a waiting-list control group. Treatment group patients attended three relaxation-training sessions and received an audio disc for home practice. Evaluations performed pre and post-treatment: state anxiety was assessed with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, QoL with the IBD Questionnaire. The Visual Analogue Scale assessed pain, depression, stress and mood. Patients completed a symptom monitoring diary. The control group's symptoms were monitored without study-related treatment. Thirty-nine subjects completed the study and were included in the data analysis. Following the relaxation-training intervention, the treatment group's (n = 18) measured results showed a statistically significant improvement as compared to the control group (n = 21) (time by treatment interaction): anxiety levels decreased (p < 0.01), QoL and mood improved (p < 0.05), while levels of pain and stress decreased (p < 0.01). Findings indicate IBD patients may benefit from relaxation training in their holistic care. New studies as well as further investigation of the subject are warranted.

  12. Evaluation by nuclear relaxation of hydrogen tucuman irradiated fruit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; Lima, Antonio Luis dos Santos, E-mail: keila@ime.eb.br, E-mail: santoslima@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia. Secao de Engenharia Quimica (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Leandro Moreira; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno, E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br [Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano (IMA/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The tucuman (Astrocarium vulgare Mart.) develops a yellow-orange fibrous pulp and a yellow-green peel as it gets mature. In Brazil it is considered a good source of carotenoids, which is the main precursor of vitamin A. Considering that the irradiation process is an alternative to avoid post-harvesting losses, without changing the nutritional value of food, this study had the objective of evaluating of different gamma irradiation doses (0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 kGy) in Tucuman samples, divided into control (non irradiated) and irradiated, by the low-field Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (NMR) analysis. The technique is used in quantitative determinations of nondestructively and non-invasive instrumentation employing low, with minimal sample, quickly, preserving its constitution and nature. (author)

  13. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydert, Joy A; Shapiro, Daniel E; Acra, Sari A; Monheim, Cynthia J; Chambers, Andrea S; Ball, Thomas M

    2006-11-08

    Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. 22 children, aged 5-18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04). There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05), and two (82% vs. 45%, P children who had learned guided imagery met the threshold of children who learned only the breathing exercises. The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  14. 76 FR 59420 - Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Guide Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... resources. The client is the best source of information on the quality of commercial guiding services. We..., including big game hunting, sport fishing, wildlife viewing, river trips, and other guided activities. We... sport fishing guide permits to evaluate an applicant's ability to provide a quality guiding service. We...

  15. Evaluation of Physiological Indices to Indicate Sleepy or Relaxed States Using Illuminance Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibagaki, Yumi; Ogawa, Kozue; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the ability of physiological indices to reflect the degree of sleepiness or relaxation of an individual due to stress, fatigue and other factors. Several studies have investigated the use of high-frequency (HF) components (0.15-0.40Hz) in heart rate variability to evaluate parasympathetic nervous activity. However, it has been difficult to assess the differences between states of sleepiness and relaxation using this method. In the present study, in order to evaluate the indices, two experimental illuminance conditions, 100 and 1,500 lx, reflecting differing states of arousal, were used during a cognitive judgment test lasting for 30 minutes. During the cognitive judgment test, electroencephalograms (EEG), electrocardiograms (ECG), physiological state and reaction time were measured, and results indicated that the two illuminance conditions could be differentiated from the recorded physiological data. More specifically, in the 1,500-lx condition, arousal level, activity level and test performance increased, and the level of HF components decreased. Opposite tendencies were observed in the 100-lx condition. Two indices of Lorenz plots (LP) at ECG RR intervals, center (C of LP) and ellipse area (S of LP), were subsequently determined from the physiological data. Subjects were then divided according to these LP indices based on their exhibited physiological responses, and we evaluated the effectiveness of the indices in differentiating between states of sleepiness and relaxation by comparing arousal level, psychological state, and reaction time. Results indicated that the C of LP and S of LP are possible indices for evaluating sleepiness or relaxation and suggest that these two indices may also be able to evaluate the relationship between physiological changes and other, subjective feelings.

  16. Evaluation of skeletal muscle relaxant activity of aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers in Albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasree Tirumalasetti; Maulik Patel; Ubedulla Shaikh; Harini, K.; Shankar, J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nerium oleander is traditionally used in various diseases because of its medicinal properties. One of its uses is in musculoskeletal disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the skeletal muscle relaxant activity of the aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers (AENOF) in albino rats in comparison with diazepam. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 Swiss albino rats aged 6-7 weeks, of either sex, weighing about 100-150 g, were taken, and after acute toxicity studies two ...

  17. Technical note: A successive over-relaxation preconditioner to solve mixed model equations for genetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K

    2016-11-01

    A computationally efficient preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm with a symmetric successive over-relaxation (SSOR) preconditioner for the iterative solution of set mixed model equations is described. The potential computational savings of this approach are examined for an example of single-step genomic evaluation of Australian sheep. Results show that the SSOR preconditioner can substantially reduce the number of iterates required for solutions to converge compared with simpler preconditioners with marked reductions in overall computing time.

  18. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  19. Multi-function displays : a guide for human factors evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This guide is designed to assist aircraft certification personnel and avionics : manufacturers in evaluating the human factors aspects of Multi-function Displays : (MFDs) for FAA certification. The guide focuses specifically on human factors and : do...

  20. Evaluation of skeletal muscle relaxant activity of aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers in Albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumalasetti, Jayasree; Patel, Maulik; Shaikh, Ubedulla; Harini, K; Shankar, J

    2015-01-01

    Nerium oleander is traditionally used in various diseases because of its medicinal properties. One of its uses is in musculoskeletal disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the skeletal muscle relaxant activity of the aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers (AENOF) in albino rats in comparison with diazepam. A total of 20 Swiss albino rats aged 6-7 weeks, of either sex, weighing about 100-150 g, were taken, and after acute toxicity studies two different doses were selected. The animals were divided into four different groups. The first group was kept as the control (normal saline), second as the standard (diazepam) and the remaining two groups as Test I and Test II, and given different doses of the AENOF. Skeletal muscle relaxant activity (motor coordination) on Rotarod and locomotor activity on photoactometer was performed. Statistical analysis was carried out by using analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison tests. The result from the Actophotometer test and Rotarod test showed that the extract of AENOF significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the motor coordination of the tested animals. Our data indicates that AENOF possesses skeletal muscle relaxant activities.

  1. Guide til evaluering af Den motiverende samtale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Douw, Karla

    UC Lillebælt har på baggrund af kommunale henvendelser udarbejdet et kursusforløb om Den motiverende samtale (DMS). I en efterfølgende evaluering af forløbet har en nedsat projektgruppe udarbejdet en guide til selvevaluering med fokus på kompetenceudvikling af kursusdeltagerne. For at sikre...... dog også andre kommunikationsmodeller, og DMS indgår i fragmenter. Det er særligt delen om ambivalens og forandringshjulet der fremhæves fra DMS. Evalueringen af SEG peger på følgende: Selvevaluering er mest meningsfyldt, når DMS jævnligt anvendes, hvorfor målgruppen for SEG med fordel kan beskrives...

  2. An Agent-based Transportation Route Planning Method for Led Fabricating Line and Its Evaluation Using Lagrangian Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tatsushi; Sotobayashi, Ken; Ando, Masakazu; Konishi, Masami

    In most of Light Emitting Diode (LED) semiconductor fabricating line, AGVs (Automated Guided Vehicles) are used to transport the products between the facilities in order to ensure dust-free operation in the transportation systems. It has been demanded to realize the route planning system which speedily derives a feasible transportation route so that each AGV does not interfere with other AGVs. In this paper, we applied an agent-based optimization method for the route planning problems with multiple AGVs in LED fabricating bay in which the total transportation time is minimized. In the agent-based method, each AGV agent independently searches its candidate of route. The imitated pheromone is effectively used to generate the route which avoids the collision among AGVs. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the lower bound of the original problem is obtained by using the Lagrangian relaxation technique. The performances of the proposed method are evaluated by using the value of duality gap for a large scale problem. The effectiveness of the agent-based optimization method is demonstrated.

  3. Effectiveness of a relaxation intervention (progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques) to reduce anxiety and improve mood of parents of hospitalized children with malignancies: A randomized controlled trial in Republic of Cyprus and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsi, Theologia; Charalambous, Andreas; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Raftopoulos, Vasilios

    2017-02-01

    To explore the effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and Guided Imagery (GI),in reducing anxiety levels among parents of children diagnosed with any type of malignancy receiving active treatment at a Paediatric Oncology Unit in Republic of Cyprus and in Greece. A randomized non-blinded control trial was conducted between April 2012 to October 2013, at two public paediatric hospitals. Fifty four eligible parents of children hospitalized with a malignancy were randomly assigned to the intervention (PMR and GI) (n = 29) and a control group (n = 25). The study evaluated the changes in anxiety levels(HAM-A) and mood changes(POMSb). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean scores of the subjects in the intervention group in HAM-A scale between the T0 (14.67 ± 9.93) and T1 (11.70 ± 8.15) measurements (p = 0.008) compared to the control group in which a borderline difference (16.00 ± 11.52 vs 13.33 ± 8.38) was found (p = 0.066). The effect size for the intervention group was low to moderate (0.37). Regarding mood changes, there was a statistically significant difference in tension for parents in the intervention group between T0 and T1 (11.15 ± 5.39 vs 9.78 ± 4.26), (p = 0.027). Furthermore, the parents in the intervention group were significantly less sad following the intervention (T1) (2.81 ± 1.07 vs 2.19 ± 1.21), (p = 0.001), and felt significantly less tense (2.93 ± 0.91 vs 2.26 ± 0.90), (p = 0.001) and anxiety (2.63 ± 1.21 vs 2.19 ± 1.07), (p = 0.031) compared to those in the control group. These findings provided evidence on the positive effect of the combination of PMR and GI in reducing anxiety and improving mood states in parents of children with malignancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  5. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  6. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  7. Summer Rejuvenation Guide: 10 Tips to Help You Relax, Reflect, and Recharge for the Coming School Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Lucas Educational Foundation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    During the rush of the school year, free time is an all-too-scarce commodity for busy teachers. Summer's another story. More relaxed schedules allow a little breathing room to reflect, collaborate, plan ahead--or just unwind. The time off is all important for helping teachers get reinvigorated and ready for the new school year. Whether your summer…

  8. Quantitative evaluation of muscle relaxation induced by Kundalini yoga with the help of EMG integrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, R; Kamat, A; Khanolkar, M; Kamat, S; Desai, S R; Dhume, R A

    1990-10-01

    The present work is aimed to quantify the degree of relaxation of muscle under the effects of Kundalini Yoga with the help of EMG integrator. The data collected from 8 individuals (4 males 4 females) on the degree of muscle relaxation at the end of meditation revealed a significantly decreased muscle activity amounting to 58% of the basal level in both the sexes.

  9. Cellular Density Evaluation for Malignant Lymphoma Using Equivalent Cross-Relaxation Rate Imaging - Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Nara (Japan); Matsushima, Shigeru; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Morishima, Yasuo [Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Equivalent cross-relaxation rate (ECR) imaging is an MRI technique used to evaluate quantitatively a change in the protein-water interaction. We aimed to evaluate retrospectively the usefulness of ECR imaging for the histologic classification of malignant lymphoma (ML). Institutional Review Board approval was obtained and all patients provided informed consent. The study subjects included 15 patients with untreated ML who were histologically diagnosed with follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 8) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 7). All patients underwent ECR imaging and the offset frequency was set at 7 ppm. The median ECR values were 71% (range; 60.7 to 75.5) in FL and 54% (50.8 to 59.4) in DLBCL (p = 0.001). The median cellular density was 1.5 {+-} 0.17 x 10{sup 6} / mm{sup 2} in FL and 1.0 {+-} 0.70 x 10{sup 6} / mm{sup 2} in DLBCL (p = 0.001). The correlation coefficient between the ECR values and cellular density in ML was 0.88 (p = 0.001). In FL and DLBCL, assuming ECR value cut-off points of 60%, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. A strong correlation between ECR and cellular density in ML is demonstrated and the ECR may be a useful technique to differentiate between FL and DLBCL.

  10. Program evaluation models and related theories: AMEE guide no. 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Ann W; Hemmer, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    This Guide reviews theories of science that have influenced the development of common educational evaluation models. Educators can be more confident when choosing an appropriate evaluation model if they first consider the model's theoretical basis against their program's complexity and their own evaluation needs. Reductionism, system theory, and (most recently) complexity theory have inspired the development of models commonly applied in evaluation studies today. This Guide describes experimental and quasi-experimental models, Kirkpatrick's four-level model, the Logic Model, and the CIPP (Context/Input/Process/Product) model in the context of the theories that influenced their development and that limit or support their ability to do what educators need. The goal of this Guide is for educators to become more competent and confident in being able to design educational program evaluations that support intentional program improvement while adequately documenting or describing the changes and outcomes-intended and unintended-associated with their programs.

  11. Research on Recognition and Evaluation of Traffic Guide Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic guide signs are effective only when they are clearly recognized by drivers. Three experiments were conducted in this study. In the first, the influence factors of guide sign recognition were studied. This study investigated 11 main factors with a convenience sample of drivers from Nanjing city in China. Weights of different influence factors were obtained through analytic hierarchy process (AHP. The results showed that the setting position, occlusion degree, and character size of guide sign had the most significant influence on the guide sign recognition, while other factors were less important. In the second stage, an evaluation model of guide sign recognition was developed based on weights of different factors. Four equations were presented to calculate the comprehensive score of guide sign, and the level of recognition was divided into five grades according to the comprehensive score. At last, a typical case in Nanjing was studied to verify the rationality and reliability of the evaluation model. Results from the real application indicate that the method had good applicability and can be used by traffic engineers.

  12. Evaluating Metacognitive Scaffolding in Guided Invention Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Ido; Holmes, Natasha G.; Day, James; Bonn, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Invention and Productive Failure activities ask students to generate methods that capture the important properties of some given data (e.g., uncertainty) before being taught the expert solution. Invention and Productive Failure activities are a class of scientific inquiry activities in that students create, implement, and evaluate mathematical…

  13. Performance evaluation of laser guided leveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hoque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI farm on clay loam soil during Rabi season of 2010-2011. The treatments consisted of laser land leveling (T1 and control (non-leveled (T2. A preliminary field survey was done using staff gage. Initially a base station was established to dispense laser ray uniformly. The laser ray erected from base station guided the sensor of the stuff gage and the leveler. Elevation data was collected from the different points of the field and made an average. The maximum gage reading were 247.0 cm and the minimum gage reading was 219.2 cm. Average gage readings of the laser leveled plot was 235.66 cm that was settled for auto adjustment. Therefore, huge amount of soils (16.46 cm high was cut from the highest point and subsequently had to fill to the low points. Finally, an equal gage reading of 235.66 cm was observed after leveling the plot. The laser leveler (Leica MLS700 was used hitching with a TAFE tractor. The field was leveled with manual control initially and finally it was operated with auto adjustment. Two operators, 25 litter diesels and total 6 hours time were required during this leveling. Wheat was cultivated in leveled land (T1 and non-leveled land (T2. Laser leveling was insured for improvement in nutrient use efficiencies, option for precision farming, reduces weed problems, and improves uniformity of crop maturity. There was better distribution of water in leveled plot, which helped to reduce irrigation application time 1 hour. Due to uniformity of moisture content improved germination and crop establishment was found which reflected in higher plant population (239 m-2. Maximum yield (3.41 t ha-1 was obtained in T1 due to longer panicle (10.89 cm, more grain per plant (27.47 and 1000 grain weight (47.38 g compared to yield of T2 (2.62 t ha-1.

  14. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Training evaluation determines a training program`s effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ``DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training`` and ``DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.``

  15. Coping with a stressful sigmoidoscopy: evaluation of cognitive and relaxation preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, R M; Atkins, C J; Lenhard, L

    1982-03-01

    Sigmoidoscopy involves the insertion of a small scope into the anal cavity to inspect for abnormalities in the colon. Although the procedure is not believed to be painful, it is often noxious for patients because it produces embarassment and discomfort. We examined the effectiveness of two brief interventions designed to enhance coping: self-instructional training and relaxation. In the self-instructional conditions patients were given brief training to focus their attention on either their own (internal) or the doctor's (external) ability to regulate the situation. A third (control) group received attention but did not experience self-instructional training. Half of each of these three groups also received relaxation training, while the other half did not. Planned comparisons demonstrated that subjects in the self-instructional strategies rated themselves as less anxious, had fewer body movements during the exam, and emitted fewer verbalization than those in an attention control group. Patients in the external condition estimated that the exam took less time but tended to have elevated heart rates during the procedure. Those experiencing relaxation training tended to overestimate the duration of the exam, but made fewer requests to stop the exam and rated themselves as less anxious than patients who did not receive relaxation training.

  16. An Evaluation of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on Stress Related Symptoms in a Geriatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Berry, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Studied the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on a group of anxious older widows (N=10). Found training decreased the severity of stress-related disorders when compared with controls. Results indicated, with state anxiety, improvement continued during home practice after treatment. (Author/JAC)

  17. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  18. Self-Study and Evaluation Guide/1968 Edition. Section D-2B: Orientation on Mobility Services. (Dog Guide Program Only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Accreditation Council for Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually Handicapped, New York, NY.

    This self-study and evaluation guide on orientation and mobility services (dog guide program emphasis) is one of 28 guides designed for organizations undertaking a self-study as part of the process for accreditation from the National Accreditation Council (NAC) for agencies serving the blind and visually handicapped. Provided are lists of…

  19. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    .5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...... echoes. Applying biexponential curve analysis, a significant deviation from a monoexponential behaviour was recognized at a ratio of corresponding relaxation rates of about 3 and 2, estimating T1 and T2 relaxation, respectively (p less than 0.01, F-test). Requiring an SD less than or equal to 10 per cent...... for each set of parameters, the biexponential model was accepted when this ratio exceeded a factor of 5 and 8, respectively. Referring to 'expected' T1 and T2 values, however, an accuracy within 20 per cent only was observed at ratios of at least 6 and 15. It is concluded that quantitative estimation...

  20. Fifteen Minutes of Chair-Based Yoga Postures or Guided Meditation Performed in the Office Can Elicit a Relaxation Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey W. Melville

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared acute (15 min yoga posture and guided meditation practice, performed seated in a typical office workspace, on physiological and psychological markers of stress. Twenty participants (39.6±9.5 yr completed three conditions: yoga, meditation, and control (i.e., usual work separated by ≥24 hrs. Yoga and meditation significantly reduced perceived stress versus control, and this effect was maintained postintervention. Yoga increased heart rate while meditation reduced heart rate versus control (<0.05. Respiration rate was reduced during yoga and meditation versus control (<0.05. Domains of heart rate variability (e.g., SDNN and Total Power were significantly reduced during control versus yoga and meditation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were reduced secondary to meditation versus control only (<0.05. Physiological adaptations generally regressed toward baseline postintervention. In conclusion, yoga postures or meditation performed in the office can acutely improve several physiological and psychological markers of stress. These effects may be at least partially mediated by reduced respiration rate.

  1. An evaluation of two behavioral rehabilitation programs, qigong versus progressive relaxation, in improving the quality of life in cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Peggy Ngor; Wan, Maurice; Chan, Wai Kwong; Yung, Paul Man Bun

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate and compare two different behavioral rehabilitation programs in improving the quality of life in cardiac patients in Hong Kong. The current study was carried out in the outpatient unit of Occupational Therapy Department in the United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong. Convenience sampling with referral from the cardiac specialty was used in the present study. A total of 65 subjects, with a mean age 65 (range, 42 to 76), were recruited in the study. The cardiac diseases included myocardial infarct, postcoronary intervention, valve replacement, and also ischemic heart disease. Patients were alternately allocated to the two groups. The first group of patients received instructions and practiced on progressive relaxation. The second group of patients underwent training in qigong. A total of eight sessions were conducted and each session lasted 20 minutes. Demographic and clinical data such as gender, age, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded. The psychological and Quality of Life assessment was performed using the Chinese versions of Short Form 36 (C-SF36), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (C-STAI), and General Health Questionnaire (C-GHQ-12). Fifty-nine (59) subjects (44 men and 15 women) completed all eight rehabilitation sessions in the study. Patients allocated to the two treatment groups had comparable baseline characteristics. Progressive relaxation was more effective in reducing blood pressures compared to qigong. Relaxation appeared to be particularly beneficial in somatic domains. qigong group demonstrated greater improvement in psychologic measures in addition to reduction in systolic blood pressure. Progressive relaxation and qigong exercise improved the quality of life for cardiac patients with reference to certain physiologic and psychologic measures. The result was supported by previous studies and literature reviews on qigong in terms of its effect on the psychologic dimension.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of guided versus non-guided interpretation in the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Roberts

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of growing pressure placed on the natural environment, the study on which this article is based considered the effectiveness of interpretive provision in mitigating the harmful effects of tourism on the environment. The aim of this research was to determine whether guided or non-guided interpretation is most effective in reaching the stated goals of interpretation. The four key goals of interpretation, namely visitor satisfaction, knowledge gain, attitude change and modification of behaviour intent, were used in the assessment of the relative effectiveness of guided and non-guided interpretation in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. Through comparing responses to questionnaires from post-visit samples and observing both guided and non-guided interpretation, the research found that guided interpretation was only marginally more effective in reaching the four key goals of interpretation than the non-guided interpretive media. Guided interpretation was found to be more effective in terms of visitor satisfaction, whilst guided and non-guided interpretation had only marginal differences in effectiveness in relation to knowledge gain, attitude change and intent to modify behaviour.Conservation implications: The necessity of implementing an appropriate interpretation programme within protected areas cannot be overemphasised. The interpretation programme should be designed to include elements of both guided and non-guided interpretation in order to achieve a predetermined goal. The effectiveness of the programme should be evaluated periodically and amended where appropriate.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery as Anxiety Reducing Interventions in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Charalambous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the effectiveness of guided imagery (GI and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR as stress reducing interventions in patients with prostate and breast cancer who undergo chemotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to either the control group or the intervention group (PMR and GI. Patients were observed for a total duration of 3 weeks and assessed with the SAS and BECK-II questionnaires for anxiety and depression, respectively, in addiotion to two biological markers (saliva cortisol and saliva amylase (trial registration number: NCT01275872. Results. 256 patients were registered and 236 were randomly assigned. In total 104 were randomised to the control group and 104 to the intervention group. Intervention’s mean anxiety score and depression score changes were significantly different compared to the control’s (b=-29.4, p<0.001; b=-29.4, p<0.001, resp.. Intervention group’s cortisol levels before the intervention (0.30±0.25 gradually decreased up to week 3 (0.16±0.18, whilst the control group’s cortisol levels before the intervention (0.21±0.22 gradually increased up to week 3 (0.44±0.35. The same interaction appears for the Amylase levels (p<0.001. Conclusions. The findings showed that patients with prostate and breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy treatment can benefit from PMR and GI sessions to reduce their anxiety and depression.

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery as Anxiety Reducing Interventions in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Bozas, Evangelos; Paikousis, Lefkios

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the effectiveness of guided imagery (GI) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) as stress reducing interventions in patients with prostate and breast cancer who undergo chemotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to either the control group or the intervention group (PMR and GI). Patients were observed for a total duration of 3 weeks and assessed with the SAS and BECK-II questionnaires for anxiety and depression, respectively, in addiotion to two biological markers (saliva cortisol and saliva amylase) (trial registration number: NCT01275872). Results. 256 patients were registered and 236 were randomly assigned. In total 104 were randomised to the control group and 104 to the intervention group. Intervention's mean anxiety score and depression score changes were significantly different compared to the control's (b = -29.4, p < 0.001; b = -29.4, p < 0.001, resp.). Intervention group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.30 ± 0.25) gradually decreased up to week 3 (0.16 ± 0.18), whilst the control group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.21 ± 0.22) gradually increased up to week 3 (0.44 ± 0.35). The same interaction appears for the Amylase levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The findings showed that patients with prostate and breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy treatment can benefit from PMR and GI sessions to reduce their anxiety and depression.

  5. Evaluation of PHB/Clay nanocomposite by spin-lattice relaxation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB based on nanocomposites containing different amounts of a commercial organically modified clay (viscogel B7 were prepared employing solution intercalation method. Three solvents, such as: CHCl3, dimethylchloride (DMC and tetrahydrofuran (THF were used. The relationship among the processing conditions; molecular structure and intermolecular interaction, between both nanocomposite components, were investigated using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, as a part of characterization methodology, which has been used by Tavares et al. It involves the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time, T1H, by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, employing low field NMR. X ray diffraction was also employed because it is a conventional technique, generally used to obtain the first information on nanocomposite formation. Changes in PHB crystallinity were observed after the organophilic nanoclay had been incorporated in the polymer matrix. These changes, in the microstructure, were detected by the variation of hydrogen nuclear relaxation time values and by X ray, which showed an increase in the clay interlamelar space due to the intercalation of the polymer in the clay between lamellae. It was also observed, for both techniques, that the solvents affect directly the organization of the crystalline region, promoting a better intercalation, considering that they behave like a plasticizer.

  6. Guided Imagery And Progressive Muscle Relaxation as a Cluster of Symptoms Management Intervention in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Charalambous

    Full Text Available Patients receiving chemotherapy often experience many different symptoms that can be difficult to alleviate and ultimately negatively influence their quality of life. Such symptoms include pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. There is a gap in the relevant literature on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural and relaxation techniques in symptom clusters. The study reflects this gap in the literature and aimed to test the effectiveness of Guided Imagery (GI and Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR on a cluster of symptoms experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy.This was a randomized control trial with 208 patients equally assigned either in the intervention or the control group. Measurements in both groups were collected at baseline and at completion of intervention (4 weeks. Patients were assessed for pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. The overall management of the cluster was also assessed based on the patients' self-reported health related quality of life-HRQoL. Chi-square tests (X2, independent T-tests and Linear Mixed Models were calculated.Patients in the intervention group experienced lower levels of Fatigue (p<0.0.0225, and Pain (p = 0.0003 compared to those in the control group and experienced better HRQoL (p<0.0001 [PRE-POST:Pain 4.2(2.5 - 2.5(1.6, Fatigue 27.6(4.1 - 19.3(4.1, HRQoL 54.9(22.7 - 64.5(23, CONTROL: Pain 3.5(1.7 - 4.8(1.5, Fatigue 28.7(4.1 - 32.5(3.8, HRQoL 51.9(22.3- 41.2(24.1]. Nausea, vomiting and retching occurred significantly less often in the intervention group [pre-post: 25.4(5.9- 20.6(5.6 compared to the control group (17.8(6.5- 22.7(5.3 (F = 58.50 p<0.0001. More patients in the control group (pre:n = 33-post:n = 47 were found to be moderately depressed compared to those in the intervention group (pre:n = 35-post:n = 15 (X2 = 5.93; p = 0.02.This study provided evidence that the combination of GI and PMR can be effective in the management

  7. Guided Imagery And Progressive Muscle Relaxation as a Cluster of Symptoms Management Intervention in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Bozas, Evaggelos; Marcou, Yiola; Kitsios, Petros; Paikousis, Lefkios

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chemotherapy often experience many different symptoms that can be difficult to alleviate and ultimately negatively influence their quality of life. Such symptoms include pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. There is a gap in the relevant literature on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural and relaxation techniques in symptom clusters. The study reflects this gap in the literature and aimed to test the effectiveness of Guided Imagery (GI) and Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) on a cluster of symptoms experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy. This was a randomized control trial with 208 patients equally assigned either in the intervention or the control group. Measurements in both groups were collected at baseline and at completion of intervention (4 weeks). Patients were assessed for pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. The overall management of the cluster was also assessed based on the patients' self-reported health related quality of life-HRQoL. Chi-square tests (X2), independent T-tests and Linear Mixed Models were calculated. Patients in the intervention group experienced lower levels of Fatigue (p<0.0.0225), and Pain (p = 0.0003) compared to those in the control group and experienced better HRQoL (p<0.0001) [PRE-POST: Pain 4.2(2.5) - 2.5(1.6), Fatigue 27.6(4.1) - 19.3(4.1), HRQoL 54.9(22.7) - 64.5(23), CONTROL: Pain 3.5(1.7) - 4.8(1.5), Fatigue 28.7(4.1) - 32.5(3.8), HRQoL 51.9(22.3)- 41.2(24.1)]. Nausea, vomiting and retching occurred significantly less often in the intervention group [pre-post: 25.4(5.9)- 20.6(5.6) compared to the control group (17.8(6.5)- 22.7(5.3) (F = 58.50 p<0.0001). More patients in the control group (pre:n = 33-post:n = 47) were found to be moderately depressed compared to those in the intervention group (pre:n = 35-post:n = 15) (X2 = 5.93; p = 0.02). This study provided evidence that the combination of GI and PMR can be effective in the

  8. The art of appropriate evaluation : a guide for highway safety program managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The guide, updated from its original release in 1999, is intended for project managers who will oversee the evaluation of traffic safety programs. It describes the benefits of evaluation and provides an overview of the steps involved. The guide inclu...

  9. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Stefano [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  10. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominici, Stefano; Wen, Hanqing; Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele; Bellotti, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 1016 cm-3 to 5 × 1019 cm-3. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  11. Weather integration in TMC operations : a self-evaluation and planning guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This flyer describes how Traffic Management Centers (TMC) can integrate weather information into their daily operations, and is based on the Road Weather Management Program publication, Self-Evaluation and Planning Guide (FHWA-JPO-08-057). The Guide ...

  12. High Temperature Performance Evaluation of As-serviced 25Cr35Ni Type Heat-resistant Steel Based on Stress Relaxation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Jun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on an as-serviced 25Cr35Ni type steel, the high temperature property evaluation using stress relaxation test(SRT method and residual life prediction were studied. The results show that creep rupture property decreases because of the formation of network carbides along grain boundaries and coarsening of secondary carbides in the austenitic matrix. Based on the relationship of stress relaxation strain rate curves obtained at different temperatures, and the extrapolation equation of stress relaxation rate-rupture time, it is capable to perform residual life evaluation by combining SRT data and a small amount of creep rupture test(CRT. Good agreement is observed for predicting results performed by current method and traditional method.

  13. New platform for evaluating ultrasound-guided interventional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle tracking systems are frequently used in surgical procedures. Various needle tracking technologies have been developed using ultrasound, electromagnetic sensors, and optical sensors. To evaluate these new needle tracking technologies, 3D volume information is often acquired to compute the actual distance from the needle tip to the target object. The image-guidance conditions for comparison are often inconsistent due to the ultrasound beam-thickness. Since 3D volumes are necessary, there is often some time delay between the surgical procedure and the evaluation. These evaluation methods will generally only measure the final needle location because they interrupt the surgical procedure. The main contribution of this work is a new platform for evaluating needle tracking systems in real-time, resolving the problems stated above. We developed new tools to evaluate the precise distance between the needle tip and the target object. A PZT element transmitting unit is designed as needle introducer shape so that it can be inserted in the needle. We have collected time of flight and amplitude information in real-time. We propose two systems to collect ultrasound signals. We demonstrate this platform on an ultrasound DAQ system and a cost-effective FPGA board. The results of a chicken breast experiment show the feasibility of tracking a time series of needle tip distances. We performed validation experiments with a plastisol phantom and have shown that the preliminary data fits a linear regression model with a RMSE of less than 0.6mm. Our platform can be applied to more general needle tracking methods using other forms of guidance.

  14. IDRC and BetterEvaluation launch an interactive guide to manage ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-21

    Oct 21, 2016 ... IDRC's support of BetterEvaluation, an international collaboration to improve evaluation practice and theory, has resulted in an online guide for an often overlooked group of people who greatly affect the quality and usefulness of ... Learn more about the Commissioner's Guide on Better Evaluation

  15. Evaluation of the effect of progressive relaxation exercises on fatigue and sleep quality in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayapoğlu, Nuray; Tan, Mehtap

    2012-10-01

    Fatigue and sleep problems are very commonly observed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique (PMRT), used as one of the alternative methods in recent years, is reported to have benefits such as facilitating sleep and reducing sensitivity against fatigue. This research was conducted to investigate the effect of PMRT on fatigue and sleep quality in patients with MS. This research was performed as a single-group pretest/post-test pretrial model. The research was conducted between March 2008 and December 2009 in the neurology polyclinic. The study was conducted with 32 patients who met the research criteria and agreed to participate in the study. A Personal Information Form was used as a data collection tool, Fatigue Severity Scale was used for measuring fatigue, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used for evaluating the sleep quality. PMRT was applied to the sample group once a day for 6 weeks. Percentage, paired t-test, and Pearson's correlation analysis were used in the assessment of data. It was determined that PMRT decreased patients' fatigue level and improved their sleep quality, and this difference was observed to be statistically significant. Moreover, patients' fatigue level increased as their sleep quality decreased. This study supports the effect of PMRT on fatigue and sleep quality in patients with MS, and it is recommended that further studies be conducted on this subject in the future.

  16. Planning, Management and Evaluation: Realizing PIC Potential. Private Industry Council Guide. Working Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME) guide was developed by the National Alliance of Business as part of its program of management assistance for Private Industry Councils (PICs). The guide is a tool which PICs can use to improve their capability to plan, manage, and evaluate the programs which they administer, and to establish locally…

  17. Cognitive Radio Application for Evaluating Coexistence with Cognitive Radars: A Software User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    A Software User’s Guide by Jeff Poston, Anthony Martone, Kelly Sherbondy, and Michael Buehrer Approved for public release...OCT 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Cognitive Radio Application for Evaluating Coexistence with Cognitive Radars: A Software User’s Guide...5 June 2017 to 11 August 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cognitive Radio Application for Evaluating Coexistence with Cognitive Radars: A Software

  18. An evaluation of guided reading in three primary schools in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee R Nathanson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Given that the South African government intends to improve its literacy rates by implementing Guided Reading in the primary schools, teachers are challenged to give good quality Guided Reading instruction. The study which this article draws on evaluates how teachers understand and implement Guided Reading in Grade 1 and 2 at three public schools in the Western Cape. Data were drawn from observations of teachers using Fountas & Pinnell’s Guided Reading instruction and a Guided Reading Self-Assessment Inventory. Analyses of the above-mentioned quantitative and qualitative research data indicate that South African teachers have a superficial understanding of Guided Reading. The study suggests that South African teachers struggle to implement Guided Reading in the classroom, because they do not create Guided Reading groups based on ongoing assessment and the teachers do not have access to levelled Guided Reading books. Furthermore, the new policy requirements for Guided Reading appear to fail to offer teachers a sufficient explanation of Guided Reading. I argue that, without addressing these basic requirements, it is unlikely that Guided Reading will be implemented with any success in the South African classrooms.

  19. The Portage Guide to Early Intervention: An Evaluation of Published Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brue, Alan W.; Oakland, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the Portage Guide to Early Intervention, a program in which teachers instruct mothers in their homes in an effort to help promote the development of young children with developmental delays. Since multiple factors precluded an appropriate evaluation of the guide's effects, professionals are encouraged to be conservative when discussing the…

  20. Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  1. Development and evaluation of study guide template for an integrated cardiovascular module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazimi, Awdah

    2012-01-01

    The undergraduate medical curriculum in the King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was reformed in 2002. It is integrated, organized in courses and modules, and has an increasing proportion of problem-based and self-directed learning. The new curriculum has presented the faculty and students with specific challenges. Accustomed to a traditional teacher-centred approach, and because the language of instruction is English, students needed much more support and encouragement in taking advantages of independent learning than their western counterparts would require. A well-designed study guide may be more effective student learning tool in the new integrated curriculum. This article describes to simplify and modern approach to the production of study guides. The approach is based on the development and the use of a study guide template. The guide is evaluated by second year medical students at King Abdulaziz University. The study guide is highly appreciated by student evaluations and 'study guide template' that includes a well-designed layout is a useful aid for medical teachers who have had no experience in producing a study guide. The template allows medical teachers to invest their time in the production of the content rather than in the layout and format of the guide.

  2. Structural Integrity Evaluation of Cold Neutron Laboratory Building by Design Change of Guide Shielding Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sangik; Kim, Youngki; Kim, Harkrho

    2007-06-15

    This report summarizes the results of the structural integrity evaluation for the cold neutron laboratory building by design change of guide shielding room. The design of the guide shielding room was changed by making its structure members in normal concrete (2.3 g/cc) instead of heavy concrete (3.5 g/cc) because the heavy concrete could be not supplied to meet its design specification. Therefore, it was decided that the guide shielding room is made of the normal concrete. And, the shielding performance of the normal concrete was recalculated to confirm satisfying its design specification, which is of a 9000 zone according to HANARO radiation region classification. The change makes the shielding wall thicker than existing design, and then it is caused to qualify the structural integrity evaluation of the CNLB. Finally, the structural integrity of the CNLB was re-evaluated by considering the design change of the guide shielding room.

  3. Introducing Evidence-Based Principles to Guide Collaborative Approaches to Evaluation: Results of an Empirical Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulha, Lyn M.; Whitmore, Elizabeth; Cousins, J. Bradley; Gilbert, Nathalie; al Hudib, Hind

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a set of evidence-based principles to guide evaluation practice in contexts where evaluation knowledge is collaboratively produced by evaluators and stakeholders. The data from this study evolved in four phases: two pilot phases exploring the desirability of developing a set of principles; an online questionnaire survey…

  4. Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Mary E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles several essays about effective evaluation of teaching. Contents of this publication include: (1) Conducting Research on Student Evaluations of Teaching (William E. Addison and Jeffrey R. Stowell); (2) Choosing an Instrument for Student Evaluation of Instruction (Jared W. Keeley); (3) Formative Teaching Evaluations: Is Student…

  5. Evaluation of the kinetic and relaxation time of gentamicin sulfate released from hybrid biomaterial Bioglass-chitosan scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wers, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Lefeuvre, B.; Merdrignac-Conanec, O.; Barroug, A.

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan scaffolds, combined with bioactive glass 46S6, were prepared to serve as gentamicin sulfate delivery in situ systems for bone biomaterials. This work presents a study about the effect of the ratio chitosan/bioactive glass (CH/BG) on the release of gentamicin sulfate and on the bioactivity during in vitro experiments. SEM observations allowed understanding the bond between the glass grains and the chitosan matrix. In vitro results showed that scaffolds form a hydroxyapatite (HA) Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 after 15 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF).The interest of this study is to see that the increase of the content of bioactive glass in the chitosan matrix slows the release of gentamicin sulfate in the liquid medium. Starting concentration of gentamicin sulfate has an influence on the relaxation time of the scaffolds. Indeed, an increasing concentration delays the return to a new equilibrium. Contents of chitosan and bioactive glass do not affect the relaxation time. Synthesized scaffolds could be adapted to a clinical situation: severity and type of infection, weight and age of the patient.

  6. A one-model approach based on relaxed combinations of inputs for evaluating input congestion in DEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, Mohammad

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides a one-model approach of input congestion based on input relaxation model developed in data envelopment analysis (e.g. [G.R. Jahanshahloo, M. Khodabakhshi, Suitable combination of inputs for improving outputs in DEA with determining input congestion -- Considering textile industry of China, Applied Mathematics and Computation (1) (2004) 263-273; G.R. Jahanshahloo, M. Khodabakhshi, Determining assurance interval for non-Archimedean ele improving outputs model in DEA, Applied Mathematics and Computation 151 (2) (2004) 501-506; M. Khodabakhshi, A super-efficiency model based on improved outputs in data envelopment analysis, Applied Mathematics and Computation 184 (2) (2007) 695-703; M. Khodabakhshi, M. Asgharian, An input relaxation measure of efficiency in stochastic data analysis, Applied Mathematical Modelling 33 (2009) 2010-2023]. This approach reduces solving three problems with the two-model approach introduced in the first of the above-mentioned reference to two problems which is certainly important from computational point of view. The model is applied to a set of data extracted from ISI database to estimate input congestion of 12 Canadian business schools.

  7. In vivo spectroradiometric evaluation of colour matching errors among five shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Yu, H; Wang, Y N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the colour errors of visual shade selection by five different shade guides. The maxillary left central incisors of sixty participants were visually evaluated by two groups of prosthodontists, with different clinical experience. The shade selection results were recorded and the most selected tab was determined as the resultant shade for each tooth. If totally different opinions were obtained, consensus was needed to determine the resultant shade among the observers. The colour distributions (L*, a* and b*) of each tooth and shade tab were measured using a spectroradiometer. The coverage errors (CEs) of each shade guide and colour differences (DeltaE values) between a tooth and the selected shade tabs were calculated. Two-way anova and Tukey's post hoc analysis were used to evaluate the differences of CE and DeltaE values among shade guides and clinical experience (alpha = 0.05). Coverage errors and DeltaE values in all of the five shade guide systems were all beyond the clinical threshold of 3.3 units. The consensus led to a better colour matching than that of the single decision group in Vitapan 3D-Master and Shofu NCC shade guides. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found among DeltaE values of the shade guide system and clinical experience. In conclusion, all five of the shade guide systems used did not achieve clinically compatible shade matching. However, the Vitapan 3D Master shade guide system resulted in the lowest CEs and DeltaE values. Consensus could be helpful in enhancing the aesthetic results using Vitapan 3D Master and Shofu NCC shade guides.

  8. A Guide to Evaluation Research in Terminal Care Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Robert W., III; Foley, Susan H.

    1978-01-01

    Pressure for greater accountability is being exerted on programs for care of terminally ill and increasing demand for evaluation research. Components, implications, and limitations of evaluation systems are discussed, and their application in the terminal care setting addressed. Buckingham evaluation of hospice home care service is cited as a…

  9. Biofeedback-assisted relaxation and progressive muscle relaxation potential for enhancing students’ distress tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jarašiūnaitė, Gabija; Perminas, Aidas; Gustainienė, Loreta; Pečiulienė, Ieva; Kavaliauskaitė-Keserauskienė, Rūta

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing biofeedback-assisted relaxation and progressive muscle relaxation potential for enhancing distress tolerance in students’ population. 125 female undergraduate students aged between 18 and 27 participated in the study. Distress Tolerance Scale was used to evaluate distress tolerance. Participants of a study were randomly assigned into 3 different groups: 1) weekly biofeedback-assisted relaxation (n=40), 2) weekly progressive muscle relaxation training (n=43), a...

  10. ARTVAL user guide : user guide for the ARTerial eVALuation computational engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This document provides guidance on the use of the ARTVAL (Arterial Evaluation) computational : engine. The engine implements the Quick Estimation Method for Urban Streets (QEM-US) : described in Highway Capacity Manual (HCM2010) as the core computati...

  11. Geometric Evaluation of Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Misop; Chang, Doyoung; Kim, Chunwoo; Lee, Brian J.; Zuo, Yihe; Kim, Hyung-Joo; Petrisor, Doru; Trock, Bruce; Partin, Alan W.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carter, H. Ballentine; Allaf, Mohamad; Kim, Jongwon; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy results rely on physician ability to target the gland according to the biopsy schema. However, to our knowledge it is unknown how accurately the freehand, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy cores are placed in the prostate and how the geometric distribution of biopsy cores may affect the prostate cancer detection rate. Materials and Methods To determine the geometric distribution of cores, we developed a biopsy simulation system with pelvic mock-ups and an optical tracking system. Mock-ups were biopsied in a freehand manner by 5 urologists and by our transrectal ultrasound robot, which can support and move the transrectal ultrasound probe. We compared 1) targeting errors, 2) the accuracy and precision of repeat biopsies, and 3) the estimated significant prostate cancer (0.5 cm3 or greater) detection rate using a probability based model. Results Urologists biopsied cores in clustered patterns and under sampled a significant portion of the prostate. The robot closely followed the predefined biopsy schema. The mean targeting error of the urologists and the robot was 9.0 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Robotic assistance significantly decreased repeat biopsy errors with improved accuracy and precision. The mean significant prostate cancer detection rate of the urologists and the robot was 36% and 43%, respectively (p sextant schema and may result in suboptimal sampling and cancer detection. Repeat freehand biopsy of the same target is challenging. Robotic assistance with optimized biopsy schemas can potentially improve targeting, precision and accuracy. A clinical trial is needed to confirm the additional benefits of robotic assistance. PMID:23088974

  12. SH ultrasonic guided waves for the evaluation of interfacial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaings, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Shear-Horizontally (SH) polarized, ultrasonic, guided wave modes are considered in order to infer changes in the adhesive properties at several interfaces located within an adhesive bond joining two metallic plates. Specific aluminium lap-joint samples were produced, with different adhesive properties at up to four interfaces when a glass-epoxy film is inserted into the adhesive bond. EMAT transducers were used to generate and detect the fundamental SH0 mode. This is launched from one plate and detected at the other plate, past the lap joint. Signals are picked up for different propagation paths along each sample, in order to check measurement reproducibility as well as the uniformity of the adhesively bonded zones. Signals measured for four samples are then compared, showing very good sensitivity of the SH0 mode to changes in the interfacial adhesive properties. In addition, a Finite Element-based model is used to simulate the experimental measurements. The model includes adhesive viscoelasticity, as well as spatial distributions of shear springs (with shear stiffness KT) at both metal-adhesive interfaces, and also at the adhesive-film interfaces when these are present. This model is solved in the frequency domain, but temporal excitation and inverse FFT procedure are implemented in order to simulate the measured time traces. Values of the interfacial adhesive parameters, KT, are determined by an optimization process so that best fit is obtained between both sets of measured and numerically predicted waveforms. Such agreement was also possible by adjusting the shear modulus of the adhesive component. This work suggests a promising use of SH-like guided modes for quantifying shear properties at adhesive interfaces, and shows that such waves can be used for inferring adhesive and cohesive properties of bonds separately. Finally, the paper considers improvements that could be made to the process, and its potential for testing the interfacial adhesion of adhesively

  13. Visual and instrumental evaluation of color match ability of 2 shade guides on a ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öngül, Değer; Şermet, Bülent; Balkaya, Mehmet Cudi

    2012-07-01

    There is limited information on the visual and instrumental evaluation of color match between a natural tooth and a ceramic crown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 shade guides on color match, and to evaluate the relationship between color difference (ΔE) values and examiners' assessments of the color match in ceramic crowns. Thirty-three subjects were selected for a ceramic crown restoration of the maxillary central incisor. Two crowns were fabricated with selected shades from Vitapan Classical and Vita Toothguide 3D-Master shade guides for each subject. The color values of maxillary central incisors, selected shade tabs, and corresponding crowns were measured with a spectrophotometer. The ΔE values between the natural teeth and the crowns and between the selected shade tabs and the corresponding crowns were calculated for each subject and compared with the Student's t test (α=.05). In addition, 3 examiners visually evaluated the clinical acceptability of each crown on a scale from 1 to 6. The agreement among the examiners was assessed with the Kappa test. The scores of examiners for both shade guides were analyzed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test (α=.05). The results revealed that the color difference values between the teeth and the crowns fabricated with the selected shades from the Vita Toothguide 3D-Master shade guide were significantly smaller than those of the Vitapan Classical guide (P=.003). Similarly, the color difference values between the selected shade tabs from the Vita Toothguide 3D-Master guide and the corresponding crowns were significantly smaller than those of the Vitapan Classical guide (P=.001). However, the ΔE values obtained for both shade guides were within the clinically acceptable range (ΔE3D-Master shade guide resulted in a closer color match to the natural teeth than those of the Vitapan Classical guide. However, the ΔE values and the examiners' scores were within the clinically acceptable range for

  14. Evaluation of a flowchart-based EHR query system: a case study of RetroGuide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Narus, Scott P; Rocha, Roberto A

    2010-02-01

    Provision of query systems which are intuitive for non-experts has been recognized as an important informatics challenge. We developed a prototype of a flowchart-based analytical framework called RetroGuide that enables non-experts to formulate query tasks using a step-based, patient-centered paradigm inspired by workflow technology. We present results of the evaluation of RetroGuide in comparison to Structured Query Language (SQL) in laboratory settings using a mixed method design. We asked 18 human subjects with limited database experience to solve query tasks in RetroGuide and SQL, and quantitatively compared their test scores. A follow-up questionnaire was designed to compare both technologies qualitatively and investigate RetroGuide technology acceptance. The quantitative comparison of test scores showed that the study subjects achieved significantly higher scores using the RetroGuide technology. Qualitative study results indicated that 94% of subjects preferred RetroGuide to SQL because RetroGuide was easier to learn, it better supported temporal tasks, and it seemed to be a more logical modeling paradigm. Additional qualitative evaluation results, based on a technology acceptance model, suggested that a fully developed RetroGuide-like technology would be well accepted by users. Our study is an example of a structure validation study of a prototype query system, results of which provided significant guidance in further development of a novel query paradigm for EHR data. We discuss the strengths and weakness of our study design and results, and their implication for future evaluations of query systems in general.

  15. Using Complexity Theory to Guide Medical School Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Roberts, Chris

    2017-07-03

    Contemporary medical school evaluations are narrow in focus and often do not consider the wider systems implications of the relationship between learning and teaching, research, clinical care, and community engagement. The result is graduates who lack the necessary knowledge and skills for the modern health care system and an educational system that is limited in its ability to learn and change.To address this issue, the authors apply complexity theory to medical school evaluation, using four key factors-nesting, diversity, self-organization, and emergent outcomes. To help medical educators apply this evaluation approach in their own settings, the authors offer two tools-a modified program logic model and sensemaking. In sensemaking, they use the organic metaphor of the medical school as a neuron situated within a complex neural network to enable medical educators to reframe the way they think about program evaluation. The authors then offer practical guidance for applying this model, including describing the example of addressing graduates' engagement in the health care system. The authors consider the input of teachers, the role of culture and curriculum, and the clinical care system in this example.Medical school evaluation is reframed as an improvement science for complex social interventions (medical school is such an intervention) in this model. With complexity theory's focus on emergent outcomes, evaluation takes on a new focus, reimagining medical students as reaching their future potential as change agents, who transform health systems and the lives of patients.

  16. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emerald Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others. Retrospective evaluations may be contrasted to prospective evaluations that reflect expected or potential outcomes only if assumptions hold. The retrospective approach described in this Guide is based on realized results only and the extent they can be attributed to the efforts of an R&D program. While it has been prepared specifically to guide retrospective benefit-cost analysis of EERE R&D Programs, this report may be used for similar analysis of other public R&D organizations.

  17. Standard guide for evaluating performance characteristics of phased-Array ultrasonic testing instruments and systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes procedures for evaluating some performance characteristics of phased-array ultrasonic examination instruments and systems. 1.2 Evaluation of these characteristics is intended to be used for comparing instruments and systems or, by periodic repetition, for detecting long-term changes in the characteristics of a given instrument or system that may be indicative of impending failure, and which, if beyond certain limits, will require corrective maintenance. Instrument characteristics measured in accordance with this guide are expressed in terms that relate to their potential usefulness for ultrasonic examinations. Other electronic instrument characteristics in phased-array units are similar to non-phased-array units and may be measured as described in E 1065 or E 1324. 1.3 Ultrasonic examination systems using pulsed-wave trains and A-scan presentation (rf or video) may be evaluated. 1.4 This guide establishes no performance limits for examination systems; if such acceptance criteria ar...

  18. SEE Action Guide for States: Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Frameworks$-$Guidance for Energy Efficiency Portfolios Funded by Utility Customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Michael [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Dietsch, Niko [US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This guide describes frameworks for evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) of utility customer–funded energy efficiency programs. The authors reviewed multiple frameworks across the United States and gathered input from experts to prepare this guide. This guide provides the reader with both the contents of an EM&V framework, along with the processes used to develop and update these frameworks.

  19. Web indicators for research evaluation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Thelwall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand for research evaluation within universities and other research-based organisations. In parallel, there has been an increasing recognition that traditional citation-based indicators are not able to reflect the societal impacts of research and are slow to appear. This has led to the creation of new indicators for different types of research impact as well as timelier indicators, mainly derived from the Web. These indicators have been called altmetrics, webometrics or just web metrics. This book describes and evaluates a range of web indicators for aspects of societal or scholarly impact, discusses the theory and practice of using and evaluating web indicators for research assessment and outlines practical strategies for obtaining many web indicators. In addition to describing impact indicators for traditional scholarly outputs, such as journal articles and monographs, it also covers indicators for videos, datasets, software and other non-standard scholarly out...

  20. Evaluation and treatment of hypernatremia: a practical guide for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-01-01

    Hypernatremia (serum sodium concentration >145 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte disorder with increased morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly and critically ill patients. The review presents the main pathogenetic mechanisms of hypernatremia, provides specific directions for the evaluation of patients with increased sodium levels and describes a detailed algorithm for the proper correction of hypernatremia. Furthermore, two representative cases of hypovolemic and hypervolemic hypernatremia are presented along with practical clues for their proper evaluation and treatment. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment is crucial since undercorrection or overcorrection of hypernatremia are both associated with poor patients' prognosis.

  1. Harmonic skeleton guided evaluation of stenoses in human coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Zhu, Lei; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Giddens, Don P

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach that three-dimensionally visualizes and evaluates stenoses in human coronary arteries by using harmonic skeletons. A harmonic skeleton is the center line of a multi-branched tubular surface extracted based on a harmonic function, which is the solution of the Laplace equation. This skeletonization method guarantees smoothness and connectivity and provides a fast and straightforward way to calculate local cross-sectional areas of the arteries, and thus provides the possibility to localize and evaluate coronary artery stenosis, which is a commonly seen pathology in coronary artery disease.

  2. An Evaluation of One-Sided and Two-Sided Communication Paradigms on Relaxed-Ordering Interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Khaled Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hargrove, Paul H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Iancu, Costin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yelick, Katherine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The Cray Gemini interconnect hardware provides multiple transfer mechanisms and out-of-order message delivery to improve communication throughput. In this paper we quantify the performance of one-sided and two-sided communication paradigms with respect to: 1) the optimal available hardware transfer mechanism, 2) message ordering constraints, 3) per node and per core message concurrency. In addition to using Cray native communication APIs, we use UPC and MPI micro-benchmarks to capture one- and two-sided semantics respectively. Our results indicate that relaxing the message delivery order can improve performance up to 4.6x when compared with strict ordering. When hardware allows it, high-level one-sided programming models can already take advantage of message reordering. Enforcing the ordering semantics of two-sided communication comes with a performance penalty. Furthermore, we argue that exposing out-of-order delivery at the application level is required for the next-generation programming models. Any ordering constraints in the language specifications reduce communication performance for small messages and increase the number of active cores required for peak throughput.

  3. Evaluation of the new C-arm guiding system ClearGuide® in an orthopaedic and trauma operating theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcus Christian; Frege, Sophie; Strauss, Andreas Christian; Gathen, Martin; Windemuth, Michael; Striepens, Eva Nadine

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether the new intraoperative C-arm guiding system ClearGuide® (CG) reduces radiation exposure of the staff in an Orthopaedic and Trauma operation theatre. Data of 95 patients CG was used were retrospectively compared using matched-pair analysis with controls without CG. Radiation dose (RD), fluoroscopic time (FT) and operation time (OT) were analysed in ten types of operative procedures. Use of CG led to a significant reduction (p ≤ 0.05) of the RD in intramedullary nailing and plate fixation of femoral shaft fractures as well as plating of tibia shaft fractures. Concerning FT, use of CG led to a significant reduction (p ≤ 0.05) while performing kyphoplasties and plate fixation of femoral shaft fractures. Regarding OT, no statistical significance was observed. CG as a simple, reproducible and intuitive communication tool for C-arm guidance reduces intraoperative staff radiation exposure especially while fixation of long bone fractures and in spine surgery. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Ultrasonic guided wave nondestructive evaluation using generalized anisotropic interface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael D.

    The motivation for this work is a goal to inspect interfaces between thick layers of materials that can be anisotropic. The specific application is a thick composite bonded to a metal substrate. The interface is inspected for disbonds between the metal and composite. The large thickness allows the problem to be modeled as a half space. The theory behind guided waves in plates is presented. This theory includes the calculation and analysis of dispersion curves and the resulting wave structure. It is noted that for high frequency-thickness values, certain modes will converge to the half-space waves, e.g. the Rayleigh wave and the Stoneley wave. Points of high energy, especially shear energy, at the interface are desirable for interfacial inspection. Therefore, the wave structure for all modes and frequencies is searched for ideal inspection points. Interface waves are inherently good modes to use for interface inspection. Results from the dispersion curves and wave structures are verified in the finite element model software package called Abaqus. It is confirmed that the group speeds and wave structures of the modes match the predicted values. A theoretical development of interface waves is given wherein Rayleigh, Stoneley, and generalized interface waves are discussed. This is applied to both isotropic and anisotropic materials. It is shown that the Stoneley wave only exists for a certain range of material parameters. Because the Stoneley wave is the interface wave between two solid half spaces, it might appear that only certain pairs of solids would allow for inspection via interface wave. However, it is shown that for perturbations of the Stoneley-wave-valid material properties, interface waves which leak energy away from the interface can still propagate. They can also be used for inspection. Certain choices of materials will leak less energy and will therefore allow for longer inspection distances. The solutions to the isotropic leaky wave problem exist on

  5. Rotation of Magnetization Derived from Brownian Relaxation in Magnetic Fluids of Different Viscosity Evaluated by Dynamic Hysteresis Measurements over a Wide Frequency Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of magnetic relaxation on particle parameters, such as the size and anisotropy, has been conventionally discussed. In addition, the influences of external conditions, such as the intensity and frequency of the applied field, the surrounding viscosity, and the temperature on the magnetic relaxation have been researched. According to one of the basic theories regarding magnetic relaxation, the faster type of relaxation dominates the process. However, in this study, we reveal that Brownian and Néel relaxations coexist and that Brownian relaxation can occur after Néel relaxation despite having a longer relaxation time. To understand the mechanisms of Brownian rotation, alternating current (AC hysteresis loops were measured in magnetic fluids of different viscosities. These loops conveyed the amplitude and phase delay of the magnetization. In addition, the intrinsic loss power (ILP was calculated using the area of the AC hysteresis loops. The ILP also showed the magnetization response regarding the magnetic relaxation over a wide frequency range. To develop biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles, such as hyperthermia and magnetic particle imaging, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation.

  6. Prospective evaluation of EUS-guided fine needle biopsy in pancreatic mass lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M H; Fristrup, C W; Detlefsen, S

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aim : Due to the scarcity of specific data on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle biopsies (SharkCore) FNB in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions, we performed a prospective study of the diagnostic performance of EUS SharkCore FNB in patients with pancreatic lesions...

  7. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.G.; Bomers, J.G.R; Yakar, D.; Huisman, H.; Rothgang, E.; Bosboom, D.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Misra, Sarthak; Futterer, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. Methods A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed

  8. Unbiased stereological methods used for the quantitative evaluation of guided bone regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Else Merete; Pinholt, E M; Schou, S

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the use of unbiased stereological methods for the quantitative evaluation of the amount of regenerated bone. Using the principle of guided bone regeneration the amount of regenerated bone after placement of degradable or non-degradable membranes covering defects...

  9. Crash test and evaluation of temporary wood sign support system for large guide signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research task was to evaluate the impact performance of a temporary wood sign support : system for large guide signs. It was desired to use existing TxDOT sign hardware in the design to the extent possible. : The full-scale cras...

  10. Visiting cultural heritage with a tour guide robot : a user evaluation study in-the-wild

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, Daphne; Ludden, Geke; Evers, Vanessa; Tapus, Adriana; André, Elisabeth; Martin, Jean-Claude; Ferland, François; Ammi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a user evaluation study on location at the Royal Alcázar in Seville, Spain, with the fully autonomous tour guide robot FROG. In this robot, technological innovations in navigation and vision were integrated with state-of-the-art design for robot behavior in order to provide

  11. 20 CFR 220.143 - Evaluation guides for an employed claimant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation guides for an employed claimant. 220.143 Section 220.143 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD... productivity when the Board decides whether the claimant has done substantial gainful activity. If the claimant...

  12. Evaluating Instruction in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Guide for Department Chairmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony

    This guide is designed for use by foreign language department chairpersons. The following topics are discussed: (1) goals of supervision, (2) the attitude of a good evaluator, (3) basic principles and purposes of supervisory visits, (4) what to look for during the supervisory visit, (5) the followup conference, (6) how to use the instruments for…

  13. Fluorescence guided evaluation of photodynamic therapy as acne treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Marica B.; Horfelt, Camilla; Cheng, Elaine; Larsson, Frida; Larko, Olle; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive alternative treatment for patients with acne because of its efficiency and few side effects. Propionibacterium acnes (P.acnes) are bacteria present in the skin, which produce endogenous porphyrins that act as photosensitisers. In addition, application of aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester (mALA) results in increased accumulation of porphyrins in the pilosebaceous units. This makes it possible to treat acne with PDT. This initial study investigates the possibility of fluorescence imaging as assessment tool in adjunct to PDT of patients with acne. Twenty-four patients with acne on the cheeks have been treated with PDT with and without mALA. Fluorescence images have been obtained before and after treatment. The clinical acne score was assessed as base line before PDT, and at every follow up visit. Additionally the amount of P.acnes was determined. The clinical evaluation showed a general improvement of acne, even though no difference between treatment with and without mALA was observed. By performing texture analysis and multivariate data analsysis on the fluorescence images, the extracted texture features were found to correlate with the corresponding clinical assessment (67%) and amount of P.acnes (72%). The analysis showed that features describing the highly fluorescent pores could be related to the clinical assessment. This result suggests that fluorescence imaging can be used as an objective assessment of acne, but further improvement of the technique is possible, for example by including colour images.

  14. The Effects of Stress Inoculation, Physical Relaxation and Skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the physical relaxation was more effective than the other treatment conditions in reducing psychophysiological symptoms, the stress inoculation was more effective in reducing the participants worry and emotionality reactions to evaluative situations. Keywords: Stress Inoculation; Physical Relaxation; Stress Management.

  15. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Using a Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique on the Self-Efficacy of Breastfeeding in Mothers With Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbandi, Soheila; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maryam; Hosseini, Seyedeh Asieh; Sadeghi, Farshad; Hesari, Maryam; Masoudi, Reza

    2017-08-01

    Breast milk is a God-given gift that conveys a mother's love and compassion and that is made according to the needs and age of the child. Mothers who are interested in the welfare of their newborns tend to breastfeed their children. Training programs have been shown to improve breastfeeding self-efficacy in terms of both duration and amount. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using the progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) technique on the self-efficacy of breastfeeding in mothers with preterm infants. A clinical trial approach was used. Sixty mothers with preterm infants were randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. The clinical trial ran for a period of 2 months for both groups. At 24-72 hours postpartum, the researcher used the Jacobson method to provide 30-45 minutes of individual training to the intervention group participants on PMR. Under the Jacobson method, mothers contract the 16 groups of muscles until they experience the feeling of pressure and then relax these muscles. The tools used in this study were the standard questionnaire of Dennis breastfeeding self-efficacy, which was completed by the participants at baseline, at the end of the fourth week, and during the eighth week. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. No significant difference was observed between the intervention and control groups in terms of demographic variables (p > .05). Independent t tests found no significant difference between the two groups (p = .45) in terms of mean score of maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy at pretest and significantly higher scores for the intervention group than the control group at both 4 (p = .001) and 8 (p relaxation training on the breastfeeding self-efficacy of mothers with preterm infants, training and performing these exercises as an effective and low-cost method to improve the health of mothers, particularly mothers of preterm infants, are recommended. The PMR technique facilitates the self-efficacy of

  16. Consistent evaluation of an ultrasound-guided surgical navigation system by utilizing an active validation platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younsu; Kim, Sungmin; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasound image-guided needle tracking systems have been widely used due to their cost-effectiveness and nonionizing radiation properties. Various surgical navigation systems have been developed by utilizing state-of-the-art sensor technologies. However, ultrasound transmission beam thickness causes unfair initial evaluation conditions due to inconsistent placement of the target with respect to the ultrasound probe. This inconsistency also brings high uncertainty and results in large standard deviations for each measurement when we compare accuracy with and without the guidance. To resolve this problem, we designed a complete evaluation platform by utilizing our mid-plane detection and time of flight measurement systems. The evaluating system uses a PZT element target and an ultrasound transmitting needle. In this paper, we evaluated an optical tracker-based surgical ultrasound-guided navigation system whereby the optical tracker tracks marker frames attached on the ultrasound probe and the needle. We performed ten needle trials of guidance experiment with a mid-plane adjustment algorithm and with a B-mode segmentation method. With the midplane adjustment, the result showed a mean error of 1.62+/-0.72mm. The mean error increased to 3.58+/-2.07mm without the mid-plane adjustment. Our evaluation system can reduce the effect of the beam-thickness problem, and measure ultrasound image-guided technologies consistently with a minimal standard deviation. Using our novel evaluation system, ultrasound image-guided technologies can be compared under equal initial conditions. Therefore, the error can be evaluated more accurately, and the system provides better analysis on the error sources such as ultrasound beam thickness.

  17. [External evaluation of population-based cancer registries: the REDEPICAN Guide for Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carmen; Molina, José Antonio; Barrios, Enrique; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Loria, Dora; Cueva, Patricia; Sánchez, María José; Chirlaque, María Dolores; Fernández, Leticia

    2013-11-01

    Evaluate the feasibility of the REDEPICAN Guide (Red Iberoamericana de Epidemiología y Sistemas de Información en Cáncer) and its adaptation to the current situation of population-based cancer registries (PBCRs) in Latin America and the Caribbean as a useful tool to improve these registries. Experts in cancer registries and health audits designed the guide and developed seven domains to evaluate in PBCRs. Several criteria were selected for each domain, with corresponding standards, scored according to three levels of compliance. Two training courses for external evaluators and three discussion panels for experts were organized. The guide was tested in six PBCRs in Latin America and Spain. The guide contains 68 criteria, 10 of which are considered essential for a PBCR. Based on its score, a registry is regarded as acceptable (41-199), good (200-299), or excellent (300-350). The registry methods domain accounts for 25% of the score, followed by completeness and validity (19%), dissemination of outcomes (19%), structure (13%), confidentiality and ethical aspects (11%), comparability (9%), and the procedures manual (3%). The pilot project enabled (1) enhancement of criteria and standards, (2) expansion of the quality concept to include client needs, and (3) strengthening the dissemination of outcomes section. Two of the Latin American registries that were evaluated improved their quality, meeting the standards of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Development of the REDEPICAN Guide has taken into account the context of the registries in Latin America and is a useful and innovative tool for improving the quality of PBCRs. Furthermore, it is ready for use in other countries and registries.

  18. Development and validation of a novel method for evaluating behavior and temperament in guide dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, J A.; Hsu, Y

    2001-06-01

    Most guide and service dog organizations would benefit from the development of accurate methods for the early evaluation of canine temperament traits. This paper describes the development and validation of a novel questionnaire method for assessing behavior and temperament in 1-year-old guide dogs. Volunteer puppy-raisers scored a total of 1097 prospective guide dogs on a series of 40 semantic differential-type, behavioral rating scales. Principle components factor analysis of these scores extracted eight stable and interpretable common factors: stranger-directed fear/aggression, non-social fear, energy level, owner-directed aggression, chasing, trainability, attachment, and dog-directed fear/aggression. Three of these eight factors exhibited moderate internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha>/=0.72), while the reliabilities of the remaining factors were relatively low (Cronbach's alpha=0.53-0.61). The eight factors were then validated against the guide dog school's own criteria for rejecting dogs for behavioral reasons. The results of this analysis confirmed the construct validity of the puppy raisers' questionnaire assessments of their dogs, and suggested that such methods can provide a useful and accurate means of predicting the suitability of dogs for guiding work. Various modifications to the original questionnaire are proposed in order to enhance its overall reliability.

  19. An evaluation of the experiences of guide dog owners visiting Scottish veterinary practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M; Girling, S J

    2016-09-10

    Guide dogs and their owners will visit a veterinary practice at least twice a year. The aim of this study was to evaluate what guide dog owners thought about these visits, in order to identify areas of good practice which could be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. Nine guide dog owners volunteered to take part in the study and were interviewed by the primary researcher. Thematic analysis was carried out and several themes were identified: good experiences were highlighted where staff had an understanding of visual impairment and the work of a guide dog; the importance of good communication skills involving the owner in the consultation; the need for veterinary professionals to understand the bond between an owner and guide dog; how medication and information could be provided in a user-friendly format for someone affected by a visual impairment and concerns about costs and decision making for veterinary treatment. This work highlights the importance for veterinary staff to talk to, empathise with and understand the individual circumstances of their clients and identifies areas that should be included in veterinary education to better prepare students for the workplace. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Strategies against burnout and anxiety in medical education--implementation and evaluation of a new course on relaxation techniques (Relacs for medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Wild

    Full Text Available Burnout and stress-related mental disorders (depression, anxiety occur in medical students and physicians with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. At the same time, the learning of coping mechanisms against stress is still not an integral part of medical education. In this pilot study we developed an elective course for learning relaxation techniques and examined the condition of the students before and after the course. 42 students participated in the semester courses in 2012 and 2013 as well as in a survey at the start and end of each course. The students were instructed in autogenic training (AT and progressive muscle relaxation according to Jacobsen (PMR with the goal of independent and regular exercising. At the beginning and the end of the semester/course the students were interviewed using standardized, validated questionnaires on burnout (BOSS-II and anxiety (STAI-G, depression (BDI, quality of life (SF-12 and sense of coherence (SOC-L9. We compared the results of our students participating in Relacs with results from eight semester medical students (n = 88, assessed with the same questionnaires at similar points of time within their semester. Participating students showed a significant decline in cognitive and emotional burnout stress and in trait anxiety. Furthermore, they showed a reduction in state anxiety and a conspicuous decrease in mean depression. The sense of coherence increased at the same time. A comparative cohort of medical students of 8th semester students, showed lower values for the specified measurement parameters at the beginning, but showed no progressive changes. Our course introducing AT and PMR led to a significant reduction of burnout and anxiety within the participating group of medical students. Even the course attendance for just one semester resulted in significant improvements in the evaluated parameters in contrast to those students who did not attend the course.

  1. Relaxation times estimation in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselice, Fabio; Caivano, Rocchina; Cammarota, Aldo; Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is a very powerful techniques for soft tissue diagnosis. At the present, the clinical evaluation is mainly conducted exploiting the amplitude of the recorded MR image which, in some specific cases, is modified by using contrast enhancements. Nevertheless, spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times can play an important role in many pathology diagnosis, such as cancer, Alzheimer or Parkinson diseases. Different algorithms for relaxation time estimation have been proposed in literature. In particular, the two most adopted approaches are based on Least Squares (LS) and on Maximum Likelihood (ML) techniques. As the amplitude noise is not zero mean, the first one produces a biased estimator, while the ML is unbiased but at the cost of high computational effort. Recently the attention has been focused on the estimation in the complex, instead of the amplitude, domain. The advantage of working with real and imaginary decomposition of the available data is mainly the possibility of achieving higher quality estimations. Moreover, the zero mean complex noise makes the Least Square estimation unbiased, achieving low computational times. First results of complex domain relaxation times estimation on real datasets are presented. In particular, a patient with an occipital lesion has been imaged on a 3.0T scanner. Globally, the evaluation of relaxation times allow us to establish a more precise topography of biologically active foci, also with respect to contrast enhanced images.

  2. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinear fractional equation; nonlinear fractional relaxation; -expansion. Abstract. We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and ...

  3. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, Martijn G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rothgang, Eva [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD (United States); Misra, Sarthak [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute of Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  4. Transverse and Oblique Long Bone Fracture Evaluation by Low Order Ultrasonic Guided Waves: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic guided waves have recently been used in fracture evaluation and fracture healing monitoring. An axial transmission technique has been used to quantify the impact of the gap breakage width and fracture angle on the amplitudes of low order guided wave modes S0 and A0 under a 100 kHz narrowband excitation. In our two dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD simulation, the long bones are modeled as three layers with a soft tissue overlay and marrow underlay. The simulations of the transversely and obliquely fractured long bones show that the amplitudes of both S0 and A0 decrease as the gap breakage widens. Fixing the crack width, the increase of the fracture angle relative to the cross section perpendicular to the long axis enhances the amplitude of A0, while the amplitude of S0 shows a nonmonotonic trend with the decrease of the fracture angle. The amplitude ratio between the S0 and A0 modes is used to quantitatively evaluate the fracture width and angles. The study suggests that the low order guided wave modes S0 and A0 have potentials for transverse and oblique bone fracture evaluation and fracture healing monitoring.

  5. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries.

  6. Ultrasonic guided waves dispersion reversal for long bone thickness evaluation: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kailiang; Liu, Chengcheng; Ta, Dean

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that ultrasonic guided waves have great potentials for long cortical bone evaluation. However, due to the multimodal dispersion, the received signals usually contain several mixed guided modes, which highly complicates the mode separation and signal processing. In the study, we showed that the use of dispersion reversal excitation allows the self-compensation of the dispersive modes in the long cortical bone. Two-dimension finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) method was employed to simulate the propagation of two fundamental guided modes, symmetrical S0 and anti-symmetrical A0, in the long cortical bones. It was demonstrated that the pulse-like modes of S0 and A0 can be detected under the dispersion reversal excitations. The simulations also illustrated that the proposed dispersion reversal method can be used to evaluate the cortical thickness. Results are promising for the application of dispersion reversal method in ultrasonic assessment of the long cortical bone.

  7. Evaluation of imaging-guided fine-needle percutaneous biopsy of renal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaff, Ameer; Molinie, Vincent; Mellot, Francois; Guth, Axel; Lebret, Thierry; Scherrer, Antoine [Hopital Foch, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Suresnes (France)

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the utility of imaging-guided fine-needle percutaneous biopsy of renal masses, we conducted a prospective analysis of our imaging-guided procedures from January 1999 to February 2003. We performed 54 percutaneous core biopsies in 46 patients. Fluoro-computed tomography and ultrasound guidance were respectively used in 48 and six cases. One to four specimens were obtained by using an 18-gauge automated coaxial biopsy system. We reviewed the patients medical records, pathology results, and imaging studies. Core biopsy results were compared with surgical pathology (n=27) or clinical follow-up (n=19). All biopsies provided sufficient material for analysis. The mean tumor size was 33 mm. Biopsy findings were positive for malignancy in 31 cases; histologic diagnoses included renal cell carcinoma (n=23), transitional cell carcinoma (n=5), and metastasis (n=3). Biopsy revealed 15 benign diagnoses: oncocytoma (n=6), hemorrhagic renal cyst (n=3), chronic nephritis (n=3), angiomyolipoma (n=2), and mycotic renal abscess (n=1). The average follow-up period for patients with benign diagnoses was 16 months. Biopsy results showed normal renal parenchyma in eight of 54 procedures, all of which had recuperated by subsequent biopsies. No immediate complications occurred after the procedures. Imaging-guided percutaneous core biopsy is a safe and accurate method for the evaluation of renal masses. (orig.)

  8. Audio-visual relaxation training for anxiety, sleep, and relaxation among Chinese adults with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2004-12-01

    The long-term effect of an audio-visual relaxation training (RT) treatment involving deep breathing, exercise, muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and meditation was compared with routine nursing care for reducing anxiety, improving sleep, and promoting relaxation in Chinese adults with cardiac disease. This research was a quasi-experimental, two-group, pretest-posttest study. A convenience sample of 100 cardiology patients (41 treatment, 59 control) admitted to one large medical center hospital in the Republic of China (ROC) was studied for 1 year. The hypothesized relationships were supported. RT significantly (p anxiety, sleep, and relaxation in the treatment group as compared to the control group. It appears audio-visual RT might be a beneficial adjunctive therapy for adult cardiac patients. However, considerable further work using stronger research designs is needed to determine the most appropriate instructional methods and the factors that contribute to long-term consistent practice of RT with Chinese populations.

  9. Validity-Guided Fuzzy Clustering Evaluation for Neural Network-Based Time-Frequency Reassignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Khan Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the validity-guided fuzzy clustering evaluation for optimal training of localized neural networks (LNNs used for reassigning time-frequency representations (TFRs. Our experiments show that the validity-guided fuzzy approach ameliorates the difficulty of choosing correct number of clusters and in conjunction with neural network-based processing technique utilizing a hybrid approach can effectively reduce the blur in the spectrograms. In the course of every partitioning problem the number of subsets must be given before the calculation, but it is rarely known apriori, in this case it must be searched also with using validity measures. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  10. Fruit juice-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: evaluation of different fruit juices and purees and optimization of a red fruit juice blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Cyril; Kim, Jong-Hun; Trinh, Sandrine; Chataigneau, Thierry; Popken, Anne M; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-05-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that several polyphenol-rich sources such as red wine and green tea are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. As various fruits and berries are known to contain high levels of polyphenols, the aim of the present study was to assess the ability of selected pure fruit juices and purees as well as blends to cause endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated arteries. Vascular reactivity was assessed using porcine coronary artery rings, and fruit juices, purees and blends were characterized for their content in vitamin C, total phenolic, sugar and antioxidant activity. Fruit juices and purees caused variable concentration-dependent relaxations, with blackcurrant, aronia, cranberry, blueberry, lingonberry, and grape being the most effective fruits. Several blends of red fruits caused endothelium-dependent relaxations. Relaxations to blend D involved both a NO- and an EDHF-mediated components. The present findings indicate that some berries and blends of red fruit juices are potent inducers of endothelium-dependent relaxations in the porcine coronary artery. This effect involves both endothelium-derived NO and EDHF, and appears to be dependent on their polyphenolic composition rather than on the polyphenolic content.

  11. Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngai, K L

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems comprehensively presents a variety of experimental evidences of universal relaxation and diffusion properties in complex materials and systems. The materials discussed include liquids, glasses, colloids, polymers, rubbers, plastic crystals and aqueous mixtures, as well as carbohydrates, biomolecules, bioprotectants and pharmaceuticals. Due to the abundance of experimental data, emphasis is placed on glass-formers and the glass transition problem, a still unsolved problem in condensed matter physics and chemistry. The evidence for universal properties of relaxation and diffusion dynamics suggests that a fundamental physical law is at work. The origin of the universal properties is traced to the many-body effects of the interaction, rigorous theory of which does not exist at the present time. However, using solutions of simplified models as guides, key quantities have been identified and predictions of the universal properties generated. These predictions from Ngai’...

  12. The 'global health' education framework: a conceptual guide for monitoring, evaluation and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinnemann Peter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the increasing importance of and rapid changes in the global health arena have provoked discussions on the implications for the education of health professionals. In the case of Germany, it remains yet unclear whether international or global aspects are sufficiently addressed within medical education. Evaluation challenges exist in Germany and elsewhere due to a lack of conceptual guides to develop, evaluate or assess education in this field. Objective To propose a framework conceptualising 'global health' education (GHE in practice, to guide the evaluation and monitoring of educational interventions and reforms through a set of key indicators that characterise GHE. Methods Literature review; deduction. Results and Conclusion Currently, 'new' health challenges and educational needs as a result of the globalisation process are discussed and linked to the evolving term 'global health'. The lack of a common definition of this term complicates attempts to analyse global health in the field of education. The proposed GHE framework addresses these problems and presents a set of key characteristics of education in this field. The framework builds on the models of 'social determinants of health' and 'globalisation and health' and is oriented towards 'health for all' and 'health equity'. It provides an action-oriented construct for a bottom-up engagement with global health by the health workforce. Ten indicators are deduced for use in monitoring and evaluation.

  13. Ultrasound-guided greater palatine nerve block: a case series of anatomical descriptions and clinical evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Najmus Sahar; Sondekoppam, Rakesh V; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Armstrong, Jerrold E; Shimizu, Michael; Johnson, Marjorie; Merrifield, Peter; Galil, Khadry A

    2014-09-01

    Greater palatine nerve (GPN) block is commonly performed for maxillary and palatal anesthesia by using bony landmarks. Ultrasound (US) can be used to consistently identify greater palatine foramen (GPF) as a defect in the bony palate enabling US-guided injections near the foramen. We scanned and injected 16 undissected well-embalmed hemisectioned cadaveric heads after excluding major anatomical malformations. A linear high-frequency hockey stick probe (7-13 MHz) positioned in long axis to the hard palate visualized GPF as a discontinuity in the hard palate. US-guided injections of 0.1 mL India ink were made in an oblique plane. Specimens were dissected immediately after injection, and dye distribution was noted. The success rate of identification of GPF, number of attempts, and number of successful injections were recorded. The technique was evaluated clinically in 7 patients undergoing dental procedures. Five patients had US-guided injections, and 2 patients received US-assisted greater palatine canal blocks. GPF was successfully identified in 16 hemisectioned heads (n = 16). In 7 of 16 hemisectioned cadaveric specimens (n = 7/16), needle pass was seen on the US and traces of India ink were found within the greater palatine canal and pterygopalatine fossa. In the remaining heads (n = 9/16), the dye was observed in the mucosal tissue of the hard palate anterior to the GPF or in the soft palate. Clinical evaluation reconfirmed successful identification of GPF by US in 6 of 7 patients (n = 6/7). US-guided injections were successful in 6 of the 8 attempted blocks (n = 6/8) with median number (range) of attempts being 2 (1-4). US-assisted injections were successful in 2 patients (n = 2/2). US has the potential to successfully locate and characterize GPF in normal and edentulous maxilla. US-guided GPN blocks can be technically challenging. The clinical applicability of US guidance or assistance for GPN block needs further evaluation in a larger sample of patients.

  14. Evaluation of Early Warning Scoring System and Nursing Guide Application in Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazar, Berrin; Yava, Ayla

    2013-12-01

    To determine the effect of nursing guide application developed for the present study and to evaluate the Early Warning Scoring System (EWSS) in post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). The study was carried out as a randomised-controlled experimental study. The study sample comprised of 123 adult patients having thoracic and abdominal surgery between January 2011 and April 2011 in the Anaesthesiology and Reanimation Department of a training and research hospital. Patients were randomised during the pre-operative period; the patients who were followed-up according to the EWSS and a nursing guide constituted the study group (SG=63) and the patients whose EWSS score was calculated but routine follow-up in PACU was not intervened constituted the control group (CG=60). During the PACU, complications developed in in 34.92% of SG patients and in 30.00% of CG patients. Of the SG patients, 95.45% developing complications and of the CG patients, 22.22% developing complications were treated in the first 10 minutes, and it was determined that in 61.12% of CG patients, complications were not treated. There was a significant difference between the SG and CG patients in terms of treatment duration against complications (pguide provides early determination and treatment of patients developing complications. Thus, it is recommended to use the EWSS and a nursing guide in PACU.

  15. Evaluation of Early Warning Scoring System and Nursing Guide Application in Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazar, Berrin; Yava, Ayla

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of nursing guide application developed for the present study and to evaluate the Early Warning Scoring System (EWSS) in post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods The study was carried out as a randomised-controlled experimental study. The study sample comprised of 123 adult patients having thoracic and abdominal surgery between January 2011 and April 2011 in the Anaesthesiology and Reanimation Department of a training and research hospital. Patients were randomised during the pre-operative period; the patients who were followed-up according to the EWSS and a nursing guide constituted the study group (SG=63) and the patients whose EWSS score was calculated but routine follow-up in PACU was not intervened constituted the control group (CG=60). Results During the PACU, complications developed in in 34.92% of SG patients and in 30.00% of CG patients. Of the SG patients, 95.45% developing complications and of the CG patients, 22.22% developing complications were treated in the first 10 minutes, and it was determined that in 61.12% of CG patients, complications were not treated. There was a significant difference between the SG and CG patients in terms of treatment duration against complications (pearly determination and treatment of patients developing complications. Thus, it is recommended to use the EWSS and a nursing guide in PACU. PMID:27366375

  16. T1(Gd) gives comparable information as Delta T1 relaxation rate in dGEMRIC evaluation of cartilage repair tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Burstein, Dehorah; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Pinker, Katja; Welsch, Goetz H; Mamisch, Tallal C

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between T1 after intravenous contrast administration (T1Gd) and Delta relaxation rate (DeltaR1) = (1/T1(Gd) - 1/T1o) in the delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) evaluation of cartilage repair tissue. Thirty single MR examinations from 30 patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantations of the knee joint with different postoperative intervals were examined using an 8-channel knee-coil at 3T. T1 mapping using a 3D GRE sequence with a 35/10 degrees flip angle excitation pulse combination was performed before and after contrast administration (dGEMRIC technique). T1 postcontrast (T1(Gd)) and the DeltaR1 (relative index of pre- and postcontrast R1 value) were calculated for repair tissue and the weight-bearing normal appearing control cartilage. For evaluation of the different postoperative intervals, MR exams were subdivided into 3 groups (up to 12 months, 12-24 months, more than 24 months). For statistical analysis Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean value for T1 postcontrast was 427 +/- 159 ms, for DeltaR1 1.85 +/- 1.0; in reference cartilage 636 +/- 181 ms for T1 postcontrast and 0.83 +/- 0.5 for DeltaR1.The correlation coefficients were highly significant between T1 (Gd) and DeltaR1 for repair tissue (0.969) as well as normal reference cartilage (0.928) in total, and for the reparative cartilage in the early, middle postoperative, and late postoperative interval after surgery (R values: -0.986, -0.970, and -0.978, respectively). Using either T1(Gd) or DeltaR1, the 2 metrics resulted in similar conclusions regarding the time course of change of repair tissue and control tissue, namely that highly significant (P > 0.01) differences between cartilage repair tissue and reference cartilage were found for all follow-up groups. Additionally, for both metrics highly significant differences (P T1 (Gd) or DeltaR1. The high correlation between T1 (Gd) and DeltaR1 and the comparable

  17. Assessment of visiting activities for young children using the UNAWE Evaluation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    When the target is young children and the activity type is play, the assessment of the activity is not easy. The table of domains of active learning shown in the EU Universe Awareness Programme Evaluation Guide is useful for the assessment; the Guide shows the four domains; motivation, scientific skills, universe knowledge, and intercultural attitudes, and many items of objectives in each domains. The Guide can be a basic format and the items can be modified so as to fit each activity. Taking my activity as an example, I will present an assessment using the Guide. The activity I will present is "Uchu no O-hanashi," a visiting activity which includeds slide show, story telling, and enjoying pictures on large sheets for children at nursery, kindergarten, preschool and other sites. In order to obtain the data, I have recorded the voice of children. The analysis method is a kind of qualitative one. I picked up "motivation" and "scientific skills" words from the record when they muttered about and asked each other what they felt, what they found, and what they got excited about. Among the items in the "scientific skills domain," looking at carefully, asking, exchanging opinions, interpreting or trying to interpret, and trying were frequently appeared. Other skills such as devising and confirming were not frequently appeared but they would sometimes appear later at home or at school after the activity. I also picked up the words of children obtaining scientific way of view and attitude through the activity. One example is "It seems that stars float in the sky and do not move. Do they really set like the Sun, our nearest star? I never saw stars set!" A boy was trying to make a new framework for his understanding. This kind of thinking will enrich his or her future "universe knowledge" and "intercultural attitudes."

  18. CT-guided procedures: evaluation of a phantom system to teach accurate needle placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimmick, S. [Department of Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia); Jones, M. [Queensland Clinical Trials Centre School of Population Health (University of Queensland), Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia); Challen, J. [Department of Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia); Iedema, J. [Department of Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia); Wattuhewa, U. [Department of Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia); Coucher, J. [Department of Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba Queensland (Australia)]. E-mail: john_coucher@health.qld.gov.au

    2007-02-15

    Aim: To evaluate the use of a phantom system to help teach the basic techniques of accurate CT-guided needle placement, thereby avoiding the risks associated with teaching on patients. Materials and Methods: Gelatine phantoms with five, 1.9 cm embedded spherical wooden targets were constructed. Four trainee operators performed 15 simulated biopsy procedures on the targets (series one) and repeated identical procedures 2 weeks later (series two). Statistical analysis of accuracy of needle placement and subject confidence were performed. Results: Significant sequential improvement in axial plane angular error was noted with the average error decreasing by 0.33 degrees after every five procedures performed (95% CI: -0.58 to -0.08, p = 0.01). Operator confidence indicated significant improvement both within each series and from series one to series two (95% CI: 0.08 to 1.17, p = 0.025 and 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.58, p = 0.05) respectively. However, variability in operator performance made statistically significant improvement in other variables unproven. Conclusion: Despite the study comprising a relatively small number of participants and procedures, it clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of teaching operators to perform CT-guided procedures using a phantom system. Needle placement accuracy significantly improved, with a reduction in axial angular error, and improved operator confidence without the risks associated with training on patients. Three of the operators in this study had never performed a CT-guided procedure previously, and their proficiency, after a relatively short but intense period of training, was impressive. The use of phantoms should be considered routinely for basic training of CT-guided needle placement.

  19. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy for the evaluation of renal dysfunction following renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jae; Choi, Chul Soon; Min, Seon Jeong; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    To evaluate the usefulness and complications of renal biopsy under ultrasonography-guidance in renal dysfunction after renal transplantation. Ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy was done in 47 patients with the transplanted kidney. The subjects consisted of 30 males and 17 females, age ranged from 16 to 66 years (average age=38 years). Biopsies were done once in 27 patients, twice in 17 patients, three times in 3 patients, a total of 70 biopsies. The success rate of renal biopsy for the accurate pathologic diagnosis and the incidence and types of complications following biopsy were evaluated. The success rate of renal biopsy for the accurate pathologic diagnosis was 96%(67/70). Pathologic diagnosis included 27 cases of acute rejection (39%), 8 cases of acute tubular necrosis (11%), 4 cases of acute rejection and acute tubular necrosis (6%), 4 cases of cyclosporin toxicity (6%), 4 cases of primary disease recurrence (6%), 4 cases of infection (6%) and others. Complications after renal biopsy included 15 cases of microscopic hematuria (21%), 1 case of gross hematuria with spontaneous cessation and 1 case of life threatening hemorrhage. Ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy is a safe and effective diagnostic method for the evaluation of renal dysfunction following renal transplantation.

  20. Non-destructive evaluation of spiral-welded pipes using flexural guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Tang, Zhifeng; Lü, Fuzai; Pan, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    Millions of miles of pipes are being used in both civil and industrial fields. Spiral-welded pipes, which are widely applied in fields such as drainage, architecture as well as oil and gas storage and transportation, are difficult to inspect due to their complex geometry. Guided waves have shown a great potential in Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) for such cases. Flexural guided waves that propagate at a helix angle relative to the axial direction of pipe, are the most appropriate modes for inspecting spiral-welded pipes. The classical Normal Mode Expansion method (NME) is adopted to disseminate the forced response and perturbation analysis of a steel pipe with respect to a time delay circular loading. A time delay circular array transducer (TDCAT) is proposed for the purpose of exciting pure flexural mode in pipes. Pure flexural mode can be excited when the time delay parameter is specifically designed. The theoretical prediction is verified by finite element numerical evaluation and spiral-welded pipe inspection experiment.

  1. Interaction study of polyisobutylene with paraffins by NMR using the evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times for hydrogen nuclei; Estudo da interacao do poliisobutileno com parafinas por RMN no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Rosana G.G. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas - CENPES]. E-mail: garrido@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas]. E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br

    2001-07-01

    The evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times of {sup 1}H for polyisobutylene/paraffin systems, were obtained using the classic inversion recovery technique, and also through Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) techniques varying the contact time and also by the delayed contact time pulse sequence. NMR results showed that the polyisobutylene/paraffin systems in which high molecular weight paraffins were used, is heterogeneous. However, for paraffins with low molecular weight, the system presents good homogeneity. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the sanitary impact of urban air pollution. Update version of the methodological guide; Evaluation de l'impact sanitaire de la pollution atmospherique urbaine. Version actualisee du guide methodologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    In order to bring a help to the evaluation of effects of air quality on health, the Institute of Sanitary surveillance published in 1999 a method guide for the realisation of sanitary impact evaluations of the urban air pollution. This work to prepare to an update version of the guide presents the first recommendations that can be made today for the realisation of sanitary impact evaluations at short and long term at a local level, taking into account the knowledge evolution. (N.C.)

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided evaluation of the pleura and cases of pleural effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    The most efficient and cost-effective approach for the diagnosis of pleural exudates remains uncertain and is a subject of controversy. Essential factors to be considered include the respective diagnostic yields of thoracocentesis, closed pleural biopsy, and thoracoscopy. The role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of the esophagus as a modality for the evaluation of pleural exudates has not yet been evaluated. The applied anatomy of the pleura has been discussed. The techniques involved in the EUS imaging of different aspects of the pleura in normal cases and in cases with pleural effusion are elaborated. The practical application of this knowledge can be useful in EUS-guided sampling of the pleural wall, pleural nodules, and in cases of pleural effusion. PMID:28869229

  4. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    neuropeptides that influence muscle tone have been isolated from the sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus using body wall muscle as a bioassay, but at present SALMFamide peptides are the only ones that have been found to have a direct relaxing action on echinoderm muscle. One of the Stichopus japonicus peptides (holothurin 1), however, causes a reduction in the magnitude of electrically evoked muscle contraction in Stichopus japonicus and also causes 'softening' of the body wall dermis, a 'mutable connective tissue'. It seems most likely that this effect of holothurin 1 on body wall dermis is mediated by constituent muscle cells, and the concept of 'mutable connective tissue' in echinoderms may therefore need to be re-evaluated to incorporate the involvement of muscle, as proposed recently for the spine ligament in sea urchins.

  5. Self-evaluation of 'International Tour Guide Internship' Practicum in a Local Society in Japan by International Exchange Students

    OpenAIRE

    恒松, 直美

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the self-evaluation of the 'International Tour Guide' internship by international exchange students. The total of eight exchange students from China, Korea, Germany, Australia, and Poland introduced as guides the local historical museum which has exhibited the development of ship building technology in the region and the history of trade and diplomacy of Japan with foreign countries. In the internship practicum, through their cooperation with the local city hall officials ...

  6. Molecular Relaxation in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Biman

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together many different relaxation phenomena in liquids under a common umbrella and provides a unified view of apparently diverse phenomena. It aligns recent experimental results obtained with modern techniques with recent theoretical developments. Such close interaction between experiment and theory in this area goes back to the works of Einstein, Smoluchowski, Kramers' and de Gennes. Development of ultrafast laser spectroscopy recently allowed study of various relaxation processes directly in the time domain, with time scales going down to picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs

  7. Dielectric and structural relaxation in water and some monohydric alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatze, Udo

    2017-07-01

    Relaxation times of the principal (Debye-type) relaxation terms in the dielectric spectra of water and normal alcohols have been evaluated in order to eliminate the effect of multi-molecular cross-correlations and to thus yield reorientation times of the molecular electric dipole moments. The reorientation times have been compared to relaxation times from ultraviolet and X-ray Brillouin spectra as well as from broadband ultrasonic spectra, which are considered as the structure relaxation times characterizing the density fluctuations of the liquid hydrogen bond networks. With some alcohols, shear impedance spectra indicate the network fluctuations to be tightly associated with shear viscosity relaxation. Within the limits of uncertainty, the molecular dipole moment reorientation times and the structure relaxation times feature close correlations. This finding suggests a coupling between translational and orientational molecular motions, and it is discussed in the light of the wait-and-switch model of dielectric relaxation.

  8. Interim findings of an evaluation of the U.S. EnergyGuide label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egan, Christine; Payne, Christopher T.; Thorne, Jennifer

    2000-08-20

    The United States has labeled appliances with the EnergyGuide labels since 1980. Consensus is growing that this label is confusing to consumers and has little impact on purchase decisions. Many researchers have documented that alternative labeling approaches are effective in other countries. The authors comprehensively evaluated the U.S. appliance labeling program for white goods, heating and cooling equipment, and water heaters, with emphasis on products sold through retail outlets. To date, our research has included consumer focus groups and semi-structured interviews with various market actors to assess how best to communicate energy information. With consumers and retail sales staff, five graphical designs were tested a European-style, letter based graphic; an Australian-style star-based graphic; a speedometer-style graphic; a thermometer-style graphic; and the current U.S. style. With manufacturers and contractors, we did not directly test alternate designs. Instead, we asked their opinion of and experience with the current EnergyGuide labeling program.

  9. Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

  10. Departing from Lectures: An Evaluation of a Peer-Led Guided Inquiry Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Scott E.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2005-01-01

    To improve a large-enrollment general chemistry course based on conventional lectures, we instituted a reform combining peer-led team learning with a guided inquiry approach, together called peer-led guided inquiry (PLGI). For one group of first-semester general chemistry students, a PLGI session was combined with two lectures per week, and this group was compared to a control group that had the usual three lectures per week. Students were compared based on performance on identical course exams and on a final exam from the ACS Examinations Institute given at the end of the semester. The experimental group was found to perform better than the control group overall, in spite of experiencing one fewer lecture each week. Also, attendance at the PLGI sessions was found to have a significant positive impact on student performance, even when controlling for students’ SAT mathematics and verbal scores. This method of evaluating reform effects for institutions with several large sections of introductory chemistry courses is recommended.

  11. Nuclear Spin Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    and almost completely destroyed by the chaotic thermal environ- ment. Fortunately, the havoc wreaked by thermal molecular motion is not complete. The tiny residual nuclear magnetism (of the order of 10–5), which is established through spin–lattice relaxation, is the basis of almost all NMR and MRI experiments. [1].

  12. Workshop for the Development and Evaluation of Study Guides of Captioned Education Films for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Leonard G.

    Presented are the workshop-prepared study guides to accompany captioned educational films for the deaf. The guide is designed to give teachers of the deaf at all levels a guide reference to captioned films, with descriptions, reviews, and suggestions for use of the films. Films are cross-referenced, according to levels and subject areas. Types of…

  13. Evaluation of an Osseous Allograft Membrane for Guided Tissue Regeneration in the Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Clinical application of a demineralized freeze-dried cortical bone membrane allograft (DFBMA) for treatment of intra(infra)bony periodontal pockets in dogs was evaluated. The mean pre-treatment periodontal probing depth equaled 7.2-mm. Post-treatment probing depths in all 11 cases were normal, with a mean periodontal probing gain of 5.4-mm. Guided tissue regeneration using a commercially available veterinary canine DFBMA and canine demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) resulted in clinically significant periodontal attachment gains. The gain of new periodontal tissue attachment was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The commercially available veterinary allograft products predictably increased new periodontal attachment without any identified membrane sequelae in these 11 cases.

  14. Quantitative Evaluation of Defect Based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave and CHMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Le

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The axial length of pipe defects is not linear with the reflection coefficient, which is difficult to identify the axial length of the defect by the reflection coefficient method. Continuous Hidden Markov Model (CHMM is proposed to accurately classify the axial length of defects, achieving the objective of preliminary quantitative evaluation. Firstly, wavelet packet decomposition method is used to extract the characteristic information of the guided wave signal, and Kernel Sliced Inverse Regression (KSIR method is used to reduce the dimension of feature set. Then, a variety of CHMM models are trained for classification. Finally, the trained models are used to identify the artificial corrosion defects on the outer surface of the pipe. The results show that the CHMM model has better robustness and can accurately identify the axial defects.

  15. Evaluating Which Dose-Function Metrics Are Most Critical for Functional-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Zhang, Jingjing; Miften, Moyed; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2017-09-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) ventilation imaging is increasingly being used to calculate lung ventilation and implement functional-guided radiation therapy in clinical trials. There has been little exhaustive work evaluating which dose-function metrics should be used for treatment planning and plan evaluation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate which dose-function metrics best predict for radiation pneumonitis (RP). Seventy lung cancer patients who underwent 4D CT imaging and pneumonitis grading were assessed. Pretreatment 4D CT scans of each patient were used to calculate ventilation images. We evaluated 3 types of dose-function metrics that combined the patient's 4D CT ventilation image and treatment planning dose distribution: (1) structure-based approaches; (2) image-based approaches using the dose-function histogram; and (3) nonlinear weighting schemes. Log-likelihood methods were used to generate normal tissue complication probability models predicting grade 3 or higher (ie, grade 3+) pneumonitis for all dose-function schemes. The area under the curve (AUC) was used to assess the predictive power of the models. All techniques were compared with normal tissue complication probability models based on traditional, total lung dose metrics. The most predictive models were structure-based approaches that focused on the volume of functional lung receiving ≥20 Gy (AUC, 0.70). Probabilities of grade 3+ RP of 20% and 10% correspond to V20 (percentage of volume receiving ≥20 Gy) to the functional subvolumes of 26.8% and 9.3%, respectively. Imaging-based analysis with the dose-function histogram and nonlinear weighted ventilation values yielded AUCs of 0.66 and 0.67, respectively, when we evaluated the percentage of functionality receiving ≥20 Gy. All dose-function metrics outperformed the traditional dose metrics (mean lung dose, AUC of 0.55). A full range of dose-function metrics and functional thresholds was examined. The

  16. Practical Guide to Designing Comprehensive Teacher Evaluation Systems: A Tool to Assist in the Development of Teacher Evaluation Systems. Revised Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goe, Laura; Holdheide, Lynn; Miller, Tricia

    2014-01-01

    Across the nation, states and districts are in the process of building better teacher evaluation systems that not only identify highly effective teachers but also systematically provide data and feedback that can be used to improve teacher practice. The "Practical Guide to Designing Comprehensive Teacher Evaluation Systems" is a tool…

  17. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo Gianluca; Pagnini Francesco; Manzoni Gian; Molinari Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety p...

  18. Evaluating the Weatherization Assistance Program in Your State: A Manager's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L

    2000-05-11

    Evaluations of the Weatherization Assistance Program (the Program) serve three major purposes: (1) to document the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the Program, (2) to attract and maintain funding, and (3) to identify opportunities for improving the Program's performance. State managers need detailed and specific information about the performance of their own Program if they are to conduct and market it as effectively as possible. In this evaluation guide, we focus almost entirely on the issues related to the measurement of energy savings. Because the Program's main goal is to reduce the energy use and energy burden of low-income households, the minimum output of an evaluation study should be an estimate of energy savings. If resources are limited, the first priority is to obtain this estimate of savings. Some states may be interested in other issues such as determining Program cost effectiveness, testing the value of various audit types, or identifying the best opportunities for increasing energy savings. Because of limited resources, most will focus only on measuring energy savings.

  19. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the product. ...

  20. Fast relaxations in foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kapilanjan; Helal, Ahmed; Höhler, Reinhard; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie

    2010-07-01

    Aqueous foams present an anomalous macroscopic viscoelastic response at high frequency, previously shown to arise from collective relaxations in the disordered bubble packing. We demonstrate experimentally how these mesoscopic dynamics are in turn tuned by physico-chemical processes on the scale of the gas-liquid interfaces. Two specific local dissipation processes are identified, and we show how the rigidity of the interfaces selects the dominant one, depending on the choice of the surfactant.

  1. Relaxation from particle production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  2. Student Analysis of Handout Development based on Guided Discovery Method in Process Evaluation and Learning Outcomes of Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerita, S.; Maizeli, A.; Afza, A.

    2017-09-01

    Process Evaluation and Learning Outcomes of Biology subjects discusses the evaluation process in learning and application of designed and processed learning outcomes. Some problems found during this subject was the student difficult to understand the subject and the subject unavailability of learning resources that can guide and make students independent study. So, it necessary to develop a learning resource that can make active students to think and to make decisions with the guidance of the lecturer. The purpose of this study is to produce handout based on guided discovery method that match the needs of students. The research was done by using 4-D models and limited to define phase that is student requirement analysis. Data obtained from the questionnaire and analyzed descriptively. The results showed that the average requirement of students was 91,43%. Can be concluded that students need a handout based on guided discovery method in the learning process.

  3. A qualitative evaluation of exposure to and perceptions of the Woolworths Healthy Tuck Shop Guide in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Toni; Meltzer, Shelly; Bourne, Lesley; Elizabeth Draper, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Both under- and over-nutrition pose a public health concern, especially for children in South Africa. Several initiatives exist in South Africa directed at promoting healthy eating and nutrition at schools. One of them is the Woolworths Making the Difference (MTD) Programme aimed at eliminating barriers to promoting healthy lifestyles that exist at schools, such as the availability of low-cost, unhealthy foods either from tuck shops (small food shops) or street vendors. The Healthy Tuck Shop Guide is a recent addition to the MTD Programme. The aim of this evaluation was to assess awareness, potential uptake, and perceptions of the Woolworths Healthy Tuck Shop Guide among parents and staff in a sample of schools that were exposed to the guide. A qualitative study consisting of focus groups, interviews, and tuck shop observation was used to gather information on 13 schools and their exposure, comprehension, and use of the guide. A mix of schools was examined in terms of economic status and level of control over their tuck shop. Thematic analysis was used to extract findings. Findings show that despite overall positive attitudes about the guide several barriers to its implementation exist, including children’s preferences for unhealthy foods, the higher cost of healthy foods, and other issues related to a lack of facilities, time and manpower. Findings suggest that the Woolworths Healthy Tuck Shop Guide would contribute more meaningfully to the creation of healthier food environments if executed within a larger support network to address barriers to implementation.

  4. The diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound guided imaging algorithm in evaluation of patients with hematuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Alparslan, E-mail: alparslanunsal@yahoo.com [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Caliskan, Eda Kazak [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Erol, Haluk [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Karaman, Can Zafer [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficiency of the following imaging algorithm, including intravenous urography (IVU) or computed tomography urography (CTU) based on ultrasonographic (US) selection, in the radiological management of hematuria. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-one patients with hematuria were prospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 106 cases with normal or nearly normal US result and then they were examined with IVU. Group 2 was composed of the remaining 35 cases which had any urinary tract abnormality, and they were directed to CTU. Radiological results were compared with clinical diagnosis. Results: Ultrasonography and IVU results of 97 cases were congruent in group 1. Eight simple cysts were detected with US and 1 non-obstructing ureter stone was detected with IVU in remaining 9 patients. The only discordant case in clinical comparison was found to have urinary bladder cancer on conventional cystoscopy. Ultrasonography and CTU results were congruent in 30 cases. Additional lesions were detected with CTU (3 ureter stones, 1 ureter TCC, 1 advanced RCC) in remaining 5 patients. Ultrasonography + CTU combination results were all concordant with clinical diagnosis. Except 1 case, radio-clinical agreement was achieved. Conclusion: Cross-sectional imaging modalities are preferred in evaluation of hematuria. CTU is the method of choice; however the limitations preclude using CTU as first line or screening test. Ultrasonography is now being accepted as a first line imaging modality with the increased sensitivity in mass detection compared to IVU. The US guided imaging algorithm can be used effectively in radiological approach to hematuria.

  5. Clinical algorithm to guide the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to evaluate early postliver transplant cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Satheesh; Lingala, Shilpa; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Eason, James D; Vanatta, Jason M

    2014-12-01

    Severe cholestasis after liver transplant is common. In this study, our aim was to develop an algorithm to guide biliary intervention in these patients. A retrospective review was performed on patients who had undergone a hepatobiliary scan, with or without subsequent endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram, during the immediate postoperative period. These findings were evaluated along with laboratory values to determine the benefit for this evaluative process. Biliary duct obstruction was defined as > than a 50% reduction in serum bilirubin within 48 hours of endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram intervention. Twelve patients had endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram with 6 stents in 25 patients with normal a hepatobiliary scan, and 2 patients met criteria for biliary duct obstruction. Twenty-two patients had endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram with 14 stents in 32 patients with delayed uptake, suggesting hepatocellular dysfunction on a hepatobiliary scan, and 4 patients met criteria for biliary duct obstruction. In the 57 patients with severe hyperbilirubinemia, 6 patients (11%) had biliary duct obstruction as a cause. Among the 34 endoscopic retrograde cholangiograms performed, 17% had biliary obstruction. On multivariate analysis, patients having both serum aspartate transaminase concentrations 257 μmol/L had an odds ratio of 25.1 for predicting biliary obstruction (95% CI: 6-37; P = .002). A hepatobiliary scan with a combination peak serum aspartate transaminase and peak serum total bilirubin levels offer a valuable tool to identify patients with hepatocellular dysfunction and can avoid endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram in the immediate posttransplant period.

  6. Biocompatibility and cytotoxic evaluation of drug-loaded biodegradable guided tissue regeneration membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nebu G; Sanil, George P; Gopimohan, Rajmohan; Prabhakaran, Jayachandran V; Thomas, George; Panda, Amulya K

    2012-10-01

    In periodontology, Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) is based on the concept of providing a space for entry of cells with regenerative potential into the wound environment to initiate the regeneration of structures lost due to periodontal disease. First generation GTR membranes were primarily non-absorbable membranes like expanded polytetrafluorethylene which required a second surgery for its removal. This led researchers to explore absorbable materials like collagen and synthetic biodegradable polymers to fabricate GTR membranes. In the present study, biodegradable Polylactic acid (PLA) is used to fabricate membranes with the potential to be used for GTR therapy. Biocompatibility of the PLA membranes were evaluated in a subcutaneous guinea pig model. Antimicrobial effect of the drug-loaded PLA membranes were assessed against a drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterial isolate. The cytocompatibility of the drug-loaded membranes were evaluated using HeLa cell lines. The PLA membranes were shown to be biocompatible. The drug-loaded PLA membranes showed significant activity against the bacterial isolate. Among the drug-loaded membranes, tetracycline-loaded membrane showed minimal cellular toxicity. The results of this study indicate that biodegradable drug-releasing polylactide membranes have the potential to be used for periodontal regeneration. It has the necessary characteristics of a GTR membrane like biocompatibility, space maintaining ability, and tissue integration. Among the various antimicrobial agents loaded in the PLA membranes, tetracycline-loaded membranes exhibited minimal cellular toxicity against HeLa cells; at the same time showing significant activity against a pathogenic bacterium.

  7. An evaluation of shade differences between natural anterior teeth in different age groups and gender using commercially available shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Shobha; Shetty, S Ramanand; Prithviraj, D R

    2012-12-01

    Shade selection with the help of shade guides and color matching the restorations to the natural dentition continues to be one of the most perplexing and frustrating problems in fixed prosthodontics. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the shade differences of the natural anterior teeth in different age groups and gender, within the cross sectional Bangalore, Karnataka population, using commercially available shade guides. The shade of a cross section of the population comprising of 400 subjects of both the sexes (800 incisors; 400 maxillary central incisors; 400 mandibular central incisors) visiting the outpatient Department of Government Dental College was selected randomly and evaluated visually by a single observer using three commonly used shade guides i.e. Vita Lumin, Chromascop and the Vita 3D Master. The incidence of the most common shades in the different age groups and gender using these shade guides was obtained and this data was subjected to the χ(2) test (p age group is A2/2R1.5/140 and A1/1M2/120 for the males and females using Vita Lumin, Vita 3D Master and Chromascop shade guides respectively. In the advanced age group the most common shade for the maxillary and mandibular incisors is A2/2R2.5/140 using the same order of shade guides. However the results showed no statistical significance in shade variation in males and females in different age groups using different shade guides. Although the incidence of males with darker teeth as compared to females was higher; the study showed no statistical significant correlation between shade differences in both the sexes. It is also observed that there is a significant darkening of teeth as the age advances.

  8. Relaxation Techniques for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combined with guided imagery and breathing exercises. Self-Hypnosis In self-hypnosis programs, people are taught to ... type headache in adults: are they beneficial? CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics. 2009;15(2):183–205. Verkaik R, ...

  9. Impact Study on Driving by Special Populations. Final Report. Volume II: A Guide for the Evaluation of Handicapped Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainin, Paul A.; And Others

    The second of a two-volume report on motor vehicle driving by handicapped persons presents an approach to the evaluation of drivers with 20 specific )edical problems. The guide provides information on symptoms, treatment, guidelines for determining risk levels (risk increasing and risk moderating factors), questions for the applicant, and…

  10. Development and Evaluation of Nutrition Education Competencies and a Competency-Based Resource Guide for Preschool-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Reed, Heather; Briggs, Marilyn; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate nutrition education competencies and a competency-based resource guide, Connecting the Dots...Healthy Foods, Healthy Choices, Healthy Kids (CTD), for preschool-aged children in California. Methods: Nutrition education experts and California Department of Education staff…

  11. Evaluation of Potential Dog Guide Users: The Role of the Orientation and Mobility Instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 13 dog-guide schools found that, in the majority of schools, between 91% and 100% of graduates received orientation and mobility (O&M) training before obtaining a dog guide. Eight schools require O&M for admittance, and 10 schools solicit recommendations from O&M specialists before admitting an applicant. (CR)

  12. Relaxing to Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karch, A; Karch, Andreas; Randall, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new selection principle for distinguishing among possible vacua that we call the "relaxation principle". The idea is that the universe will naturally select among possible vacua through its cosmological evolution, and the configuration with the biggest filling fraction is the likeliest. We apply this idea to the question of the number of dimensions of space. We show that under conventional (but higher-dimensional) FRW evolution, a universe filled with equal numbers of branes and antibranes will naturally come to be dominated by 3-branes and 7-branes. We show why this might help explain the number of dimensions that are experienced in our visible universe.

  13. Augmented virtuality based on stereoscopic reconstruction in multimodal image-guided neurosurgery: methods and performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Perrine; Fleig, Oliver; Jannin, Pierre

    2005-11-01

    Displaying anatomical and physiological information derived from preoperative medical images in the operating room is critical in image-guided neurosurgery. This paper presents a new approach referred to as augmented virtuality (AV) for displaying intraoperative views of the operative field over three-dimensional (3-D) multimodal preoperative images onto an external screen during surgery. A calibrated stereovision system was set up between the surgical microscope and the binocular tubes. Three-dimensional surface meshes of the operative field were then generated using stereopsis. These reconstructed 3-D surface meshes were directly displayed without any additional geometrical transform over preoperative images of the patient in the physical space. Performance evaluation was achieved using a physical skull phantom. Accuracy of the reconstruction method itself was shown to be within 1 mm (median: 0.76 mm +/- 0.27), whereas accuracy of the overall approach was shown to be within 3 mm (median: 2.29 mm +/- 0.59), including the image-to-physical space registration error. We report the results of six surgical cases where AV was used in conjunction with augmented reality. AV not only enabled vision beyond the cortical surface but also gave an overview of the surgical area. This approach facilitated understanding of the spatial relationship between the operative field and the preoperative multimodal 3-D images of the patient.

  14. Evaluation of 3 different registration techniques in image-guided bimaxillary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Agbaje, Jimoh Olubanwo; Schepers, Serge; Vrielinck, Luc; Lambrichts, Ivo; Politis, Constantinus

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative navigation is an upcoming tool in orthognathic surgery. This study aimed to access the feasibility of the technique and to evaluate the success rate of 3 different registration methods--facial surface registration, anatomic landmark-based registration, and template-based registration. The BrainLab navigation system (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used as an additional precision tool for 85 patients who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery from February 2010 to June 2012. Eighteen cases of facial surface-based registration, 63 cases of anatomic landmark-based registration, and 8 cases of template-based registration were analyzed. The overall success rate of facial surface-based registration was 39%, which was significant lower than template-based (100%, P = 0.013) and anatomic landmark-based registration (95%, P registration, the further procedure of surgical navigation was performed. The concept of navigation of the maxilla during bimaxillary orthognathic surgery has been proved to be feasible. The registration process is the critical point regarding success of intraoperative navigation. Anatomic landmark-based registration is a reliable technique for image-guided bimaxillary surgery. In contrast, facial surface-based registration is highly unreliable.

  15. Laparoscopic evaluation of testicular mobility as a guide to management of intra-abdominal testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banieghbal, B; Davies, M

    2003-05-01

    The optimal management of intra-abdominal testes is the subject of an ongoing debate as the result of widespread use of laparoscopy since early 1990's. A simple laparoscopic technique uses cord mobility to act as a guide to cord length and therefore predict the success of a conventional orchidopexy in cases of true intra-abdominal testes. In the technique described, the testis is displaced by stretching the testes to overly the opposite internal inguinal ring. Over a 3-year period, a total of 36 boys with 38 intra-abdominal testes, confirmed laparoscopically, were prospectively assessed. The reported "stretching maneuver" was carried out in all cases. Successful conventional orchidopexy as predicted by a positive stretch maneuver was carried out in 20 testes. When the stretch maneuver failed, conventional 2-stage open operation was done in 3 patients and Fowler-Stephens orchidopexies for the remaining 13 children. A simple test determining testicular mobility assessed during laparoscopic evaluation of intra-abdominal testes provides information of significant importance upon which the correct surgical approach can be based.

  16. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  17. Management of Kell isoimmunization--evaluation of a Doppler-guided approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimon, E; Peltz, R; Gamzu, R; Yagel, S; Feldman, B; Chayen, B; Achiron, R; Lipitz, S

    2006-11-01

    To assess the role of peak systolic velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA-PSV) in the management of pregnancies complicated by Kell isoimmunization. Sixteen fetuses were monitored by conventional protocol (Group 1) and eight fetuses by an MCA-PSV-guided protocol (Group 2). The conventional protocol included a weekly ultrasound evaluation and measurement of maternal anti-Kell titers every 4-6 weeks. In Group 2 Doppler assessment of the MCA-PSV was performed at intervals of 4 to 7 days and MCA-PSV>1.5 multiples of the median (MoM) was considered as an indication for fetal blood sampling (FBS). No parameter emerged as a reliable predictor of isoimmunization severity in Group 1. In Group 2, no FBS was necessary in one case since the MCA-PSV values obtained during the follow-up were 1.5 MoM prior to intrauterine transfusion (IUT) had severe fetal anemia on FBS. In fetuses with severe anemia on the first FBS, the MCA-PSV values 7 days before the first FBS were 1.55 MoM (one case). In the management of Kell isoimmunization invasive procedures may be avoided by implementing MCA-PSV measurements. Delineation of appropriate intervals between reassessments, the reliability of MCA-PSV following repeated IUTs, and cut-off values for FBS await further study. Copyright (c) 2006 ISUOG.

  18. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Karin; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-03-28

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce.Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood.In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  19. Clinical evaluation of the use of an intracardiac electrocardiogram to guide the tip positioning of peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiyi; Chen, Chunfang; Jin, Jingfen; Sharma, Komal; Jiang, Nan; Shentu, Yingqin; Wang, Xingang

    2016-06-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provides important central venous accesses for clinical treatments, tests and monitoring. Compared with the traditional methods, intracardiac electrocardiogram (ECG)-guided method has the potential to guide more accurate tip positioning of PICCs. This study aimed to clinically evaluate the effectiveness of an intracardiac ECG to guide the tip positioning by monitoring characteristic P-wave changes. In this study, eligible patients enrolled September 2011 to May 2012 according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria received the catheterization monitored by intracardiac ECG. Then chest radiography was performed to check the catheter position. The results revealed that, with 117 eligible patients, all bar one patient who died (n = 116) completed the study, including 60 males and 56 females aged 51.2 ± 15.1 years. Most (n = 113, > 97%) had characteristic P-wave changes. The intracardiac ECG-guided positioning procedure achieved correct placement for 112 patients (96.56%), demonstrating 99.12% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, the intracardiac ECG can be a promising technique to guide tip positioning of PICCs. However, since the sample size in this study is limited, more experience and further study during clinical practice are needed to demonstrate achievement of optimal catheterization outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. In vitro evaluation of various bioabsorbable and nonresorbable barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different types of bioabsorbable and nonresorbable membranes have been widely used for guided tissue regeneration (GTR with its ultimate goal of regenerating lost periodontal structures. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of various bioabsorbable and nonresorbable membranes in cultures of primary human gingival fibroblasts (HGF, periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF and human osteoblast-like (HOB cells in vitro. Methods Three commercially available collagen membranes [TutoDent® (TD, Resodont® (RD and BioGide® (BG] as well as three nonresorbable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membranes [ACE (AC, Cytoplast® (CT and TefGen-FD® (TG] were tested. Cells plated on culture dishes (CD served as positive controls. The effect of the barrier membranes on HGF, PDLF as well as HOB cells was assessed by the Alamar Blue fluorometric proliferation assay after 1, 2.5, 4, 24 and 48 h time periods. The structural and morphological properties of the membranes were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results The results showed that of the six barriers tested, TD and RD demonstrated the highest rate of HGF proliferation at both earlier (1 h and later (48 h time periods (P P ≤ 0.001. In HOB cell culture, the highest rate of cell proliferation was also calculated for TD at all time periods (P Conclusion Results from the present study suggested that GTR membrane materials, per se, may influence cell proliferation in the process of periodontal tissue/bone regeneration. Among the six membranes examined, the bioabsorbable membranes demonstrated to be more suitable to stimulate cellular proliferation compared to nonresorbable PTFE membranes.

  1. [Clinical evaluation of in-plane ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, T; Li, M; Tian, Y; Song, J T; Ni, C; Guo, X Y

    2017-02-18

    To evaluate the feasibility and success rate of in-plane ultrasound-guided paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach. In the study, 27 patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were selected to do paravertebral block preoperatively. The fifth intercostal space was scanned by ultrasound probe which was placed along the long axis of the rib and 8 cm lateral to the midline of the spine. The needle was advanced in increments aiming at the space between the internal and innermost intercostal muscles. Once the space between the muscles was achieved, 20 mL of 0.5% (mass fraction) ropivacaine was injected and a catheter was inserted. Whether the tip of catheter was in right place was evaluated by ultrasound image. The block dermatomes of cold sensation were recorded 10, 20 and 30 min after the bolus drug was given. Then 0.2% ropivacaine was infused with 6 mL/h via the catheter by an analgesia pump postoperatively. The block dermatomes of cold sensation and pain score were recorded 1, 6, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. The first attempt success rate of catheteration was 81.48% (22/27); the tips of catheter were proved in right places after the second or third attempt in 5 patients. The median numbers of the block dermatomes 10, 20 and 30 min after the bolus drug was given were 2, 3, 4; the median numbers of block dermatomes were 5, 5, 5, 4, and of pain score were 1, 1, 2, 2 at 1, 6, 24, 48 h postoperatively; no case of bilateral block, pneumothorax or vessel puncture occurred. Thoracic paravertebral block using laterally intercostal approach is feasible, which has high success rate of block and low rate of complications.

  2. The diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound guided imaging algorithm in evaluation of patients with hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsal, Alparslan; Calişkan, Eda Kazak; Erol, Haluk; Karaman, Can Zafer

    2011-07-01

    To assess the efficiency of the following imaging algorithm, including intravenous urography (IVU) or computed tomography urography (CTU) based on ultrasonographic (US) selection, in the radiological management of hematuria. One hundred and forty-one patients with hematuria were prospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 106 cases with normal or nearly normal US result and then they were examined with IVU. Group 2 was composed of the remaining 35 cases which had any urinary tract abnormality, and they were directed to CTU. Radiological results were compared with clinical diagnosis. Ultrasonography and IVU results of 97 cases were congruent in group 1. Eight simple cysts were detected with US and 1 non-obstructing ureter stone was detected with IVU in remaining 9 patients. The only discordant case in clinical comparison was found to have urinary bladder cancer on conventional cystoscopy. Ultrasonography and CTU results were congruent in 30 cases. Additional lesions were detected with CTU (3 ureter stones, 1 ureter TCC, 1 advanced RCC) in remaining 5 patients. Ultrasonography+CTU combination results were all concordant with clinical diagnosis. Except 1 case, radio-clinical agreement was achieved. Cross-sectional imaging modalities are preferred in evaluation of hematuria. CTU is the method of choice; however the limitations preclude using CTU as first line or screening test. Ultrasonography is now being accepted as a first line imaging modality with the increased sensitivity in mass detection compared to IVU. The US guided imaging algorithm can be used effectively in radiological approach to hematuria. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro evaluation of electrospun chitosan mats crosslinked with genipin as guided tissue regeneration barrier membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norowski, Peter Andrew, Jr.

    Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a surgical technique commonly used to exclude bacteria and soft tissues from bone graft sites in oral/maxillofacial bone graft sites by using a barrier membrane to maintain the graft contour and space. Current clinical barrier membrane materials based on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and bovine type 1 collagen are non-ideal and experience a number of disadvantages including membrane exposure, bacterial colonization/biofilm formation and premature degradation, all of which result in increased surgical intervention and poor bone regeneration. These materials do not actively participate in tissue regeneration, however bioactive materials, such as chitosan, may provide advantages such as the ability to stimulate wound healing and de novo bone formation. Our hypothesis is that electrospun chitosan GTR membranes will support cell attachment and growth but prevent cell infiltration/penetration of membrane, demonstrate in vitro degradation predictive of 4--6 month in vivo functionality, and will deliver antibiotics locally to prevent/inhibit periopathogenic complications. To test this hypothesis a series of chitosan membranes were electrospun, in the presence or absence of genipin, a natural crosslinking agent, at concentrations of 5 and 10 mM. These membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, suture pullout testing, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and gel permeation chromatography, and in vitro biodegradation for diameter/morphology of fibers, membrane strengths, degree of crosslinking, crystallinity, molecular weight, and degradation kinetics, respectively. Cytocompability of membranes was evaluated in osteoblastic, fibroblastic and monocyte cultures. The activity of minocycline loaded and released from the membranes was determined in zone of inhibition tests using P. gingivalis microbe. The results demonstrated that genipin crosslinking extended the in vitro

  4. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Evaluation of pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements intraoperatively and by sonographically guided fine-needle puncture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    pressure measurements by direct puncture of pancreatic tissue and duct. In patients with chronic pancreatitis we found small week-to-week variations in sonographically guided percutaneous pressure measurements and good agreement between preoperative percutaneous pressure measurements and intraoperative...

  6. Evaluation of the wound healing property of Commiphora guidottii Chiov. ex. Guid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwot, Michael; Asres, Kaleab; Bisrat, Daniel; Mazumder, Avijit; Lindemann, Peter; Bucar, Franz

    2015-08-18

    The traditional use of the oleo-gum-resin of Commiphora guidottii Chiov. ex. Guid., which is commonly called scented myrrh, for topical treatment of wound is well documented. The major objective of the present study was to investigate the essential oil and resin obtained from C. guidottii for their potential wound healing properties. Due to their influence on the wound healing process, the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of scented myrrh have also been investigated. Powdered oleo-gum-resin of C. guidottii was steam-distilled to obtain essential oil, and the resin was extracted from the marc with MeOH and filtered. The TLC fingerprint profile of the resin has been recorded by using silica gel GF254 as stationary phase. The essential oil components were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Ointments prepared from the essential oil (4% v/w) and the resin (5% w/w) were used for wound healing activity tests. Toxicity of the formulated ointments was investigated according to Draize skin irritation test. Acute anti-inflammatory effect in mice was evaluated using carrageenan induced mouse hind paw oedema model. Antimicrobial activity tests were carried out using disk diffusion and broth dilution techniques against 21 pathogenic bacterial and 4 fungal strains. Ointment formulations of both the oil and resin were found to be non-irritant at the concentrations used and showed significant (p<0.05-0.001) increase in wound contraction rate, shorter epithelization time and higher skin breaking strength as compared to the negative control. Overall, the antibacterial and antifungal activities of the oil and resin were comparable with the standard antibiotics ciprofloxacin and griseofulvin, respectively. The results confirm that scented myrrh possesses genuine wound healing activity supporting the traditional use of the plant.

  7. A program director's guide to the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (former dean's letter) with a database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidich, James B; Grimaldi, Gregory M; Lombardi, Pamela; Davis, Lawrence P; Naidich, Jason J

    2014-06-01

    The value of the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) for a program director is in the information it contains comparing how a student performed in medical school relative to his or her classmates. The Association of American Medical Colleges has recommended that a student's class ranking be included in the summary paragraph of the MSPE and that this information be repeated in a supplementary appendix. The authors reviewed the MSPEs from 1,479 applications for residency training positions. The aim was to determine to what extent and in what manner individual schools reveal how their students perform relative to their peers. The authors then set out to create a database containing this information. Working from a list of 141 US members of the Association of American Medical Colleges, complete information for 107 schools (76%) and partial information for the remaining 34 schools (24%) was gathered. Only 12 schools (9%) included complete comparative information in the summary section in accordance with the guidelines of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Other schools were in partial compliance or did not comply at all. The database the authors constructed will inform users if comparative information is available, guide users to its location in the MSPE, and explain the meaning of the language different schools use to rank or classify their students. The authors recognize that this database is incomplete and that the individual institutions will alter their ranking system from time to time. But this database is offered in an open format so that it can be continuously updated by users. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dosimetric and Radiobiological Evaluation of Multiparametric MRI-Guided Dose Painting in Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Iraj; Tavakkoli, Mohammad B; Jabbari, Keyvan; Amouheidari, Alireza; Yadegarfard, Ghasem

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the treatment options for locally advanced prostate cancer; however, with standard radiation doses, it is not always very effective. One of the strategies to improve the efficiency of radiotherapy is increasing the dose. In this study, to increase tumor local control rates, a new radiotherapy method, known as dose painting (DP), was investigated. To compare 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with DP for prostate cancer. Twenty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent an multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) (T2w, diffusion weighted image, dynamic contrast enhancement, and MRS) scan before a diagnostic biopsy from September 2015 to April 2016 were invited to take part in this study. The tumor local control probability (TCP) values for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and DP techniques were 45, 56, and 77%, respectively. The DP technique had a 37.5 and 71% higher TCP than IMRT and 3D-CRT, and these differences were statistically significant (P = 0.001). The mean normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values of the organ at risks for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and DP showed that there were statistically significant differences among them in three plans (P = 0.01). DP by contours using MP-MRI is technically feasible. This study evaluated biological modeling based on both MP-MRI defined subvolumes and pathologically defined subvolumes. The MP-MRI-guided DP results in better TCP/NTCP than 3D-CRT and IMRT.

  9. Monitoring iCCM: a feasibility study of the indicator guide for monitoring and evaluating integrated community case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Timothy; Kasungami, Dyness; Guenther, Tanya; Hazel, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have now adopted integrated community case management (iCCM) of common childhood illnesses as a strategy to improve child health. In March 2014, the iCCM Task Force published an Indicator Guide for Monitoring and Evaluating iCCM: a 'menu' of recommended indicators with globally agreed definitions and methodology, to guide countries in developing robust iCCM monitoring systems. The Indicator Guide was conceived as an evolving document that would incorporate collective experience and learning as iCCM programmes themselves evolve. This article presents findings from two studies that examined the feasibility of collecting the Indicator Guide's 18 routine monitoring indicators with the iCCM monitoring systems that countries currently have in place. We reviewed iCCM monitoring tools, protocols and reports from a purposive sample of 10 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a scorecard system to assess which of the Indicator Guide's 18 routine monitoring indicators could be calculated with the given monitoring tools, and at which level of the health system the relevant information would be available. We found that the data needed to calculate many of the Indicator Guide's routine monitoring indicators are already being collected through existing monitoring systems, although much of these data are only available at health facility level and not aggregated to district or national levels. Our results highlight challenge of using supervision checklists as a data source, and the need for countries to maintain accurate deployment data for CHWs and CHW supervisors. We suggest that some of the recommended indicators need revising. Routine monitoring will be more feasible, effective and efficient if iCCM programmes focus on a smaller set of high-value indicators that are easy to measure, reliably interpreted and useful both for global and national stakeholders and for frontline health workers themselves. © The Author 2016. Published by

  10. Relaxing Behavioural Inheritance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Amálio

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Object-oriented (OO inheritance allows the definition of families of classes in a hierarchical way. In behavioural inheritance, a strong version, it should be possible to substitute an object of a subclass for an object of its superclass without any observable effect on the system. Behavioural inheritance is related to formal refinement, but, as observed in the literature, the refinement constraints are too restrictive, ruling out many useful OO subclassings. This paper studies behavioural inheritance in the context of ZOO, an object-oriented style for Z. To overcome refinement's restrictions, this paper proposes relaxations to the behavioural inheritance refinement rules. The work is presented for Z, but the results are applicable to any OO language that supports design-by-contract.

  11. OCT-based approach to local relaxations discrimination from translational relaxation motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Matveyev, Alexandr L.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.

    2016-04-01

    Multimodal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool for tissue state characterization. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an approach to mapping mechanical properties of tissue based on OCT. One of challenging problems in OCE is elimination of the influence of residual local tissue relaxation that complicates obtaining information on elastic properties of the tissue. Alternatively, parameters of local relaxation itself can be used as an additional informative characteristic for distinguishing the tissue in normal and pathological states over the OCT image area. Here we briefly present an OCT-based approach to evaluation of local relaxation processes in the tissue bulk after sudden unloading of its initial pre-compression. For extracting the local relaxation rate we evaluate temporal dependence of local strains that are mapped using our recently developed hybrid phase resolved/displacement-tracking (HPRDT) approach. This approach allows one to subtract the contribution of global displacements of scatterers in OCT scans and separate the temporal evolution of local strains. Using a sample excised from of a coronary arteria, we demonstrate that the observed relaxation of local strains can be reasonably fitted by an exponential law, which opens the possibility to characterize the tissue by a single relaxation time. The estimated local relaxation times are assumed to be related to local biologically-relevant processes inside the tissue, such as diffusion, leaking/draining of the fluids, local folding/unfolding of the fibers, etc. In general, studies of evolution of such features can provide new metrics for biologically-relevant changes in tissue, e.g., in the problems of treatment monitoring.

  12. Evaluation of MRI protocols for the assessment of lumbar facet joints after MR-guided focused ultrasound treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Roland; Do, Loi; Rieke, Viola; Wilson, Mark W.; Saeed, Maythem

    2016-01-01

    Background MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) might be a very safe and effective minimally invasive technique to treat facet joint pain caused by arthritis and other degenerative changes. However, there are still safety concerns for this treatment and challenges regarding MR imaging and temperature mapping due to susceptibility effects between the bone and soft tissue near the joint, which has resulted in poor MR image quality. The goal of this research was to evaluate multiple magnetic re...

  13. The effects of relaxation exercises on anxiety levels in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of relaxation exercises on anxiety levels in an inpatient general psychiatric unit. The conceptual framework used was holism. A convenience sample of 39 subjects was studied. Anxiety levels were measured prior to and post interventions with the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Progressive muscle relaxation, meditative breathing, guided imagery, and soft music were employed to promote relaxation. A significant reduction in anxiety level was obtained on the post-test. The findings of this study can be incorporated by holistic nurses to help reduce anxiety levels of general psychiatric inpatients by using relaxation interventions.

  14. Double layer relaxation in colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijlstra, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to improve our insight into the relaxation of the electrical double layer around particles in hydrophobic sols. A detailed knowledge of the relaxation mechanisms is required to explain the behaviour of sols under conditions where the double layer is

  15. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...

  16. [Evaluation of CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy for Diagnosis of Renal Tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taiki; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Matsushita, Yuto; Suzuki, Takahisa; Motoyama, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Rikiya; Otsuka, Atsushi; Furuse, Hiroshi; Tsukui, Hiroe; Ushio, Takasuke; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2017-02-01

    We performed computed tomographic (CT)-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for renal tumors that were difficult to diagnose or were inoperable malignant renal tumors. Nineteen patients who underwent CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy between November 2007 and March 2015 at Hamamatsu University Hospital were included in this study. The median tumor diameter was 78 mm (40-140 mm). Seventeen patients were diagnosed pathologically by biopsy, but 2 patients could not be diagnosed despite the existence of adequate sample volume. One patient had an adverse complication ; fever (CTCAE ver 4.0 grade 1). The median duration of follow-up was 21 months (0-111 months), no one had tumor seeding along a needle tract. CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of renal tumors is helpful for pathological diagnosis and further treatment planning. However, there are still some limitations to obtain an accurate diagnosis.

  17. Evaluating the Acceptability and Usability of EASEL: A Mobile Application that Supports Guided Reflection for Experiential Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry C Schnepp

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To examine the early perceptions (acceptability and usability of EASEL (Education through Application-Supported Experiential Learning, a mobile platform that delivers reflection prompts and content before, during, and after an experiential learning activity. Background: Experiential learning is an active learning approach in which students learn by doing and by reflecting on the experience. This approach to teaching is often used in disciplines such as humanities, business, and medicine. Reflection before, during, and after an experience allows the student to analyze what they learn and why it is important, which is vital in helping them to understand the relevance of the experience. A just-in-time tool (EASEL was needed to facilitate this. Methodology: To inform the development of a mobile application that facilitates real-time guided reflection and to determine the relevant feature set, we conducted a needs analysis with both students and faculty members. Data collected during this stage of the evaluation helped guide the creation of a prototype. The user experience of the prototype and interface interactions were evaluated during the usability phase of the evaluation study. Contribution: Both the needs analysis and usability assessment provided justification for continued development of EASEL as well as insight that guides current development. Findings: The interaction design of EASEL is understandable and usable. Both students and teachers value an application that facilitates real-time guided reflection. Recommendations for Practitioners: The use of a system such as EASEL can leverage time and location-based services to support students in field experiences. This technology aligns with evidence that guided reflection provides opportunities for metacognition. Recommendation for Researchers: Iterative prototyping, testing, and refinement can lead to a deliberate and effective app development process. Impact on Society: The EASEL

  18. Una apreciacion de la guia pedagogica de la pelicula, "Breaking Away" (An Evaluation of the Viewing Guide for the Film "Breaking Away").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper, written in Spanish, examines the viewing guide for the film "Breaking Away." The guide, prepared by the United States Information Agency, was intended for the use of teaching English as a Second Language. It is evaluated, along with the movie, to determine whether it fulfills its objectives of providing enriched and critical thinking…

  19. Evolving fuzzy rules for relaxed-criteria negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong

    2008-12-01

    In the literature on automated negotiation, very few negotiation agents are designed with the flexibility to slightly relax their negotiation criteria to reach a consensus more rapidly and with more certainty. Furthermore, these relaxed-criteria negotiation agents were not equipped with the ability to enhance their performance by learning and evolving their relaxed-criteria negotiation rules. The impetus of this work is designing market-driven negotiation agents (MDAs) that not only have the flexibility of relaxing bargaining criteria using fuzzy rules, but can also evolve their structures by learning new relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules to improve their negotiation outcomes as they participate in negotiations in more e-markets. To this end, an evolutionary algorithm for adapting and evolving relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules was developed. Implementing the idea in a testbed, two kinds of experiments for evaluating and comparing EvEMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are evolved using the evolutionary algorithm) and EMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are manually constructed) were carried out through stochastic simulations. Empirical results show that: 1) EvEMDAs generally outperformed EMDAs in different types of e-markets and 2) the negotiation outcomes of EvEMDAs generally improved as they negotiated in more e-markets.

  20. Biomolecules: Fluctuations and relaxations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, F.; Ostermann, A.; Gassmann, A.; Scherk, C.; Chong, S.-H.; Kidera, A.; Go, N.

    1999-10-01

    The normal-mode refinement of X-ray crystallographic data opened a new possibility to analyze the mean-square displacements in a protein molecule. A comparison of the X-ray structure of myoglobin at several temperatures with Mössbauer data is performed. In the low-temperature regime below 180 K the iron mean-square displacements obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy are in good agreement with a normal-mode analysis. The X-ray mean-square displacements at the position of the iron, after the motion originated from the external degrees of freedom are subtracted, have practically the same temperature dependence as those from Mössbauer spectroscopy. The difference between the X-ray mean-square displacements and those predicted by normal-mode analysis measures the distribution of molecules into conformational substates. Above 180 K the Mössbauer effect indicates fluctuations between conformational substates. The relaxation from a Fe(III) conformation to a Fe(II) conformation is shown for superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii.

  1. A study to evaluate fibreoptic-guided intubation through the i-gel™

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... using fibreoptic-guided intubation through an i-gel™ in adult patients undergoing elective surgery. A study to ... in adult patients undergoing elective surgery. Design: A prospective clinical study. Subjects ..... for blind intubation via i-gel™, depending on the fibreoptic score. The overall success rate of blind ...

  2. A guide for evaluating the environmental performance of Product/Service-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Laumann; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    when focusing on product performance (e.g.by offering lighting as a service) rather than the physical products (e.g. by selling light bulbs). Such strategies of integrating products and services to deliver required user functionality are often termed Product/Service-Systems (PSS). This guide...

  3. The evaluation of using road-map guided Excel VBA training to promote nursing informatics in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, I-Ching; Liu, Che-Wei; Hsu, Chiao-Ling; Chang, Polun

    2009-01-01

    In Taiwan nursing informatics is taking off. It is therefore strategically important to educate our nurses what nursing informatics is in a short time. We used a method of road-map guided Excel VBA to educate our nurses how to cope with their informatics needs. An eight-day training program based on this concept was implemented in the one regional hospital and a survey was done at the end of the program to evaluate the participants' perception of the training program. The results show very high acceptance and positive outcomes. We suggest that the method of road-map guided Excel VBA might be a promising strategy to promote nursing informatics internationally Taiwan.

  4. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology in the evaluation of suspected tuberculosis in patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puri, R.; Vilmann, P.; Sud, R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with suspected tuberculosis without pulmonary lesions and with mediastinal lymphadenopathy often pose a diagnostic challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an established modality to evaluate mediastinal and abdominal lesions. The aim...

  6. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  7. Evaluation of Time of Scour at Guide Banks in Plain Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauva, O.; Klive, G.; Gjunsburgs, B.

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the literature shows that there are no methods or formulas to calculate the equilibrium time of scour near elliptical guide banks. In the formulas used in calculating the equilibrium time of scour at piers or abutments, different parameters are not taken into consideration. The differential equation of the bed sediment movement in clear-water was used and the method for computing the equilibrium time of scour near elliptical guide banks was elaborated. New hydraulic threshold criterion is proposed for the calculation of equilibrium time of scour. Analysis of the proposed method shows the influence of the following parameters on the equilibrium time of scour: contraction rate of the flow, Froude number, bed layering, sediment movement parameters, local flow modification, relative local and critical velocities ratio, and relative depth. Computer modeling results were compared with the equilibrium times of scour which were calculated by the presented method and they were in good agreement.

  8. Evaluation of overhead guide sign sheeting materials to increase visibility and safety for drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Mohammed Said; Rys, Malgorzata J; Rys, Andrew; Du, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Overhead guide sign visibility must increase to improve driver safety on roadways. Two methods increase overhead guide sign visibility: sign illumination and use of retroreflective sheeting materials. This paper compares three types of retroreflective sheeting: Engineering Grade (type I), Diamond Grade (type XI), and High Intensity (type IV). A field experiment was conducted at night using licensed drivers to determine the optimum retroreflective sheeting material that increases sign visibility and legibility. Results showed that, of the three types of retroreflective sheeting, Diamond Grade (type XI) sheeting requires minimum illuminance to be visible, followed by High Intensity (type IV) sheeting. Cost analysis, including labor, maintenance, and material cost components of the three retroreflective sheeting materials, showed that High Intensity (type IV) could increase sign visibility and legibility at night for Departments of Transportation with limited budgets, consequently increasing driver safety on roadways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. "Pssst . . . the really useful guide to alcohol": evaluation of an alcohol education television series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, P; Smith, C; Nugent, Z; Panter, C

    1991-03-01

    The paper reports on the effectiveness of a six-part television series ("Pssst . . . the really useful guide to alcohol") in changing viewers' knowledge and alcohol-related behaviours and attitudes. Comparisons between viewers and matched controls indicated significant increases in knowledge relating to alcohol. No changes in attitudes were found, although some behavioural change was indicated. These results are discussed in the context of wider-ranging alcohol-related health promotion initiatives.

  10. Le CRDI et BetterEvaluation lancent un guide interactif pour la ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    21 oct. 2016 ... Le mandat peut ensuite être finalisé avec les intervenants, être utilisé pour embaucher des évaluateurs et guider la gestion de l'évaluation. ... Ce projet de recherche servira à élaborer un guide en matière d'évaluation destiné aux instances qui commandent des évaluations pour améliorer la qualité des ...

  11. Advancing Molecular-Guided Surgery through probe development and testing in a moderate cost evaluation pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hull, Sally M.; Samkoe, Kimberly S.; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, Jack; Roberts, David W.; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular guided oncology surgery has the potential to transform the way decisions about resection are done, and can be critically important in areas such as neurosurgery where the margins of tumor relative to critical normal tissues are not readily apparent from visual or palpable guidance. Yet there are major financial barriers to advancing agents into clinical trials with commercial backing. We observe that development of these agents in the standard biological therapeutic paradigm is not ...

  12. Subacute posteromedial impingement of the ankle in athletes: MR imaging evaluation and ultrasound guided therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiou, Christina; Robinson, Philip; O' Connor, Philip J.; Grainger, Andrew [Leeds Teaching Hospitals, St. James University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    To describe the use of MR imaging and efficacy of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the diagnosis and management of athletes with clinical posteromedial impingement of the ankle. A retrospective analysis of imaging findings on MR was undertaken in nine elite athletes with clinical posteromedial ankle impingement. MR studies from six professional athletes with posterolateral pain were also reviewed as an imaging control group. The two reviewing radiologists were blinded to the clinical details and the proportion of control and study subjects. The nine study athletes also underwent diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided injection of steroid and anaesthetic into the posteromedial capsular abnormality. Follow-up was by telephone interview. Posteromedial capsular thickening was seen only in athletes with posteromedial impingement (7/9). Posteromedial synovitis was present in all athletes with posteromedial impingement; however, posterior and posterolateral synovitis was also seen in these athletes. Mild posteromedial synovitis was present in two control athletes. Ultrasound identified abnormal posteromedial soft tissue thickening deep to tibialis posterior between the medial malleolus and talus in all nine athletes. After injection all athletes returned to their previous level of sport, with eight of the nine not experiencing any residual or recurrent symptoms. If MR imaging excludes significant coexistent abnormality, ultrasound can localise posteromedial soft tissue abnormality and guide injection therapy, allowing return to athletic activity without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  13. Standard guide for evaluating data acquisition systems used in cyclic fatigue and fracture mechanics testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers how to understand and minimize the errors associated with data acquisition in fatigue and fracture mechanics testing equipment. This guide is not intended to be used instead of certified traceable calibration or verification of data acquisition systems when such certification is required. It does not cover static load verification, for which the user is referred to the current revision of Practices E 4, or static extensometer verification, for which the user is referred to the current revision of Practice E 83. The user is also referred to Practice E 467. 1.2 The output of the fatigue and fracture mechanics data acquisition systems described in this guide is essentially a stream of digital data. Such digital data may be considered to be divided into two types- Basic Data, which are a sequence of digital samples of an equivalent analog waveform representing the output of transducers connected to the specimen under test, and Derived Data, which are digital values obtained from the Basic D...

  14. Evaluation of a Standardized Program for Training Practicing Anesthesiologists in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Edward R; Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kan, Jack; Shum, Cynthia; Gaba, David M; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; Udani, Ankeet D; Howard, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    Practicing anesthesiologists have generally not received formal training in ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion. We designed this study to determine the efficacy of a standardized teaching program in this population. Anesthesiologists in practice for 10 years or more were recruited and enrolled to participate in a 1-day program: lectures and live-model ultrasound scanning (morning) and faculty-led iterative practice and mannequin-based simulation (afternoon). Participants were assessed and recorded while performing ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion at baseline, at midday (interval), and after the program (final). Videos were scored by 2 blinded reviewers using a composite tool and global rating scale. Participants were surveyed every 3 months for 1 year to report the number of procedures, efficacy of teaching methods, and implementation obstacles. Thirty-two participants were enrolled and completed the program; 31 of 32 (97%) completed the 1-year follow-up. Final scores [median (10th-90th percentiles)] were 21.5 (14.5-28.0) of 30 points compared to 14.0 (9.0-20.0) at interval (P Practicing anesthesiologists without previous training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can acquire perineural catheter insertion skills after a 1-day standardized course, but changing clinical practice remains a challenge. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. The relaxation & stress reduction workbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Martha; Eshelman, Elizabeth Robbins; McKay, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    "The Relaxation & Stress Reduction Workbook broke new ground when it was first published in 1980, detailing easy, step-by-step techniques for calming the body and mind in an increasingly overstimulated world...

  16. Relaxation Pathways in Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    At temperatures below the glass transition temperature, physical properties of metallic glasses, such as density, viscosity, electrical resistivity or enthalpy, slowly evolve with time. This is the process of physical aging that occurs among all types of glasses and leads to structural changes at the microscopic level. Even though the relaxation pathways are ruled by thermodynamics as the glass attempts to re-attain thermodynamic equilibrium, they are steered by sluggish kinetics at the microscopic level. Understanding the structural and dynamic pathways of the relaxing glassy state is still one of the grand challenges in materials physics. We review some of the recent experimental advances made in understanding the nature of the relaxation phenomenon in metallic glasses and its implications to the macroscopic and microscopic properties changes of the relaxing glass.

  17. Standard guide for evaluation of materials used in extended service of interim spent nuclear fuel dry storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Part of the total inventory of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is stored in dry cask storage systems (DCSS) under licenses granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of this guide is to provide information to assist in supporting the renewal of these licenses, safely and without removal of the SNF from its licensed confinement, for periods beyond those governed by the term of the original license. This guide provides information on materials behavior under conditions that may be important to safety evaluations for the extended service of the renewal period. This guide is written for DCSS containing light water reactor (LWR) fuel that is clad in zirconium alloy material and stored in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), at an independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). The components of an ISFSI, addressed in this document, include the commercial SNF, canister, cask, and all parts of the storage installation including the ISFSI pad. The language of t...

  18. In vitro accuracy evaluation of image-guided robot system for direct cochlear access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brett; Gerber, Nicolas; Williamson, Tom; Gavaghan, Kate; Wimmer, Wilhelm; Caversaccio, Marco; Weber, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    A previously developed image-guided robot system can safely drill a tunnel from the lateral mastoid surface, through the facial recess, to the middle ear, as a viable alternative to conventional mastoidectomy for cochlear electrode insertion. Direct cochlear access (DCA) provides a minimally invasive tunnel from the lateral surface of the mastoid through the facial recess to the middle ear for cochlear electrode insertion. A safe and effective tunnel drilled through the narrow facial recess requires a highly accurate image-guided surgical system. Previous attempts have relied on patient-specific templates and robotic systems to guide drilling tools. In this study, we report on improvements made to an image-guided surgical robot system developed specifically for this purpose and the resulting accuracy achieved in vitro. The proposed image-guided robotic DCA procedure was carried out bilaterally on 4 whole head cadaver specimens. Specimens were implanted with titanium fiducial markers and imaged with cone-beam CT. A preoperative plan was created using a custom software package wherein relevant anatomical structures of the facial recess were segmented, and a drill trajectory targeting the round window was defined. Patient-to-image registration was performed with the custom robot system to reference the preoperative plan, and the DCA tunnel was drilled in 3 stages with progressively longer drill bits. The position of the drilled tunnel was defined as a line fitted to a point cloud of the segmented tunnel using principle component analysis (PCA function in MatLab). The accuracy of the DCA was then assessed by coregistering preoperative and postoperative image data and measuring the deviation of the drilled tunnel from the plan. The final step of electrode insertion was also performed through the DCA tunnel after manual removal of the promontory through the external auditory canal. Drilling error was defined as the lateral deviation of the tool in the plane perpendicular

  19. Phase Transitions in Semidefinite Relaxations

    OpenAIRE

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful...

  20. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  1. Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-01-01

    The author pretends to present with this article, the therapeutic contributions of Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Mental Health context, making only reference to adults intervention. A brief description of the body, as a biopsychosocial unity, is found in the introduction, which is followed by the explanation of conceptual and interventional models in Clinical Psychomotricity. The author makes reference to psychotherapeutic values of relaxation, giving some examples of techniques and expos...

  2. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P suture in the treatment of Achilles tendon repair by an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Comparison Evaluation of the PFP FSAR and NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 with DOE-STD-3009-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSCARSON, E.E.

    2000-07-28

    One of the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) current Authorization Basis (AB) documents is the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR (HNF-SD-CP-SAR-02 1) was prepared to the format and content guidance specified in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 3.39, Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Plutonium Processing and Fuel Fabrication Plants (RG 3.39). In April 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE Order 5480.23 which established the FSAR requirements for DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. In 1994, DOE issued DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, which is a format and content guide addressing the preparation of FSARs in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23. During the initial preparation and issuance of the PFP FSAR the format and content guidance contained in NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 was utilized, since it was the most applicable guidance at the time for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for plutonium processing plants. With the adoption of DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94, DOE required the preparation of SARs to meet the format and content of those DOE documents. The PFP was granted an exemption to continue with RG 3.39 format for future FSAR revisions. PFP modifications and additions have required PFP FSAR modifications that have typically been prepared to the same NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 format and content, to provide consistency with the PFP FSAR. This document provides a table comparison between the 3009 and RG 3.39 formats to validate the extent of PFP FSAR compliance with the intent of DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94. This evaluation was initially performed on Revisions 1 and 1A of the PFP FSAR. With the preparation of a Revision 2 draft to the FSAR, sections with significant changes were reevaluated for compliance and the tables were updated, as appropriate. The tables resulting from this

  4. Microplastic relaxations of single and polycrystalline molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichl, W.; Weiss, B. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Materialphysik; Chen, D.L.

    1998-05-01

    The microplasticity of high-purity molybdenum single crystals and of Mo polycrystals of technical purity has been investigated by relaxation step tests in uniaxial compression. A new model for the evaluation of relaxation tests in the microplastic range of b.c.c metals is presented which takes into account the decrease of the mobile dislocation density due to exhaustion of non-screw dislocations. The model allows an independent determination of the activation volume and of the microstructure parameters controlling dislocation exhaustion. The results indicate that in the high-purity single crystals the deformation rate is controlled by interactions of non-screw dislocations with the grown-in network. In the polycrystals additional interactions with impurity atoms seem to occur. In the single crystals the activity and subsequent exhaustion of two different glide systems was observed, followed by a gradual onset of screw dislocation motion. (orig.) 26 refs.

  5. Relaxation processes in Aeolian transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selmani Houssem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate experimentally the relaxation process toward the equilibrium regime of saltation transport in the context of spatial inhomogeneous conditions. The relaxation length associated to this process is an important length in aeolian transport. This length stands for the distance needed for the particle flux to adapt to a change in flow conditions or in the boundary conditions at the bed. Predicting the value of this length under given conditions of transport remains an open and important issue. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to document the influence of the upstream particle flux and wind speed on the relaxation process toward the saturated transport state. In the absence of upstream particle flux, data show that the relaxation length is independent of the wind strength (except close to the threshold of transport. In contrast, in the case of a finite upstream flux, the relaxation length exhibits a clear increase with increasing air flow velocity. Moreover, in the latter the relaxation is clearly non-monotonic and presents an overshoot.

  6. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N., E-mail: nwen1@hfhs.org; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Brand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P. [Varian Medical System, Täfernstrasse 7, Dättwil AG 5405 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  7. A user`s guide to SABLE 2.0: The Sandia Automated Boolean Logic Evaluation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, K.M.; Wyss, G.D.; Daniel, S.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Risk Assessment and Systems Modeling Dept.

    1996-04-01

    This document is a reference guide for the Sandia Automated Boolean Logic Evaluation software (SABLE) version 2.0 developed at Sandia National Laboratories. SABLE 2.0 is designed to solve and quantify fault trees on IBM-compatible personal computers using the Microsoft Windows operating environment. SABLE 2.0 consists of a Windows user interface combined with a fault tree solution engine that is derived from the well-known SETS fault tree analysis code. This manual explains the fundamentals of solving fault trees and shows how to use the Windows SABLE 2.0 interface to specify a problem, solve the problem, and view the output.

  8. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, J. A., E-mail: yosimoon13@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia (Costa Rica); Rojas, J. I., E-mail: isaac.rojas@siglo21.cr [Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XX1, La Uruca (Costa Rica); PROXTRONICS CR, Ltda, Heredia (Costa Rica)

    2016-07-07

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  9. Data Acquisition User’s Guide-1 for Fuel/Engine Evaluation System Applied to an Experimental Air Stirling Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    expfrimenta! d’avion no 1 de marque Stirling ; ce dernier avait d6ja ftg conqu et construit dans le cadre des Atudes sur lea " moteurs avanc6s" men-es pour...crivons le logiciel que l’on utilise pour faire l’essai du moteur de marque Stirling . Finalement, nous d~crivons certaines limites du systime d’ AD. i...ACQUISITION USER’S GUIDE-1 FOR FUEL/ENGINE EVALUATION SYSTEM APPLIED TO AN EXPERIMENTAL AIR STIRLING ENGINE by IR. Bingham and G.D. Webster Energy

  10. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  11. Economic Evaluation of Community Water Fluoridation: A Community Guide Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Tao; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K

    2016-06-01

    A recently updated Community Guide systematic review of the effectiveness of community water fluoridation once again found evidence that it reduces dental caries. Although community water fluoridation was found to save money in a 2002 Community Guide systematic review, the conclusion was based on studies conducted before 1995. Given the update to the effectiveness review, re-examination of the benefit and cost of community water fluoridation is necessary. Using methods developed for Community Guide economic reviews, 564 studies were identified within a search period from January 1995 to November 2013. Ten studies were included in the current review, with four covering community fluoridation benefits only and another six providing both cost and benefit information. Additionally, two of the six studies analyzed the cost effectiveness of community water fluoridation. All currencies were converted to 2013 dollars. The analysis was conducted in 2014. The benefit-only studies used regression analysis, showing that different measures of dental costs were always lower in communities with water fluoridation. For the six cost-benefit studies, per capita annual intervention cost ranged from $0.11 to $4.92 for communities with at least 1,000 population, and per capita annual benefit ranged from $5.49 to $93.19. Benefit-cost ratios ranged from 1.12:1 to 135:1, and these ratios were positively associated with community population size. Recent evidence continues to indicate that the economic benefit of community water fluoridation exceeds the intervention cost. Further, the benefit-cost ratio increases with the community population size. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Benchmark IMRT evaluation of a Co-60 MRI-guided radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, H Omar; Rodriguez, Vivian; Green, Olga; Kashani, Rojano; Santanam, Lakshmi; Tanderup, Kari; Mutic, Sasa; Li, H Harold

    2015-03-01

    A device for MRI-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) that uses cobalt-60 sources to deliver intensity modulated radiation therapy is now commercially available. We investigated the performance of the treatment planning and delivery system against the benchmark recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 119 for IMRT commissioning and demonstrated that the device plans and delivers IMRT treatments within recommended confidence limits and with similar accuracy as linac IMRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quasistatic in-depth local strain relaxation/creep rate mapping using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Lev A.; Karashtin, Dmitry A.; Sovetsky, Aleksandr A.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Sirotkina, Marina A.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Druzhkova, Irina N.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Vitkin, Alex; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.

    2017-07-01

    OCT-based local strain relaxation/creep evaluation is an emerging tool for tissue viscoelasticity characterization. We present a tool for 2D visualization of local strain relaxation and creep time/rate inside the tissue.

  14. Comparison of palpation-versus ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies in the evaluation of thyroid nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peker Kamil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare the results of palpation-versus ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsies. Findings Clinical data, cytology and histopathology results were retrospectively analyzed on all patients who underwent thyroid FNA biopsy in our outpatient endocrinology clinic between January 1998 and April 2003. The same investigators performed all thyroid FNAs (ASC and cytological evaluations (KP. Subjects in the ultrasound-guided group were older, otherwise there were no differences in baseline characteristics (gender, thyroid function, the frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule diameter and nodule location between groups. Cytology results in nodules aspirated by palpation (n = 202 versus ultrasound guidance (n = 184 were as follows: malignant 2.0% versus 2.7% (p = 0.74, benign 69.8% versus 79.9% (p = 0.02, indeterminate 1.0% versus 4.9% (p = 0.02, inadequate 27.2% versus 12.5% (p Conclusion We demonstrate that ultrasound guidance for thyroid FNA significantly decreases inadequate for evaluation category. We also confirm the high sensitivity and specificity of thyroid FNA biopsy in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Where available, we recommend universal application of ultrasound guidance for thyroid FNA biopsy as a standard component of this diagnostic technique.

  15. Computer systems experiences of users with and without disabilities an evaluation guide for professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Borsci, Simone; Federici, Stefano; Mele, Maria Laura

    2013-01-01

    This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. The book creates an evaluation process that is able to assess the user's satisfaction with a developed system. Presenting a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons, it takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process.

  16. Evaluating Whole-School Reform Efforts: A Guide for District and School Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kim; Douglas, Inge; Railsback, Jennifer; Shaughnessy, Joan; Speth, Timothy

    This guidebook offers suggestions that can help district and school staff choose an approach for evaluating school-reform efforts. It is intended to provide further evaluation assistance to education stakeholders to ensure that schools conduct evaluation of whole-school reform efforts in a way that provides valid and useful information for…

  17. Museums for all: evaluation of an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the science museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Soler Gallego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Translation and interpreting are valuable tools to improve accessibility at museums. Theese tools permit the museum communicate with visitors with different capabilities. The aim of this article is to show the results of a study carried out within the TACTO project, aimed at creating and evaluating an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the Science Museum of Granada. The project focused on the linguistic aspects of the guide’s contents and its evaluation, which combined the participatory observation with a survey and interview. The results from this study allow us to conclude that the proposed design improves visually impaired visitors’ access to the museum. However, the expectations and specific needs of each visitor change considerably depending on individual factors such as their level of disability and museum visiting habits.

  18. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems.

  19. Advancing molecular-guided surgery through probe development and testing in a moderate cost evaluation pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hull, Sally M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, Jack; Roberts, David W.; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    Molecular guided oncology surgery has the potential to transform the way decisions about resection are done, and can be critically important in areas such as neurosurgery where the margins of tumor relative to critical normal tissues are not readily apparent from visual or palpable guidance. Yet there are major financial barriers to advancing agents into clinical trials with commercial backing. We observe that development of these agents in the standard biological therapeutic paradigm is not viable, due to the high up front financial investment needed and the limitations in the revenue models of contrast agents for imaging. The hypothesized solution to this problem is to develop small molecular biologicals tagged with an established fluorescent reporter, through the chemical agent approval pathway, targeting a phase 0 trials initially, such that the initial startup phase can be completely funded by a single NIH grant. In this way, fast trials can be completed to de-risk the development pipeline, and advance the idea of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) reporters into human testing. As with biological therapies the potential successes of each agent are still moderate, but this process will allow the field to advance in a more stable and productive manner, rather than relying upon isolated molecules developed at high cost and risk. The pathway proposed and tested here uses peptide synthesis of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-binding Affibody molecules, uniquely conjugated to IRDye 800CW, developed and tested in academic and industrial laboratories with well-established records for GMP production, fill and finish, toxicity testing, and early phase clinical trials with image guidance.

  20. Shoreline relaxation at pocket beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Imen; Medina, Raul; Kakeh, Nabil; González, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    A new physical concept of relaxation time is introduced in this research as the time required for the beach to dissipate its initial perturbation. This concept is investigated using a simple beach-evolution model of shoreline rotation at pocket beaches, based on the assumption that the instantaneous change of the shoreline plan-view shape depends on the long-term equilibrium plan-view shape. The expression of relaxation time is developed function of the energy conditions and the physical characteristics of the beach; it increases at longer beaches having coarse sediments and experiencing low-energy conditions. The relaxation time, calculated by the developed model, is validated by the shoreline observations extracted from video images at two artificially embayed beaches of Barcelona (NW Mediterranean) suffering from perturbations of sand movement and a nourishment project. This finding is promising to estimate the shoreline response and useful to improve our understanding of the dynamic of pocket beaches and their stability.

  1. Evaluation of the setup margins for cone beam computed tomography-guided cranial radiosurgery: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco; Wunderink, Wouter; Delgado, David; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the setup margins from the clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments guided by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). We designed an end-to-end (E2E) test using a skull phantom with an embedded 6mm tungsten ball (target). A noncoplanar plan was computed (E2E plan) to irradiate the target. The CBCT-guided positioning of the skull phantom on the linac was performed. Megavoltage portal images were acquired after 15 independent deliveries of the E2E plan. The displacement 2-dimensional (2D) vector between the centers of the square field and the ball target on each portal image was used to quantify the isocenter accuracy. Geometrical margins on each patient׳s direction (left-right or LR, anterior-posterior or AP, superior-inferior or SI) were calculated. Dosimetric validation of the margins was performed in 5 real SRS cases: 3-dimesional (3D) isocenter deviations were mimicked, and changes in CTV dose coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) dosage were analyzed. The CTV-PTV margins of 1.1mm in LR direction, and 0.7mm in AP and SI directions were derived from the E2E tests. The dosimetric analysis revealed that a 1-mm uniform margin was sufficient to ensure the CTV dose coverage, without compromising the OAR dose tolerances. The effect of isocenter uncertainty has been estimated to be 1mm in our CBCT-guided SRS approach. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnoy, J.; Gale, G. M.

    The de-excitation of the vibrational population of small molecules in the liquid state is considered. Experimental techniques applicable to the measurement of relaxation times in dense phases are first described. Theoretical approaches are subsequently developed with special emphasis on the relationship between ab-initio quantum methods and binary interaction models. Finally, a selection of experimental results is analysed in the light of these theories. Special attention is given to the dependence of the relaxation time on experimental parameters such as density, temperature or the concentration of a mixture. The behaviour of the relaxation time across the liquid/solid phase transition is also treated. La désexcitation vibrationnelle de petites molécules est étudiée en phase liquide. Les techniques expérimentales utilisables pour mesurer les temps de relaxation en phase dense sont d'abord décrites. Les approches théoriques sont ensuite développées en montrant en particulier les liens entre les deux principales : l'approche quantique ab-initio et les modèles d'interaction binaire. Un choix de résultats expérimentaux est finalement analysé à la lumière de ces théories. Les dépendances des temps de relaxation envers les paramètres expérimentaux, comme la densité, la température ou la concentration d'un mélange, sont spécialement étudiées. Le comportement de la relaxation à la transition liquide/solide est aussi abordé.

  3. Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete Maximiano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The author pretends to present with this article, the therapeutic contributions of Psychomotricity and Relaxation in Mental Health context, making only reference to adults intervention. A brief description of the body, as a biopsychosocial unity, is found in the introduction, which is followed by the explanation of conceptual and interventional models in Clinical Psychomotricity. The author makes reference to psychotherapeutic values of relaxation, giving some examples of techniques and exposing a clinical case. Finally, the author briefly describes her recent experience of Psychomotor intervention in Psychiatric Service of Hospital Fernando Fonseca.

  4. Molecular relaxations in amorphous phenylbutazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahra, M.; Thayyil, M. Shahin; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular dynamics of phenylbutazone in the supercooled liquid and glassy state is studied using broadband dielectric spectroscopy for test frequencies 1 kHz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz over a wide temperature range. Above the glass transition temperature Tg, the presence of the structural α-relaxation peak was observed which shifts towards lower frequencies as the temperature decreases and kinetically freezes at Tg. Besides the structural α-relaxation peak, a β-process which arises due to the localized molecular fluctuations is observed at lower temperature.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology in the evaluation of suspected tuberculosis in patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puri, R.; Vilmann, P.; Sud, R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with suspected tuberculosis without pulmonary lesions and with mediastinal lymphadenopathy often pose a diagnostic challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an established modality to evaluate mediastinal and abdominal lesions. The aim...... of the present study was to evaluate the role of EUS-FNA in isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients suspected of having tuberculosis....

  6. Light-microscopic and electron-microscopic evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denDunnen, WFA; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Holwerda, A; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a IO-mm gap, using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide, with an internal diameter of 1.5 mm and a wall thickness of 0.30 mm. To do so, we evaluated regenerating nerves using light

  7. Evaluating Whole-School Reform Efforts: A Guide for District and School Staff. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kim; Aldersebaes, Inge; Railsback, Jennifer; Shaughnessy, Joan; Speth, Timothy

    This guidebook provides evaluation assistance to district and school staff. It was published in response to the Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration (CSRD) Program, passed by Congress in 1997 to provide incentives and support for low-performing, high-poverty schools. CSRD is an attempt to ensure that schools conduct evaluation of whole-school…

  8. Evaluation of biodegradable electric conductive tube-guides and mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jorge; Pereira, Tiago; Caseiro, Ana Rita; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Amorim, Irina; Amado, Sandra; França, Miguel; Gonçalves, Carolina; Lopes, Maria Ascensão; Santos, José Domingos; Silva, Dina Morais; Geuna, Stefano; Luís, Ana Lúcia; Maurício, Ana Colette

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic effect of three tube-guides with electrical conductivity associated to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on neuro-muscular regeneration after neurotmesis. METHODS: Rats with 10-mm gap nerve injury were tested using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), PVA-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and MSCs, and PVA-polypyrrole (PPy). The regenerated nerves and tibialis anterior muscles were processed for stereological studies after 20 wk. The functional recovery was assessed serially for gait biomechanical analysis, by extensor postural thrust, sciatic functional index and static sciatic functional index (SSI), and by withdrawal reflex latency (WRL). In vitro studies included cytocompatibility, flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and karyotype analysis of the MSCs. Histopathology of lung, liver, kidneys, and regional lymph nodes ensured the biomaterials biocompatibility. RESULTS: SSI remained negative throughout and independently from treatment. Differences between treted groups in the severity of changes in WRL existed, showing a faster regeneration for PVA-CNTs-MSCs (P < 0.05). At toe-off, less acute ankle joint angles were seen for PVA-CNTs-MSCs group (P = 0.051) suggesting improved ankle muscles function during the push off phase of the gait cycle. In PVA-PPy and PVA-CNTs groups, there was a 25% and 42% increase of average fiber area and a 13% and 21% increase of the “minimal Feret’s diameter” respectively. Stereological analysis disclosed a significantly (P < 0.05) increased myelin thickness (M), ratio myelin thickness/axon diameter (M/d) and ratio axon diameter/fiber diameter (d/D; g-ratio) in PVA-CNT-MSCs group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Results revealed that treatment with MSCs and PVA-CNTs tube-guides induced better nerve fiber regeneration. Functional and kinematics analysis revealed positive synergistic effects brought by MSCs and PVA-CNTs. The PVA-CNTs and PVA-PPy are promising scaffolds with electric conductive properties, bio

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of CT-guided infiltration in the treatment of Arnold's neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sebastien [CHU Sherbrooke, Departement de Radiologie, Sherbrooke, QC (Canada); Universite de Franche-Comte, Laboratoire Intervention, Imagerie, Ingenierie et Innovation en Sante, Besancon (France); Kastler, Bruno [Universite de Franche-Comte, Laboratoire Intervention, Imagerie, Ingenierie et Innovation en Sante, Besancon (France); CHU Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiologie A, Besancon (France); Bier, Vincent; Hussein, Hussein Haj [CHU Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiologie A, Besancon (France); Hadjidekov, Vassil [Alexandrovska Hospital, Radiology Department, Sofia (Bulgaria); Fergane, Bernard [CHU Jean Minjoz, Centre d' Evaluation et de Traitement de la Douleur, Besancon (France)

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided infiltration in the treatment of Arnold's neuralgia. A retrospective study included 31 patients suffering from Arnold's neuralgia and having undergone a total of 45 CT-guided infiltrations of the greater occipital nerve (GON), in a proximal site (emergence of the GON, technique 1, n = 24) or in two proximal sites (emergence of the GON and at the site of the first bend of the GON drawn by the GON, technique 2, n = 21). Infiltration was considered to be effective when pain relief was equal to or greater than 50% for at least 1 month. There was no significant difference between the two techniques regarding immediate pain relief effect (53.3% for technique 1 vs. 60.5% for technique 2, p = 0.5), but technique 2 yielded better persistence of pain relief effect (p = 0.01), leading to a significantly higher percentage of effective infiltrations with technique 2 (p = 0.03). Infiltrations carried out in a single site yield results that are comparable to those previously published. Infiltrations in two sites provide significantly better results and should now be preferred to other single-site techniques in order to reduce the rate of failure or recurrence of Arnold's neuralgia. (orig.)

  10. Critical evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging targeted, transrectal ultrasound guided transperineal fusion biopsy for detection of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Timur H; Roethke, Matthias C; Seidenader, Jonas; Simpfendörfer, Tobias; Boxler, Silvan; Alammar, Khalid; Rieker, Philip; Popeneciu, Valentin I; Roth, Wilfried; Pahernik, Sascha; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hohenfellner, Markus; Hadaschik, Boris A

    2013-10-01

    Diagnosis and precise risk stratification of prostate cancer is essential for individualized treatment decisions. Magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion has shown encouraging results for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer. We critically evaluated magnetic resonance imaging targeted, transrectal ultrasound guided transperineal fusion biopsy in routine clinical practice. Included in this prospective study were 347 consecutive patients with findings suspicious for prostate cancer. Median age was 65 years (range 42 to 84) and mean prostate specific antigen was 9.85 ng/ml (range 0.5 to 104). Of the men 49% previously underwent transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies, which were negative, and 51% underwent primary biopsy. In all patients 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was done. Systematic stereotactic prostate biopsies plus magnetic resonance imaging targeted, transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies were performed in those with abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data and biopsy results were analyzed. A self-designed questionnaire was sent to all men on further clinical history and biopsy adverse effects. Of 347 patients biopsy samples of 200 (58%) showed prostate cancer and 73.5% of biopsy proven prostate cancer were clinically relevant according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. On multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 104 men had findings highly suspicious for prostate cancer. The tumor detection rate was 82.6% (86 of 104 men) with a Gleason score of 7 or greater in 72%. Overall targeted cores detected significantly more cancer than systematic biopsies (30% vs 8.2%). Of 94 patients without cancer suspicious lesions on magnetic resonance imaging 11 (11.7%) were diagnosed with intermediate risk disease. Regarding adverse effects, 152 of 300 patients (50.6%) reported mild hematuria, 26% had temporary erectile dysfunction and 2.6% needed short-term catheterization after biopsy

  11. An Ultrasound Imaging-Guided Robotic HIFU Ablation Experimental System and Accuracy Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Yu An

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, noninvasive thermal treatment by using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU has high potential in tumor treatment. The goal of this research is to develop an ultrasound imaging-guided robotic HIFU ablation system for tumor treatment. The system integrates the technologies of ultrasound image-assisted guidance, robotic positioning control, and HIFU treatment planning. With the assistance of ultrasound image guidance technology, the tumor size and location can be determined from ultrasound images as well as the robotic arm can be controlled to position the HIFU transducer to focus on the target tumor. After the development of the system, several experiments were conducted to measure the positioning accuracy of this system. The results show that the average positioning error is 1.01 mm with a standard deviation 0.34, and HIFU ablation accuracy is 1.32 mm with a standard deviation 0.58, which means this system is confirmed with its possibility and accuracy.

  12. Properties and in vitro biological evaluation of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan membranes for bone guided regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Xianmiao [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Department of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Li Yubao [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China)], E-mail: nic7504@scu.edu.cn; Zuo Yi; Zhang Li [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Li Jidong [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Department of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Wang Huanan [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA)/chitosan(CS) composite membranes were prepared by solvent casting and evaporation methods for the function of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The effect of n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature on the properties of the composite membranes was studied. The n-HA/CS membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, swelling measurement, mechanical test, cell culture and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenylte-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The results show that the surface roughness and micropores of the composite membranes increase with the rise of n-HA content, suitable for adhesion, crawl and growth of cells. The hydroxyapatite holds nano size and distributes uniformly in the composite membranes. Chemical bond interaction exists between Ca ions and -OH groups of n-HA and -NH{sub 2} or -OH groups of CS. The n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature have obvious influence on the swelling ratio, tensile strength and elongation rate of the composite membranes. Cell culture and MTT assays show that n-HA and its content can affect the proliferation of cells. The n-HA/CS composite membranes have no negative effect on the cell morphology, viability and proliferation and possess good biocompatibility. This study makes the n-HA/CS composite membrane be a prospective biodegradable GBR membrane for future applications.

  13. An Ultrasound Imaging-Guided Robotic HIFU Ablation Experimental System and Accuracy Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chih Yu; Syu, Jia Hao; Tseng, Ching Shiow; Chang, Chih-Ju

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, noninvasive thermal treatment by using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has high potential in tumor treatment. The goal of this research is to develop an ultrasound imaging-guided robotic HIFU ablation system for tumor treatment. The system integrates the technologies of ultrasound image-assisted guidance, robotic positioning control, and HIFU treatment planning. With the assistance of ultrasound image guidance technology, the tumor size and location can be determined from ultrasound images as well as the robotic arm can be controlled to position the HIFU transducer to focus on the target tumor. After the development of the system, several experiments were conducted to measure the positioning accuracy of this system. The results show that the average positioning error is 1.01 mm with a standard deviation 0.34, and HIFU ablation accuracy is 1.32 mm with a standard deviation 0.58, which means this system is confirmed with its possibility and accuracy.

  14. Optical coherence tomography for image-guided dermal filler injection and biomechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Dermal fillers are a very popular anti-ag ing treatment with estimated sales in the billions of dollars and millions of procedures performed. As the aging population continues to grow, these figures are only e xpected to increase. Dermal fillers have various compositions depending on their intended applicati on. Reactions to dermal fillers can be severe, such as ischemic events and filler migration to the eyes. Howe ver, these adverse reactions are rare. Nevertheless, the capability to perform imag e-guided filler injections would minimize th e risk of such reacti ons. In addition, the biomechanical properties of various fillers have been evalua ted, but there has been no investigation on the effects of filler on the biomechanical properties of skin. In this work, we utilize optical cohe rence tomography (OCT) for visualizing dermal filler injections with micrometer-scale sp atial resolution. In addition, we utilize noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify the changes in the biomechan ical properties of pig skin after the dermal filler injections. OCT was successfully able to visualize the dermal filler injecti on process, and OCE showed that the viscoelasticity of the pig skin was increased locally at the filler injection sites. OCT may be able to provide real-time image guidance in 3D, and when combined with functional OCT techniques such as optical microangiography, could be used to avoid blood vessels during the injection.

  15. Evaluation of biodegradable electric conductive tube-guides and mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jorge; Pereira, Tiago; Caseiro, Ana Rita; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Amorim, Irina; Amado, Sandra; França, Miguel; Gonçalves, Carolina; Lopes, Maria Ascensão; Santos, José Domingos; Silva, Dina Morais; Geuna, Stefano; Luís, Ana Lúcia; Maurício, Ana Colette

    2015-07-26

    To study the therapeutic effect of three tube-guides with electrical conductivity associated to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on neuro-muscular regeneration after neurotmesis. Rats with 10-mm gap nerve injury were tested using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), PVA-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and MSCs, and PVA-polypyrrole (PPy). The regenerated nerves and tibialis anterior muscles were processed for stereological studies after 20 wk. The functional recovery was assessed serially for gait biomechanical analysis, by extensor postural thrust, sciatic functional index and static sciatic functional index (SSI), and by withdrawal reflex latency (WRL). In vitro studies included cytocompatibility, flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and karyotype analysis of the MSCs. Histopathology of lung, liver, kidneys, and regional lymph nodes ensured the biomaterials biocompatibility. SSI remained negative throughout and independently from treatment. Differences between treted groups in the severity of changes in WRL existed, showing a faster regeneration for PVA-CNTs-MSCs (P nerve fiber regeneration. Functional and kinematics analysis revealed positive synergistic effects brought by MSCs and PVA-CNTs. The PVA-CNTs and PVA-PPy are promising scaffolds with electric conductive properties, bio- and cytocompatible that might prevent the secondary neurogenic muscular atrophy by improving the reestablishment of the neuro-muscular junction.

  16. [Psychometric properties of an instrument to evaluate the nurse attitude towards good practice guides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díaz, Cristina; Fraille-Calle, Luis; Herrero-Rosado, Marta; Arnés-Muñoz, Vanessa; De-Dios-De-Dios, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Guides of Good Practices (GGP) are necessary tools in the universal healthcare and in the clinical management, providing the user/patient with a major quality in the assistance, in order to optimize and reinforce an individualized attention into action, taking into account the best scientific evidence. The literature provides different references to the development of the GGP, but there is little knowledge about the attitude of professionals towards them, since most of the studies that exist are qualitative. Therefore, the aim of this work is to construct and validate a Likert scale which could assess the attitude of the nurse towards GGP. The methodology used was quantitative, descriptive, cross, opinion, anonymous and also it could validate a scale via the following measurements: content validation by experts, correlation between items, external reliability, internal consistency, stability and exploratory factor analysis. The result was a scale consisting of 20 items that refer to the attitude toward the GGP, with a percentage of agreement among experts over 75 % on all the items, and a significant Pearson correlation between the pre-test and post-test in all variables, but for three. The internal consistency measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.878. These results are acceptable in terms of the psychometric characteristics of the instrument, with easy and fast administration and simple in their interpretation, allowing quantifying and generating knowledge about the attitudes of nurses towards GGP.

  17. Engineer’s Guide to the Use of Human Resources in Electronic System Design: an Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    recording inter - viewee’s comments, was used for these interviews. Originally, plans had been to conduct the evaluation entirely within the Navy...system proposed yet that can’t be operated and maintained by untrained Neanderthal monkeys." Section 6: Taxonomies of Tasks and Associated Skill Levels...sensor system, surface fire control system; SIRCS, inter - mediate range combat system. (20 May 1980. Evaluation Package C) RCA - Systems Engineer

  18. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  19. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A; Benfenati, F; Galgani, L

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  20. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide. Natural phenomena hazards at Department of Energy facilities: Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, S.J. [EQE Engineering Consultants, San Francisco, CA (United States); Eli, M.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Salmon, M.W. [EQE Engineering Consultants, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines` development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term.

  1. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  2. Early evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound sonication in the treatment of uterine fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Himabindu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids are common cause of morbidity in women of reproductive age group. High intensity focused ultrasound with the imaging guidance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI known as magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound sonication (MRgFUS is now available. However, there are no available studies with this non invasive modality of treatment in Indian subjects. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and clinical efficacy of MRgFUS in the treatment of uterine fibroids. Methods: This prospective study included 32 consecutive women with clinically symptomatic uterine fibroids who were treated with MRgFUS from February 2011 to October 2011. Pre and post treatment symptom severity scores (SSS were assessed at the time of enrolment and at one, three and six months follow up using a validated uterine fibroid symptom - quality of life questionnaire (UFS-QOL. Pre and post treatment fibroid volumes were compared immediately after treatment and at six months follow up using contrast enhanced MRI scan. Non perfused volume (NPV ratios were calculated and correlated with fibroid volume reductions immediately after the treatment and at the end of six months follow up. Results: This procedure was well tolerated by the patients and procedure related adverse effects were non significant. Significant reductions in SSS were seen at one, three and six month intervals after the treatment (P<0.01. Significant reductions were noticed in fibroid volumes at six months follow up compared to pretreatment fibroid volumes (P<0.01. Significant positive correlations were observed between NPV ratios and reduction in fibroid volumes at six months follow-up (r=0.659, P<0.01. Interpretation & conclusions: MRgFUS is relatively a safe and effective non invasive treatment modality for treating uterine fibroids in selected patients. Its long term efficacy is yet to be tested and compared with other available minimally

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Simulation-based Curriculum for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert; Chaplin, Tim; McKaigney, Conor; Rang, Louise; Jaeger, Melanie; Redfearn, Damian; Davison, Colleen; Ungi, Tamas; Holden, Matthew; Yeo, Caitlin; Keri, Zsuzsanna; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2016-11-01

    To develop a simulation-based curriculum for residents to learn ultrasound-guided (USG) central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, and to study the volume and type of practice that leads to technical proficiency. Ten post-graduate year two residents from the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology completed four training sessions of two hours each, at two week intervals, where they engaged in a structured program of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion on a simulator. Progress during training was monitored using regular hand motion analysis (HMA) and performance benchmarks were determined by HMA of local experts. Blinded assessment of video recordings was done at the end of training to assess technical competence using a global rating scale. None of the residents met any of the expert benchmarks at baseline. Over the course of training, the HMA metrics of the residents revealed steady and significant improvement in technical proficiency. By the end of the fourth session six of 10 residents had faster procedure times than the mean expert benchmark, and nine of 10 residents had more efficient left and right hand motions than the mean expert benchmarks. Nine residents achieved mean GRS scores rating them competent to perform independently. We successfully developed a simulation-based curriculum for residents learning the skills of USG CVC insertion. Our results suggest that engaging residents in three to four distributed sessions of deliberate practice of the fundamental skills of USG CVC insertion leads to steady and marked improvement in technical proficiency with individuals approaching or exceeding expert level benchmarks.

  4. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates.

  5. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  6. 20 CFR 416.974 - Evaluation guides if you are an employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... engaging in substantial gainful activity or that you are in a position to control when earnings are paid to... Service to America, University Year for ACTION, Special Volunteer Programs, Retired Senior Volunteer... civilians in certain government-sponsored job training and employment programs, we evaluate the work...

  7. Reducing Alcohol Problems on Campus: A Guide to Planning and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltz, Robert F.; DeJong, William

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism established the Task Force of the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to review and report on the existing research on college student drinking, including the evaluation of camps and community policies, prevention programs, and early intervention strategies. This review…

  8. A guide to evaluating linkage quality for the analysis of linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Katie L; Doidge, James C; Knight, Hannah E; Gilbert, Ruth E; Goldstein, Harvey; Cromwell, David A; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2017-10-01

    Linked datasets are an important resource for epidemiological and clinical studies, but linkage error can lead to biased results. For data security reasons, linkage of personal identifiers is often performed by a third party, making it difficult for researchers to assess the quality of the linked dataset in the context of specific research questions. This is compounded by a lack of guidance on how to determine the potential impact of linkage error. We describe how linkage quality can be evaluated and provide widely applicable guidance for both data providers and researchers. Using an illustrative example of a linked dataset of maternal and baby hospital records, we demonstrate three approaches for evaluating linkage quality: applying the linkage algorithm to a subset of gold standard data to quantify linkage error; comparing characteristics of linked and unlinked data to identify potential sources of bias; and evaluating the sensitivity of results to changes in the linkage procedure. These approaches can inform our understanding of the potential impact of linkage error and provide an opportunity to select the most appropriate linkage procedure for a specific analysis. Evaluating linkage quality in this way will improve the quality and transparency of epidemiological and clinical research using linked data. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  9. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of an Acetobacter xylinum synthesized microbial cellulose membrane intended for guided tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima-Neto João

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrier materials as cellulose membranes are used for guided tissue repair. However, it is essential that the surrounding tissues accept the device. The present study histologically evaluated tissue reaction to a microbial cellulose membrane after subcutaneous implantation in mice. Furthermore, the interaction between mesenchymal stem cells and the biomaterial was studied in vitro to evaluate its ability to act as cellular scaffold for tissue engineering. Methods Twenty-five Swiss Albino mice were used. A 10 × 10 mm cellulose membrane obtained through biosynthesis using Acetobacter xylinum bacteria was implanted into the lumbar subcutaneous tissue of each mouse. The mice were euthanatized at seven, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days, and the membrane and surrounding tissues were collected and examined by histology. Results A mild inflammatory response without foreign body reaction was observed until 30 days post-surgery around the implanted membrane. Polarized microscopy revealed that the membrane remained intact at all evaluation points. Scanning electron microscopy of the cellulose membrane surface showed absence of pores. The in vitro evaluation of the interaction between cells and biomaterial was performed through viability staining analysis of the cells over the biomaterial, which showed that 95% of the mesenchymal stem cells aggregating to the cellulose membrane were alive and that 5% were necrotic. Scanning electron microscopy showed mesenchymal stem cells with normal morphology and attached to the cellulose membrane surface. Conclusion The microbial cellulose membrane evaluated was found to be nonresorbable, induced a mild inflammatory response and may prove useful as a scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells.

  10. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    .... We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom...

  11. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms Details Content Last Updated: ... Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS You’ve been to the doctor ...

  12. Restricting query relaxation through user constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaasterland, T.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes techniques to restrict and to heuristically control relaxation of deductive database queries. The process of query relaxation provides a user with a means to automatically identify new queries that are related to the user`s original query. However, for large databases, many relaxations may be possible. The methods to control and restrict the relaxation process introduced in this paper focus the relaxation process and make it more efficient. User restrictions over the data base domain may be expressed as user constraints. This paper describes how user constraints can restrict relaxed queries. Also, a set of heuristics based on cooperative answering techniques are presented for controlling the relaxation process. Finally, the interaction of the methods for relaxing queries, processing user constraints, and applying the heuristic rules is described.

  13. Evaluation of 3 Different Registration Techniques in Image-Guided Bimaxillary Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yi; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Agbaje, Jimoh Olubanwo; Schepers, Serge; Vrielinck, Luc; Lambrichts, Ivo; Politis, Constantinus

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative navigation is an upcoming tool in orthognathic surgery. This study aimed to access the feasibility of the technique and to evaluate the success rate of 3 different registration methods-facial surface registration, anatomic landmark-based registration, and template-based registration. The BrainLab navigation system (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used as an additional precision tool for 85 patients who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery from February 2010 to June ...

  14. Evaluation of residual patient position variation for spinal radiosurgery using the Novalis image guided system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Ryu, Samuel; Rock, Jack; Faber, Kathleen; Chen, Qing; Ajlouni, Munther; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-03-01

    The Novalis system has been demonstrated to achieve accurate target localization on anthropomorphic phantoms. However, other factors, such as rotational deviation, patient intrafraction motion, and image fusion uncertainty due to patient body deformation, could contribute additional position uncertainty for actual patients. This study evaluates such position uncertainty for spinal radiosurgery patients. Fifty-two consecutive spinal radiosurgery patients were included in the study. Rotational deviation was evaluated from 6-deg of freedom (6D) fusion results for all patients. The combined uncertainty of patient motion and image fusion was determined from fusion results of additional kV x-ray images acquired before, during, and after treatment for 25 of the 52 patients. The uncertainty of image fusion was also evaluated by performing 6D fusion ten different times with various regions of interest in the images selected for fusion. This was performed for two patients with L3 and T2 lesions, respectively, for comparison. The mean rotational deviation was 0.7 +/- 1.8, 0.7 +/- 1.5, and 0.7 +/- 1.6 deg along the yaw, roll, and pitch directions, respectively. The combined uncertainty from patient motion and image fusion was 0.1 +/- 0.9, 0.2 +/- 1.2, and 0.2 +/- 1.0 mm in the anteroposterior (AP), longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The uncertainty (standard deviation) due to image fusion was less than 0.28 mm in any direction for the L3 lesion and 0.8 mm in the AP direction for the T2 lesion. Overall position uncertainty for spinal radiosurgery patients has been evaluated. Rotational deviation and patient motion were the main factors contributed to position uncertainty for actual patient treatment.

  15. The Prato Method: A Guide to the Application of Economic Evaluations in Health Professions Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, George; Reeves, Scott; Ilic, Dragan; Foo, Jon; Walsh, Kieran; Maloney, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of cost and value in health professions education should involve robust methodologies and decision tools. These methods and tools should be applied consistently and transparently, but more importantly, employed in the appropriate context depending on the availability of data, target estimates, and stakeholder focus. Best practice methodology and application of decision tools will allow for a clearer and more comprehensive understanding of the return on investment of health profession education interventions by shedding greater light on the full opportunity cost of providing programs and the value of such programs to learners and recipients of health care services more broadly. This article provides insight into the basic methods, decision tools, and key evaluation concepts that might be considered for the purpose of undertaking cost and value research in continuing education for health professionals. These methods and decision tools are based on consolidated discussions by the organizing delegates of the inaugural Symposium of the Society for Cost and Value of Health Professions Education, held in Prato, Italy, October 2015. In summary, the application of economic methods and tools used for analyzing health professions education is currently inconsistent. This article provides an overview and recommendations on the use of certain economic methods and tools when evaluating health profession education programs. It also provides a clear understanding of key evaluation concepts important for undertaking an economic review of a program.

  16. TU-AB-201-06: Evaluation of Electromagnetically Guided High- Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Ablative Treatment of Lung Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkham, D.W.; Shultz, D.; Loo, B.W.; Sung, A.; Diehn, M.; Fahimian, B.P. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The advent of electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy has enabled minimally invasive access to peripheral lung tumors previously inaccessible by optical bronchoscopes. As an adjunct to Stereotactic Ablative Radiosurgery (SABR), implantation of HDR catheters can provide focal treatments for multiple metastases and sites of retreatments. The authors evaluate a procedure to deliver ablative doses via Electromagnetically-Guided HDR (EMG-HDR) to lung metastases, quantify the resulting dosimetry, and assess its role in the comprehensive treatment of lung cancer. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on ten patients, who, from 2009 to 2011, received a hypo-fractionated SABR regimen with 6MV VMAT to lesions in various lobes ranging from 1.5 to 20 cc in volume. A CT visible pathway was delineated for EM guided placement of an HDR applicator (catheter) and dwell times were optimized to ensure at least 98% prescription dose coverage of the GTV. Normal tissue doses were calculated using inhomogeneity corrections via a grid-based Boltzmann solver (Acuros-BV-1.5.0). Results: With EMG-HDR, an average of 83% (+/−9% standard deviation) of each patient’s GTV received over 200% of the prescription dose, as compared to SABR where the patients received an average maximum dose of 125% (+/−5%). EMG-HDR enabled a 59% (+/−12%) decrease in the aorta maximum dose, a 63% (+/−26%) decrease in the spinal cord max dose, and 57% (+/−23%) and 70% (+/−17%) decreases in the volume of the body receiving over 50% and 25% of the prescription dose, respectively. Conclusion: EMG-HDR enables delivery of higher ablative doses to the GTV, while concurrently reducing surrounding normal tissue doses. The single catheter approach shown here is limited to targets smaller than 20 cc. As such, the technique enables ablation of small lesions and a potentially safe and effective retreatment option in situations where external beam utility is limited by normal tissue constraints.

  17. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M; Popov, V L; Pohrt, R

    2015-11-09

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect "relaxation damping". The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  18. Wheal and flare responses to muscle relaxants in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J H; Adelson, D; Walker, B

    1991-11-01

    Chemically and pharmacologically unrelated molecules release histamine in humans to produce both cutaneous and systemic responses. It has been suggested that molecular changes in the new benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxant, atracurium, make it less likely to cause histamine release. We therefore injected volunteers intradermally with equimolar concentrations of various muscle relaxants, morphine, papaverine (a benzylisoquinoline), and histamine, to evaluate the relative ability of these drugs to cause wheal and flare responses, and mast-cell degranulation. There were no significant differences in wheal and flare responses among the three benzylisoquinoline-derived muscle relaxants, D-tubocurarine, metocurine, and atracurium. The cutaneous effects of morphine were significantly greater than those of the benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants, suggesting both direct vascular changes and histamine release. Papaverine injection was followed by a significant wheal but no flare. Skin biopsies from vecuronium- and papaverine-induced wheals revealed normal intact mast-cell granules, suggesting a direct cutaneous vascular response rather than histamine release. Skin biopsies after morphine and atracurium injections revealed mast-cell degranulation. All evaluated benzylisoquinoline muscle relaxants are equipotent histamine releasers at equimolar concentrations. A hydrogenated, benzylisoquinoline-nitrogen-containing ring, present in atracurium but not in papaverine, appears to be the molecular conformation responsible for mast-cell degranulation by atracurium.

  19. Agile practice guide

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Agile Practice Guide – First Edition has been developed as a resource to understand, evaluate, and use agile and hybrid agile approaches. This practice guide provides guidance on when, where, and how to apply agile approaches and provides practical tools for practitioners and organizations wanting to increase agility. This practice guide is aligned with other PMI standards, including A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Sixth Edition, and was developed as the result of collaboration between the Project Management Institute and the Agile Alliance.

  20. Generalized approach to non-exponential relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Non-exponential relaxation is a universal feature of systems as diverse as glasses, spin glasses, earthquakes, financial markets and the universe. Complex relaxation results from hierarchically constrained dynamics with the strength of the constraints being directly related to the form of the relaxation, which ...

  1. Brief relaxation training program for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Judith L; Chung, Sheng-Chia; Beigi, Richard; Brooks, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Employee stress leads to attrition, burnout, and increased medical costs. We aimed to assess if relaxation training leads to decreased stress levels based on questionnaire and thermal biofeedback. Thirty-minute relaxation training sessions were conducted for hospital employees and for cancer patients. Perceived Stress levels and skin temperature were analyzed before and after relaxation training.

  2. Domain relaxation in Langmuir films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, James C.; Bernoff, Andrew J.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Mann, J. Adin; Wintersmith, Jacob R.; Zou, Lu

    We report on theoretical studies of molecularly thin Langmuir films on the surface of a quiescent subfluid and qualitatively compare the results to both new and previous experiments. The film covers the entire fluid surface, but domains of different phases are observed. In the absence of external forcing, the compact domains tend to relax to circles, driven by a line tension at the phase boundaries. When stretched (by a transient applied stagnation-point flow or by stirring), a compact domain elongates, creating a bola consisting of two roughly circular reservoirs connected by a thin tether. This shape will then relax slowly to the minimum-energy configuration of a circular domain. The tether is never observed to rupture, even when it is more than a hundred times as long as it is wide. We model these experiments by taking previous descriptions of the full hydrodynamics, identifying the dominant effects via dimensional analysis, and reducing the system to a more tractable form. The result is a free boundary problem for an inviscid Langmuir film whose motion is driven by the line tension of the domain and damped by the viscosity of the subfluid. Using this model we derive relaxation rates for perturbations of a uniform strip and a circular patch. We also derive a boundary integral formulation which allows an efficient numerical solution of the problem. Numerically this model replicates the formation of a bola and the subsequent relaxation observed in the experiments. Finally, we suggest physical properties of the system (such as line tension) that can be deduced by comparison of the theory and numerical simulations to the experiment. Two movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  3. Environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection: methodology and user's guide. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrop, G.M.

    1980-02-01

    This report is designed to facilitate assessments of environmental and socioeconomic impacts of fossil energy conversion facilities which might be implemented at potential sites. The discussion of methodology and the User's Guide contained herein are presented in a format that assumes the reader is not an energy technologist. Indeed, this methodology is meant for application by almost anyone with an interest in a potential fossil energy development - planners, citizen groups, government officials, and members of industry. It may also be of instructional value. The methodology is called: Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems (SELECS) and is organized in three levels of increasing sophistication. Only the least complicated version - the Level 1 SELECS - is presented in this document. As stated above, it has been expressly designed to enable just about anyone to participate in evaluating the potential impacts of a proposed energy conversion facility. To accomplish this objective, the Level 1 calculations have been restricted to ones which can be performed by hand in about one working day. Data collection and report preparation may bring the total effort required for a first or one-time application to two to three weeks. If repeated applications are made in the same general region, the assembling of data for a different site or energy conversion technology will probably take much less time.

  4. The use of computerised tomography guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, K A

    2012-02-01

    The evaluation of a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) has changed over the years with increased access to percutaneous computerised tomography (CT) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), where bronchoscopy is unhelpful. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sample adequacy, diagnostic and complication rate of CT-FNA of a SPN at our academic teaching hospital over an 18 month period. CT-FNA was performed by a radiologist, with a cytopathologist in attendance to confirm the adequacy of the sample obtained. The size of the nodule, sample material and adequacy, diagnosis and complications were recorded. A total of 101 patients were included, 54 male and the mean age was 68 +\\/- 11 years. The mean size of the SPN was 2.3 cm (range 1-11 cm). 56 (56%) patients had a right SPN, 45 (45%) had a left SPN. CT-FNA was diagnostic in 80 (80%) patients and non-diagnostic in 21 (20%) patients. The sample was insufficient for immunocytochemistry, although the morphological appearance was diagnostic in 20 (25%) of the 80 patients. Pneumothorax occurred in 26\\/101 (26%) patients post CT-FNA, of these 7 (27%) required chest drain insertion, while 19 (73%) were managed conservatively. CT FNA is a useful tool for the diagnosis of a SPN, with our diagnostic accuracy comparable to that reported in the literature. However, CT-FNA may not provide adequate sample volume to perform ancillary testing and has a moderate complication rate.

  5. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  6. System evaluation of a fiber optic guided missile with a simple guidance addition to improve system effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbendam, A. J.

    1992-11-01

    Based on lessons learned during the accomplishment of a National Technology Project in the Netherlands, a simple and low cost Fiber Optic Guided Weapon (FOGW) concept was contrived. The main characteristics of the concept are the short range of 10 km, the simple strapdown television CCD-camera, and the solid fuel rocket propulsion. This low cost concept is more closely examined. The concept was evaluated by conducting flight trajectory simulations. An already existing six degrees of freedom (6-DOF) trajectory simulation program was modified. The program and especially the relatively simple target sensor system model are described. The problem of choosing an appropriate target configuration for system evaluation is attended to. A target configuration consists of various target positions, various target maneuvers, and various target speeds. The probability of hit is calculated for a chosen target configuration base-case. Miscellaneous model parameters are varied, especially the target sensor system is investigated. The probability of hit is determined as a function of the sensor resolution, the sensor field of view, and the modeled characteristics of the image processing algorithm. Another investigation concerns a simple addition to the normal guidance commands trying to reduce target-lost situations. The effect of two different implementations of this addition is calculated for the same situation as the basic guidance configuration.

  7. The use of economic evaluation for guiding the pharmaceutical reimbursement list in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Tritasavit, Nattha; Suchonwanich, Netnapis; Kingkaew, Pritaporn

    2014-01-01

    Medicines expenditure consumes a significant proportion of public health expenditure in Thailand, where Universal Health Coverage has been in place since 2002. The National List of Essential Medicines has been successfully used as a pharmaceutical benefits package for all public health plans. All patients are eligible for all medicines included in the list free of charge by law. Health economic evaluation has been employed as a tool for the development of this list, including price negotiation of medicines before inclusion, especially of high-cost medicines or medicines with high budget implications. This paper illustrates the current process, mechanisms, and impact and informs of seven success factors that have contributed to the successful use of health economic evaluation in Thailand. These include strong political commitment, development of individual and institutional capacity, participation of all relevant stakeholders, establishment of standard methodological and process guidelines, consideration of several elements in the decision-making process, using evidence as a starting point rather than a deciding factor, and strong enforcement. The lessons learned from this study are likely to be applicable to other settings committed to evidence-based decision making. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  10. Preliminary evaluation of a "formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)" for crisis and transitional case management clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8-12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (Pself-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services.

  11. Common issues encountered in adolescent sports medicine: guide to completing the preparticipation physical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Blair; Mullner, Justin

    2014-09-01

    Participation in athletic activities among children and adolescents is on the rise in the United States. Approximately 35 million children ages 5 to 18 play organized sports each year. High school athletes suffer approximately 2 million injuries per year, resulting in 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations. In addition, early specialization in sports has led to increased incidence of overuse injury in adolescents. Head injuries among adolescents are also on the rise. Primary care providers are called on to complete preparticipation evaluations and to see adolescents with acute injuries. The goal of this article is to discuss these issues common to adolescent athletes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Seismic site evaluation practice and seismic design guide for NPP in Continent of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Yuxian [State Seismological Bureau, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Geophysics

    1997-03-01

    Energy resources, seismicity, NPP and related regulations of the Continent of China are briefly introduced in the beginning and two codes related to the seismic design of NPP, one on siting and another on design, are discussed in some detail. The one on siting is an official code of the State Seismological Bureau, which specifies the seismic safety evaluation requirements of various kinds of structures, from the most critic and important structures such as NPP to ordinary buildings, and including also engineering works in big cities. The one on seismic design of NPP is a draft subjected to publication now, which will be an official national code. The first one is somewhat unique but the second one is quite similar to those in the world. (author)

  13. Chronic lower leg pain in athletes: a guide for the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J M

    2012-03-01

    Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians.

  14. Expression-guided in silico evaluation of candidate cis regulatory codes for Drosophila muscle founder cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A Philippakis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed "CodeFinder" that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells.

  15. Construction and evaluation of yeast expression networks by database-guided predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Papsdorf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA-Microarrays are powerful tools to obtain expression data on the genome-wide scale. We performed microarray experiments to elucidate the transcriptional networks, which are up- or down-regulated in response to the expression of toxic polyglutamine proteins in yeast. Such experiments initially generate hit lists containing differentially expressed genes. To look into transcriptional responses, we constructed networks from these genes. We therefore developed an algorithm, which is capable of dealing with very small numbers of microarrays by clustering the hits based on co-regulatory relationships obtained from the SPELL database. Here, we evaluate this algorithm according to several criteria and further develop its statistical capabilities. Initially, we define how the number of SPELL-derived co-regulated genes and the number of input hits influences the quality of the networks. We then show the ability of our networks to accurately predict further differentially expressed genes. Including these predicted genes into the networks improves the network quality and allows quantifying the predictive strength of the networks based on a newly implemented scoring method. We find that this approach is useful for our own experimental data sets and also for many other data sets which we tested from the SPELL microarray database. Furthermore, the clusters obtained by the described algorithm greatly improve the assignment to biological processes and transcription factors for the individual clusters. Thus, the described clustering approach, which will be available through the ClusterEx web interface, and the evaluation parameters derived from it represent valuable tools for the fast and informative analysis of yeast microarray data.

  16. Expert Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    This guide summarizes the work of Subtask B of IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 “Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings” and is based on the contributions from the participating countries. The publication is an official Annex report. With a focus on innovative building concepts that dynam......, and for rough evaluation of building performance. It is hoped, that this guide will be helpful in the search for new solutions in the built environment and to the problem of designing and constructing sustainable buildings......., their benefits and limitations, economical feasibility and impact on energy savings, company image, comfort, productivity, building functionality and flexibility and gives guidance on design of these concepts, including integration of responsive building elements and HVAC-systems and build examples...

  17. The Promise and Challenge of Practice-Research Collaborations: Guiding Principles and Strategies for Initiating, Designing, and Implementing Program Evaluation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Mary; Abell, Melissa L.; Berlin, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a set of guiding principles and strategies to facilitate the collaborative efforts of social work researchers and practitioners as they initiate, design, and implement outcome evaluations of human service interventions and programs. Beginning with an exploration of the interpersonal barriers to practice-research collaborations,…

  18. Evaluating the (cost-)effectiveness of guided and unguided Internet-based self-help for problematic alcohol use in employees, a three arm randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BoB, L.; Lehr, D.; Berking, M.; Riper, H.; Schaub, M.P.; Ebert, D.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Problematic alcohol consumption is associated with a high disease burden for affected individuals and has a detrimental impact on companies and society due to direct and indirect health costs. This protocol describes a study design to evaluate the (cost)-effectiveness of a guided and

  19. Economic Evaluation of a Web-Based Guided Self-Help Intervention for Employees With Depressive Symptoms: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, A.S.; Dongen, J.M. van; Kleiboer, A.M.; Wiezer, N.M.; Mechelen, W. van; Cuijpers, P.; Bosmans, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Web-based guided intervention compared with care as usual for employees with depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 231 employees with depressive symptoms were randomized. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Analyses

  20. Economic evaluation of a Web-based guided selfhelp intervention for employees with depressive symptoms; results of a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, A.S.; van Dongen, J.M.; Kleiboer, A.M.; Wiezer, N.M.; van Mechelen, W.; Cuijpers, P.; Bosmans, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a Web-based guided intervention compared with care as usual for employees with depressive symptoms. Methods: A total of 231 employees with depressive symptoms were randomized. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Analyses

  1. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide, filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Den Dunnen, WFA; Schakenraad, JM; Robinson, PH

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon -CL) nerve guide, as filled with either modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery,

  2. Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Crowther, Caroline A

    2011-12-07

    relief (risk ratio (RR) 8.00, 95% CI 1.10 to 58.19, one trial, 40 women) and lower assisted vaginal delivery (RR 0.07, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.50, two trials, 86 women). Yoga was associated with reduced pain (mean difference (MD) -6.12, 95% CI -11.77 to -0.47), one trial, 66 women), increased satisfaction with pain relief (MD 7.88, 95% CI 1.51 to 14.25, one trial, 66 women), satisfaction with the childbirth experience (MD) 6.34, 95% CI 0.26 to 12.42, one trial, 66 women), and reduced length of labour when compared to usual care (MD -139.91, 95% CI -252.50 to -27.32, one trial, 66 women) and when compared with supine position (MD -191.34, 95% CI -243.72 to -138.96, one trial, 83 women). Trials evaluating music and audio analgesia found no difference between groups in the primary outcomes pain intensity, satisfaction with pain relief, and caesarean delivery. The risk of bias was unclear for the majority of trials. Relaxation and yoga may have a role with reducing pain, increasing satisfaction with pain relief and reducing the rate of assisted vaginal delivery. There was insufficient evidence for the role of music and audio-analgesia. However, there is a need for further research.

  3. Aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Totzeck Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is one of the most frequent headache diseases and impairs patients’ quality of life. Up to now, many randomized studies reported efficacy of prophylactic therapy with medications such as beta-blockers or anti-epileptic drugs. Non-medical treatment, like aerobic endurance training, is considered to be an encouraging alternative in migraine prophylaxis. However, there is still a lack of prospective, high-quality randomized trials. We therefore designed a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of aerobic endurance training versus relaxation training in patients with migraine (ARMIG. Methods This is a single-center, open-label, prospective, randomized trial. Sixty participants with migraine are randomly allocated to either endurance training or a relaxation group. After baseline headache diary documentation over at least 4 weeks, participants in the exercise group will start moderate aerobic endurance training under a sport therapist’s supervision at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. The second group will perform Jacobson’s progressive muscle relaxation training guided by a trained relaxation therapist, also at least 3 times a week over a 12-week period. Both study arms will train in groups of up to 10 participants. More frequent individual training is possible. The follow-up period will be 12 weeks after the training period. The general state of health, possible state of anxiety or depression, impairments due to the headache disorder, pain-related disabilities, the headache-specific locus of control, and the motor fitness status are measured with standardized questionnaires. Discussion The study design is adequate to generate meaningful results. The trial will be helpful in gaining important data on exercise training for non-medical migraine prophylaxis. Trial registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01407861.

  4. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  5. Evaluating the Implementation of Integrated Mental Health Care: A Systematic Review to Guide the Development of Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderji, Nadiya; Ion, Allyson; Ghavam-Rassoul, Abbas; Abate, Amanda

    2017-09-01

    Although the effectiveness of integrated mental health care has been demonstrated, its implementation in real-world settings is highly variable, may not conform to evidence-based practice, and has rarely been evaluated. Quality indicators can guide improvements in integrated care implementation. However, the literature on indicators for this purpose is limited. This article reports findings from a systematic review of existing measures by which to evaluate integrated care models in primary care settings. Bibliographic databases and gray literature sources, including academic conference proceedings, were searched to July 2014. Measures used or proposed to evaluate integrated care implementation or outcomes were extracted and critically appraised. A qualitative synthesis was conducted to generate a panel of unique measures and to group these measures into broad domains and specific dimensions of integrated care program performance. From 172 literature sources, 1,255 measures were extracted, which were distilled into 148 unique measures. Existing literature frequently reports integrated care program effectiveness vis-à-vis evidence-based care processes and individual clinical outcomes, as well as efficiency (cost-effectiveness) and client satisfaction. No measures of safety of care and few measures of equitability, accessibility, or timeliness of care were located, despite the known benefits of integrated care in several of these areas. To realize the potential for quality measurement to improve integrated care implementation, future measures will need to incorporate domains of quality that are presently unaddressed; microprocesses of care that influence effectiveness, sustainability, and transferability of models of care; and client and health care provider perspectives on meaningful measures of quality.

  6. A randomised controlled study of mindfulness meditation versus relaxation therapy in the management of tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, M; Sadlier, M; Rajenderkumar, D; James, J; Tahir, T

    2017-06-01

    Psychotherapeutic interventions have been adopted effectively in the management of tinnitus for a long time. This study compared mindfulness meditation and relaxation therapy for management of tinnitus. In this randomised controlled trial, patients were recruited for five sessions of mindfulness meditation or five sessions of relaxation therapy. Patients' responses were evaluated using the Tinnitus Reaction Questionnaire as a primary outcome measure, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, visual analogue scale and a health status indicator as secondary outcome measures. A total of 86 patients were recruited. Thirty-four patients completed mindfulness meditation and 27 patients completed relaxation therapy. Statistically significant improvement was seen in all outcome measures except the health status indicator in both treatment groups. The change in treatment scores was greater in the mindfulness meditation group than in the relaxation therapy group. This study suggests that although both mindfulness meditation and relaxation therapy are effective in the management of tinnitus, mindfulness meditation is superior to relaxation therapy.

  7. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2011-03-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue autofluorescence imaging is used in optical diagnostics, especially in the early detection of cancer. Usually, malignant transformation is associated with thickening of the epithelium, enhanced cellular density due to increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio which may attenuate the excitation leading to a decrease in collagen autofluorescence. Hence, dysplastic and cancerous tissues often exhibit decreased blue-green autofluorescence and appear darker compared to uninvolved mucosa. Currently, there are three commercially available devices to examine tissue autofluorescence in the oral cavity. In this study we used the oral cancer screening device IdentafiTM 3000 to examine the tissue reflectance and autofluorescence of PML and confounding lesions of the oral cavity. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging enables rapid inspection of large mucosal surfaces, to aid in recognition of suspicious lesions and may also help in discriminate the PML (class 1) from some of the confounding lesions (class II). However, the presence of inflammation or pigments is also associated with loss of stromal autofluorescence, and may give rise to false-positive results with widefield fluorescence imaging. Clinicians who use these autofluorescence based oral cancer screening devices should be aware about the benign oral mucosal lesions that may give false positivity so that unnecessary patient's anxiety and the need for scalpel biopsy can be eliminated.

  8. Sedative, hypothermic and muscle relaxant effects of the essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essential oil of the fruits of Dennettia tripetala G. Baker (Annonaceae) has been reported to have depressant effects on the central nervous system in mice. This study was carried out to evaluate sedative, hypothermic and muscle relaxant effects of the oil and its mechanism(s) in mice. Different groups of mice were ...

  9. Gamma dosimetric parameters in some skeletal muscle relaxants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are evaluated from the measured mass attentuation coefficient. These measured gamma dosimetric parameters are compared with the theoretical values. The measured values agree with the theoretical values. The studied gamma dosimetric values for the relaxants are useful in medical physics and radiation medicine.

  10. Weaving a circle: a relaxation program using imagery and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, K

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the imagery and music components of the relaxation program at the Vancouver Centre of the British Columbia Cancer Agency. An outline of the objectives and design of the experiential portion of the sessions is accompanied by a detailed description of the musical elements and influences. Some participant evaluation is also included.

  11. In vivo evaluation of a MR-guided 980nm laser interstitial thermal therapy system for ablations in porcine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Medina, Oscar; Gorny, Krzysztof; McNichols, Roger; Friese, Jeremy; Misra, Sanjay; Amrami, Kimberly; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Callstrom, Matthew; Woodrum, David

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the use of a 980-nm diode laser for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MR-guided LITT) ablations in liver tissue in an in vivo porcine model. MR-guided guided LITT was performed on nine juvenile pigs placed under general anesthesia. Target ablation sites were selected in the left and right lobes of the liver. Laser applicators were placed in the liver using intermittent MR guidance. Up to four separate ablations were performed in each animal using a 15 or 30 W laser generator using one or two applicators. During the ablations, continuous MR-based temperature mapping (MR-thermal mapping), using a proton resonance frequency technique, was performed to monitor the size of the ablation in real-time. Extent of thermal tissue damage was continuously estimated based on Arrhenius model. Two-minute ablations were performed at each site. MR-thermal mapping of ablations within the posteroinferior liver were accomplished with continuous breathing at low tidal volume. In the mid right lobe of the liver, due to motion artefacts, MR-thermometry was performed intermittently during breath hold periods. In the left lobe of the liver, ablations were performed with ventilation using positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 10 cm of water. Upon completion, MR imaging with gadolinium contrast was performed to assess the extent of treatment. Thermal lesions were subsequently measured using both, MR-thermal dose and MR gadolinium images, for comparison. Following the animal euthanasia, the liver was harvested and subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding for histological examination. Between one and four focal liver ablations (total 24 ablations) were successfully performed in nine animals with either a 15 or 30 W laser generator. For the 15-W laser generator, the average single applicator ablation size was (2.0 ± 0.5) × (2.6 ± 0.4) cm(2) , as measured by magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, or (1.7 ± 0.4)

  12. Functional Connectivity During Exposure to Favorite-Food, Stress, and Neutral-Relaxing Imagery Differs Between Smokers and Nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Scheinost, Dustin; Jastreboff, Ania M; Constable, R Todd; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-09-01

    Tobacco-use disorder is a complex condition involving multiple brain networks and presenting with multiple behavioral correlates including changes in diet and stress. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of neural responses to favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers demonstrated blunted corticostriatal-limbic responses to favorite-food cues. Based on other recent reports of alterations in functional brain networks in smokers, the current study examined functional connectivity during exposure to favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing imagery in smokers and nonsmokers, using the same dataset. The intrinsic connectivity distribution was measured to identify brain regions that differed in degree of functional connectivity between groups during each imagery condition. Resulting clusters were evaluated for seed-to-voxel connectivity to identify the specific connections that differed between groups during each imagery condition. During exposure to favorite-food imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed lower connectivity in the supramarginal gyrus, and differences in connectivity between the supramarginal gyrus and the corticostriatal-limbic system. During exposure to neutral-relaxing imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed greater connectivity in the precuneus, and greater connectivity between the precuneus and the posterior insula and rolandic operculum. During exposure to stress imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed lower connectivity in the cerebellum. These findings provide data-driven insights into smoking-related alterations in brain functional connectivity patterns related to appetitive, relaxing, and stressful states. This study uses a data-driven approach to demonstrate that smokers and nonsmokers show differential patterns of functional connectivity during guided imagery related to personalized favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing cues, in brain regions implicated in attention

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of Guided Reading and Explicit Interventions for Primary-Grade Students At-Risk for Reading Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A; Fletcher, Jack M; Taylor, W Pat; Barth, Amy E; Vaughn, Sharon

    2014-07-03

    Considerable research evidence supports the provision of explicit instruction for students at risk for reading difficulties; however, one of the most widely implemented approaches to early reading instruction is Guided Reading (GR; Fountas & Pinnel, 1996), which deemphasizes explicit instruction and practice of reading skills in favor of extended time reading text. This study evaluated the two approaches in the context of supplemental intervention for at-risk readers at the end of Grade 1. Students (n = 218) were randomly assigned to receive GR intervention, explicit intervention (EX), or typical school instruction (TSI). Both intervention groups performed significantly better than TSI on untimed word identification. Significant effects favored EX over TSI on phonemic decoding and one measure of comprehension. Outcomes for the intervention groups did not differ significantly from each other; however, an analysis of the added value of providing each intervention relative to expected growth with typical instruction indicated that EX is more likely to substantially accelerate student progress in phonemic decoding, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension than GR. Implications for selection of Tier 2 interventions within a response-to-intervention format are discussed.

  14. Evaluation of the antiproliferative activity of the leaves from Arctium lappa by a bioassay-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabio Bahls; Yamamoto, Rafael Eidi; Zanoli, Karine; Nocchi, Samara Requena; Novello, Cláudio Roberto; Schuquel, Ivânia Teresinha Albrecht; Sakuragui, Cássia Mônica; Luftmann, Heinrich; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo

    2012-02-14

    Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF) showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1), mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate) (2), a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3), mixture of 1 with melitensin (4), dehydrovomifoliol (5), and loliolide (6). The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS) and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2-5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC(50) (µg/mL) values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  15. Evaluation of the Antiproliferative Activity of the Leaves from Arctium lappa by a Bioassay-Guided Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1, mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate (2, a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3, mixture of 1 with melitensin (4, dehydrovomifoliol (5, and loliolide (6. The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2–5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC50 (µg/mL values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  16. An Experimental Evaluation of Guided Reading and Explicit Interventions for Primary-Grade Students At-Risk for Reading Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Taylor, W. Pat; Barth, Amy E.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research evidence supports the provision of explicit instruction for students at risk for reading difficulties; however, one of the most widely implemented approaches to early reading instruction is Guided Reading (GR; Fountas & Pinnel, 1996), which deemphasizes explicit instruction and practice of reading skills in favor of extended time reading text. This study evaluated the two approaches in the context of supplemental intervention for at-risk readers at the end of Grade 1. Students (n = 218) were randomly assigned to receive GR intervention, explicit intervention (EX), or typical school instruction (TSI). Both intervention groups performed significantly better than TSI on untimed word identification. Significant effects favored EX over TSI on phonemic decoding and one measure of comprehension. Outcomes for the intervention groups did not differ significantly from each other; however, an analysis of the added value of providing each intervention relative to expected growth with typical instruction indicated that EX is more likely to substantially accelerate student progress in phonemic decoding, text reading fluency, and reading comprehension than GR. Implications for selection of Tier 2 interventions within a response-to-intervention format are discussed. PMID:26779296

  17. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  18. Design, Development and Preliminary Student Evaluation of Virtual Field Guides as aids to teaching and learning in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Tim

    2010-05-01

    In Universities the benefits of teaching and learning through fieldwork has been brought under closer examination in recent years (e.g. Andrews et al., 2003) and the notion of supporting fieldwork in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines has been gathering momentum over the past decade as evidenced by conferences on ‘Supporting fieldwork using information technology' (Maskall et al., 2007) and a Higher Education Academy GEES Virtual Fieldwork Conference at University of Worcester (May 2007). Virtual environments and e-learning resources have been shown to help students become active rather than passive learners by appealing to their multi-sensory learning ability with interactive media (Fletcher et al., 2002; 2007). Research on glacial and fluvial processes has been conducted since 2003 by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) staff, sometimes in collaboration with other Universities, at field sites in the French Alps, Swiss Alps and Cariboo Mountains in British Columbia. A virtual field guide (VFG) (www.virtualalps.co.uk) has been developed which uses maps, site photos, panorama movies, video clips, a google earth tour, student exercises using hydrological and glacial datasets collected in the field and revision exercises. A preliminary evaluation of this learning resource has been carried out with two groups of LJMU students and an article written (Stott et al. 2009a). The Ingleton Waterfalls VFG (http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/BIE/ingleton/) was developed by LJMU staff to meet the needs of Foundation degree and undergraduate students. A workshop was presented at the Earth Science Teachers Association 2008 Annual Conference at LJMU, and a subsequent article written (Stott et al. 2009b). The final section of this presentation will summarise some staff perspectives and raises some questions and issues concerned with development and accessibility of VFGs in the light of new developments of a ‘semantic web' at LJMU (Carmichael, 2009). Andrews

  19. The evaluation of chorionic membrane in guided tissue regeneration for periodontal pocket therapy: a clinical and radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothiwale, Shaila V

    2014-03-01

    Periodontal regenerative therapy is aimed at reconstruction and to restore the architecture and function of lost or injured tissues. Melcher (J Periodontol 47(5):256-260, 1976) introduced the concept of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) for osseous reconstructive surgery. The aim of the present innovative clinical and radiographic study was to evaluate the effect of chorionic membrane (CM) in GTR in periodontal pocket therapy. Ten patients with moderate to severe periodontitis were selected in the single blind randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with periodontal pocket therapy along with CM in study sites and the control sites were treated with periodontal pocket therapy alone. The clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 12 months. The radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Clinical parameters included gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), pocket probing depth (PPD) and relative attachment level (RAL). Digital images were analysed for bone gain (BG) and density. Data were evaluated using t test. Statistical significant differences were found in both sites at 12 months for GI, PI, PPD and RAL. Highly significant reduction was seen in GI 0.40 ± 0.08 (p = 0.0001), PI (0.41 ± 0.18), PPD 2.50 ± 0.53 mm (p = 0.0431) and increased BG 0.86 ± 0.18 (p < 0.0001) were observed in study sites. This shows that CM when used with pocket therapy can have influence on clinical parameters. Radiographic findings from this study demonstrated significant BG and density in sites treated with CM as compared to control sites.

  20. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  1. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  2. Providing emotional stability through relaxation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, M; Zahirodin, A; Norri, N; Ghafarsamar, R; Shams, J

    2009-01-01

    To determine the effects of integrative relaxation training (IRT) on emotional stability, we exposed 32 patients diagnosed with anxiety disorder to a pre-test (16PF) and to 12 sessions of group psychoeducation training. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups (study 17 and control 15 patients). The study group received 12 weekly group sessions of IRT. Level of anxiety was evaluated in a post-test using a questionnaire and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Emotional stability and level of anxiety were significantly reduced in the study group: there was a marked increase in scores for emotionally s and venturesome and a decrease in scores for apprehensive and tense. The STAI score was statistically significantly lower in the study group.

  3. Muscle relaxants and histamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J

    1995-01-01

    Many anaesthetic drugs and adjuvants can cause the release of histamine by chemical (anaphylactoid) or immunologic (anaphylactic) mechanisms. While both types of reactions can be clinically indistinguishable, they are mechanistically different. In anaphylactoid reactions, only preformed mediators are released, of which histamine may be the most clinically important. In true immunologic reactions, mast cell degranulation occurs, and many vasoactive substances (including histamine) are released. Clinical signs and symptoms of both classes of reactions include hypotension (most common), tachycardia, bronchospasm, or cutaneous manifestations. Anaphylactoid reactions may occur commonly under anaesthesia in response to many drugs, including induction agents, some opiates, plasma expanders, and curariform relaxants. Anaphylactic reactions are far less common than anaphylactoid reactions, but they nevertheless represent more than half of the life-threatening reactions that occur in anaesthetic practice. Muscle relaxants are the most frequently implicated class of drugs; suxamethonium is the most common agent implicated in anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia, but even drugs without apparent chemical histamine release (i.e., vecuronium) are frequently implicated in anaphylactic reactions.

  4. Test & Evaluation Management Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    and contracts administration) for all elements of DoD. The DAE’s charter includes the authority over the Services and Defense Agencies on policy...is controlled by a chartered PM or by the commander of a systems command. In both cases, the...measurement process including technical performance measurement ( TPM ) can be found in International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE)-TP-2003

  5. Barnett relaxation in non-symmetric grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasi, Erald; Weingartner, Joseph C.

    2017-10-01

    Barnett relaxation, first described by Purcell in 1979, appears to play a major role in the alignment of grains with the interstellar magnetic field. In 1999, Lazarian and Draine proposed that Barnett relaxation and its relative, nuclear relaxation, can induce grains to flip. If this thermal flipping is rapid then the dynamical effect of torques that are fixed relative to the grain body can be greatly reduced. To date, detailed studies of Barnett relaxation have been confined to grains exhibiting dynamic symmetry. In 2009, Weingartner argued that internal relaxation cannot induce flips in any grains, whether they exhibit dynamic symmetry or not. In this work, we develop approximate expressions for the dissipation rate and diffusion coefficient for Barnett relaxation. We revisit the issue of internally induced thermal flipping, finding that it cannot occur for grains with dynamic symmetry, but does occur for grains lacking dynamic symmetry.

  6. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  7. Stress and Relaxation in Relation to Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Harish Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation plays a significant role in facing stress. The aim of the present study is to see whether personality patterns determine an individual’s ability to relax. As a reaction to stress, coping is the best way to handle stress, which requires rational and conscious thinking. Does this ability to relax anyway facilitate coping reactions? A study was conducted on 100 college students. Results revealed that extraverts...

  8. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  9. Internal magnetic relaxation in levitation superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyak, B M; Ermakov, G V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of arresting levitation relaxation, appearing during reverse magnetization of YBaCuO superconducting ceramics, was detected. At bipolar magnetization magnetic moment of a sample remains invariable. Internal magnetic relaxation occurs, in the course of which magnetic flux is redistributed inside the sample. As a result the state of filed at the sample boundary does not change and full force acting on the system of closed currents remains constant. A formula for calculating the time of internal relaxation is provided

  10. Technological patterns of preventive relaxation of workings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, L.L.; Bakhtin, A.F.; Zel' vyanskii, M.Sh. (Donetskaya Proektnaya Kontora (USSR))

    1991-09-01

    Presents stress relaxation patterns of workings. The patterns are used at horizon layouts and panel development of mine-take in stone inclines, boundary entries, mine drainage galleries and main galleries. The stress relaxation variants are: stress relaxing longwalls with complete mining with two or three winning galleries, longwalls worked by long pillars on the strike, and longwalls worked with advance mining on the strike. The individual variants differ by the ventilation system adopted.

  11. Impaired gastric relaxation in patients with achalasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Mearin, F; Papo, M; Malagelada, J R

    1995-01-01

    Achalasia is considered a primary motility disorder confined to the oesophagus. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) in achalasia is frequently hypertonic and manifests absent or incomplete relaxation in response to deglution. On the other hand, the LOS and the proximal stomach act physiologically as a functional unit whereby relaxation of the LOS during deglution is associated with receptive relaxation of the proximal stomach. Thus, this study investigated the hypothesis that impaired LOS r...

  12. [Autocontrol of muscle relaxation with vecuronium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilla, C; Zatelli, R; Marchi, M; Zago, M

    1990-01-01

    The optimal conditions for maintaining desired levels of muscle relaxation with vecuronium are obtained by means of the continuous infusion (I.V.) technique. A frequent correction of the infusion flow is required, since it is impossible to predict the exact amount for the muscle relaxant in single case. In order to overcome such limits the authors propose a very feasible infusion system for the self-control of muscle relaxation; furthermore they positively consider its possible daily clinical application.

  13. Evaluation of methods to produce an image library for automatic patient model localization for dose mapping during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian-Meneghin, Josh; Xiong, Z.; Rudin, S.; Oines, A.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods for producing a library of 2D-radiographic images to be correlated to clinical images obtained during a fluoroscopically-guided procedure for automated patient-model localization. The localization algorithm will be used to improve the accuracy of the skin-dose map superimposed on the 3D patient- model of the real-time Dose-Tracking-System (DTS). For the library, 2D images were generated from CT datasets of the SK-150 anthropomorphic phantom using two methods: Schmid's 3D-visualization tool and Plastimatch's digitally-reconstructed-radiograph (DRR) code. Those images, as well as a standard 2D-radiographic image, were correlated to a 2D-fluoroscopic image of a phantom, which represented the clinical-fluoroscopic image, using the Corr2 function in Matlab. The Corr2 function takes two images and outputs the relative correlation between them, which is fed into the localization algorithm. Higher correlation means better alignment of the 3D patient-model with the patient image. In this instance, it was determined that the localization algorithm will succeed when Corr2 returns a correlation of at least 50%. The 3D-visualization tool images returned 55-80% correlation relative to the fluoroscopic-image, which was comparable to the correlation for the radiograph. The DRR images returned 61-90% correlation, again comparable to the radiograph. Both methods prove to be sufficient for the localization algorithm and can be produced quickly; however, the DRR method produces more accurate grey-levels. Using the DRR code, a library at varying angles can be produced for the localization algorithm.

  14. Evaluation of a new biotin-DOTA conjugate for pretargeted antibody-guided radioimmunotherapy (PAGRIT {sup registered})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbano, Nicoletta; Papi, Stefano; Paganelli, Giovanni; Chinol, Marco [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ginanneschi, Mauro [University of Florence and CNR-ICOM, Polo Scientifico, Laboratory of Peptides and Proteins, Chemistry and Biology, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); De Santis, Rita; Pace, Silvia; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Ferrari, Liliana [Sigma Tau SpA R and D, Pomezia, Rome (Italy); Choi, Sun Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2007-01-15

    A novel biotin-DOTA conjugate (r-BHD: reduced biotinamidohexylamine-DOTA) was investigated in order to provide an efficient pretargeted antibody-guided radioimmunotherapy (PAGRIT {sup registered}) application. Preclinical and clinical results are described. {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu were used to label r-BHD. The effect of pH and a wide range of specific activities were studied. Radiolabelled r-BHD was tested for affinity towards avidin and for stability in saline or in human serum with and without ascorbic acid. Pharmacokinetic data were collected and organ biodistribution evaluated in a tumour-bearing pretargeted animal model. A pilot study was performed in a metastatic melanoma patient and dosimetry was estimated. High radiochemical purity (>99%) was routinely achieved with {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu in sodium acetate buffer (1.0 M, pH 5.0) at a specific activity of 2.6 MBq/nmol. Both {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-r-BHD were also prepared at higher specific activities. Radiolabelled r-BHD was stable up to 96 h in human serum and saline with the addition of ascorbic acid. The structural modifications proposed for the r-BHD stabilised it against enzymatic degradation while retaining high binding affinity for avidin. Renal clearance appeared to be the main route of excretion in animals, and high tumour uptake was observed in the pretargeted animals. The patient study showed a total body clearance of {proportional_to}85% in 24 h, with a kidney absorbed dose of 1.5 mGy/MBq. Tumour uptake was rapid and the calculated dose to a 10-mm tumour lesion was {proportional_to}12 mGy/MBq. These results indicate that the new biotin-DOTA conjugate may be a suitable candidate for pretargeting trials. (orig.)

  15. Load relaxation studies of zircaloy-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, F.H.; Sabol, G.P.; McDonald, S.G.; Li, C.Y.

    1976-01-01

    The results of the present work have shown (1) the load relaxation data of Zircaloy-4 in the temperature range of 200/sup 0/C to 385/sup 0/C can be represented by the phenomenological model based on Hart's plastic equation of state; (2) the room temperature load relaxation data reflect the effects of deformation twinning; (3) at higher temperatures the load relaxation data suggest the contribution of grain boundary sliding; and (4) the effects of strain aging can be identified based on the load relaxation data.

  16. Baryogenesis via Elementary Goldstone Higgs Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertov, Helene; Pearce, Lauren; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We extend the relaxation mechanism to the Elementary Goldstone Higgs framework. Besides studying the allowed parameter space of the theory we add the minimal ingredients needed for the framework to be phenomenologically viable. The very nature of the extended Higgs sector allows to consider very...... flat scalar potential directions along which the relaxation mechanism can be implemented. This fact translates into wider regions of applicability of the relaxation mechanism when compared to the Standard Model Higgs case. Our results show that, if the electroweak scale is not fundamental...... but radiatively generated, it is possible to generate the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry via the relaxation mechanism....

  17. Effects of magnetic field strength and particle aggregation on relaxivity of ultra-small dual contrast iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Hang T.; Li, Zhen; Wu, Yuao; Cowin, Gary; Zhang, Shaohua; Yago, Anya; Whittaker, Andrew K.; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to compare the relaxivities of ultra-small dual positive and negative contrast iron oxide nanoparticles (DCION) at different magnetic field strengths ranging from 4.7 to 16.4 T at physiological temperatures; and to investigate the effect of particle aggregation on relaxivities. Relaxivities of DCIONs were determined by magnetic resonance imaging scanners at 4.7, 7, 9.4, and 16.4 T. Both longitudinal (T 1) and transverse relaxation times (T 2) were measured by appropriate spin-echo sequences. It has been found that both longitudinal and transverse relaxivities are significantly dependent on the magnetic field strength. Particle aggregation also strongly affects the relaxivities. Awareness of the field strength and particle colloid stability is crucial for the comparison and evaluation of relaxivity values of these ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles, and also for their medical applications as contrast agents.

  18. Stress relaxation of constructions elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A relaxation of stress in the elements of constructions is considered and an approach is proposed for solution of corresponding problems. It is notable that this approach is based on a modification Boltzmann’s principle superposition of fraction creep deformations. This modification reduces the noted problems to solution of linear relative to so-called structural stress integral equations. Next a desired stress is defined by solution of algebraic equations. It should be underline that a material (concrete, steel, graph of elements a considered as a union of its fractions with statistical disturbed strengths. This ascending to Weibull conception [1] permits to modify Boltzmann’s principle superposition [2]. As a result this principle is applicable when a dependence on deformations from the stresses is nonlinear [3-7].

  19. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  20. Zen meditation and ABC relaxation theory: an exploration of relaxation states, beliefs, dispositions, and motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, N B; Smith, J C

    2001-06-01

    This study is an attempt to rigorously map the psychological effects of Zen meditation among experienced practitioners. Fifty-nine Zen meditators with at least six years of experience practiced an hour of traditional Zazen seated meditation. A control group of 24 college students spent 60 min silently reading popular magazines. Before relaxation, all participants took the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (SRSI), the Smith Relaxation Dispositions/Motivations Inventory (SRD/MI), and the Smith Relaxation Beliefs Inventory (SRBI). After practice, participants again took the SRSI. Analyses revealed that meditators are less likely to believe in God, more likely to believe in Inner Wisdom, and more likely to display the relaxation dispositions Mental Quiet, Mental Relaxation, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. Pre- and postsession analyses revealed that meditators showed greater increments in the relaxation states Mental Quiet, Love and Thankfulness, and Prayerfulness, as well as reduced Worry. Results support Smith's ABC Relaxation Theory.

  1. Phospholemman does not participate in forskolin-induced swine carotid artery relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, M K; Han, S; Tucker, A L; Rembold, C M

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM) on ser68 has been proposed to at least partially mediate cyclic AMP (cAMP) mediated relaxation of arterial smooth muscle. We evaluated the time course of the phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM) on ser68, myosin regulatory light chains (MRLC) on ser19, and heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) on ser16 during a transient forskolin-induced relaxation of histamine-stimulated swine carotid artery. We also evaluated the dose response for forskolin- and nitroglycerin-induced relaxation in phenylephrine-stimulated PLM-/- and PLM+/+ mice. The time course for changes in ser19 MRLC dephosphorylation and ser16 HSP20 phosphorylation was appropriate to explain the forskolin-induced relaxation and the recontraction observed upon washout of forskolin. However, the time course for changes in ser68 PLM phosphorylation was too slow to explain forskolin-induced changes in force. There was no difference in the phenylephrine contractile dose response or in forskolin-induced relaxation dose response observed in PLM-/- and PLM+/+ aortae. In aortae precontracted with phenylephrine, nitroglycerin induced a slightly, but significantly greater relaxation in PLM-/- compared to PLM+/+ aortae. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that ser19 MRLC dephosphorylation and ser16 HSP20 phosphorylation are involved in forskolin-induced relaxation. Our data suggest that PLM phosphorylation is not significantly involved in forskolin-induced arterial relaxation.

  2. Diagnostic difficulties and pitfalls in rapid on-site evaluation of endobronchial ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Sara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the novel techniques utilizing fine needle aspiration (FNA in the diagnosis of mediastinal and lung lesions is the endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS-guided FNA. In this study, we describe five cases which had a discrepancy between on-site evaluation and final diagnosis, or a diagnostic dilemma when rendering the preliminary diagnosis, in order to illustrate some of the diagnostic difficulties and pitfalls that can occur in EBUS FNA. Methods: A total of five EBUS FNA cases from five patients were identified in our records with a discrepancy between the rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE and final diagnosis, or that addressed a diagnostic dilemma. All of the cases had histological confirmation or follow-up. The cytomorphology in the direct smears, cell block, and immunohistochemical stains were reviewed, along with the clinical history and other available information. Results: Two cases were identified with a nondefinitive diagnosis at ROSE that were later diagnosed as malignant (metastatic signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC on the final cytological diagnosis. Three additional cases were identified with a ROSE and final diagnosis of malignant (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC and two squamous cell carcinomas, but raised important diagnostic dilemmas. These cases highlight the importance of recognizing discohesive malignant cells and bland neoplasms on EBUS FNA, which may lead to a negative or a nondefinitive preliminary diagnosis. Neuroendocrine tumors can also be difficult due to the wide range of entities in the differential diagnosis, including benign lymphocytes, lymphomas, small and nonsmall cell carcinomas, and the lack of immunohistochemical stains at the time of ROSE. Finally, the background material in EBUS FNAs may be misleading and unrelated to the cells of interest. Conclusions: This study illustrates the cytomorphology of five EBUS FNA cases that address some of the

  3. Preclinical evaluation of a low-frequency transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system in a primate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret; Barış Top, Can; Sutton, Jonathan; Todd, Nick; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated thermal ablation and skull-induced heating with a 230 kHz transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) system in nonhuman primates. We evaluated real-time acoustic feedback and aimed to understand whether cavitation contributed to the heating and the lesion formation. In four macaques, we sonicated thalamic targets at acoustic powers of 34-560 W (896-7590 J). Tissue effects evaluated with MRI and histology were compared to MRI-based temperature and thermal dose measurements, acoustic emissions recorded during the experiments, and acoustic and thermal simulations. Peak temperatures ranged from 46 to 57 °C, and lesions were produced in 5/8 sonicated targets. A linear relationship was observed between the applied acoustic energy and both the focal and brain surface heating. Thermal dose thresholds were 15-50 cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C, similar to prior studies at higher frequencies. Histology was also consistent with earlier studies of thermal effects in the brain. The system successfully controlled the power level and maintained a low level of cavitation activity. Increased acoustic emissions observed in 3/4 animals occurred when the focal temperature rise exceeded approximately 16 °C. Thresholds for thermally-significant subharmonic and wideband emissions were 129 and 140 W, respectively, corresponding to estimated pressure amplitudes of 2.1 and 2.2 MPa. Simulated focal heating was consistent with the measurements for sonications without thermally-significant acoustic emissions; otherwise it was consistently lower than the measurements. Overall, these results suggest that the lesions were produced by thermal mechanisms. The detected acoustic emissions, however, and their association with heating suggest that cavitation might have contributed to the focal heating. Compared to earlier work with a 670 kHz TcMRgFUS system, the brain surface heating was substantially reduced and the focal heating was higher with this

  4. Qualitative process evaluation of a problem-solving guided self-help manual for family carers of young people with first-episode psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Caring for a young person experiencing first-episode psychosis is challenging and can affect carers’ well-being adversely. While some face-to-face approaches have achieved promising outcomes, they are costly and resource-intensive to provide, restricting their reach and penetration. Guided self-help in book-form (or bibliotherapy) is an alternative but untested approach in these circumstances. In this study, we aimed to evaluate carers’ beliefs about the usefulness of problem-solving guided self-help manual for primary carers of young people with first-episode psychosis. Methods A qualitative process evaluation nested in a randomised controlled trial, conducted across two early intervention psychosis services in Melbourne, Australia. 124 carers were randomised to problem-solving guided self-help intervention or treatment as usual. We also undertook a qualitative process evaluation, using individual interviews, with a random sample of 24 of the intervention group. A thematic analysis of the qualitative data was undertaken, which is the subject of this paper. Interviews were conducted between January 2009 and September 2010. Results Three themes were abstracted from the data, reflecting carers’ beliefs about the usefulness of the manual: promoting carers’ well-being, increasing carers’ understanding of and support for the young person with first-episode psychosis, and accessibility and delivery modes of the programme. Conclusion This process evaluation highlights that guided self-help is useful in informing and supporting carers of affected young people. While there is scope for broadening the delivery modes, the approach is easy to use and accessible, and can be used as a cost-effective adjunct to standard support provided to carers, by community mental health nurses and other clinicians. Trial registration ACTRN12609000064202 PMID:24906392

  5. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Farooq Naeem,1,2 Rupinder K Johal,1 Claire Mckenna,1 Olivia Calancie,1 Tariq Munshi,1,2 Tariq Hassan,1 Amina Nasar,3 Muhammad Ayub1 1Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2Addiction and Mental Health Services – Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington (AMHS-KFLA, Kingston, ON, Canada; 3Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format.Methods: This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36 consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU (treatment group or to TAU alone (control group. The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.Findings: Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005, anxiety and depression (P<0.005, and disability (P<0.005 at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion: A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis

  6. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy v. conventional guided self-help for bulimia nervosa: long-term evaluation of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Wanner, Christian; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Waldherr, Karin; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based guided self-help is recommended as a first step in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. To evaluate in a randomised controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00461071) the long-term effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) compared with conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH) in females with bulimia nervosa. A total of 155 participants were randomly assigned to INT-GSH or BIB-GSH for 7 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, month 7 and month 18. The greatest improvement was reported after 4 months with a continued reduction in eating disorder symptomatology reported at month 7 and 18. After 18 months, 14.6% (n = 7/48) of the participants in the INT-GSH group and 25% (n = 7/28) in the BIB-GSH group were abstinent from binge eating and compensatory measures, 43.8% (n = 21/48) and 39.2% (n = 11/28) respectively were in remission. No differences regarding outcome between the two groups were found. Internet-based guided self-help for bulimia nervosa was not superior compared with bibliotherapy, the gold standard of self-help. Improvements remain stable in the long term.

  7. An in vitro study to evaluate the difference in shade between commercially available shade guides and glazed porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smile is one of the most important interactive communication skills of a person. A smile is the key factor for an aesthetic appearance. Hence aesthetics is one of the motivating factor for the patients to seek dental care. Correction of unaesthetic appearance gives a positive effect to the self esteem of the patient. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the difference in the shade between the commercially available shade guides namely Vita Classical And Ivoclar Chromascop and the fired porcelain samples fabricated using Vita Zahnfabrik VMK 95 and Ivoclar Classic Materials respectively. Objectives: The objective of this study was to obtain a matching brand of material that has a particular shade tab among the brands used. Conclusion: To conclude, Ivoclar material matched the chromascop shade guide better than the vita material matched the vita classic shade guide.

  8. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Wall And Window Retrofit Configurations: Supporting the Residential Retrofit Best Practices Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Hulvey, Kimberly D [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    A Retrofit Best Practices Guide was developed to encourage homeowners to consider energy conservation issues whenever they modify their siding or windows. In support of this guide, an experimental program was implemented to measure the performance of a number of possible wall siding and window retrofit configurations. Both thermal and air-leakage measurements were made for a 2.4 x 2.4 m (8 x 8 ft) wall section with and without a 0.9 x 1.2 m (3 x 4 ft) window. The windows tested were previously well-characterized at a dedicated window test facility. A computer model was also used to provide information for the Best Practices Guide. The experimental data for walls and windows were used in conjunction with this model to estimate the total annual energy savings for several typical houses in a number of different locations.

  9. EERE Peer Review Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    The primary purpose of this guide is to provide managers and staff guidance in establishing formal in-progress peer review that provides intellectually fair expert evaluation of EERE RD3 and supporting business administration programs, both retrospective and prospective.

  10. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Tanaka, Ryoichi, E-mail: rtanaka@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS AND CONCLUS...

  12. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  13. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  14. Stress and Relaxation in Relation to Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Kumar Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation plays a significant role in facing stress. The aim of the present study is to see whether personality patterns determine an individual’s ability to relax. As a reaction to stress, coping is the best way to handle stress, which requires rational and conscious thinking. Does this ability to relax anyway facilitate coping reactions? A study was conducted on 100 college students. Results revealed that extraverts relax easily than introverts. In addition, if intelligence level is average or above average, relaxation does play a role in facilitating coping reactions. It suggests that in designing techniques of stress management, the personality and intelligence level must be taken into consideration to make techniques effective.

  15. First Passage Times, Lifetimes, and Relaxation Times of Unfolded Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Sengupta, Anirvan M; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-07-24

    The dynamics of proteins in the unfolded state can be quantified in computer simulations by calculating a spectrum of relaxation times which describes the time scales over which the population fluctuations decay to equilibrium. If the unfolded state space is discretized, we can evaluate the relaxation time of each state. We derive a simple relation that shows the mean first passage time to any state is equal to the relaxation time of that state divided by the equilibrium population. This explains why mean first passage times from state to state within the unfolded ensemble can be very long but the energy landscape can still be smooth (minimally frustrated). In fact, when the folding kinetics is two-state, all of the unfolded state relaxation times within the unfolded free energy basin are faster than the folding time. This result supports the well-established funnel energy landscape picture and resolves an apparent contradiction between this model and the recently proposed kinetic hub model of protein folding. We validate these concepts by analyzing a Markov state model of the kinetics in the unfolded state and folding of the miniprotein NTL9 (where NTL9 is the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9), constructed from a 2.9 ms simulation provided by D. E. Shaw Research.

  16. A NATO Guide for Assessing Deployability for Military Personnel with Medical Conditions (Guide OTAN d’evaluation de l’aptitude medicale a la projection du personnel militaire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Equivalent Diseases D-2 D.6 Cardiac Diagnostic Evaluation D-2 D.7 Metabolic Syndrome Definition D-2 Annex E – List of Medications that are Normally...and high uric acid (increased by some medications). They are also called nephrolithiasis or renal calculi. It is Difficult to Predict When a Kidney...with caution if they have either one of the following: • Metabolic syndrome ; AND/OR • Calculated 10-year CHD risk (e.g. Framingham) is 10 to 15 % or

  17. Evaluation of renal mass biopsy risk stratification algorithm for robotic partial nephrectomy--could a biopsy have guided management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Haider; Bhayani, Sam; Stifelman, Michael; Kaouk, Jihad; Allaf, Mohamad; Marshall, Susan; Zargar, Homayoun; Ball, Mark W; Larson, Jeffrey; Rogers, Craig

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated a published biopsy directed small renal mass management algorithm using a large cohort of patients who underwent robotic partial nephrectomy for tumors 4 cm or smaller. A simplified algorithm of biopsy directed small renal mass management previously reported using risk stratified biopsies was applied to 1,175 robotic partial nephrectomy cases from 5 academic centers. A theoretical assumption was made of perfect biopsies that were feasible for all patients and had 100% concordance to final pathology. Pathology risk groups were benign, favorable, unfavorable and intermediate. The algorithm assigned favorable or intermediate tumors smaller than 2 cm to active surveillance and unfavorable or intermediate 2 to 4 cm tumors to treatment. Higher surgical risk patients were defined as ASA® 3 or greater and age 70 years or older. Patients were assigned to the pathology risk groups of benign (23%), favorable (13%), intermediate (51%) and unfavorable (12%). Patients were also assigned to the management groups of benign pathology (275, 23%), active surveillance (336, 29%) and treatment (564, 48%). Most of the 611 (52%) patients in the benign or active surveillance groups were low surgical risk and had safe treatment (2.6% high grade complications). A biopsy may not have been feasible or accurate in some tumors that were anterior (378, 32%), hilar (93, 7.9%) or less than 2 cm (379, 32%). Of 129 (11%) high surgical risk patients the biopsy algorithm assigned 70 (54%) to benign or active surveillance groups. The theoretical application of a biopsy driven, risk stratified small renal mass management algorithm to a large robotic partial nephrectomy database suggests that about half of the patients might have avoided surgery. Despite the obvious limitations of a theoretical assumption of all patients receiving a perfect biopsy, the data support the emerging role of renal mass biopsies to guide management, particularly in high surgical risk patients. Copyright

  18. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance-guided transarterial aortic valve implantation: In vitro evaluation and modification of existing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladd Mark E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is considered an attractive alternative for guiding transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI featuring unlimited scan plane orientation and unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization. We sought to evaluate the CMR characteristics of both currently commercially available transcatheter heart valves (Edwards SAPIEN™, Medtronic CoreValve® including their dedicated delivery devices and of a custom-built, CMR-compatible delivery device for the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis as an initial step towards real-time CMR-guided TAVI. Methods The devices were systematically examined in phantom models on a 1.5-Tesla scanner using high-resolution T1-weighted 3D FLASH, real-time TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Images were analyzed for device visualization quality, device-related susceptibility artifacts, and radiofrequency signal shielding. Results CMR revealed major susceptibility artifacts for the two commercial delivery devices caused by considerable metal braiding and precluding in vivo application. The stainless steel-based Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was also regarded not suitable for CMR-guided TAVI due to susceptibility artifacts exceeding the valve's dimensions and hindering an exact placement. In contrast, the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis was excellently visualized with delineation even of small details and, thus, regarded suitable for CMR-guided TAVI, particularly since reengineering of its delivery device toward CMR-compatibility resulted in artifact elimination and excellent visualization during catheter movement and valve deployment on real-time TrueFISP imaging. Reliable flow measurements could be performed for both stent-valves after deployment using phase-contrast sequences. Conclusions The present study shows that the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis is potentially suited for real-time CMR-guided placement

  19. Evaluation of a novel Seldinger-needle for computed tomography guided interventions: initial experiences; Evaluierung einer neuen Seldinger-Nadel fuer computertomografisch gesteuerte Interventionen: Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhans, C.; Mahnken, A.; Iwa, R.; Behrendt, F.F.; Sebastian, K.; Guenther, R.W.; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate a new Seldinger puncture device for computed tomography-guided interventions under difficult conditions, to analyze applicability, and to investigate assets and drawbacks. From November 2007 to March 2008, we performed CT-guided interventions in 16 patients (7 women, 9 men; mean age 62 years old) using a new 20G-Seldinger needle (Sika-Med, Wiehl, Germany). This novel needle serves as a guide for many different interventional devices due to a guide wire welded on the proximal needle end. It allows continuous application of anesthesia via four tiny holes at the distal needle end until the region of interest is reached. Each intervention was subject to difficult interventional conditions. The indications for intervention were drainage (n = 7), Trucut biopsy of tumor (n = 8) and radiofrequency ablation (n = 1). Handling, success, advantages, drawbacks, complications and patient tolerance were noted after each procedure. A pain scale from 1 - 10 was used to grade the pain level during the intervention. All interventions were performed successfully and no severe complications were observed. Patient tolerance was very good resulting in a mean pain score of 2 {+-} 1. Regions with dangerous and difficult access were successfully reached with the new Seldinger needle in 15 of 16 cases by dilatation of the puncture tract and continuous administration of local anesthesia via the system. Furthermore, different devices such as Trucut systems and a drainage catheter were able to be inserted without complication via the needle. With a proximal removable luer-lock connection, liquid material was able to be aspirated in six cases. Under difficult interventional conditions, the use of a Seldinger needle as a reliable technique for CT-guided interventions can provide a safe and successful procedure. (orig.)

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Curved Biopsy Device for CT-Guided Biopsy of Lesions Unreachable Using Standard Straight Needle Trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Hagen, Maximilian Franz, E-mail: mschulze@ukaachen.de; Pfeffer, Jochen; Zimmermann, Markus; Liebl, Martin [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stillfried, Saskia Freifrau von [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility of a novel curved CT-guided biopsy needle prototype with shape memory to access otherwise not accessible biopsy targets.Methods and MaterialsA biopsy needle curved by 90° with specific radius was designed. It was manufactured using nitinol to acquire shape memory, encased in a straight guiding trocar to be driven out for access of otherwise inaccessible targets. Fifty CT-guided punctures were conducted in a biopsy phantom and 10 CT-guided punctures in a swine corpse. Biposies from porcine liver and muscle tissue were separately gained using the biopsy device, and histological examination was performed subsequently.ResultsMean time for placement of the trocar and deployment of the inner biopsy needle was ~205 ± 69 and ~93 ± 58 s, respectively, with a mean of ~4.5 ± 1.3 steps to reach adequate biopsy position. Mean distance from the tip of the needle to the target was ~0.7 ± 0.8 mm. CT-guided punctures in the swine corpse took relatively longer and required more biopsy steps (~574 ± 107 and ~380 ± 148 s, 8 ± 2.6 steps). Histology demonstrated appropriate tissue samples in nine out of ten cases (90%).ConclusionsTargets that were otherwise inaccessible via standard straight needle trajectories could be successfully reached with the curved biopsy needle prototype. Shape memory and preformed size with specific radius of the curved needle simplify the target accessibility with a low risk of injuring adjacent structures.

  1. Corroborative evidences of TV γ -scaling of the α-relaxation originating from the primitive relaxation/JG β relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Successful thermodynamic scaling of the structural alpha-relaxation time or transport coefficients of glass-forming liquids determined at various temperatures T and pressures P means the data conform to a single function of the product variable TVgamma, where V is the specific volume and gamma is a material specific constant. In the past two decades we have witnessed successful TVgamma-scaling in many molecular, polymeric, and even metallic glass-formers, and gamma is related to the slope of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential. The advances made indicate TVgamma-scaling is an important aspect of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-formers. In this paper we show the origin of TVgamma-scaling is not from the structural alpha-relaxation time. Instead it comes from its precursor, the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the Coupling Model and their relaxation times or tau_0 respectively. It is remarkable that all relaxation times are functions of TVgamma with the same gama, as well as the fractional exponent of the Kohlrausch correlation function of the structural alpha-relaxation. We arrive at this conclusion convincingly based on corroborative evidences from a number of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations performed on a wide variety of glass-formers and in conjunction with consistency with the predictions of the Coupling Model.

  2. Histological evaluation of degradable guided bone regeneration membranes prepared from poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  3. Histological Evaluation of Degradable Guided Bone Regeneration Membranes Prepared from Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  4. Means to an End: A Guide to Developing Teacher Evaluation Systems That Support Growth and Development. Templates and Worksheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspen Institute, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Means to an End" is a practical toolkit for structuring the design process, elevating important issues, and identifying tensions and trade-offs that need to be resolved. The guide was conceived at a 2011 Aspen Institute workshop that brought together leading educators, researchers, and policymakers to share strategies for designing and…

  5. Efficacy evaluation of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma beneath the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song WANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the feasibility, safety and efficacy of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beneath the diaphragm. Methods Twenty- three consecutive patients with solitary HCC beneath the diaphragm were treated by laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided RFA in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from January 2013 to March 2016. We observed the perioperative complications and followed- up long-term effect. Results All the 23 patients successfully underwent laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation. No serious complications such as massive hemorrhage, biliary fistula and severe pleural effusion, hemopneumothorax occurred in the patients during perioperative period. CT examination 2-3 days after the operation revealed that the tumor was completely covered by the ablation area. Besides, the survival condition was satisfactory during follow-up period of 9-38 months. Conclusion Laparoscopy-assisted ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation is effective and safe for HCC beneath the diaphragm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.16

  6. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-06-02

    Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. All studies (1997-2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  7. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelnuovo Gianluca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007, both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68 in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634 in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  8. Diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging: A multidimensional approach for probing microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeun; Doyle, Eamon K; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Kim, Joong Hee; Haldar, Justin P

    2017-12-01

    To propose and evaluate a novel multidimensional approach for imaging subvoxel tissue compartments called Diffusion-Relaxation Correlation Spectroscopic Imaging. Multiexponential modeling of MR diffusion or relaxation data is commonly used to infer the many different microscopic tissue compartments that contribute signal to macroscopic MR imaging voxels. However, multiexponential estimation is known to be difficult and ill-posed. Observing that this ill-posedness is theoretically reduced in higher dimensions, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging uses a novel multidimensional imaging experiment that jointly encodes diffusion and relaxation information, and then uses a novel constrained reconstruction technique to generate a multidimensional diffusion-relaxation correlation spectrum for every voxel. The peaks of the multidimensional spectrum are expected to correspond to the distinct tissue microenvironments that are present within each macroscopic imaging voxel. Using numerical simulations, experiment data from a custom-built phantom, and experiment data from a mouse model of traumatic spinal cord injury, diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging is demonstrated to provide substantially better multicompartment resolving power compared to conventional diffusion- and relaxation-based methods. The diffusion-relaxation correlation spectroscopic imaging approach provides powerful new capabilities for resolving the different components of multicompartment tissue models, and can be leveraged to significantly expand the insights provided by MRI in studies of tissue microstructure. Magn Reson Med 78:2236-2249, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Muscle relaxation of the foot reduces corticospinal excitability of hand muscles and enhances intracortical inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki eKato

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to clarify the effects of foot muscle relaxation on activity in the primary motor cortex of the hand area. Subjects were asked to volitionally relax the right foot from sustained contraction of either the dorsiflexor (tibialis anterior; TA relaxation or plantarflexor (soleus; SOL relaxation in response to an auditory stimulus. Single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS was delivered to the hand area of the left primary motor cortex at different time intervals before and after the onset of TA or SOL relaxation. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs were recorded from the right extensor carpi radialis (ECR and flexor carpi radialis (FCR. MEP amplitudes of ECR and FCR caused by single-pulse TMS temporarily decreased after TA and SOL relaxation onset, respectively, as compared with those of the resting control. Furthermore, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI of ECR evaluated with paired-pulse TMS temporarily increased after TA relaxation onset. Our findings indicate that muscle relaxation of the dorsiflexor reduced corticospinal excitability of the ipsilateral hand muscles. This is most likely caused by an increase in intracortical inhibition.

  10. The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

  11. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players’ Mood States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. Methods Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusion These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players’ mood states. PMID:22375225

  12. Dielectric relaxation in dipolar mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Agarwal, Vinod K.; Mansingh, Abhai

    1981-08-01

    Dielectric constants and losses have been measured at several microwave frequencies in the range 2.4-25 GHz for two binary mixtures: bromoform +1-bromonaphthalene (dipole moment ratio is about 1:1), and nitrobenzene +1-bromonaphthalene (dipole moment ratio is about 4:1). The dielectric data of each binary system have been analyzed in terms of two superimposed Debye regions. This analysis has been carried out to study the effect of internal field on the numerical values of the relative weights or amplitudes C1 and C2 in the dipolar mixtures. It is observed that the discrepancy between the numerical values of weight factors obtained from relaxation data and dipole moment and mole fractions of the binary mixture cannot be attributed to the internal field. For the bromoform +1-bromonaphthalene system, it has been found that both the Budo and Cole-Cole equation represent the system equally well, but for nitrobenzene +1-bromonaphthalene system the Cole distribution fits better than Budo's equation.

  13. The effect of music, therapy, and relaxation on adrenal corticosteroids and the re-entrainment of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, M S; Floyd, J W; Kirkpatrick, J

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of music, progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), and guided imagery (GI) on the adrenal corticosteroids, or "stress hormones." Hypotheses were designed to evaluate the effect of a taped induction of music/PMR/GI on the mean level (1), circadian amplitude (2), and circadian re-entrainment with body temperature (3) of urinary corticosteroids. Urine collections and body temperature were recorded in shift-working nurses during three 4-5 day intervals over a 1-month period. The nurses listened to the tape on a daily basis, commencing after the first recording period. Results indicated that circadian amplitude decreased significantly (p = .007), and corticosteroid and temperature rhythms were significantly (p less than .01) more entrained during the tape conditions. The mean corticosteroid level also declined during tape listening, but nonsignificantly (p = .15). Because of the close relationship between corticosteroids and the immune system, these data suggest a relationship between music/relaxation techniques and physical health.

  14. A quantum-mechanical relaxation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, R.; Kashyap, A.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    The atomic origin of micromagnetic damping is investigated by developing and solving a quantum-mechanical relaxation model. A projection-operator technique is used to derive an analytical expression for the relaxation time as a function of the heat-bath and interaction parameters. The present findings are consistent with earlier research beyond the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and show that the underlying relaxation mechanism is very general. Zermelo's recurrence paradox means that there is no true irreversibility in non-interacting nanoparticles, but the corresponding recurrence times are very long and can be ignored in many cases.

  15. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  16. Relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulpinar, Gul; Demirhan, Dogan; Buyukkilic, Fevzi

    2007-02-01

    In this study, the relaxation dynamics of iron-group dihalides by making use of spin- 1/2 metamagnetic Ising model has been formulated by the method of thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Using a molecular field approximation for the magnetic Gibbs energy, the magnetic Gibbs energy production in the irreversible process is calculated and time derivatives of the order parameters are treated as fluxes conjugate to their appropriate generalized forces in the sense of Onsager’s theory of irreversible thermodynamics. Two relaxation times are calculated and their temperature variances are examined. Moreover, the phase transition behaviors of the relaxation times are also obtained anaytically via the critical exponents.

  17. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    -posterior (A/P), superior-inferior (S/I), and the left-right (L/R) directions, respectively. In the treatment protocol, adjustment of couch was guided by US images. Residual setup errors as assessed by kV images were found to be: {mu}{sub residual}= (-0.4, 0.2, 0.2) mm, {Sigma}{sub residual}= (1.0, 1.0,0.7) mm, and {sigma}{sub residual}= (2.5, 2.3, 1.8) mm. Intrafraction prostate motion, evaluated using electromagnetic transponders, was: {mu}{sub intrafxn}= (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (1.3, 1.5, 0.6) mm, and {sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (2.6, 2.4, 1.4) mm. Shifts between pre- and post-treatment kV images were: {mu}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (-0.3, 0.8, -0.2), {Sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.4, 2.7, 2.1) mm, and {sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.7, 3.2, 3.1) mm. Relative to skin tattoos, planning margins for setup error were within 10-11 mm for all image-based modalities. The use of image guidance was shown to reduce these margins to less than 5 mm. Margins to compensate for both residual setup (interfraction) errors as well as intrafraction motion were 6.6, 6.8, and 3.9 mm in the A/P, S/I, and L/R directions, respectively. Conclusions: Analysis of interfraction setup errors, performed with US, CBCT, planar kV images, and electromagnetic transponders, from a large dataset revealed intermodality shifts were comparable (within 3-4 mm). Interfraction planning margins, relative to setup based on skin marks, were generally within the 10 mm prostate-to-planning target volume margin used in our clinic. With image guidance, interfraction residual planning margins were reduced to approximately less than 4 mm. These findings are potentially important for dose escalation studies using smaller margins to better protect normal tissues.

  18. Perceived and physiological indicators of relaxation: as different as Mozart and Alice in chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J; Labbé, E; Williams, K; McCall, J

    1999-09-01

    The effects of listening to different types of music on perceived and physiological indicators of relaxation were evaluated. Fifty-six undergraduate students, 24 males and 32 females, mean age of 21, were randomly assigned to listen to classical, hard rock, self-selected relaxing music, or no music. Participants' relaxation level, skin temperature, muscle tension and heart rate were evaluated before and after exposure to a music condition. Analyses of variance using baseline measures as covariates indicated that skin temperature decreased for all conditions (p = 0.001) and the classical, self-selected relaxing music and no music groups reported significant increases in feelings of relaxation (p = 0.004). These results partially support the hypothesis that classical and self-selected relaxing music can increase perceptions of relaxation to a greater degree than listening to hard rock music. However, no differences were found between different types of music on physiological indicators of arousal. Implications for using music to reduce stress were discussed.

  19. Use of Operant Performance to Guide and Evaluate Medical Treatment in an Adult Male Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    improve animal welfare in laboratory settings and to guide effective therapies and veterinary practices. The present study is a case report of...treatment. The affected monkey received ketoprofen, buprenorphine , or their combination but continued to perform poorly during daily operant behavioral...evening administration of buprenorphine (0.01 mg/kg IM) was added to the treatment regimen of ketoprofen (2.0 mg/kg IM) ad- ministration in the

  20. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDoseTM MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  2. A Brief Tool to Assess Image-Based Dietary Records and Guide Nutrition Counselling Among Pregnant Women: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Amy M; Collins, Clare E; Brown, Leanne J; Rae, Kym M; Rollo, Megan E

    2016-11-04

    Dietitians ideally should provide personally tailored nutrition advice to pregnant women. Provision is hampered by a lack of appropriate tools for nutrition assessment and counselling in practice settings. Smartphone technology, through the use of image-based dietary records, can address limitations of traditional methods of recording dietary intake. Feedback on these records can then be provided by the dietitian via smartphone. Efficacy and validity of these methods requires examination. The aims of the Australian Diet Bytes and Baby Bumps study, which used image-based dietary records and a purpose-built brief Selected Nutrient and Diet Quality (SNaQ) tool to provide tailored nutrition advice to pregnant women, were to assess relative validity of the SNaQ tool for analyzing dietary intake compared with nutrient analysis software, to describe the nutritional intake adequacy of pregnant participants, and to assess acceptability of dietary feedback via smartphone. Eligible women used a smartphone app to record everything they consumed over 3 nonconsecutive days. Records consisted of an image of the food or drink item placed next to a fiducial marker, with a voice or text description, or both, providing additional detail. We used the SNaQ tool to analyze participants' intake of daily food group servings and selected key micronutrients for pregnancy relative to Australian guideline recommendations. A visual reference guide consisting of images of foods and drinks in standard serving sizes assisted the dietitian with quantification. Feedback on participants' diets was provided via 2 methods: (1) a short video summary sent to participants' smartphones, and (2) a follow-up telephone consultation with a dietitian. Agreement between dietary intake assessment using the SNaQ tool and nutrient analysis software was evaluated using Spearman rank correlation and Cohen kappa. We enrolled 27 women (median age 28.8 years, 8 Indigenous Australians, 15 primiparas), of whom 25

  3. Time evaluation of image-guided radiotherapy in patients with spinal bone metastases. A single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, H.; Habermehl, D.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Time is an important factor during immobilization for radiotherapy (RT) of painful spinal bone metastases. The different RT techniques currently in use have differing impacts on medical staff requirements, treatment planning and radiation delivery. This prospective analysis aimed to evaluate time management during RT of patients with spine metastases, focusing particularly on the impact of image-guided RT (IGRT). Between 21 March 2013 and 17 June 2013, we prospectively documented the time associated with the core work procedures involving the patient during the first day of RT at three different linear accelerators (LINACs). The study included 30 patients; 10 in each of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with a single photon field in the posterior-anterior direction; group 3 received a three-dimensional conformal treatment plan. The median overall durations of one treatment session were 24 and 25.5 min for the conventional RT groups and 15 min for IGRT group. The longest single procedure was patient immobilization in group 1 (median 9.5 min), whereas this was image registration and matching in groups 2 and 3 (median duration 9.5 and 5 min, respectively). Duration of irradiation (beam-on time) was similar for all groups at 4 or 5 min. The shortest immobilization procedure was observed in group 3 with a median of 3 min, compared to 4 min in group 2 and 9.5 min in group 1. With this analysis, we have shown for the first time that addition of modern IGRT does not extend the overall treatment time for patients with painful bone metastases and can be applied as part of clinical routine in a palliative setting. The choice of treatment technique should be based upon the patient's performance status, as well as the size of the target volume and location of the metastasis. (orig.) [German] Der Zeitfaktor ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil bei der Immobilisation waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) bei schmerzhaften Knochenmetastasen der Wirbelsaeule. Unterschiedliche RT

  4. Magnetic helicity balance at Taylor relaxed states sustained by AC helicity injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Makoto; Morrison, Philip J.; Horton, Wendell; Hattori, Yuji

    2017-10-01

    Magnitudes of Taylor relaxed states that are sustained by AC magnetic helicity injection (also known as oscillating field current drive, OFCD) are investigated numerically in a cylindrical geometry. Compared with the amplitude of the oscillating magnetic field at the skin layer (which is normalized to 1), the strength of the axial guide field Bz 0 is shown to be an important parameter. The relaxation process seems to be active only when Bz 0 Neill et al., where the helicity injection rate is directly equated with the dissipation rate at the Taylor states. Then, the bifurcation to the helical Taylor state is predicted theoretically and the estimated magnitudes of the relaxed states reasonably agree with numerical results as far as Bz 0 < 1 . This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05627.

  5. Interventions to Prevent Suicide: A Literature Review to Guide Evaluation of California's Mental Health Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Joie; Ramchand, Rajeev; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Becker, Amariah; Eberhart, Nicole K.

    2013-01-01

    To help inform the evaluation design for CalMHSA's suicide prevention and early intervention initiatives, a review of program evaluation literature was done to assess program effectiveness and identify previously used evaluation methodologies.

  6. Anelastic Relaxation Mechanisms Characterization by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soberon Mobarak, Martin Jesus, E-mail: msoberon@sep.gob.mx [Secretaria de Educacion Publica (Mexico)

    2005-02-15

    Anelastic behavior of crystalline solids is generated by several microstructural processes. Its experimental study yields valuable information about materials, namely: modulus, dissipation mechanisms and activation enthalpies. However, conventional techniques to evaluate it are complicated, expensive, time consuming and not easily replicated. As a new approach, in this work a Moessbauer spectrum of an iron specimen is obtained with the specimen at repose being its parameters the 'base parameters'. After that, the same specimen is subjected to an alternated stress-relaxation cycle at frequency {omega}{sub 1} and a new Moessbauer spectrum is obtained under this excited condition; doing the same at several increasing frequencies {omega}{sub n} in order to scan a wide frequencies spectrum. The differences between the Moessbauer parameters obtained at each excitation frequency and the base parameters are plotted against frequency, yielding an 'anelastic spectrum' that reveals the different dissipation mechanisms involved, its characteristic frequency and activation energy. Results are in good agreement with the obtained with other techniques

  7. Anomalous enthalpy relaxation in vitreous silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here, we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extremely high sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content, but also from decrease of the Tg with repeating the calorimetric...... scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here, we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy...... relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hyperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas...

  8. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... the intramolecular dynamics during photodissociation is investigated. The apparent agreement with quantum mechanical calculations is shown to be in contrast to the applicability of the individual approximations used in deriving the model from a quantum mechanical treatment. In the spirit of the Bersohn-Zewail model...

  9. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t......We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... excellent agreement for the Likhtman-McLeish theory using the double reptation approximation for constraint release, if we remove the contribution of high-frequency modes to contour length fluctuations of the primitive chain....

  10. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm. The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap.

  11. Interventions to Improve Student Mental Health: A Literature Review to Guide Evaluation of California's Mental Health Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Osilla, Karen Chan; Woodbridge, Michelle W; Kase, Courtney Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H; D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Cerully, Jennifer L; Eberhart, Nicole K; Golan, Shari

    2013-01-01

    The authors review data on the prevalence of youth mental health disorders and schools' use of student mental health (SMH) programs. They also describe the role of schools in addressing SMH concerns and outline a conceptual model for guiding evaluation of SMH programs. Finally, they touch on issues related to evaluation of cross-system collaborations that can influence students' access to resources and services and then review some of the challenges associated with evaluating SMH programs. They determine that SMH programs can be effective and can improve staff, faculty, and student knowledge of mental health problems; provide skills for identifying and referring students with mental health and social and emotional difficulties; and change attitudes toward mental health problems.

  12. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu-Ju Jiang; Weiwei Chen; Hong Dan; Li Tan; He Zhu; Guangzhong Yang; Jinhua Shen; Yong-Bo Peng; Ping Zhao; Lu Xue; Meng-Fei Yu; Liqun Ma; Xiao-Tang Si; Zhuo Wang; Jiapei Dai

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smoo...

  13. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  14. The effect of relaxation therapy on autonomic functioning, symptoms and daily functioning, in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo; Vanderheiden, Tanja; Baert, Isabel; Descheemaeker, Filip; Struyf, Filip

    2015-03-01

    To establish the effects of relaxation therapy on autonomic function, pain, fatigue and daily functioning in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. A systematic literature study was performed. Using specific keywords related to fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome and relaxation therapy, the electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched. Included articles were assessed for their risk of bias and relevant information regarding relaxation was extracted. The review was conducted and reported according to the PRISMA-statement. Thirteen randomized clinical trials of sufficient quality were included, resulting in a total of 650 fibromyalgia patients (11 studies) and 88 chronic fatigue syndrome patients (3 studies). None of the studies reported effects on autonomic function. Six studies reported the effect of guided imagery on pain and daily functioning in fibromyalgia. The acute effect of a single session of guided imagery was studied in two studies and seems beneficial for pain relief. For other relaxation techniques (eg. muscle relaxation, autogenic training) no conclusive evidence was found for the effect on pain and functioning in fibromyalgia patients comparison to multimodal treatment programs. For fatigue a multimodal approach seemed better than relaxation, as shown in the sole three studies on chronic fatigue syndrome patients. There is moderate evidence for the acute effect of guided imagery on pain, although the content of the visualization is a matter of debate. Other relaxation formats and the effects on functionality and autonomic function require further study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Prospective evaluation of the radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions; Prospektive Evaluation der Handdosis des Radiologen im Rahmen von CT-gestuetzten Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogits, B.; Jungnickel, K.; Loewenthal, D.; Dudeck, O.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kropf, S. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Biometry and Medical Informatics; Nekolla, E.A. [The Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Wieners, G. [Charite CVC, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Assessment of radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions and determination of influencing factors. Materials and Methods: The following CT-guided interventions were included: Core biopsy, drainage, periradicular therapy, and celiac plexus neurolysis. The hand dose was measured with an immediately readable dosimeter, the EDD-30 (Unfors, Sweden). The default parameters for CT fluoroscopy were 120 kV, 90 mA and a 4 mm slice thickness. All interventions were performed on a 16-slice CT unit (Aquilion 16 Toshiba, Japan). The tumor size, degree of difficulty (1 - 3), level of experience and device parameters (mAs, dose-length product, scan time) were documented. Results: 138 CT-guided interventions (biopsy n = 99, drainage n = 23, pain therapy n = 16) at different locations (lung n = 41, retroperitoneum n = 53, liver n = 25, spine n = 19) were included. The lesion size was 4 - 240 mm (median: 23 mm). The fluoroscopy time per intervention was 4.6 - 140.2 s (median: 24.2 s). The measured hand dose ranged from 0.001 - 3.02 mSv (median: 0.22 mSv). The median hand dose for lung puncture (n = 41) was slightly higher (median: 0.32 mSv, p = 0.01) compared to that for the liver, retroperitoneum and other. Besides physical influencing factors, the degree of difficulty (p = 0.001) and summed puncture depth (p = 0.004) correlated significantly with the hand dose. Conclusion: The median hand dose for different CT-guided interventions was 0.22 mSv. Therefore, the annual hand dose limit would normally only be reached with about 2000 interventions. (orig.)

  16. Diffusional mechanisms augment the fluorine MR relaxation in paramagnetic perfluorocarbon nanoparticles that provides a "relaxation switch" for detecting cellular endosomal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingzhi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Junjie; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2011-09-01

    To develop a physical model for the (19)F relaxation enhancement in paramagnetic perfluorocarbon nanoparticles (PFC NP) and demonstrate its application in monitoring cellular endosomal functionality through a "(19)F relaxation switch" phenomenon. An explicit expression for (19)F longitudinal relaxation enhancement was derived analytically. Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to confirm the gadolinium-induced magnetic field inhomogeneity inside the PFC NP. Field-dependent T(1) measurements for three types of paramagnetic PFC NPs were carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. Based on the physical model, (19)F and (1)H relaxation properties of macrophage internalized paramagnetic PFC NPs were measured to evaluate the intracellular process of NPs by macrophages in vitro. The theoretical description was confirmed experimentally by field-dependent T(1) measurements. The shortening of (19)F T(1) was found to be attributed to the Brownian motion of PFC molecules inside the NP in conjunction with their ability to permeate into the lipid surfactant coating. A dramatic change of (19)F T(1) was observed upon endocytosis, revealing the transition from intact bound PFC NP to processed constituents. The proposed first-principle analysis of (19)F spins in paramagnetic PFC NP relates their structural parameters to the special MR relaxation features. The demonstrated "(19)F relaxation switch" phenomenon is potentially useful for monitoring cellular endosomal functionality. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Dynamics of supercooled liquid and plastic crystalline ethanol: Dielectric relaxation and AC nanocalorimetry distinguish structural α- and Debye relaxation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Y Z; Young-Gonzales, A R; Richert, R; Ediger, M D; Schick, C

    2017-07-07

    Physical vapor deposition has been used to prepare glasses of ethanol. Upon heating, the glasses transformed into the supercooled liquid phase and then crystallized into the plastic crystal phase. The dynamic glass transition of the supercooled liquid is successfully measured by AC nanocalorimetry, and preliminary results for the plastic crystal are obtained. The frequency dependences of these dynamic glass transitions observed by AC nanocalorimetry are in disagreement with conclusions from previously published dielectric spectra of ethanol. Existing dielectric loss spectra have been carefully re-evaluated considering a Debye peak, which is a typical feature in the dielectric loss spectra of monohydroxy alcohols. The re-evaluated dielectric fits reveal a prominent dielectric Debye peak, a smaller and asymmetrically broadened peak, which is identified as the signature of the structural α-relaxation and a Johari-Goldstein secondary relaxation process. This new assignment of the dielectric processes is supported by the observation that the AC nanocalorimetry dynamic glass transition temperature, Tα, coincides with the dielectric structural α-relaxation process rather than the Debye process. The combined results from dielectric spectroscopy and AC nanocalorimetry on the plastic crystal of ethanol suggest the occurrence of a Debye process also in the plastic crystal phase.

  18. Isometric relaxation of rat myocardium at end-systolic fiber length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegner, A W; Bing, S H

    1978-12-01

    In a "physiologically sequenced" contraction (PSC), which loads the isolated muscle preparation in a manner which approximates that of the intact heart, isometric relaxation precedes isotonic relaxation and occurs at minimum ("end-systolic") length. We studied the effects of inital muscle length, load, temperature, calcium, and isoproterenol on the isometric relaxation phase of physiologically sequenced contractions to define the determinants of the rate of isometric relaxation of rat left ventricular myocardium. At the baseline temperature (28 degrees C), relaxation was found to be nonexponential, and the maximum rate of decline of force (-dF/dtmax) was used to evaluate changes in relaxation. Three factors, shortening, end-systolic length, and total load, were examined as possible mechanical determinants of -dF/dtmax. We found that -dF/dtmax is linearly related to end-systolic muscle length for lengths below 94% of Lmax; -dF/dtmax is also strongly related to total load for lightly loaded contractions, but peaks at loads of approximately 80% of peak developed force and declines thereafter. Shortening is poorly correlated with -dF/dtmax. The slope of the linear portion of the relation between -dF/dtmax and end-systolic length appears to be independent of muscle-loading conditions and sensitive to factors known to alter relaxation.

  19. EMG biofeedback training, relaxation training, and placebo for the relief of chronic back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, S J; Jacobs, A; Goldfarb, J

    1986-12-01

    24 patients with chronic low back pain were randomly assigned to three treatment conditions: EMG biofeedback, relaxation training, and a placebo condition. Patients were seen for eight sessions and were evaluated before Session 1 and after Session 8. Eight analyses of covariance which were adjusted for age and pretest scores were computed on the final scores to find which variables could detect significant difference between treatments. Age was included as a covariate because the differences in age between conditions were significant. Four variables with significant and nearly significant differences were chosen for analysis. The second set of analyses identified the nature of the differences among the three conditions. These included a priori planned comparisons among conditions, and paired t tests. Relaxation-trained subjects were significantly superior to subjects in the placebo condition, in decreasing pain during the function test, increasing relaxation, and decreasing Upper Trapezius EMG. They were superior to EMG Biofeedback training in increasing reported activity. Both Relaxation and EMG trained subjects were able to reduce Upper Trapezius EMG by Session 8. Relaxation-trained subjects showed significant change on eight of the 14 possible comparisons for each treatment condition. EMG biofeedback training showed significant favorable results in only one condition; the placebo condition showed no significant results. Relaxation training gave better results in reducing EMG and pain, and in increasing relaxation and activity than either EMG biofeedback alone or a placebo condition.

  20. Adolescents developing life skills for managing type 1 diabetes: a qualitative, realistic evaluation of a guided self-determination-youth intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Gitte R; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Hommel, Eva; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Zoffmann, Vibeke

    2014-11-01

    To explore and illustrate how the Guided Self-Determination-Youth method influences the development of life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes supported by their parents and healthcare providers. Evidence-based methods that accomplish constructive cooperation between adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, their parents and healthcare providers are needed. We adjusted an adult life skills intervention comprising reflection sheets and advanced communication for use by adolescent-parent-professional triads in outpatient visits. A qualitative realistic evaluation design comprising eight context-mechanism-outcome configurations directed the analysis of the Guided Self-Determination-Youth's influence on adolescent-parent-professional triads to evaluate what worked for whom, how and in what circumstances. Thirteen adolescents aged 13-18 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes for ≥1 year and having poor glycaemic control participated together with 17 parents and eight healthcare providers. Data were collected from December 2009-March 2012 and consisted of digitally recorded outpatient Guide Self-Determination-Youth visits collected during the intervention period (11·5-24·5 months) and semi-structured interviews at 6-month follow-up. Emerging life skills in adolescents were identified as: (1) developing new relatedness with healthcare providers and parents; (2) becoming decision makers in their own lives with diabetes; and (3) growing personally. Reflection sheets combined with healthcare providers' advanced communication were central to promoting mutual problem-solving. A life skills approach turned outpatient visits into person-specific visits with improved cooperation patterns in the triads. Combining reflection sheets and advanced communication skills supported adolescents in beginning a process of developing life skills. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Viscoelastic Relaxation of Craters and Thermal Histories of the Mid-Sized Icy Satellites of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James; Phillips, Cynthia B.

    2017-10-01

    . Combination of the present crater relaxation results with a model of thermal evolution is ongoing in order to evaluate the geophysical self-consistency of the thermal structures considered here.

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a nHA/PA66 Composite Membrane for Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jidong; Man, Yi; Zuo, Yi; Zhang, Li; Huang, Cui; Liu, Man; Li, Yubao

    2011-01-01

    A nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (nHA/PA66) composite with good bioactivity and osteoconductivity is employed to develop a novel porous membrane with an asymmetric structure. In order to investigate the biocompatibility and the effect on guided bone regeneration (GBR) of nHA/PA66 porous membrane, the proliferation, viability, morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) of the osteoblast-like cell line (MG63) cultured on the membrane were studied in vitro. In vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis of the fabricated membrane were assessed by comparing guiding rats calvarial bone defects regeneration with "gold standard" GBR material, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) membrane. In vitro experiments showed that the nHA/PA66 composite membrane had good cell affinity and cytocompatibility, in favor of cell proliferation. The in vivo study showed that the nHA/PA66 asymmetric porous membrane had a good GBR effect. All the results indicate that the asymmetric porous nHA/PA66 composite GBR membrane with good biocompatibility, high bioactivity and osteoconductivity exhibits good GBR effect and has a potential to be applied in GBR fields, especially in dental tissue regeneration.

  3. Evaluation of a simplified augmented reality device for ultrasound-guided vascular access in a vascular phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yunseok; Choi, Seungpyo; Kim, Heechan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether a novel ultrasound device may be used with a simplified augmented reality technique, and to compare this device with conventional techniques during vascular access using a vascular phantom. Prospective, randomized study. Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine departments of a university-affiliated hospital. 20 physicians with no experience with ultrasound-guided techniques. All participants performed the vascular access technique on the vascular phantom model using both a conventional device and the new ultrasound device. Time and the number of redirections of the needle until aspiration of dye into a vessel of the vascular phantom were measured. The median/interquartile range of time was 39.5/41.7 seconds versus 18.6/10.0 seconds (P < 0.001) and number of redirections was 3/3.5 versus 1/0 (P < 0.001) for the conventional and novel ultrasound devices, respectively. During vascular access in a vascular phantom model, the novel device decreased the time and the number of redirections significantly. The device successfully improved the efficiency of the ultrasound-guided vascular access technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Axial transmission method for long bone fracture evaluation by ultrasonic guided waves: simulation, phantom and in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kailiang; Ta, Dean; He, Runxin; Qin, Yi-Xian; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-04-01

    Mode conversion occurs when the ultrasonic guided waves encounter fractures. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of fracture assessment in long cortical bone using guided-mode conversion. Mode conversion behavior between the fundamental modes S0 and A0 was analyzed. The expressions proposed for modal velocity were used to identify the original and converted modes. Simulations and phantom experiments were performed using 1.0-mm-thick steel plates with a notch width of 0.5 mm and notch depths of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Furthermore, in vitro experiments were carried out on nine ovine tibias with 1.0-mm-wide partial transverse gap break and cortical thickness varying from 2.10 to 3.88 mm. The study confirmed that mode conversion gradually becomes observable as fracture depth increases. Energy percentages of the converted modes correlated strongly with fracture depth, as illustrated by the frequency-sweeping experiments on steel phantoms (100-1100 kHz, r(2) = 0.97, p < 0.0069) and the fixed-frequency experiments on nine ovine tibias (250 kHz, r(2) = 0.97, p < 0.0056). The approaches described, including mode excitation, velocity expressions and energy percentage criteria, may also contribute to ultrasonic monitoring of long bone fracture healing. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Muscle relaxants for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bethan L; Whittle, Samuel L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2012-01-18

    -pharmacological therapies, or placebo) in adult patients with RA and that reported at least one clinically relevant outcome. Two blinded review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the trials. Meta-analyses were used to examine the efficacy of muscle relaxants on pain, depression, sleep and function, as well as their safety. Six trials (126 participants) were included in this review. All trials were rated at high risk of bias. Five cross-over trials evaluated a benzodiazepine, four assessed diazepam (n = 71) and one assessed triazolam (n = 15). The sixth trial assessed zopiclone (a non-benzodiazepine) (n = 40) and was a parallel group study. No trial duration was longer than two weeks while three single dose trials assessed outcomes at 24 hours only. Overall the included trials failed to find evidence of a beneficial effect of muscle relaxants over placebo, alone (at 24 hrs, 1 or 2 weeks) or in addition to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (at 24 hrs), on pain intensity, function, or quality of life. Data from two trials of longer than 24 hours duration (n = 74) (diazepam and zopiclone) found that participants who received a muscle relaxant had significantly more adverse events compared with those who received placebo (number needed to harm (NNTH) 3, 95% CI 2 to 7). These were predominantly central nervous system side effects, including dizziness and drowsiness (NNTH 3, 95% CI 2 to 11).  Based upon the currently available evidence in patients with RA, benzodiazepines (diazepam and triazolam) do not appear to be beneficial in improving pain over 24 hours or one week. The non-benzodiazepine agent zopiclone also did not significantly reduce pain over two weeks. However, even short term muscle relaxant use (24 hours to 2 weeks) is associated with significant adverse events, predominantly drowsiness and dizziness.

  6. A Investigation Into the Relaxation Behavior of Pharmaceutical Film Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, Christopher Michael

    Polymeric materials utilized as film coatings exhibit many different time dependent relaxations which can yield relevant information regarding their use. In this dissertation research, the effect of additives on the primary relaxation behavior and the effect of physical aging, a relaxation to the lowest free energy state, on the physical properties of glassy polymeric materials was investigated. Glassy polymeric materials were chosen in this study since they are widely utilized in the pharmaceutical industry. The observation of the aging process using a creep compliance technique was confirmed with polystyrene, a material whose aging behavior has been well studied. Results from both hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate, HP-55, and cellulose acetate indicate that these materials physically age in their sub-Tg temperature ranges. The mechanical data in both cases was successfully fit to a model which describes the relaxation behavior of condensed amorphous materials. The aging time and temperature dependence of key parameters from this model show that physical aging is thermally activated and thermoreversible. Aging time and temperature dependent reductions in the water permeability of cellulose acetate were observed. The reductions were correlated with calculations, based on the mechanical property changes, which describe the aging -induced relaxation of the glass. These results indicate that a structural change due to aging may be responsible for the observed reductions in water mobility in cellulose acetate. The dissolution rate of HP-55 was found to decrease to a limiting rate when physically aged. Mechanical measurements performed on film samples which were subjected to the same thermal history utilized in the dissolution experiments confirmed the observed aging effect. The effect of the addition of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate and polyethylene glycol 200 on the primary relaxation behavior of Eudragit S100, an enteric coating, was also evaluated in this

  7. Evaluation of Guided Bone Regeneration around Oral Implants over Different Healing Times Using Two Different Bovine Bone Materials: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical and Histological Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohal, Ralf Joachim; Straub, Lisa Marie; Wolkewitz, Martin; Bächle, Maria; Patzelt, Sebastian Berthold Maximilian

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the potential of two bone substitute materials and the influence of different healing periods in guided bone regeneration therapy of osseous defects around implants. Twenty-four edentulous patients received implants in the region of the lost lower incisors. Around two standardized osseous defects were created, treated either with a 50:50 mixture of PepGen P-15® and OsteoGraf®/N-700 (test group) or with BioOss® (control group), and covered with titanium membranes. After healing periods of 2, 4, 6, or 9 months, the implants were removed together with the surrounding bone and subsequently prepared for histological evaluations. Defect depths in both groups showed a clinical reduction after intervention. The histologically measured distance from the implant shoulder to the first point of bone-implant contact (BIC) after treatment did not differ between the two groups. The healing time influenced the level of the first point of BIC, with a longer healing period producing a more coronal first point of BIC. A greater percentage BIC and a higher fraction of mineralized bone were found in the pristine bone area compared with the augmented defect area. It can be concluded that in the treatment of osseous defects around oral implants, both materials were equally effective bone substitute materials when used in combination with guided bone regeneration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evaluation of osteochondral sample collection guided by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for early detection of osteoarthritis in centrodistal joints of young Icelandic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Charles J; Ekman, Stina; Dahlberg, Leif E; Björnsdóttir, Sigríður; Hansson, Kerstin

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the use of CT and MRI for guidance of osteochondral sample collection for histologic detection of early osteoarthritic lesions in centrodistal (distal intertarsal) joints of horses. Right tarsal joints from the cadavers of 24 Icelandic horses aged 29 to 31 months. CT and MRI were used to evaluate the extent of suspected osteoarthritic changes in centrodistal joints, which were graded with a semiquantitative system. The anatomic regions with the highest grade of change were identified, and osteochondral samples were obtained from these regions. Samples were also obtained from the same centrodistal joints at predetermined sites. Histologic examination of all samples was performed, with samples classified as negative or positive for osteoarthritis, and results were compared between sample collection methods. Histologic examination revealed osteoarthritic lesions in 29% (7/24) of centrodistal joints with the predetermined method and in 63% (15/24) with the image-guided method. Significant associations were identified between histologic osteoarthritis detection and the summed image-guided sample collection site image grades, central osteophytes, articular cartilage thickness abnormalities, grade 2 articular mineralization front defects, and grade 2 marginal osteophytes. CT and MRI aided the detection of focal changes suggestive of early-stage osteoarthritis in the centrodistal joints of equine cadavers and may be useful for detection of similar disease in live horses. The first morphological changes of centrodistal joint osteoarthritis were suspected to be in the articular cartilage and the articular mineralization front regions.

  9. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  10. A double-blind randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the influence of oral long-acting muscle relaxant (Mebeverine MR), and insufflation with CO(2) on pain associated with barium enema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A S; Chapman, A H; Wilson, D; Culpan, A G

    2003-07-01

    Previous investigators have shown significant benefit using CO(2) for bowel insufflation. Others have suggested that the long-acting smooth muscle relaxant, Mebeverine, may be of benefit. We subjected this to a randomised double-blind trial. A total of 181 outpatients were randomised to receive either Mebeverine or placebo as pre-medication, and either air or CO(2) for bowel insufflation, thus creating four treatment groups. Visual-analogue lines were used to record pain scores before, during, and up to 8 h following the enema. All groups showed increased pain scores during the enema, with peak pain scores at the end of the examination, falling to baseline scores by 8 h. Patients receiving the combination of C0(2) and placebo had significantly lower pain scores at 1 and 4 h ( P=0.00 and P=0.014, respectively; Kruskal-Wallis test) compared with all other groups. Having Mebeverine as a pre-medication did not significantly lower pain scores compared with placebo, and decreased the amount of benefit received from the CO(2). We confirm that CO(2) is of benefit in decreasing pain during barium enema, and we recommend its routine use to improve the comfort of patients. Mebeverine is not of benefit, and its use as a pre-medication for enemas is not recommended.

  11. A double-blind randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the influence of oral long-acting muscle relaxant (Mebeverine MR), and insufflation with CO{sub 2} on pain associated with barium enema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, A.S.; Chapman, A.H.; Wilson, D.; Culpan, A.G. [Department of Radiology, St. James' s University Hospital, Beckett Street, LS9 7TF, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Previous investigators have shown significant benefit using CO{sub 2} for bowel insufflation. Others have suggested that the long-acting smooth muscle relaxant, Mebeverine, may be of benefit. We subjected this to a randomised double-blind trial. A total of 181 outpatients were randomised to receive either Mebeverine or placebo as pre-medication, and either air or CO{sub 2} for bowel insufflation, thus creating four treatment groups. Visual-analogue lines were used to record pain scores before, during, and up to 8 h following the enema. All groups showed increased pain scores during the enema, with peak pain scores at the end of the examination, falling to baseline scores by 8 h. Patients receiving the combination of C0{sub 2} and placebo had significantly lower pain scores at 1 and 4 h (P=0.00 and P=0.014, respectively; Kruskal-Wallis test) compared with all other groups. Having Mebeverine as a pre-medication did not significantly lower pain scores compared with placebo, and decreased the amount of benefit received from the CO{sub 2}. We confirm that CO{sub 2} is of benefit in decreasing pain during barium enema, and we recommend its routine use to improve the comfort of patients. Mebeverine is not of benefit, and its use as a pre-medication for enemas is not recommended. (orig.)

  12. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  13. Limited locomotive ability relaxed selective constraints on molluscs mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shao'e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2017-09-06

    Mollusca are the second largest phylum in the animal kingdom with different types of locomotion. Some molluscs are poor-migrating, while others are free-moving or fast-swimming. Most of the energy required for locomotion is provided by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we conduct a comparative genomic analysis of 256 molluscs complete mitochondrial genomes and evaluate the role of energetic functional constraints on the protein-coding genes, providing a new insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution. The weakly locomotive molluscs, compared to strongly locomotive molluscs, show significantly higher Ka/Ks ratio, which suggest they accumulated more nonsynonymous mutations in mtDNA and have experienced more relaxed evolutionary constraints. Eleven protein-coding genes (CoxI, CoxII, ATP6, Cytb, ND1-6, ND4L) show significant difference for Ka/Ks ratios between the strongly and weakly locomotive groups. The relaxation of selective constraints on Atp8 arise in the common ancestor of bivalves, and the further relaxation occurred in marine bivalves lineage. Our study thus demonstrates that selective constraints relevant to locomotive ability play an essential role in evolution of molluscs mtDNA.

  14. Alternating-current conductivity and dielectric relaxation of bulk iodoargentate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hai-Bao, E-mail: duanhaibao4660@163.com; Yu, Shan-Shan; Zhou, Hong

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The electric modulus shows single dielectric relaxation process in the measured frequency range. - Highlights: • The conduction mechanism is described by quantum mechanical tunneling model. • The applications of dielectric modulus give a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. • The [Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4}]{sup 2−}1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cation column form the layered stacks by hydrogen bond interactions. - Abstract: An inorganic-organic hybrid compound Cu(en){sub 2}Ag{sub 2}I{sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine) (1) was synthesized and single crystal structurally characterized. Along the [001] direction, the inorganic parts form an infinite 1-D chain and [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} cations are separated by inorganic chain. The electrical conductivity and dielectric properties of 1 have been investigated over wide ranges of frequency. The alternating-current conductivities have been fitted to the Almond–West type power law expression with use of a single value of S. It is found that S values for 1 are nearly temperature-independent, which indicates that the conduction mechanism could be quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model. The dielectric loss and electric modulus show single dielectric relaxation process. The activation energy obtained from temperature-dependent electric modulus compare with the calculated from the dc conductivity plots.

  15. Comparison of ultrasound-guided core biopsy versus fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the evaluation of salivary gland lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, Nicholas J; Bradford, Carol R

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided core biopsy provides many benefits compared with fine-needle aspiration cytology and has begun to emerge as part of the diagnostic work-up for a salivary gland lesion. Although the increased potential for tumor-seeding and capsule rupture has been extensively discussed, the safety of this procedure is widely accepted based on infrequent reports of tumor-seeding. In fact, a review of the literature shows only 2 cases of salivary tumor seeding following biopsy with larger-gauge needle characteristics, with 2 reported cases of salivary tumor seeding following fine-needle aspiration cytology. However, the follow-up interval of such studies (seeding in each procedure, (3) discuss time course and patient numbers necessary to detect tumor recurrence, and (4) describe how these uncertainties should be factored into clinical considerations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Dirichlet problem successive upper relaxation numerical method convergence relaxation parameters influence investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliynyk A.P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation parameters values to definite sequential upper relaxation block method convergence optimal velocity have been determined for the Dirichlet's problem in two-dimensional rectangle spatial region, the iteration procedure convergence and positive definiteness of the corresponding linear algebraic equations system matrix have been proved.

  17. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  18. NOTE: Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Raghu B.; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; George, Rohini; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery.

  19. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); George, Rohini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: Paul.Keall@stanford.edu

    2008-06-07

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  20. Dynamics of Knot Relaxation in Stretched DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Alexander; Narsimhan, Vivek; Soh, Beatrice; Doyle, Patrick

    Knots occur naturally in biological DNA and have been shown to be relevant for next-generation sequencing applications. Knots and other topological constraints in bulk polymer systems have been shown to influence the overall dynamical behavior of aggregate materials, but it is an open question as to the role that individual knots play in polymer dynamics. Here, we investigated the dynamics of polymer knot relaxation by stretching knotted DNA with an extensional field in a microfluidic device and allowing it to relax to its coiled state, measuring the growth rate of the knot using fluorescence microscopy. We find that knots swell during relaxation with a timescale comparable to that of the end-to-end relaxation. The knot growth timescale in insensitive to differences in the perceived topological complexity of the knot and increases with polymer chain length with the same scaling as the end-to-end relaxation timescale. These findings suggest that the timescale governing the swelling of knots in initially stretched chains is subject to global rather than local polymer dynamics. NSF, SMART, NSERC.

  1. Characterization and evaluation of ionizing and non-ionizing imaging systems used in state of the art image-guided radiation therapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dennis Nichols

    With the growing incidence of cancer worldwide, the need for effective cancer treatment is paramount. Currently, radiation therapy exists as one of the few effective, non-invasive methods of reducing tumor size and has the capability for the elimination of localized tumors. Radiation therapy utilizes non-invasive external radiation to treat localized cancers but to be effective, physicians must be able to visualize and monitor the internal anatomy and target displacements. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy frequently utilizes planar and volumetric imaging during a course of radiation therapy to improve the precision and accuracy of the delivered treatment to the internal anatomy. Clinically, visualization of the internal anatomy allows physicians to refine the treatment to include as little healthy tissue as possible. This not only increases the effectiveness of treatment by damaging only the tumor but also increases the quality of life for the patient by decreasing the amount of healthy tissue damaged. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy is commonly used to treat tumors in areas of the body that are prone to movement, such as the lungs, liver, and prostate, as well as tumors located close to critical organs and tissues such as the tumors in the brain and spinal cord. Image-Guided Radiation Therapy can utilize both ionizing modalities, like x-ray based planar radiography and cone-beam CT, and nonionizing modalities like MRI, ultrasound and video-based optical scanning systems. Currently ionizing modalities are most commonly utilized for their ability to visualize and monitor internal anatomy but cause an increase to the total dose to the patient. Nonionizing imaging modalities allow frequent/continuous imaging without the increase in dose; however, they are just beginning to be clinically implemented in radiation oncology. With the growing prevalence and variety of Image-Guided Radiation Therapy imaging modalities the ability to evaluate the overall image quality, monitor

  2. Strain relaxation in nano-patterned strained-Si/SiGe heterostructure on insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuyn, E-mail: liuyan@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Liu Weili, E-mail: rabbitlwl@mail.sim.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Ma Xiaobo [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Lv Shilong; Song Zhitang; Lin Chenglu [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Shanghai Institute of Micro-system and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-03-15

    In order to evaluate the strain stability, arrays of strained Si/SiGe nano-stripes and nano-pillars were fabricated by Electron-Beam Lithography (EBL) and Reactive-Ion Etching (RIE). The strain relaxation in the patterned strained Si on SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) was investigated by high-resolution UV micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman measurements before and after patterning indicate that most of the strain in the top strained Si is maintained until scaling down to 300 nm, and relaxation of <15% is observed in pillars with a dimension of 150 nm x 150 nm. In the nano-patterned heterostructure strained Si/SiGe, the observed relaxation is small, which is mainly attributed to the fully relaxed and dislocation-free SiGe virtual substrate fabricated by modified Ge condensation.

  3. Viscoelastic relaxations of high alcohols and alkanes: Effects of heterogeneous structure and translation-orientation coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The frequency-dependent shear viscosity of high alcohols and linear alkanes, including 1-butanol, 1-octanol, 1-dodecanol, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. The relaxation of all the liquids was bimodal. The correlation functions of the collective orientation were also evaluated. The analysis of these functions showed that the slower relaxation mode of alkanes is assigned to the translation-orientation coupling, while that of high alcohols is not. The X-ray structure factors of all the alcohols showed prepeaks, as have been reported in the literature, and the intermediate scattering functions were calculated at the prepeak. Comparing the intermediate scattering function with the frequency-dependent shear viscosity based on the mode-coupling theory, it was demonstrated that the slower viscoelastic relaxation of the alcohols is assigned to the relaxation of the heterogeneous structure described by the prepeak.

  4. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Intervention in Extremity Fracture Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Qin; Deng, Yun-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Richmond, Christopher J; Tang, Ying; Zhou, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and self-efficacy in hospitalized patients admitted for an extremity fracture receiving elective surgery. Eighty four patients met the inclusion criteria and all were randomly assigned to either the progressive muscle relaxation group or the control group. The control group received standard orthopedic nursing care, and the experimental group received standard care along with daily progressive muscle relaxation throughout their hospitalization. The State Anxiety Inventory and Self-Efficacy Scales were administered before and after the intervention. Both paired-sample t tests and independent t tests showed that progressive muscle relaxation is effective in reducing state anxiety and enhancing the self-efficacy of patients with extremity fracture undergoing an elective surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. A major trauma course based on posters, audio-guides and simulation improves the management skills of medical students: Evaluation via medical simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisinier, Adrien; Schilte, Clotilde; Declety, Philippe; Picard, Julien; Berger, Karine; Bouzat, Pierre; Falcon, Dominique; Bosson, Jean Luc; Payen, Jean-François; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Medical competence requires the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and technical skills. Severe trauma management teaching is poorly developed during internship. Nevertheless, the basics of major trauma management should be acquired by every future physician. For this reason, the major trauma course (MTC), an educational course in major traumatology, has been developed for medical students. Our objective was to evaluate, via a high fidelity medical simulator, the impact of the MTC on medical student skills concerning major trauma management. The MTC contains 3 teaching modalities: posters with associated audio-guides, a procedural workshop on airway management and a teaching session using a medical simulator. Skills evaluation was performed 1 month before (step 1) and 1 month after (step 3) the MTC (step 2). Nineteen students were individually evaluated on 2 different major trauma scenarios. The primary endpoint was the difference between steps 1 and 3, in a combined score evaluating: admission, equipment, monitoring and safety (skill set 1) and systematic clinical examinations (skill set 2). After the course, the combined primary outcome score improved by 47% (P<0.01). Scenario choice or the order of use had no significant influence on the skill set evaluations. This study shows improvement in student skills for major trauma management, which we attribute mainly to the major trauma course developed in our institution. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of a new endoscopic ultrasound-guided multi-fiducial delivery system: a prospective non-survival study in a live porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganov, Peter V; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; Wagh, Mihir S

    2013-11-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an excellent tool for implanting fiducials for gastrointestinal malignancies, but a dedicated delivery system for EUS-guided fiducial placement is not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of a new dedicated EUS-guided multi-fiducial delivery system. This was a prospective live porcine study using prototype 22-G EUS needles preloaded with four fiducials. Primary outcomes were technical success and accuracy of fiducial placement. Secondary outcomes were ease of passage of delivery system, ease of deployment, EUS visualization of the needle, visual appearance of fiducials on EUS, fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) scans, time taken for fiducial placement and adverse events. Outcomes were scored on a predetermined 5-point Likert scale (1 = best, 5 = worst). Fiducial deployment was successful in 43 out of 45 needles (95.6%). All 172 fiducials (43 needles, four fiducials each)were successfully deployed on target. Fiducial placement accuracy score was 1.30 ± 0.64. All needles passed with ease (score 1.0 ± 0.0). Ease of fiducial deployment score was 1.85 ± 1.02. Mean scores for EUS visualization of the needle and fiducial were 1.02 ± 0.15 and 2.10 ± 0.91, respectively. Fluoroscopic and CT visualization of fiducials was excellent. Time for placement of four fiducials was new EUS-guided multi-fiducial delivery system provided quick, easy, and accurate fiducial deployment without adverse events. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  8. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  9. Asymptotic representation of relaxation oscillations in lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    In this book we analyze relaxation oscillations in models of lasers with nonlinear elements controlling light dynamics. The models are based on rate equations taking into account periodic modulation of parameters, optoelectronic delayed feedback, mutual coupling between lasers, intermodal interaction and other factors. With the aim to study relaxation oscillations we present the special asymptotic method of integration for ordinary differential equations and differential-difference equations. As a result, they are reduced to discrete maps. Analyzing the maps we describe analytically such nonlinear phenomena in lasers as multistability of large-amplitude relaxation cycles, bifurcations of cycles, controlled switching of regimes, phase synchronization in an ensemble of coupled systems and others. The book can be fruitful for students and technicians in nonlinear laser dynamics and in differential equations.

  10. Charge relaxation dynamics of an electrolytic nanocapacitor

    CERN Document Server

    Thakore, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Understanding ion relaxation dynamics in overlapping electric double layers (EDLs) is critical for the development of efficient nanotechnology based electrochemical energy storage, electrochemomechanical energy conversion and bioelectrochemical sensing devices besides controlled synthesis of nanostructured materials. Here, using Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method, we present results from the simulations of an electrolytic nanocapacitor subjected to a step potential at t = 0 for various degrees of EDL overlap, solvent viscosities, ratios of cation to anion diffusivity and electrode separations. A continuously varying molecular speed dependent relaxation time, proposed for use with the LB equation, recovers the correct microscopic description of molecular collision phenomena and holds promise for enhancing the stability of the LB algorithm. Results for large EDL overlap showed oscillatory behavior for ionic current densities in contrast to monotonic relaxation to equilibrium for low EDL overlap. Further, at low solv...

  11. Improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator

    KAUST Repository

    Mosad, Ahmed G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents an improved memristor-based relaxation oscillator which offers higher frequency and wider tunning range than the existing reactance-less oscillators. It also has the capability of operating on two positive supplies or alternatively a positive and negative supply. Furthermore, it has the advantage that it can be fully integrated on-chip providing an area-efficient solution. On the other hand, The oscillation concept is discussed then a complete mathematical analysis of the proposed oscillator is introduced. Furthermore, the power consumption of the new relaxation circuit is discussed and validated by the PSPICE circuit simulations showing an excellent agreement. MATLAB results are also introduced to demonstrate the resistance range and the corresponding frequency range which can be obtained from the proposed relaxation oscillator. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Impaired gastric relaxation in patients with achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearin, F; Papo, M; Malagelada, J R

    1995-03-01

    Achalasia is considered a primary motility disorder confined to the oesophagus. The lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) in achalasia is frequently hypertonic and manifests absent or incomplete relaxation in response to deglution. On the other hand, the LOS and the proximal stomach act physiologically as a functional unit whereby relaxation of the LOS during deglution is associated with receptive relaxation of the proximal stomach. Thus, this study investigated the hypothesis that impaired LOS relaxation in patients with achalasia might be associated with impaired relaxation of the proximal stomach. The study consisted of 20 patients with achalasia and 10 healthy controls. Gastric tone variations were quantified using an electronic barostat. Firstly, the study established the basal gastric tone (intragastric volume at the minimal distending pressure+1 mm Hg) and gastric compliance (volume/pressure relation) during isobaric distension (increasing stepwise the intragastric pressure from 0 to 20 mm Hg up to 600 ml). Secondly, the gastric tone response to cold stress (hand immersion into ice water for five minutes) or to control stimuli (water at 37 degrees) was determined. Basal gastric tone mean (SEM) was similar in achalasia and in healthy controls (125 (9) ml v 138 (9) ml, respectively). Compliance was linear and similar in both groups, which also showed similar gastric extension ratios (58 (7) ml/mm Hg v 57 (6) ml/mm Hg). Cold stress induced a gastric relaxatory response that, as a group, was significantly lower in achalasia than in healthy controls (volume: 43 (20) ml v 141 (42) ml; p 100 ml) relaxatory responses whereas four of the 10 healthy controls did not. In conclusion, reflex gastric relaxation is impaired in most patients with achalasia showing that the proximal stomach, and not exclusively the oesophagus, may be effected by the disease.

  13. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  14. A randomised controlled trial of the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on chemotherapy-induced anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mei-Feng; Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Hsu, Yu-Yun; Fetzer, Susan; Hsu, Mei-Chi

    2011-04-01

    To determine the effect of music therapy and verbal relaxation on state anxiety and anxiety-induced physiological manifestations among patients with cancer before and after chemotherapy. Cancer and its treatment provoke a series of changes in the emotional sphere of the patient's anxiety. Music therapy and verbal relaxation had reported the anxiety reduction effect on patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been undertaken comparing music therapy and verbal relaxation in differentiating high-normal state anxiety subsample. A randomised controlled trial and permuted block design were used. Outpatient chemotherapy clinic operated by a University medical centre in southern Taiwan. Ninety-eight patients were randomised into three groups: the music therapy group received one-hour single music session; the verbal relaxation group received 30 minutes of guided relaxation; the control group received usual care. Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Emotional Visual Analog Scale, three biobehavioural indicators: skin temperature, heart rate and consciousness level were measured during and after chemotherapy. Music therapy had a greater positive effect on postchemotherapy anxiety than verbal relaxation and control groups and a significantly increase in skin temperature. Patients with high state anxiety receiving music therapy had a greater drop in postchemotherapy anxiety than did the normal state anxiety subsample. Both music and verbal relaxation therapy are effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced anxiety. Thirty minutes of intervention initiates anxiety reduction. Patients with high state anxiety receiving chemotherapy obtain the most benefit from music or verbal relaxation. Prior to chemotherapy, patients with high state anxiety must be sorted from all patients as they are more responsive to interventions. Oncology nurses can offer music and verbal relaxation as adjuvant interventions to reduce chemotherapy-induced anxiety and enhance the

  15. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements and into the t...... excellent agreement for the Likhtman-McLeish theory using the double reptation approximation for constraint release, if we remove the contribution of high-frequency modes to contour length fluctuations of the primitive chain....

  16. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  17. Signal prediction by anticipatory relaxation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Henning U.

    2016-03-01

    Real-time prediction of signals is a task often encountered in control problems as well as by living systems. Here, a parsimonious prediction approach based on the coupling of a linear relaxation-delay system to a smooth, stationary signal is described. The resulting anticipatory relaxation dynamics (ARD) is a frequency-dependent predictor of future signal values. ARD not only approximately predicts signals on average but can anticipate the occurrence of signal peaks, too. This can be explained by recognizing ARD as an input-output system with negative group delay. It is characterized, including its prediction horizon, by its analytically given frequency response function.

  18. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akural, Etem [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Pain Clinic (Finland); Ojala, Risto O. [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland); Jaervimaeki, Voitto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology (Finland); Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.blanco@oulu.fi [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland)

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  19. Clinical evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue graft and guided tissue regeneration for treatment of Miller’s class 1 gingival recession (comparative, split mouth, six months study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Neeta-V.; Dulani, Kirti; Trivedi, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study aims to clinically compare and evaluate subepithelial connective tissue graft and the GTR based root coverage in treatment of Miller’s Class I gingival recession. Study Design: 30 patients with at least one pair of Miller’s Class I gingival recession were treated either with Subepithelial connective tissue graft (Group A) or Guided tissue regeneration (Group B). Clinical parameters monitored included recession RD, width of keratinized gingiva (KG), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), attached gingiva (AG), residual probing depth (RPD) and % of Root coverage(%RC). Measurements were taken at baseline, three months and six months. A standard surgical procedure was used for both Group A and Group B. Data were recorded and statistical analysis was done for both intergroup and intragroup. Results: At end of six months % RC obtained were 84.47% (Group A) and 81.67% (Group B). Both treatments resulted in statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters. When compared, no statistically significant difference was found between both groups except in RPD, where it was significantly greater in Group A. Conclusions: GTR technique has advantages over subepithelial connective tissue graft for shallow Miller’s Class I defects and this procedure can be used to avoid patient discomfort and reduce treatment time. Key words:Collagen membrane, comparative split mouth study, gingival recession, subepithelial connective tissue graft, guided tissue regeneration (GTR). PMID:25136420

  20. Clinical evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue graft and guided tissue regeneration for treatment of Miller's class 1 gingival recession (comparative, split mouth, six months study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Sakshee-R; Bhavsar, Neeta-V; Dulani, Kirti; Trivedi, Rahul

    2014-07-01

    The present study aims to clinically compare and evaluate subepithelial connective tissue graft and the GTR based root coverage in treatment of Miller's Class I gingival recession. 30 patients with at least one pair of Miller's Class I gingival recession were treated either with Subepithelial connective tissue graft (Group A) or Guided tissue regeneration (Group B). Clinical parameters monitored included recession RD, width of keratinized gingiva (KG), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), attached gingiva (AG), residual probing depth (RPD) and % of Root coverage(%RC). Measurements were taken at baseline, three months and six months. A standard surgical procedure was used for both Group A and Group B. Data were recorded and statistical analysis was done for both intergroup and intragroup. At end of six months % RC obtained were 84.47% (Group A) and 81.67% (Group B). Both treatments resulted in statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters. When compared, no statistically significant difference was found between both groups except in RPD, where it was significantly greater in Group A. GTR technique has advantages over subepithelial connective tissue graft for shallow Miller's Class I defects and this procedure can be used to avoid patient discomfort and reduce treatment time. Key words:Collagen membrane, comparative split mouth study, gingival recession, subepithelial connective tissue graft, guided tissue regeneration (GTR).

  1. Evaluation of the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of occupational radiation dose rate during fluoroscopically guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandblom, V; Mai, T; Almén, A; Rystedt, H; Cederblad, Å; Båth, M; Lundh, C

    2013-09-01

    Optimisation of radiological protection for operators working with fluoroscopically guided procedures has to be performed during the procedure, under varying and difficult conditions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate on optimisation of occupational radiological protection in fluoroscopically guided procedures. Individual radiation dose measurements, using a system for real-time visualisation, were performed in a cardiology laboratory for three cardiologists and ten assisting nurses. Radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were not displayed to the staff were compared to radiation doses collected when the radiation dose rates were displayed. When the radiation dose rates were displayed to the staff, one cardiologist and the assisting nurses (as a group) significantly reduced their personal radiation doses. The median radiation dose (Hp(10)) per procedure decreased from 68 to 28 μSv (p = 0.003) for this cardiologist and from 4.3 to 2.5 μSv (p = 0.001) for the assisting nurses. The results of the present study indicate that a system for real-time visualisation of radiation dose rate may have a positive impact on optimisation of occupational radiological protection. In particular, this may affect the behaviour of staff members practising inadequate personal radiological protection.

  2. Computerized tomography-guided sphenopalatine ganglion pulsed radiofrequency treatment in 16 patients with refractory cluster headaches: Twelve- to 30-month follow-up evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Luo; Jingjing, Lu; Ying, Shen; Lan, Meng; Tao, Wang; Nan, Ji

    2016-02-01

    Sphenopalatine ganglion percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation treatment can improve the symptoms of cluster headaches to some extent. However, as an ablation treatment, radiofrequency thermocoagulation treatment also has side effects. To preliminarily evaluate the efficacy and safety of a non-ablative computerized tomography-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of sphenopalatine ganglion in patients with refractory cluster headaches. We included and analysed 16 consecutive cluster headache patients who failed to respond to conservative therapy from the Pain Management Center at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital between April 2012 and September 2013 treated with pulsed radiofrequency treatment of sphenopalatine ganglion. Eleven of 13 episodic cluster headaches patients and one of three chronic cluster headaches patient were completely relieved of the headache within an average of 6.3 ± 6.0 days following the treatment. Two episodic cluster headache patients and two chronic cluster headache patients showed no pain relief following the treatment. The mean follow-up time was 17.0 ± 5.5 months. All patients enrolled in this study showed no treatment-related side effects or complications. Our data show that patients with refractory episodic cluster headaches were quickly, effectively and safely relieved from the cluster period after computerized tomography-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of sphenopalatine ganglion, suggesting that it may be a therapeutic option if conservative treatments fail. © International Headache Society 2015.

  3. Interventions to Prevent Suicide: A Literature Review to Guide Evaluation of California's Mental Health Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie; Ramchand, Rajeev; Jaycox, Lisa H; Becker, Amariah; Eberhart, Nicole K

    2013-01-01

    To help inform the evaluation design for CalMHSA's suicide prevention (SP) and early intervention initiatives, a review of program evaluation literature was done to assess program effectiveness and identify previously used evaluation methodologies. Using evidence from the literature review, the authors provide an overview of the epidemiology of suicides and of non-fatal self-inflicted injuries in California and present a framework for evaluating SP programs, including candidate evaluation measures. The review identified three methodological considerations that can inform the evaluation of SP programs: (1) identifying whether a SP program was effective at reducing suicide deaths is challenging because suicide is such a rare event; (2) SP programs may have differential effects on population subgroups, because suicide rates differ by age, race, and sex; and (3) SP programs may show immediate reductions in suicide attempts but their long-term effects are uncertain. The review also identified two critical gaps in the literature. First, SP evaluation research explores the effects of programs on such outcomes as reduced access to lethal means, provision of care, and crisis response; however, we need to learn more about how these programs influence suicide rates. Second, more research must address the differential effectiveness of SP programs for population subgroups vulnerable to suicide.

  4. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  5. Spectrophotometric evaluation of color match to VITA classical shade guide of four different veneering porcelain systems for metal ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Giovanni; Vichi, Alessandro; Corciolani, Gabriele; Ferrari, Marco

    2009-02-01

    To determine by a spectrophotometric analysis the variations in color between the fabricated shade of four different porcelain systems and the intended shade when applied in a set thickness. Four porcelain systems (Duceram Kiss, VITA Omega, Wieland Reflex, Ivoclar IPS d.SIGN) for metal ceramic restorations were selected. Three disk-shaped (15 mm diameter, 0.3 mm thickness) specimens per group were made for three different shades of the A color scale of the Vitapan classical shade guide. On a Cr-Co alloy, 0.15 mm of porcelain opaque and 1.0 mm of translucent porcelain was applied. The porcelain stratification was executed according to the manufacturers' indications. The color measures were made by the clinical spectrophotometer Easyshade. No statistically significant differences were found among the ceramic systems examined. The recorded differences in color between A2 porcelain disks and corresponding VITA shade tabs were closer (mean delta E = 2.50) than those recorded for shade A3 (mean delta E = 3.84) and shade A3.5 (mean delta E= 3.94) (P<0.05).

  6. National approach for evaluation and control of wine safety: Guide to good hygiene practices for French wine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camponovo Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptation of wines to the market requirements have involved changes in wine making processes. Improved methods of analysis now allow to detect traces of compounds injurious for consumers' health. In collective imagination, wines remain born from traditional methods, pathogen free and, by extension, free of any health concern. Consumers now access easily to detailed information, and various media allow them to get a hold on the subject of wine safety. The contents encountered are sometimes alarming and create many questions enable to damage the image of the product. In order to support French wine makers facing the rise of this theme and answer European regulation, IFV has developed with French professional organizations a guide to good hygiene practices (GGHP including hazard analysis for wine industry. The aim was to provide all companies a reference document approved by the French authorities and pool most of the principles of HACCP to limit the task of smaller businesses. The GGHP details essential good practices that have to be implemented by every company of wine industry, regardless its size and the kind of wine produced. It also describes hazard analysis and specific recommendations for each one and gives recommendations and tools to manage them.

  7. Evaluation of the incidence on insufficient cytology results comparing different ultrasound-guided aspiration techniques for thyroid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hyng; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Ji Kang [Dept. of Radiology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    We compared the incidence of insufficient thyroid cytology due to blood-stained materials or low cellularity in terms of aspiration technique, especially focusing on the degree of suction pressure and needle size. Three experienced radiologists performed ultrasound-guided aspiration for thyroid nodules in 1174 thyroid nodules consecutively. Three different techniques were used; (A) using a 25 gauge needle with mainly capillary technique in 269 nodules; (B) using a 25 gauge needle with 3 cc syringe and minimal suction pressure in 303 nodules; (C) using a 22-23 gauge needle with 10 cc syringe and aspirator in 602 nodules. The differences of the incidence of the insufficient cytology among the three aspiration techniques and relationships of the incidence and needle size/degree of suction pressure was statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test with linear-by-linear association. Overall, the difference in insufficient cytology was significant across the three aspiration technique (p = 0.004), and the incidence tended to increase significantly with increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure (p < 0.001). A pairwise comparison of aspiration techniques found significant differences (p = 0.003) between techniques (A) and (C), and no differences between technique (B) and (C) (p 0.07) and between techniques (A) and (B) (p = 0.10). The incidence of insufficient cytology was significantly low in the capillary technique, and it increased significantly with the increase of needle size and degree of suction pressure.

  8. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various ...

  9. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various other investigations ...

  10. Individualized Study Guide on Apiculture: Instructor's Guide. Curriculum Materials for Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housmam, John L.; And Others

    The instructor's guide is coordinated for use with the student guide. The guide includes suggestions for teacher preparation, equipment and supply needs, suggested references, available audiovisual materials, open-ended questions for classroom discussion, educational opportunities for students, and a form for student evaluation of the study guide.…

  11. Analyses of guide update approaches for vector evaluated particle swarm optimisation on dynamic multi-objective optimisation problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available constraint violations on the performance of the Dynamic Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation (DVEPSO) algorithm when solving DMOOPs. Furthermore, the performance of DVEPSO is compared against the performance of three other state-of-the-art dynamic...

  12. Research on elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for activities implemented jointly; Kyodo jisshi katsudo hyoka guide line sakutei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for activities implemented jointly (AIJ) was researched to prevent the earth from warming. AIJ is the means to globally promote countermeasures against global warming cost-effectively by optimally combining every country`s technology, know-how and fund. AIJ was established in the 1st Conference of the Parties (COPI) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in March, 1995. The pilot phase of AIJ is first carried out by voluntary workers jointly with developing countries under the agreement of the parties. The current situation of activities is reported in COPI as materials for evaluation of AIJ. To promote AIJ, elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for AIJ Japan program is also necessary for Japan. This research arranged the contents of the evaluation guidelines and the method of classifying projects for AIJ Japan program, and carried out some case studies of promising projects to reduce greenhouse gas emission for future proposal. 3 figs., 31 tabs.

  13. Bioassay-guided evaluation of Dioscorea villosa - an acute and subchronic toxicity, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lima, Claudio Moreira; Lima, Adriana Karla; Melo, Marcelia G Dória; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Oliveira, Dênisson Lima; de Almeida, Enrik Barbosa; Barreto, Rosana Souza Siqueira; Nogueira, Paulo Cesar de Lima; Moraes, Valéria Regina de Souza; Oliveira, Edica Ramone Andrade; de Albuquerque, Jr, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Araújo, Adriano Antunes Souza

    2013-01-01

    .... In this regard, we carried out to evaluated both antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental models and assess the toxic effects of the acute (single dose) and subchronic (30 days...

  14. A Software Developer’s Guide to Informal Evaluation of Visual Analytics Environments Using VAST Challenge Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Kris A.; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.

    2015-12-07

    The VAST Challenge has been a popular venue for academic and industry participants for over ten years. Many participants comment that the majority of their time in preparing VAST Challenge entries is discovering elements in their software environments that need to be redesigned in order to solve the given task. Fortunately, there is no need to wait until the VAST Challenge is announced to test out software systems. The Visual Analytics Benchmark Repository contains all past VAST Challenge tasks, data, solutions and submissions. This paper details the various types of evaluations that may be conducted using the Repository information. In this paper we describe how developers can do informal evaluations of various aspects of their visual analytics environments using VAST Challenge information. Aspects that can be evaluated include the appropriateness of the software for various tasks, the various data types and formats that can be accommodated, the effectiveness and efficiency of the process supported by the software, and the intuitiveness of the visualizations and interactions. Researchers can compare their visualizations and interactions to those submitted to determine novelty. In addition, the paper provides pointers to various guidelines that software teams can use to evaluate the usability of their software. While these evaluations are not a replacement for formal evaluation methods, this information can be extremely useful during the development of visual analytics environments.

  15. Development and evaluation of multi-energy PbO dosimeter for quality assurance of image-guide radiation therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Han, Moo-Jae; Oh, Kyung-Min; Lee, Young-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Wook; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, accurate radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) reproduction is necessary to optimize the clinical results. Thus, attempts have recently been made to ensure high RTP reproducibility using image-guide radiation therapy (IGRT) technology. However, the clinical use of digital X-ray equipment requires extended quality assurance (QA) for those devices, since the IGRT device quality determines the precision of intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The study described in this paper was focused on developing a multi-energy PbO dosimeter for IGRT device QA. The Schottky-type polycrystalline PbO dosimeter with a Au/PbO/ITO structure was evaluated by comparing its response coincidence, dose linearity, measurement reproducibility, linear attenuation coefficient, and percent depth dose with those of Si diode and standard ionization chamber dosimeters.

  16. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide - Table of Contents Facts For Families Guide - View by Topic Chinese Facts for Families Guide ... Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate for any child or adolescent ...

  17. Evaluation of the use of laparoscopic-guided cholecystocholangiography and liver biopsy in definitive diagnosis of neonatal cholestatic jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Shreef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Once it is established that a jaundiced infant has direct hyperbilirubinemia, the principal diagnostic concern is to differentiate hepatocellular from obstructive cholestasis. Traditional tests such as ultrasonography, percutaneous liver biopsy and technetium 99 m hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (HIDA scan are often not sufficiently discriminating. Definitive exclusion of biliary atresia (BA in the infant with cholestatic jaundice usually requires mini-laparotomy and intra-operative cholangiography. This approach has many drawbacks because those sick infants are subjected to a time-consuming procedure with the probability of negative surgical exploration. Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of laparoscopic-guided cholecystocholangiography (LGCC and its accuracy and safety in the diagnosis of BA and thus preventing unnecessary laparotomy in infants whose cholestasis is caused by diseases other than BA. Patients and Methods: Twelve cholestatic infants with direct hyperbilirubinemia subjected to LGCC (age, 7–98 days; mean, 56 days after ultrasound scan and (99 mTc HIDA scan and percutaneous liver biopsy failed to provide the definitive diagnosis. Results: One patient had completely absent gall bladder (GB so the laparoscopic procedure was terminated and laparotomy was done (Kasai operation. Four patients had small size GB; they underwent LGCC that showed patent common bile duct with atresia of common hepatic duct, so laparotomy and Kasai operation was performed. Seven patients had well-developed GB, LGCC revealed patent biliary tree, so laparoscopic liver biopsies were taken for histopathology. Five of those patients had neonatal hepatitis, and two had cholestasis as a complication of prolonged TPN. No perioperative complications or mortalities were recorded. Conclusion: When the diagnosis neonatal cholestasis remains elusive after traditional investigations, LGCC is an accurate and simple method

  18. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  19. Collection Development: Relaxation & Meditation, September 1, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettus, Dodi

    2010-01-01

    One of the first books to document the relationship between stress and physical and emotional health was "The Relaxation Response" by Herbert Benson, M.D., with Miriam Z. Klipper. Originally published in 1975, the book grew out of Benson's observations as a cardiologist and his research as a fellow at Harvard Medical School. Benson's study of…

  20. Waveform relaxation methods for implicit differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van der Houwen; W.A. van der Veen

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe apply a Runge-Kutta-based waveform relaxation method to initial-value problems for implicit differential equations. In the implementation of such methods, a sequence of nonlinear systems has to be solved iteratively in each step of the integration process. The size of these systems

  1. High Relaxivity Gadolinium-Polydopamine Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao; Carniato, Fabio; Xie, Yijun; Huang, Yuran; Li, Yiwen; He, Sha; Zang, Nanzhi; Rinehart, Jeffrey D; Botta, Mauro; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2017-10-10

    This study reports the preparation of a series of gadolinium-polydopamine nanoparticles (GdPD-NPs) with tunable metal loadings. GdPD-NPs are analyzed by nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion and with a 7-tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A relaxivity of 75 and 10.3 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 and 7 T is observed, respectively. Furthermore, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry is used to study intraparticle magnetic interactions and determine the GdPD-NPs consist of isolated metal ions even at maximum metal loadings. From these data, it is concluded that the observed high relaxivities arise from a high hydration state of the Gd(III) at the particle surface, fast rate of water exchange, and negligible antiferromagnetic coupling between Gd(III) centers throughout the particles. This study highlights design parameters and a robust synthetic approach that aid in the development of this scaffold for T1 -weighted, high relaxivity MRI contrast agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Relaxation and music to reduce postsurgical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, M; Stanton-Hicks, M; Grass, J A; Anderson, G C; Lai, H L; Roykulcharoen, V; Adler, P A

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effects of relaxation, music, and the combination of relaxation and music on postoperative pain, across and between two days and two activities (ambulation and rest) and across ambulation each day. This secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial was conducted from 1995 to 1997. After surgery, patients do not always receive sufficient relief from opioids and may have undesired side-effects. More complete relief (10-30%) was found recently with adjuvant interventions of relaxation, music, and their combination. Comparison of effects between days and treatments have not been examined longitudinally. With a repeated measures design, abdominal surgery patients (n = 468) in five US hospitals were assigned randomly to one of four groups; relaxation, music, their combination, and control. With institutional approval and written informed consent, subjects were interviewed and taught interventions preoperatively. Postoperative testing was at ambulation and rest on days 1 and 2 using visual analogue (VAS) sensation and distress of pain scales. Multivariate analysis indicated that although pain decreased by day 2, interventions were not different between days and activities. They were effective for pain across ambulation on each day, across ambulation and across rest over both days (all P pain on both postoperative days and at both ambulation and rest.

  3. Electron beam relaxation in turbulent plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karfidov, D.M.; Lukina, N.A. [General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The electron beam interaction with collisionless plasma was studied experimentally. The beam relaxation length is shown to be determined by strong Langmuir turbulence development. Effective collision frequency of turbulence is determined; final cavity size determined from plasma electrical field strength measurements is estimated to be about 30 Debay lengths. (author)

  4. Relaxations of combinatorial problems via association schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; De Oliveira Filho, F.M.; Pasechnik, D.V.; Anjos, M.F.; Lasserre, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we describe a novel way of deriving semidefinite programming relaxations of a wide class of combinatorial optimization problems. Many combinatorial optimization problems may be viewed as finding an induced subgraph of a specific type of maximum weight in a given weighted graph. The

  5. Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The relaxation model proposed by Taylor [1] is well-suited to characterize the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a self-organized state, but its application to tokamak discharges was beset with difficulties. Bhattacharjee and Kwok [2] tried to overcome these by formulat- ing additional global invariants and constructed tokamak ...

  6. Paramagnetic proton nuclear magnetic relaxation in the Ni2 hexa-aquo complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlund, Per-Olof; Benetis, Nikolas; Wennerström, Håkan

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation of the protons in the Ni2+(H2O)6 complex is analysed using a previously developed formalism (Benetis et al. 1983, Molec. Phys., 48, 329) for the description of paramagnetic nuclear spin relaxation in systems with a complex electron spin relaxation. The nuclear spin relaxation can be described within the Redfield theory and the transverse relaxation rate is expressed in terms of a spectral density K1, -1(ωI), which is the Fourier-Laplace transform of a complex correlation function. In the Ni2+(H2O) complex the electron spin relaxation is caused by the zero field splitting (ZFS) and to evaluate the correlation function it is necessary to specify the dynamics of the ZFS. Three models are considered for this motion: (i) modulation of the ZFS by quantized vibrations, (ii) a classical pseudo-rotation of the ZFS at constant amplitude and (iii) a classical motion of the ZFS in an harmonic potential governed by the Smoluchowski equation.

  7. Effect of static neck flexion in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon in healthy males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi-Khatir, Roghayeh; Talebian, Saeed; Maroufi, Nader; Olyaei, Gholam Reza

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal disorder, especially among skilled workers who must keep their necks in a flexed position frequently during the day. The present study investigated changes in cervical flexion-relaxation phenomenon parameters after sustained neck flexion. The participants were 40 healthy subjects grouped by gender (20 females, 20 males). They were exposed to static neck flexion at the full angle of cervical flexion for 10 min. Each subject underwent three trials of cervical flexion and re-extension before and after this period. Differences in onset and cessation angle of flexion-relaxation phenomenon, maximum neck flexion angle, amplitude of neck muscle activation and flexion-relaxation ratio were evaluated. The maximum neck flexion angle significantly increased after sustained flexion. The onset of flexion-relaxation was significantly delayed during flexion, but cessation angle remained unchanged. Myoelectric activity of the cervical erector spinae muscles increased significantly after maintaining flexion, especially in female subjects. The flexion-relaxation ratio also decreased significantly. It was concluded that 10 min of static flexion results in a delay in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and a shortened silence period. Also the cervical erector spinae muscles are required to be active longer and generate more activity. These neuromuscular changes may be a risk factor for neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Operator Performance Metrics for Control Room Modernization: A Practical Guide for Early Design Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Thomas Ulrich; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-03-01

    As control rooms are modernized with new digital systems at nuclear power plants, it is necessary to evaluate the operator performance using these systems as part of a verification and validation process. There are no standard, predefined metrics available for assessing what is satisfactory operator interaction with new systems, especially during the early design stages of a new system. This report identifies the process and metrics for evaluating human system interfaces as part of control room modernization. The report includes background information on design and evaluation, a thorough discussion of human performance measures, and a practical example of how the process and metrics have been used as part of a turbine control system upgrade during the formative stages of design. The process and metrics are geared toward generalizability to other applications and serve as a template for utilities undertaking their own control room modernization activities.

  9. Calcium dobesilate potentiates endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated relaxation of human penile resistance arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier; Cuevas, Pedro; Fernández, Argentina; Gabancho, Sonia; Videla, Sebastián; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2003-06-01

    1 We have evaluated the participation of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) and human corpus cavernosum (HCC) strips. In addition, the effect of the angioprotective agent, calcium dobesilate (DOBE), on the endothelium-dependent relaxation of these tissues was investigated. 2 Combined inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) nearly abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) in HCC, while 60% relaxation of HPRA was observed under these conditions. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA resistant to NOS and COX inhibition was prevented by raising the extracellular concentration of K(+) (35 mM) or by blocking Ca(2)(+)-activated K(+) channels, with apamin (APA; 100 nM) and charybdotoxin (CTX; 100 nM), suggesting the involvement of EDHF in these responses. 3 Endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh was markedly enhanced by DOBE (10 micro M) in HPRA but not in HCC. The potentiating effects of DOBE on ACh-induced responses in HPRA, remained after NOS and COX inhibition, were reduced by inhibition of cytochrome P450 oxygenase with miconazole (0.3 mM) and were abolished by high K(+) or a combination of APA and CTX. 4 In vivo, DOBE (10 mg kg(-1) i.v.) significantly potentiated the erectile responses to cavernosal nerve stimulation in male rats. 5 EDHF plays an important role in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA but not in HCC. DOBE significantly improves endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA mediated by EDHF and potentiates erectile responses in vivo. Thus, EDHF becomes a new therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and DOBE could be considered a candidate for oral therapy for ED.

  10. Relationship between motor function of the proximal stomach and transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation after morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penagini, R; Allocca, M; Cantù, P; Mangano, M; Savojardo, D; Carmagnola, S; Bianchi, P A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Morphine reduces the rate of transient lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) relaxations but its site of action is presently unknown. There are no data available concerning its motor effects on the proximal stomach, an important site for triggering transient LOS relaxations. Aim: To evaluate the effect of morphine on the rate of transient LOS relaxations and motor function of the proximal stomach. Subjects and methods: In 19 healthy subjects, concurrent transient LOS relaxations with a sleeve sensor and motor function of the proximal stomach with a bag connected to an electronic barostat were recorded during pressure controlled (n = 9) and volume controlled (n = 10) gastric distensions after intravenous administration of placebo and morphine 100 μg/kg. Results: During pressure controlled distensions, intrabag volume was markedly decreased by morphine (median 189 ml (interquartile range 101–448) v 404 (265–868) after placebo; p<0.01) as was the rate of transient LOS relaxations (0.5/30 minutes (0.4–2) v 2.5 (2–4); p<0.01). When intrabag volume was kept constant (525 ml (490–600)) (that is, in volume controlled distensions), the rate of transient LOS relaxations was not affected by morphine (2/30 minutes (2–3) v 2.5 (2–3)). Gastric contractions decreased after morphine similarly during pressure controlled and volume controlled distensions (8.5/30 minutes (4–10) v 15.5 (9.5–20.5), p<0.02; and 6.5 (0–24) v 19.5 (12–22), p<0.05). Conclusions: The effect of morphine on transient LOS relaxations is dependent on the decrease in volume of the proximal stomach. Our data suggest that pharmacological interventions which decrease fundal volume should result in control of transient LOS relaxation mediated gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:15306575

  11. Calcium dobesilate potentiates endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated relaxation of human penile resistance arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier; Cuevas, Pedro; Fernández, Argentina; Gabancho, Sonia; Videla, Sebastián; Tejada, Iñigo Sáenz de

    2003-01-01

    We have evaluated the participation of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) and human corpus cavernosum (HCC) strips. In addition, the effect of the angioprotective agent, calcium dobesilate (DOBE), on the endothelium-dependent relaxation of these tissues was investigated. Combined inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) nearly abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) in HCC, while 60% relaxation of HPRA was observed under these conditions. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA resistant to NOS and COX inhibition was prevented by raising the extracellular concentration of K+ (35 mM) or by blocking Ca2+-activated K+ channels, with apamin (APA; 100 nM) and charybdotoxin (CTX; 100 nM), suggesting the involvement of EDHF in these responses. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to ACh was markedly enhanced by DOBE (10 μM) in HPRA but not in HCC. The potentiating effects of DOBE on ACh-induced responses in HPRA, remained after NOS and COX inhibition, were reduced by inhibition of cytochrome P450 oxygenase with miconazole (0.3 mM) and were abolished by high K+ or a combination of APA and CTX. In vivo, DOBE (10 mg kg−1 i.v.) significantly potentiated the erectile responses to cavernosal nerve stimulation in male rats. EDHF plays an important role in the endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA but not in HCC. DOBE significantly improves endothelium-dependent relaxation of HPRA mediated by EDHF and potentiates erectile responses in vivo. Thus, EDHF becomes a new therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and DOBE could be considered a candidate for oral therapy for ED. PMID:12813009

  12. Relaxant effects of Ocimum basilicum on guinea pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanism(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Boskabady

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic effects of Ocimum basilicum on respiratory diseases especially dyspnea have been reported in Iranian ancient medical books. In the present study, the relaxant effects of macerated and soxhlet extracts of this plant on tracheal chains of guinea pigs were evaluated. The relaxant effects of 4 cumulative concentrations of macerated and soxhlet extracts (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 W/V in comparison with saline as negative control and 4 cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 mM as positive control were examined on precontracted tracheal chains of two groups of 6 guinea pig by 60 mM KCl (group 1 and 10 µM methacholine (group 2. Decrease in contractile tone of tracheal chains was considered as relaxant effect. In group 1 experiments only the last two higher concentrations of theophylline showed significant relaxant effect compared to that of saline (p<0.001 for both concentrations, which were significantly greater than those of macerated and soxhlet extracts (p<0.001 for all cases and in group 2 experiments both macerated and soxhlet extracts showed concentrationdependent relaxant effects compared to that of saline (p<0.05 to p<0.001 for both extracts. There were significant differences between the relaxant effects of both extracts with those of theophylline in group 2 experiments (p<0.01 to p<0.001. The relaxant effects of macerated and soxhlet extracts in group 1 were significantly lower than those of groups 2. These results showed a potent relaxant effect of Ocimum basilicum on tracheal chains of guinea pigs which were lower than theophylline at concentrations used.

  13. The effect of music relaxation versus progressive muscular relaxation on insomnia in older people and their relationship to personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Naomi; Rotem, Tomer; Arnon, Zahi; Haimov, Iris

    2008-01-01

    A large percentage of older people suffer from chronic insomnia, affecting many aspects of life quality and well-being. Although insomnia is most often treated with medication, a growing number of studies demonstrate the efficiency of various relaxation techniques. The present study had three aims: first, to compare two relaxation techniques--music relaxation and progressive muscular relaxation--on various objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine the effect of these techniques on anxiety and depression; and finally, to explore possible relationships between the efficiency of both techniques and personality variables. Fifteen older adults took part in the study. Following one week of base-line measurements of sleep quality, participants followed one week of music relaxation and one week of progressive muscular relaxation before going to sleep. Order of relaxation techniques was controlled. Results show music relaxation was more efficient in improving sleep. Sleep efficiency was higher after music relaxation than after progressive muscular relaxation. Moreover, anxiety was lower after music relaxation. Progressive muscular relaxation was related to deterioration of sleep quality on subjective measures. Beyond differences between the relaxation techniques, extraverts seemed to benefit more from both music and progressive muscular relaxation. The advantage of non-pharmacological means to treat insomnia, and the importance of taking individual differences into account are discussed.

  14. Influence of SnO2 nanoparticles on the relaxation dynamics of the conductive processes in polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2017-10-01

    The effect of stannic oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity relaxation and distribution of relaxation times within the 4-Dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) doped polyaniline (Pani) was investigated using electrical impedance spectroscopy. A temperature dependent Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type temporal relaxation function in the time domain was generated from the analysis of the frequency dependence of the dielectric modulus (imaginary component). The thermal evolution of the characteristics parameters of the KWW function was evaluated and using these parameters the temperature dependent average conductivity relaxation time and associated macroscopic conductivity of different samples were estimated. The study revealed that SnO2 nanoparticles within the polyaniline matrix induced faster relaxation of charge carriers that essentially enhanced the conductivity of the nanocomposite. The observed phenomena were well supported by the observed improvement of the localization length of the charge carriers within the nanocomposite.

  15. Correlation and relaxation times for a stochastic process with a fat-tailed steady-state distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Serota, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    We study a stochastic process defined by the interaction strength for the return to the mean and a stochastic term proportional to the magnitude of the variable. Its steady-state distribution is the Inverse Gamma distribution, whose power-law tail exponent is determined by the ratio of the interaction strength to stochasticity. Its time-dependence is characterized by a set of discrete times describing relaxation of respective cumulants to their steady-state values. We show that as the progressively lower cumulants diverge with the increase of stochasticity, so do their relaxation times. We analytically evaluate the correlation function and show that it is determined by the longest of these times, namely the inverse interaction strength, which is also the relaxation time of the mean. We also investigate relaxation of the entire distribution to the steady state and the distribution of relaxation times, which we argue to be Inverse Gaussian.

  16. Biological Evaluation (In Vitro and In Vivo) of Bilayered Collagenous Coated (Nano Electrospun and Solid Wall) Chitosan Membrane for Periodontal Guided Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ghogha; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mofid, Rasoul; Abbas, Fatemeh Mashhadi; Ghanavati, Farzin; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Yavari, Seyedeh Kimia; Pajoumshariati, Seyedramin

    2016-07-01

    The application of barrier membranes in guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a commonly used surgical technique in periodontal research. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on two different collagenous coatings (nano electrospun fibrous vs. solid wall) of bilayered collagen/chitosan membrane and their histological evaluation on bone regeneration in rabbit calvarial defects. It was found that chitosan-nano electrospun collagen (CNC) membranes had higher proliferation/metabolic activity compared to the chitosan-collagen (CC) and pristine chitosan membranes. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated the CNC membranes induced significant expression of osteogenic genes (Osteocalcin, RUNX2 and Col-α1) in MSCs. Moreover, higher calcium content and alkaline phosphatase activity of MSCs were observed compared to the other groups. Histologic and histomorphometric evaluations were performed on the uncovered (negative control) as well as covered calvarial defects of ten adult white rabbits with different membranes (CNC, CC, BioGide (BG, positive control)) at 1 and 2 months after surgery. More bone formation was detected in the defects covered with CNC and BG membranes than those covered by CC and the negative control. No inflammation and residual biomaterial particles were observed on the membrane surface or in the surrounding tissues in the surgical areas. These results suggest that bilayer CNC membrane can have the potential for use as a GBR membrane material facilitating bone formation.

  17. Clinical yield of endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for incidental pancreatic cysts in kidney transplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeski, Jared; Rogers, Jeffrey; Hauser, Matthew; Mishra, Girish

    2017-07-01

    For several reasons, including an elevated risk for malignancy after transplant, kidney transplant candidates undergo a thorough evaluation prior to transplantation. Further assessment of incidentally discovered pancreatic cysts on routine abdominal imaging has been assumed to be prudent, and the preferred method has been endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The clinical utility of EUS/EUS-FNA with respect to transplant decision-making has not been evaluated. Kidney transplant candidates undergoing EUS/EUS-FNA for further evaluation of one or more pancreatic cysts were identified. The clinical yield of the EUS/EUS-FNA was determined via retrospective chart review. After exclusion criteria were applied, a total of 15 cases were identified at a high-volume transplant center over a 71-month period. EUS/EUS-FNA was deemed to have a clinically relevant impact in 73.3% of cases. Kidney transplant candidates are a unique group with respect to the need to clarify the etiology of pancreatic cysts. EUS/EUS-FNA frequently provides information that is clinically relevant to the determination of transplant status. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Static tensioning promotes hamstring tendons force relaxation more reliably than cycling tensioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Mischan, Martha Maria; Piedade, Cezar; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Graft elongation might be a major reason for increased anterior laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This study analyzed the force relaxation values and their stabilization when single strands of the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons underwent cyclic and static tensioning at 2.5% strain level, and compared the efficiency of static and cyclic tensioning in promoting force relaxation. Eighteen gracilis tendons and 18 semitendinosus tendons from nine male cadavers (mean age: 22.44years) were subjected to 10 in vitro cyclic loads at 2.5% strain level, or to a static load at 2.5% strain level. During cyclic loading, the reduction in force values tended to stabilize after the sixth cyclic load, while, in the case of static loading, this stabilization occurred by the second minute. Comparing static and cyclic loading, the gracilis tendon had similar mechanical responses in both conditions, while the semitendinosus tendon showed greater force relaxation in static compared with cyclic loading. Considering that the semitendinosus tendon is the main component of the hamstring graft, its biomechanical response to loading should guide the tensioning protocol. Therefore, static tensioning seems more effective for promoting force relaxation of the semitendinosus tendon than cyclic tensioning. The gracilis tendon showed a similar mechanical response to either tensioning protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prolonged bone marrow T1-relaxation in patients with polycythemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Grube, T; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    In vitro as well as in vivo studies have shown prolonged T1 relaxation times in patients with acute leukemia. The mechanism behind this finding is not known. In order to evaluate if this was specific for leukemia we examined eight patients with polycythemia vera, representing a condition with a r......In vitro as well as in vivo studies have shown prolonged T1 relaxation times in patients with acute leukemia. The mechanism behind this finding is not known. In order to evaluate if this was specific for leukemia we examined eight patients with polycythemia vera, representing a condition...

  20. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is a sensitive method to evaluate patients who should not undergo pulmonary metastasectomy†

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Licht, Peter Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    and oligometastatic disease confined to the lungs on positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and who were considered eligible for pulmonary metastasectomy, routinely underwent EBUS-TBNA of the mediastinal lymph nodes. If EBUS-TBNA did not reveal malignant spread, the patient subsequently underwent pulmonary......OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary metastasectomy is considered an effective treatment in selected patients with extrapulmonary cancer and oligometastatic disease. We know that the presence of mediastinal lymph node metastases reduces survival significantly, but the mediastinum is rarely evaluated before......-TBNA for diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node metastasis were 94.4, 100, 98.8 and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: EBUS-TBNA is a sensitive minimally invasive modality for evaluation of mediastinal lymph node metastases in patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease. It allows surgeons to select patients who...

  1. Evaluating assumptions for least squares analysis using the general linear model: a guide for the pharmaceutical industry statistician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darken, Patrick F

    2004-08-01

    A review of graphical and test based methods for evaluating assumptions underlying the use of least squares analysis with the general linear model is presented along with some discussion of robustness. Alternative analyses are described for situations where there is evidence that the assumptions are not reasonable. Evaluation of the assumptions is illustrated through the use of an example from a clinical trial used for US registration purposes. It is recommended that: (1) most assumptions required for the least squares analysis of data using the general linear model can be judged using residuals graphically without the need for formal testing, (2) it is more important to normalize data or to use nonparametric methods when there is heterogeneous variance between treatment groups, and (3) nonparametric analyses can be used to demonstrate robustness of results and that it is best to specify these analyses prior to unblinding.

  2. ITSM ProcessGuide – a longitudinal and multi-method field study for real-world DSR artifact evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Morana, Stefan; Schacht, Silvia; Gerards, Timo; Maedche, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Process guidance supports users to increase their process model understanding, process execution effectiveness as well as efficiency, and process compliance performance. This paper presents a research in progress encompassing our ongoing DSR project on Process Guidance Systems and a field evaluation of the resulting artifact in cooperation with a company. Building on three theory-grounded design principles, a Process Guidance System artifact for the company’s IT service ticketing process is d...

  3. Topologically Guided, Automated Construction of Metal-Organic Frameworks and Their Evaluation for Energy-Related Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, Yamil J.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2017-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for a range of energy and environmental applications. Here we describe in detail a computational algorithm and code to generate MOFs based on edge-transitive topological nets for subsequent evaluation via molecular simulation. This algorithm has been previously used by us to construct and evaluate 13 512 MOFs of 41 different topologies for cryo-adsorbed hydrogen storage. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used here to evaluate the 13 512 structures for the storage of gaseous fuels such as hydrogen and methane and nondistillative separation of xenon/krypton mixtures at various operating conditions. MOF performance for both gaseous fuel storage and xenon/krypton separation is influenced by topology. Simulation data suggest that gaseous fuel storage performance is topology-dependent due to MOF properties such as void fraction and surface area combining differently in different topologies, whereas xenon/krypton separation performance is topology-dependent due to how topology constrains the pore size distribution.

  4. Methodologic Guide for Evaluating Clinical Performance and Effect of Artificial Intelligence Technology for Medical Diagnosis and Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Ho; Han, Kyunghwa

    2018-03-01

    The use of artificial intelligence in medicine is currently an issue of great interest, especially with regard to the diagnostic or predictive analysis of medical images. Adoption of an artificial intelligence tool in clinical practice requires careful confirmation of its clinical utility. Herein, the authors explain key methodology points involved in a clinical evaluation of artificial intelligence technology for use in medicine, especially high-dimensional or overparameterized diagnostic or predictive models in which artificial deep neural networks are used, mainly from the standpoints of clinical epidemiology and biostatistics. First, statistical methods for assessing the discrimination and calibration performances of a diagnostic or predictive model are summarized. Next, the effects of disease manifestation spectrum and disease prevalence on the performance results are explained, followed by a discussion of the difference between evaluating the performance with use of internal and external datasets, the importance of using an adequate external dataset obtained from a well-defined clinical cohort to avoid overestimating the clinical performance as a result of overfitting in high-dimensional or overparameterized classification model and spectrum bias, and the essentials for achieving a more robust clinical evaluation. Finally, the authors review the role of clinical trials and observational outcome studies for ultimate clinical verification of diagnostic or predictive artificial intelligence tools through patient outcomes, beyond performance metrics, and how to design such studies. © RSNA, 2018.

  5. Seismic Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagling, D.G. (ed.)

    1983-09-01

    This guide provides managers with practical guidelines for administering a comprehensive earthquake safety program. The Guide is comprehensive with respect to earthquakes in that it covers the most important aspects of natural hazards, site planning, evaluation and rehabilitation of existing buildings, design of new facilities, operational safety, emergency planning, special considerations related to shielding blocks, non-structural elements, lifelines, fire protection and emergency facilities. Management of risk and liabilities is also covered. Nuclear facilities per se are not dealt with specifically. The principles covered also apply generally to nuclear facilities but the design and construction of such structures are subject to special regulations and legal controls.

  6. Model-based feasibility assessment and evaluation of prostate hyperthermia with a commercial MR-guided endorectal HIFU ablation array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A., E-mail: salgaonkarv@radonc.ucsf.edu; Hsu, I-C.; Diederich, Chris J. [Thermal Therapy Research Group, Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H-1031, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Prakash, Punit [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Kansas State University, 2077 Rathbone Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Rieke, Viola; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kurhanewicz, John [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Plata, Juan [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Feasibility of targeted and volumetric hyperthermia (40–45 °C) delivery to the prostate with a commercial MR-guided endorectal ultrasound phased array system, designed specifically for thermal ablation and approved for ablation trials (ExAblate 2100, Insightec Ltd.), was assessed through computer simulations and tissue-equivalent phantom experiments with the intention of fast clinical translation for targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: The simulations included a 3D finite element method based biothermal model, and acoustic field calculations for the ExAblate ERUS phased array (2.3 MHz, 2.3 × 4.0 cm{sup 2}, ∼1000 channels) using the rectangular radiator method. Array beamforming strategies were investigated to deliver protracted, continuous-wave hyperthermia to focal prostate cancer targets identified from representative patient cases. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. Preliminary experiments included beamformed sonications in tissue mimicking phantoms under MR temperature monitoring at 3 T (GE Discovery MR750W). Results: Acoustic intensities considered during simulation were limited to ensure mild hyperthermia (T{sub max} < 45 °C) and fail-safe operation of the ExAblate array (spatial and time averaged acoustic intensity I{sub SATA} < 3.4 W/cm{sup 2}). Tissue volumes with therapeutic temperature levels (T > 41 °C) were estimated. Numerical simulations indicated that T > 41 °C was calculated in 13–23 cm{sup 3} volumes for sonications with planar or diverging beam patterns at 0.9–1.2 W/cm{sup 2}, in 4.5–5.8 cm{sup 3} volumes for simultaneous multipoint focus beam patterns at ∼0.7 W/cm{sup 2}, and in ∼6.0 cm{sup 3} for curvilinear (cylindrical) beam patterns at 0.75 W/cm{sup 2}. Focused heating patterns may be practical for treating focal disease in a single posterior

  7. New inverse planning technology for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy: description and evaluation within a clinical frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnková, Petra; Pötter, Richard; Baltas, Dimos; Karabis, Andreas; Fidarova, Elena; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Georg, Dietmar; Kirisits, Christian

    2009-11-01

    To test the feasibility of a new inverse planning technology based on the Hybrid Inverse treatment Planning and Optimisation (HIPO) algorithm for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy in comparison to conventional manual optimisation as applied in recent clinical practice based on long-term intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy experience. The clinically applied treatment plans of 10 tandem/ring (T/R) and 10 cases with additional needles (T/R+N) planned with PLATO v14.3 were included. Standard loading patterns were manually optimised to reach an optimal coverage with 7 Gy per fraction to the High Risk CTV and to fulfil dose constraints for organs at risk. For each of these patients an inverse plan was retrospectively created with Oncentra GYN v0.9.14. Anatomy based automatic source activation was based on the topography of target and organs. The HIPO algorithm included individual gradient and modification restrictions for the T/R and needle dwell times to preserve the spatial high-dose distribution as known from the long-term clinical experience in the standard cervical cancer brachytherapy and with manual planning. HIPO could achieve a better target coverage (V100) for all T/R and 7 T/R+N patients. Changes in the shape of the overdose volume (V200/400) were limited. The D(2 cc) per fraction for bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon was on average lower by 0.2 Gy, 0.4 Gy, 0.2 Gy, respectively, for T/R patients and 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 0.3 Gy for T/R+N patients (a decrease from 4.5 to 4 Gy per fraction means a total dose reduction of 5 Gy EQD2 for a 4-fraction schedule). In general the dwell times in the additional needles were lower compared to manual planning. The sparing factors were always better for HIPO plans. Additionally, in 7 T/R and 7 T/R+N patients all three D(0.1 cc), D(1 cc) and D(2 cc) for vagina wall were lower and a smaller area of vagina was covered by the reference dose in HIPO plans. Overall loading times in the tandem, the ring and the needles

  8. Model-based feasibility assessment and evaluation of prostate hyperthermia with a commercial MR-guided endorectal HIFU ablation array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Prakash, Punit; Rieke, Viola; Ozhinsky, Eugene; Plata, Juan; Kurhanewicz, John; Hsu, I.-C. Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    Here, operational modifications to a commercial MR-guided ultrasound phased array designed for prostate ablation (part of ExAblate 2100, InSightec Ltd) are presented for the delivery of protracted mild (40 - 45°C) hyperthermia to large contiguous target volumes in the prostate. This high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array is already in clinical trials for prostate ablation, and can be potentially fast-tracked for clinical hyperthermia treatments. As a part of this preliminary feasibility study, patient-specific numerical simulations were performed using Pennes bioheat model and acoustic field calculations were conducted using the rectangular radiator method for the ExAblate prostate array (2.3 MHz, 2.3×4.0 cm2, ˜1000 channels). Thermal solutions were computed using 3D finite element methods (FEM) implemented using Comsol Multiphysics (Comsol Inc). The patient-specific geometries were created through manual segmentation of anatomical structures from representative patient MRIs and 3D rendering (Mimics 15.01, Materialise) and generation of finite element meshes (3-Matic 7.01, Materialise). Array beamforming was employed and acoustic fields were synthesized (Matlab 2010a, MathWorks) to deliver protracted continuous wave hyperthermia to focal prostate cancer targets identified in the patient-specific models. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. Sonication strategies explored during modeling were implemented on the ExAblate prostate array and preliminary experiments were conducted in tissue mimicking phantoms under MR temperature monitoring at 3 T (GE Discovery MR750W). Therapeutic temperatures (40 - 45 °C) could be established conformably in focal cancer volumes in a single prostate quadrant using focused heating patterns and hemi-gland heating was possible using diffused heating patterns (iso-phase or diverging). T>41 °C was calculated in 13

  9. Fiscal 1999 technological survey report. Part 1. Applied technology for measuring human sense (Human sense measuring manual - human sense evaluation index guideline); Ningen kankaku keisoku manual. 1. Ningen kankaku hyoka shihyo guide line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A method of measuring/evaluating a mental and physical state by means of physiological information developed by a project was compiled into a 'guide book', as was a method of evaluating adaptability to the environment or products; and, this manual was prepared for the purpose of improving the adaptability of human beings to products by making use of the guide book widely in the field of industrial manufacturing. Described in the part 1 are a method of evaluating human mind and body by the measurement of physiological quantity, a method of evaluating mental and physical adaptability from the element of environmental physics such as vision, sound and warmth, and a method of evaluating adaptability concerning utilization of machines and equipment, as 'human sense evaluation indexes'. The chapter 1 is the index of physiological/psychological state (stress evaluation index, fatigue/awakening evaluation index), the chapter 2 is an environmental/psychological index (overall environmental evaluation index, visual environmental effect index, sound/vibration environmental evaluation index, thermal environmental evaluation index), the chapter 3 is an adaptability evaluation index of products and the like (adaptability evaluation index by form and movement, evaluation index for operability of equipment for example), and the chapter 4 is the guideline (of environmental design and of product design). (NEDO)

  10. Effects of Stress and Relaxation on Time Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    1998). Common relaxation methods include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, imaging, autogenic training (self- hypnosis ), listening to 14 music...2001). Menstrual and circadian rythms in time perception in healthy women and women with premenstrual syndrome. Neuroscience Research, 41(4), 339

  11. Vibrational Energy Relaxation in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  12. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, D; Yeremenko, S; Pshenichnikov, MS; Wiersma, DA; Kobayashi, T; Okada, T; Kobayashi, T; Nelson, KA; DeSilvestri, S

    2005-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  13. Vibrational energy relaxation in water-acetonitrile mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Yeremenko, Sergey; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2004-01-01

    IR pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study the effect of hydrogen bonding on the vibrational energy relaxation pathways. Hydrogen bonding accelerates the population relaxation from 12ps in diluted acetonitrile solution to 700fs in bulk water.

  14. MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases: clinical evaluation; MR-gesteuerte laserinduzierte Thermotherapie (LITT) von Lebermetastasen: Klinische Evaluierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Weinhold, N. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Mueller, P. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Mack, M. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Scholz, W. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Philipp, C. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Roggan, A. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Felix, R. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    The goal was to perform an evaluation of MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases as a clinical method. In a prospective study, 50 patients with liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (35 patients), or other primary tumors (15 patients) were treated with LITT. For preparation and intermittent controls of therapy, standardized MRI examinations were made. Online monitoring during the the LITT was done with temperature-sensitive T1-weighted sequences (FLASH-2D, TurboFLASH). All in all, 83 metastases of a volume between 1 and 282 cubic centimeters (median = {+-} 10 cm{sup 3}) were treated.During performance of the LITT, a decrease of signal intensity in the thermosensitive sequences was measured for the application area, and was correlated with fluorine-optical temperature measurements. The MRI-guided LITT is a novel, potential modality for treatment of liver metastases, and poses only minimal clinical risks. (orig./VHE) [Deutsch] Ziel: Evaluierung der MR-gesteuerten laserinduzierten Thermotherapie (LITT) von Lebermetastasen im klinischen Einsatz. Material und Methodik: Im Rahmen einer prospektiven Studie wurden 50 Patienten mit Lebermetastasen kolorektaler Karzinome (35 Patienten) und anderer Primaertumoren (15 Patienten) mittels LITT behandelt. Zur Vorbereitung und Verlaufskontrolle der Therapie wurden standardisierte MRT-Untersuchungen vorgenommmen. Das On-Line Monitoring waehrend der LITT wurde mit temperatursensitiven T1-gewichteten Sequenzen (FLASH-2D, TurboFLASH) durchgefuehrt. Es wurden 83 Metastasen mit einem Volumen von 1 bis 282 cm{sup 3} (Median = {+-} 10 cm{sup 3}) therapiert. Waehrend der LITT wurde im Applikationsbereich eine Signalintensitaetsabnahme in den thermosensitiven Sequenzen dokumentiert und mit fluoroptischer Temperaturmessung korreliert. Schlussfolgerung: Die MR-gesteuerte LITT stellt eine neue potente Therapieform fuer Lebermetastasen dar und kann mit klinisch minimalem Risiko eingesetzt werden. (orig./VHE)

  15. In vivo evaluation of multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 approach for temperature monitoring during breast MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the precision of in vivo temperature measurements in adipose and glandular breast tissue using a multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 pulse sequence. A high-bandwidth, multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 sequence was developed for monitoring temperature changes simultaneously in fat- and water-based tissues. The multiple echoes were combined with the optimal weightings for magnitude and phase images, allowing for precise measurement of both T1 and the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift. The sequence was tested during in vivo imaging of 10 healthy volunteers in a breast-specific MR-guided focused ultrasound system and also during focused ultrasound heating of excised breast adipose tissue. The in vivo results indicated that the sequence can measure PRF temperatures with 1.25 × 1.25 × 3.5 mm resolution, 1.9 s temporal resolution, and 1.0°C temperature precision, and can measure T1 values with 3.75 × 3.75 × 3.5 mm resolution, 3.8 s temporal resolution, and 2.5%-4.8% precision. The excised tissue heating experiments demonstrate the sequence's ability to monitor temperature changes simultaneously in water- and fat-based tissues. The addition of a high-bandwidth, multi-echo readout to the hybrid PRF/T1 sequence improves the precision of each measurement, providing a sequence that will be beneficial to several MR-guided thermal therapies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The advantage of high relaxivity contrast agents in brain perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotton, F. [MRI Center, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); CREATIS, INSA-502, Villeurbanne (France); Lab. d' Anatomie, UFR Laennec, Lyon (France); Hermier, M. [CREATIS, INSA-502, Villeurbanne (France); MRI Center, Neurologic Hospital, Lyon (France)

    2006-01-10

    Accurate MRI characterization of brain lesions is critical for planning therapeutic strategy, assessing prognosis and monitoring response to therapy. Conventional MRI with gadolinium-based contrast agents is useful for the evaluation of brain lesions, but this approach primarily depicts areas of disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) rather than tissue perfusion. Advanced MR imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast agent-enhanced perfusion MRI provide physiological information that complements the anatomic data available from conventional MRI. We evaluated brain perfusion imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA, MultiHance; Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy). The contrast-enhanced perfusion technique was performed on a Philips Intera 1.5-T MR system. The technique used to obtain perfusion images was dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI, which is highly sensitive to T2* changes. Combined with PRESTO perfusion imaging, SENSE is applied to double the temporal resolution, thereby improving the signal intensity curve fit and, accordingly, the accuracy of the derived parametric images. MultiHance is the first gadolinium MR contrast agent with significantly higher T1 and T2 relaxivities than conventional MR contrast agents. The higher T1 relaxivity, and therefore better contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, leads to significantly improved detection of BBB breakdown and hence improved brain tumor conspicuity and delineation. The higher T2 relaxivity allows high-quality T2*-weighted perfusion MRI and the derivation of good quality relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps. We determined the value of MultiHance for enhanced T2*-weighted perfusion imaging of histologically proven (by surgery or stereotaxic biopsy) intraaxial brain tumors (n=80), multiple sclerosis lesions (n=10), abscesses (n=4), neurolupus (n=15) and stroke (n=16). All the procedures carried out were safe and no adverse events occurred. The acquired perfusion images were of good quality in

  17. Surgical retrieval of a guide wire lost during central venous catheterization in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jade M; Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Himsel, Carol A; Freer, Sean R

    2017-05-01

    To report a case of successful surgical removal of a guide wire lost during central venous catheterization. A 28 kg, 4-year-old female neutered mixed breed dog presented to the primary care veterinarian with diabetic ketosis. During the process of central venous catheterization, the guide wire was accidently released and the entire length of the guide wire slipped into the jugular vein. Due to the absence of nearby interventional radiology facilities, surgical intervention was proposed. An ultrasound was used to determine that the guide wire was located in the caudal vena cava extending caudally into the right internal iliac vein. Rommel tourniquets were placed around the iliac vein cranial to the bifurcation of the common iliac vein into the external and internal iliac veins. A venotomy was performed in the right common iliac vein and the guide wire was grasped with hemostats and gently removed while alternately relaxing the cranial then caudal tourniquets. During anesthesia, ventricular premature contractions were noted that varied in frequency with the dog's positioning. Postoperative color flow Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the caudal vena cava, right common, internal and external iliac veins, and right femoral vein was normal with no evidence of thrombosis. Several days postoperative the dog's diabetic ketosis and ventricular premature contractions had resolved and color flow Doppler ultrasound evaluation was normal with no evidence of thrombosis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported veterinary case of loss and subsequent surgical retrieval of a central venous catheter guide wire. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  18. Mixed-Integer Nonconvex Quadratic Optimization Relaxations and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    approaches are considered: one is based on convex semidefinite relaxation ( SDR ), while the other is based on quasi- convex relaxations. For SDR , a new... receive SNR. 2 Statement of the problem studied This project considers a class of nonconvex quadratic optimization problems involving both in- teger and...problem, two relaxation approaches are considered: one is based on convex semidefinite relaxation ( SDR ), while the other is based on quasi-convex

  19. Endovascular image-guided treatment of in-vivo model aneurysms with asymmetric vascular stents (AVS): evaluation with time-density curve angiographic analysis and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohatcu, A.; Ionita, C. N.; Paciorek, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Hoffmann, K. R.; Rudin, S.

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we compare the results obtained from Time-Density Curve (TDC) analysis of angiographic imaging sequences with histological evaluation for a rabbit aneurysm model treated with standard stents and new asymmetric vascular stents (AVS) placed by image-guided endovascular deployment. AVSs are stents having a low-porosity patch region designed to cover the aneurysm neck and occlude blood flow inside. To evaluate the AVSs, rabbits with elastase-induced aneurysm models (n=20) were divided into three groups: the first (n=10) was treated with an AVS, the second (n=5) with a non-patch standard coronary stent, and third was untreated as a control (n=5). We used TDC analysis to measure how much contrast media entered the aneurysm before and after treatment. TDCs track contrast-media-density changes as a function of time over the region of interest in x-ray DSA cine-sequences. After 28 days, the animals were sacrificed and the explanted specimens were histologically evaluated. The first group showed an average reduction of contrast flow into the aneurysm of 95% after treatment with an AVS with fully developed thrombus at 28 days follow-up. The rabbits treated with standard stents showed an increase in TDC residency time after treatment and partial-thrombogenesis. The untreated control aneurysms displayed no reduction in flow and were still patent at follow-up. The quantitative TDC analysis findings were confirmed by histological evaluation suggesting that the new AVS has great potential as a definitive treatment for cerebro-vascular aneurysms and that angiographic TDC analysis can provide in-vivo verification.

  20. Evaluation of complication rates and vertical bone gain after guided bone regeneration with non-resorbable membranes versus titanium meshes and resorbable membranes. A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchi, Alessandro; Vignudelli, Elisabetta; Napolitano, Aldo; Marchetti, Claudio; Corinaldesi, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The partial edentulous posterior mandible is often a challenge area that requires a bone reconstructive surgery for implants placement. This RCT was aimed to evaluate complications rate and vertical bone gain after Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) with dense non-resorbable d-PTFE titanium-reinforced membranes (Group A) versus titanium meshes covered by cross-linked collagen membranes (Group B). 40 partially edentulous patients with atrophic posterior mandible, were randomly divided into two study group: 20 patients were treated with one stage GBR by means of non-resorbable d-PTFE titanium-reinforced membranes (Group A); and 20 patients, by means of titanium mesh covered by cross-linked collagen membranes (Group B). All complications were recorded, distinguishing between "surgical" and "healing" and between "minor" or "major.". Primary implants stability and vertical bone gain were also evaluated. In the group A, surgical and healing complication rates were 5.0% and 15.0%, respectively. In the group B, surgical and healing complication rates were 15.8% and 21.1%, respectively. No significant differences between two study group were observed regarding complications rate implant stability and vertical bone gain. Both GBR approaches for the restoration of atrophic posterior mandible achieved similar results regarding complications, vertical bone gain and implant stability. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.