WorldWideScience

Sample records for evaluating guided relaxation

  1. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery on gestational hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjkesh F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hypertension is a common disorder in pregnancy. Although this disorder is accompanied by many difficulties in pregnancy, no effective therapy has still been found to treat it. One of the main methods in the treatment of hypertension is stress reducing programs such as relaxation and Guided Imagery. This study is aimed to evaluate the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on the gestational hypertension. Methods: The present study is a randomized clinical...

  2. Predictors of Adherence to Relaxation Guided Imagery During Pregnancy in Women with Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Lan; Liu, Shu-Chen; Chen, Yi-Heng; Lin, Li-Chan

    2015-09-01

    To examine adherence to relaxation guided imagery in women experiencing preterm labor as well as predictors influencing adherence. This study used a longitudinal follow-up approach. Each of the 57 participating women received a mini-MP3 player containing a 13-minute relaxation guided imagery audio program that they were instructed to follow daily until giving birth. Follow-up interviews were conducted weekly. A generalized estimating equation was used to predict adherence. The total adherence rate was 58%. Higher adherence was predicted by the presence of at least a college degree (p=0.006), greater perceived stress (p=0.006), a higher risk of preterm delivery (pguided imagery. For women with a lower adherence to relaxation guided imagery, health care professionals may consider individual preferences regarding relaxation techniques.

  3. Relationship between relaxation by guided imagery and performance of working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, J A; Hudetz, A G; Klayman, J

    2000-02-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that relaxation by guided imagery improves working-memory performance of healthy participants. 30 volunteers (both sexes, ages 17-56 years) were randomly assigned to one of three groups and administered the WAIS-III Letter-Number Sequencing Test before and after 10-min. treatment with guided imagery or popular music. The control group received no treatment. Groups' test scores were not different before treatment. The mean increased after relaxation by guided imagery but not after music or no treatment. This result supports the hypothesis that working-memory scores on the test are enhanced by guided imagery and implies that human information processing may be enhanced by prior relaxation.

  4. Effect of guided relaxation and imagery on falls self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bang Hyun; Newton, Roberta A; Sachs, Michael L; Glutting, Joseph J; Glanz, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of guided relaxation and imagery (GRI) on improvement in falls self-efficacy in older adults who report having a fear of falling. Randomized, controlled trial with allocation to GRI or guided relaxation with music of choice. General community. Ninety-one men and women aged 60 to 92. Participants were randomized to listen to a GRI audio compact disk (intervention group) or a guided relaxation audio compact disk and music of choice (control group) twice a week for 6 weeks for 10 minutes per session. Primary outcome measure was the Short Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I). Secondary outcome measures were the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (LTEQ) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) mobility test. GRI participants reported greater improvements on the Short FES-I (P = .002) and LTEQ (P = .001) scores and shorter time on the TUG (P = .002) than the guided relaxation and music-of-choice group. GRI was more effective at increasing falls self-efficacy and self-reported leisure time exercise and reducing times on a simple mobility test than was guided relaxation with music of choice. GRI is an effective, simple, low-cost tool for older adults to improve falls self-efficacy and leisure time exercise behaviors. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Relaxation and Guided Imagery: A School-Based Intervention for Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Heather L.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation analyzed the effect of relaxation and guided imagery on lung function and anxiety by employing a multiple baseline design across four middle school students with asthma. With the introduction of the intervention, it was found that lung function improved and anxiety decreased in all students. (Contains 63 references, 1 table, and…

  6. American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Five principles developed by American Evaluation Associ intended to guide professional practice of evaluators & to inform evaluation clients and the general public about principles they can expect to be upheld by professional evaluators.

  7. Relaxation Therapy with Guided Imagery for Postoperative Pain Management: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Márcia Marques Dos Santos; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz Guimarães; da Cruz, Luciana Falcão; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2017-12-14

    To identify the evidence in the literature about relaxation therapy with guided imagery for postoperative pain management. Integrative review. PubMed, Lilacs, Cochrane, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Cinahl, between August 2006 and December 2016. Descriptors: Postoperative Pain, Imagery (Psychotherapy) and Guided Imagery. original studies published in English, Spanish and Portuguese. 291 studies were identified and eight were selected. Descriptive data analysis, presented in detail, with a summary of the knowledge produced in each study. In the primary studies included, the use of guided imagery associated with other complementary therapies was highlighted: hand and foot "M" technique, education on postoperative pain management with analgesic drugs, relaxation exercises, respiration exercises, meditation, soothing biorhythmic music combined with positive and encouraging assertions and music with nature sounds. The knowledge synthesis resulting from this study indicates that evidence could be identified on the use of guided imagery associated with relaxation therapy as a complementary approach to drug analgesia in postoperative pain control strengthens its indication for nursing practice. This evidence, however, demonstrates that the quality of the use of this therapy is limited, and it is necessary to carry out new randomized clinical studies to fill the existing gaps in this topic. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. American Evaluation Association: Guiding Principles for Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Journal of Evaluation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Evaluation Association (AEA) strives to promote ethical practice in the evaluation of programs, products, personnel, and policy. This article presents the list of principles which AEA developed to guide evaluators in their professional practice. These principles are: (1) Systematic Inquiry; (2) Competence; (3) Integrity/Honesty; (4)…

  9. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes.

  10. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes

  11. Effect of psychological intervention in the form of relaxation and guided imagery on cellular immune function in normal healthy subjects. An overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R; Kristensen, J S; Hokland, P

    1991-01-01

    The present study measured the effects of relaxation and guided imagery on cellular immune function. During a period of 10 days 10 healthy subjects were given one 1-hour relaxation procedure and one combined relaxation and guided imagery procedure, instructing the subjects to imagine their immune...... on the immune defense and could form the basis of further studies on psychological intervention and immunological status. Udgivelsesdato: 1990-null...

  12. Impact of self-administered relaxation and guided imagery techniques during final trimester and birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedde-Dahl, Merete; Fors, Egil A

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test if and how self-administered practice of relaxation techniques, positive affirmation and guided imagery, in the final part of pregnancy had an impact on giving birth. Further to see if the use of a simple method, a CD with a booklet, with no previous training or specific support of the participants (neither required nor delivered), affected the birth experience. Outcome measures were monitored both during and after delivery: During delivery, pain and anxiety were measured at different stages of birth. Post-delivery Wellbeing (Edmonton Scale 0-10, where 10 is the worst possible feeling of Wellbeing), pain, anxiety, Apgar score, duration of birth, complications and anesthesia/analgesic were recorded. Those in the CD-intervention group also reported how many times they had practiced the techniques. The study employed a randomized controlled trial. Results show that the CD-intervention group had a significantly better score on total Wellbeing, as measured by the ESAS (0-10) Edmonton Scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Test and Evaluation Management Guide, Fifth Edition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Claxton, John D; Cavoli, Christina; Johnson, Collie

    2005-01-01

    This January 2005 update to the Defense Acquisition University's "Test and Evaluation Management Guide" includes updates from the Military Services, Defense Agencies, and other organizations, as well...

  14. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B

    1988-01-01

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1...... echoes. Applying biexponential curve analysis, a significant deviation from a monoexponential behaviour was recognized at a ratio of corresponding relaxation rates of about 3 and 2, estimating T1 and T2 relaxation, respectively (p less than 0.01, F-test). Requiring an SD less than or equal to 10 per cent...

  15. Treatment of Nightmares via Relaxation and Desensitization: A Controlled Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; DiPilato, Marina

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the role of relaxation training as a component of desensitization to nightmares in adults (N=32). Results showed an 80 percent reduction in nightmares reported by 20 clients, of whom 12 reported total elimination of symptoms at 25-week follow-up, suggesting the effectiveness of a behavioral approach in treating nightmares. (LLL)

  16. EPRI's pumped storage planning and evaluation guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    EPRI's Hydropower Pumped Storage Planning and Evaluation Guide was published in 1990. The Guide provides step-by-step procedures to: evaluate pumped-storage operation in a utility system, establish site development concept, estimate capital cost, and conduct economic analysis. The Guide provides a floppy diskette containing a production costing model simulating the chronologic operation of pumped storage in a generating system. It provides a series of estimating curves for the preparation of capital cost estimates. The paper presents how the Guide was organized and prepared, and highlights its contents

  17. Doing Your Community Education Evaluation: A Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Malcolm B.; And Others

    Intended to assist in the evaluation of community education programs, this guide is for program decision makers, primarily at the local level, including staff of school districts, park and recreation departments, other local and state agencies, and private citizens serving on community education boards and councils. Part 1, Evaluation and…

  18. A Guide to the Multifactored Evaluation (MFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, Marion.

    This guide provides Ohio parents of children with disabilities with information on multifactored evaluations. It begins by discussing the Intervention Assistance Team and what occurs at the assistance team meeting. It also explains that to begin the multifactored evaluation process, the parent must complete a "Request for Parent Consent for…

  19. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, S.J.; Eli, M.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines' development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term

  20. Comparing the Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery on sleep quality in primigravida women referring to Mashhad health care centers-1393

    OpenAIRE

    Nahid Golmakani; Farnaz Sadat Seyed Ahmadi Nejad; Mohammad Taghi Shakeri; Negar Asghari Pour

    2015-01-01

    Background & aim: Decreased sleep quality is a common complaint during pregnancy. Relaxation is one of the non-pharmaceutical treatments for sleep disorders. Different techniques could have different impacts on various biological and mental stressors. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on the sleep quality of primigravida women. Methods:This three-group clinical trial was conducted on 100 primigravida women, referring to Mash...

  1. A randomized controlled pilot study feasibility of a tablet-based guided audio-visual relaxation intervention for reducing stress and pain in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, Miriam O; Yao, Yingwei; Engeland, Christopher G; Molokie, Robert E; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Suarez, Marie L; Wilkie, Diana J

    2016-06-01

    To test feasibility of a guided audio-visual relaxation intervention protocol for reducing stress and pain in adults with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell pain is inadequately controlled using opioids, necessitating further intervention such as guided relaxation to reduce stress and pain. Attention-control, randomized clinical feasibility pilot study with repeated measures. Randomized to guided relaxation or control groups, all patients recruited between 2013-2014 during clinical visits, completed stress and pain measures via a Galaxy Internet-enabled Android tablet at the Baseline visit (pre/post intervention), 2-week posttest visit and also daily at home between the two visits. Experimental group patients were asked to use a guided relaxation intervention at the Baseline visit and at least once daily for 2 weeks. Control group patients engaged in a recorded sickle cell discussion at the Baseline visit. Data were analysed using linear regression with bootstrapping. At baseline, 27/28 of consented patients completed the study protocol. Group comparison showed that guided relaxation significantly reduced current stress and pain. At the 2-week posttest, 24/27 of patients completed the study, all of whom reported liking the study. Patients completed tablet-based measures on 71% of study days (69% in control group, 72% in experiment group). At the 2-week posttest, the experimental group had significantly lower composite pain index scores, but the two groups did not differ significantly on stress intensity. This study protocol appears feasible. The tablet-based guided relaxation intervention shows promise for reducing sickle cell pain and warrants a larger efficacy trial. The ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier is: NCT02501447. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Conceptual Framework for Therapeutic Training with Biofeedback in Virtual Reality: First Evaluation of a Relaxation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Førland, Ekaterina; Stiles, Tore C.; Krogh, Anne Berit; Linde, Mattias

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a concept for designing low-cost therapeutic training with biofeedback and virtual reality. We completed the first evaluation of a prototype--a mobile learning application for relaxation training, primarily for adolescents suffering from tension-type headaches. The system delivers visual experience on a head-mounted display. A…

  3. Evaluation by nuclear relaxation of hydrogen tucuman irradiated fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; Lima, Antonio Luis dos Santos; Araujo, Leandro Moreira; Tavares, Maria Ines Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The tucuman (Astrocarium vulgare Mart.) develops a yellow-orange fibrous pulp and a yellow-green peel as it gets mature. In Brazil it is considered a good source of carotenoids, which is the main precursor of vitamin A. Considering that the irradiation process is an alternative to avoid post-harvesting losses, without changing the nutritional value of food, this study had the objective of evaluating of different gamma irradiation doses (0.0; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0 kGy) in Tucuman samples, divided into control (non irradiated) and irradiated, by the low-field Magnetic Nuclear Resonance (NMR) analysis. The technique is used in quantitative determinations of nondestructively and non-invasive instrumentation employing low, with minimal sample, quickly, preserving its constitution and nature. (author)

  4. Comparing the Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery on sleep quality in primigravida women referring to Mashhad health care centers-1393

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Golmakani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Decreased sleep quality is a common complaint during pregnancy. Relaxation is one of the non-pharmaceutical treatments for sleep disorders. Different techniques could have different impacts on various biological and mental stressors. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on the sleep quality of primigravida women. Methods:This three-group clinical trial was conducted on 100 primigravida women, referring to Mashhad health care centers in 2014. All women, who met the inclusion criteria, were randomly assigned to three groups: progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and control groups. The intervention groups performed the exercises twice a day for a period of four weeks at home after two sessions of relaxation training (held during two weeks. Then, the quality of sleep was measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. For data analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, paired t-test, and post-hoc test were performed, using SPSS version 11.5. Results: The total score of sleep quality and its components (except use of sleep medication was significantly lower after the intervention, compared to the pre-intervention period in progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery groups (P

  5. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation behaviour in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative estimation of individual biologic components in relaxation curves obtained in vivo may increase the specificity of tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging. In this study, the potential of biexponential curve analysis was evaluated in T1 and T2 measurements on the human...... brain at 1.5 tesla. Optimal experimental conditions were carefully observed, including the use of long TR values and a very small voxel size. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination involved a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...... echoes. No genuine biexponentiality was demonstrated in the T1 and T2 relaxation processes of white matter, cortical grey matter, or cerebrospinal fluid. Thus, a monoexponential model seems adequate for description of the relaxation behaviour in these cases. Furthermore, the results suggest...

  6. Relaxation and guided imagery do not reduce stress, pain and unpleasantness for 11- to 12-year-old girls during vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Stefan; Forsner, Maria; Finnström, Berit; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2015-07-01

    Relaxation and guided imagery is a distraction technique known to reduce discomfort during paediatric medical procedures. We examined whether its use decreased the stress experienced by 11- to 12-year-old girls receiving the human papilloma virus vaccination, as well as the intensity and unpleasantness of any pain. A randomised crossover trial was conducted with 37 girls. During the first vaccination, each girl was randomised to receive either relaxation and guided imagery or standard care. They then received the other form of care during the second vaccination. Salivary cortisol was measured before each vaccination, and 30 minutes after it was administered. The girls reported pain intensity and pain unpleasantness before and directly after each vaccination and stress after each vaccination. On a group level, relaxation and guided imagery did not decrease cortisol levels, self-reported stress, pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Salivary cortisol levels decreased significantly in both groups during the second vaccination. Relaxation and guided imagery did not prove beneficial during the vaccination of 11- to 12-year-old girls and is not recommended as a regular nursing intervention. However, further research is needed into effective techniques to help children who experience pain unpleasantness in connection with needle procedures. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fast evaluation of protein dynamics from deficient 15N relaxation data

    KAUST Repository

    Jaremko, Łukasz

    2018-03-28

    Simple and convenient method of protein dynamics evaluation from the insufficient experimental N relaxation data is presented basing on the ratios, products, and differences of longitudinal and transverse N relaxation rates obtained at a single magnetic field. Firstly, the proposed approach allows evaluating overall tumbling correlation time (nanosecond time scale). Next, local parameters of the model-free approach characterizing local mobility of backbone amide N–H vectors on two different time scales, S and R, can be elucidated. The generalized order parameter, S, describes motions on the time scale faster than the overall tumbling correlation time (pico- to nanoseconds), while the chemical exchange term, R, identifies processes slower than the overall tumbling correlation time (micro- to milliseconds). Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data handling are thoroughly discussed.

  8. Fast evaluation of protein dynamics from deficient 15N relaxation data

    KAUST Repository

    Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Ejchart, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Michał

    2018-01-01

    Simple and convenient method of protein dynamics evaluation from the insufficient experimental N relaxation data is presented basing on the ratios, products, and differences of longitudinal and transverse N relaxation rates obtained at a single magnetic field. Firstly, the proposed approach allows evaluating overall tumbling correlation time (nanosecond time scale). Next, local parameters of the model-free approach characterizing local mobility of backbone amide N–H vectors on two different time scales, S and R, can be elucidated. The generalized order parameter, S, describes motions on the time scale faster than the overall tumbling correlation time (pico- to nanoseconds), while the chemical exchange term, R, identifies processes slower than the overall tumbling correlation time (micro- to milliseconds). Advantages and disadvantages of different methods of data handling are thoroughly discussed.

  9. Evaluation of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1987-01-01

    Several circumstances may explain the great variation in reported proton T1 and T2 relaxation times usually seen. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of relaxation time measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operating at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom of nine boxes with different...... concentrations of CuSO4 and correlating the calculated T1 and T2 values with reference values obtained by two spectrometers (corrected to MRI-proton frequency = 64 MHz) we found a maximum deviation of about 10 per cent. Measurements performed on a large water phantom in order to evaluate the homogeneity...... in the imaging plane showed a variation of less than 10 per cent within 10 cm from the centre of the magnet in all three imaging planes. Changing the gradient field strength apparently had no influence on the T2 values recorded. Consequently diffusion processes seem without significance. It is concluded...

  10. Evaluation of guided imagery as treatment for recurrent abdominal pain in children: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Daniel E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the paucity of effective evidence-based therapies for children with recurrent abdominal pain, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of guided imagery, a well-studied self-regulation technique. Methods 22 children, aged 5 – 18 years, were randomized to learn either breathing exercises alone or guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation. Both groups had 4-weekly sessions with a therapist. Children reported the numbers of days with pain, the pain intensity, and missed activities due to abdominal pain using a daily pain diary collected at baseline and during the intervention. Monthly phone calls to the children reported the number of days with pain and the number of days of missed activities experienced during the month of and month following the intervention. Children with ≤ 4 days of pain/month and no missed activities due to pain were defined as being healed. Depression, anxiety, and somatization were measured in both children and parents at baseline. Results At baseline the children who received guided imagery had more days of pain during the preceding month (23 vs. 14 days, P = 0.04. There were no differences in the intensity of painful episodes or any baseline psychological factors between the two groups. Children who learned guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation had significantly greater decrease in the number of days with pain than those learning breathing exercises alone after one (67% vs. 21%, P = 0.05, and two (82% vs. 45%, P Conclusion The therapeutic efficacy of guided imagery with progressive muscle relaxation found in this study is consistent with our present understanding of the pathophysiology of recurrent abdominal pain in children. Although unfamiliar to many pediatricians, guided imagery is a simple, noninvasive therapy with potential benefit for treating children with RAP.

  11. 76 FR 59420 - Proposed Information Collection; Alaska Guide Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... lands, we issue permits for commercial guide services, including big game hunting, sport fishing... information during the competitive selection process for big game and sport fishing guide permits to evaluate...

  12. An evaluation of the use of modulated temperature DSC as a means of assessing the relaxation behaviour of amorphous lactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D Q; Barsnes, M; Royall, P G; Kett, V L

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the use of Modulated Temperature DSC (MTDSC) as a means of assessing the relaxation behaviour of amorphous lactose via measurement of the heat capacity, glass transition (Tg) and relaxation endotherm. Samples of amorphous lactose were prepared by freeze drying. MTDSC was conducted using a TA Instruments 2920 MDSC using a heating rate of 2 degrees C/minute, a modulation amplitude of +/-0.3 degrees C and a period of 60 seconds. Samples were cycled by heating to 140 degrees C and cooling to a range of annealing temperatures between 80 degrees C and 100 degrees C, followed by reheating through the Tg region. Systems were then recooled to allow for correction of the Tg shift effect. MTDSC enabled separation of the glass transition from the relaxation endotherm, thereby facilitating calculation of the relaxation time as a function of temperature. The relative merits of using MTDSC for the assessment of relaxation processes are discussed. In addition, the use of the fictive temperature rather than the experimentally derived Tg is outlined. MTDSC allows assessment of the glass transition temperature, the magnitude of the relaxation endotherm and the value of the heat capacity, thus facilitating calculation of relaxation times. Limitations identified with the approach include the slow scanning speed, the need for careful choice of experimental parameters and the Tg shift effect.

  13. The ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of abdominal wall contributed to anesthetic management of cholecystectomy in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy without using muscle relaxants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masato; Kuzumoto, Naoya; Akasaki, Yuka; Morioka, Masayo; Nakayama, Kana; Matsuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Kimoto, Katsuhiro; Shimomura, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The sensitivity to non-depolarizing muscle relaxant in a patient with muscle dystrophy is reportedly higher than that in normal individuals, and the duration of the effect is known to be prolonged. In this report, we present the case of a 58-year-old man with BMD who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis under total intravenous anesthesia without the use of muscle-relaxant drugs and supplemented with regional anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol, remifentanil, and fentanyl; ultrasound-guided bilateral rectus sheath block (RSB) and right-sided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) were performed. The procedure required conversion to open surgery because of hard conglutination; intraoperative and postoperative periods were uneventful. Adequate analgesia was maintained after extubation because of the effect of RSB and TAP.

  14. Influence of relaxation processes on the evaluation of the metastable defect density in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciaszek, M.; Zabierowski, P. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, Warszawa 00 662 (Poland)

    2016-06-07

    In this contribution, we investigated by means of numerical simulations the influence of relaxation processes related to metastable defects on electrical characteristics of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}. In particular, we analyzed the relaxation of a metastable state induced by illumination at a fixed temperature as well as the dependence of the hole concentration on the temperature during cooling. The knowledge of these two relaxation processes is crucial in the evaluation of the hole concentration in the relaxed state and after light soaking. We have shown that the distribution of the metastable defects can be considered frozen below 200 K. The hole capture cross section was estimated as ∼3 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}. It was shown that the usually used cooling rates may lead to relevant changes of the hole concentration. We calculated the lower limit of the hole concentration after cooling, and we presented how it depends on densities of shallow acceptors and metastable defects. Moreover, we proposed a method which allows for the evaluation of shallow acceptor and metastable defect densities from two capacitance-voltage profiles measured in the relaxed and light soaking states. Finally, we indicated experimental conditions in which the influence of relaxation processes on the accuracy of this method is the smallest.

  15. Iowa Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-09-04

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  16. Nevada Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  17. Utah Compliance Implementation and Evaluation Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Pamala C.

    2012-08-30

    This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation and Classification of Interchange Diagrammatic Guide Signs’ Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Zhao, Xiaohua; He, Qing; Huang, Lihua; Rong, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The effectiveness of interchange diagrammatic guide signs has significant meaning in traffic safety and driver’s understanding. This paper presented a comprehensive evaluation and classification of interchange diagrammatic guide signs’ complexity. The effectiveness of interchange diagrammatic guide signs relies on how well road users can understand those diagrams. This study tested 37 types of diagrams on the visual recognition complexity degree in three levels, general level, partial level, ...

  19. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on stress, anxiety, and depression of pregnant women referred to health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Saeideh; Akbari, Hossein; Tagharrobi, Leila; Tabatabaee, Akram Sadat

    2018-01-01

    If anxiety and depression do not detect in pregnant women, they may cause complications for the mother, child, and family, including postpartum depression. With regard to the administrative capability of relaxation in health centers, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on stress, anxiety, and depression in pregnant women. This randomized clinical trial was conducted on pregnant women in the city of Kashan at 28-36 weeks. At the onset of the study, demographic questionnaire, Edinburgh Depression Scale, and Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) were completed. Providing obtaining score of mild-to-moderate in the stress, anxiety, and depression scale and score of 10 or higher in Edinburgh Depression Scale, individuals were divided randomized to the intervention group ( n = 33) and control group ( n = 33). DASS-21 was again completed in the 4 th -7 th weeks of beginning of the study by all women. Analysis of variance with repeated measures indicated significant differences in mean of scores of stress, anxiety, and depression at three different times in relaxation group ( P pregnancy outcomes.

  20. Fatigue life evaluation based on welding residual stress relaxation and notch strain approach for cruciform welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jeong Woo; Han, Seung Ho; Shin, Byung Chun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue strength of welded joint is influenced by the welding residual stress which is relaxed depending on local stress distributed in vicinity of stress raisers, eg. under cut, overlap and blow hole. To evaluate its fatigue life the geometry of the stress raisers and the welding residual stress should be taken into account. The several methods based on notch strain approach have been proposed in order to consider the two factors above mentioned. These methods, however, have shown considerable differences between analytical and experimental results. It is due to the fact that the amount of the relaxed welding residual stress evaluated by the cyclic stress-strain relationship do not correspond with that occurred in reality. In this paper the residual stress relaxation model based on experimental results was used in order to reduce the discrepancy of the estimated amount of the relaxed welding residual stress. Under an assumption of the superimposition of the relaxed welding residual stress and the local stress, a modified notch strain approach was proposed and verified to the cruciform welded joint

  1. Quantitative evaluation of muscle relaxation induced by Kundalini yoga with the help of EMG integrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, R; Kamat, A; Khanolkar, M; Kamat, S; Desai, S R; Dhume, R A

    1990-10-01

    The present work is aimed to quantify the degree of relaxation of muscle under the effects of Kundalini Yoga with the help of EMG integrator. The data collected from 8 individuals (4 males 4 females) on the degree of muscle relaxation at the end of meditation revealed a significantly decreased muscle activity amounting to 58% of the basal level in both the sexes.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of degenerative lumbar intervertebral disc applying an equivalent cross-relaxation rate using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Hideaki; Inaba, Tadashi; Kato, Takaya; Tokuda, Masataka; Matsushima, Shigeru; Yamada, Michiaki; Kinosada, Yasutomi

    2004-01-01

    The equivalent cross-relaxation rate (ECR) is a measurement method to evaluate a change in organizational structure quantitatively utilizing MRI. The objectives of this study are to understand the characteristics related to water contents in degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs, and to investigate the usefulness of quantitative evaluation using ECR in order to find as early as possible disordered discs. Seven normal volunteers and four asymptomatic volunteers with degeneration in lumbar intervertebral discs, 21 to 26 years of age, were studied using a SIGNA model of GE Medical Systems equipped with a 1.5 T clinical scanner and spine coil. The ECR values were defined as the percentage of signal loss between unsaturated and saturated images. The results showed that the ECR value of annulus fibrosus in an intervertebral disc was higher than nucleus pulposus. Furthermore, it was found that the ECR value of nucleus pulposus (L5-S1) with degeneration was significantly higher than that without degeneration. It was considered that this result reflected an increase of water contents in the degenerative nucleus. This study suggests that the ECR value of a nucleus could be an effective parameter to diagnosis of degenerated discs or grades of disorder. (author)

  3. Evaluation of brain tissue applying equivalent cross-relaxation rate using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Hideaki; Inaba, Tadashi; Tokuda, Masataka; Matsushima, Shigeru; Kinosada, Yasutomi

    2003-01-01

    The equivalent cross-relaxation rate (ECR) is a measurement method that can evaluate a change in organization structure quantitatively utilizing MRI. The goal of this study is to discover a parameter that we can use to evaluate aging of the human brain using ECR. Fourteen patients diagnosed with diseases other than those located in the cranium were imaged using a SIGNA model of GE Medical Systems equipped with a 1.5 T clinical scanner. The ECR values were defined as the percentage of signal loss between unsaturated and saturated images. It was found that the ECR value of gray matter was lower than subcortical white matter. At ages under 70 years old, the mean of ECR values of subcortical white matter showed stable values with insignificant variance. Furthermore, there was no correlation between age and ECR value of every region calculated. On the other hand, it was found that there was a negative correlation for the ECR values of subcortical white matter and gray matter at ages slightly over 70 years old. It is possible that the reduction in ECR value shows demyelination by aging in the senium. When the offset frequency is near the water resonance frequency, the ECR values mean information about neurocytes. Accordingly, the ECR (320)/ECR (1200) value probably shows that information is related to the amount or activity of neurons. (author)

  4. Evaluation of long-term relaxation for high-strength bolted connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, H. S.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    It is general that the clamping forces of high-strength bolts diminish within a certain time period after the initial clamping force. In case that special treatments are applied on a faying surface, the clamping force is relaxed severely. Tests were conducted for slip critical joints subjected to various faying surface parameters. The candidates for bolt were two kinds: Korean Standard and American Standard. Relaxation occurred for slip resistant joints with an uncoated surface that had been shot-blasted, cleaned, milled or rusted. In case of ASTM hexagon bolts, the initial clamping force dropped from 7.9% to 13.6% after 1, 000 hours while relaxation ratio was the range from 8.7% to 15.4% for KS bolts. For ASTM hexagon bolt joints with a 5 mil thick zinc coating, the clamping force of the bolts decreased 15.0%, while relaxation ratio was 12.85% for KS bolts. For 4.9 mil thick red lead painted treatment, the relaxation ratio was 18.7% for ASTM hexagon bolt, 34.9% for KS bolts. Regardless of faying surface treatments, the first week charged at least 86% of total relaxation from this test. (authors)

  5. Library Program Evaluation: The AASL Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Rebecca M.

    2012-01-01

    The word "evaluation" often strikes fear in people, but the author is different. She has always been a person who thought of evaluation, in any form, as a way to make her better and help her strive for excellence. So naturally when her library supervisor announced at a meeting that they were going to do the American Association of School…

  6. Evaluation of a new disposable silicon limbal relaxing incision knife by experienced users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, John; Dugue, Geoffrey; Parvu, Valentin; Bajart, Ann M; Lee, Edwin

    2009-12-21

    Previous research has suggested that the silicon BD Atomic Edge knife has superior performance characteristics when compared to a metal knife and performance similar to diamond knife when making various incisions. This study was designed to determine whether a silicon accurate depth knife has equivalent performance characteristics when compared to a diamond limbal relaxing incision (LRI) knife and superior performance characteristics when compared to a steel accurate depth knife when creating limbal relaxing incision. Sixty-five ophthalmic surgeons with limbal relaxing incision experience created limbal relaxing incisions in ex-vivo porcine eyes with silicon and steel accurate depth knives and diamond LRI knives. The ophthalmic surgeons rated multiple performance characteristics of the knives on Visual Analog Scales. The observed differences between the silicon knife and diamond knife were found to be insignificant. The mean ratio between the performance of the silicon knife and the diamond knife was shown to be greater than 90% (with 95% confidence). The silicon knife's mean performance was significantly higher than the performance of the steel knife for all characteristics. (p-value knife was found to be equivalent in performance to the diamond LRI knife and superior to the steel accurate depth knife when making limbal relaxing incisions in ex vivo porcine eyes. Disposable silicon LRI knives may be an alternative to diamond LRI knives.

  7. Evaluation of a new disposable silicon limbal relaxing incision knife by experienced users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvu Valentin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that the silicon BD Atomic Edge™ knife has superior performance characteristics when compared to a metal knife and performance similar to diamond knife when making various incisions. This study was designed to determine whether a silicon accurate depth knife has equivalent performance characteristics when compared to a diamond limbal relaxing incision (LRI knife and superior performance characteristics when compared to a steel accurate depth knife when creating limbal relaxing incision. Methods Sixty-five ophthalmic surgeons with limbal relaxing incision experience created limbal relaxing incisions in ex-vivo porcine eyes with silicon and steel accurate depth knives and diamond LRI knives. The ophthalmic surgeons rated multiple performance characteristics of the knives on Visual Analog Scales. Results The observed differences between the silicon knife and diamond knife were found to be insignificant. The mean ratio between the performance of the silicon knife and the diamond knife was shown to be greater than 90% (with 95% confidence. The silicon knife's mean performance was significantly higher than the performance of the steel knife for all characteristics. (p-value Conclusions For experienced users, the silicon accurate depth knife was found to be equivalent in performance to the diamond LRI knife and superior to the steel accurate depth knife when making limbal relaxing incisions in ex vivo porcine eyes. Disposable silicon LRI knives may be an alternative to diamond LRI knives.

  8. Performance evaluation of laser guided leveler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hoque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI farm on clay loam soil during Rabi season of 2010-2011. The treatments consisted of laser land leveling (T1 and control (non-leveled (T2. A preliminary field survey was done using staff gage. Initially a base station was established to dispense laser ray uniformly. The laser ray erected from base station guided the sensor of the stuff gage and the leveler. Elevation data was collected from the different points of the field and made an average. The maximum gage reading were 247.0 cm and the minimum gage reading was 219.2 cm. Average gage readings of the laser leveled plot was 235.66 cm that was settled for auto adjustment. Therefore, huge amount of soils (16.46 cm high was cut from the highest point and subsequently had to fill to the low points. Finally, an equal gage reading of 235.66 cm was observed after leveling the plot. The laser leveler (Leica MLS700 was used hitching with a TAFE tractor. The field was leveled with manual control initially and finally it was operated with auto adjustment. Two operators, 25 litter diesels and total 6 hours time were required during this leveling. Wheat was cultivated in leveled land (T1 and non-leveled land (T2. Laser leveling was insured for improvement in nutrient use efficiencies, option for precision farming, reduces weed problems, and improves uniformity of crop maturity. There was better distribution of water in leveled plot, which helped to reduce irrigation application time 1 hour. Due to uniformity of moisture content improved germination and crop establishment was found which reflected in higher plant population (239 m-2. Maximum yield (3.41 t ha-1 was obtained in T1 due to longer panicle (10.89 cm, more grain per plant (27.47 and 1000 grain weight (47.38 g compared to yield of T2 (2.62 t ha-1.

  9. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Training evaluation determines a training program's effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ''DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training'' and ''DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.''

  10. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices evaluation instrument examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    Training evaluation determines a training program`s effectiveness in meeting its intended purpose: producing competent employees. Evaluation is the quality assurance component of a systematic approach to training program. This guide provides information on evaluation instruments used to gather employee, supervisor, and instructor feedback to identify strengths and weaknesses of training programs at DOE facilities. It should be used in conjunction with ``DOE Training Program Handbook: A Systematic Approach to Training`` and ``DOE Handbook, Alternative Systematic Approaches to Training.``

  11. Interaction study of polyisobutylene with paraffins by NMR using the evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times for hydrogen nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Rosana G.G.; Tavares, Maria I.B.

    2001-01-01

    The evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times of 1 H for polyisobutylene/paraffin systems, were obtained using the classic inversion recovery technique, and also through Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) techniques varying the contact time and also by the delayed contact time pulse sequence. NMR results showed that the polyisobutylene/paraffin systems in which high molecular weight paraffins were used, is heterogeneous. However, for paraffins with low molecular weight, the system presents good homogeneity. (author)

  12. IDRC and BetterEvaluation launch an interactive guide to manage ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-21

    Oct 21, 2016 ... ... evaluations, this guide is intended for program and project managers. ... used to hire evaluators, and guide the management of the evaluation. ... Strategic Evaluation on Communicating Research for Influence: Part I.

  13. Interim Reliability Evaluation Program procedures guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.D.; Gallup, D.R.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Kolb, G.J.; Stack, D.W.; Lofgren, E.; Horton, W.H.; Lobner, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    This document presents procedures for conducting analyses of a scope similar to those performed in Phase II of the Interim Reliability Evaluation Program (IREP). It documents the current state of the art in performing the plant systems analysis portion of a probabilistic risk assessment. Insights gained into managing such an analysis are discussed. Step-by-step procedures and methodological guidance constitute the major portion of the document. While not to be viewed as a cookbook, the procedures set forth the principal steps in performing an IREP analysis. Guidance for resolving the problems encountered in previous analyses is offered. Numerous examples and representative products from previous analyses clarify the discussion

  14. Study Design and Data Gathering Guide for Serious Games’ Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke; Boyle, Elizabeth; Mayer, Igor; Nadolski, Rob; Riedel, Johann C. K. H.; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Bellotti, Francesco; Lim, Theodore; Ritchie, James

    2013-01-01

    Baalsrud Hauge, J., Boyle, E., Mayer, I., Nadolski, R. J., Riedel, J. C. K. H., Moreno-Ger, P., Bellotti, F., Lim, T., & Ritchie, J. (2013). Study Design and Data Gathering Guide for Serious Games’ Evaluation. In T. M. Connolly, T. Hainey, E. Boyle, G. Baxter, & P. Moreno-Ger (Eds.), Psychology,

  15. Evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on how to determine the ground motion hazards for a plant at a particular site and the potential for surface faulting, which could affect the feasibility of construction and safe operation of a plant at that site. The guidelines and procedures presented in this Safety Guide can appropriately be used in evaluations of site suitability and seismic hazards for nuclear power plants in any seismotectonic environment. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis recommended in this Safety Guide also addresses the needs for seismic hazard analysis of external event PSAs conducted for nuclear power plants. Many of the methods and processes described may also be applicable to nuclear facilities other than power plants. Other phenomena of permanent ground displacement (liquefaction, slope instability, subsidence and collapse) as well as the topic of seismically induced flooding are treated in Safety Guides relating to foundation safety and coastal flooding. Recommendations of a general nature are given in Section 2. Section 3 discusses the acquisition of a database containing the information needed to evaluate and address all hazards associated with earthquakes. Section 4 covers the use of this database for construction of a seismotectonic model. Sections 5 and 6 review ground motion hazards and evaluations of the potential for surface faulting, respectively. Section 7 addresses quality assurance in the evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants

  16. Evaluation of multi-exponential relaxation processes: In vitro and in vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Thomsen, C.; Kjaer, L.; Ring, P.

    1986-01-01

    T1 and T2 relaxation values obtained at 1.5 T were measured on 12 inversion-recovery (IR) sequences and a multiple spin-echo (SE) sequence with 32 echoes. Phantom studies were carried out for different CuSO/sub 4/ solutions, using MR imaging and reference spectrometry. The correlation was excellent (r=.98, P>.01;r=1.00, P>.01). T1 and T2 values varied less than 10% in the imaging plane. Then two-compartment phantoms were examined. For T1 and T2, the ratios T1(compartment A)/T1 (compartment B)>6 ant T2(c.A)/T2(c.B) > 6 were essential for reliable estimation. Studies on the normal brain indicate a multiexponential T1 and T2 relaxation process in gray matter

  17. Evaluation of a new disposable silicon limbal relaxing incision knife by experienced users

    OpenAIRE

    Parvu Valentin; Dugue Geoffrey; Albanese John; Bajart Ann M; Lee Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that the silicon BD Atomic Edge™ knife has superior performance characteristics when compared to a metal knife and performance similar to diamond knife when making various incisions. This study was designed to determine whether a silicon accurate depth knife has equivalent performance characteristics when compared to a diamond limbal relaxing incision (LRI) knife and superior performance characteristics when compared to a steel accurate dept...

  18. Economic evaluation of flying-qualities design criteria for a transport configured with relaxed static stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Direct constrained parameter optimization was used to optimally size a medium range transport for minimum direct operating cost. Several stability and control constraints were varied to study the sensitivity of the configuration to specifying the unaugmented flying qualities of transports designed to take maximum advantage of relaxed static stability augmentation systems. Additionally, a number of handling qualities related design constants were studied with respect to their impact on the design.

  19. Fifteen Minutes of Chair-Based Yoga Postures or Guided Meditation Performed in the Office Can Elicit a Relaxation Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey W. Melville

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared acute (15 min yoga posture and guided meditation practice, performed seated in a typical office workspace, on physiological and psychological markers of stress. Twenty participants (39.6±9.5 yr completed three conditions: yoga, meditation, and control (i.e., usual work separated by ≥24 hrs. Yoga and meditation significantly reduced perceived stress versus control, and this effect was maintained postintervention. Yoga increased heart rate while meditation reduced heart rate versus control (<0.05. Respiration rate was reduced during yoga and meditation versus control (<0.05. Domains of heart rate variability (e.g., SDNN and Total Power were significantly reduced during control versus yoga and meditation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were reduced secondary to meditation versus control only (<0.05. Physiological adaptations generally regressed toward baseline postintervention. In conclusion, yoga postures or meditation performed in the office can acutely improve several physiological and psychological markers of stress. These effects may be at least partially mediated by reduced respiration rate.

  20. Evaluation of iron deposits in the reticuloendothelial system using T2-relaxation rate of MRI. Relation with serum ferritin and Fe concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootsuka, Kae; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro

    1996-01-01

    MR imaging is a useful non-invasive technique to detect iron deposits in many organs, but it is difficult to evaluate quantitatively. This study was performed to determine the possibility whether T2 relaxation rate (1/T2) could quantify iron deposits in the reticuloendothelial system (liver, spleen and bone marrow) of 11 patients and four normal volunteers. A moderate correlation was obtained between T2-relaxation rate and the serum ferritin level. These results suggest that T2-relaxation rate may provide useful information for the repeated quantitative evaluation of patients with iron-overload-syndromes. (author)

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery as Anxiety Reducing Interventions in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Charalambous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the effectiveness of guided imagery (GI and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR as stress reducing interventions in patients with prostate and breast cancer who undergo chemotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to either the control group or the intervention group (PMR and GI. Patients were observed for a total duration of 3 weeks and assessed with the SAS and BECK-II questionnaires for anxiety and depression, respectively, in addiotion to two biological markers (saliva cortisol and saliva amylase (trial registration number: NCT01275872. Results. 256 patients were registered and 236 were randomly assigned. In total 104 were randomised to the control group and 104 to the intervention group. Intervention’s mean anxiety score and depression score changes were significantly different compared to the control’s (b=-29.4, p<0.001; b=-29.4, p<0.001, resp.. Intervention group’s cortisol levels before the intervention (0.30±0.25 gradually decreased up to week 3 (0.16±0.18, whilst the control group’s cortisol levels before the intervention (0.21±0.22 gradually increased up to week 3 (0.44±0.35. The same interaction appears for the Amylase levels (p<0.001. Conclusions. The findings showed that patients with prostate and breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy treatment can benefit from PMR and GI sessions to reduce their anxiety and depression.

  2. Evaluation of creep and relaxation data for hastelloy alloy x sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.

    1979-02-01

    Hastelloy alloy X has been a successful high-temperature structural material for more than two decades. Recently, Hastelloy alloy X sheet has been selected as a prime structural material for the proposed Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS). The material also sees extensive application in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Design of these systems requires a detailed consideration of the high-temperature creep properties of this material. Therefore, available creep, creep-rupture, and relaxation data for Hastelloy alloy X were collected and analyzed to yield mathematical representations of the behavior for design use

  3. Evaluation of PHB/Clay nanocomposite by spin-lattice relaxation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB based on nanocomposites containing different amounts of a commercial organically modified clay (viscogel B7 were prepared employing solution intercalation method. Three solvents, such as: CHCl3, dimethylchloride (DMC and tetrahydrofuran (THF were used. The relationship among the processing conditions; molecular structure and intermolecular interaction, between both nanocomposite components, were investigated using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, as a part of characterization methodology, which has been used by Tavares et al. It involves the hydrogen spin-lattice relaxation time, T1H, by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, employing low field NMR. X ray diffraction was also employed because it is a conventional technique, generally used to obtain the first information on nanocomposite formation. Changes in PHB crystallinity were observed after the organophilic nanoclay had been incorporated in the polymer matrix. These changes, in the microstructure, were detected by the variation of hydrogen nuclear relaxation time values and by X ray, which showed an increase in the clay interlamelar space due to the intercalation of the polymer in the clay between lamellae. It was also observed, for both techniques, that the solvents affect directly the organization of the crystalline region, promoting a better intercalation, considering that they behave like a plasticizer.

  4. Guide for understanding and evaluation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This report was the guide of understanding and evaluation of safety culture. Operator's activities for enhancement of safety culture in nuclear installations became an object of safety regulation in the management system. Evaluation of operator's activities (including top management's involvement) to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate in daily works needed understanding of safety culture and diversity of operator's activities. This guide was prepared to check indications of degradation of safety culture and organization climate in operator's activities in daily works and encourage operator's activities to enhance safety culture improvement and good practice. Comprehensive evaluation of operator's activities to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate would be performed from the standpoints of 14 safety culture elements such as top management commitment, clear plan and implementation of upper manager, measures to avoid wrong decision making, questioning attitude, reporting culture, good communications, accountability and openness, compliance, learning system, activities to prevent accidents or incidents beforehand, self-assessment or third party evaluation, work management, change management and attitudes/motivation. Element-wise examples and targets for evaluation were attached with evaluation check tables. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Evaluation of creep damage due to stress relaxation in SA533 grade B class 1 and SA508 class 3 pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.L.; Urko, W.

    1993-01-01

    Creep damage can result from stress relaxation of residual stresses in components when exposed to high temperature thermal cycles. Pressure vessels, such as the reactor vessel of the modular high-temperature gas reactor (MHTGR), which normally operate at temperatures well below the creep range can develop relatively high residual stresses in high stress locations. During short term excursions to elevated-temperatures, creep damage can be produced by the loadings on the vessel. In addition, residual stresses will relax out, causing greater creep damage in the pressure vessel material than might otherwise be calculated. The evaluation described in this paper assesses the magnitude of the creep damage due to relaxation of residual stresses resulting from short term exposure of the pressure vessel material to temperatures in the creep range. Creep relaxation curves were generated for SA533 Grade B, Class 1 and SA508 Class 3 pressure vessel steels using finite element analysis of a simple uniaxial truss loaded under constant strain conditions to produce an initial axial stress equal to 1.25 times the material yield strength at temperature. The strain is held constant for 1000 hours at prescribed temperatures from 700 F to 1000 F. The material creep law is used to calculate the relaxed stress for each time increment. The calculated stress relaxation versus time curves are compared with stress relaxation test data. Creep damage fractions are calculated by integrating the stress relaxation versus time curves and performing a linear creep damage summation using the minimum stress to rupture curves at the respective relaxation temperatures. Cumulative creep damage due to stress relaxation as a function of time and temperature is derived from the linear damage summation

  6. The art of appropriate evaluation : a guide for highway safety program managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The guide, updated from its original release in 1999, is intended for project managers who will oversee the evaluation of traffic safety programs. It describes the benefits of evaluation and provides an overview of the steps involved. The guide inclu...

  7. User's guide to the repository intrusion risk evaluation code INTRUDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nancarrow, D.J.; Thorne, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    The report, commissioned by the Department of the Environment as part of its radioactive waste management research programme, constitutes the user's guide to the repository intrusion risk evaluation code INTRUDE. It provides an explanation of the mathematical basis of the code, the database used and the operation of the code. INTRUDE is designed to facilitate the estimation of individual risks arising from the possibility of intrusion into shallow land burial facilities for radioactive wastes. It considers a comprehensive inventory of up to 65 long-lived radionuclides and produces risk estimates for up to 20 modes of intrusion and up to 50 times of evaluation. (author)

  8. Evaluation as na instrumento to guide school inclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephânia Cottorello Vitorino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work, is a part from the PhD thesis and aims to discuss school evaluation within the inclusive context, in a school for all. Firstly, the impasse of assessment and the conflicts it provides for students, teachers and managers are addressed. It also addresses the role of classificatory assessment, culturally constructed, therefore, far from its objective as an instrument for reflection on pedagogical action and consequently on student learning. Next, education for all is addressed, specifically the student with intellectual disability in the context of an inclusive school, and evaluation as an instrument capable of guiding an education that truly meets the specific needs of each student.

  9. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Stefano [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  10. A randomized trial of the effect of training in relaxation and guided imagery techniques in improving psychological and quality-of-life indices for gynecologic and breast brachytherapy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Pizarro, Concha; Gich, Ignasi; Barthe, Emma; Rovirosa, Angeles; Farrús, Blanca; Casas, Francesc; Verger, Eugènia; Biete, Albert; Craven-Bartle, Jordi; Sierra, Jordi; Arcusa, Angeles

    2007-11-01

    The randomized study aimed to determine the efficacy of psychological intervention consisting of relaxation and guided imagery to reduce anxiety and depression in gynecologic and breast cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy during hospitalization. Sixty-six patients programmed to receive brachytherapy in two hospitals in Barcelona (Spain) were included in this study. The patients were randomly allocated to either the study group (n=32) or the control group (n=34). Patients in both groups received training regarding brachytherapy, but only study group patients received training in relaxation and guided imagery. After collection of sociodemographic data, all patients were given a set of questionnaires on anxiety and depression: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and on quality of life: Cuestionario de Calidad de Vida QL-CA-AFex (CCV), prior to, during and after brachytherapy. The study group demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in anxiety (p=0.008), depression (p=0.03) and body discomfort (p=0.04) compared with the control group. The use of relaxation techniques and guided imagery is effective in reducing the levels of anxiety, depression and body discomfort in patients who must remain isolated while undergoing brachytherapy. This simple and inexpensive intervention enhances the psychological wellness in patients undergoing brachytherapy.State: This study has passed Ethical Committee review.

  11. Weather integration in TMC operations : a self-evaluation and planning guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This flyer describes how Traffic Management Centers (TMC) can integrate weather information into their daily operations, and is based on the Road Weather Management Program publication, Self-Evaluation and Planning Guide (FHWA-JPO-08-057). The Guide ...

  12. Relaxation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  13. Evaluation of dysthyroid optic neuropathy using T2-relaxation time of extraocular muscle as parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Fumihiko; Maeda, Toshine; Inoue, Toyoko; Inoue, Yoichi

    2001-01-01

    The T2 value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in evaluating the activity of dysthyroid ophthlamopathy. We applied this method in evaluating dysthyroid optic neuropathy in 15 affected eyes of 15 patients. Another group of 40 eyes of 20 patients of dysthyroid opthalmopathy without hypertrophy of extraocular muscles served as control. The T2 value in dysthyroid optic neuropathy significantly decreased following treatment with corticosteroid but the value was still higher than that in control eyes. The findings show that the T2 value of MRI is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  14. Evaluation of dysthyroid optic neuropathy using T2-relaxation time of extraocular muscle as parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Fumihiko; Maeda, Toshine; Inoue, Toyoko; Inoue, Yoichi [Olympia Eye Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The T2 value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in evaluating the activity of dysthyroid ophthlamopathy. We applied this method in evaluating dysthyroid optic neuropathy in 15 affected eyes of 15 patients. Another group of 40 eyes of 20 patients of dysthyroid opthalmopathy without hypertrophy of extraocular muscles served as control. The T2 value in dysthyroid optic neuropathy significantly decreased following treatment with corticosteroid but the value was still higher than that in control eyes. The findings show that the T2 value of MRI is useful in evaluating the therapeutic effect of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  15. High Temperature Performance Evaluation of As-serviced 25Cr35Ni Type Heat-resistant Steel Based on Stress Relaxation Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Jun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on an as-serviced 25Cr35Ni type steel, the high temperature property evaluation using stress relaxation test(SRT method and residual life prediction were studied. The results show that creep rupture property decreases because of the formation of network carbides along grain boundaries and coarsening of secondary carbides in the austenitic matrix. Based on the relationship of stress relaxation strain rate curves obtained at different temperatures, and the extrapolation equation of stress relaxation rate-rupture time, it is capable to perform residual life evaluation by combining SRT data and a small amount of creep rupture test(CRT. Good agreement is observed for predicting results performed by current method and traditional method.

  16. Numerical evaluation of energy barriers and magnetic relaxation in interacting nanostructured magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana A.; Chantrell, Roy W.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a model to quantify long-time thermally induced magnetization reversal in magnetic systems with distributed properties. Two algorithms, based on kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo are introduced. While the former requires the constant recalculation of all energy barriers and is useful when the interactions are weak, the latter uses the Metropolis Monte Carlo to estimate the magnetization trajectory and, consequently, only the most probable transition rates are evaluated. The ridge optimization method is used to evaluate the energy barriers in a multidimensional energy landscape. The algorithms are applied to a granular system modeled by means of Voronoi polyhedra and having random in-plane anisotropy

  17. New concept of damage evaluation method for core internal materials considering radiation induced stress relaxation (1). Experiments and modeling of radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yukio; Kondo, Keietsu; Okubo, Nariaki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Tsukada, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    In order to build the new concept of material damage evaluation method, synergistic effect of radiation and residual stress on material degradation was estimated experimentally, and the effect of radiation induced stress relaxation on retardation of material degradation was observed. (author)

  18. Numerical and experimental evaluation of the residual stress relaxation and the influence zone due to application of the crack compliance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval-Pineda, J M; Garcia-Lira, J; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Hernandez-Gomez, L H; Beltran-Fernandez, J A; RodrIguez-Martinez, R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results concerning an evaluation of the crack compliance method. The research was focused on the relaxation caused by a cut induced to obtain the data required to calculate the residual stress field. The main objective in this research is to establish the optimum place to cut in a specimen that has suffered a failure and how extended is the zone of relaxed stresses. It has been recognized that a crack vanishes the beneficial or detrimental effects of the residual stress fields. This research has been performed in a numerical and experimental way, so results can be compared and FEM on this topic can be assessed.

  19. Numerical and experimental evaluation of the residual stress relaxation and the influence zone due to application of the crack compliance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval-Pineda, J M; Garcia-Lira, J [Instituto Politecnico Nacional Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Escuela Superior de IngenierIa Mecanica y Electrica (ESIME), Unidad profesional, Azcapotzalco, Av. de las Granjas No. 682, Col. Sta. Catarina Azcapotzalco, C.P. 02550, Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Urriolagoitia-Sosa, G; Urriolagoitia-Calderon, G; Hernandez-Gomez, L H; Beltran-Fernandez, J A; RodrIguez-Martinez, R, E-mail: jsandovalp@ipn.m, E-mail: guiurri@hotmail.co [Instituto Politecnico Nacional Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion (SEPI), Escuela Superior de IngenierIa Mecanica y Electrica (ESIME). Edificio 5. 2do Piso, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos ' Zacatenco' Col. Lindavista, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the results concerning an evaluation of the crack compliance method. The research was focused on the relaxation caused by a cut induced to obtain the data required to calculate the residual stress field. The main objective in this research is to establish the optimum place to cut in a specimen that has suffered a failure and how extended is the zone of relaxed stresses. It has been recognized that a crack vanishes the beneficial or detrimental effects of the residual stress fields. This research has been performed in a numerical and experimental way, so results can be compared and FEM on this topic can be assessed.

  20. Development of CANDU ECCS performance evaluation methodology and guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Park, Kyung Soo; Chu, Won Ho [Korea Maritime Univ., Jinhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The objectives of the present work are to carry out technical evaluation and review of CANDU safety analysis methods in order to assist development of performance evaluation methods and review guides for CANDU ECCS. The applicability of PWR ECCS analysis models are examined and it suggests that unique data or models for CANDU are required for the following phenomena: break characteristics and flow, frictional pressure drop, post-CHF heat transfer correlations, core flow distribution during blowdown, containment pressure, and reflux rate. For safety analysis of CANDU, conservative analysis or best estimate analysis can be used. The main advantage of BE analysis is a more realistic prediction of margins to acceptance criteria. The expectation is that margins demonstrated with BE methods would be larger that when a conservative approach is applied. Some outstanding safety analysis issues can be resolved by demonstration that accident consequences are more benign than previously predicted. Success criteria for analysis and review of Large LOCA can be developed by top-down approach. The highest-level success criteria can be extracted from C-6 and from them, the lower level criteria can be developed step-by-step, in a logical fashion. The overall objectives for analysis and review are to verify radiological consequences and frequency are met.

  1. Evaluation of a Modified User Guide for Hearing Aid Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caposecco, Andrea; Hickson, Louise; Meyer, Carly; Khan, Asaduzzaman

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated if a hearing aid user guide modified using best practice principles for health literacy resulted in superior ability to perform hearing aid management tasks, compared with the user guide in the original form. This research utilized a two-arm study design to compare the original manufacturer's user guide with a modified user guide for the same hearing aid--an Oticon Acto behind-the-ear aid with an open dome. The modified user guide had a lower reading grade level (4.2 versus 10.5), used a larger font size, included more graphics, and had less technical information. Eighty-nine adults ages 55 years and over were included in the study; none had experience with hearing aid use or management. Participants were randomly assigned either the modified guide (n = 47) or the original guide (n = 42). All participants were administered the Hearing Aid Management test, designed for this study, which assessed their ability to perform seven management tasks (e.g., change battery) with their assigned user guide. The regression analysis indicated that the type of user guide was significantly associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test, adjusting for 11 potential covariates. In addition, participants assigned the modified guide required significantly fewer prompts to perform tasks and were significantly more likely to perform four of the seven tasks without the need for prompts. The median time taken by those assigned the modified guide was also significantly shorter for three of the tasks. Other variables associated with performance on the Hearing Aid Management test were health literacy level, finger dexterity, and age. Findings indicate that the need to design hearing aid user guides in line with best practice principles of health literacy as a means of facilitating improved hearing aid management in older adults.

  2. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery on stress, anxiety, and depression of pregnant women referred to health centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Nasiri

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: In this study, relaxation could reduce stress, anxiety, and depression in pregnant women during six sessions. Due to the simplicity and low cost of this technique, it can be used to reduce stress and anxiety in pregnant women and improve pregnancy outcomes.

  3. Application of stress relaxation testing in evaluation of creep strength of a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavender Rao, G.; Gupta, O.P.; Pradhan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial isothermal stress relaxation tests (SRT) were performed on a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel (G-X12Cr Mo W V Nb N 10 1 1) at temperatures of 580, 600 and 620 o C and initial strain levels of 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8%. Inelastic strain rates for different stresses were estimated from the stress versus time data generated from the tests. Conventional creep tests were also conducted on the same material at 580, 600 and 620 o C and at different stress levels. The strain rate data estimated from SRT were compared with minimum creep rates derived from the creep tests; the strain rates estimated from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in better agreement than those estimated from SRT with 0.2 and 0.5% initial strain levels. In order to ascertain the technique, stress relaxation behaviour was estimated from creep test data and compared with the stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT at corresponding temperatures. The stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in good agreement with the stress relaxation curves estimated from the creep tests. It is concluded that the stress relaxation test with initial strain level of 0.8% could be considered as an appropriate short-term test technique for estimation of creep strength of newly developed materials.

  4. Relaxation as a Factor in Semantic Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, James E.; McNamara, J. Regis

    1975-01-01

    Relaxation and semantic desensitization were used to alleviate the fear of phobic females. Results showed that semantic desensitization, alone or in combination with relaxation, failed to modify the evaluative meanings evoked by the feared object. (SE)

  5. Physiological blunting during pregnancy extends to induced relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Mendelson, Tamar; Williams, Erica L.; Costigan, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that pregnancy is accompanied by hyporesponsivity to physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges. This study evaluates whether observed autonomic blunting extends to conditions designed to decrease arousal. Physiological and psychological responsivity to an 18-minute guided imagery relaxation protocol in healthy pregnant women during the 32nd week of gestation (n = 54) and non-pregnant women (n = 28) was measured. Data collection included heart period (HP)...

  6. User's guide to Monte Carlo methods for evaluating path integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbroek, Marise J. E.; King, Peter R.; Vvedensky, Dimitri D.; Dürr, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    We give an introduction to the calculation of path integrals on a lattice, with the quantum harmonic oscillator as an example. In addition to providing an explicit computational setup and corresponding pseudocode, we pay particular attention to the existence of autocorrelations and the calculation of reliable errors. The over-relaxation technique is presented as a way to counter strong autocorrelations. The simulation methods can be extended to compute observables for path integrals in other settings.

  7. INCOMMANDS TDP: Human Factors Design and Evaluation Guide (PDT INCOMMANDS: Guide de Conception et d’Evaluation des Facteurs Humains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Human-Computer Interface (AHCI) Style Guide, (Report No. 64201-97U/61223), Veridian, Veda Operations, Dayton Ohio. [13] CSFAB Osga, G. and Kellmeyer, D...Interface (AHCI) Style Guide, (Report No. 64201-97U/61223), Veridian, Veda Operations, Dayton Ohio. [14] Osga, G. and Kellmeyer, D. (2000), Combat

  8. Physiological blunting during pregnancy extends to induced relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Janet A; Mendelson, Tamar; Williams, Erica L; Costigan, Kathleen A

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that pregnancy is accompanied by hyporesponsivity to physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges. This study evaluates whether observed autonomic blunting extends to conditions designed to decrease arousal. Physiological and psychological responsivity to an 18-min guided imagery relaxation protocol in healthy pregnant women during the 32nd week of gestation (n=54) and non-pregnant women (n=28) was measured. Data collection included heart period (HP), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), tonic and phasic measures of skin conductance (SCL and NS-SCR), respiratory period (RP), and self-reported psychological relaxation. As expected, responses to the manipulation included increased HP, RSA, and RP and decreased SCL and NS-SCR, followed by post-manipulation recovery. However, responsivity was attenuated for all physiological measures except RP in pregnant women, despite no difference in self-reported psychological relaxation. Findings support non-specific blunting of physiological responsivity during pregnancy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Research on Recognition and Evaluation of Traffic Guide Sign

    OpenAIRE

    Li Yuan; Ming-jie Cai; Tang-yi Guo; Yu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Traffic guide signs are effective only when they are clearly recognized by drivers. Three experiments were conducted in this study. In the first, the influence factors of guide sign recognition were studied. This study investigated 11 main factors with a convenience sample of drivers from Nanjing city in China. Weights of different influence factors were obtained through analytic hierarchy process (AHP). The results showed that the setting position, occlusion degree, and character size of gui...

  10. Evaluation of Image-Guided Positioning for Frameless Intracranial Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamba, Michael; Breneman, John C.; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The standard for target alignment and immobilization in intracranial radiosurgery is frame-based alignment and rigid immobilization using a stereotactic head ring. Recent improvements in image-guidance systems have introduced the possibility of image-guided radiosurgery with nonrigid immobilization. We present data on the alignment accuracy and patient stability of a frameless image-guided system. Methods and Materials: Isocenter alignment errors were measured for in vitro studies in an anthropomorphic phantom for both frame-based stereotactic and frameless image-guided alignment. Subsequently, in vivo studies assessed differences between frame-based and image-guided alignment in patients who underwent frame-based intracranial radiosurgery. Finally, intratreatment target stability was determined by image-guided alignment performed before and after image-guided mask immobilized radiosurgery. Results: In vitro hidden target localization errors were comparable for the framed (0.7 ± 0.5 mm) and image-guided (0.6 ± 0.2 mm) techniques. The in vivo differences in alignment were 0.9 ± 0.5 mm (anteroposterior), -0.2 ± 0.4 mm (superoinferior), and 0.3 ± 0.5 mm (lateral). For in vivo stability tests, the mean distance differed between the pre- and post-treatment positions with mask-immobilized radiosurgery by 0.5 ± 0.3 mm. Conclusion: Frame-based and image-guided alignment accuracy in vitro was comparable for the system tested. In vivo tests showed a consistent trend in the difference of alignment in the anteroposterior direction, possibly due to torque to the ring and mounting system with frame-based localization. The mask system as used appeared adequate for patient immobilization.

  11. Evaluation of ultrasound-guided vascular access in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Scott C; Sullivan, Lauren A; Morley, Paul S; Boscan, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    To describe the technique and determine the feasibility, success rate, perceived difficulty, and time to vascular access using ultrasound guidance for jugular vein catheterization in a cardiac arrest dog model. Prospective descriptive study. University teaching hospital. Nine Walker hounds. A total of 27 jugular catheterizations were performed postcardiac arrest using ultrasound guidance. Catheterizations were recorded based on the order in which they were performed and presence/absence of a hematoma around the vein. Time (minutes) until successful vascular access and perceived difficulty in achieving vascular access (scale of 1 = easy to 10 = difficult) were recorded for each catheterization. Mean time to vascular access was 1.9 minutes (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4 min) for catheterizations without hematoma, versus 4.3 minutes (1.8-10.1 min) for catheterizations with hematoma (P = 0.1). Median perceived difficulty was 2 of 10 (range 1-7) for catheterizations without hematoma, versus 2 of 10 (range 1-8) for catheterizations with hematoma (P = 0.3). A learning curve was evaluated by comparing mean time to vascular access and perceived difficulty in initial versus subsequent catheterizations. Mean time to vascular access was 2.5 minutes (1.0-6.4 min) in the initial 13 catheterizations versus 3.3 minutes (1.5-7.5 min) in the subsequent 14 catheterizations (P = 0.6). Median perceived difficulty in the first 13 catheterizations (3, range 1-8) was significantly greater (P = 0.049) than median perceived difficulty in the subsequent 14 catheterizations (2, range 1-6). Ultrasound-guided jugular catheterization is associated with a learning curve but is successful in obtaining rapid vascular access in dogs. Further prospective studies are warranted to confirm the utility of this technique in a clinical setting. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  12. Special Education Program Evaluation: A Planning Guide. An Overview. CASE Commissioned Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, John A.

    This resource guide is intended to help in planning special education program evaluations. It focuses on: basic evaluation concepts, identification of special education decision makers and their information needs, specific evaluation questions, procedures for gathering relevant information, and evaluation of the evaluation process itself.…

  13. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPietro, Janet A; Costigan, Kathleen A; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-min guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal motor activity (FM), and increased FM-FHR coupling. Attribution of the two fetal cardiac responses to the guided imagery procedure itself, as opposed to simple rest or recumbency, is tempered by the observed pattern of response. Evaluation of correspondence between changes within individual maternal-fetal pairs revealed significant associations between maternal autonomic measures and fetal cardiac patterns, lower umbilical and uterine artery resistance and increased FHR variability, and declining salivary cortisol and FM activity. Potential mechanisms that may mediate the observed results are discussed.

  14. Standard guide for in-plant performance evaluation of automatic pedestrian SNM monitors

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This guide is affiliated with Guide C1112 on special nuclear material (SNM) monitors, Guide C1169 on laboratory performance evaluation, and Guide C1189 on calibrating pedestrian SNM monitors. This guide to in-plant performance evaluation is a comparatively rapid way to verify whether a pedestrian SNM monitor performs as expected for detecting SNM or SNM-like test sources. 1.1.1 In-plant performance evaluation should not be confused with the simple daily functional test recommended in Guide C1112. In-plant performance evaluation takes place less often than daily tests, usually at intervals ranging from weekly to once every three months. In-plant evaluations are also more extensive than daily tests and may examine both a monitor's nuisance alarm record and its detection sensitivity for a particular SNM or alternative test source. 1.1.2 In-plant performance evaluation also should not be confused with laboratory performance evaluation. In-plant evaluation is comparatively rapid, takes place in the monitor...

  15. Mechanical strength evaluation of the glass base material in the JRR-3 neutron guide tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    The lifetime of the thermal neutron guide tube installed JRR-3 was investigated after 6 years from their first installation. And it was confirmed that a crack had been piercing into the glass base material of the side plate of the neutron guide tube. The cause of the crack was estimated as a static fatigue of the guide tube where an inside of the tube had been evacuated and stressed as well as an embrittlement of the glass base material by gamma ray irradiation. In this report, we evaluate the mechanical strength of the glass base material and estimate the time when the base material gets fatigue fracture. Furthermore, we evaluate a lifetime of the neutron guide tube and confirm the validity of update timing in 2000 and 2001 when the thermal neutron guide tubes T1 and T2 were exchanged into those using the super mirror. (author)

  16. Evaluating the influence of initial magnetization conditions on extracted exchange parameters in NMR relaxation experiments: applications to CPMG and CEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Sekhar, Ashok; Kay, Lewis E., E-mail: kay@pound.med.utoronto.ca [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Transient excursions of native protein states to functionally relevant higher energy conformations often occur on the μs–ms timescale. NMR spectroscopy has emerged as an important tool to probe such processes using techniques such as Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion and Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST). The extraction of kinetic and structural parameters from these measurements is predicated upon mathematical modeling of the resulting relaxation profiles, which in turn relies on knowledge of the initial magnetization conditions at the start of the CPMG/CEST relaxation elements in these experiments. Most fitting programs simply assume initial magnetization conditions that are given by equilibrium populations, which may be incorrect in certain implementations of experiments. In this study we have quantified the systematic errors in extracted parameters that are generated from analyses of CPMG and CEST experiments using incorrect initial boundary conditions. We find that the errors in exchange rates (k{sub ex}) and populations (p{sub E}) are typically small (<10 %) and thus can be safely ignored in most cases. However, errors become larger and cannot be fully neglected (20–40 %) as k{sub ex} falls near the lower limit of each method or when short CPMG/CEST relaxation elements are used in these experiments. The source of the errors can be rationalized and their magnitude given by a simple functional form. Despite the fact that errors tend to be small, it is recommended that the correct boundary conditions be implemented in fitting programs so as to obtain as robust estimates of exchange parameters as possible.

  17. Users guide for evaluating alternative fixed-site physical protection systems using ''FESEM''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.; Kinemond, G.A.; Sasser, D.W.

    1977-11-01

    The objective of this manual is to provide a guide for evaluating physical protection systems using the Forcible Entry Safeguards Effectiveness Model (FESEM). It is intended for use by personnel involved in evaluating fixed-site security systems, or managers involved in making decisions related to the modification of existing protection systems or the implementation of new systems. This users' guide has been written for an audience which has some previous computer experience

  18. Foundations of Reporting: Or Bartlett's Guide to Evaluation Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Freda M.

    The author believes her ideas on evaluation reporting are old ideas in various fields including communication theory, advertising, social science, and learning theory. The human factor in reporting evaluation must be considered. Those being evaluated often feel threatened by the evaluation. Evaluators need to accept the behaviors of evaluation…

  19. Azemiopsin, a Selective Peptide Antagonist of Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: Preclinical Evaluation as a Local Muscle Relaxant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Shelukhina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Azemiopsin (Az, a linear peptide from the Azemiops feae viper venom, contains no disulfide bonds, is a high-affinity and selective inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR of muscle type and may be considered as potentially applicable nondepolarizing muscle relaxant. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regard to in vitro and in vivo efficacy, acute and chronic toxicity, pharmacokinetics, allergenic capacity, immunotoxicity and mutagenic potency. The peptide effectively inhibited (IC50 ~ 19 nM calcium response of muscle nAChR evoked by 30 μM (EC100 acetylcholine but was less potent (IC50 ~ 3 μM at α7 nAChR activated by 10 μM (EC50 acetylcholine and had a low affinity to α4β2 and α3-containing nAChR, as well as to GABAA or 5HT3 receptors. Its muscle relaxant effect was demonstrated at intramuscular injection to mice at doses of 30–300 µg/kg, 30 µg/kg being the initial effective dose and 90 µg/kg—the average effective dose. The maximal muscle relaxant effect of Az was achieved in 10 min after the administration and elimination half-life of Az in mice was calculated as 20–40 min. The longest period of Az action observed at a dose of 300 µg/kg was 55 min. The highest acute toxicity (LD50 510 μg/kg was observed at intravenous injection of Az, at intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration it was less toxic. The peptide showed practically no immunotoxic, allergenic or mutagenic capacity. Overall, the results demonstrate that Az has good drug-like properties for the application as local muscle relaxant and in its parameters, is not inferior to the relaxants currently used. However, some Az modification might be effective to extend its narrow therapeutic window, a typical characteristic and a weak point of all nondepolarizing myorelaxants.

  20. Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Mary E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles several essays about effective evaluation of teaching. Contents of this publication include: (1) Conducting Research on Student Evaluations of Teaching (William E. Addison and Jeffrey R. Stowell); (2) Choosing an Instrument for Student Evaluation of Instruction (Jared W. Keeley); (3) Formative Teaching Evaluations: Is Student…

  1. Evaluation relaxed volume of .sub.a-./sub.PMMA and .sub.a-./sub.PMMA/CB from heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadač, J.; Slobodian, P.; Sáha, P.; Říha, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 108, special issue 1 (2014), s. 50-58 ISSN 0009-2770 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : isobaric heating * physical aging * PMMA * volume relaxation * polymer/carbon black composite Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.272, year: 2014 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/docs/full/2014_s1_s50-s58.pdf

  2. Quantitative MRI T2 relaxation time evaluation of knee cartilage: comparison of meniscus-intact and -injured knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    Associated meniscal injury is well recognized at anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and it is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of articular cartilage after different meniscal treatment in ACL-reconstructed knees using T2 relaxation time evaluation on MRI. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 62 consecutive patients who under ACL reconstruction were recruited in this study, including 23 patients undergoing partial meniscectomy (MS group), 21 patients undergoing meniscal repair (MR group), and 18 patients with intact menisci (MI group) at time of surgery. Clinical evaluation, including subjective functional scores and physical examination, was performed on the same day as the MRI examination and at follow-up times ranging from 2 to 4.2 years. The MRI multiecho sagittal images were segmented to determine the T2 relaxation time value of each meniscus and articular cartilage plate. Differences in each measurement were compared among groups. No patient had joint-line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test or instability. There were also no statistically significant differences in functional scores or medial or lateral meniscus T2 values among the 3 groups (P > .05 for both). There was a significantly higher articular cartilage T2 value in the medial femorotibial articular cartilage for the MS group (P T2 value between the MS and MR groups (P > .05) in each articular cartilage plate. The medial tibial articular cartilage T2 value had a significant positive correlation with medial meniscus T2 value (r = 0.287; P = .024) CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that knees with meniscectomy or meniscal repair had articular cartilage degeneration at 2 to 4 years postoperatively, with higher articular cartilage T2 relaxation time values compared with the knees with an intact meniscus. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Evaluation Guide for the Evaluated Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay Database (SFCOMPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortego, P.; Boulanger, D.; Gauld, I.; Gysemans, M.; Hennebach, M.; Mennerdahl, D.; Neuber, J.C.; Tore, C.; Tittelbach, S.; Van Winckel, S.; Zwicky, H.-U.

    2016-01-01

    The Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel (EGADSNF) of the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS) under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee was set up in 2007 with the objective of compiling and evaluating experimental data on the nuclide compositions of irradiated nuclear fuel. Experimental data refer not only to the measured nuclide inventories and uncertainties as determined mainly by destructive radiochemical assay of spent fuel samples, but also the fuel assembly design data, reactor design information, and operating data necessary to develop benchmark models. These data provide an important basis for validating calculation methods (computer codes and nuclear data) used in fuel burn-up analyses applied to spent fuel criticality safety analyses using burnup credit, thermal analysis, radiation shielding, accident dose consequence analysis, fuel cycle safety, reprocessing, and deep geological repository safety studies. The quality and usefulness of the experimental data for methods validation can be improved by developing complete descriptions of the experiments, providing benchmark specifications, and by performing independent evaluations of the experimental and benchmark data. Evaluations of the experimental data have been identified as an important task to verify the quality of the information in the spent fuel composition (SFCOMPO) database maintained by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank. This guide defines the evaluation document format and data review procedures for evaluators tasked with reviewing the experimental data. Guidance is developed to provide recommended procedures and criteria developed by experts in the field on how to perform standardised reviews, how to identify potential problems in the measurement data and gaps in the experimental description, and provide guidance on how to resolve these issues, when possible, using a consistent technical basis. Procedures for deriving benchmark data and models

  4. Letting Students Take the Lead: A User-Centred Approach to Evaluating Subject Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Hintz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – What do students need and want from library subject guides? Options such as Web 2.0 enhancement are now available to librarians creating subject-specific web pages. Librarians may be eager to implement these new tools, but are such add-ons a priority forstudents? This paper aims to start a dialogue on this issue by presenting the findings of the University of British Columbia (UBC Library’s Subject Guides Working Group (SGWG, which was tasked with assessing current library subject guides in order to make recommendations for the update and future development of UBC Library subject guides.Methods – The working group solicited feedback through a questionnaire that was distributed to undergraduate and graduate students from a variety of disciplines at UBC. The questionnaire included an evaluation of UBC subject guides, as well as guides from other academic libraries that used various platforms such as LibGuides and SubjectsPlus.Results – Respondents to the student questionnaire indicated that a simple and clean layout was of primary importance. Students also desired succinct annotations to resources and limited page scrolling. Meanwhile, few students identified Web 2.0 features such as rating systems and discussion forums as being important for their needs. The working group used the questionnaire data to create a “Top Ten” list of student recommendations.Conclusions – The “Top Ten” list of student recommendations was combined with stakeholder feedback from faculty, liaison librarians and Library Systems and Information Technology representatives to create the SGWG’s final recommendation for subject guide revision and enhancement. For the SGWG these findings called into question the necessity of Web 2.0 technologies within subject guide pages and highlighted the need for further research on the topic of subject guide usability and effectiveness.

  5. Evaluation of combined intracoronary two-dimensional and doppler ultransound techniques in the relaxation function of coronary microcirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Chunmei; Li Dongye; Pan Defeng; Zhu Hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the value of detecting the relaxation function of coronary microcirculation by using combined intracoronary two-dimensional (IVUS) and Doppler interventional ultransound (ICD) techniques with mean arteries pressure. Methods: Fourteen healthy male swines were divided into two groups randomly: eight swines fed with 1% cholesterol-rich diet for 12 weeks as a model of early atherosclerosis were classified as the experimental group; six swines fed with standard diet were classified as control group. All the swines were undergone cardiovascular catheterization examination after 12 weeks. Combined IVUS and ICD techniques were taken to calculate the change of coronary blood flow (CBF) after the administration of acetylcholine and nitroglycerin. The pressure of the root of aorta and then the relaxation function of coronary microcirculation can be accessed with coronary resistance index (RI). At last, all of the examed coronary arteries and related coronary microcirculation were undergone pathological examinations. Results: The pathological examinations demonstrated that the average intima thickness in experimental group was increased more evidently than that of control group (74.80 μm ± 17.60 μm vs 7.60 μm ± 4.27 μm P<0.001). The intima thickness increase can not be seen in the coronary microcirculation. Acetylcholine induced increase in RI in experimental group compared with control group (-0.18 ± 0.09 vs 0.29 ± 0.18, P<0.05). Nitroglycerin induced a decrease in RI for both groups (-0.40 ± 0.13 vs -0.34 ± 0.20). Conclusions: Using IVUS and ICD techniques combined mean arterial pressure can identify the endothelium-mediated dysfunction on coronary microcirculation in the early stage of AS. (authors)

  6. Bending moment evaluation of a long specimen using a radial speckle pattern interferometer in combination with relaxation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Anderson; Fontana, Filipe; Viotti, Matias R.; Veiga, Celso L. N.; Lothhammer, Lívia R.; Albertazzi G., Armando, Jr.

    2015-08-01

    The authors developed an achromatic speckle pattern interferometer able to measure in-plane displacements in polar coordinates. It has been used to measure combined stresses resulting from the superposition of mechanical loading and residual stresses. Relaxation methods have been applied to produce on the surface of the specimen a displacement field that can be used to determine the amount of combined stresses. Two relaxation methods are explored in this work: blind hole-drilling and indentation. The first one results from a blind hole drilled with a high-speed drilling unit in the area of interest. The measured displacement data is fitted in an appropriate model to quantify the stress level using an indirect approach based on a set of finite element coefficients. The second approach uses indentation, where a hard spherical tip is firmly pressed against the surface to be measured with a predetermined indentation load. A plastic flow occurs around the indentation mark producing a radial in-plane displacement field that is related to the amount of combined stresses. Also in this case, displacements are measured by the radial interferometer and used to determine the stresses by least square fitting it to a displacement field determined by calibration. Both approaches are used to quantify the amount of bending stresses and moment in eight sections of a 12 m long 200 mm diameter steel pipe submitted to a known transverse loading. Reference values of bending stresses are also determined by strain gauges. The comparison between the four results is discussed in the paper.

  7. Follow-up of regional myocardial T2 relaxation times in patients with myocardial infarction evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, X.H.; Wall, E. van der; Laarse, A. van der; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Doornbos, J.; Roos, A. de; Voorthuisen, A.E. van

    1990-01-01

    Multi-echo spin-echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies (echo times 30, 60, 90 and 120 ms) were performed in 19 patients with a 7-14-day (mean 10) old myocardial infarction and were repeated in 13 patients 4-7 months (mean 6) later. Also, 10 normal subjects were studied with magnetic resonance imaging. T2 relaxation times of certain left ventricular segments were calculated from the signal intensities at echo times of 30 and 90 ms. Compared to normal individuals, the mean T2 values on the early magnetic resonance images of the patients with inferior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the inferiorly localized segments, while on the follow-up magnetic resonance images the T2 times had almost returned to the normal range. Also the patients with anterior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the anteriorly localized segments on the early nuclear magnetic resonance images, but the T2 times remained prolonged at the follow-up magnetic resonance images. For every patient a myocardial damage score was determined, which was defined as the sum of the segmental T2 values in the patients minus the upper limit of normal T2 values obtained from the normal volunteers (= mean normal+2SD). The damage score on both the early and late magnetic resonance imaging study correlated well with the infarction size determined by myocardial enzyme release. Only the patients with an inferior infarction showed a significant decrease in damage score at follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that the regional T2 relaxation times are increased in infarcted myocardial regions and may remain prolonged for at least up to 7 months after the acute event, particularly in patients with an anterior infarction. These findings demonstrate the clinical potential of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies for detecting myocardial infarction, and estimating infarct size for an extended period after acute myocardial infarction. (author). 29 refs

  8. A guide for evaluating the adequacy of oak advance reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan L. Sander; Paul S. Johnson; Richard F. Watt

    1976-01-01

    Gives instructions for conducting an inventory of oak advance reproduction prior to final harvest cutting to evaluate the potential for successful oak reproduction in new stands. The potential for oak stump sprouting is also considered.

  9. Diagnostic value of T1 and T2 * relaxation times and off-resonance saturation effects in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy by MRI at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ulrich; Syha, Roland; Hein, Tobias; Gatidis, Sergios; Grözinger, Gerd; Schabel, Christoph; Martirosian, Petros; Schick, Fritz; Springer, Fabian

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate and compare the diagnostic value of T1 , T2 * relaxation times and off-resonance saturation ratios (OSR) in healthy controls and patients with different clinical and morphological stages of Achilles tendinopathy. Forty-two healthy Achilles tendons and 34 tendons of 17 patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic tendinopathy were investigated clinically with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences on a 3T whole-body MR scanner and a dynamic ultrasound examination. In addition, T1 and T2 * relaxation times were assessed using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging sequence with flip angle and echo time variation. For the calculation of OSR values a Gaussian off-resonance saturation pulse (frequency offset: 750-5000 Hz) was used. The diagnostic value of the derived MR values was assessed and compared using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. ROC curves demonstrate the highest overall test performance for OSR values at 2000 Hz off-resonance in differentiating slightly (OSR-2000 [AUC: 0.930] > T2 * [AUC: 0.884] > T1 [AUC: 0.737]) and more severe pathologically altered tendon areas (OSR-2000 [AUC: 0.964] > T2 * [AUC: 0.917] > T1 [AUC: 0.819]) from healthy ones. OSR values at a frequency offset of 2000 Hz demonstrated a better sensitivity and specificity for detecting mild and severe stages of tendinopathy compared to T2 * and particularly when compared to T1 relaxation times. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel ring-opened cromakalim analogues with relaxant effects on vascular and respiratory smooth muscles and as stimulators of elastin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhedja, Mourad; Peres, Basile; Fhayli, Wassim; Ghandour, Zeinab; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Faury, Gilles; Khelili, Smail

    2018-01-20

    Two new series of ring-opened analogues of cromakalim bearing sulfonylurea moieties (series A: with N-unmethylated sulfonylureas, series B: with N-methylated sulfonylureas) were synthesized and tested as relaxants of vascular and respiratory smooth muscles (rat aorta and trachea, respectively). Ex vivo biological evaluations indicated that the most active compounds, belonging to series B, displayed a marked vasorelaxant activity on endothelium-intact aortic rings and the trachea. A majority of series B compounds exhibited a higher vasorelaxant activity (EC 50  stronger relaxant effects on the trachea than the reference compound cromakalim (EC 50  = 124 μM), in particular compounds B4, B7 and B16 (EC 50   57 μM for all, and EC 50  > 200 μM for a majority of them), but some of them showed an interesting relaxing effect on trachea (i.e. A15 and A33, EC 50  = 30 μM). The most potent compounds of both series, i.e. A15, A33 and B16, tested on aortic rings in the presence of glibenclamide or 80 mM KCl, suggested that they acted as voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel blockers, like verapamil, instead of being ATP-potassium channel activators, as is cromakalim, the parent molecule. Further investigations on cultured vascular smooth muscle cells showed a strong stimulating effect on elastin synthesis, especially compound B16, which was more active at 20 μM than diazoxide, a reference ATP-sensitive potassium channel activator. Taken together, our results show that the N-methylation of the sulfonylurea moieties of ring-opened cromakalim analogues led to new compounds blocking calcium-gated channels, which had a major impact on the arterial and tracheal activities as well as selectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emerald Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others. Retrospective evaluations may be contrasted to prospective evaluations that reflect expected or potential outcomes only if assumptions hold. The retrospective approach described in this Guide is based on realized results only and the extent they can be attributed to the efforts of an R&D program. While it has been prepared specifically to guide retrospective benefit-cost analysis of EERE R&D Programs, this report may be used for similar analysis of other public R&D organizations.

  12. Standard guide for evaluating performance characteristics of phased-Array ultrasonic testing instruments and systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes procedures for evaluating some performance characteristics of phased-array ultrasonic examination instruments and systems. 1.2 Evaluation of these characteristics is intended to be used for comparing instruments and systems or, by periodic repetition, for detecting long-term changes in the characteristics of a given instrument or system that may be indicative of impending failure, and which, if beyond certain limits, will require corrective maintenance. Instrument characteristics measured in accordance with this guide are expressed in terms that relate to their potential usefulness for ultrasonic examinations. Other electronic instrument characteristics in phased-array units are similar to non-phased-array units and may be measured as described in E 1065 or E 1324. 1.3 Ultrasonic examination systems using pulsed-wave trains and A-scan presentation (rf or video) may be evaluated. 1.4 This guide establishes no performance limits for examination systems; if such acceptance criteria ar...

  13. Web indicators for research evaluation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Thelwall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand for research evaluation within universities and other research-based organisations. In parallel, there has been an increasing recognition that traditional citation-based indicators are not able to reflect the societal impacts of research and are slow to appear. This has led to the creation of new indicators for different types of research impact as well as timelier indicators, mainly derived from the Web. These indicators have been called altmetrics, webometrics or just web metrics. This book describes and evaluates a range of web indicators for aspects of societal or scholarly impact, discusses the theory and practice of using and evaluating web indicators for research assessment and outlines practical strategies for obtaining many web indicators. In addition to describing impact indicators for traditional scholarly outputs, such as journal articles and monographs, it also covers indicators for videos, datasets, software and other non-standard scholarly out...

  14. SEE Action Guide for States: Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Frameworks$-$Guidance for Energy Efficiency Portfolios Funded by Utility Customers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Michael [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Dietsch, Niko [US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This guide describes frameworks for evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) of utility customer–funded energy efficiency programs. The authors reviewed multiple frameworks across the United States and gathered input from experts to prepare this guide. This guide provides the reader with both the contents of an EM&V framework, along with the processes used to develop and update these frameworks.

  15. Development and performance evaluation of a guided horizontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and tested on the rice field of National Cereals Research Institute (NCRI), Moor plantation, Ibadan, to evaluate the performance of the machine. A 22 x 3 factorial experimental design with two replicates was used to analysis the effect of engine speed (1200, 1400 and 1800rpm), ecology (irrigated and rainfed-lowland) and ...

  16. The Program Manager's Guide to Evaluation, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children & Families, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), a unit within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), is responsible for advising the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families on increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of programs to improve the economic and social well-being of children and families. In collaboration…

  17. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Doctor Relaxation is the absence of tension in muscle groups and a minimum or absence ... Drill Meditation Progressive Muscle Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath Visualization This information has been approved by Shelby ...

  18. Evaluation of Dental Shade Guide Variability Using Cross-Polarized Photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrea, Jon; Gurrea, Marta; Bruguera, August; Sampaio, Camila S; Janal, Malvin; Bonfante, Estevam; Coelho, Paulo G; Hirata, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated color variability in the A hue between the VITA Classical (VITA Zahnfabrik) shade guide and four other VITA-coded ceramic shade guides using a Canon EOS 60D camera and software (Photoshop CC, Adobe). A total of 125 photographs were taken, 5 per shade tab for each of 5 shades (A1 to A4) from the following shade guides: VITA Classical (control), IPS e.max Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent), IPS d.SIGN (Ivoclar Vivadent), Initial ZI (GC), and Creation CC (Creation Willi Geller). Photos were processed with Adobe Photoshop CC to allow standardized evaluation of hue, chroma, and value between shade tabs. None of the VITA-coded shade tabs fully matched the VITA Classical shade tab for hue, chroma, or value. The VITA-coded shade guides evaluated herein showed an overall unmatched shade in all tabs when compared with the control, suggesting that shade selection should be made using the guide produced by the manufacturer of the ceramic intended for the final restoration.

  19. An Evaluation of One-Sided and Two-Sided Communication Paradigms on Relaxed-Ordering Interconnect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Khaled Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hargrove, Paul H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Iancu, Costin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yelick, Katherine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-14

    The Cray Gemini interconnect hardware provides multiple transfer mechanisms and out-of-order message delivery to improve communication throughput. In this paper we quantify the performance of one-sided and two-sided communication paradigms with respect to: 1) the optimal available hardware transfer mechanism, 2) message ordering constraints, 3) per node and per core message concurrency. In addition to using Cray native communication APIs, we use UPC and MPI micro-benchmarks to capture one- and two-sided semantics respectively. Our results indicate that relaxing the message delivery order can improve performance up to 4.6x when compared with strict ordering. When hardware allows it, high-level one-sided programming models can already take advantage of message reordering. Enforcing the ordering semantics of two-sided communication comes with a performance penalty. Furthermore, we argue that exposing out-of-order delivery at the application level is required for the next-generation programming models. Any ordering constraints in the language specifications reduce communication performance for small messages and increase the number of active cores required for peak throughput.

  20. Standard guide to In-Plant performance evaluation of Hand-Held SNM monitors

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This guide is one of a series on the application and evaluation of special nuclear material (SNM) monitors. Other guides in the series are listed in Section 2, and the relationship of in-plant performance evaluation to other procedures described in the series is illustrated in Fig. 1. Hand-held SNM monitors are described in of Guide C1112, and performance criteria illustrating their capabilities can be found in Appendix X1. 1.2 The purpose of this guide to in-plant performance evaluation is to provide a comparatively rapid procedure to verify that a hand-held SNM monitor performs as expected for detecting SNM or alternative test sources or to disclose the need for repair. The procedure can be used as a routine operational evaluation or it can be used to verify performance after a monitor is calibrated. 1.3 In-plant performance evaluations are more comprehensive than daily functional tests. They take place less often, at intervals ranging from weekly to once every three months, and derive their result fr...

  1. Damage evaluation by a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hanfei; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjin

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave based structural health monitoring has shown great potential in aerospace applications. However, one of the key challenges of practical engineering applications is the accurate interpretation of the guided wave signals under time-varying environmental and operational conditions. This paper presents a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method to improve the damage evaluation reliability of real aircraft structures under time-varying conditions. In the proposed approach, an HMM based unweighted moving average trend estimation method, which can capture the trend of damage propagation from the posterior probability obtained by HMM modeling is used to achieve a probabilistic evaluation of the structural damage. To validate the developed method, experiments are performed on a hole-edge crack specimen under fatigue loading condition and a real aircraft wing spar under changing structural boundary conditions. Experimental results show the advantage of the proposed method.

  2. Teacher Performance Evaluation Plan: A Personalized Approach to Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation. An Implementation Guide. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jeanne; And Others

    This guide provides assistance to New Mexico school districts in implementing a state-sponsored teacher performance evaluation plan (Provision III of the New Mexico Staff Accountability Plan, adopted by the State Board of Education). This plan involves five basic procedures: (1) determine specific definitions of the six essential teaching…

  3. Evaluation of the internal structure of articular cartilage in terms of 1H-NMR relaxation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics of articular cartilage were analyzed using 1 H-longitudinal (T 1 ) and transverse (T 2 ) relaxation times as measured by fast-inversion-recovery and multi-spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pairs of cartilage-bone plugs from weight bearing and non-weight bearing regions were dissected from 15 medial femoral condyles and were subjected to NMR measurements with and without static loads (0.15-1.0 MPa). The T 1 of the cartilage with no load showed a maximum value just beneath the articular surface and this value decreased gradually towards the deeper zones. The T 2 of the same cartilage showed a maximum value at, or just beneath, the articular surface, decreased rapidly towards the intermediate zone yet increased again in the deepest zone. The increase of T 2 in the deepest zone was more greatly pronounced in the weight bearing region than in the non-weight bearing region. These layer-dependent differences in the T 1 and T 2 could account for the laminar appearance of the articular cartilage in the MR images. Under static loads, the decrease of T 1 in the transitional zone (from just beneath the articular surface to the intermediate zone) was significant. Because T 1 has a positive correlation with the water content, this decrease in T 1 may signify that the largest water loss occurs in the transitional zone. These findings suggest that the transitional zone might attenuate mechanical stress in the joint, and the expressed water from the cartilage could substantially contribute to the lubrication of the joint. (author)

  4. Meteorological events in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on conducting hazard assessments of extreme and rare meteorological phenomena. It is of interest to safety assessors and regulators involved in the licensing process as well as to designers of nuclear power plants. This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. It supplements the IAEA Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Facilities which is to supersede the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, Safety Series No. 50-C-S (Rev. 1), IAEA, Vienna (1988). The present Safety Guide supersedes two earlier Safety Guides: Safety Series No. 50-SG-S11A (1981) on Extreme Meteorological Events in Nuclear Power Plant Siting, Excluding Tropical Cyclones and Safety Series No. 50-SG-S11B (1984) on Design Basis Tropical Cyclone for Nuclear Power Plants. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations and guidance on conducting hazard assessments of extreme and rare meteorological phenomena. This Safety Guide provides interpretation of the Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Facilities and guidance on how to fulfil these requirements. It is aimed at safety assessors or regulators involved in the licensing process as well as designers of nuclear power plants, and provides them with guidance on the methods and procedures for analyses that support the assessment of the hazards associated with extreme and rare meteorological events. This Safety Guide discusses the extreme values of meteorological variables and rare meteorological phenomena, as well as their rates of occurrence, according to the following definitions: (a) Extreme values of meteorological variables such as air temperature and wind speed characterize the meteorological or climatological environment. And (b) Rare meteorological phenomena

  5. Prospective evaluation of EUS-guided fine needle biopsy in pancreatic mass lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, M H; Fristrup, C W; Detlefsen, S

    2018-01-01

    Background and study aim : Due to the scarcity of specific data on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle biopsies (SharkCore) FNB in the evaluation of pancreatic lesions, we performed a prospective study of the diagnostic performance of EUS SharkCore FNB in patients with pancreatic lesions...

  6. SITEQUAL--A User's Guide: Computerized Site Evaluation for 14 Southern Hardwood Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance A. Harrington; Bettina M. Casson

    1986-01-01

    An interactive computer program, SITEQUAL, has been developed from the widely-used Baker and Broadfoot field guides, which evaluate site quality for 14 southern hardwood tree species. The SITEQUAL program calculates site index for all species simultaneously and provides a breakdown of site index into the component contributions by each of the four major soil factors...

  7. Unbiased stereological methods used for the quantitative evaluation of guided bone regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Else Merete; Pinholt, E M; Schou, S

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the use of unbiased stereological methods for the quantitative evaluation of the amount of regenerated bone. Using the principle of guided bone regeneration the amount of regenerated bone after placement of degradable or non-degradable membranes covering defects...

  8. User's guide for evaluating physical security capabilities of nuclear facilities by the EASI method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, H.A.

    1977-06-01

    This handbook is a guide for evaluating physical security of nuclear facilities using the ''Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption (EASI)'' method and a hand-held programmable calculator. The handbook is intended for use by personnel at facilities where special nuclear materials are used, processed, or stored. It may also be used as a design aid for such facilities by potential licensees

  9. Dielectric Relaxation of Water: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, Narayan Prasad; Paudyal, Harihar; Johri, Manoj

    2010-06-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bond dynamics and methods for evaluation of probability and relaxation time for hydrogen bond network. Further, dielectric relaxation time has been calculated by using a diagonalization procedure by obtaining eigen values (inverse of relaxation time) of a master equation framed on the basis of Fokker-Planck equations. Microwave cavity spectrometer has been described to make measurements of relaxation time. Slater's perturbation equations are given for the analysis of the data. A comparison of theoretical and experimental data shows that there is a need for improvements in the theoretical model and experimental techniques to provide exact information about structural properties of water. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Turner relaxed state as a model of long-lived ion-trapping structures in plasma focus and Z-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2011-03-01

    Relatively long-lived spheroidal structures coincident with the neutron emission phase have been observed in frozen deuterium fiber Z-pinch and some plasma focus devices. Existence of energetic ion-trapping mechanism in plasma focus has also been inferred from experimental data. It has been conjectured that these are related phenomena. This paper applies Turner's theory [L. Turner, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 14, 849 (1986)] of relaxation of a Hall magnetofluid to construct a model of these structures and ion-trapping mechanism. Turner's solution modified for a finite-length plasma is used to obtain expressions for the magnetic field, velocity, and equilibrium pressure fields and is shown to represent an entity which is simultaneously a fluid vortex, a force-free magnetic field, a confined finite-pressure plasma, a charged object, and a trapped energetic ion beam. Characteristic features expected from diagnostic experiments are evaluated and shown to resemble experimental observations.

  11. Tensions relaxation in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuniberti, A.M.; Picasso, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Traction and stress relaxation studies were performed on polycrystalline Zry-4 at room temperature. The effect of loading velocity on the plastic behaviour of the material is discussed, analysing log σ vs. log dε/dt at different deformation levels. The contribution introduced by the testing machine was taken into account in data evaluation. (Author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Pharmacokinetic and in vivo evaluation of a self-assembled gadolinium(III)-iron(II) contrast agent with high relaxivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N; Vander Elst, Luce; Kimpe, Kristof; Laurent, Sophie; Burtéa, Carmen; Chen, Feng; Van Deun, Rik; Ni, Yicheng; Muller, Robert N; Binnemans, Koen

    2006-01-01

    A high-molecular weight tetrametallic supramolecular complex [(Ln-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- (Ln = Gd, Eu, La) has been obtained upon self-assembly around one iron(II) ion of three 1,10-phenantroline-based molecules substituted in 5'-position with the polyaminocarboxylate diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N',N'-pentaacetate, DTPA-phen(4-). The ICP-MS measurements indicated that the lanthanide:iron ratio is 3:1. Photoluminescence spectra of [Eu-DTPA-phen](-) and of [(Eu-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- are nearly identical, implying that the first coordination sphere of the lanthanide(III) ion has not been changed upon coordination of phenantroline unit to iron(II) ion. NMRD measurements revealed that at 20 MHz and 310 K the relaxivity of the [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is equal to 9.5 +/- 0.3 s(-1) mM(-1) of Gd (28.5 s(-1) per millimole per liter of complex) which is significantly higher than that for Gd-DTPA (3.9 s(-1) mM(-1)). The pharmacokinetic parameters of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- in rats indicate that the elimination of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- is significantly slower than that of Gd-DTPA and is correlated with a reduced volume of distribution. The low volume of distribution and the longer elimination time (T(e1/2)) suggest that the agent is confined to the blood compartment, so it could have an important potential as a blood pool contrast agent. The biodistribution profile of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- 2 h after injection indicates significantly higher concentrations of [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- as compared with Gd-DTPA in kidney, liver, lungs, heart and spleen. The images obtained on rats by MR angiography show the enhancement of the abdominal blood vessels. The signal intensity reaches a maximum of 55% at 7 min post-contrast and remains around 25% after 90 min. MRI-histomorphological correlation studies of [Gd-DTPA-phen]- and [(Gd-DTPA-phen)3Fe]- showed that both agents displayed potent contrast enhancement in organs including the liver. The necrosis avidity tests indicated that, in contrast to the [Gd

  13. Peeling mode relaxation ELM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to modelling Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in which toroidal peeling modes are envisaged to initiate a constrained relaxation of the tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces both a flattened edge current profile (which tends to further destabilise a peeling mode), and a plasma-vacuum negative current sheet which has a counteracting stabilising influence; the balance that is struck between these two effects determines the radial extent (rE) of the ELM relaxed region. The model is sensitive to the precise position of the mode rational surfaces to the plasma surface and hence there is a 'deterministic scatter' in the results that has an accord with experimental data. The toroidal peeling stability criterion involves the edge pressure, and using this in conjunction with predictions of rE allows us to evaluate the ELM energy losses and compare with experiment. Predictions of trends with the edge safety factor and collisionality are also made

  14. Evaluation of an optimized shade guide made from porcelain powder mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wei, Jiaqiang; Li, Qing; Wang, Yining

    2014-12-01

    Color errors associated with current shade guides and problems with color selection and duplication are still challenging for restorative dentists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an optimized shade guide for visual shade duplication. Color distributions (L*, a*, and b*) of the maxillary left central incisors of 236 participants, whose ages ranged from 20 to 60, were measured with a spectrophotometer. Based on this color map, an optimized shade guide was designed with 14 shade tabs evenly distributed within the given color range of the natural incisors. The shade tabs were fabricated with porcelain powder mixtures and conventional laboratory procedures. A comparison of shade duplication by using the optimized and Vitapan Classical shade guides was conducted. Thirty Chinese participants were involved, and the colors of the left maxillary incisors were selected by using 2 shade guides. Metal ceramic crowns were fabricated according to the results of the shade selection. The colors of the shade tabs, natural teeth, and the ceramic crowns were measured with a spectrophotometer. The color differences among the natural teeth, the shade tabs, and the corresponding metal ceramic crowns were calculated and analyzed (α=.017). Significant differences were found in both phases of shade determination and shade duplication (P<.017). The total number of color errors with the optimized shade guide was 3.5, which was significantly less than that of Vitapan, 5.1 (P<.001). The optimized shade guide system improved performance not only in the color selection phase but also in the color of the fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Strategies against burnout and anxiety in medical education--implementation and evaluation of a new course on relaxation techniques (Relacs) for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Katharina; Scholz, Michael; Ropohl, Axel; Bräuer, Lars; Paulsen, Friedrich; Burger, Pascal H M

    2014-01-01

    Burnout and stress-related mental disorders (depression, anxiety) occur in medical students and physicians with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. At the same time, the learning of coping mechanisms against stress is still not an integral part of medical education. In this pilot study we developed an elective course for learning relaxation techniques and examined the condition of the students before and after the course. 42 students participated in the semester courses in 2012 and 2013 as well as in a survey at the start and end of each course. The students were instructed in autogenic training (AT) and progressive muscle relaxation according to Jacobsen (PMR) with the goal of independent and regular exercising. At the beginning and the end of the semester/course the students were interviewed using standardized, validated questionnaires on burnout (BOSS-II) and anxiety (STAI-G), depression (BDI), quality of life (SF-12) and sense of coherence (SOC-L9). We compared the results of our students participating in Relacs with results from eight semester medical students (n = 88), assessed with the same questionnaires at similar points of time within their semester. Participating students showed a significant decline in cognitive and emotional burnout stress and in trait anxiety. Furthermore, they showed a reduction in state anxiety and a conspicuous decrease in mean depression. The sense of coherence increased at the same time. A comparative cohort of medical students of 8th semester students, showed lower values for the specified measurement parameters at the beginning, but showed no progressive changes. Our course introducing AT and PMR led to a significant reduction of burnout and anxiety within the participating group of medical students. Even the course attendance for just one semester resulted in significant improvements in the evaluated parameters in contrast to those students who did not attend the course.

  16. Strategies against burnout and anxiety in medical education--implementation and evaluation of a new course on relaxation techniques (Relacs for medical students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Wild

    Full Text Available Burnout and stress-related mental disorders (depression, anxiety occur in medical students and physicians with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. At the same time, the learning of coping mechanisms against stress is still not an integral part of medical education. In this pilot study we developed an elective course for learning relaxation techniques and examined the condition of the students before and after the course. 42 students participated in the semester courses in 2012 and 2013 as well as in a survey at the start and end of each course. The students were instructed in autogenic training (AT and progressive muscle relaxation according to Jacobsen (PMR with the goal of independent and regular exercising. At the beginning and the end of the semester/course the students were interviewed using standardized, validated questionnaires on burnout (BOSS-II and anxiety (STAI-G, depression (BDI, quality of life (SF-12 and sense of coherence (SOC-L9. We compared the results of our students participating in Relacs with results from eight semester medical students (n = 88, assessed with the same questionnaires at similar points of time within their semester. Participating students showed a significant decline in cognitive and emotional burnout stress and in trait anxiety. Furthermore, they showed a reduction in state anxiety and a conspicuous decrease in mean depression. The sense of coherence increased at the same time. A comparative cohort of medical students of 8th semester students, showed lower values for the specified measurement parameters at the beginning, but showed no progressive changes. Our course introducing AT and PMR led to a significant reduction of burnout and anxiety within the participating group of medical students. Even the course attendance for just one semester resulted in significant improvements in the evaluated parameters in contrast to those students who did not attend the course.

  17. Strategies against Burnout and Anxiety in Medical Education – Implementation and Evaluation of a New Course on Relaxation Techniques (Relacs) for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropohl, Axel; Bräuer, Lars; Paulsen, Friedrich; Burger, Pascal H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Burnout and stress-related mental disorders (depression, anxiety) occur in medical students and physicians with a significantly higher prevalence than in the general population. At the same time, the learning of coping mechanisms against stress is still not an integral part of medical education. In this pilot study we developed an elective course for learning relaxation techniques and examined the condition of the students before and after the course. 42 students participated in the semester courses in 2012 and 2013 as well as in a survey at the start and end of each course. The students were instructed in autogenic training (AT) and progressive muscle relaxation according to Jacobsen (PMR) with the goal of independent and regular exercising. At the beginning and the end of the semester/course the students were interviewed using standardized, validated questionnaires on burnout (BOSS-II) and anxiety (STAI-G), depression (BDI), quality of life (SF-12) and sense of coherence (SOC-L9). We compared the results of our students participating in Relacs with results from eight semester medical students (n = 88), assessed with the same questionnaires at similar points of time within their semester. Participating students showed a significant decline in cognitive and emotional burnout stress and in trait anxiety. Furthermore, they showed a reduction in state anxiety and a conspicuous decrease in mean depression. The sense of coherence increased at the same time. A comparative cohort of medical students of 8th semester students, showed lower values for the specified measurement parameters at the beginning, but showed no progressive changes. Our course introducing AT and PMR led to a significant reduction of burnout and anxiety within the participating group of medical students. Even the course attendance for just one semester resulted in significant improvements in the evaluated parameters in contrast to those students who did not attend the course. PMID:25517399

  18. Mechanical relaxation in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The basic properties of glasses and the characteristics of mechanical relaxation in glasses were briefly reviewed, and then our studies concerned were presented. Experimental methods adopted were viscosity, internal friction, ultrasonic attenuation, and Brillouin scattering measurements. The specimens used were several kinds of inorganic, organic, and metallic glasses. The measurements were mainly carried out from the room temperature up to the glass transition temperature, and the relaxation time was determined as a function of temperature. The 'double relaxation' composed of two Arrhenius-type relaxations was observed in many materials. In both relaxations, the 'compensation effect' showing a correlation of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was observed. These results were explained by considering the 'complex relaxation' due to cooperative motions of atoms or group of atoms. Values of activation energy near the glass transition determined by the various experimental methods were compared with each other

  19. Realization of 3D evaluation algorithm in dose-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Li Gui; Wang Dong; Wu Yican; FDS Team

    2012-01-01

    3D evaluation algorithm instead of 2D evaluation method of clinical dose verification is highly needed for dose evaluation in Dose-guided Radiotherapy. 3D evaluation algorithm of three evaluation methods, including Dose Difference, Distance-To-Agreement and 7 Analysis, was realized by the tool of Visual C++ according to the formula. Two plans were designed to test the algorithm, plan 1 was radiation on equivalent water using square field for the verification of the algorithm's correctness; plan 2 was radiation on the emulation head phantom using conformal field for the verification of the algorithm's practicality. For plan 1, the dose difference, in the tolerance range has a pass rate of 100%, the Distance-To-Agreement and 7 analysis was of a pass rate of 100% in the tolerance range, and a pass rate of 99±1% at the boundary of range. For plan 2, the pass rate of algorithm were 88.35%, 100%, 95.07% for the three evaluation methods, respectively. It can be concluded that the 3D evaluation algorithm is feasible and could be used to evaluate 3D dose distributions in Dose-guided Radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. Relaxation characteristics of hastelloy X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiko

    1980-02-01

    Relaxation diagrams of Hastelloy X (relaxation curves, relaxation design diagrams, etc.) were generated from the creep constitutive equation of Hastelloy X, using inelastic stress analysis code TEPICC-J. These data are in good agreement with experimental relaxation data of ORNL-5479. Three typical inelastic stress analyses were performed for various relaxation behaviors of the high-temperature structures. An attempt was also made to predict these relaxation behaviors by the relaxation curves. (author)

  1. CT-guided core needle biopsy of pleural lesions: Evaluating diagnostic yield and associated complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Xiang Ke; Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy (CT-guided CNB) of pleural lesion and the possible effects of influencing factors. From September 2007 to June 2013, 88 consecutive patients (60 men and 28 women; mean [+/- standard deviation] age, 51.1 +/- 14.4 years; range, 19-78 years) underwent CT-guided CNB, which was performed by two experienced chest radiologists in our medical center. Out of 88 cases, 56 (63%) were diagnosed as malignant, 28 (31%) as benign and 4 (5%) as indeterminate for CNB of pleural lesions. The final diagnosis was confirmed by either histopathological diagnosis or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and complication rates were statistically evaluated. Influencing factors (patient age, sex, lesion size, pleural-puncture angle, patient position, pleural effusion, and number of pleural punctures) were assessed for their effect on accuracy of CT-guided CNB using univariate and subsequent multivariate analysis. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 89.2%, 86.1%, 100%, 100%, and 67.8%, respectively. The influencing factors had no significant effect in altering diagnostic accuracy. As far as complications were concerned, occurrence of pneumothorax was observed in 14 (16%) out of 88 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed lesion size/pleural thickening as a significant risk factor (odds ratio [OR]: 8.744, p = 0.005) for occurrence of pneumothorax. Moreover, presence of pleural effusion was noted as a significant protective factor (OR: 0.171, p = 0.037) for pneumothorax. CT-guided CNB of pleural lesion is a safe procedure with high diagnostic yield and low risk of significant complications.

  2. CT-guided core needle biopsy of pleural lesions: Evaluating diagnostic yield and associated complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Xiang Ke [Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University, Chengdu (China); Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng [Dept. of Radiology, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong (China)

    2015-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy (CT-guided CNB) of pleural lesion and the possible effects of influencing factors. From September 2007 to June 2013, 88 consecutive patients (60 men and 28 women; mean [+/- standard deviation] age, 51.1 +/- 14.4 years; range, 19-78 years) underwent CT-guided CNB, which was performed by two experienced chest radiologists in our medical center. Out of 88 cases, 56 (63%) were diagnosed as malignant, 28 (31%) as benign and 4 (5%) as indeterminate for CNB of pleural lesions. The final diagnosis was confirmed by either histopathological diagnosis or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and complication rates were statistically evaluated. Influencing factors (patient age, sex, lesion size, pleural-puncture angle, patient position, pleural effusion, and number of pleural punctures) were assessed for their effect on accuracy of CT-guided CNB using univariate and subsequent multivariate analysis. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 89.2%, 86.1%, 100%, 100%, and 67.8%, respectively. The influencing factors had no significant effect in altering diagnostic accuracy. As far as complications were concerned, occurrence of pneumothorax was observed in 14 (16%) out of 88 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed lesion size/pleural thickening as a significant risk factor (odds ratio [OR]: 8.744, p = 0.005) for occurrence of pneumothorax. Moreover, presence of pleural effusion was noted as a significant protective factor (OR: 0.171, p = 0.037) for pneumothorax. CT-guided CNB of pleural lesion is a safe procedure with high diagnostic yield and low risk of significant complications.

  3. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schouten, Martijn G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rothgang, Eva [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research (Germany); Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Siemens Corporate Research, Baltimore, MD (United States); Misra, Sarthak [University of Twente, MIRA-Institute of Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of a robotic technique for transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouten, Martijn G.; Bomers, Joyce G.R.; Yakar, Derya; Huisman, Henkjan; Bosboom, Dennis; Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Fuetterer, Jurgen J.; Rothgang, Eva; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and speed of a novel robotic technique as an aid to perform magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided prostate biopsies on patients with cancer suspicious regions. A pneumatic controlled MR-compatible manipulator with 5 degrees of freedom was developed in-house to guide biopsies under real-time imaging. From 13 consecutive biopsy procedures, the targeting error, biopsy error and target displacement were calculated to evaluate the accuracy. The time was recorded to evaluate manipulation and procedure time. The robotic and manual techniques demonstrated comparable results regarding mean targeting error (5.7 vs 5.8 mm, respectively) and mean target displacement (6.6 vs 6.0 mm, respectively). The mean biopsy error was larger (6.5 vs 4.4 mm) when using the robotic technique, although not significant. Mean procedure and manipulation time were 76 min and 6 min, respectively using the robotic technique and 61 and 8 min with the manual technique. Although comparable results regarding accuracy and speed were found, the extended technical effort of the robotic technique make the manual technique - currently - more suitable to perform MRI-guided biopsies. Furthermore, this study provided a better insight in displacement of the target during in vivo biopsy procedures. (orig.)

  5. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  6. Relaxation of Anisotropic Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deubener, Joachim; Martin, Birgit; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2004-01-01

    . When the load was removed at room temperature a permanent optical anisotropy (birefringence) was observed only perpendicular to cylinder axis and the pressure direction indicating complete elimination of thermal stresses. Relaxation of structural anisotropy was studied from reheating experiments using...... the energy release, thermo-mechanical and optical relaxation behaviour are drawn....

  7. Relaxation techniques for stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your heart rate. This is called the stress response. Relaxation techniques can help your body relax and lower your blood pressure ... also many other types of breathing techniques you can learn. In many cases, you do not need much ... including those that cause stress. Meditation has been practiced for thousands of years, ...

  8. Clinical evaluation of stethoscope-guided inflation of tracheal tube cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R D C; Hirsch, N P

    2011-11-01

    Tracheal tube cuffs are commonly inflated to pressures exceeding the recommended upper limit of 30 cmH(2)O. We evaluated whether a stethoscope-guided method of cuff inflation results in pressures within the recommended range. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two methods of cuff inflation. In the standard 'just seal' group, air was introduced into the tracheal cuff until the audible leak at the mouth disappeared. In the stethoscope-guided group, air was introduced into the cuff until a change from harsh to soft breath sounds occurred, whilst listening with a stethoscope bell placed over the thyroid cartilage. Twenty-five patients were recruited to each group. The median (IQR [range]) cuff pressure in the 'just seal' group was 34 (28-40 [18-49]) cmH(2)O, and in the stethoscope-guided group was 20 (20-26 [16-28]) cmH(2)O, p stethoscope-guided method of tracheal tube cuff inflation is a novel, simple technique that reliably results in acceptable tracheal cuff pressures. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  9. Relaxation dynamics following transition of solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.B.; Landman, U.; Nitzan, A.

    1989-01-01

    Relaxation dynamics following an electronic transition of an excess solvated electron in clusters and in bulk water is studied using an adiabatic simulation method. In this method the solvent evolves classically and the electron is constrained to a specified state. The coupling between the solvent and the excess electron is evaluated via the quantum expectation value of the electron--water molecule interaction potential. The relaxation following excitation (or deexcitation) is characterized by two time scales: (i) a very fast (/similar to/20--30 fs) one associated with molecular rotations in the first solvation shell about the electron, and (ii) a slower stage (/similar to/200 fs), which is of the order of the longitudinal dielectric relaxation time. The fast relaxation stage exhibits an isotope effect. The spectroscopical consequences of the relaxation dynamics are discussed

  10. A guide to understanding and implementing risk evaluation and mitigation strategies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Tichy, Eric M

    2013-03-01

    To review the components of the Congressional mandate for risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) managed by the Food and Drug Administration and assess their impact on health care providers practicing within the organ transplant arena. A non-date-limited search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (January 2007-June 2012) was conducted by using the following search terms: risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, REMS, and organ transplant, including a query of the individual organs. Information from the Federal Register and the Food and Drug Administration was also evaluated. REMS are strategies implemented to manage known or potential risks associated with medications and to ensure ongoing pharmacovigilance throughout the life of a pharmaceutical product. Elements of REMS programs may consist of 3 levels: a medication guide, communication plan, and elements to assure safe use. A medication guide is used to help prevent serious adverse events, aid in patients' decision making, and enhance medication adherence. Communication plans help educate health care providers and encourage adherence with REMS. The elements to assure safe use is a restrictive process implemented when it is deemed necessary to ensure safe access for patients to products with known serious risks. In transplant medicine, REMS currently exist for belatacept (medication guide and communication plan) and the mycophenolic acid derivatives (medication guide and elements to assure safe use). REMS are another step in the evolution of the development and marketing of pharmaceutical agents. Use of REMS in solid-organ transplant is becoming common. Transplant clinicians must provide required patient education and become involved with other aspects of REMS implementation to reduce the serious risks of pharmaceuticals and to improve patients' outcomes.

  11. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 1: Volumes I--III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared in partial fulfillment of Task 2 of MITRE contract AT(49-24)-0376 for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment. Among the equipment parameters evaluated, as appropriate, are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation are listed

  12. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 2: Volumes IV--VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared for use by U.S. NRC. Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment (NUREG-0274). Among the equipment parameters evaluated are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation is listed. The following categories of equipment are covered: surveillance and alarm assessment components, contraband detection components, automated response components, general purpose display components, and general purpose communication components

  13. Dynamic telecytologic evaluation of imprint cytology samples from CT-guided lung biopsies: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, Helmut [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Hoffmann, Elisabeth; Schober, Ewald; Mostbeck, Gerhard [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bernhardt, Klaus; Schalleschak, Johann [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Rowhani, Marcel [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-09-15

    This study assessed the feasibility of telecytological evaluation of samples from CT-guided lung biopsies using a dynamic telecytological system in which the microscope was operated by personnel from the radiology department at the site of the biopsy and a cytologist off-site diagnosed the biopsy sample. 45 imprint samples from CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions were reviewed by two cytologists using a telecytological microscope (Olympus BX51, Tokyo, Japan). The telecytological microscope was operated by one radiologist and one radiology technician. The cytological samples were classified by a cytologist into four categories: benign, malignant, atypical cells of undetermined significance, and non-diagnostic. The results were compared with those of a previous consensus reading of two independent cytologists (gold standard). When the radiologist was operating the microscope, the diagnostic accuracy was 100% as both cytologists came to the correct diagnosis in all samples. When the technician operated the microscope, two diagnoses of cyotologist 1 differed from the gold standard. Thus, the accuracy for the technician was 95.56%. Telecytological evaluation of imprint samples from CT-guided lung biopsies is feasible because it can be performed with high diagnostic accuracy if personnel from the radiology department operate the microscope. (orig.)

  14. Development of a Novel Guided Wave Generation System Using a Giant Magnetostrictive Actuator for Nondestructive Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingzhang; Li, Weijie; Wang, Junming; Wang, Ning; Chen, Xuemin; Song, Gangbing

    2018-03-04

    As a common approach to nondestructive testing and evaluation, guided wave-based methods have attracted much attention because of their wide detection range and high detection efficiency. It is highly desirable to develop a portable guided wave testing system with high actuating energy and variable frequency. In this paper, a novel giant magnetostrictive actuator with high actuation power is designed and implemented, based on the giant magnetostrictive (GMS) effect. The novel GMS actuator design involves a conical energy-focusing head that can focus the amplified mechanical energy generated by the GMS actuator. This design enables the generation of stress waves with high energy, and the focusing of the generated stress waves on the test object. The guided wave generation system enables two kinds of output modes: the coded pulse signal and the sweep signal. The functionality and the advantages of the developed system are validated through laboratory testing in the quality assessment of rock bolt-reinforced structures. In addition, the developed GMS actuator and the supporting system are successfully implemented and applied in field tests. The device can also be used in other nondestructive testing and evaluation applications that require high-power stress wave generation.

  15. Seismic Hazards in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. Specific Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-08-15

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear installations. It supplements the Safety Requirements publication on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations. The present publication provides guidance and recommends procedures for the evaluation of seismic hazards for nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations. It supersedes Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-3.3 (2002). In this publication, the following was taken into account: the need for seismic hazard curves and ground motion spectra for the probabilistic safety assessment of external events for new and existing nuclear installations; feedback of information from IAEA reviews of seismic safety studies for nuclear installations performed over the previous decade; collective knowledge gained from recent significant earthquakes; and new approaches in methods of analysis, particularly in the areas of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis and strong motion simulation. In the evaluation of a site for a nuclear installation, engineering solutions will generally be available to mitigate, by means of certain design features, the potential vibratory effects of earthquakes. However, such solutions cannot always be demonstrated to be adequate for mitigating the effects of phenomena of significant permanent ground displacement such as surface faulting, subsidence, ground collapse or fault creep. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations and guidance on evaluating seismic hazards at a nuclear installation site and, in particular, on how to determine: (a) the vibratory ground motion hazards, in order to establish the design basis ground motions and other relevant parameters for both new and existing nuclear installations; and (b) the potential for fault displacement and the rate of fault displacement that could affect the feasibility of the site or the safe operation of the installation at

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Using a Progressive Muscle Relaxation Technique on the Self-Efficacy of Breastfeeding in Mothers With Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbandi, Soheila; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maryam; Hosseini, Seyedeh Asieh; Sadeghi, Farshad; Hesari, Maryam; Masoudi, Reza

    2017-08-01

    Breast milk is a God-given gift that conveys a mother's love and compassion and that is made according to the needs and age of the child. Mothers who are interested in the welfare of their newborns tend to breastfeed their children. Training programs have been shown to improve breastfeeding self-efficacy in terms of both duration and amount. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using the progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) technique on the self-efficacy of breastfeeding in mothers with preterm infants. A clinical trial approach was used. Sixty mothers with preterm infants were randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group. The clinical trial ran for a period of 2 months for both groups. At 24-72 hours postpartum, the researcher used the Jacobson method to provide 30-45 minutes of individual training to the intervention group participants on PMR. Under the Jacobson method, mothers contract the 16 groups of muscles until they experience the feeling of pressure and then relax these muscles. The tools used in this study were the standard questionnaire of Dennis breastfeeding self-efficacy, which was completed by the participants at baseline, at the end of the fourth week, and during the eighth week. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. No significant difference was observed between the intervention and control groups in terms of demographic variables (p > .05). Independent t tests found no significant difference between the two groups (p = .45) in terms of mean score of maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy at pretest and significantly higher scores for the intervention group than the control group at both 4 (p = .001) and 8 (p mothers with preterm infants, training and performing these exercises as an effective and low-cost method to improve the health of mothers, particularly mothers of preterm infants, are recommended. The PMR technique facilitates the self-efficacy of breastfeeding in mothers with preterm infants and should be

  17. The study on nondestructive evaluation for a tubular structure by the lamb-type guided wave wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Park, Jung Chul

    1998-01-01

    The study on the cylindrical guided wave was carried out to investigate its feasibility for nondestructive evaluation of tubular structures such as heat exchanger tubings of power industries and various pipings of chemical plants. The concept of wedge design and incident angle selection to optimize guided wave generation is presented based on the dispersion theory and the snell's law for the cylindrical guided wave. The brass tubes with artificial defects in the circumferential or axial direction were used for detect defection experiments. It was found that guided wave sensitivity for detecting an axial defect can be remarkably improved by using non-axisymmetrically launched guided waves. Through this study, it is expected that the guided wave can be successfully applied to tubular structure inspections as an more advanced and efficient NDE technique than a conventional point-by-point technique.

  18. Emergency coronary angioplasty with stenting using Cordis® diagnostic coronary catheters when there is difficulty in engaging guide catheters and bench evaluation of diagnostic and guide catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiaraj, Mark Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Difficulty in engaging with guide catheters is not uncommon in acute emergencies. We aimed to evaluate the use of Cordis ® INFINITI diagnostic catheters to perform angioplasty in patients in whom the coronaries cannot be engaged using standard guide catheters. In 34 cases of acute coronary syndrome, when difficulty in engagement with two standard guide catheters was encountered with reasonable manipulations, angioplasty was performed using diagnostic catheters. In total, 40 stents were placed by this technique. Pushability and trackability, distal tip flexion and three-point bending tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the guide and diagnostic catheters. Angioplasty was performed easily in a setting where it would have been very difficult to perform. Coronary dissection occurred in one patient, treated by a stent. The stent and dilatation balloons were easily passed through the diagnostic catheters. Pressure tracings were clearly preserved with certain stent delivery systems, and at angioplasty, although there was slightly reduced opacification of the respective artery, the coronary anatomy was sufficiently visualized to perform angioplasty. No periprocedural target lesion complications were seen in any cases. Pushability and trackability tests showed good force transmission along a tortuous path with diagnostic catheters, and balanced force-displacement curves from three-point bending tests and distal tip softness tests. Angioplasty with stenting can be performed safely through 6F Cordis ® infiniti diagnostic catheters when difficulty in engaging guide catheters is encountered. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.J.; Weinhold, N.; Mueller, P.; Mack, M.; Scholz, W.; Philipp, C.; Roggan, A.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    The goal was to perform an evaluation of MRI-guided laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of liver metastases as a clinical method. In a prospective study, 50 patients with liver metastases of colorectal carcinoma (35 patients), or other primary tumors (15 patients) were treated with LITT. For preparation and intermittent controls of therapy, standardized MRI examinations were made. Online monitoring during the the LITT was done with temperature-sensitive T1-weighted sequences (FLASH-2D, TurboFLASH). All in all, 83 metastases of a volume between 1 and 282 cubic centimeters (median = ± 10 cm 3 ) were treated.During performance of the LITT, a decrease of signal intensity in the thermosensitive sequences was measured for the application area, and was correlated with fluorine-optical temperature measurements. The MRI-guided LITT is a novel, potential modality for treatment of liver metastases, and poses only minimal clinical risks. (orig./VHE) [de

  20. Evaluating Web-Scale Discovery Services: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Deodato

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Selecting a web-scale discovery service is a large and important undertaking that involves a significant investment of time, staff, and resources. Finding the right match begins with a thorough and carefully planned evaluation process. In order to be successful, this process should be inclusive, goal-oriented, data-driven, user-centered, and transparent. The following article offers a step-by-step guide for developing a web-scale discovery evaluation plan rooted in these five key principles based on best practices synthesized from the literature as well as the author’s own experiences coordinating the evaluation process at Rutgers University. The goal is to offer academic libraries that are considering acquiring a web-scale discovery service a blueprint for planning a structured and comprehensive evaluation process.

  1. The relaxation time approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, R.P.; Indu, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A plausible approximation has been made to estimate the relaxation time from a knowledge of the transition probability of phonons from one state (r vector, q vector) to other state (r' vector, q' vector), as a result of collision. The relaxation time, thus obtained, shows a strong dependence on temperature and weak dependence on the wave vector. In view of this dependence, relaxation time has been expressed in terms of a temperature Taylor's series in the first Brillouin zone. Consequently, a simple model for estimating the thermal conductivity is suggested. the calculations become much easier than the Callaway model. (author). 14 refs

  2. The 'global health' education framework: a conceptual guide for monitoring, evaluation and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past decades, the increasing importance of and rapid changes in the global health arena have provoked discussions on the implications for the education of health professionals. In the case of Germany, it remains yet unclear whether international or global aspects are sufficiently addressed within medical education. Evaluation challenges exist in Germany and elsewhere due to a lack of conceptual guides to develop, evaluate or assess education in this field. Objective To propose a framework conceptualising 'global health' education (GHE) in practice, to guide the evaluation and monitoring of educational interventions and reforms through a set of key indicators that characterise GHE. Methods Literature review; deduction. Results and Conclusion Currently, 'new' health challenges and educational needs as a result of the globalisation process are discussed and linked to the evolving term 'global health'. The lack of a common definition of this term complicates attempts to analyse global health in the field of education. The proposed GHE framework addresses these problems and presents a set of key characteristics of education in this field. The framework builds on the models of 'social determinants of health' and 'globalisation and health' and is oriented towards 'health for all' and 'health equity'. It provides an action-oriented construct for a bottom-up engagement with global health by the health workforce. Ten indicators are deduced for use in monitoring and evaluation. PMID:21501519

  3. Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngai, K L

    2011-01-01

    Relaxation and Diffusion in Complex Systems comprehensively presents a variety of experimental evidences of universal relaxation and diffusion properties in complex materials and systems. The materials discussed include liquids, glasses, colloids, polymers, rubbers, plastic crystals and aqueous mixtures, as well as carbohydrates, biomolecules, bioprotectants and pharmaceuticals. Due to the abundance of experimental data, emphasis is placed on glass-formers and the glass transition problem, a still unsolved problem in condensed matter physics and chemistry. The evidence for universal properties of relaxation and diffusion dynamics suggests that a fundamental physical law is at work. The origin of the universal properties is traced to the many-body effects of the interaction, rigorous theory of which does not exist at the present time. However, using solutions of simplified models as guides, key quantities have been identified and predictions of the universal properties generated. These predictions from Ngai’...

  4. ASTM STANDARD GUIDE FOR EVALUATING DISPOSAL OPTIONS FOR REUSE OF CONCRETE FROM NUCLEAR FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    Within the nuclear industry, many contaminated facilities that require decommissioning contain huge volumes of concrete. This concrete is generally disposed of as low-level waste at a high cost. Much of the concrete is lightly contaminated and could be reused as roadbed, fill material, or aggregate for new concrete, thus saving millions of dollars. However, because of the possibility of volumetric contamination and the lack of a method to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete, reuse is rarely considered. To address this problem, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory teamed to write a ''concrete protocol'' to help evaluate the ramifications of reusing concrete within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document, titled the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Site (1) is based on ANL-E's previously developed scrap metal recycle protocols; on the 10-step method outlined in DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material (2); and on DOE Order 4500.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (3). The DOE concrete protocol was the basis for the ASTM Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning, which was written to make the information available to a wider audience outside DOE. The resulting ASTM Standard Guide is a more concise version that can be used by the nuclear industry worldwide to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. The bulk of the ASTM Standard Guide focuses on evaluating the dose and cost for each disposal option. The user calculates these from the detailed formulas and tabulated data provided, then compares the dose and cost for each disposal option to select the best option that meets regulatory requirements. With this information

  5. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  6. Ultrasound-guided biopsy of transplanted pancreas: evaluation of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Vieira da Nóbrega

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience with percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic grafts guided by ultrasonography. Methods: Series of cases referred from outpatient’s clinic for biopsy of pancreas transplant, between December 2006 and March 2008. Data were collected from medical electronic records for age, sex and histopathology. The indication for the procedure was obtained from medical and laboratory records. Doppler ultrasonography was performed for control and to guide biopsy in real time. Rresults: Twenty patients referred for biopsy of their transplanted pancreas over a one-year period were evaluated. In one patient, biopsy was not performed for having no safe access for ultrasound. It was used 18 gauge needles, mostly automatic-cut type. The main indications were increased blood glucose and pancreatic enzyme levels as well as reduction of urinary amylase. The sonographic aspect of the pancreatic graft was normal in 18 cases. In all 19 biopsies performed, satisfactory samples for histopathological study were obtained. There were no complications. Cconclusions: This series of cases demonstrated low sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in diagnosis of pancreatic transplants disorders, but showed to be very useful to guide transplanted pancreas biopsies. Although no complications occurred in this experience, the risk-benefit relation should always be assessed for every patient.

  7. Evaluation of effect of low opening operation on increasing wear of bearing bushings of guide vanes used in hydropower plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Se Na

    2012-01-01

    A guide vane plays a key role in controlling the flow rate of water supplied to the turbine of a hydropower plant. It has been reported that guide vane bearing bushings are subjected to considerable wear, which requires them to be maintained. An ancillary service such as frequency control and black start causes cyclic low opening operation of the guide vanes. It is empirically well known that such operation increases the wear rate of the guide vane bearing bushing. In this study, the effect of low opening operation on the increasing wear of the guide vane bearing bushing is quantitatively assessed via finite element flow analysis, finite element stress analysis, and relative wear evaluation. As a result of the assessment, it is identified that the pressure applied on the guide vane surface increases and the contact length between the outer surface of the guide vane stem and the inner surface of the bearing bushing decreases with a decrease in the opening of the guide vane. In addition, low opening of the guide vanes results in an increase in the relative wear owing to the generation of high contact pressure on the bearing bushing surfaces

  8. CT-guided procedures: evaluation of a phantom system to teach accurate needle placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmick, S.; Jones, M.; Challen, J.; Iedema, J.; Wattuhewa, U.; Coucher, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of a phantom system to help teach the basic techniques of accurate CT-guided needle placement, thereby avoiding the risks associated with teaching on patients. Materials and Methods: Gelatine phantoms with five, 1.9 cm embedded spherical wooden targets were constructed. Four trainee operators performed 15 simulated biopsy procedures on the targets (series one) and repeated identical procedures 2 weeks later (series two). Statistical analysis of accuracy of needle placement and subject confidence were performed. Results: Significant sequential improvement in axial plane angular error was noted with the average error decreasing by 0.33 degrees after every five procedures performed (95% CI: -0.58 to -0.08, p = 0.01). Operator confidence indicated significant improvement both within each series and from series one to series two (95% CI: 0.08 to 1.17, p = 0.025 and 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.58, p = 0.05) respectively. However, variability in operator performance made statistically significant improvement in other variables unproven. Conclusion: Despite the study comprising a relatively small number of participants and procedures, it clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of teaching operators to perform CT-guided procedures using a phantom system. Needle placement accuracy significantly improved, with a reduction in axial angular error, and improved operator confidence without the risks associated with training on patients. Three of the operators in this study had never performed a CT-guided procedure previously, and their proficiency, after a relatively short but intense period of training, was impressive. The use of phantoms should be considered routinely for basic training of CT-guided needle placement

  9. Reliability of the AMA Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forst, Linda; Friedman, Lee; Chukwu, Abraham

    2010-12-01

    AMA's Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment is used to rate loss of function and determine compensation and ability to work after injury or illness; however, there are few studies that evaluate reliability or construct validity. To evaluate the reliability of the fifth and sixth editions for back injury; to determine best methods for further study. Intra-class correlation coefficients within and between raters were relatively high. There was wider variability for individual cases. Impairment ratings were lower and correlated less well for the sixth edition, though confidence intervals overlapped. The sixth edition may not be an improvement over the fifth. A research agenda should include investigations of reliability and construct validity for different body sites and organ systems along the entire rating scale and among different categories of raters.

  10. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy for the evaluation of renal dysfunction following renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jae; Choi, Chul Soon; Min, Seon Jeong; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won; Bae, Sang Hoon

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and complications of renal biopsy under ultrasonography-guidance in renal dysfunction after renal transplantation. Ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy was done in 47 patients with the transplanted kidney. The subjects consisted of 30 males and 17 females, age ranged from 16 to 66 years (average age=38 years). Biopsies were done once in 27 patients, twice in 17 patients, three times in 3 patients, a total of 70 biopsies. The success rate of renal biopsy for the accurate pathologic diagnosis and the incidence and types of complications following biopsy were evaluated. The success rate of renal biopsy for the accurate pathologic diagnosis was 96%(67/70). Pathologic diagnosis included 27 cases of acute rejection (39%), 8 cases of acute tubular necrosis (11%), 4 cases of acute rejection and acute tubular necrosis (6%), 4 cases of cyclosporin toxicity (6%), 4 cases of primary disease recurrence (6%), 4 cases of infection (6%) and others. Complications after renal biopsy included 15 cases of microscopic hematuria (21%), 1 case of gross hematuria with spontaneous cessation and 1 case of life threatening hemorrhage. Ultrasonography-guided renal biopsy is a safe and effective diagnostic method for the evaluation of renal dysfunction following renal transplantation.

  11. External human induced events in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present Safety Guide is to provide recommendations and guidance for the examination of the region considered for site evaluation for a plant in order to identity hazardous phenomena associated with human induced events initiated by sources external to the plant. In some cases it also presents preliminary guidance for deriving values of relevant parameters for the design basis. This Safety Guide is also applicable for periodic site evaluation and site evaluation following a major human induced event, and for the design and operation of the site's environmental monitoring system. Site evaluation includes site characterization. Consideration of external events that could lead to a degradation of the safety features of the plant and cause a release of radioactive material from the plant and/or affect the dispersion of such material in the environment. And consideration of population issues and access issues significant to safety (such as the feasibility of evacuation, the population distribution and the location of resources). The process of site evaluation continues throughout the lifetime of the facility, from siting to design, construction, operation and decommissioning. The external human induced events considered in this Safety Guide are all of accidental origin. Considerations relating to the physical protection of the plant against wilful actions by third parties are outside its scope. However, the methods described herein may also have some application for the purposes of such physical protection. The present Safety Guide may also be used for events that may originate within the boundaries of the site, but from sources which are not directly involved in the operational states of the nuclear power plant units, such as fuel depots or areas for the storage of hazardous materials for the construction of other facilities at the same site. Special consideration should be given to the hazardous material handled during the construction, operation and

  12. Environmental restoration program pollution prevention checklist guide for the evaluation of alternatives project phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Evaluation of alternative studies determine what decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) alternatives are presented to regulators for facility and site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best clean-up option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all Evaluation of Alternatives (EV) phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will assist users with documenting PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to help users implement and evaluate waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves, eliminating expensive process waste assessments and audit teams

  13. Standard guide for conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1981-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers conducting and evaluating galvanic corrosion tests to characterize the behavior of two dissimilar metals in electrical contact in an electrolyte under low-flow conditions. It can be adapted to wrought or cast metals and alloys. 1.2 This guide covers the selection of materials, specimen preparation, test environment, method of exposure, and method for evaluating the results to characterize the behavior of galvanic couples in an electrolyte. Note 1—Additional information on galvanic corrosion testing and examples of the conduct and evaluation of galvanic corrosion tests in electrolytes are given in Refs (1) through (7). 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicabil...

  14. Geotechnical aspects of site evaluation and foundations for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This publication is a revision of the former safety standards of IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-S8. The scope has been extended to cover not only foundations but also design questions related to geotechnical science and engineering, such as the bearing capacity of foundations, design of earth structures and design of buried structures. Seismic aspects also play an important role in this field, and consequently the Safety Guide on Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants, Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-3.3, which discusses the determination of seismic input motion, is referenced on several occasions. The present Safety Guide provides an interpretation of the Safety Requirements on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations and guidance on how to implement them. It is intended for the use of safety assessors or regulators involved in the licensing process as well as the designers of nuclear power plants, and it provides them with guidance on the methods and procedures for analyses to support the assessment of the geotechnical aspects of the safety of nuclear power plants

  15. Geotechnical aspects of site evaluation and foundations for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This publication is a revision of the former safety standards of IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-S8. The scope has been extended to cover not only foundations but also design questions related to geotechnical science and engineering, such as the bearing capacity of foundations, design of earth structures and design of buried structures Seismic aspects also play an important role in this field, and consequently the Safety Guide on Evaluation of Seismic Hazards for Nuclear Power Plants, Safety Standards Series No. NS-G-3.3, which discusses the determination of seismic input motion, is referenced on several occasions. The present Safety Guide provides an interpretation of the Safety Requirements on Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations and guidance on how to implement them. It is intended for the use of safety assessors or regulators involved in the licensing process as well as the designers of nuclear power plants, and it provides them with guidance on the methods and procedures for analyses to support the assessment of the geotechnical aspects of the safety of nuclear power plants

  16. Evaluation of the photon transmission efficiency of light guides used in scintillation detectors using LightTools code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik; Kim, Jeong Ho; Kim, Dong Sung; Park, Ki Hyun; Park, Chan Jong; Han, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    To optimize the photon transmission efficiency of light guides used in scintillation detectors, LightTools code, which can construct and track light, was used to analyze photon transmission effectiveness with respect to light guides thickness. This analysis was carried out using the commercial light guide, N-BK 7 Optical Glass by SCHOTT, as a model for this study. The luminous exitance characteristic of the LYSO scintillator was used to analyze the photon transmission effectiveness according to the thickness of the light guide. The results of the simulations showed the effectiveness of the photon transmission according to the thickness of the light guide, which was found to be distributed from 13.38% to 33.57%. In addition, the photon transmission efficiency was found to be the highest for light guides of 4 mm of thickness and a receiving angle of 49 .deg. . Through such simulations, it is confirmed that photon transmission efficiency depends on light guide thickness and subsequent changes in the internal angle of reflection. The aim is to produce an actual light guide based on these results and to evaluate its performance

  17. Evaluation of the sanitary impact of urban air pollution. Update version of the methodological guide; Evaluation de l'impact sanitaire de la pollution atmospherique urbaine. Version actualisee du guide methodologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    In order to bring a help to the evaluation of effects of air quality on health, the Institute of Sanitary surveillance published in 1999 a method guide for the realisation of sanitary impact evaluations of the urban air pollution. This work to prepare to an update version of the guide presents the first recommendations that can be made today for the realisation of sanitary impact evaluations at short and long term at a local level, taking into account the knowledge evolution. (N.C.)

  18. Interaction study of polyisobutylene with paraffins by NMR using the evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times for hydrogen nuclei; Estudo da interacao do poliisobutileno com parafinas por RMN no estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Rosana G.G. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas - CENPES]. E-mail: garrido@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas]. E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br

    2001-07-01

    The evaluation of spin-lattice relaxation times of {sup 1}H for polyisobutylene/paraffin systems, were obtained using the classic inversion recovery technique, and also through Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) techniques varying the contact time and also by the delayed contact time pulse sequence. NMR results showed that the polyisobutylene/paraffin systems in which high molecular weight paraffins were used, is heterogeneous. However, for paraffins with low molecular weight, the system presents good homogeneity. (author)

  19. Technical guide to evaluate upper limb joints (shoulder, elbow and wrist) by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon Baez, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    A guideline to follow is offered to radiologists and residents of radiology service of medical imaging, when evaluating by ultrasound the shoulder joints, elbow, wrist. The importance to performing of musculoskeletal ultrasound by its pathology variable is established. The use of appropriate equipment and effective application of the techniques exposed of echography exploration have made enable the valuation of many pathologies with high sensitivity and specificity. The echography has been the musculoskeletal imaging technique that more rapidly has evolved. Currently, this technique has been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging in various clinical fields and also serves as a complement to other techniques. Exposed techniques have been of great benefit for radiologists medical and residents, obtaining with its use a quick guide for the realization of upper limb musculoskeletal ultrasounds. The appropriate and easy techniques are better known for the evaluation of these structures, and so document both sports injuries, as joint and rheumatic diseases [es

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided evaluation of the pleura and cases of pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    The most efficient and cost-effective approach for the diagnosis of pleural exudates remains uncertain and is a subject of controversy. Essential factors to be considered include the respective diagnostic yields of thoracocentesis, closed pleural biopsy, and thoracoscopy. The role of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) of the esophagus as a modality for the evaluation of pleural exudates has not yet been evaluated. The applied anatomy of the pleura has been discussed. The techniques involved in the EUS imaging of different aspects of the pleura in normal cases and in cases with pleural effusion are elaborated. The practical application of this knowledge can be useful in EUS-guided sampling of the pleural wall, pleural nodules, and in cases of pleural effusion.

  1. What is the most suitable MR signal index for quantitative evaluation of placental function using Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo compared with T2-relaxation time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Kyoko Nakao; Kido, Aki; Himoto, Yuki; Moribata, Yusaku; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Konishi, Ikuo; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-06-01

    Background Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) imaging is now widely used for placental and fetal imaging because of its rapidity and low sensitivity to fetal movement. If placental dysfunction is also predicted by quantitative value obtained from HASTE image, then it might be beneficial for evaluating placental wellbeing. Purpose To ascertain the most suitable magnetic resonance (MR) signal indexes reflecting placental function using HASTE imaging. Material and Methods This retrospective study included 37 consequent patients who had given informed consent to MR imaging (MRI) examinations. All had undergone MRI examinations between February 2014 and June 2015. First, the correlation between T2-relaxation time of normal placenta and gestational age (GA) was examined. Second, correlation between signal intensity ratios (SIRs) using HASTE imaging and placental T2-relaxation time were assessed. The SIRs were calculated using placental signal intensity (SI) relative to the SI of the amniotic fluid, fetal ocular globes, gastric fluid, bladder, maternal psoas major muscles, and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. Results Among the 37 patients, the correlation between T2-relaxation time of the 25 normal placentas and GA showed a moderately strong correlation (Spearman rho = -0.447, P = 0.0250). The most significant correlation with placental T2-relaxation time was observed with the placental SIR relative to the maternal psoas major muscles (SIR pl./psoas muscle ) (Spearman rho = -0.531, P = 0.0007). Conclusion This study revealed that SIR pl./psoas muscle showed the best correlation to placental T2-relaxation time. Results show that SIR pl./psoas muscle might be optimal as a clinically available quantitative index of placental function.

  2. Evaluation guide for the international reactor physics experiments evaluation project (IRPhEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Akifumi

    2013-01-01

    At present, there is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data including separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated as a pilot activity in 1999 by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. This document outlines the general presentation guidelines that evaluators should follow for the description of the experiments and all relevant experimental data in order to ensure the consistency between the evaluations published in the final Handbook. Publication templates will be used to ensure this consistency and will follow the general scheme below: 1 - Experiment identification number; 2- Date; 3 - Name of experiment (Purpose of experiment, Phenomena measured and scope); 4 - Name or designation of experimental programme; 5 - Description of facility; 6 - Description of test or experiment (Experimental configuration, Core life cycle, Experimental limitations or shortcomings); 7 - Phenomena measured (Description of results and analysis, Special features and characteristics of experiment, Measurement systems/methods and uncertainties); 8 - Duplicate or complementary experiments / other related experiments; 9 - Status of completion of the evaluation; 10 - References (pointer to evaluation, archive if available, otherwise generic bibliographic reference); 11 - Authors/ organisers 12 - Material available

  3. Guide of Evaluation of the Operation of Incinerators of Solid Waste in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera Sanchez, J.

    2001-01-01

    This project has as general objective to prepare, in accordance with the effective Costa Rica legislation, a guide to evaluate the operation of incinerators of solid waste in Costa Rica. For this, it was necessary to define the parameters and approaches to evaluate the operation of an incineration center, as well as to investigate the regulations related with the topic in our country and to detail the technical specifications of equipment of this nature.The guide embraces such aspects as the specifications of the equipment and chimney, the type of waste to incinerate, the control of gassy emissions and the administration of the scums, distributed in several sections: administration, legislation, waste type, details technician, control and operation. Initially, the state of operation of an incinerator belonging to a hospital center and the project of energy recycling that impels the National Industry of Cements are evaluated. A study of the current state of the incineration of waste in the country must monitor the gassy emissions, the variables of the water heater-chemical process and the operation conditions. For limitations in the availability of the data and for the non existence of similar studies in the country, some of the parameters proposed in the guide are not evaluated. According to spokesmen of the Ministry of Public Health, only five incinerators operate in the country. Of these, none has location permission, construction or sanitary permission of operation, and data on their operation conditions are not carried, neither control of the incinerated waste is taken, of its operation frequency and even less the generated gassy emissions. It is necessary to adapt the standards of emission of Costa Rica (PRONASA Report) to the international standards, incorporating new pollutants (dioxins, furanos) and appropriating the existent ones (solid particles). In the case of our country, the incineration should be constituted in a stage of the process of integral

  4. Evaluating the role of prefrontal and parietal cortices in memory-guided response with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidi, Massihullah; Tononi, Giulio; Postle, Bradley R.

    2008-01-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) plays an important role in working memory, including the control of memory-guided response. In this study, with 24 subjects, we used high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to evaluate the role of the dlPFC in memory-guided response to two different types of spatial working memory tasks: one requiring a recognition decision about a probe stimulus (operationalized with a yes/no button press), another requiring direct recall ...

  5. Evaluation of iris recognition system for wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis for myopic astigmatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudipta; Couper, Terry A; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Jhanji, Vishal; Taylor, Hugh R; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes of wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using an iris recognition system for the correction of myopic astigmatism. Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne Excimer Laser Research Group, and Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. A comparative analysis of wavefront-guided LASIK was performed with an iris recognition system (iris recognition group) and without iris recognition (control group). The main parameters were uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best spectacle-corrected visual acuity, amount of residual cylinder, manifest spherical equivalent (SE), and the index of success using the Alpins method of astigmatism analysis 1 and 3 months postoperatively. A P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Preoperatively, the mean SE was -4.32 diopters (D) +/- 1.59 (SD) in the iris recognition group (100 eyes) and -4.55 +/- 1.87 D in the control group (98 eyes) (P = .84). At 3 months, the mean SE was -0.05 +/- 0.21 D and -0.20 +/- 0.40 D, respectively (P = .001), and an SE within +/-0.50 D of emmetropia was achieved in 92.0% and 85.7% of eyes, respectively (P = .07). At 3 months, the UCVA was 20/20 or better in 90.0% and 76.5% of eyes, respectively. A statistically significant difference in the amount of astigmatic correction was seen between the 2 groups (P = .00 and P = .01 at 1 and 3 months, respectively). The index of success was 98.0% in the iris recognition group and 81.6% in the control group (P = .03). Iris recognition software may achieve better visual and refractive outcomes in wavefront-guided LASIK for myopic astigmatism.

  6. Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Nelson, Priscilla; Gurewitsch, Edith D.; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2007-01-01

    Fetal responses to induced maternal relaxation during the 32nd week of pregnancy were recorded in 100 maternal-fetal pairs using a digitized data collection system. The 18-minute guided imagery relaxation manipulation generated significant changes in maternal heart rate, skin conductance, respiration period, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Significant alterations in fetal neurobehavior were observed, including decreased fetal heart rate (FHR), increased FHR variability, suppression of fetal...

  7. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a new biodegradable poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; denDunnen, WFA; Robinson, PH; Pennings, AJ; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate functional nerve recovery following reconstruction of a 1 cm gap in the sciatic nerve of a rat, using a new biodegradable p (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide. To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery, walking track analysis and electrostimulation tests were

  8. HEAT - Habitat Evaluation and Assessment Tools for Effective Environmental Evaluations: User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    evaluation model (HMEM). Version 1. Fort Collins, CO: National Ecology Center. ERDC/EL SR-12-1 295 Van der Lee, G. E. M., D. T. Van der Molen , H...Store and Jokimaki 2003; Shifley et al. 2006; Van der Lee et al. 2006; and others). ERDC/EL SR-12-1 5 Virtually all attempts to use HSI models...Burgman 2006; Van der Lee et al. 2006; and others). A fundamental problem with these approaches con- tinues to be the inability to link species

  9. Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

  10. Physical activity guides for Canadians: messaging strategies, realistic expectations for change, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawley, Lawrence R; Latimer, Amy E

    2007-01-01

    Physical activity guidelines offer evidence-based behavioural benchmarks that relate to reduced risk of morbidity and mortality if people adhere to them. Essentially, the guidelines tell people what to do, but not why and how they should do it. Thus, to motivate adherence, messages that translate guidelines should convey not only how much physical activity one should attempt and why it is recommended, but also how to achieve such a recommendation. Canada's physical activity guides exemplify how guidelines can be translated. This paper (i) provides a brief overview of the challenges encountered in creating the existing guides and (ii) highlights important practical issues and empirical evidence that should be considered in the future when translating guidelines into messages and disseminating these messages. We draw on the successes of past efforts to translate the goals of physical activity guidelines and on recent literature on messages and media campaigns to make recommendations. Information to motivate people to move toward the goals in physical activity guidelines should be translated into a set of messages that are informative, thought provoking, and persuasive. These messages should be disseminated to the public via a multi-phase social-marketing campaign that is carefully planned and thoroughly evaluated.

  11. Evaluation of commercial nickel-phosphorus coating for ultracold neutron guides using a pinhole bottling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattie, R. W.; Adamek, E. R.; Brenner, T.; Brandt, A.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ito, T. M.; Lauer, T.; Liu, C. Y.; Majewski, J.; Makela, M.; Masuda, Y.; Morris, C. L.; Ramsey, J. C.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Schroffenegger, J.; Tang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wang, Z.; Watkins, E.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the evaluation of commercial electroless nickel phosphorus (NiP) coatings for ultracold neutron (UCN) transport and storage. The material potential of 50 μm thick NiP coatings on stainless steel and aluminum substrates was measured to be VF = 213(5 . 2) neV using the time-of-flight spectrometer ASTERIX at the Lujan Center. The loss per bounce probability was measured in pinhole bottling experiments carried out at ultracold neutron sources at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the Institut Laue-Langevin. For these tests a new guide coupling design was used to minimize gaps between the guide sections. The observed UCN loss in the bottle was interpreted in terms of an energy independent effective loss per bounce, which is the appropriate model when gaps in the system and upscattering are the dominate loss mechanisms, yielding a loss per bounce of 1 . 3(1) × 10-4. We also present a detailed discussion of the pinhole bottling methodology and an energy dependent analysis of the experimental results.

  12. Development and Evaluation of an Ontology for Guiding Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, E. Yoko; Kuperman, Gilad J.; Cimino, James J.; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop and apply formal ontology creation methods to the domain of antimicrobial prescribing and to formally evaluate the resulting ontology through intrinsic and extrinsic evaluation studies. Methods We extended existing ontology development methods to create the ontology and implemented the ontology using Protégé-OWL. Correctness of the ontology was assessed using a set of ontology design principles and domain expert review via the laddering technique. We created three artifacts to support the extrinsic evaluation (set of prescribing rules, alerts and an ontology-driven alert module, and a patient database) and evaluated the usefulness of the ontology for performing knowledge management tasks to maintain the ontology and for generating alerts to guide antibiotic prescribing. Results The ontology includes 199 classes, 10 properties, and 1,636 description logic restrictions. Twenty-three Semantic Web Rule Language rules were written to generate three prescribing alerts: 1) antibiotic-microorganism mismatch alert; 2) medication-allergy alert; and 3) non-recommended empiric antibiotic therapy alert. The evaluation studies confirmed the correctness of the ontology, usefulness of the ontology for representing and maintaining antimicrobial treatment knowledge rules, and usefulness of the ontology for generating alerts to provide feedback to clinicians during antibiotic prescribing. Conclusions This study contributes to the understanding of ontology development and evaluation methods and addresses one knowledge gap related to using ontologies as a clinical decision support system component—a need for formal ontology evaluation methods to measure their quality from the perspective of their intrinsic characteristics and their usefulness for specific tasks. PMID:22019377

  13. Relaxed Binaural LCMV Beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutrouvelis, A.; Hendriks, R.C.; Heusdens, R.; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new binaural beamforming technique, which can be seen as a relaxation of the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) framework. The proposed method can achieve simultaneous noise reduction and exact binaural cue preservation of the target source, similar to the

  14. Snakes or Ladders? Evaluating a LibGuides pilot at University College Dublin Library

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Michelle; Pan, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    Online subject guides are commonly used by libraries to provide information support to students. LibGuides (a cloud-based commercial product launched in 2007) represent one of the latest incarnations of the traditional subject guide or portal, and are widely used across American academic libraries. In Ireland however, library subject guides of entirely local design and hosted on a local web server still dominate. This paper outlines the project management process involved in implementing a Li...

  15. Evaluation of Kerma rate in the skin entrance in interventional procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; Alves, Fatima Faloppa Rodrigues; Ruberti Filha, Eny M.

    2005-01-01

    Interventional therapeutic procedures guided by fluoroscopy are responsible for delayed exposure to radiation of professionals and patients. The technology employed on generation of the pulsed fluoroscopy can be an important tool of protection used for reducing the exposure time. It generates constant width and varied frequency pulse or width pulse or varied frequency for a constant frequency. The typical doses into the skin and its relationship with the quality of the images in the various technical and operational conditions should be known by the professionals so that they can optimize them. Generated radiation doses were evaluated using the Toshiba Infinitix equipment used in invasive cardiology procedures and electrophysiological studies through the Kerma rate at the entrance of the patient's skin measured throughout the year of 2004. With these information shall be set out the criteria for the decision of the technical-operational conditions that allow minimizing of dose

  16. Clinical evaluation of CT-guided stereotaxic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masato; Yoshinaga, Shiya; Nakayama, Yoshiya; Hirakawa, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Akira; Tomonaga, Masamichi

    1989-01-01

    The clinical results of CT-guided stereotaxic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas which had been done in our department during the last 16 months were evaluated. They included 18 cases; 8 of thalamic, 9 of putaminal and one of cerebellar hematoma. The patients were 11 males and 7 females, with an average age of 57. The time interval from oneset to surgery was 1-21 days, 9.5 days on average. The hematoma volume estimated on a CT scan was 6-35 ml and the average rate of hematoma removal by surgery was 75%. Intraoperative monitoring with ultrasonography and postoperative infusion of Urokinase increased the removal rate. In 14 cases, the mental ability and motor function improved within days after surgery and rehabilitation was started within a short period. However, the recovery in aged people was generally poor. Rebleeding occurred postoperatively in one case, necessitating a subsequent craniotomy. (author)

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Defect Based on Ultrasonic Guided Wave and CHMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Le

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The axial length of pipe defects is not linear with the reflection coefficient, which is difficult to identify the axial length of the defect by the reflection coefficient method. Continuous Hidden Markov Model (CHMM is proposed to accurately classify the axial length of defects, achieving the objective of preliminary quantitative evaluation. Firstly, wavelet packet decomposition method is used to extract the characteristic information of the guided wave signal, and Kernel Sliced Inverse Regression (KSIR method is used to reduce the dimension of feature set. Then, a variety of CHMM models are trained for classification. Finally, the trained models are used to identify the artificial corrosion defects on the outer surface of the pipe. The results show that the CHMM model has better robustness and can accurately identify the axial defects.

  18. Evaluation of image-guided helical tomotherapy for the retreatment of spinal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Chester R.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.; Chase, Daniel J.; Byrne, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with vertebral metastasis that receive radiation therapy are typically treated to the spinal cord tolerance dose. As such, it is difficult to successfully deliver a second course of radiation therapy for patients with overlapping treatment volumes. In this study, an image-guided helical tomotherapy system was evaluated for the retreatment of previously irradiated vertebral metastasis. Methods and Materials: Helical tomotherapy dose gradients and maximum cord doses were measured in a cylindrical phantom for geometric test cases with separations between the planning target volume (PTV) and the spinal cord organ at risk (OAR) of 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, and 10 mm. Megavoltage computed tomography (CT) images were examined for their ability to localize spinal anatomy for positioning purposes by repeat imaging of the cervical spine in an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition to the phantom studies, 8 patients with cord compressions that had received previous radiation therapy were retreated to a mean dose of 28 Gy using conventional fractionation. Results and Discussion: Megavoltage CT images were capable of positioning an anthropomorphic phantom to within ±1.2 mm (2σ) superior-inferiorly and within ±0.6 mm (2σ) anterior-posteriorly and laterally. Dose gradients of 10% per mm were measured in phantom while PTV uniformity indices of less than 11% were maintained. The calculated maximum cord dose was 25% of the prescribed dose for a 10-mm PTV-to-OAR separation and 71% of the prescribed dose for a PTV-to-OAR separation of 2 mm. Eight patients total have been treated without radiation-induced myelopathy or any other adverse effects from treatment. Conclusions: A technique has been evaluated for the retreatment of vertebral metastasis using image-guided helical tomotherapy. Phantom and patient studies indicated that a tomotherapy system is capable of delivering dose gradients of 10% per mm and positioning the patient within 1.2 mm without the use of

  19. In vivo MR guided boiling histotripsy in a mouse tumor model evaluated by MRI and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan; den Brok, Martijn H; Veltien, Andor; Wassink, Melissa; Wesseling, Pieter; Dumont, Erik; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J; Heerschap, Arend

    2016-06-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation technique to mechanically fragmentize soft tissue into submicrometer fragments. So far, ultrasound has been used for BH treatment guidance and evaluation. The in vivo histopathological effects of this treatment are largely unknown. Here, we report on an MR guided BH method to treat subcutaneous tumors in a mouse model. The treatment effects of BH were evaluated one hour and four days later with MRI and histopathology, and compared with the effects of thermal HIFU (T-HIFU). The lesions caused by BH were easily detected with T2 w imaging as a hyper-intense signal area with a hypo-intense rim. Histopathological evaluation showed that the targeted tissue was completely disintegrated and that a narrow transition zone (<200 µm) containing many apoptotic cells was present between disintegrated and vital tumor tissue. A high level of agreement was found between T2 w imaging and H&E stained sections, making T2 w imaging a suitable method for treatment evaluation during or directly after BH. After T-HIFU, contrast enhanced imaging was required for adequate detection of the ablation zone. On histopathology, an ablation zone with concentric layers was seen after T-HIFU. In line with histopathology, contrast enhanced MRI revealed that after BH or T-HIFU perfusion within the lesion was absent, while after BH in the transition zone some micro-hemorrhaging appeared. Four days after BH, the transition zone with apoptotic cells was histologically no longer detectable, corresponding to the absence of a hypo-intense rim around the lesion in T2 w images. This study demonstrates the first results of in vivo BH on mouse tumor using MRI for treatment guidance and evaluation and opens the way for more detailed investigation of the in vivo effects of BH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo Gianluca; Pagnini Francesco; Manzoni Gian; Molinari Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety p...

  1. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  2. Development of a Rabbit Model of Radiation-Induced Sciatic Nerve Injury: In Vivo Evaluation Using T2 Relaxation Time Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qi; Zeng, Qian; Li, Xinchun; Sun, Chongpeng; Zhou, Jiaxuan; Zou, Qiao; Deng, Yingshi; Niu, Daoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a rabbit model of radiation-induced sciatic nerve injury (RISNI), using computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic radiosurgery, and assess the value of T2 measurements of injured nerves. Twenty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into A (n = 5) and B (n = 15) groups. Group A rabbits underwent CT and magnetic resonance scan and were then killed for comparison of images and anatomy of sciatic nerves. One side of the sciatic nerve of group B rabbits received irradiation doses of 35, 50, or 70 Gy (n = 5 per group). Magnetic resonance imaging and functional assessments were performed before irradiation and 1, 2, 3, and 4 months thereafter. The thigh section of the sciatic nerve outside the pelvis could be observed by CT and magnetic resonance imaging. T2 values of the irradiated nerve of the 35-Gy group increased gradually, peaking at 4 months; T2 values of the 50-Gy group increased faster, peaking at 3 months. Significant differences between the 35-Gy and control groups were found at 3 and 4 months, and between the 50-Gy and control groups at 2, 3, and 4 months. Functional scores of the 50-Gy group declined progressively, whereas the 35-Gy group scores reached a low point at 3 months posttreatment and then recovered. Functional scores of the irradiated limbs demonstrated a negative correlation with T2 values (r = -0.591 and -0.595, P T2 values are useful for monitoring RISNI, they may not be sensitive enough to evaluate its severity.

  3. Experiments in paramagnetic relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijphart, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    This thesis presents two attempts to improve the resolving power of the relaxation measurement technique. The first attempt reconsiders the old technique of steady state saturation. When used in conjunction with the pulse technique, it offers the possibility of obtaining additional information about the system in which all-time derivatives are zero; in addition, non-linear effects may be distinguished from each other. The second attempt involved a systematic study of only one system: Cu in the Tutton salts (K and Rb). The systematic approach, the high accuracy of the measurement and the sheer amount of experimental data for varying temperature, magnetic field and concentration made it possible in this case to separate the prevailing relaxation mechanisms reliably

  4. Evaluation of an artificial intelligence guided inverse planning system: Clinical case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hui; Yin Fangfang; Willett, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: An artificial intelligence (AI) guided method for parameter adjustment of inverse planning was implemented on a commercial inverse treatment planning system. For evaluation purpose, four typical clinical cases were tested and the results from both plans achieved by automated and manual methods were compared. Methods and materials: The procedure of parameter adjustment mainly consists of three major loops. Each loop is in charge of modifying parameters of one category, which is carried out by a specially customized fuzzy inference system. A physician prescribed multiple constraints for a selected volume were adopted to account for the tradeoff between prescription dose to the PTV and dose-volume constraints for critical organs. The searching process for an optimal parameter combination began with the first constraint, and proceeds to the next until a plan with acceptable dose was achieved. The initial setup of the plan parameters was the same for each case and was adjusted independently by both manual and automated methods. After the parameters of one category were updated, the intensity maps of all fields were re-optimized and the plan dose was subsequently re-calculated. When final plan arrived, the dose statistics were calculated from both plans and compared. Results: For planned target volume (PTV), the dose for 95% volume is up to 10% higher in plans using the automated method than those using the manual method. For critical organs, an average decrease of the plan dose was achieved. However, the automated method cannot improve the plan dose for some critical organs due to limitations of the inference rules currently employed. For normal tissue, there was no significant difference between plan doses achieved by either automated or manual method. Conclusion: With the application of AI-guided method, the basic parameter adjustment task can be accomplished automatically and a comparable plan dose was achieved in comparison with that achieved by the manual

  5. Evaluation of an artificial intelligence guided inverse planning system: clinical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Yin, Fang-Fang; Willett, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    An artificial intelligence (AI) guided method for parameter adjustment of inverse planning was implemented on a commercial inverse treatment planning system. For evaluation purpose, four typical clinical cases were tested and the results from both plans achieved by automated and manual methods were compared. The procedure of parameter adjustment mainly consists of three major loops. Each loop is in charge of modifying parameters of one category, which is carried out by a specially customized fuzzy inference system. A physician prescribed multiple constraints for a selected volume were adopted to account for the tradeoff between prescription dose to the PTV and dose-volume constraints for critical organs. The searching process for an optimal parameter combination began with the first constraint, and proceeds to the next until a plan with acceptable dose was achieved. The initial setup of the plan parameters was the same for each case and was adjusted independently by both manual and automated methods. After the parameters of one category were updated, the intensity maps of all fields were re-optimized and the plan dose was subsequently re-calculated. When final plan arrived, the dose statistics were calculated from both plans and compared. For planned target volume (PTV), the dose for 95% volume is up to 10% higher in plans using the automated method than those using the manual method. For critical organs, an average decrease of the plan dose was achieved. However, the automated method cannot improve the plan dose for some critical organs due to limitations of the inference rules currently employed. For normal tissue, there was no significant difference between plan doses achieved by either automated or manual method. With the application of AI-guided method, the basic parameter adjustment task can be accomplished automatically and a comparable plan dose was achieved in comparison with that achieved by the manual method. Future improvements to incorporate case

  6. Evaluation of Two Passes Cold Pilgering Property for PLUS7TM Guide Thimble and Instrumentation Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Young; Park, Ki Bum; Kim, In Kyu; Lee, Young Hee; Kahng, Jong Yeol [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The thermo-mechanical property of zirconium alloy tube is well known to be influenced by pilgering pass schedule and its tooling; thus the control of its microstructure and mechanical property in the final tube production stage for nuclear fuel applications is a major concern of tube manufacture. To fabricate final tube, the 3 passes pilgering is applied in general by using TREX(Tube Reduced EXtrusion), 63.5mm outer diameter(OD), in KEPCO NF and most of Zr tube manufacturing companies. They are also taking big efforts to reduce pilgering step for the sake of increasing the efficiency of production in the forming stage of tube. The objective of this study is to develop two passes of pilgering schedule from the conventional three passes of pilgering schedule for manufacturing the Guide Thimble and Instrumentation tube conforming to specification, which are newly developing component for the advanced nuclear fuel assembly in KEPCO NF. CSR, hydride orientation, and structural integrity are well conformed to the desired targets so it is expected that both die and mandrel were newly designed for the PLUS7TM guide thimble and instrumentation tube with higher Q factor for two passes of pilgering at 50LC and 25LC pilger machine, instead of three passes of pilgering, are able to be applicable to this design of fuel component. If developed two passes pilgering is applied to current manufacturing process, it would improve not only productivity but also yield rate by reducing 3 steps(pilgering, heat-treatment, pickiling and cleaning) of manufacturing process. But additional tests(including in-pile test) should be performed in order to evaluate integrity in reactor.

  7. Evaluation of the long-term efficacy of CT-guided epidural steroid injection for the treatment of sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Guohai; Wang Wei; Chen Wei; Chen Kemin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of CT-guided epidural steroid injection for the treatment of sciatica. Methods: CT-guided epidural steroid injection was performed in 180 patients with sciatica from May 1998 to March 2004, and all patients had failure to previous conservative treatment. Visual analogue scale was used to evaluate the pain of the patient before and after the treatment. Results: Follow-up was taken for 112 cases during 1-6 years after the treatment, 89 patients (79.5%) had successful long-term outcome and 80 patients (71.4%) were satisfied. Conclusions: CT-guided epidural steroid injection can reduce low back pain and radical pain. It should be preferentially considered as the first choice when conservative treatments are failed. (authors)

  8. Relaxation from particle production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a “Relaxion” solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  9. Magnetic relaxation in anisotropic magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1971-01-01

    The line shape and the kinematic and thermodynamic slowing down of the critical and paramagnetic relaxation in axially anisotropic materials are discussed. Kinematic slowing down occurs only in the longitudinal relaxation function. The thermodynamic slowing down occurs in either the transverse...... or longitudinal relaxation function depending on the sign of the axial anisotropy....

  10. Momentum constraint relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Full relativistic simulations in three dimensions invariably develop runaway modes that grow exponentially and are accompanied by violations of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints. Recently, we introduced a numerical method (Hamiltonian relaxation) that greatly reduces the Hamiltonian constraint violation and helps improve the quality of the numerical model. We present here a method that controls the violation of the momentum constraint. The method is based on the addition of a longitudinal component to the traceless extrinsic curvature A ij -tilde, generated by a vector potential w i , as outlined by York. The components of w i are relaxed to solve approximately the momentum constraint equations, slowly pushing the evolution towards the space of solutions of the constraint equations. We test this method with simulations of binary neutron stars in circular orbits and show that it effectively controls the growth of the aforementioned violations. We also show that a full numerical enforcement of the constraints, as opposed to the gentle correction of the momentum relaxation scheme, results in the development of instabilities that stop the runs shortly

  11. Guiding principles for evaluating the impacts of conservation interventions on human well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Emily; Homewood, Katherine M; Beauchamp, Emilie; Clements, Tom; McCabe, J Terrence; Wilkie, David; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2015-11-05

    Measures of socio-economic impacts of conservation interventions have largely been restricted to externally defined indicators focused on income, which do not reflect people's priorities. Using a holistic, locally grounded conceptualization of human well-being instead provides a way to understand the multi-faceted impacts of conservation on aspects of people's lives that they value. Conservationists are engaging with well-being for both pragmatic and ethical reasons, yet current guidance on how to operationalize the concept is limited. We present nine guiding principles based around a well-being framework incorporating material, relational and subjective components, and focused on gaining knowledge needed for decision-making. The principles relate to four key components of an impact evaluation: (i) defining well-being indicators, giving primacy to the perceptions of those most impacted by interventions through qualitative research, and considering subjective well-being, which can affect engagement with conservation; (ii) attributing impacts to interventions through quasi-experimental designs, or alternative methods such as theory-based, case study and participatory approaches, depending on the setting and evidence required; (iii) understanding the processes of change including evidence of causal linkages, and consideration of trajectories of change and institutional processes; and (iv) data collection with methods selected and applied with sensitivity to research context, consideration of heterogeneity of impacts along relevant societal divisions, and conducted by evaluators with local expertise and independence from the intervention. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. The diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound guided imaging algorithm in evaluation of patients with hematuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Alparslan, E-mail: alparslanunsal@yahoo.com [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Caliskan, Eda Kazak [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Erol, Haluk [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Karaman, Can Zafer [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficiency of the following imaging algorithm, including intravenous urography (IVU) or computed tomography urography (CTU) based on ultrasonographic (US) selection, in the radiological management of hematuria. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-one patients with hematuria were prospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 106 cases with normal or nearly normal US result and then they were examined with IVU. Group 2 was composed of the remaining 35 cases which had any urinary tract abnormality, and they were directed to CTU. Radiological results were compared with clinical diagnosis. Results: Ultrasonography and IVU results of 97 cases were congruent in group 1. Eight simple cysts were detected with US and 1 non-obstructing ureter stone was detected with IVU in remaining 9 patients. The only discordant case in clinical comparison was found to have urinary bladder cancer on conventional cystoscopy. Ultrasonography and CTU results were congruent in 30 cases. Additional lesions were detected with CTU (3 ureter stones, 1 ureter TCC, 1 advanced RCC) in remaining 5 patients. Ultrasonography + CTU combination results were all concordant with clinical diagnosis. Except 1 case, radio-clinical agreement was achieved. Conclusion: Cross-sectional imaging modalities are preferred in evaluation of hematuria. CTU is the method of choice; however the limitations preclude using CTU as first line or screening test. Ultrasonography is now being accepted as a first line imaging modality with the increased sensitivity in mass detection compared to IVU. The US guided imaging algorithm can be used effectively in radiological approach to hematuria.

  13. Evaluating imaging-pathology concordance and discordance after ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided breast biopsy has become the main method for diagnosing breast pathology, and it has a high diagnostic accuracy, approaching that of open surgical biopsy. However, methods for confirming adequate lesion retrieval after US-guided biopsy are relatively limited and false-negative results are unavoidable. Determining imaging-pathology concordance after US-guided biopsy is essential for validating the biopsy result and providing appropriate management. In this review article, we briefly present the results of US-guided breast biopsy; describe general aspects to consider when establishing imaging-pathology concordance; and review the various categories of imaging-pathology correlations and corresponding management strategies. PMID:29169231

  14. Green--Kubo formula for collisional relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the Green--Kubo method (usually used for obtaining formulas for transport coefficients involving conserved densities) to relaxation processes occurring during collisions, such as the transfer of energy from vibrational to translational modes in a molecular fluid. We show that the relaxation rate can be calculated without evaluating time correlation functions over long times, and can in fact be written as a sum over collisions which makes the relation between the Green--Kubo method and approximate independent-collision models much clearer

  15. Evaluation of a patient specific femoral alignment guide for hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael; Naudie, Douglas D; Edwards, Max R; Sellan, Michael E; McCalden, Richard W; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-03-01

    A novel alternative to conventional instrumentation for femoral component insertion in hip resurfacing is a patient specific, computed tomography based femoral alignment guide. A benchside study using cadaveric femora was performed comparing a custom alignment guide to conventional instrumentation and computer navigation. A clinical series of twenty-five hip resurfacings utilizing a custom alignment guide was conducted by three surgeons experienced in hip resurfacing. Using cadaveric femora, the custom guide was comparable to conventional instrumentation with computer navigation proving superior to both. Clinical femoral component alignment accuracy was 3.7° and measured within ± 5° of plan in 20 of 24 cases. Patient specific femoral alignment guides provide a satisfactory level of accuracy and may be a better alternative to conventional instrumentation for initial femoral guidewire placement in hip resurfacing. Crown Copyright © 2014. All rights reserved.

  16. Phantom evaluation of a commercially available three modality image guided radiation therapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploquin, Nicolas; Rangel, Alejandra; Dunscombe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a detailed evaluation of the capabilities of imaging and image registration systems available with Varian linear accelerators for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Specifically, they present modulation transfer function curves for megavoltage planar, kilovoltage (kV) planar, and cone beam computed tomography imaging systems and compare these with conventional computed tomography. While kV planar imaging displayed the highest spatial resolution, all IGRT imaging techniques were assessed as adequate for their intended purpose. They have also characterized the image registration software available for use in conjunction with these imaging systems through a comprehensive phantom study involving translations in three orthogonal directions. All combinations of imaging systems and image registration software were found to be accurate, although the planar kV imaging system with automatic registration was generally superior, with both accuracy and precision of the order of 1 mm, under the conditions tested. Based on their phantom study, the attainable accuracy for rigid body translations using any of the features available with Varian equipment will more likely be limited by the resolution of the couch readouts than by inherent limitations in the imaging systems and image registration software. Overall, the accuracy and precision of currently available IGRT technology exceed published experience with the accuracy and precision of contouring for planning.

  17. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  18. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate

  19. Emergency response guide-B ECCS guideline evaluation analyses for N reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.C.; Callow, R.A.

    1989-07-01

    INEL conducted two ECCS analyses for Westinghouse Hanford. Both analyses will assist in the evaluation of proposed changes to the N Reactor Emergency Response Guide-B (ERG-B) Emergency Core System (ECCS) guideline. The analyses were a sensitivity study for reduced-ECCS flow rates and a mechanistically determined confinement steam source for a delayed-ECCS LOCA sequence. The reduced-ECCS sensitivity study established the maximum allowable reduction in ECCS flow as a function of time after core refill for a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence in the N Reactor. The maximum allowable ECCS flow reduction is defined as the maximum flow reduction for which ECCS continues to provide adequate core cooling. The delayed-ECCS analysis established the liquid and steam break flows and enthalpies during the reflood of a hot core following a delayed ECCS injection LOCA sequence. A simulation of a large, hot leg manifold break with a seven-minute ECCS injection delay was used as a representative LOCA sequence. Both analyses were perform using the RELAP5/MOD2.5 transient computer code. 13 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Schmidt, Martina E; Wiskemann, Joachim; Hof, Holger; Klassen, Oliver; Habermann, Nina; Beckhove, Philipp; Debus, Juergen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. The BEST study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing progressive

  1. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soo Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  2. Value of computed tomography for evaluating the injection site in endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nishio, Takeshi; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Yasuda, Chikao; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) safely and effectively relieves pain associated with intra-abdominal malignancies when the neurolytic is accurately injected. We applied contrast medium to evaluate the ethanol injection sites in patients who received EUS-CPN due to abdominal pain caused by malignancies. We injected, under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), ethanol containing 10% contrast medium into the celiac plexus of patients with intra-abdominal pain due to malignancies. Immediately after the endoscopic therapy, patients underwent computed tomography (CT) to confirm the injection site. Images of distribution of injected solutions were classified into three groups. Injected solution dispersed in unilateral and bilateral anterocrural space was defined as ''unilateral injection'' or bilateral injection'', respectively. Injected solution located out of the anterocrural space was defined as ''inappropriate injection''. Pre- and postprocedure pain was assessed using a standard analog scale. Before and 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the procedure, pain scores were evaluated. From April 2003 to May 2005, 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Improvement of pain score in the ''bilateral injection'' and ''unilateral injection'' groups was significantly superior to the change in the ''inappropriate injection'' group. Although EUS-CPN was effective in eight of 13 patients (61.5%), additional EUS-CPN to the ''inappropriate injection group'' increased the response rate to 84.6%. Injection of ethanol to the anterocrural space by EUS-CPN produced adequate pain relief. Immediate examination by CT for confirmation of injection sites after EUS-CPN would increase the likelihood of induction of pain relief. (author)

  3. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Soo Man

    2008-01-01

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  4. In vitro evaluation of various bioabsorbable and nonresorbable barrier membranes for guided tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different types of bioabsorbable and nonresorbable membranes have been widely used for guided tissue regeneration (GTR with its ultimate goal of regenerating lost periodontal structures. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of various bioabsorbable and nonresorbable membranes in cultures of primary human gingival fibroblasts (HGF, periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF and human osteoblast-like (HOB cells in vitro. Methods Three commercially available collagen membranes [TutoDent® (TD, Resodont® (RD and BioGide® (BG] as well as three nonresorbable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membranes [ACE (AC, Cytoplast® (CT and TefGen-FD® (TG] were tested. Cells plated on culture dishes (CD served as positive controls. The effect of the barrier membranes on HGF, PDLF as well as HOB cells was assessed by the Alamar Blue fluorometric proliferation assay after 1, 2.5, 4, 24 and 48 h time periods. The structural and morphological properties of the membranes were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results The results showed that of the six barriers tested, TD and RD demonstrated the highest rate of HGF proliferation at both earlier (1 h and later (48 h time periods (P P ≤ 0.001. In HOB cell culture, the highest rate of cell proliferation was also calculated for TD at all time periods (P Conclusion Results from the present study suggested that GTR membrane materials, per se, may influence cell proliferation in the process of periodontal tissue/bone regeneration. Among the six membranes examined, the bioabsorbable membranes demonstrated to be more suitable to stimulate cellular proliferation compared to nonresorbable PTFE membranes.

  5. Staff supplement to the draft report on human engineering guide to control room evaluation: response to comments, sample checklist, draft systems review guidelines, and evaluation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This staff supplement to Draft Report NUREG/CR-1580, Human Engineering Guide to Control Room Evaluation, provides staff responses to comments on the draft report and supplemental material not provided in the draft report. The supplemental material includes new draft guidelines for the systems review of nuclear power plant control rooms and sample checklists and corresponding human engineering guidelines

  6. In vitro evaluation of electrospun chitosan mats crosslinked with genipin as guided tissue regeneration barrier membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norowski, Peter Andrew, Jr.

    Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a surgical technique commonly used to exclude bacteria and soft tissues from bone graft sites in oral/maxillofacial bone graft sites by using a barrier membrane to maintain the graft contour and space. Current clinical barrier membrane materials based on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and bovine type 1 collagen are non-ideal and experience a number of disadvantages including membrane exposure, bacterial colonization/biofilm formation and premature degradation, all of which result in increased surgical intervention and poor bone regeneration. These materials do not actively participate in tissue regeneration, however bioactive materials, such as chitosan, may provide advantages such as the ability to stimulate wound healing and de novo bone formation. Our hypothesis is that electrospun chitosan GTR membranes will support cell attachment and growth but prevent cell infiltration/penetration of membrane, demonstrate in vitro degradation predictive of 4--6 month in vivo functionality, and will deliver antibiotics locally to prevent/inhibit periopathogenic complications. To test this hypothesis a series of chitosan membranes were electrospun, in the presence or absence of genipin, a natural crosslinking agent, at concentrations of 5 and 10 mM. These membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, tensile testing, suture pullout testing, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and gel permeation chromatography, and in vitro biodegradation for diameter/morphology of fibers, membrane strengths, degree of crosslinking, crystallinity, molecular weight, and degradation kinetics, respectively. Cytocompability of membranes was evaluated in osteoblastic, fibroblastic and monocyte cultures. The activity of minocycline loaded and released from the membranes was determined in zone of inhibition tests using P. gingivalis microbe. The results demonstrated that genipin crosslinking extended the in vitro

  7. Variational formulation of relaxed and multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, R. L.; Yoshida, Z.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hudson, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    > Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor relaxation model for formation of macroscopically self-organized plasma equilibrium states, all these constraints are relaxed save for the global magnetic fluxes and helicity. A Lagrangian variational principle is presented that leads to a new, fully dynamical, relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (RxMHD), such that all static solutions are Taylor states but also allows state with flow. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics (MRxMHD) is developed.

  8. Clinical evaluation of the use of an intracardiac electrocardiogram to guide the tip positioning of peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiyi; Chen, Chunfang; Jin, Jingfen; Sharma, Komal; Jiang, Nan; Shentu, Yingqin; Wang, Xingang

    2016-06-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provides important central venous accesses for clinical treatments, tests and monitoring. Compared with the traditional methods, intracardiac electrocardiogram (ECG)-guided method has the potential to guide more accurate tip positioning of PICCs. This study aimed to clinically evaluate the effectiveness of an intracardiac ECG to guide the tip positioning by monitoring characteristic P-wave changes. In this study, eligible patients enrolled September 2011 to May 2012 according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria received the catheterization monitored by intracardiac ECG. Then chest radiography was performed to check the catheter position. The results revealed that, with 117 eligible patients, all bar one patient who died (n = 116) completed the study, including 60 males and 56 females aged 51.2 ± 15.1 years. Most (n = 113, > 97%) had characteristic P-wave changes. The intracardiac ECG-guided positioning procedure achieved correct placement for 112 patients (96.56%), demonstrating 99.12% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, the intracardiac ECG can be a promising technique to guide tip positioning of PICCs. However, since the sample size in this study is limited, more experience and further study during clinical practice are needed to demonstrate achievement of optimal catheterization outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. A comparison of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy in evaluation of palpable breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, H.N.; Farooqui, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy (CNB) in patients presenting with palpable breast lumps (PBLs), in terms of sensitivity and specificity, taking final histopathology as gold standard. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Ultrasound guided FNAC and CNB were taken of all female patients with PBLs. The results were compared with final histopathology as gold standard. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software and chi-square test. Results: A total of 60 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 33.8 yrs. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound guided FNAC were 68.7% and 93.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound guided CNB was 93.7% and 100%. The accuracy of FNAC was 86.2% and that of core needle biopsy was 98.3%. Conclusion: The ultrasound guided core needle biopsy can be used as an initial diagnostic test for the evaluation of all PBLs. Because of high negative predictive value core needle biopsy can replace surgical excision biopsy for benign lesions. (author)

  10. Ultrasound-guided, vacuum-assisted biopsy in evaluation of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luczynska, E.; Kocurek, A.; Dyczek, S.; Skotnicki, P.; Stelmach, A.; Herman, K.

    2008-01-01

    Aim. Evaluation of the efficacy of ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy for the verification of breast lesions. Introduction. Ultrasound breast examination is a noninvasive method of breast imaging. It is adjunct to mammography and physical examination and, in women under 30 years of age, pregnant and lactating, it is the basic examination used for the detection and diagnosing of breast diseases. It allows also to obtain cells or tissue samples with such minimally invasive techniques as fine-needle biopsy, core needle biopsy or vacuum-assisted biopsy. Material and methods. The study group consisted of 138 women, aged from 20 to 76 years, who underwent ultrasound guided vacuum-assisted biopsy between March and December 2006. Because double lesions were diagnosed in 6 patients, this resulted in 144 performed procedures. Each patient underwent ultrasound examination, performed with a 10-12 MHz transducer. Biopsies were guided by a 12 MHz transducer and performed with the Mammotome System using an 11G or an 8G needle, depending upon the size and site of the lesion. Obtained data were compared using the Chi-square test; p values of less than 0.05 were considered indicative of a significant difference. Results. The average size of the biopted lesions was estimated as 11±3,8 mm (range: 4-30 mm). However, lesions described by radiologists as apparently suspicious were not qualified for the vacuum-assisted biopsy, in the tested material 4 lesions appeared to be carcinomas (3 were invasive breast carcinomas and 1 was ductal carcinoma in situ). When compared with other changes, these lesions were most frequently equivocal (3 vs 1 determined as benign, p=0.014). There was no statistically significant difference in echogenicity (3 hypoechoic vs 1 with mixed echogenicity) nor in the shape (1 oval change, 2 lobulated and 1 irregular). Pathological examination revealed 86 cases of fibroadenoma within the tested material. Those lesions were mostly benign (77 vs 9 equivocal

  11. Dynamics of relaxed inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangarife, Walter; Tobioka, Kohsaku; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Volansky, Tomer

    2018-02-01

    The cosmological relaxation of the electroweak scale has been proposed as a mechanism to address the hierarchy problem of the Standard Model. A field, the relaxion, rolls down its potential and, in doing so, scans the squared mass parameter of the Higgs, relaxing it to a parametrically small value. In this work, we promote the relaxion to an inflaton. We couple it to Abelian gauge bosons, thereby introducing the necessary dissipation mechanism which slows down the field in the last stages. We describe a novel reheating mechanism, which relies on the gauge-boson production leading to strong electro-magnetic fields, and proceeds via the vacuum production of electron-positron pairs through the Schwinger effect. We refer to this mechanism as Schwinger reheating. We discuss the cosmological dynamics of the model and the phenomenological constraints from CMB and other experiments. We find that a cutoff close to the Planck scale may be achieved. In its minimal form, the model does not generate sufficient curvature perturbations and additional ingredients, such as a curvaton field, are needed.

  12. Evaluating the Uncertainty in Exchange Parameters Determined from Off-Resonance R1ρ Relaxation Dispersion for Systems in Fast Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k−1 and Φıx = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ(ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ(−ΔΩ)), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω exchange parameters. Results from simulations are complemented by analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ~ 0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ~10–16; pE = ~13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s−1) chemical shift timescales. PMID:24819426

  13. In Vivo Study on Analgesic, Muscle-Relaxant, Sedative Activity of Extracts of Hypochaeris radicata and In Silico Evaluation of Hypochaeris Glucoside and Guaiane-Type Sesquiterpene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Abu-Izneid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypochaeris radicata (flatweed from the family Asteraceae is a medicinal plant found in Europe, Middle East, and India. In folkloric medication, it is used to heal jaundice, dyspepsia, constipation, rheumatism, and hypoglycemia as well as renal problems. Leaves and roots of the plant have antioxidant and antibacterial properties. The plant is a rich source of pharmacologically active phytochemicals; however, it is explored scantily. The objective of the current study was to identify the chemical composition and investigate the in vivo biological potency of crude extracts of this plant. Methods. The crude extract and the fractions were screened for various phytochemical groups of constituents following standard procedures. The acute toxicity was assayed for safe range of dose determination. The analgesic potential of the extract and fractions was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing test. The muscle-relaxant activity was examined by standard inclined-plane test and traction test. Sedative potential of extract/fractions was assessed by using standard white wood procedures. Furthermore, docking analysis of two compounds isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of the plant was assessed against 3D cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2. Results. The extract/fractions of H. radicata showed significant analgesic effect in in vivo model of peripheral algesia. The docking analysis of previously isolated molecules from the plant also exhibited promising interaction with COX-1 and COX-2. Also, the plant has a mild sedative and muscle-relaxant potential. Thus, our study provided pharmacological rationale for the traditional uses of the plant as analgesic and anti-inflammatory remedy. Conclusion. The crude extracts and fractions exhibited excellent activity due to active phytochemicals. These active phytochemicals also exhibited promising interaction with COX-1 and COX-2. This finding directed researcher to isolate active compounds from H

  14. Evaluation of friction forces between control bars and guide tubes of CAREM fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiselli, Alberto M.; Fiori, Jose M.; Yedros, Pablo A.

    2003-01-01

    The design of the MSAC (Mecanismo del Sistema de ajuste y control, Mechanism of the Adjustment and control system, MACS) for CAREM reactor shall consider all loads that the reactor shall support during its operation. Several charges are originated by friction forces produced on contact points of the control Bars/Guide tubes assembly against other components. A test facility was designed and manufactured for the determination of friction components and the damping characteristics of the assembly formed by guide tubes fuel element, the control bars and the guide of the bar of the MACS. In this work a description of the test performed and the results obtained is presented. (author)

  15. Preparing Patients for Cancer Chemotherapy: Effect of Coping Preparation and Relaxation Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burish, Thomas G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Sixty cancer chemotherapy patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: relaxation training with guided relaxation imagery (RT), general coping preparation (PREP), both RT and PREP, or routine clinic treatment only. Found that PREP intervention increased patients' knowledge of disease and treatment, reduced anticipatory side effects,…

  16. Evaluation of NCHRP 747 Pavement Forensic Guide for GDOT’s Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    This report presents the recommendation for whether the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) should adopt the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 747 (Guide for Conducting Forensic Investigations of Highway Pavements) ...

  17. A strategy to objectively evaluate the necessity of correcting detected target deviations in image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Narra, Venkat; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2007-01-01

    Image guided radiotherapy technologies are being increasingly utilized in the treatment of various cancers. These technologies have enhanced the ability to detect temporal and spatial deviations of the target volume relative to planned radiation beams. Correcting these detected deviations may, in principle, improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the target. However, in many situations, a clinical decision has to be made as to whether it is necessary to correct some of the deviations since the relevant dosimetric impact may or may not be significant, and the corresponding corrective action may be either impractical or time consuming. Ideally this decision should be based on objective and reproducible criteria rather than subjective judgment. In this study, a strategy is proposed for the objective evaluation of the necessity of deviation correction during the treatment verification process. At the treatment stage, without any alteration from the planned beams, the treatment beams should provide the desired dose coverage to the geometric volume identical to the planning target volume (PTV). Given this fact, the planned dose distribution and PTV geometry were used to compute the dose coverage and PTV enclosure of the clinical target volume (CTV) that was detected from imaging during the treatment setup verification. The spatial differences between the detected CTV and the planning CTV are essentially the target deviations. The extent of the PTV enclosure of the detected CTV as well as its dose coverage were used as criteria to evaluate the necessity of correcting any of the target deviations. This strategy, in principle, should be applicable to any type of target deviations, including both target deformable and positional changes and should be independent of how the deviations are detected. The proposed strategy was used on two clinical prostate cancer cases. In both cases, gold markers were implanted inside the prostate for the purpose of treatment setup

  18. Risk evaluations of aging: Procedures guide for an age-dependent PSA with emphasis on prioritization and sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the previous work which has been performed in the project, a procedures guide is being developed for carrying out an age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for evaluating the core damage frequency with aging effects explicitly treated. A PSA is basically a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The emphasis of the guide is on prioritization and sensitivity studies. Focus is also on active components although consideration of aging effects in passive components is also treated. The guide is intended to become a NUREG/CR and is the first of three volumes which are being developed. The following topics with demonstrations and applications are described in the presentation: (1) the age-dependent PSA versus the standard PSA; (2) component reliability models used in an age-dependent PSA; (3) approaches for transforming a PSA into an age-dependent PSA; (4) application of an age-dependent PSA; (5) using a PSA to evaluate the risk effects from aging passive components; (6) evaluation of the risk importance of passive components; (7) prioritizations of aging contributors; (8) evaluations of test and maintenance effectiveness; and (9) sensitivity studies and uncertainty analyses of aging effects

  19. Evaluation of the wound healing property of Commiphora guidottii Chiov. ex. Guid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwot, Michael; Asres, Kaleab; Bisrat, Daniel; Mazumder, Avijit; Lindemann, Peter; Bucar, Franz

    2015-08-18

    The traditional use of the oleo-gum-resin of Commiphora guidottii Chiov. ex. Guid., which is commonly called scented myrrh, for topical treatment of wound is well documented. The major objective of the present study was to investigate the essential oil and resin obtained from C. guidottii for their potential wound healing properties. Due to their influence on the wound healing process, the anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of scented myrrh have also been investigated. Powdered oleo-gum-resin of C. guidottii was steam-distilled to obtain essential oil, and the resin was extracted from the marc with MeOH and filtered. The TLC fingerprint profile of the resin has been recorded by using silica gel GF254 as stationary phase. The essential oil components were identified and quantified by GC-MS. Ointments prepared from the essential oil (4% v/w) and the resin (5% w/w) were used for wound healing activity tests. Toxicity of the formulated ointments was investigated according to Draize skin irritation test. Acute anti-inflammatory effect in mice was evaluated using carrageenan induced mouse hind paw oedema model. Antimicrobial activity tests were carried out using disk diffusion and broth dilution techniques against 21 pathogenic bacterial and 4 fungal strains. Ointment formulations of both the oil and resin were found to be non-irritant at the concentrations used and showed significant (p<0.05-0.001) increase in wound contraction rate, shorter epithelization time and higher skin breaking strength as compared to the negative control. Overall, the antibacterial and antifungal activities of the oil and resin were comparable with the standard antibiotics ciprofloxacin and griseofulvin, respectively. The results confirm that scented myrrh possesses genuine wound healing activity supporting the traditional use of the plant.

  20. An evaluation of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy with the pull technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Chang Wook; Won, Jong Yun; Yu, Jeong Sik; Ko, Heung Kyu; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and usefulness of the fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gastrostomy (FPG) using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied with the pull technique, and without the use of an endoscopy or a gastropexy. From March 2005 to February 2007, 25 patients underwent an FPG using a large profile gastrostomy tube accompanied by the pull technique, in which a 24F pull-type tube was inserted into a patient's mouth and was pulled to the upper abdominal puncture site using a snare, under fluoroscopy. The 18 patients with difficulty swallowing due to muscular atrophic lateral sclerosis or transitional myodystrophy included 5 cases of quadriplegia, 1 case of Parkinson's disease, and 1 metastatic mediastinal tumor. The technical success rate, occurrence of complications, and clinical outcomes were examined. The technical success rate was found to be 100%. In addition, the retention periods for the indwelling tube ranged from 1 to 24 months (mean: 6.5 months), with all tubes retained at a normal position with normal function. No procedure-related mortality occurred. One patient (4%) did however develop a complication in the form of ascites and ascitic fluid leakage around the tube, which was of hepatic origin and was ultimately resolved after the drainage of ascites. As a result of this study the FPG, accompanied with the pull technique using a 24F tube, should be considered as a safe and effective method for examining patients. It was found to have a high success rate and a low complication rate.

  1. Guided self-help for mental health disorders in children and young people with chronic neurological conditions: A qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sophie D; Coughtrey, Anna E; Heyman, Isobel; Greally, Suzanna; Clarkson, Harriet; Bhattacharyya, Tuhina; Lewis, Corah; Varadkar, Sophia; Shafran, Roz

    2018-03-09

    Children with neurological conditions such as epilepsy are at high risk of developing mental health disorders. Guided self-help can be used to increase access to psychological therapies. When developing and evaluating interventions, it is important to obtain the views of service-users about their acceptability. A telephone-guided self-help intervention was used to treat common mental health difficulties in children and young people with neurological conditions. The intervention was not adapted in content to account for chronic illness. This study therefore reports on qualitative interviews with participants to determine the acceptability of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 participants (25 parents and 2 young people) who had undertaken a telephone-delivered guided self-help intervention for common mental health difficulties in the context of a paediatric neurological condition. Transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Thirteen themes were extracted, organised into three main domains, which covered: the practicalities of telephone guided self-help treatment; the outcomes of the intervention; and the extent to which adaptation was needed for chronic illness. Most families found the intervention helpful in working towards their specific goals and noticed changes for the child and/or parents and family. Participants had a positive experience of the intervention and the majority of parents found the standard intervention with individualised goals sufficient to meet the young person's mental health needs. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating the Acceptability and Usability of EASEL: A Mobile Application that Supports Guided Reflection for Experiential Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry C Schnepp

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To examine the early perceptions (acceptability and usability of EASEL (Education through Application-Supported Experiential Learning, a mobile platform that delivers reflection prompts and content before, during, and after an experiential learning activity. Background: Experiential learning is an active learning approach in which students learn by doing and by reflecting on the experience. This approach to teaching is often used in disciplines such as humanities, business, and medicine. Reflection before, during, and after an experience allows the student to analyze what they learn and why it is important, which is vital in helping them to understand the relevance of the experience. A just-in-time tool (EASEL was needed to facilitate this. Methodology: To inform the development of a mobile application that facilitates real-time guided reflection and to determine the relevant feature set, we conducted a needs analysis with both students and faculty members. Data collected during this stage of the evaluation helped guide the creation of a prototype. The user experience of the prototype and interface interactions were evaluated during the usability phase of the evaluation study. Contribution: Both the needs analysis and usability assessment provided justification for continued development of EASEL as well as insight that guides current development. Findings: The interaction design of EASEL is understandable and usable. Both students and teachers value an application that facilitates real-time guided reflection. Recommendations for Practitioners: The use of a system such as EASEL can leverage time and location-based services to support students in field experiences. This technology aligns with evidence that guided reflection provides opportunities for metacognition. Recommendation for Researchers: Iterative prototyping, testing, and refinement can lead to a deliberate and effective app development process. Impact on Society: The EASEL

  3. Una apreciacion de la guia pedagogica de la pelicula, "Breaking Away" (An Evaluation of the Viewing Guide for the Film "Breaking Away").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper, written in Spanish, examines the viewing guide for the film "Breaking Away." The guide, prepared by the United States Information Agency, was intended for the use of teaching English as a Second Language. It is evaluated, along with the movie, to determine whether it fulfills its objectives of providing enriched and critical thinking…

  4. Non-invasive evaluation of blood oxygen saturation and hematocrit from T1 and T2 relaxation times: In-vitro validation in fetal blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Sharon; Seed, Mike; Sled, John G; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2017-12-01

    We propose an analytical method for calculating blood hematocrit (Hct) and oxygen saturation (sO 2 ) from measurements of its T 1 and T 2 relaxation times. Through algebraic substitution, established two-compartment relationships describing R1=T1-1 and R2=T2-1 as a function of hematocrit and oxygen saturation were rearranged to solve for Hct and sO 2 in terms of R 1 and R 2 . Resulting solutions for Hct and sO 2 are the roots of cubic polynomials. Feasibility of the method was established by comparison of Hct and sO 2 estimates obtained from relaxometry measurements (at 1.5 Tesla) in cord blood specimens to ground-truth values obtained by blood gas analysis. Monte Carlo simulations were also conducted to assess the effect of T 1 , T 2 measurement uncertainty on precision of Hct and sO 2 estimates. Good agreement was observed between estimated and ground-truth blood properties (bias = 0.01; 95% limits of agreement = ±0.13 for Hct and sO 2 ). Considering the combined effects of biological variability and random measurement noise, we estimate a typical uncertainty of ±0.1 for Hct, sO 2 estimates. Results demonstrate accurate quantification of Hct and sO 2 from T 1 and T 2 . This method is applicable to noninvasive fetal vessel oximetry-an application where existing oximetry devices are unusable or require risky blood-sampling procedures. Magn Reson Med 78:2352-2359, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. A prospective clinical evaluation of biodegradable neurolac nerve guides for sensory nerve repair in the hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, MJOE; Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA

    Purpose: Our purpose was to study the recovery of sensory nerve function, after treatment of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Neurolac nerve guide (Polyganics B.V., Groningen, the Netherlands) versus the current standard reconstruction

  6. Ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block evaluated by infrared thermography and distal skin temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn

    2014-01-01

    of the 2nd and 5th digits. METHODS: We performed an ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block in 45 patients undergoing upper limb surgery. The contralateral hand served as control and we obtained infrared thermographic images of both hands before the block and during the following 30 min. We defined...

  7. Stress wave timing nondestructive evaluation tools for inspecting historic structures : a guide for use and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ross; Roy F. Pellerin; Norbert Volny; William W. Salsig; Robert H. Falk

    2000-01-01

    This guide was prepared to assist inspectors in the use of stress wave timing instruments and various methods of locating and defining areas of decay in timber members in historic structures. The first two sections provide (a) background information regarding conventional methods to locate and measure decay in historic structures and (b) the principles of stress wave...

  8. A SIL quantification approach based on an operating situation model for safety evaluation in complex guided transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beugin, J.; Renaux, D.; Cauffriez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Safety analysis in guided transportation systems is essential to avoid rare but potentially catastrophic accidents. This article presents a quantitative probabilistic model that integrates Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) for evaluating the safety of such systems. The standardized SIL indicator allows the safety requirements of each safety subsystem, function and/or piece of equipment to be specified, making SILs pivotal parameters in safety evaluation. However, different interpretations of SIL exist, and faced with the complexity of guided transportation systems, the current SIL allocation methods are inadequate for the task of safety assessment. To remedy these problems, the model developed in this paper seeks to verify, during the design phase of guided transportation system, whether or not the safety specifications established by the transport authorities allow the overall safety target to be attained (i.e., if the SIL allocated to the different safety functions are sufficient to ensure the required level of safety). To meet this objective, the model is based both on the operating situation concept and on Monte Carlo simulation. The former allows safety systems to be formalized and their dynamics to be analyzed in order to show the evolution of the system in time and space, and the latter make it possible to perform probabilistic calculations based on the scenario structure obtained

  9. Evolving fuzzy rules for relaxed-criteria negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kwang Mong

    2008-12-01

    In the literature on automated negotiation, very few negotiation agents are designed with the flexibility to slightly relax their negotiation criteria to reach a consensus more rapidly and with more certainty. Furthermore, these relaxed-criteria negotiation agents were not equipped with the ability to enhance their performance by learning and evolving their relaxed-criteria negotiation rules. The impetus of this work is designing market-driven negotiation agents (MDAs) that not only have the flexibility of relaxing bargaining criteria using fuzzy rules, but can also evolve their structures by learning new relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules to improve their negotiation outcomes as they participate in negotiations in more e-markets. To this end, an evolutionary algorithm for adapting and evolving relaxed-criteria fuzzy rules was developed. Implementing the idea in a testbed, two kinds of experiments for evaluating and comparing EvEMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are evolved using the evolutionary algorithm) and EMDAs (MDAs with relaxed-criteria rules that are manually constructed) were carried out through stochastic simulations. Empirical results show that: 1) EvEMDAs generally outperformed EMDAs in different types of e-markets and 2) the negotiation outcomes of EvEMDAs generally improved as they negotiated in more e-markets.

  10. Occlus-o-Guide® versus Andresen activator appliance: neuromuscular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Giampietro; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Grillo, Elena; Maspero, Cinzia

    2013-05-20

    The aim of the present study was to assess the muscular variations at the electromyography (EMG) level for the anterior temporalis muscles and masseter muscles during treatment with Occlus-o-Guide® and Andresen activator appliances. Eighty-two patients (35 males and 47 females) aged between 8 and 12 years (mean age, 10.5±0.8 years) participated in the study. Fifty patients underwent treatment with an Occlus-o-Guide® and 32 patients with an Andresen activator. All patients underwent EMG examination using a Freely EMG (De Gotzen, Legnano, Italy) and surface bipolar electrodes when the appliances were worn for the first time (T0), and after 6 months (T1) and after 12 months (T2) of appliance use. Statistical analysis showed that both at T0 and T2, the percent overlapping coefficient (POC) of the anterior temporalis muscles was not statistically different between the appliance groups. At T0, the POC of the masseter muscles was significantly lower for the Andresen appliance as compared to the Occlus-o-Guide® (p=0.02), while at T2 this significance was lost. At insertion of an appliance, all patients show neuromuscular balance that does not correspond to orthognathic occlusion. Both appliances work by creating muscular imbalance. With the appliances in situ, EMG responses were generally analogous for the Occlus-o-Guide® and the Andresen activator; however, the imbalance was greater and the recovery of the orthological muscular balance was slower in patients under treatment with the Andresen activator as compared to those with the Occlus-o-Guide®.

  11. A study for the establishment of regulatory requirement and evaluation guide for station blackout in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J. H.; Koo, C. S.; Joo, W. P.; Oh, S. H.; Shin, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    The consequence of SBO event could be a severe accident unless AC power was restored within a proper time, because many safety systems depend upon AC power. Based on the severity, the SBO has been extensively studied since it was identified as Unresolved Safety Issue at USNRC. The resolution of those studies is a rule-making such as 10 CFR 50.63 and Regulatory Guide 1.155. But there is no regulatory requirements of SBO for an operating domestic nuclear power plant up to the present time. This tudy has established SBO rule(regulatory requirements and evaluation guides) for an operating PWR type of the operating nuclear power plants in Korea

  12. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Ling; Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  13. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology in the evaluation of suspected tuberculosis in patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puri, R.; Vilmann, P.; Sud, R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with suspected tuberculosis without pulmonary lesions and with mediastinal lymphadenopathy often pose a diagnostic challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an established modality to evaluate mediastinal and abdominal lesions. The aim...

  15. Relaxed states with plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.; Taylor, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the theory of relaxation, a turbulent plasma reaches a state of minimum energy subject to constant magnetic helicity. In this state the plasma velocity is zero. Attempts have been made by introducing a number of different constraints, to obtain relaxed states with plasma flow. It is shown that these alternative constraints depend on two self-helicities, one for ions, and one for electrons. However, whereas there are strong arguments for the effective invariance of the original magnetic-helicity, these arguments do not apply to the self-helicities. Consequently the existence of relaxed states with flow remains in doubt. (author)

  16. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  17. Prospective evaluation of the radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogits, B.; Jungnickel, K.; Loewenthal, D.; Dudeck, O.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J.; Kropf, S.; Nekolla, E.A.; Wieners, G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Assessment of radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions and determination of influencing factors. Materials and Methods: The following CT-guided interventions were included: Core biopsy, drainage, periradicular therapy, and celiac plexus neurolysis. The hand dose was measured with an immediately readable dosimeter, the EDD-30 (Unfors, Sweden). The default parameters for CT fluoroscopy were 120 kV, 90 mA and a 4 mm slice thickness. All interventions were performed on a 16-slice CT unit (Aquilion 16 Toshiba, Japan). The tumor size, degree of difficulty (1 - 3), level of experience and device parameters (mAs, dose-length product, scan time) were documented. Results: 138 CT-guided interventions (biopsy n = 99, drainage n = 23, pain therapy n = 16) at different locations (lung n = 41, retroperitoneum n = 53, liver n = 25, spine n = 19) were included. The lesion size was 4 - 240 mm (median: 23 mm). The fluoroscopy time per intervention was 4.6 - 140.2 s (median: 24.2 s). The measured hand dose ranged from 0.001 - 3.02 mSv (median: 0.22 mSv). The median hand dose for lung puncture (n = 41) was slightly higher (median: 0.32 mSv, p = 0.01) compared to that for the liver, retroperitoneum and other. Besides physical influencing factors, the degree of difficulty (p = 0.001) and summed puncture depth (p = 0.004) correlated significantly with the hand dose. Conclusion: The median hand dose for different CT-guided interventions was 0.22 mSv. Therefore, the annual hand dose limit would normally only be reached with about 2000 interventions. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of a standard shade guide for color change after disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Randall M; Hackman, Steven T; Browning, William D

    2007-09-01

    To determine if surface disinfectants cause a change in the shade perception of a standard Classic Vitapan shade guide. Consistency in shade selection for dental restorations involves many factors, and one of the most important is the shade tabs used in the selection process. Ten shade tabs each of shades B2, D2, C1, and A3.5 were selected from the Classic Vitapan shade guide (Vident). All tabs were measured with the EasyShade shade device (Vident) at baseline. Three tabs of each shade were set aside as controls. The other 7 tabs of each shade were treated with the surface disinfectant Cavicide (Metrex Research) for 480 cycles to simulate a year's usage. After each 480 cycles, all the tabs were again measured with the EasyShade. This process was repeated to simulate 2 and 3 years of use. The data were analyzed to calculate the delta E 2000 for any change. A statistically significant increase was observed in the value (L*) and chroma (C*) after 2 and 3 years of simulated treatments. These changes were not perceptible to the clinician. The authors suggest that 1 standard shade guide be set aside to compare against those in clinical use to determine when they should be replaced.

  19. Subacute posteromedial impingement of the ankle in athletes: MR imaging evaluation and ultrasound guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiou, Christina; Robinson, Philip; O'Connor, Philip J.; Grainger, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    To describe the use of MR imaging and efficacy of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the diagnosis and management of athletes with clinical posteromedial impingement of the ankle. A retrospective analysis of imaging findings on MR was undertaken in nine elite athletes with clinical posteromedial ankle impingement. MR studies from six professional athletes with posterolateral pain were also reviewed as an imaging control group. The two reviewing radiologists were blinded to the clinical details and the proportion of control and study subjects. The nine study athletes also underwent diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided injection of steroid and anaesthetic into the posteromedial capsular abnormality. Follow-up was by telephone interview. Posteromedial capsular thickening was seen only in athletes with posteromedial impingement (7/9). Posteromedial synovitis was present in all athletes with posteromedial impingement; however, posterior and posterolateral synovitis was also seen in these athletes. Mild posteromedial synovitis was present in two control athletes. Ultrasound identified abnormal posteromedial soft tissue thickening deep to tibialis posterior between the medial malleolus and talus in all nine athletes. After injection all athletes returned to their previous level of sport, with eight of the nine not experiencing any residual or recurrent symptoms. If MR imaging excludes significant coexistent abnormality, ultrasound can localise posteromedial soft tissue abnormality and guide injection therapy, allowing return to athletic activity without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  20. Application of a digital technique in evaluating the reliability of shade guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, E; Sonugelen, M; Guneri, P; Kesercioglu, A; Kose, T

    2004-05-01

    There appears to be a need for a reliable method for quantification of tooth colour and analysis of shade. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to show the applicability of graphic software in colour analysis and secondly to investigate the reliability of commercial shade guides produced by the same manufacturer, using this digital technique. After confirming the reliability and reproducibility of the digital method by using self-assessed coloured images, three shade guides of the same manufacturer were photographed in daylight and in studio environments with a digital camera and saved in tagged image file format (TIFF) format. Colour analysis of each photograph was performed using the Adobe Photoshop 4.0 graphic program. Luminosity, and red, green, blue (L and RGB) values of each shade tab of each shade guide were measured and the data were subjected to statistical analysis using the repeated measure Anova test. The L and RGB values of the images taken in daylight differed significantly from those of the images taken in studio environment (P < 0.05). In both environments, the luminosity and red values of the shade tabs were significantly different from each other (P < 0.05). It was concluded that, when the environmental conditions were kept constant, the Adobe Photoshop 4.0 colour analysis program could be used to analyse the colour of images. On the other hand, the results revealed that the accuracy of shade tabs widely being used in colour matching should be readdressed.

  1. Standard guide for evaluation of materials used in extended service of interim spent nuclear fuel dry storage systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Part of the total inventory of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is stored in dry cask storage systems (DCSS) under licenses granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of this guide is to provide information to assist in supporting the renewal of these licenses, safely and without removal of the SNF from its licensed confinement, for periods beyond those governed by the term of the original license. This guide provides information on materials behavior under conditions that may be important to safety evaluations for the extended service of the renewal period. This guide is written for DCSS containing light water reactor (LWR) fuel that is clad in zirconium alloy material and stored in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), at an independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI). The components of an ISFSI, addressed in this document, include the commercial SNF, canister, cask, and all parts of the storage installation including the ISFSI pad. The language of t...

  2. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  3. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  4. Relaxation effects in ferrous complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolini, C.; Mathieu, J.P.; Chappert, J.

    1976-01-01

    The slow relaxation mechanism of the Fe 2+ ion in the tri-fluorinated TF(acac) and hexafluorinated HF(acac) complexes of Fe(II) acetylacetonate was investigated. The 300K and 77K Moessbauer spectra for TF(acac) consist in a slightly asymmetric quadrupole doublet. On the contrary, at 4.2K the higher energy line is strongly widened; that is typical of a slowing down in the electron relaxation frequency [fr

  5. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media. PMID:22453050

  6. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Philipp; Parohl, Nina; Albert, Juliane; Schäfer, Lena; Reinhardt, Renate; Kaiser, Gernot M; McDougall, Ian; Decker, Brad; Plicht, Björn; Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H

    2012-03-27

    Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  7. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlert Philipp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2 and transsubclavian (n = 6 TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  8. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is a sensitive method to evaluate patients who should not undergo pulmonary metastasectomy†

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Licht, Peter Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    metastasectomy with systematic sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes for histological evaluation. RESULTS: One hundred and three eligible patients were referred for EBUS-TBNA during a 4-year period. The primary cancers were located in the colon/rectum (n = 64), kidney (n = 16) and other sites (n = 23). EBUS......OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary metastasectomy is considered an effective treatment in selected patients with extrapulmonary cancer and oligometastatic disease. We know that the presence of mediastinal lymph node metastases reduces survival significantly, but the mediastinum is rarely evaluated before...... metastasectomy in these patients. We prospectively evaluated how endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) could identify metastases to the mediastinal lymph nodes in patients referred for pulmonary metastasectomy. METHODS: All patients with extrapulmonary cancer...

  9. Application of DOE prescribed guides to the evaluation of Hanford's Mixed Low Level Solid Waste Treatment Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.F.; Nash, C.R.

    1994-10-01

    A recent Westinghouse Hanford Company report (WHC-SD-W100-ES-008, February, 1994), compared a Vitrification process to the WRAP-2A Grout/PE process for the treatment of Mixed Low Level Waste (MLLW). This comparison applied a limited scope numerical evaluation to compare technology complexity of the two processes, but focused primarily on capital and operating costs. The work reported here is supplementary to WHC-SD-Wl00-ES-008. It provides a record of the application of the more formal DOE-prescribed criteria (Treatment Selection Guides for Federal Facility Compliance Act Draft Site Treatment Plans) to the Vitrification and Grout/PE processes previously evaluated. Results of the evaluation favored the Grout/PE process by a weighted score of 83 to 78 over the Plasma arc vitrification process

  10. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N., E-mail: nwen1@hfhs.org; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Brand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P. [Varian Medical System, Täfernstrasse 7, Dättwil AG 5405 (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  11. Technical Note: Evaluation of the systematic accuracy of a frameless, multiple image modality guided, linear accelerator based stereotactic radiosurgery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, N.; Snyder, K. C.; Qin, Y.; Li, H.; Siddiqui, M. S.; Chetty, I. J.; Scheib, S. G.; Schmelzer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the total systematic accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy and intermodality difference was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom, in which the targets were localized using optical surface monitoring system (OSMS), electromagnetic beacon-based tracking (Calypso®), cone-beam CT, “snap-shot” planar x-ray imaging, and a robotic couch. Six IMRT plans with jaw tracking and a flattening filter free beam were used to study the dosimetric accuracy for intracranial and spinal stereotactic radiosurgery treatment. Results: End-to-end localization accuracy of the system evaluated with the end-to-end phantom was 0.5 ± 0.2 mm with a maximum deviation of 0.9 mm over 90 measurements (including jaw, MLC, and cone measurements for both auto and manual fusion) for single isocenter, single target treatment, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm for multitarget treatment with shared isocenter. Residual setup errors were within 0.1 mm for OSMS, and 0.3 mm for Calypso. Dosimetric evaluation based on absolute film dosimetry showed greater than 90% pass rate for all cases using a gamma criteria of 3%/1 mm. Conclusions: The authors’ experience demonstrates that the localization accuracy of the frameless image-guided system is comparable to robotic or invasive frame based radiosurgery systems.

  12. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, J. A., E-mail: yosimoon13@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica, Heredia (Costa Rica); Rojas, J. I., E-mail: isaac.rojas@siglo21.cr [Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XX1, La Uruca (Costa Rica); PROXTRONICS CR, Ltda, Heredia (Costa Rica)

    2016-07-07

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  13. Microplastic relaxations of single and polycrystalline molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichl, W.; Weiss, B. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Materialphysik; Chen, D.L.

    1998-05-01

    The microplasticity of high-purity molybdenum single crystals and of Mo polycrystals of technical purity has been investigated by relaxation step tests in uniaxial compression. A new model for the evaluation of relaxation tests in the microplastic range of b.c.c metals is presented which takes into account the decrease of the mobile dislocation density due to exhaustion of non-screw dislocations. The model allows an independent determination of the activation volume and of the microstructure parameters controlling dislocation exhaustion. The results indicate that in the high-purity single crystals the deformation rate is controlled by interactions of non-screw dislocations with the grown-in network. In the polycrystals additional interactions with impurity atoms seem to occur. In the single crystals the activity and subsequent exhaustion of two different glide systems was observed, followed by a gradual onset of screw dislocation motion. (orig.) 26 refs.

  14. Evaluation of a Standardized Program for Training Practicing Anesthesiologists in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Edward R; Harrison, T Kyle; Kim, T Edward; Kan, Jack; Shum, Cynthia; Gaba, David M; Ganaway, Toni; Kou, Alex; Udani, Ankeet D; Howard, Steven K

    2015-10-01

    Practicing anesthesiologists have generally not received formal training in ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion. We designed this study to determine the efficacy of a standardized teaching program in this population. Anesthesiologists in practice for 10 years or more were recruited and enrolled to participate in a 1-day program: lectures and live-model ultrasound scanning (morning) and faculty-led iterative practice and mannequin-based simulation (afternoon). Participants were assessed and recorded while performing ultrasound-guided perineural catheter insertion at baseline, at midday (interval), and after the program (final). Videos were scored by 2 blinded reviewers using a composite tool and global rating scale. Participants were surveyed every 3 months for 1 year to report the number of procedures, efficacy of teaching methods, and implementation obstacles. Thirty-two participants were enrolled and completed the program; 31 of 32 (97%) completed the 1-year follow-up. Final scores [median (10th-90th percentiles)] were 21.5 (14.5-28.0) of 30 points compared to 14.0 (9.0-20.0) at interval (P < .001 versus final) and 12.0 (8.5-17.5) at baseline (P < .001 versus final), with no difference between interval and baseline. The global rating scale showed an identical pattern. Twelve of 26 participants without previous experience performed at least 1 perineural catheter insertion after training (P < .001). However, there were no differences in the monthly average number of procedures or complications after the course when compared to baseline. Practicing anesthesiologists without previous training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia can acquire perineural catheter insertion skills after a 1-day standardized course, but changing clinical practice remains a challenge. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. A guide for evaluating the environmental performance of Product/Service-Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Laumann; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    Environmental issues, such as climate change, resource depletion and pollution are societal concerns, which are also increasingly affecting the way we do business. Concepts such as circular economy,sharing economy, and service economy, often highlight that more sustainable businesses can be created...... when focusing on product performance (e.g.by offering lighting as a service) rather than the physical products (e.g. by selling light bulbs). Such strategies of integrating products and services to deliver required user functionality are often termed Product/Service-Systems (PSS). This guide...

  16. Fetal response to abbreviated relaxation techniques. A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Nadine S; Urech, Corinne; Isabel, Fornaro; Meyer, Andrea; Hoesli, Irène; Bitzer, Johannes; Alder, Judith

    2011-02-01

    stress during pregnancy can have adverse effects on the course of pregnancy and on fetal development. There are few studies investigating the outcome of stress reduction interventions on maternal well-being and obstetric outcome. this study aims (1) to obtain fetal behavioral states (quiet/active sleep, quiet/active wakefulness), (2) to investigate the effects of maternal relaxation on fetal behavior as well as on uterine activity, and (3) to investigate maternal physiological and endocrine parameters as potential underlying mechanisms for maternal-fetal relaxation-transferral. the behavior of 33 fetuses was analyzed during laboratory relaxation/quiet rest (control group, CG) and controlled for baseline fetal behavior. Potential associations between relaxation/quiet rest and fetal behavior (fetal heart rate (FHR), FHR variation, FHR acceleration, and body movements) and uterine activity were studied, using a computerized cardiotocogram (CTG) system. Maternal heart rate, blood pressure, cortisol, and norepinephrine were measured. intervention (progressive muscle relaxation, PMR, and guided imagery, GI) showed changes in fetal behavior. The intervention groups had higher long-term variation during and after relaxation compared to the CG (p=.039). CG fetuses had more FHR acceleration, especially during and after quiet rest (p=.027). Women in the PMR group had significantly more uterine activity than women in the GI group (p=.011) and than CG women. Maternal heart rate, blood pressure, and stress hormones were not associated with fetal behavior. this study indicates that the fetus might participate in maternal relaxation and suggests that GI is superior to PMR. This could especially be true for women who tend to direct their attention to body sensations such as abdominal activity. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The safety evaluation guide for laboratories and plants a tool for enhancing safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhomme, Veronique; Daubard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) acts as technical support for the French government Authorities competent in nuclear safety and radiation protection for civil and defence activities. In this frame, the Institute's performs safety assessments of the safety cases submitted by operators to these Authorities for each stage in the life cycle of a nuclear facility, including dismantling operations, which is subjected to a licensing procedure. In the fuel cycle field, this concerns a large variety of facilities. Very often, depending on facilities and on safety cases, safety assessment to be performed is multidisciplinary and involves the supervisor in charge of the facility and several safety experts, particularly to cover the whole set of risks (criticality, exposure to radiation, fire, handling, containment, human and organisational factors...) encountered during facility's operations. Taking these into account, and in order to formalize the assessment process of the fuel cycle facilities, laboratories, irradiators, particle accelerators, under-decommissioning reactors and radioactive waste management, the 'Plants, Laboratories, Transports and Waste Safety' Division of IRSN has developed an internal guide, as a tool: - To present the methodological framework, and possible specificities, for the assessment according to the 'Defence in Depth Concept' (Part 1); - To provide key questions associated to the necessary contradictory technical review of the safety cases (Part 2); - To capitalise on experience on the basis of technical examples (coming from incident reports, previous safety assessments...) demonstrating the questioning (Part 3). The guide is divided in chapters, each dedicated to a type of risk (dissemination of radioactive material, external or internal exposure from ionising radiation, criticality, radiolysis mechanisms, handling operations, earthquake, human or organisational factors...) or to a type

  18. Signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty: evaluation of contrast-agent-based polymethylmethacrylate cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, Hermann Josef; Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Wichlas, Florian; Sattig, Christoph; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl Mart

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate two signal-inducing bone cements for MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty. The bone cements were made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA, 5 ml monomeric, 12 g polymeric) and gadoterate meglumine as a contrast agent (CA, 0-40 μl) with either saline solution (NaCl, 2-4 ml) or hydroxyapatite bone substitute (HA, 2-4 ml). The cement's signal was assessed in an open 1-Tesla MR scanner, with T1W TSE and fast interventional T1W TSE pulse sequences, and the ideal amount of each component was determined. The compressive and bending strength for different amounts of NaCl and HA were evaluated. The cement's MRI signal depended on the concentration of CA, the amount of NaCl or HA, and the pulse sequence. The signal peaks were recorded between 1 and 10 μl CA per ml NaCl or HA, and were higher in fast T1W TSE than in T1W TSE images. The NaCl-PMMA-CA cements had a greater MRI signal intensity and compressive strength; the HA-PMMA-CA cements had a superior bending strength. Concerning the MR signal and biomechanical properties, these cements would permit MRI-guided cementoplasty. Due to its higher signal and greater compressive strength, the NaCl-PMMA-CA compound appears to be superior to the HA-PMMA-CA compound. (orig.)

  19. Computer systems experiences of users with and without disabilities an evaluation guide for professionals

    CERN Document Server

    Borsci, Simone; Federici, Stefano; Mele, Maria Laura

    2013-01-01

    This book provides the necessary tools for the evaluation of the interaction between the user who is disabled and the computer system that was designed to assist that person. The book creates an evaluation process that is able to assess the user's satisfaction with a developed system. Presenting a new theoretical perspective in the human computer interaction evaluation of disabled persons, it takes into account all of the individuals involved in the evaluation process.

  20. Museums for all: evaluation of an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the science museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Soler Gallego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Translation and interpreting are valuable tools to improve accessibility at museums. Theese tools permit the museum communicate with visitors with different capabilities. The aim of this article is to show the results of a study carried out within the TACTO project, aimed at creating and evaluating an audio descriptive guide for visually impaired visitors at the Science Museum of Granada. The project focused on the linguistic aspects of the guide’s contents and its evaluation, which combined the participatory observation with a survey and interview. The results from this study allow us to conclude that the proposed design improves visually impaired visitors’ access to the museum. However, the expectations and specific needs of each visitor change considerably depending on individual factors such as their level of disability and museum visiting habits.

  1. Evaluation of a guided continuous quality improvement program in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthammit, Chanadda; Rupp, Michael T; Armstrong, Edward P; Modisett, Tara; Snead, Rebecca P; Warholak, Terri L

    2017-01-01

    The importance of creating and sustaining a strong culture of patient safety has been recognized as a critical component of safe medication use. This study aims to assess changes in attitudes toward patient safety culture and frequency of quality-related event (QRE) reporting after guided implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) program in a panel of community pharmacies in the United States (U.S.). Twenty-one community pharmacies volunteered to participate in the project and were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Pharmacy staff in the intervention group received guided training to ensure full implementation of a CQI program while those in the control group partially implemented the program. Pharmacy staff in both groups completed retrospective pre-post safety culture questionnaires and reported medication errors and near misses that occurred in their practices. Rasch analysis was applied to assess questionnaire validity and reliability and to confirm if the ordinal level data approximated interval level measures. Paired t-tests and repeated measure analysis of covariance tests were subsequently used to compare observed changes in the attitudes of subjects and frequency of QREs reporting in intervention and control groups. Sixty-nine employees completed the questionnaire, a 43.9% response rate. Improvement in attitudes toward patient safety was statistically significant in the intervention group in six domains: staff, training, and skill ( p  = 0.017); patient counseling ( p  = 0.043); communication about mistakes ( p  continuous improvement ( p  < 0.001); and overall patient safety perceptions ( p  = 0.033). No significant differences were observed in QRE reporting rates between intervention and control groups. However, differences were observed in the types of QREs reported (e.g., incorrect safety cap) and the point in the prescription processing workflow where a QRE was detected (e.g., partner check station, and drug

  2. GUIDE 7. A general program for evaluating the properties of scintillation and Cerenkov counter optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massam, T.

    1976-01-01

    GUIDE 7 is a design tool for optical systems which are constructed predominantly from reflecting surfaces. A wide range of surface forms and qualities may be chosen and there is provision for the user to extend the range of applicability of the program. Available facilities include estimation of light collection efficiencies, simulation of the space-time intensity distributions of photons arriving at a detector, optimization of the parameters of focusing systems. The report gives a complete description of the program, including user-defined routines. A large-area time-of-flight counter and ray-tracing for a parabolic mirror are treated as examples, detailing the input data and showing the corresponding output. The derivation of the vector algorithms used in the program is also included. (Auth.)

  3. Fast and Simple Method for Evaluation of Polarization Correction to Propagation Constant of Arbitrary Order Guided Modes in Optical Fibers with Arbitrary Refractive Index Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Bourdine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents fast and simple method for evaluation of polarization correction to scalar propagation constant of arbitrary order guided modes propagating over weakly guiding optical fibers. Proposed solution is based on earlier on developed modified Gaussian approximation extended for analysis of weakly guiding optical fibers with arbitrary refractive index profile in the core region bounded by single solid outer cladding. Some results are presented that illustrate the decreasing of computational error during the estimation of propagation constant when polarization corrections are taken into account. Analytical expressions for the first and second derivatives of polarization correction are derived and presented.

  4. Advancing molecular-guided surgery through probe development and testing in a moderate cost evaluation pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Hull, Sally M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, Jack; Roberts, David W.; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    Molecular guided oncology surgery has the potential to transform the way decisions about resection are done, and can be critically important in areas such as neurosurgery where the margins of tumor relative to critical normal tissues are not readily apparent from visual or palpable guidance. Yet there are major financial barriers to advancing agents into clinical trials with commercial backing. We observe that development of these agents in the standard biological therapeutic paradigm is not viable, due to the high up front financial investment needed and the limitations in the revenue models of contrast agents for imaging. The hypothesized solution to this problem is to develop small molecular biologicals tagged with an established fluorescent reporter, through the chemical agent approval pathway, targeting a phase 0 trials initially, such that the initial startup phase can be completely funded by a single NIH grant. In this way, fast trials can be completed to de-risk the development pipeline, and advance the idea of fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) reporters into human testing. As with biological therapies the potential successes of each agent are still moderate, but this process will allow the field to advance in a more stable and productive manner, rather than relying upon isolated molecules developed at high cost and risk. The pathway proposed and tested here uses peptide synthesis of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-binding Affibody molecules, uniquely conjugated to IRDye 800CW, developed and tested in academic and industrial laboratories with well-established records for GMP production, fill and finish, toxicity testing, and early phase clinical trials with image guidance.

  5. Bioassay-guided isolation and evaluation of antimicrobial compounds from Ixora megalophylla against some oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyo, J; Matsunami, K; Panichayupakaranant, P

    2016-09-01

    Context Ixora megalophylla Chamch. (Rubiaceae) is a new plant species recently found in southern Thailand. Ethyl acetate extracts of its leaves and stems showed antimicrobial activities. Objectives To isolate and identify the antimicrobial compounds from I. megalophylla leaves and stems. Materials and methods The dried leaves (1.7 kg) and stems (3.5 kg) were consecutively extracted with petroleum ether (5 L × 4), ethyl acetate (5 L × 3) and ethanol (5 L × 4) under reflux conditions. The ethyl acetate extract was subjected to an antimicrobial assay guided isolation with Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Compounds 1-10 were identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and EI-MS. Minimal lethal concentration (MLC) against C. albicans and Streptococcus spp. was determined using a broth microdilution method for 48 and 24 h, respectively. Results and discussion On the basis of the antimicrobial assay guided isolation, 10 known compounds, including vanillic acid (1), syringic acid (2), 4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (3), scopoletin (4), loliolide (5), syringaldehyde (6), sinapaldehyde (7), coniferaldehyde (8), syringaresinol (9) and 2,2'-dithiodipyridine (10), were identified. Compounds 1-5 were purified from the ethyl acetate extract of the leaves, while 6-9 and 10 were from the ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of the stems, respectively. Among these isolates, 10 showed the strongest antibacterial activities against S. mutans and Streptococcus mitis, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2-4 μg/mL, and MLC of 4 μg/mL, as well as having a weak antifungal activity against C. albicans (MIC of 125 μg/mL). This is the first report of the antimicrobial activities of 10.

  6. Theoretical model of intravascular paramagnetic tracers effect on tissue relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølby, Birgitte Fuglsang; Østergaard, Leif; Kiselev, Valerij G

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of MRI tracers cannot be measured directly by MRI and is commonly evaluated indirectly using their relaxation effect. This study develops a comprehensive theoretical model to describe the transverse relaxation in perfused tissue caused by intravascular tracers. The model takes...... into account a number of individual compartments. The signal dephasing is simulated in a semianalytical way by embedding Monte Carlo simulations in the framework of analytical theory. This approach yields a tool for fast, realistic simulation of the change in the transverse relaxation. The results indicate...... with bulk blood. The enhancement of relaxation in tissue is due to the contrast in magnetic susceptibility between blood vessels and parenchyma induced by the presence of paramagnetic tracer. Beyond the perfusion measurements, the results can be applied to quantitation of functional MRI and to vessel size...

  7. Evaluation of the setup margins for cone beam computed tomography–guided cranial radiosurgery: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco, E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain); Wunderink, Wouter [Department of Radiotherapy, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delgado, David; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Quirón, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the setup margins from the clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatments guided by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). We designed an end-to-end (E2E) test using a skull phantom with an embedded 6mm tungsten ball (target). A noncoplanar plan was computed (E2E plan) to irradiate the target. The CBCT-guided positioning of the skull phantom on the linac was performed. Megavoltage portal images were acquired after 15 independent deliveries of the E2E plan. The displacement 2-dimensional (2D) vector between the centers of the square field and the ball target on each portal image was used to quantify the isocenter accuracy. Geometrical margins on each patient's direction (left-right or LR, anterior-posterior or AP, superior-inferior or SI) were calculated. Dosimetric validation of the margins was performed in 5 real SRS cases: 3-dimesional (3D) isocenter deviations were mimicked, and changes in CTV dose coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) dosage were analyzed. The CTV-PTV margins of 1.1 mm in LR direction, and 0.7 mm in AP and SI directions were derived from the E2E tests. The dosimetric analysis revealed that a 1-mm uniform margin was sufficient to ensure the CTV dose coverage, without compromising the OAR dose tolerances. The effect of isocenter uncertainty has been estimated to be 1 mm in our CBCT-guided SRS approach.

  8. Light-microscopic and electron-microscopic evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denDunnen, WFA; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Holwerda, A; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a IO-mm gap, using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide, with an internal diameter of 1.5 mm and a wall thickness of 0.30 mm. To do so, we evaluated regenerating nerves using light

  9. Traditional Birth Attendants: A Field Guide to Their Training, Evaluation, and Articulation with Health Services. World Health Organization Offset Publication No. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Guidelines for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of nationwide programs for the training and utilization of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) are presented. The guide begins with a chart outlining the steps in the development and evaluation of TBA programs. The next section discusses the formulation of basic policies regarding the…

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology in the evaluation of suspected tuberculosis in patients with isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puri, R.; Vilmann, P.; Sud, R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with suspected tuberculosis without pulmonary lesions and with mediastinal lymphadenopathy often pose a diagnostic challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology is an established modality to evaluate mediastinal and abdominal lesions. The aim...... of the present study was to evaluate the role of EUS-FNA in isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy in patients suspected of having tuberculosis....

  11. Electronmicroscopical evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration through a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Kors, G; den Dunnen, WFA

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using a thin-walled biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon -caprolactone) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT). The evaluation was performed

  12. Guide for licensing evaluations using CRAC2: A computer program for calculating reactor accident consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.E.; Roussin, R.W.; Gilpin, H.

    1988-12-01

    A version of the CRAC2 computer code applicable for use in analyses of consequences and risks of reactor accidents in case work for environmental statements has been implemented for use on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Data General MV/8000 computer system. Input preparation is facilitated through the use of an interactive computer program which operates on an IBM personal computer. The resulting CRAC2 input deck is transmitted to the MV/8000 by using an error-free file transfer mechanism. To facilitate the use of CRAC2 at NRC, relevant background material on input requirements and model descriptions has been extracted from four reports - ''Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences,'' Version 2, NUREG/CR-2326 (SAND81-1994) and ''CRAC2 Model Descriptions,'' NUREG/CR-2552 (SAND82-0342), ''CRAC Calculations for Accident Sections of Environmental Statements, '' NUREG/CR-2901 (SAND82-1693), and ''Sensitivity and Uncertainty Studies of the CRAC2 Computer Code,'' NUREG/CR-4038 (ORNL-6114). When this background information is combined with instructions on the input processor, this report provides a self-contained guide for preparing CRAC2 input data with a specific orientation toward applications on the MV/8000. 8 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  13. Properties and in vitro biological evaluation of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan membranes for bone guided regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Xianmiao [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Department of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Li Yubao [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China)], E-mail: nic7504@scu.edu.cn; Zuo Yi; Zhang Li [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Li Jidong [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Department of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China); Wang Huanan [Research Center for Nano-Biomaterials, Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 610064 Chengdu (China)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA)/chitosan(CS) composite membranes were prepared by solvent casting and evaporation methods for the function of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The effect of n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature on the properties of the composite membranes was studied. The n-HA/CS membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, swelling measurement, mechanical test, cell culture and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenylte-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The results show that the surface roughness and micropores of the composite membranes increase with the rise of n-HA content, suitable for adhesion, crawl and growth of cells. The hydroxyapatite holds nano size and distributes uniformly in the composite membranes. Chemical bond interaction exists between Ca ions and -OH groups of n-HA and -NH{sub 2} or -OH groups of CS. The n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature have obvious influence on the swelling ratio, tensile strength and elongation rate of the composite membranes. Cell culture and MTT assays show that n-HA and its content can affect the proliferation of cells. The n-HA/CS composite membranes have no negative effect on the cell morphology, viability and proliferation and possess good biocompatibility. This study makes the n-HA/CS composite membrane be a prospective biodegradable GBR membrane for future applications.

  14. Properties and in vitro biological evaluation of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan membranes for bone guided regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xianmiao; Li Yubao; Zuo Yi; Zhang Li; Li Jidong; Wang Huanan

    2009-01-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite(n-HA)/chitosan(CS) composite membranes were prepared by solvent casting and evaporation methods for the function of guided bone regeneration (GBR). The effect of n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature on the properties of the composite membranes was studied. The n-HA/CS membranes were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, swelling measurement, mechanical test, cell culture and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenylte-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The results show that the surface roughness and micropores of the composite membranes increase with the rise of n-HA content, suitable for adhesion, crawl and growth of cells. The hydroxyapatite holds nano size and distributes uniformly in the composite membranes. Chemical bond interaction exists between Ca ions and -OH groups of n-HA and -NH 2 or -OH groups of CS. The n-HA content and solvent evaporation temperature have obvious influence on the swelling ratio, tensile strength and elongation rate of the composite membranes. Cell culture and MTT assays show that n-HA and its content can affect the proliferation of cells. The n-HA/CS composite membranes have no negative effect on the cell morphology, viability and proliferation and possess good biocompatibility. This study makes the n-HA/CS composite membrane be a prospective biodegradable GBR membrane for future applications

  15. [Psychometric properties of an instrument to evaluate the nurse attitude towards good practice guides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díaz, Cristina; Fraille-Calle, Luis; Herrero-Rosado, Marta; Arnés-Muñoz, Vanessa; De-Dios-De-Dios, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Guides of Good Practices (GGP) are necessary tools in the universal healthcare and in the clinical management, providing the user/patient with a major quality in the assistance, in order to optimize and reinforce an individualized attention into action, taking into account the best scientific evidence. The literature provides different references to the development of the GGP, but there is little knowledge about the attitude of professionals towards them, since most of the studies that exist are qualitative. Therefore, the aim of this work is to construct and validate a Likert scale which could assess the attitude of the nurse towards GGP. The methodology used was quantitative, descriptive, cross, opinion, anonymous and also it could validate a scale via the following measurements: content validation by experts, correlation between items, external reliability, internal consistency, stability and exploratory factor analysis. The result was a scale consisting of 20 items that refer to the attitude toward the GGP, with a percentage of agreement among experts over 75 % on all the items, and a significant Pearson correlation between the pre-test and post-test in all variables, but for three. The internal consistency measured by Cronbach's alpha was 0.878. These results are acceptable in terms of the psychometric characteristics of the instrument, with easy and fast administration and simple in their interpretation, allowing quantifying and generating knowledge about the attitudes of nurses towards GGP.

  16. Multiple Speech Source Separation Using Inter-Channel Correlation and Relaxed Sparsity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoshen Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a multiple speech source separation method using inter-channel correlation and relaxed sparsity is proposed. A B-format microphone with four spatially located channels is adopted due to the size of the microphone array to preserve the spatial parameter integrity of the original signal. Specifically, we firstly measure the proportion of overlapped components among multiple sources and find that there exist many overlapped time-frequency (TF components with increasing source number. Then, considering the relaxed sparsity of speech sources, we propose a dynamic threshold-based separation approach of sparse components where the threshold is determined by the inter-channel correlation among the recording signals. After conducting a statistical analysis of the number of active sources at each TF instant, a form of relaxed sparsity called the half-K assumption is proposed so that the active source number in a certain TF bin does not exceed half the total number of simultaneously occurring sources. By applying the half-K assumption, the non-sparse components are recovered by regarding the extracted sparse components as a guide, combined with vector decomposition and matrix factorization. Eventually, the final TF coefficients of each source are recovered by the synthesis of sparse and non-sparse components. The proposed method has been evaluated using up to six simultaneous speech sources under both anechoic and reverberant conditions. Both objective and subjective evaluations validated that the perceptual quality of the separated speech by the proposed approach outperforms existing blind source separation (BSS approaches. Besides, it is robust to different speeches whilst confirming all the separated speeches with similar perceptual quality.

  17. Evaluating clinical and public health interventions: a practical guide to study design and statistics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katz, Mitchell H

    2010-01-01

    ... and observational studies. In addition to reviewing standard statistical analysis, the book has easy-to-follow explanations of cutting edge techniques for evaluating interventions, including propensity score analysis...

  18. Effects of relaxation on psychobiological wellbeing during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urech, Corinne; Fink, Nadine S; Hoesli, Irène; Wilhelm, Frank H; Bitzer, Johannes; Alder, Judith

    2010-10-01

    Prenatal maternal stress is associated with adverse birth outcomes and may be reduced by relaxation exercises. The aim of the present study was to compare the immediate effects of two active and one passive 10-min relaxation technique on perceived and physiological indicators of relaxation. 39 healthy pregnant women recruited at the outpatient department of the University Women's Hospital Basel participated in a randomized controlled trial with an experimental repeated measure design. Participants were assigned to one of two active relaxation techniques, progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) or guided imagery (GI), or a passive relaxation control condition. Self-reported relaxation on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and state anxiety (STAI-S), endocrine parameters indicating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (cortisol and ACTH) and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) system activity (norepinephrine and epinephrine), as well as cardiovascular responses (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) were measured at four time points before and after the relaxation exercise. Between group differences showed, that compared to the PMR and control conditions, GI was significantly more effective in enhancing levels of relaxation and together with PMR, GI was associated with a significant decrease in heart rate. Within the groups, passive as well as active relaxation procedures were associated with a decline in endocrine measures except epinephrine. Taken together, these data indicate that different types of relaxation had differential effects on various psychological and biological stress systems. GI was especially effective in inducing self-reported relaxation in pregnant women while at the same time reducing cardiovascular activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of guided bone generation around implants placed into fresh extraction sockets: an experimental study in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Nimb, L; Buser, D

    1993-01-01

    Immediate placement of implants into fresh extraction sockets would have the principal advantage of decreasing the recommended period of healing. It also would result in a guided placement of the implant, and it could reduce the resorption of the alveolar bone in the extraction area. However, when...... an implant is placed immediately into an extraction socket, it may not engage the walls of the socket near the crest of the alveolar ridge. With the presence of a bone defect around an implant, ingrowth of soft tissue could compromise the achievement of osseointegration in the crestal bone area....... The objective of this study was to evaluate the crestal bone healing response adjacent to implants placed immediately into fresh extraction sockets with and without covering membranes. Eight adult mongrel dogs had the third and fourth mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. Thirty-two submerged titanium...

  20. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  1. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  2. Anisotropic spin relaxation in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, N.; Tanabe, S.; Veligura, A.; Jozsa, C.; Popinciuc, M.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Spin relaxation in graphene is investigated in electrical graphene spin valve devices in the nonlocal geometry. Ferromagnetic electrodes with in-plane magnetizations inject spins parallel to the graphene layer. They are subject to Hanle spin precession under a magnetic field B applied perpendicular

  3. Stochastic and Chaotic Relaxation Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1988-01-01

    For relaxation oscillators stochastic and chaotic dynamics are investigated. The effect of random perturbations upon the period is computed. For an extended system with additional state variables chaotic behavior can be expected. As an example, the Van der Pol oscillator is changed into a

  4. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  5. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  6. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ''big picture'' and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a '' top down'' approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ''top down'' approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers

  7. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Philipp J.; Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 ± 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 ± 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 ± 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 ± 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 ± 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  8. Evaluation of the precision of portal-image-guided head-and-neck localization: An intra- and interobserver study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, Laurence E.; Allen, Aaron; Tishler, Roy

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that, for some patients, image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer patients may maintain target dose coverage and critical organ (e.g., parotids) dose closer to the planned doses than setup using lasers alone. We investigated inter- and intraobserver uncertainties in patient setup in head-and-neck cancer patients. Twenty-two sets of orthogonal digital portal images (from five patients) were selected from images used for daily localization of head-and-neck patients treated with IMRT. To evaluate interobserver variations, five radiation therapists compared the portal images with the plan digitally reconstructed radiographs and reported shifts for the isocenter (∼C2) and for a supraclavicular reference point. One therapist repeated the procedure a month later to evaluate intraobserver variations. The procedure was then repeated with teams of two therapists. The frequencies for which agreement between the shift reported by the observer and the daily mean shift (average of all observers for a given image set) were less than 1.5 and 2.5 mm were calculated. Standard errors of measurement for the intra- and interobserver uncertainty (SEM intra and SEM inter ) for the individual and teams were calculated. The data showed that there was very little difference between individual therapists and teams. At isocenter, 80%-90% of all reported shifts agreed with the daily average within 1.5 mm, showing consistency in the ways both individuals and teams interpret the images (SEM inter ∼1 mm). This dropped to 65% for the supraclavicular point (SEM inter ∼1.5 mm). Uncertainties increased for larger setup errors. In conclusion, image-guided patient positioning allows head-and-neck patients to be controlled within 3-4 mm. This is similar to the setup uncertainties found for most head-and-neck patients, but may provide some improvement for the subset of patients with larger setup uncertainties

  9. Prognostic evaluation of primary biliary cirrhosis and its value in guiding therapeutic regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Chunyang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prognostic evaluation of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and how to improve the prognosis have attracted much attention. Further therapeutic regimens for PBC patients with poor prognosis has become the direction of clinical and scientific studies. This article summarizes the association between baseline indices and prognosis and prognostic evaluation of patients undergoing ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA treatment, introduces the current status of UDCA combined with budesonide, fibrates, and obeticholic acid for patients with poor response to UDCA and the drugs being developed, and analyzes the influencing factors for prognosis and efficacy of UDCA. It is pointed out that prognosis and efficacy should be evaluated before and during UDCA treatment, and that therapeutic regimens should be adjusted in time to improve prognosis.

  10. Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, Stress & Relaxation: Rejuvenate Body & Mind; Relieve Stress; best ways to relieve stress; best way to relieve stress; different ways to relieve stress; does smoking relieve stress; does tobacco relieve stress; how can I relieve stress; how can you relieve stress; how do I relieve stress; reduce stress; does smoking reduce stress; how can I reduce stress; how to reduce stress; reduce stress; reduce stress levels; reducing stress; smoking reduce stress; smoking reduces stress; stress reducing techniques; techniques to reduce stress; stress relief; best stress relief; natural stress relief; need stress relief; relief for stress; relief from stress; relief of stress; smoking and stress relief; smoking for stress relief; smoking stress relief; deal with stress; dealing with stress; dealing with anger; dealing with stress; different ways of dealing with stress; help dealing with stress; how to deal with anger; how to deal with stress; how to deal with stress when quitting smoking; stress management; free stress management; how can you manage stress; how do you manage stress; how to manage stress; manage stress; management of stress; management stress; managing stress; strategies for managing stress; coping with stress; cope with stress; copeing with stress; coping and stress; coping skills for stress; coping strategies for stress; coping strategies with stress; coping strategy for stress; coping with stress; coping with stress and anxiety; emotional health; emotional health; emotional health article; emotional health articles; deep relaxation; deep breathing relaxation techniques; deep muscle relaxation; deep relaxation; deep relaxation meditation; deep relaxation technique; deep relaxation techniques; meditation exercises; mindful exercises; mindful meditation exercises; online relaxation exercises; relaxation breathing exercises; relaxation exercise; relaxation exercises; stress relaxation; methods of relaxation for stress; relax stress; relax techniques stress

  11. [Participatory design guide for mental health promotion in prisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante Navarro, R; Paredes-Carbonell, J J; Aviñó Juan-Ulpiano, D; González Rubio, J; Pitarch Monzó, C; Martínez Martínez, L; Arroyo-Cobo, J M

    2013-01-01

    [corrected] The main aim was to describe the issues and the participatory process required to design a Guide to promotemental health in prison through group activities. We reviewed the bibliography, the mental health policies, the workshops about healthy mental habits, and a video about protection and risk factors. We identified the stakeholders and sought their points of view about the topics included in the Guide. We decided on the contents of the Guide and the incorporation of the health assets model and the perspectives provided by gender and cultural diversity. After the initial design of the modules and sessions, we started a pilot in the Prison of Valencia and the Prison of Zaragoza with women and men from different cultures, incorporating the suggested improvements, unifying contents and the discursive style. The guide is formed by: a preface, introduction, description, modules, sessions and evaluation. It has 6 modules and 19 sessions on: health and motivation; self-esteem; health and emotions; more assets to improve health: relax, positive thinking, keeping calm, communication and problem resolution; progress is possible: resiliency and starring in my own change. Each session consists of: activities (objectives, material, allocated time and development), theoretical material and tabbed sheets for activities. The guide is available in print and online versions. A guide has been elaborated with involved stakeholders and the opinion of the prison population.

  12. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates.

  13. Evaluation of a self-guided transport vehicle for remote transportation of transuranic and other hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.M.; Moody, S.J.; Peterson, R.

    1997-04-01

    Between 1952 and 1970, over two million cubic ft of transuranic mixed waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches in the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Commingled with this two million cubic ft of waste is up to 10 million cubic ft of fill soil. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. The main contaminants are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides. Retrieval, treatment, and disposal is one of the options being considered for the waste. This report describes the results of a field demonstration conducted to evaluate a technology for transporting exhumed transuranic wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and at other hazardous or radioactive waste sites through the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The full-scale demonstration, conducted at the INEEL Robotics Center in the summer of 1995, evaluated equipment performance and techniques for remote transport of exhumed buried waste. The technology consisted of a Self-Guided Transport Vehicle designed to remotely convey retrieved waste from the retrieval digface and transport it to a receiving/processing area with minimal human intervention. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate performance parameters such as precision and accuracy of navigation and transportation rates

  14. A guide to evaluating linkage quality for the analysis of linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Katie L; Doidge, James C; Knight, Hannah E; Gilbert, Ruth E; Goldstein, Harvey; Cromwell, David A; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2017-10-01

    Linked datasets are an important resource for epidemiological and clinical studies, but linkage error can lead to biased results. For data security reasons, linkage of personal identifiers is often performed by a third party, making it difficult for researchers to assess the quality of the linked dataset in the context of specific research questions. This is compounded by a lack of guidance on how to determine the potential impact of linkage error. We describe how linkage quality can be evaluated and provide widely applicable guidance for both data providers and researchers. Using an illustrative example of a linked dataset of maternal and baby hospital records, we demonstrate three approaches for evaluating linkage quality: applying the linkage algorithm to a subset of gold standard data to quantify linkage error; comparing characteristics of linked and unlinked data to identify potential sources of bias; and evaluating the sensitivity of results to changes in the linkage procedure. These approaches can inform our understanding of the potential impact of linkage error and provide an opportunity to select the most appropriate linkage procedure for a specific analysis. Evaluating linkage quality in this way will improve the quality and transparency of epidemiological and clinical research using linked data. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  15. Evaluating Remote Reference Service: A Practical Guide to Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Jeffrey; Mon, Lorri; McClure, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies key methodological issues affecting quality of data in the evaluation of remote reference services. Despite a growing number of studies in this area, no comprehensive effort has been made to identify potential problems and suggest solutions. The strategies proposed in this paper offer practical ways in which libraries can…

  16. In vivo MR guided boiling histotripsy in a mouse tumor model evaluated by MRI and histopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, M.; Eikelenboom, D.C.; Brok, M.H. den; Veltien, A.A.; Wassink, M.; Wesseling, P.; Dumont, E.; Futterer, J.J.; Adema, G.J.; Heerschap, A.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a new high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation technique to mechanically fragmentize soft tissue into submicrometer fragments. So far, ultrasound has been used for BH treatment guidance and evaluation. The in vivo histopathological effects of this treatment are

  17. Evaluation of the Leap Motion Controller during the performance of visually-guided upper limb movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Gonzalez, David; Nouredanesh, Mina; Tung, James

    2018-01-01

    Kinematic analysis of upper limb reaching provides insight into the central nervous system control of movements. Until recently, kinematic examination of motor control has been limited to studies conducted in traditional research laboratories because motion capture equipment used for data collection is not easily portable and expensive. A recently developed markerless system, the Leap Motion Controller (LMC), is a portable and inexpensive tracking device that allows recording of 3D hand and finger position. The main goal of this study was to assess the concurrent reliability and validity of the LMC as compared to the Optotrak, a criterion-standard motion capture system, for measures of temporal accuracy and peak velocity during the performance of upper limb, visually-guided movements. In experiment 1, 14 participants executed aiming movements to visual targets presented on a computer monitor. Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to assess the validity and limits of agreement for measures of temporal accuracy (movement time, duration of deceleration interval), peak velocity, and spatial accuracy (endpoint accuracy). In addition, a one-sample t-test was used to test the hypothesis that the error difference between measures obtained from Optotrak and LMC is zero. In experiment 2, 15 participants performed a Fitts' type aiming task in order to assess whether the LMC is capable of assessing a well-known speed-accuracy trade-off relationship. Experiment 3 assessed the temporal coordination pattern during the performance of a sequence consisting of a reaching, grasping, and placement task in 15 participants. Results from the t-test showed that the error difference in temporal measures was significantly different from zero. Based on the results from the 3 experiments, the average temporal error in movement time was 40±44 ms, and the error in peak velocity was 0.024±0.103 m/s. The limits of agreement between the LMC and Optotrak for spatial accuracy measures ranged between

  18. Relaxations to Sparse Optimization Problems and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skau, Erik West

    Parsimony is a fundamental property that is applied to many characteristics in a variety of fields. Of particular interest are optimization problems that apply rank, dimensionality, or support in a parsimonious manner. In this thesis we study some optimization problems and their relaxations, and focus on properties and qualities of the solutions of these problems. The Gramian tensor decomposition problem attempts to decompose a symmetric tensor as a sum of rank one tensors.We approach the Gramian tensor decomposition problem with a relaxation to a semidefinite program. We study conditions which ensure that the solution of the relaxed semidefinite problem gives the minimal Gramian rank decomposition. Sparse representations with learned dictionaries are one of the leading image modeling techniques for image restoration. When learning these dictionaries from a set of training images, the sparsity parameter of the dictionary learning algorithm strongly influences the content of the dictionary atoms.We describe geometrically the content of trained dictionaries and how it changes with the sparsity parameter.We use statistical analysis to characterize how the different content is used in sparse representations. Finally, a method to control the structure of the dictionaries is demonstrated, allowing us to learn a dictionary which can later be tailored for specific applications. Variations of dictionary learning can be broadly applied to a variety of applications.We explore a pansharpening problem with a triple factorization variant of coupled dictionary learning. Another application of dictionary learning is computer vision. Computer vision relies heavily on object detection, which we explore with a hierarchical convolutional dictionary learning model. Data fusion of disparate modalities is a growing topic of interest.We do a case study to demonstrate the benefit of using social media data with satellite imagery to estimate hazard extents. In this case study analysis we

  19. Guide for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in an electricity production nuclear centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, C.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach for the evaluation of the implementation of radioprotection in nuclear power plants. This approach encompasses six main themes: radioprotection customization, radioprotection steering quality, professional and contractor commitment, skill and efficiency of the Risk Prevention Department, radioprotection operational management, robustness of the transport system. Each theme comprises sub-themes which are assessed according to 2, 3 or 4 levels, the sum of which giving a mark out of 20 for the theme

  20. Evaluation of occupational dose from the special procedures guided by fluoroscopy: cardiac catheterism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Juliene da

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by health professionals in the hemodynamic sector of a university hospital in Sao Paulo city. A self-applied questionnaire was used to delineate the profile of health professionals, taking into account sociodemographic variables and variables related to the work with ionizing radiation. The assessment of occupational doses was performed by consulting of the individual dose records of the institution database from 2000 to 2009. A total of 240 records was evaluated, corresponding to 38 active professionals (2009), divided in different professional category: physician, nurses, radiologic technologists and nursing assistants. The annual doses were compared with the limits established by national regulatory authorities. Based on the effective doses received and recorded during the studied period, experimental measures were performed with TL dosimeters in five physicians to evaluate the equivalent dose, in the left hand, during hemodynamic procedures. In addition, the radioprotection measures adopted by health professionals were verified. This study allowed delineating the profile of medical staff that integrates the hemodynamic service as well as knowing the distribution of their doses in relation to limits over the years. (author)

  1. A Pragmatic Approach to Guide Implementation Evaluation Research: Strategy Mapping for Complex Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis K. Huynh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionGreater specification of implementation strategies is a challenge for implementation science, but there is little guidance for delineating the use of multiple strategies involved in complex interventions. The Cardiovascular (CV Toolkit project entails implementation of a toolkit designed to reduce CV risk by increasing women’s engagement in appropriate services. The CV Toolkit project follows an enhanced version of Replicating Effective Programs (REP, an evidence-based implementation strategy, to implement the CV Toolkit across four phases: pre-conditions, pre-implementation, implementation, and maintenance and evolution. Our current objective is to describe a method for mapping implementation strategies used in real time as part of the CV Toolkit project. This method supports description of the timing and content of bundled strategies and provides a structured process for developing a plan for implementation evaluation.MethodsWe conducted a process of strategy mapping to apply Proctor and colleagues’ rubric for specification of implementation strategies, constructing a matrix in which we identified each implementation strategy, its conceptual group, and the corresponding REP phase(s in which it occurs. For each strategy, we also specified the actors involved, actions undertaken, action targets, dose of the implementation strategy, and anticipated outcome addressed. We iteratively refined the matrix with the implementation team, including use of simulation to provide initial validation.ResultsMapping revealed patterns in the timing of implementation strategies within REP phases. Most implementation strategies involving the development of stakeholder interrelationships and training and educating stakeholders were introduced during the pre-conditions or pre-implementation phases. Strategies introduced in the maintenance and evolution phase emphasized communication, re-examination, and audit and feedback. In addition to its value

  2. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for 15–20 seconds and then begin again. Progressive Muscle Relaxation This method of relaxation focuses on ... helpful, please consider supporting IFFGD with a small tax- deductible donation. Make Donation Adapted from IFFGD Publication # ...

  3. Relaxation and Distraction in Experimental Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, R. O.; Marshall, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Compared experimental desensitization with a procedure that replaced relaxation with a distraction task and with an approach that combined both relaxation and distraction. Desensitization generally was more effective than the other two procedures. (Author)

  4. Tracking accuracy evaluation of a PET-enabled glove for molecular image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruionu, L.G.; Wilson, E.; Cleary, K.; Wong, K.H.; Weinberg, I.N.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a new type of PET scanner with a flexible geometry that can provide in situ functional imaging in environments where conventional full-body PET scanning would be difficult or impossible. Because PET reconstruction depends on localizing emissions from the radiotracer inside the patient, our system must have a means of continuously monitoring the detectors' position and orientation. We therefore evaluated the accuracy of using electromagnetic tracking for this task by comparing position measurements from the electromagnetic tracking system to a reference optical tracking system. The mean error in localization was 2.1 mm. (orig.)

  5. Tracking accuracy evaluation of a PET-enabled glove for molecular image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruionu, L.G. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Faculty of Engineering and Management of Technological Systems, Univ. of Craiova, Craiova (Romania); Wilson, E.; Cleary, K.; Wong, K.H. [Computer Aided Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR), Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center, Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Weinberg, I.N. [Fast Imaging Co., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2007-06-15

    We are developing a new type of PET scanner with a flexible geometry that can provide in situ functional imaging in environments where conventional full-body PET scanning would be difficult or impossible. Because PET reconstruction depends on localizing emissions from the radiotracer inside the patient, our system must have a means of continuously monitoring the detectors' position and orientation. We therefore evaluated the accuracy of using electromagnetic tracking for this task by comparing position measurements from the electromagnetic tracking system to a reference optical tracking system. The mean error in localization was 2.1 mm. (orig.)

  6. Effects of thermal relaxation on an amorphous superconducting Zr--Rh alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drehman, A.J.; Johnson, W.L.

    1978-05-01

    The electronic and superconducting properties of an amorphous transition metal alloy are used to evaluate the effects of low temperature annealing. It is observed that the superconducting transition temperature and the electrical resistivity relax exponentially in time from their initial value to a final relaxed value. From this an activation energy for the relaxation process is derived and an explanation is suggested which involves internal stress

  7. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, D. K. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States); Somphonsane, R. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, New York 14260-1500 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  8. The use of economic evaluation for guiding the pharmaceutical reimbursement list in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawattananon, Yot; Tritasavit, Nattha; Suchonwanich, Netnapis; Kingkaew, Pritaporn

    2014-01-01

    Medicines expenditure consumes a significant proportion of public health expenditure in Thailand, where Universal Health Coverage has been in place since 2002. The National List of Essential Medicines has been successfully used as a pharmaceutical benefits package for all public health plans. All patients are eligible for all medicines included in the list free of charge by law. Health economic evaluation has been employed as a tool for the development of this list, including price negotiation of medicines before inclusion, especially of high-cost medicines or medicines with high budget implications. This paper illustrates the current process, mechanisms, and impact and informs of seven success factors that have contributed to the successful use of health economic evaluation in Thailand. These include strong political commitment, development of individual and institutional capacity, participation of all relevant stakeholders, establishment of standard methodological and process guidelines, consideration of several elements in the decision-making process, using evidence as a starting point rather than a deciding factor, and strong enforcement. The lessons learned from this study are likely to be applicable to other settings committed to evidence-based decision making. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Agile practice guide

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Agile Practice Guide – First Edition has been developed as a resource to understand, evaluate, and use agile and hybrid agile approaches. This practice guide provides guidance on when, where, and how to apply agile approaches and provides practical tools for practitioners and organizations wanting to increase agility. This practice guide is aligned with other PMI standards, including A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Sixth Edition, and was developed as the result of collaboration between the Project Management Institute and the Agile Alliance.

  10. Environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection: methodology and user's guide. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrop, G.M.

    1980-02-01

    This report is designed to facilitate assessments of environmental and socioeconomic impacts of fossil energy conversion facilities which might be implemented at potential sites. The discussion of methodology and the User's Guide contained herein are presented in a format that assumes the reader is not an energy technologist. Indeed, this methodology is meant for application by almost anyone with an interest in a potential fossil energy development - planners, citizen groups, government officials, and members of industry. It may also be of instructional value. The methodology is called: Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems (SELECS) and is organized in three levels of increasing sophistication. Only the least complicated version - the Level 1 SELECS - is presented in this document. As stated above, it has been expressly designed to enable just about anyone to participate in evaluating the potential impacts of a proposed energy conversion facility. To accomplish this objective, the Level 1 calculations have been restricted to ones which can be performed by hand in about one working day. Data collection and report preparation may bring the total effort required for a first or one-time application to two to three weeks. If repeated applications are made in the same general region, the assembling of data for a different site or energy conversion technology will probably take much less time.

  11. Evaluation of motion measurement using cine MRI for image guided stereotactic body radiotherapy on a new phantom platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Wang, Ziheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate accuracy of motion tracking of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for image-guided stereotactic body radiotherapy. A phantom platform was developed in this work to fulfill the goal. The motion phantom consisted of a platform, a solid thread, a motor and a control system that can simulate motion in various modes. To validate its reproducibility, the phantom platform was setup three times and imaged with fluoroscopy using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the same motion profile. After the validation test, the phantom platform was evaluated using cine MRI at 2.5 frames/second on a 1.5T GE scanner using five different artificial profiles and five patient profiles. The above profiles were again measured with EPID fluoroscopy and used as references. Discrepancies between measured profiles from cine MRI and EPID were quantified using root-mean-square (RMS) and standard deviation (SD). Pearson’s product moment correlational analysis was used to test correlation. The standard deviation for the reproducibility test was 0.28 mm. The discrepancies (RMS) between all profiles measured by cine MRI and EPID fluoroscopy ranged from 0.30 to 0.49 mm for artificial profiles and ranged from 0.75 to 0.91 mm for five patient profiles. The cine MRI sequence could precisely track phantom motion and the proposed motion phantom was feasible to evaluate cine MRI accuracy. PMID:29296304

  12. The use of computerised tomography guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, K A

    2012-02-01

    The evaluation of a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) has changed over the years with increased access to percutaneous computerised tomography (CT) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), where bronchoscopy is unhelpful. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sample adequacy, diagnostic and complication rate of CT-FNA of a SPN at our academic teaching hospital over an 18 month period. CT-FNA was performed by a radiologist, with a cytopathologist in attendance to confirm the adequacy of the sample obtained. The size of the nodule, sample material and adequacy, diagnosis and complications were recorded. A total of 101 patients were included, 54 male and the mean age was 68 +\\/- 11 years. The mean size of the SPN was 2.3 cm (range 1-11 cm). 56 (56%) patients had a right SPN, 45 (45%) had a left SPN. CT-FNA was diagnostic in 80 (80%) patients and non-diagnostic in 21 (20%) patients. The sample was insufficient for immunocytochemistry, although the morphological appearance was diagnostic in 20 (25%) of the 80 patients. Pneumothorax occurred in 26\\/101 (26%) patients post CT-FNA, of these 7 (27%) required chest drain insertion, while 19 (73%) were managed conservatively. CT FNA is a useful tool for the diagnosis of a SPN, with our diagnostic accuracy comparable to that reported in the literature. However, CT-FNA may not provide adequate sample volume to perform ancillary testing and has a moderate complication rate.

  13. Nonlinear Relaxation in Population Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirone, Markus A.; de Pasquale, Ferdinando; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    We analyze the nonlinear relaxation of a complex ecosystem composed of many interacting species. The ecological system is described by generalized Lotka-Volterra equations with a multiplicative noise. The transient dynamics is studied in the framework of the mean field theory and with random interaction between the species. We focus on the statistical properties of the asymptotic behaviour of the time integral of the ith population and on the distribution of the population and of the local field.

  14. Structural relaxation: low temperature properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, F. de la

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the changes in transport and superconducting properties of amorphous Zr 70 Cu 30 , induced by thermal relaxation. The experimental results are used to investigate the relation between the microscopic parameters and the observed physical properties. It is shown that the density of eletronic states determines the shift Tc as well as the variation of the electrical resistivity. It is necessary to assume strong hybridization between s and d bands to understand the eletrodynamic response of the superconductor. (Author) [pt

  15. The Effects of Suggestibility on Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Henry C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Selected undergraduates (N=32) on the basis of Creative Imagination Scale scores and randomly assigned high and low suggestibility subjects to progressive relaxation (PR) and suggestions of relaxation (SR) training modes. Results revealed a significant pre-post relaxation effect, and main efffects for both suggestibility and training mode. (NRB)

  16. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  18. Vibrational relaxation in OCS mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, C.J.S.M.; Gait, P.D.; Simmie, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental measurements are reported of vibrational relaxation times which may be used to show whether there is near resonant vibration-rotation energy transfer between OCS and H 2 , D 2 or HD. Vibrational relaxation times have been measured in OCS and OCS mixtures over the temperature range 360 to 1000 K using a shock tube and a laser schlieren system. The effectiveness of the additives in reducing the relaxation time of OCS is in the order 4 He 3 He 2 2 and HD. Along this series the effect of an increase in temperature changes from the case of speeding up the rate with 4 He to retarding it with D 2 , HD and H 2 . There is no measurable difference in the effectiveness of n-D 2 and o-D 2 and little, or no, difference between n-H 2 and p-H 2 . Thus the experimental results do not give clear evidence for rotational-vibration energy transfer between hydrogen and OCS. This contrasts with the situation for CO 2 + H 2 mixtures. (author)

  19. Relaxed plasma-vacuum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, G.O.; Lortz, D.; Kaiser, R.

    2001-01-01

    Taylor's theory of relaxed toroidal plasmas (states of lowest energy with fixed total magnetic helicity) is extended to include a vacuum between the plasma and the wall. In the extended variational problem, one prescribes, in addition to the helicity and the magnetic fluxes whose conservation follows from the perfect conductivity of the wall, the fluxes whose conservation follows from the assumption that the plasma-vacuum interface is also perfectly conducting (if the wall is a magnetic surface, then one has the toroidal and the poloidal flux in the vacuum). Vanishing of the first energy variation implies a pressureless free-boundary magnetohydrostatic equilibrium with a Beltrami magnetic field in the plasma, and in general with a surface current in the interface. Positivity of the second variation implies that the equilibrium is stable according to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, that it is a relaxed state according to Taylor's theory if the interface is replaced by a wall, and that the surface current is nonzero (at least if there are no closed magnetic field lines in the interface). The plane slab, with suitable boundary conditions to simulate a genuine torus, is investigated in detail. The relaxed state has the same double symmetry as the vessel if, and only if, the prescribed helicity is in an interval that depends on the prescribed fluxes. This interval is determined in the limit of a thin slab

  20. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  1. Seismic site evaluation practice and seismic design guide for NPP in Continent of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuxian, Hu [State Seismological Bureau, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Geophysics

    1997-03-01

    Energy resources, seismicity, NPP and related regulations of the Continent of China are briefly introduced in the beginning and two codes related to the seismic design of NPP, one on siting and another on design, are discussed in some detail. The one on siting is an official code of the State Seismological Bureau, which specifies the seismic safety evaluation requirements of various kinds of structures, from the most critic and important structures such as NPP to ordinary buildings, and including also engineering works in big cities. The one on seismic design of NPP is a draft subjected to publication now, which will be an official national code. The first one is somewhat unique but the second one is quite similar to those in the world. (author)

  2. Seismic site evaluation practice and seismic design guide for NPP in Continent of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yuxian

    1997-01-01

    Energy resources, seismicity, NPP and related regulations of the Continent of China are briefly introduced in the beginning and two codes related to the seismic design of NPP, one on siting and another on design, are discussed in some detail. The one on siting is an official code of the State Seismological Bureau, which specifies the seismic safety evaluation requirements of various kinds of structures, from the most critic and important structures such as NPP to ordinary buildings, and including also engineering works in big cities. The one on seismic design of NPP is a draft subjected to publication now, which will be an official national code. The first one is somewhat unique but the second one is quite similar to those in the world. (author)

  3. Construction and evaluation of yeast expression networks by database-guided predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Papsdorf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA-Microarrays are powerful tools to obtain expression data on the genome-wide scale. We performed microarray experiments to elucidate the transcriptional networks, which are up- or down-regulated in response to the expression of toxic polyglutamine proteins in yeast. Such experiments initially generate hit lists containing differentially expressed genes. To look into transcriptional responses, we constructed networks from these genes. We therefore developed an algorithm, which is capable of dealing with very small numbers of microarrays by clustering the hits based on co-regulatory relationships obtained from the SPELL database. Here, we evaluate this algorithm according to several criteria and further develop its statistical capabilities. Initially, we define how the number of SPELL-derived co-regulated genes and the number of input hits influences the quality of the networks. We then show the ability of our networks to accurately predict further differentially expressed genes. Including these predicted genes into the networks improves the network quality and allows quantifying the predictive strength of the networks based on a newly implemented scoring method. We find that this approach is useful for our own experimental data sets and also for many other data sets which we tested from the SPELL microarray database. Furthermore, the clusters obtained by the described algorithm greatly improve the assignment to biological processes and transcription factors for the individual clusters. Thus, the described clustering approach, which will be available through the ClusterEx web interface, and the evaluation parameters derived from it represent valuable tools for the fast and informative analysis of yeast microarray data.

  4. Methodological improvement and extension of scope of the guide to the radiological examination and evaluation of contaminated former mining sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    G.E.O.S. Freiberg Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH have been requested in a letter from the Federal Radiation Protection Office dated 15 September 2006 - AG 3.1 StSch - to submit a quote on the topic of ''Methodological improvement and extension of scope of the guide to the radiological examination and evaluation of contaminated former mining sites''. In response to this request Part A of this guide is to be extended by a section on microbiology or, more specifically, on processes in tailings and sedimentation plants that could be induced by microorganisms. Up until now the guide only considered chemical and geochemical processes in the modelling and evaluation of the release of radionuclides from tailings. However, in view of the possibility of microbiological processes occurring in tailings, as for example in the presence of pyrite, one must also reckon with microbiological influences on radionuclide release. the following tasks and problems will therefore be addressed: Do the recommendations given in the guide also apply if microbiological influences are considered? Is it also necessary to consider microbiological issues in the examination and modelling of radionuclide transport via groundwater? What parameters need to be measured and assessed if decisions on rehabilitation measures for tailings must also be based on microbiological aspects? Which examination methods should be used to measure the required parameters efficiently and reliably? Is there anything particular that needs to be considered in studying the involvement of microbiological processes in the release of radionuclides from industrial sedimentation plants? The recommendations given in the guide with respect to the treatment of the water pathway should be reviewed with regard to any amendments or supplementations they might require from the microbiological viewpoint. It should also be investigated whether microbiological studies and measurements are required for the guide's further development. The

  5. Preliminary evaluation of a "formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)" for crisis and transitional case management clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8-12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology ( P crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services.

  6. Evaluation of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a poly (DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide, filled with modified denatured muscle tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Den Dunnen, WFA; Schakenraad, JM; Robinson, PH

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed of functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon -CL) nerve guide, as filled with either modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). To evaluate both motor and sensory nerve recovery,

  7. Self Evaluation Guide for Institutional Participation in Title IV and Other Federal Progams. 12th Edition. 1995-96 and 1996-97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This guide is designed as an in-house tool for postsecondary educational institutions to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of their administration of financial aid programs in compliance with federal laws and regulations. References to current regulations or, where final regulations have not yet been issued, to statute, are included for…

  8. A Guide to the Field Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural History, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a compilation of recommended field guides which deal with birds, mammals, trees, and wildflowers. Each recommended volume is described, noting its distinguishing features and evaluating its organization, photography, and text. Includes the author, publisher, and suggested retail price. (TW)

  9. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  10. Capturing molecular multimode relaxation processes in excitable gases based on decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Kesheng

    2017-08-01

    Existing two-frequency reconstructive methods can only capture primary (single) molecular relaxation processes in excitable gases. In this paper, we present a reconstructive method based on the novel decomposition of frequency-dependent acoustic relaxation spectra to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process. This decomposition of acoustic relaxation spectra is developed from the frequency-dependent effective specific heat, indicating that a multi-relaxation process is the sum of the interior single-relaxation processes. Based on this decomposition, we can reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation process by capturing the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N interior single-relaxation processes, using the measurements of acoustic absorption and sound speed at 2N frequencies. Experimental data for the gas mixtures CO2-N2 and CO2-O2 validate our decomposition and reconstruction approach.

  11. Autofluorescence guided diagnostic evaluation of suspicious oral mucosal lesions: opportunities, limitations, and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2011-03-01

    Wide-filed autofluorescence examination is currently considered as a standard of care for screening and diagnostic evaluation of early neoplastic changes of the skin, cervix, lung, bladder, gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. Naturally occurring fluorophores within the tissue absorb UV and visible light and can re-emit some of this light at longer wavelengths in the form of fluorescence. This non-invasive tissue autofluorescence imaging is used in optical diagnostics, especially in the early detection of cancer. Usually, malignant transformation is associated with thickening of the epithelium, enhanced cellular density due to increased nuclear cytoplasmic ratio which may attenuate the excitation leading to a decrease in collagen autofluorescence. Hence, dysplastic and cancerous tissues often exhibit decreased blue-green autofluorescence and appear darker compared to uninvolved mucosa. Currently, there are three commercially available devices to examine tissue autofluorescence in the oral cavity. In this study we used the oral cancer screening device IdentafiTM 3000 to examine the tissue reflectance and autofluorescence of PML and confounding lesions of the oral cavity. Wide-field autofluorescence imaging enables rapid inspection of large mucosal surfaces, to aid in recognition of suspicious lesions and may also help in discriminate the PML (class 1) from some of the confounding lesions (class II). However, the presence of inflammation or pigments is also associated with loss of stromal autofluorescence, and may give rise to false-positive results with widefield fluorescence imaging. Clinicians who use these autofluorescence based oral cancer screening devices should be aware about the benign oral mucosal lesions that may give false positivity so that unnecessary patient's anxiety and the need for scalpel biopsy can be eliminated.

  12. Sandpile model for relaxation in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Brouers, F.

    1997-10-01

    The relaxation in complex systems is, in general, nonexponential. After an initial rapid decay the system relaxes slowly following a long time tail. In the present paper a sandpile moderation of the relaxation in complex systems is analysed. Complexity is introduced by a process of avalanches in the Bethe lattice and a feedback mechanism which leads to slower decay with increasing time. In this way, some features of relaxation in complex systems: long time tails relaxation, aging, and fractal distribution of characteristic times, are obtained by simple computer simulations. (author)

  13. Thermal relaxation of charm in hadronic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Min, E-mail: mhe@comp.tamu.edu [Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Fries, Rainer J. [Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); RIKEN/BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rapp, Ralf [Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2011-07-18

    The thermal relaxation rate of open-charm (D) mesons in hot and dense hadronic matter is calculated using empirical elastic scattering amplitudes. D-meson interactions with thermal pions are approximated by D{sup *} resonances, while scattering off other hadrons (K, {eta}, {rho}, {omega}, K{sup *}, N, {Delta}) is evaluated using vacuum scattering amplitudes as available in the literature based on effective Lagrangians and constrained by realistic spectroscopy. The thermal relaxation time of D-mesons in a hot {pi} gas is found to be around 25-50 fm/c for temperatures T=150-180 MeV, which reduces to 10-25 fm/c in a hadron-resonance gas. The latter values, argued to be conservative estimates, imply significant modifications of D-meson spectra in heavy-ion collisions. Close to the critical temperature (T{sub c}), the spatial diffusion coefficient (D{sub s}) is surprisingly similar to recent calculations for charm quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma using non-perturbative T-matrix interactions. This suggests a possibly continuous minimum structure of D{sub s} around T{sub c}.

  14. The relationships between suggestibility, influenceability, and relaxability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polczyk, Romuald; Frey, Olga; Szpitalak, Malwina

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between relaxability and various aspects of suggestibility and influenceability. The Jacobson Progressive Muscle Relaxation procedure was used to induce relaxation. Tests of direct suggestibility, relating to the susceptibility of overt suggestions, and indirect suggestibility, referring to indirect hidden influence, as well as self-description questionnaires on suggestibility and the tendency to comply were used. Thayer's Activation-Deactivation Adjective Check List, measuring various kinds of activation and used as a pre- and posttest, determined the efficacy of the relaxation procedure. Indirect, direct, and self-measured suggestibility proved to be positively related to the ability to relax, measured by Thayer's subscales relating to emotions. Compliance was not related to relaxability. The results are discussed in terms of the aspects of relaxation training connected with suggestibility.

  15. Effect of relaxation on working memory and the Bispectral Index of the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudetz, Judith A; Hudetz, Anthony G; Reddy, Diane M

    2004-08-01

    Beneficial effects of relaxation on cardiovascular and immune functions and on memory has been implied but an empirical relationship between task performance and anxiety reduction has not been reported. In this study, we investigated whether guided imagery of relatively short duration would decrease S-Anxiety and electroencephalogram Bispectral Index and improve working memory. 42 participants (age: M=39, SD=11, 14 men, 28 women, university students and VA Medical Center employees, recruited by their professor or by fellow employees) underwent relaxation by 16-min. guided imagery or no treatment (control). Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the WAIS-III Letter-Number Sequencing Test were administered before and after relaxation. S-Anxiety and BIS Index decreased and the Letter-Number test score increased by 30% after relaxation but not in the control group. This score was higher for participants with low anxiety and BIS Index. There was no significant difference between the groups before treatment. The results suggest that guided imagery of short duration produces relaxation as measured by psychological and neurophysiological indices and improves working memory performance.

  16. Evaluation of the antiproliferative activity of the leaves from Arctium lappa by a bioassay-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabio Bahls; Yamamoto, Rafael Eidi; Zanoli, Karine; Nocchi, Samara Requena; Novello, Cláudio Roberto; Schuquel, Ivânia Teresinha Albrecht; Sakuragui, Cássia Mônica; Luftmann, Heinrich; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo

    2012-02-14

    Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF) showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1), mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate) (2), a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3), mixture of 1 with melitensin (4), dehydrovomifoliol (5), and loliolide (6). The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS) and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2-5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC(50) (µg/mL) values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  17. Evaluation of the Antiproliferative Activity of the Leaves from Arctium lappa by a Bioassay-Guided Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1, mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate (2, a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3, mixture of 1 with melitensin (4, dehydrovomifoliol (5, and loliolide (6. The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2–5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC50 (µg/mL values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  18. Functional Connectivity During Exposure to Favorite-Food, Stress, and Neutral-Relaxing Imagery Differs Between Smokers and Nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Scheinost, Dustin; Jastreboff, Ania M; Constable, R Todd; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-09-01

    Tobacco-use disorder is a complex condition involving multiple brain networks and presenting with multiple behavioral correlates including changes in diet and stress. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of neural responses to favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers demonstrated blunted corticostriatal-limbic responses to favorite-food cues. Based on other recent reports of alterations in functional brain networks in smokers, the current study examined functional connectivity during exposure to favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing imagery in smokers and nonsmokers, using the same dataset. The intrinsic connectivity distribution was measured to identify brain regions that differed in degree of functional connectivity between groups during each imagery condition. Resulting clusters were evaluated for seed-to-voxel connectivity to identify the specific connections that differed between groups during each imagery condition. During exposure to favorite-food imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed lower connectivity in the supramarginal gyrus, and differences in connectivity between the supramarginal gyrus and the corticostriatal-limbic system. During exposure to neutral-relaxing imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed greater connectivity in the precuneus, and greater connectivity between the precuneus and the posterior insula and rolandic operculum. During exposure to stress imagery, smokers versus nonsmokers showed lower connectivity in the cerebellum. These findings provide data-driven insights into smoking-related alterations in brain functional connectivity patterns related to appetitive, relaxing, and stressful states. This study uses a data-driven approach to demonstrate that smokers and nonsmokers show differential patterns of functional connectivity during guided imagery related to personalized favorite-food, stress, and neutral-relaxing cues, in brain regions implicated in attention

  19. Design, Development and Preliminary Student Evaluation of Virtual Field Guides as aids to teaching and learning in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Tim

    2010-05-01

    In Universities the benefits of teaching and learning through fieldwork has been brought under closer examination in recent years (e.g. Andrews et al., 2003) and the notion of supporting fieldwork in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines has been gathering momentum over the past decade as evidenced by conferences on ‘Supporting fieldwork using information technology' (Maskall et al., 2007) and a Higher Education Academy GEES Virtual Fieldwork Conference at University of Worcester (May 2007). Virtual environments and e-learning resources have been shown to help students become active rather than passive learners by appealing to their multi-sensory learning ability with interactive media (Fletcher et al., 2002; 2007). Research on glacial and fluvial processes has been conducted since 2003 by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) staff, sometimes in collaboration with other Universities, at field sites in the French Alps, Swiss Alps and Cariboo Mountains in British Columbia. A virtual field guide (VFG) (www.virtualalps.co.uk) has been developed which uses maps, site photos, panorama movies, video clips, a google earth tour, student exercises using hydrological and glacial datasets collected in the field and revision exercises. A preliminary evaluation of this learning resource has been carried out with two groups of LJMU students and an article written (Stott et al. 2009a). The Ingleton Waterfalls VFG (http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/BIE/ingleton/) was developed by LJMU staff to meet the needs of Foundation degree and undergraduate students. A workshop was presented at the Earth Science Teachers Association 2008 Annual Conference at LJMU, and a subsequent article written (Stott et al. 2009b). The final section of this presentation will summarise some staff perspectives and raises some questions and issues concerned with development and accessibility of VFGs in the light of new developments of a ‘semantic web' at LJMU (Carmichael, 2009). Andrews

  20. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  1. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Multi-spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2017-08-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissues, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have previously developed a rigorous EMOR relaxation theory for dipole-coupled two-spin and three-spin systems. Here, we extend the stochastic Liouville theory to four-spin systems and use these exact results as a guide for constructing an approximate multi-spin theory, valid for spin systems of arbitrary size. This so-called generalized stochastic Redfield equation (GSRE) theory includes the effects of longitudinal-transverse cross-mode relaxation, which gives rise to an inverted step in the relaxation dispersion profile, and coherent spin mode transfer among solid-like spins, which may be regarded as generalized spin diffusion. The GSRE theory is compared to an existing theory, based on the extended Solomon equations, which does not incorporate these phenomena. Relaxation dispersion profiles are computed from the GSRE theory for systems of up to 16 protons, taken from protein crystal structures. These profiles span the range from the motional narrowing limit, where the coherent mode transfer plays a major role, to the ultra-slow motion limit, where the zero-field rate is closely related to the strong-collision limit of the dipolar relaxation rate. Although a quantitative analysis of experimental data is beyond the scope of this work, it is clear from the magnitude of the predicted relaxation rate and the shape of the relaxation dispersion profile that the dipolar EMOR mechanism is the principal cause of water-1H low-field longitudinal relaxation in aqueous systems of immobilized macromolecules, including soft biological tissues. The relaxation theory developed here therefore provides a basis for molecular-level interpretation of endogenous soft

  2. Computer animated relaxation therapy in children between 7 and 13 years with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornoe, Birte; Skov, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the effect of computer animated relaxation therapy in children between 7 and 13 years with tension-type headache and the children's experiences with the therapy. The therapy consisted of an uncontrolled nine-session course in modified progressive relaxation therapy assi...

  3. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  4. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William; Staruch, Robert M.; Pichardo, Samuel; Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O.; Huang, Yuexi; Ylihautala, Mika; McGuffin, Merrylee; Czarnota, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  5. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation

  6. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-24

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  7. Conjugation and Evaluation of Triazole?Linked Single Guide RNA for CRISPR?Cas9 Gene Editing

    OpenAIRE

    He, Kaizhang; Chou, Eldon T.; Begay, Shawn; Anderson, Emily M.; van?Brabant?Smith, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The CRISPR?Cas9 gene editing system requires Cas9 endonuclease and guide RNAs (either the natural dual RNA consisting of crRNA and tracrRNA or a chimeric single guide RNA) that direct site?specific double?stranded DNA cleavage. This communication describes a click ligation approach that uses alkyne?azide cycloaddition to generate a triazole?linked single guide RNA (sgRNA). The conjugated sgRNA shows efficient and comparable genome editing activity to natural dual RNA and unmodified s...

  8. Analyses of guide update approaches for vector evaluated particle swarm optimisation on dynamic multi-objective optimisation problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Helbig, M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available not indicate whether Pareto-dominance is used to update guides. Therefore, it is assumed that the original version of VEPSO updates the local and global guides according to the particles? fitness with regards to only one objective, i.e. the objective... that were used to study the influence of guide update approaches on the performance of DVEPSO. Five benchmark functions were used of various DMOO Types, namely DIMP2 [10], FDA3Camara [11], dMOP2 [12], dMOP3 [12] and HE2 [13]. Various types of DMOOPs...

  9. Ultrasonic relaxations in borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angelo, G.; Tripodo, G.; Carini, G.; Cosio, E.; Bartolotta, A.; Di Marco, G.

    2004-01-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range from 10 to 70 MHz have been measured in M 2 O-B 2 O 3 borate glasses (M: Li or Ag) as a function of temperature between 15 and 350 K. The velocity of sound waves decreases with increasing temperature in all the glasses, the decrease as the temperature is increased is larger in glasses containing silver than in those with lithium. A broad relaxation peak characterises the attenuation behaviour of the lithium and silver borate glasses at temperatures below 100 K and is paralleled by a corresponding dispersive behaviour of the sound velocity. Above 100 K, the ultrasonic velocity shows a nearly linear behaviour regulated by the vibrational anharmonicity, which decreases with increasing content of modifier oxide and is smaller in lithium than in silver borates. These results suggest that the relaxation of structural defects and the anharmonicity of borate glasses are strongly affected by two parameters: the number of bridging bonds per network forming ion and the polarising power of network modifier ions which occupy sites in the existing interstices

  10. Statistical mechanics of violent relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    We reexamine the foundations of Lynden-Bell's statistical mechanical discussion of violent relaxation in collisionless stellar systems. We argue that Lynden-Bell's formulation in terms of a continuum description introduces unnecessary complications, and we consider a more conventional formulation in terms of particles. We then find the exclusion principle discovered by Lynden-Bell to be quantitatively important only at phase densities where two-body encounters are no longer negligible. Since the edynamical basis for the exclusion principle vanishes in such cases anyway, Lynden-Bell statistics always reduces in practice to Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics when applied to stellar systems. Lynden-Bell also found the equilibrium distribution function generally to be a sum of Maxwellians with velocity dispersions dependent on the phase density at star formation. We show that this difficulty vanishes in the particulate description for an encounterless stellar system as long as stars of different masses are initially well mixed in phase space. Our methods also demonstrate the equivalence between Gibbs's formalism which uses the microcanonical ensemble and Boltzmann's formalism which uses a coarse-grained continuum description. In addition, we clarify the concept of irreversible behavior on a macroscopic scale for an encounterless stellar system. Finally, we comment on the use of unusual macroscopic constraints to simulate the effects of incomplete relaxation

  11. Scalar Similarity for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method allows the measurement of trace gas fluxes when no fast sensors are available for eddy covariance measurements. The flux parameterisation used in REA is based on the assumption of scalar similarity, i.e., similarity of the turbulent exchange of two scalar quantities. In this study changes in scalar similarity between carbon dioxide, sonic temperature and water vapour were assessed using scalar correlation coefficients and spectral analysis. The influence on REA measurements was assessed by simulation. The evaluation is based on observations over grassland, irrigated cotton plantation and spruce forest. Scalar similarity between carbon dioxide, sonic temperature and water vapour showed a distinct diurnal pattern and change within the day. Poor scalar similarity was found to be linked to dissimilarities in the energy contained in the low frequency part of the turbulent spectra ( definition.

  12. ANDOSE: a computer code for calculating annual doses to man from routine releases of LWR effluents for the purpose of evaluating compliance with JAEC's guide for doseobjectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Toshinori; Shiraishi, Tadao

    1979-10-01

    For environmental doses from routine releases of LWRs effluents to meet the Criterion 'As Low As is Practicable (ALAP)', Japan Atomic Energy Commission (JAEC) established a series of guides, the first for 'Dose Objectives' (May 1975), the second for models and parameters for calculating the environmental doses to compare with the 'Dose Objectives' (September 1976), and the third providing onsite meteorological programs, statistics of the data obtained and atmospheric dispersion models (June 1977). JAERI has developed a computer code, designated as ANDOSE, for calculating annual releases of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents and, then, total body doses and thyroid doses to individuals around sites on the basis of these guides. The total body doses are from radioactive noble gases as well as from radioactive materials taken with marine food. For the calculation of thyroid doses are taken into account exposure pathways via inhalation and ingestion of leafy vegetables, cow's milk and marine food. The age-specific thyroid doses are evaluated. The doses are summed up when multisource or multisite conditions need to be evaluated (Nuclear Safety Bureau's requirement). In the present report, are described source-term models, environmental transport models and dose models used in the code, of which most are provided in the guides but some are complemented by the authors, the functions of ANDOSE and the manual for users of the code. The program lists and the latter two guides mentioned above are included in the appendices. (author)

  13. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D; Duan, Y; Zhang, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  14. TU-AB-202-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration in MRI-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooney, K; Zhao, T; Green, O; Mutic, S; Yang, D [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Duan, Y [University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri (United States); Zhang, M [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance of the deformable image registration algorithm used for MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy using image feature analysis. Methods: MR images were collected from five patients treated on the MRIdian (ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH), a three head Cobalt-60 therapy machine with an 0.35 T MR system. The images were acquired immediately prior to treatment with a uniform 1.5 mm resolution. Treatment sites were as follows: head/neck, lung, breast, stomach, and bladder. Deformable image registration was performed using the ViewRay software between the first fraction MRI and the final fraction MRI, and the DICE similarity coefficient (DSC) for the skin contours was reported. The SIFT and Harris feature detection and matching algorithms identified point features in each image separately, then found matching features in the other image. The target registration error (TRE) was defined as the vector distance between matched features on the two image sets. Each deformation was evaluated based on comparison of average TRE and DSC. Results: Image feature analysis produced between 2000–9500 points for evaluation on the patient images. The average (± standard deviation) TRE for all patients was 3.3 mm (±3.1 mm), and the passing rate of TRE<3 mm was 60% on the images. The head/neck patient had the best average TRE (1.9 mm±2.3 mm) and the best passing rate (80%). The lung patient had the worst average TRE (4.8 mm±3.3 mm) and the worst passing rate (37.2%). DSC was not significantly correlated with either TRE (p=0.63) or passing rate (p=0.55). Conclusions: Feature matching provides a quantitative assessment of deformable image registration, with a large number of data points for analysis. The TRE of matched features can be used to evaluate the registration of many objects throughout the volume, whereas DSC mainly provides a measure of gross overlap. We have a research agreement with ViewRay Inc.

  15. Paramagnetic relaxation effects in perturbed angular correlations for arbitrary electronic relaxation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, C.; Spanjaard, D.; Hartmann-Boutron, F.

    1975-01-01

    Previous perturbation treatments of paramagnetic relaxation effects in γγ PAC were limited to the case of very short electronic relaxation times. This limitation is circumvented by invoking a new perturbation theory recently elaborated by Hirst and others for handling relaxation effects in Moessbauer spectra. Under the assumption of spherical electronic relaxation the perturbation factors are computed as functions of certain relaxation parameters which are directly related to the microscopic relaxation Hamiltonian. The results are compared to those of the stochastic theory of Scherer and Blume [fr

  16. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI-dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We, are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin......-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We, the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from...... the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI-dependent....

  17. Evaluation of methods to produce an image library for automatic patient model localization for dose mapping during fluoroscopically guided procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian-Meneghin, Josh; Xiong, Z.; Rudin, S.; Oines, A.; Bednarek, D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods for producing a library of 2D-radiographic images to be correlated to clinical images obtained during a fluoroscopically-guided procedure for automated patient-model localization. The localization algorithm will be used to improve the accuracy of the skin-dose map superimposed on the 3D patient- model of the real-time Dose-Tracking-System (DTS). For the library, 2D images were generated from CT datasets of the SK-150 anthropomorphic phantom using two methods: Schmid's 3D-visualization tool and Plastimatch's digitally-reconstructed-radiograph (DRR) code. Those images, as well as a standard 2D-radiographic image, were correlated to a 2D-fluoroscopic image of a phantom, which represented the clinical-fluoroscopic image, using the Corr2 function in Matlab. The Corr2 function takes two images and outputs the relative correlation between them, which is fed into the localization algorithm. Higher correlation means better alignment of the 3D patient-model with the patient image. In this instance, it was determined that the localization algorithm will succeed when Corr2 returns a correlation of at least 50%. The 3D-visualization tool images returned 55-80% correlation relative to the fluoroscopic-image, which was comparable to the correlation for the radiograph. The DRR images returned 61-90% correlation, again comparable to the radiograph. Both methods prove to be sufficient for the localization algorithm and can be produced quickly; however, the DRR method produces more accurate grey-levels. Using the DRR code, a library at varying angles can be produced for the localization algorithm.

  18. Comparative evaluation of two dose optimization methods for image-guided, highly-conformal, tandem and ovoids cervix brachytherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiyun; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron

    2013-04-01

    Although the Manchester system is still extensively used to prescribe dose in brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced cervix cancer, many radiation oncology centers are transitioning to 3D image-guided BT, owing to the excellent anatomy definition offered by modern imaging modalities. As automatic dose optimization is highly desirable for 3D image-based BT, this study comparatively evaluates the performance of two optimization methods used in BT treatment planning—Nelder-Mead simplex (NMS) and simulated annealing (SA)—for a cervix BT computer simulation model incorporating a Manchester-style applicator. Eight model cases were constructed based on anatomical structure data (for high risk-clinical target volume (HR-CTV), bladder, rectum and sigmoid) obtained from measurements on fused MR-CT images for BT patients. D90 and V100 for HR-CTV, D2cc for organs at risk (OARs), dose to point A, conformation index and the sum of dwell times within the tandem and ovoids were calculated for optimized treatment plans designed to treat the HR-CTV in a highly conformal manner. Compared to the NMS algorithm, SA was found to be superior as it could perform optimization starting from a range of initial dwell times, while the performance of NMS was strongly dependent on their initial choice. SA-optimized plans also exhibited lower D2cc to OARs, especially the bladder and sigmoid, and reduced tandem dwell times. For cases with smaller HR-CTV having good separation from adjoining OARs, multiple SA-optimized solutions were found which differed markedly from each other and were associated with different choices for initial dwell times. Finally and importantly, the SA method yielded plans with lower dwell time variability compared with the NMS method.

  19. Structural relaxation in annealed hyperquenched basaltic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Mauro, John C.; Potuzak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The enthalpy relaxation behavior of hyperquenched (HQ) and annealed hyperquenched (AHQ) basaltic glass is investigated through calorimetric measurements. The results reveal a common onset temperature of the glass transition for all the HQ and AHQ glasses under study, indicating that the primary...... relaxation is activated at the same temperature regardless of the initial departure from equilibrium. The analysis of secondary relaxation at different annealing temperatures provides insights into the enthalpy recovery of HQ glasses....

  20. Evaluation of every other day-cone beam computed tomography in image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Kim, Jong Sik; Song, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography(CBCT) in Image Guided Radiation Therapy(IGRT), Set-up error can be reduced but exposure dose of the patient due to CBCT will increase. Through this study, we are to evaluate by making a scenario with the implementation period of CBCT as every other day. Of prostate cancer patients, 9 patients who got a Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy(IMRT) with CBCT in IGRT were analyzed. Based on values corrected by analyzing set-up error by using CBCT every day during actual treatment, we created a scenario that conducts CBCT every other day. After applying set-up error values of the day not performing CBCT in the scenario to the treatment planning system(Pinnacle 9.2, Philips, USA) by moving them from the treatment iso-center during actual treatment, we established re-treatment plan under the same conditions as actual treatment. Based on this, the dose distribution of normal organs and Planning Target Volume(PTV) was compared and analyzed. In the scenario that performs CBCT every other day based on set-up error values when conducting CBCT every day, average X-axis : 0.2±0.73 mm , Y-axis : 0.1±0.58 mm , Z-axis : -1.3±1.17 mm difference was shown. This was applied to the treatment planning to establish re-treatment plan and dose distribution was evaluated and as a result, Dmean : -0.17 Gy, D99% : -0.71 Gy of PTV difference was shown in comparison with the result obtained when carrying out CBCT every day. As for normal organs, V66 : 1.55% of rectal wall, V66 : -0.76% of bladder difference was shown. In case of a CBCT perform every other day could reduce exposure dose and additional treatment time. And it is thought to be able to consider the application depending on the condition of the patient because the difference in the dose distribution of normal organs, PTV is not large

  1. A Novel Observation-Guided Approach for Evaluating Mesoscale Convective Systems Simulated by the DOE ACME Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Z.; Ma, P. L.; Hardin, J. C.; Houze, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are the largest type of convective storms that develop when convection aggregates and induces mesoscale circulation features. Over North America, MCSs contribute over 60% of the total warm-season precipitation and over half of the extreme daily precipitation in the central U.S. Our recent study (Feng et al. 2016) found that the observed increases in springtime total and extreme rainfall in this region are dominated by increased frequency and intensity of long-lived MCSs*. To date, global climate models typically do not run at a resolution high enough to explicitly simulate individual convective elements and may not have adequate process representations for MCSs, resulting in a large deficiency in projecting changes of the frequency of extreme precipitation events in future climate. In this study, we developed a novel observation-guided approach specifically designed to evaluate simulated MCSs in the Department of Energy's climate model, Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME). The ACME model has advanced treatments for convection and subgrid variability and for this study is run at 25 km and 100 km grid spacings. We constructed a robust MCS database consisting of over 500 MCSs from 3 warm-season observations by applying a feature-tracking algorithm to 4-km resolution merged geostationary satellite and 3-D NEXRAD radar network data over the Continental US. This high-resolution MCS database is then down-sampled to the 25 and 100 km ACME grids to re-characterize key MCS properties. The feature-tracking algorithm is adapted with the adjusted characteristics to identify MCSs from ACME model simulations. We demonstrate that this new analysis framework is useful for evaluating ACME's warm-season precipitation statistics associated with MCSs, and provides insights into the model process representations related to extreme precipitation events for future improvement. *Feng, Z., L. R. Leung, S. Hagos, R. A. Houze, C. D. Burleyson

  2. Pair plasma relaxation time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A G; Ruffini, R; Vereshchagin, G V

    2010-04-01

    By numerically solving the relativistic Boltzmann equations, we compute the time scale for relaxation to thermal equilibrium for an optically thick electron-positron plasma with baryon loading. We focus on the time scales of electromagnetic interactions. The collisional integrals are obtained directly from the corresponding QED matrix elements. Thermalization time scales are computed for a wide range of values of both the total-energy density (over 10 orders of magnitude) and of the baryonic loading parameter (over 6 orders of magnitude). This also allows us to study such interesting limiting cases as the almost purely electron-positron plasma or electron-proton plasma as well as intermediate cases. These results appear to be important both for laboratory experiments aimed at generating optically thick pair plasmas as well as for astrophysical models in which electron-positron pair plasmas play a relevant role.

  3. Relaxing Chosen-Ciphertext Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canetti, Ran; Krawczyk, Hugo; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2003-01-01

    Security against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks (or, CCA security) has been accepted as the standard requirement from encryption schemes that need to withstand active attacks. In particular, it is regarded as the appropriate security notion for encryption schemes used as components within...... general protocols and applications. Indeed, CCA security was shown to suffice in a large variety of contexts. However, CCA security often appears to be somewhat too strong: there exist encryption schemes (some of which come up naturally in practice) that are not CCA secure, but seem sufficiently secure...... “for most practical purposes.” We propose a relaxed variant of CCA security, called Replayable CCA (RCCA) security. RCCA security accepts as secure the non-CCA (yet arguably secure) schemes mentioned above; furthermore, it suffices for most existing applications of CCA security. We provide three...

  4. Objective-guided image annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qi; Tsang, Ivor Wai-Hung; Gao, Shenghua

    2013-04-01

    Automatic image annotation, which is usually formulated as a multi-label classification problem, is one of the major tools used to enhance the semantic understanding of web images. Many multimedia applications (e.g., tag-based image retrieval) can greatly benefit from image annotation. However, the insufficient performance of image annotation methods prevents these applications from being practical. On the other hand, specific measures are usually designed to evaluate how well one annotation method performs for a specific objective or application, but most image annotation methods do not consider optimization of these measures, so that they are inevitably trapped into suboptimal performance of these objective-specific measures. To address this issue, we first summarize a variety of objective-guided performance measures under a unified representation. Our analysis reveals that macro-averaging measures are very sensitive to infrequent keywords, and hamming measure is easily affected by skewed distributions. We then propose a unified multi-label learning framework, which directly optimizes a variety of objective-specific measures of multi-label learning tasks. Specifically, we first present a multilayer hierarchical structure of learning hypotheses for multi-label problems based on which a variety of loss functions with respect to objective-guided measures are defined. And then, we formulate these loss functions as relaxed surrogate functions and optimize them by structural SVMs. According to the analysis of various measures and the high time complexity of optimizing micro-averaging measures, in this paper, we focus on example-based measures that are tailor-made for image annotation tasks but are seldom explored in the literature. Experiments show consistency with the formal analysis on two widely used multi-label datasets, and demonstrate the superior performance of our proposed method over state-of-the-art baseline methods in terms of example-based measures on four

  5. Diagnostic Accuracy of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fusion Guided Targeted Biopsy Evaluated by Transperineal Template Saturation Prostate Biopsy for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Ashkan; Märzendorfer, Olivia; Donati, Olivio F; Rizzi, Gianluca; Rupp, Niels J; Wettstein, Marian S; Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Eberli, Daniel

    2018-02-21

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy against that of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy to detect prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 415 men who consecutively presented for prostate biopsy between November 2014 and September 2016 at our tertiary care center. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3 Tesla device without an endorectal coil, followed by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy with the BiopSee® fusion system. Additional fusion guided targeted biopsy was done in men with a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, defined as Likert score 3 to 5. Any Gleason pattern 4 was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. The detection rates of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and fusion guided targeted biopsy were compared with the detection rate of transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy using the McNemar test. We obtained a median of 40 (range 30 to 55) and 3 (range 2 to 4) transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and fusion guided targeted biopsy cores, respectively. Of the 124 patients (29.9%) without a suspicious lesion on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging 32 (25.8%) were found to have clinically significant prostate cancer on transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy. Of the 291 patients (70.1%) with a Likert score of 3 to 5 clinically significant prostate cancer was detected in 129 (44.3%) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging fusion guided targeted biopsy, in 176 (60.5%) by transperineal template saturation prostate biopsy and in 187 (64.3%) by the combined approach. Overall 58 cases (19.9%) of clinically significant prostate cancer would have been missed if fusion guided targeted biopsy had been performed exclusively. The sensitivity of

  6. Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Levett, Kate M; Collins, Carmel T; Armour, Mike; Dahlen, Hannah G; Suganuma, Machiko

    2018-03-28

    birth, and caesarean section were not reported under this comparison.MusicWhen comparing music to control interventions there was evidence of lower pain intensity in the latent phase for women receiving music (measured on a scale of 0 to 10 with low scores indicating less pain) (MD -0.73, 95% CI -1.01 to -0.45, random-effects analysis, two trials, 192 women) and very low-quality evidence of no clear benefit in the active phase (MD -0.51, 95% CI -1.10 to 0.07, three trials, 217 women). Very low-quality evidence suggested no clear benefit in terms of reducing assisted vaginal birth (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.08 to 2.05, one trial, 156 women) or caesarean section rate (RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.70, two trials, 216 women). Satisfaction with pain relief, sense of control in labour, satisfaction with childbirth experience, and breastfeeding were not reported under this comparison.Audio analgesiaOne trial evaluating audio analgesia versus control only reported one outcome and showed no evidence of benefit in satisfaction with pain relief.MindfulnessOne trial evaluating mindfulness versus usual care found an increase in sense of control for the mindfulness group (using the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory) (MD 31.30, 95% CI 1.61 to 60.99, 26 women). There is no strong evidence that the effects were any different between groups for satisfaction in childbirth, or for caesarean section rate, need for assisted vaginal delivery or need for pharmacological pain relief. No other outcomes were reported in this trial. Relaxation, yoga and music may have a role with reducing pain, and increasing satisfaction with pain relief, although the quality of evidence varies between very low to low. There was insufficient evidence for the role of mindfulness and audio-analgesia. The majority of trials did not report on the safety of the interventions. Further randomised controlled trials of relaxation modalities for pain management in labour are needed. Trials should be adequately powered and include

  7. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Farooq Naeem,1,2 Rupinder K Johal,1 Claire Mckenna,1 Olivia Calancie,1 Tariq Munshi,1,2 Tariq Hassan,1 Amina Nasar,3 Muhammad Ayub1 1Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2Addiction and Mental Health Services – Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington (AMHS-KFLA, Kingston, ON, Canada; 3Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format.Methods: This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36 consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU (treatment group or to TAU alone (control group. The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.Findings: Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005, anxiety and depression (P<0.005, and disability (P<0.005 at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion: A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis

  8. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy v. conventional guided self-help for bulimia nervosa: long-term evaluation of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Wanner, Christian; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Waldherr, Karin; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based guided self-help is recommended as a first step in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. To evaluate in a randomised controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00461071) the long-term effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) compared with conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH) in females with bulimia nervosa. A total of 155 participants were randomly assigned to INT-GSH or BIB-GSH for 7 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, month 7 and month 18. The greatest improvement was reported after 4 months with a continued reduction in eating disorder symptomatology reported at month 7 and 18. After 18 months, 14.6% (n = 7/48) of the participants in the INT-GSH group and 25% (n = 7/28) in the BIB-GSH group were abstinent from binge eating and compensatory measures, 43.8% (n = 21/48) and 39.2% (n = 11/28) respectively were in remission. No differences regarding outcome between the two groups were found. Internet-based guided self-help for bulimia nervosa was not superior compared with bibliotherapy, the gold standard of self-help. Improvements remain stable in the long term.

  9. A study to evaluate the efficacy of image-guided core biopsy in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma-Results in 103 biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandervelde, C.; Kamani, T.; Varghese, A.; Ramesar, K.; Grace, R.; Howlett, D.C.

    2008-01-01

    The reason for this study was to evaluate the ability of image-guided core biopsy to replace surgical excision by providing sufficient diagnostic and treatment information. All consecutive image-guided core biopsies in patients with a final diagnosis of lymphoma over a 6-year period at our institution were collected retrospectively. Case notes and pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnostic techniques used were recorded. Pathology reports were graded according to their diagnostic completeness and their ability to provide treatment information. Out of a total of 328 instances of lymphoma, 103 image-guided core biopsies were performed in 96 patients. In 78% of these, the diagnostic information obtained from the biopsy provided a fully graded and subtyped diagnosis of lymphoma with sufficient information to initiate therapy. In the head and neck 67% of core biopsies were fully diagnostic for treatment purposes compared to 91% in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Image-guided core biopsy has a number of cost and safety advantages over surgical excision biopsy and in suitable cases it can obviate the need for surgery in cases of suspected lymphoma. This is especially relevant for elderly patients and those with poor performance status

  10. A study to evaluate the efficacy of image-guided core biopsy in the diagnosis and management of lymphoma-Results in 103 biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandervelde, C. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clivevandervelde@gmail.com; Kamani, T. [Department of ENT Surgery, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: tkamany@yahoo.com; Varghese, A. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: vargheseajay@hotmail.com; Ramesar, K. [Department of Histopathology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.ramesar@esht.nhs.uk; Grace, R. [Department of Haematology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: richard.grace@esht.nhs.uk; Howlett, D.C. [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: david.howlett@esht.nhs.uk

    2008-04-15

    The reason for this study was to evaluate the ability of image-guided core biopsy to replace surgical excision by providing sufficient diagnostic and treatment information. All consecutive image-guided core biopsies in patients with a final diagnosis of lymphoma over a 6-year period at our institution were collected retrospectively. Case notes and pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnostic techniques used were recorded. Pathology reports were graded according to their diagnostic completeness and their ability to provide treatment information. Out of a total of 328 instances of lymphoma, 103 image-guided core biopsies were performed in 96 patients. In 78% of these, the diagnostic information obtained from the biopsy provided a fully graded and subtyped diagnosis of lymphoma with sufficient information to initiate therapy. In the head and neck 67% of core biopsies were fully diagnostic for treatment purposes compared to 91% in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Image-guided core biopsy has a number of cost and safety advantages over surgical excision biopsy and in suitable cases it can obviate the need for surgery in cases of suspected lymphoma. This is especially relevant for elderly patients and those with poor performance status.

  11. An in vitro study to evaluate the difference in shade between commercially available shade guides and glazed porcelain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Smile is one of the most important interactive communication skills of a person. A smile is the key factor for an aesthetic appearance. Hence aesthetics is one of the motivating factor for the patients to seek dental care. Correction of unaesthetic appearance gives a positive effect to the self esteem of the patient. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the difference in the shade between the commercially available shade guides namely Vita Classical And Ivoclar Chromascop and the fired porcelain samples fabricated using Vita Zahnfabrik VMK 95 and Ivoclar Classic Materials respectively. Objectives: The objective of this study was to obtain a matching brand of material that has a particular shade tab among the brands used. Conclusion: To conclude, Ivoclar material matched the chromascop shade guide better than the vita material matched the vita classic shade guide.

  12. An in vitro study to evaluate the difference in shade between commercially available shade guides and glazed porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, P; Sadan, D Sai

    2016-10-01

    Smile is one of the most important interactive communication skills of a person. A smile is the key factor for an aesthetic appearance. Hence aesthetics is one of the motivating factor for the patients to seek dental care. Correction of unaesthetic appearance gives a positive effect to the self esteem of the patient. The aim of this study was to compare the difference in the shade between the commercially available shade guides namely Vita Classical And Ivoclar Chromascop and the fired porcelain samples fabricated using Vita Zahnfabrik VMK 95 and Ivoclar Classic Materials respectively. The objective of this study was to obtain a matching brand of material that has a particular shade tab among the brands used. To conclude, Ivoclar material matched the chromascop shade guide better than the vita material matched the vita classic shade guide.

  13. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Wall And Window Retrofit Configurations: Supporting the Residential Retrofit Best Practices Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Hulvey, Kimberly D [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    A Retrofit Best Practices Guide was developed to encourage homeowners to consider energy conservation issues whenever they modify their siding or windows. In support of this guide, an experimental program was implemented to measure the performance of a number of possible wall siding and window retrofit configurations. Both thermal and air-leakage measurements were made for a 2.4 x 2.4 m (8 x 8 ft) wall section with and without a 0.9 x 1.2 m (3 x 4 ft) window. The windows tested were previously well-characterized at a dedicated window test facility. A computer model was also used to provide information for the Best Practices Guide. The experimental data for walls and windows were used in conjunction with this model to estimate the total annual energy savings for several typical houses in a number of different locations.

  14. EERE Peer Review Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    The primary purpose of this guide is to provide managers and staff guidance in establishing formal in-progress peer review that provides intellectually fair expert evaluation of EERE RD3 and supporting business administration programs, both retrospective and prospective.

  15. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com; Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sone, Miyuki, E-mail: msone@me.com [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Tanaka, Ryoichi, E-mail: rtanaka@iwate-med.ac.jp; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato@iwate-med.ac.jp; Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC.

  16. CT-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: A Retrospective Evaluation in 177 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Akio; Kato, Kenichi; Suzuki, Michiko; Sone, Miyuki; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the technical success rate and adverse events (AEs) associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous gastrostomy for patients with head and neck cancer (HNC).Materials and MethodsThis retrospective study included patients with HNC who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy between February 2007 and December 2013. Information regarding the patients’ backgrounds, CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy techniques, technical success rate, and AEs were obtained from the medical records. In all patients, the stomach was punctured under CT fluoroscopy with a Funada gastropexy device.ResultsDuring the study period, 177 patients underwent CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy. The most common tumor location was the oral cavity, followed by the pharynx and maxilla. The indication for CT-guided percutaneous gastrostomy were tumor obstruction in 78 patients, postoperative dysphagia in 55 patients, radiation edema in 43 patients, and cerebral infarction in 1 patient. The technical success rate was 97.7 %. The overall mean procedure time was 25.3 min. Major AEs occurred in seven patients (4.0 %), including bleeding (n = 4), colonic injury (n = 1), gastric tear (n = 1), and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Minor AEs occurred in 15 patients (8.5 %), which included peristomal leakage (n = 6), irritation (n = 4), inadvertent removal (n = 2), peristomal hemorrhage (n = 1), peristomal infection (n = 1), and wound granulation (n = 1). The mean follow-up period was 111 days (range 1–1106 days).ConclusionOur study suggests that CT-guided gastrostomy may be suitable in patients with HNC

  17. The Effects of Progressive Relaxation and Music on Attention, Relaxation, and Stress Responses: An Investigation of the Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Relaxation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheufele, Peter

    1999-01-01

    ...) suggested that stress management techniques have specific effects A compromise position suggests that the specific effects of relaxation techniques are superimposed upon a general relaxation response...

  18. Relaxation property of the fractional Brownian particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Litan; Lung, C.W.

    1988-08-01

    Dynamic susceptibility of a diffusion system associated with the fractional Brownian motion (fBm) was examined for the fractal property of the Non-Debye relaxation process. The comparisons between fBm and other approaches were made. Anomalous diffusion and the Non-Debye relaxation processes were discussed with this approach. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  19. Lifshitz quasinormal modes and relaxation from holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, Watse|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/369283074; Vandoren, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830739

    2015-01-01

    We obtain relaxation times for field theories with Lifshitz scaling and with holographic duals Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton gravity theories. This is done by computing quasinormal modes of a bulk scalar field in the presence of Lifshitz black branes. We determine the relation between relaxation time and

  20. Superparamagnetic relaxation of weakly interacting particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Tronc, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    The influence of particle interactions on the superparamagnetic relaxation time has been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy in samples of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles with different particle sizes and particle separations. It is found that the relaxation time decreases with decreasing particl...

  1. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    J. Astrophys. Astr. (2000) 21, 299 302. Models of Flux Tubes from Constrained Relaxation. Α. Mangalam* & V. Krishan†, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala,. Bangalore 560 034, India. *e mail: mangalam @ iiap. ernet. in. † e mail: vinod@iiap.ernet.in. Abstract. We study the relaxation of a compressible plasma to ...

  2. Superparamagnetic relaxation in alpha-Fe particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Pedersen, Michael Stanley

    1998-01-01

    The superparamagnetic relaxation time of carbon-supported alpha-Fe particles with an average size of 3.0 Mm has been studied over a large temperature range by the use of Mossbauer spectroscopy combined with AC and DC magnetization measurements. It is found that the relaxation time varies...

  3. Baryogenesis via Elementary Goldstone Higgs Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertov, Helene; Pearce, Lauren; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We extend the relaxation mechanism to the Elementary Goldstone Higgs framework. Besides studying the allowed parameter space of the theory we add the minimal ingredients needed for the framework to be phenomenologically viable. The very nature of the extended Higgs sector allows to consider very ...... but radiatively generated, it is possible to generate the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry via the relaxation mechanism....

  4. Evaluating the Performance of a Visually Guided Hearing Aid Using a Dynamic Auditory-Visual Word Congruence Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roverud, Elin; Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R; Streeter, Timothy; Kidd, Gerald

    2017-12-15

    The "visually guided hearing aid" (VGHA), consisting of a beamforming microphone array steered by eye gaze, is an experimental device being tested for effectiveness in laboratory settings. Previous studies have found that beamforming without visual steering can provide significant benefits (relative to natural binaural listening) for speech identification in spatialized speech or noise maskers when sound sources are fixed in location. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the VGHA in listening conditions in which target speech could switch locations unpredictably, requiring visual steering of the beamforming. To address this aim, the present study tested an experimental simulation of the VGHA in a newly designed dynamic auditory-visual word congruence task. Ten young normal-hearing (NH) and 11 young hearing-impaired (HI) adults participated. On each trial, three simultaneous spoken words were presented from three source positions (-30, 0, and 30 azimuth). An auditory-visual word congruence task was used in which participants indicated whether there was a match between the word printed on a screen at a location corresponding to the target source and the spoken target word presented acoustically from that location. Performance was compared for a natural binaural condition (stimuli presented using impulse responses measured on KEMAR), a simulated VGHA condition (BEAM), and a hybrid condition that combined lowpass-filtered KEMAR and highpass-filtered BEAM information (BEAMAR). In some blocks, the target remained fixed at one location across trials, and in other blocks, the target could transition in location between one trial and the next with a fixed but low probability. Large individual variability in performance was observed. There were significant benefits for the hybrid BEAMAR condition relative to the KEMAR condition on average for both NH and HI groups when the targets were fixed. Although not apparent in the averaged data, some

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Dual-Energy Imaging in Patients Undergoing Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: Initial Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherertz, Tracy; Hoggarth, Mark; Luce, Jason; Block, Alec M.; Nagda, Suneel; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective feasibility study was conducted to investigate the utility of dual-energy (DE) imaging compared to conventional x-ray imaging for patients undergoing kV-based image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved feasibility study enrolled patients with lung cancer undergoing IGRT and was initiated in September 2011. During daily setup, 2 sequential respiration-gated x-ray images were obtained using an on-board imager. Imaging was composed of 1 standard x-ray image at 120 kVp (1 mAs) and a second image obtained at 60 kVp (4 mAs). Weighted logarithmic subtraction of the 2 images was performed offline to create a soft tissue-selective DE image. Conventional and DE images were evaluated by measuring relative contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and also by comparing spatial localization, using both approaches. Imaging dose was assessed using a calibrated ion chamber. Results: To date, 10 patients with stage IA to IIIA lung cancer were enrolled and 57 DE images were analyzed. DE subtraction resulted in complete suppression of overlying bone in all 57 DE images, with an average improvement in relative contrast of 4.7 ± 3.3 over that of 120 kVp x-ray images (P<.0002). The improvement in relative contrast with DE imaging was seen for both smaller (gross tumor volume [GTV] ≤5 cc) and larger tumors (GTV >5 cc), with average relative contrast improvement ratios of 3.4 ± 4.1 and 5.4 ± 3.6, respectively. Moreover, the GTV was reliably localized in 95% of the DE images versus 74% of the single energy (SE images, (P=.004). Mean skin dose per DE image set was 0.44 ± 0.03 mGy versus 0.43 ± 0.03 mGy, using conventional kV imaging parameters. Conclusions: Initial results of this feasibility study suggest that DE thoracic imaging may enhance tumor localization in lung cancer patients receiving kV-based IGRT without increasing imaging dose

  6. Stress relaxation under cyclic electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystrov, L.N.; Reznitskij, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of deformation process in a relaxating sample under 2 MeV electron cyclic irradiation was studied experimentally. The Al-Mg alloys with controllable and different (in dislocation density precipitate presence and their character) structure were used in experiments. It was established that after the beam was switched on the deformation rate increased sharply and then, during prolonged irradiation, in a gradual manner. After the switching-off the relaxation rate decreases by jumps up to values close to extrapolated rates of pre-radiation relaxation. The exhibition of these effects with radiation switching-off and switchin-on is dependent on the initial rate of thermal relaxation, the test temperature, the preliminary cold deformation and the dominating deformation dislocation mechanism. The preliminary cold deformation and test temperature elevation slightly decrease the effect of instantaneous relaxation acceleration with the irradiation switch-on. 17 refs., 5 figs

  7. Anomalous enthalpy relaxation in vitreous silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here, we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy...... relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hyperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas...... the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica....

  8. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... is found in both cases. Furthermore, the rotational energy relaxation of H2O in liquid water is studied via simulations and a power-and-work analysis. The mechanism of the energy transfer from the rotationally excited H2O molecule to its water neighbors is elucidated, i.e. the energy-accepting degrees...

  9. Cross-relaxation solid state lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipenko, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-relaxation functional diagrams provide a high quantum efficiency for pumping bands of solid state laser media and a low waste heat. A large number of the cross-relaxation mechanisms for decay rare earth excited states in crystals have been investigated. These investigations have been a starting-point for development of the cross-relaxation solid state lasers. For example, the cross-relaxation interactions, have been used for the laser action development of LiYF 4 :Gd-Tb. These interactions are important elements of the functional diagrams of the 2 μm Ho-doped media sensitized with Er and Tm and the 3 μm Er-doped media. Recently, new efficient 2 μm laser media with cross-relaxation pumping diagrams have been developed. Physical aspects of these media are the subject of this paper. A new concept of the Er-doped medium, sensitized with Yb, is illustrated

  10. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance-guided transarterial aortic valve implantation: In vitro evaluation and modification of existing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladd Mark E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is considered an attractive alternative for guiding transarterial aortic valve implantation (TAVI featuring unlimited scan plane orientation and unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization. We sought to evaluate the CMR characteristics of both currently commercially available transcatheter heart valves (Edwards SAPIEN™, Medtronic CoreValve® including their dedicated delivery devices and of a custom-built, CMR-compatible delivery device for the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis as an initial step towards real-time CMR-guided TAVI. Methods The devices were systematically examined in phantom models on a 1.5-Tesla scanner using high-resolution T1-weighted 3D FLASH, real-time TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Images were analyzed for device visualization quality, device-related susceptibility artifacts, and radiofrequency signal shielding. Results CMR revealed major susceptibility artifacts for the two commercial delivery devices caused by considerable metal braiding and precluding in vivo application. The stainless steel-based Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was also regarded not suitable for CMR-guided TAVI due to susceptibility artifacts exceeding the valve's dimensions and hindering an exact placement. In contrast, the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis was excellently visualized with delineation even of small details and, thus, regarded suitable for CMR-guided TAVI, particularly since reengineering of its delivery device toward CMR-compatibility resulted in artifact elimination and excellent visualization during catheter movement and valve deployment on real-time TrueFISP imaging. Reliable flow measurements could be performed for both stent-valves after deployment using phase-contrast sequences. Conclusions The present study shows that the Medtronic CoreValve® prosthesis is potentially suited for real-time CMR-guided placement

  11. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Curved Biopsy Device for CT-Guided Biopsy of Lesions Unreachable Using Standard Straight Needle Trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze-Hagen, Maximilian Franz, E-mail: mschulze@ukaachen.de; Pfeffer, Jochen; Zimmermann, Markus; Liebl, Martin [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stillfried, Saskia Freifrau von [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane; Bruners, Philipp; Isfort, Peter [University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the feasibility of a novel curved CT-guided biopsy needle prototype with shape memory to access otherwise not accessible biopsy targets.Methods and MaterialsA biopsy needle curved by 90° with specific radius was designed. It was manufactured using nitinol to acquire shape memory, encased in a straight guiding trocar to be driven out for access of otherwise inaccessible targets. Fifty CT-guided punctures were conducted in a biopsy phantom and 10 CT-guided punctures in a swine corpse. Biposies from porcine liver and muscle tissue were separately gained using the biopsy device, and histological examination was performed subsequently.ResultsMean time for placement of the trocar and deployment of the inner biopsy needle was ~205 ± 69 and ~93 ± 58 s, respectively, with a mean of ~4.5 ± 1.3 steps to reach adequate biopsy position. Mean distance from the tip of the needle to the target was ~0.7 ± 0.8 mm. CT-guided punctures in the swine corpse took relatively longer and required more biopsy steps (~574 ± 107 and ~380 ± 148 s, 8 ± 2.6 steps). Histology demonstrated appropriate tissue samples in nine out of ten cases (90%).ConclusionsTargets that were otherwise inaccessible via standard straight needle trajectories could be successfully reached with the curved biopsy needle prototype. Shape memory and preformed size with specific radius of the curved needle simplify the target accessibility with a low risk of injuring adjacent structures.

  12. Evaluation of a novel Seldinger-needle for computed tomography guided interventions: initial experiences; Evaluierung einer neuen Seldinger-Nadel fuer computertomografisch gesteuerte Interventionen: Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhans, C.; Mahnken, A.; Iwa, R.; Behrendt, F.F.; Sebastian, K.; Guenther, R.W.; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate a new Seldinger puncture device for computed tomography-guided interventions under difficult conditions, to analyze applicability, and to investigate assets and drawbacks. From November 2007 to March 2008, we performed CT-guided interventions in 16 patients (7 women, 9 men; mean age 62 years old) using a new 20G-Seldinger needle (Sika-Med, Wiehl, Germany). This novel needle serves as a guide for many different interventional devices due to a guide wire welded on the proximal needle end. It allows continuous application of anesthesia via four tiny holes at the distal needle end until the region of interest is reached. Each intervention was subject to difficult interventional conditions. The indications for intervention were drainage (n = 7), Trucut biopsy of tumor (n = 8) and radiofrequency ablation (n = 1). Handling, success, advantages, drawbacks, complications and patient tolerance were noted after each procedure. A pain scale from 1 - 10 was used to grade the pain level during the intervention. All interventions were performed successfully and no severe complications were observed. Patient tolerance was very good resulting in a mean pain score of 2 {+-} 1. Regions with dangerous and difficult access were successfully reached with the new Seldinger needle in 15 of 16 cases by dilatation of the puncture tract and continuous administration of local anesthesia via the system. Furthermore, different devices such as Trucut systems and a drainage catheter were able to be inserted without complication via the needle. With a proximal removable luer-lock connection, liquid material was able to be aspirated in six cases. Under difficult interventional conditions, the use of a Seldinger needle as a reliable technique for CT-guided interventions can provide a safe and successful procedure. (orig.)

  13. Creep and stress relaxation behavior of two soft denture liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2014-03-01

    Numerous investigators stated the indications of soft denture lining materials; but no one determined the indications of these materials according to their chemical structure. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of acrylic and silicon lining materials. This study investigated and compared viscoelastic properties of two resilient denture lining materials. Tested materials were laboratory processed; one of them was silicone-based liner product (Molloplast-B), and the other was plasticized acrylic resin (Vertex™ Soft). Twenty cylindrical specimens (10-20 mm in length, 11.55 mm in diameter) were fabricated in an aluminum mold from each material for creep and stress relaxation testing (the study of viscoelastic properties). Tests were performed by using the universal testing machine DY-34. Collected data were analyzed with t test statistics for statistically significant differences at the 95 % confidence level. There was a clear difference in creep and stress relaxation behavior between acrylic and silicone liners. Statistical study of Young's moduli illustrated that Vertex™ Soft was softer than Molloplast-B. On the other hand, the results explained that the recovery of silicone material was better than of acrylic one. The creep test revealed that the plasticized acrylic resin lining material exhibited considerable creep, whereas silicone-based liner exhibited elastic behavior. Besides, the stress relaxation test showed that relaxation of the plasticized acrylic resin material was bigger than of the silicone-based liner.

  14. Dielectric relaxation in Yb-doped SrZrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamishima, O; Abe, Y; Ishii, T; Kawamura, J; Hattori, T

    2004-01-01

    The dielectric constant of the proton conductor SrZr 1-x Yb x O 3 (x 0-0.1) was measured as a function of temperature and frequency. Two well-defined relaxation peaks were observed in SrZrO 3 doped with more than 1 mol% of Yb. The assignment of the two dielectric relaxations is discussed in terms of IR spectra and by free energy calculation for a miscibility of dopant Yb ions. The Yb concentration dependence of the relaxation strength of the two dielectric relaxations is in agreement with the results calculated from the free energy. The two relaxations can be assigned to a reorientation of a single Yb-OH dipole and of Yb-OH dipoles associated with Yb-clusters. The attractive energy for Yb-clustering in SrZrO 3 is evaluated at about -85 meV

  15. SU-E-I-64: Transverse Relaxation Time in Methylene Protons of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, K-H; Lee, D-W; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate transverse relaxation time of methylene resonance compared to other lipid resonances. Methods: The examinations were performed using a 3.0 T scanner with a point — resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Lipid relaxation time in a lipid phantom filled with canola oil was estimated considering repetition time (TR) as 6000 msec and echo time (TE) as 40 — 550 msec. For in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H — MRS), eight male Sprague — Dawley rats were given free access to a normal - chow (NC) and eight other male Sprague-Dawley rats were given free access to a high — fat (HF) diet. Both groups drank water ad libitum. T{sub 2} measurements in the rats’ livers were conducted at a fixed TR of 6000 msec and TE of 40 – 220 msec. Exponential curve fitting quality was calculated through the coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: A chemical analysis of phantom and liver was not performed but a T{sub 2} decay curve was acquired. The T{sub 2} relaxation time of methylene resonance was estimated as follows: NC rats, 37.07 ± 4.32 msec; HF rats, 31.43 ± 1.81 msec (p < 0.05). The extrapolated M0 values were higher in HF rats than in NC rats (p < 0.005). Conclusion: This study of {sup 1}H-MRS led to sufficient spectral resolution and signal — to — noise ratio differences to characterize all observable resonances for yielding T{sub 2} relaxation times of methylene resonance. {sup 1}H — MRS relaxation times may be useful for quantitative characterization of various liver diseases, including fatty liver disease. This study was supported by grant (2012-007883 and 2014R1A2A1A10050270) from the Mid-career Researcher Program through the NRF funded by Ministry of Science. In addition, this study was supported by the Industrial R&D of MOTIE/KEIT (10048997, Development of the core technology for integrated therapy devices based on real-time MRI-guided tumor tracking)

  16. The Effect of Relaxation Interventions on Cortisol Levels in HIV-Sero-Positive Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah; Owens, Mary; Kumar, Mahendra; Cook, Ryan; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, assessed in terms of cortisol levels, may enhance the ability of HIV to infect lymphocytes and downregulate the immune system, accelerating disease progression. This study sought to determine the effects of relaxation techniques on cortisol levels in HIV-sero-positive women. Methods Women (n = 150) were randomized to a group cognitive–behavioral stress management (CBSM) condition or an individual information condition and underwent 3 types of relaxation training (progressive muscle relaxation, imagery, and autogenic training). Cortisol levels were obtained pre- and postrelaxation. Results Guided imagery was effective in reducing cortisol in the group condition (t = 3.90, P < .001), and muscle relaxation reduced cortisol in the individual condition (t = 3.11, P = .012). Among participants in the group condition attending all sessions, the magnitude of pre- to postsession reduction became greater over time. Conclusions Results suggest that specific relaxation techniques may be partially responsible for cortisol decreases associated with relaxation and CBSM. PMID:23715264

  17. Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting with short relaxation intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, Thomas; Doneva, Mariya; Koken, Peter; Sommer, Karsten; Meineke, Jakob; Börnert, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a technique for improving the performance of Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) in repetitive sampling schemes, in particular for 3D MRF acquisition, by shortening relaxation intervals between MRF pulse train repetitions. A calculation method for MRF dictionaries adapted to short relaxation intervals and non-relaxed initial spin states is presented, based on the concept of stationary fingerprints. The method is applicable to many different k-space sampling schemes in 2D and 3D. For accuracy analysis, T 1 and T 2 values of a phantom are determined by single-slice Cartesian MRF for different relaxation intervals and are compared with quantitative reference measurements. The relevance of slice profile effects is also investigated in this case. To further illustrate the capabilities of the method, an application to in-vivo spiral 3D MRF measurements is demonstrated. The proposed computation method enables accurate parameter estimation even for the shortest relaxation intervals, as investigated for different sampling patterns in 2D and 3D. In 2D Cartesian measurements, we achieved a scan acceleration of more than a factor of two, while maintaining acceptable accuracy: The largest T 1 values of a sample set deviated from their reference values by 0.3% (longest relaxation interval) and 2.4% (shortest relaxation interval). The largest T 2 values showed systematic deviations of up to 10% for all relaxation intervals, which is discussed. The influence of slice profile effects for multislice acquisition is shown to become increasingly relevant for short relaxation intervals. In 3D spiral measurements, a scan time reduction of 36% was achieved, maintaining the quality of in-vivo T1 and T2 maps. Reducing the relaxation interval between MRF sequence repetitions using stationary fingerprint dictionaries is a feasible method to improve the scan efficiency of MRF sequences. The method enables fast implementations of 3D spatially

  18. Assessment of decay in standing timber using stress wave timing nondestructive evaluation tools : a guide for use and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Ferenc Divos; Crystal Pilon; Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Roy F. Pellerin

    2004-01-01

    This guide was prepared to assist field foresters in the use of stress wave timing instruments to locate and define areas of decay in standing timber. The first three sections provide background information, the principles of stress wave nondestructive testing, and measurement techniques for stress wave nondestructive testing. The last section is a detailed description...

  19. Histological Evaluation of Degradable Guided Bone Regeneration Membranes Prepared from Poly(trimethylene carbonate) and Biphasic Calcium Phosphate Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  20. Histological evaluation of degradable guided bone regeneration membranes prepared from poly(trimethylene carbonate) and biphasic calcium phosphate composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Ni; van Leeuwen, Anne; Bos, Ruud R.M.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2013-01-01

    In oral and maxillofacial surgery, guided bone regeneration using barrier membranes is an important strategy to treat bone defects. The currently used barrier membranes have important disadvantages. Barrier membranes prepared from resorbable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) performed as well as

  1. Assessing Online Learning Objects: Student Evaluation of a Guide on the Side Interactive Learning Tutorial Designed by SRJC Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Alicia; Dean, Ellen; Matheson, Molly

    2014-01-01

    More and more of today's scholars conduct their research in a digital realm rather than using a print collection. The University of Arizona Libraries Guide on the Side tutorial software offers an opportunity to apply the principles of active learning with real world research scenarios. This paper reports on the design and introduction of…

  2. Efficacy evaluation of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma beneath the diaphragm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song WANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the feasibility, safety and efficacy of laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beneath the diaphragm. Methods Twenty- three consecutive patients with solitary HCC beneath the diaphragm were treated by laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided RFA in the Chinese PLA General Hospital from January 2013 to March 2016. We observed the perioperative complications and followed- up long-term effect. Results All the 23 patients successfully underwent laparoscopy assisted ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation. No serious complications such as massive hemorrhage, biliary fistula and severe pleural effusion, hemopneumothorax occurred in the patients during perioperative period. CT examination 2-3 days after the operation revealed that the tumor was completely covered by the ablation area. Besides, the survival condition was satisfactory during follow-up period of 9-38 months. Conclusion Laparoscopy-assisted ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation is effective and safe for HCC beneath the diaphragm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.05.16

  3. The promise and challenge of practice-research collaborations: Guiding principles and strategies for initiating, designing, and implementing program evaluation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Mary; Abell, Melissa L; Berlin, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a set of guiding principles and strategies to facilitate the collaborative efforts of social work researchers and practitioners as they initiate, design, and implement outcome evaluations of human service interventions and programs. Beginning with an exploration of the interpersonal barriers to practice-research collaborations, and building on their experiences in successfully completing a community-based research evaluation, the authors identify specific relationship-focused principles and strategies and illustrate how these approaches can guide practice-research teams through the various sequential activities of the evaluation research process. In particular, it is suggested that practice-research collaborations can be formed, strengthened, and sustained by emphasis on a spirit of discovery and shared leadership at the start of the relationship, use of a comprehensive evaluation model to clarify and frame the evaluation and program goals, beginning where the client is when selecting research methodology and measurement tools, commitment to keeping the program first and recording everything during the implementation and data-collection stages, discussion of emerging findings and presentation of findings in graphic format at the data-analysis stage, and a total team approach at the dissemination stage.

  4. Corroborative evidences of TV γ -scaling of the α-relaxation originating from the primitive relaxation/JG β relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, K. L.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    Successful thermodynamic scaling of the structural alpha-relaxation time or transport coefficients of glass-forming liquids determined at various temperatures T and pressures P means the data conform to a single function of the product variable TVgamma, where V is the specific volume and gamma is a material specific constant. In the past two decades we have witnessed successful TVgamma-scaling in many molecular, polymeric, and even metallic glass-formers, and gamma is related to the slope of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential. The advances made indicate TVgamma-scaling is an important aspect of the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of glass-formers. In this paper we show the origin of TVgamma-scaling is not from the structural alpha-relaxation time. Instead it comes from its precursor, the Johari-Goldstein beta-relaxation or the primitive relaxation of the Coupling Model and their relaxation times or tau_0 respectively. It is remarkable that all relaxation times are functions of TVgamma with the same gama, as well as the fractional exponent of the Kohlrausch correlation function of the structural alpha-relaxation. We arrive at this conclusion convincingly based on corroborative evidences from a number of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations performed on a wide variety of glass-formers and in conjunction with consistency with the predictions of the Coupling Model.

  5. Relaxing a large cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Florian; Sola, Joan; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological constant (CC) problem is the biggest enigma of theoretical physics ever. In recent times, it has been rephrased as the dark energy (DE) problem in order to encompass a wider spectrum of possibilities. It is, in any case, a polyhedric puzzle with many faces, including the cosmic coincidence problem, i.e. why the density of matter ρ m is presently so close to the CC density ρ Λ . However, the oldest, toughest and most intriguing face of this polyhedron is the big CC problem, namely why the measured value of ρ Λ at present is so small as compared to any typical density scale existing in high energy physics, especially taking into account the many phase transitions that our Universe has undergone since the early times, including inflation. In this Letter, we propose to extend the field equations of General Relativity by including a class of invariant terms that automatically relax the value of the CC irrespective of the initial size of the vacuum energy in the early epochs. We show that, at late times, the Universe enters an eternal de Sitter stage mimicking a tiny positive cosmological constant. Thus, these models could be able to solve the big CC problem without fine-tuning and have also a bearing on the cosmic coincidence problem. Remarkably, they mimic the ΛCDM model to a large extent, but they still leave some characteristic imprints that should be testable in the next generation of experiments.

  6. The effects of progressive muscle relaxation and autogenic relaxation on young soccer players' mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players' mood states.

  7. The Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Autogenic Relaxation on Young Soccer Players’ Mood States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hairul Anuar; Hanafi@Ahmad Yusof, Hazwani

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to compare the effects of two different relaxation techniques, namely progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and autogenic relaxation (AGR) on moods of young soccer players. Methods Sixteen adolescent athletes (mean age: 14.1 ± 1.3) received either PMR or AGR training. Using Profile of Mood States- Adolescents, their mood states were measured one week before relaxation training, before the first relaxation session, and after the twelfth relaxation session. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed no significant interaction effects and no significant main effects in any of the subscales. However, significant main effects for testing sessions were found for confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscales. Post hoc tests revealed post-intervention reductions in the confusion, depression, fatigue, and tension subscale scores. Conclusion These two relaxation techniques induce equivalent mood responses and may be used to regulate young soccer players’ mood states. PMID:22375225

  8. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training. PMID:18518981

  9. Development of stress relaxation measurement by a small size C-ring specimen method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimanuki, Shizuka; Nakata, Kiyotomo; Kasahara, Shigeki; Kuniya, Jiro

    2002-01-01

    A stress relaxation measurement method has been developed by using C-ring specimens, and a specimen size effect has been evaluated taking radiation-induced stress relaxation into consideration. C-ring specimens were stressed by forcing a wedge in the gap. Giving an appropriate eccentric configuration in the half of the ring opposite the gap, the stress gradient along the circumference was eliminated in the section and the stress level could be varied by changing the gap spacing. The validity of the C-ring test method was confirmed by thermally stress relaxation experiments at annealing temperatures from 300 to 600degC for 1 min to 200 h in carbon steel: considerable stress relaxation could be measured for all levels of applied stress even at relatively low annealing temperatures. The relaxation results obtained from the C-ring test were in good agreement with those from a uniaxial tensile stress relaxation test. The smaller C-ring specimen with about 40 mm diameter, which is required for radiation-induced stress relaxation test, also showed adequate accuracy on stress relaxation at 600 to 830degC in stainless steel, compared with the large size C-ring specimen test. (author)

  10. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2008-06-02

    Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. All studies (1997-2007), both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation) for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68) in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634) in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  11. Relaxation training for anxiety: a ten-years systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelnuovo Gianluca

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relaxation training is a common treatment for anxiety problems. Lacking is a recent quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after relaxation treatment. Methods All studies (1997–2007, both RCT, observational and without control group, evaluating the efficacy of relaxation training (Jacobson's progressive relaxation, autogenic training, applied relaxation and meditation for anxiety problems and disorders were identified by comprehensive electronic searches with Pubmed, Psychinfo and Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews. Our primary outcome was anxiety measured with psychometric questionnaires. Meta-analysis was undertaken synthesizing the data from all trials, distinguishing within and between effect sizes. Results 27 studies qualified for the inclusion in the meta-analysis. As hypothesized, relaxation training showed a medium-large effect size in the treatment of anxiety. Cohen's d was .57 (95% CI: .52 to .68 in the within analysis and .51 (95% CI: .46 to .634 in the between group analysis. Efficacy was higher for meditation, among volunteers and for longer treatments. Implications and limitations are discussed. Conclusion The results show consistent and significant efficacy of relaxation training in reducing anxiety. This meta-analysis extends the existing literature through facilitation of a better understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety improvement subsequent to relaxation training.

  12. PP092. Satisfaction and experiences of pregnant hypertensive women participating in a feasibility study of guided imagery effects on blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, F Wight; Hodnett, E; Esplen, M J; Watt-Watson, J

    2012-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are associated with maternal and perinatal health risk. Some studies have demonstrated blood pressure reduction from the use of relaxation therapies, although previous study in pregnancy was limited. We undertook a RCT to determine the effects of guided imagery relaxation on BP and anxiety in hypertensive women during pregnancy, to answer feasibility questions for a larger trial. This presentation will describe experiences and satisfaction with study participation, as reported by women in our study. Pregnant women with hypertension (n=69) were randomized to two daily periods of guided imagery or quiet rest, for 4weeks or until delivery, whichever came first. Participants provided compliance data and evaluated guided imagery each week, and completed postpartum questionnaires about their satisfaction with study participation. Sixty women completed at least one week in the study. Compliance with allocated group conditions was high. Most women were satisfied with their allocation; 83.3% would choose to be in the study again. A greater proportion (42.4%) indicated that the study reassured them, compared to 3.4% who felt it added to their worry. Of those in the Guided Imagery group providing ratings, more than 75% reported enjoyment and ease of use. Most indicated they would use it for future hypertension in pregnancy and for stress, and would recommend it to others. Our results suggest that Guided Imagery may moderate BP increases in pregnant women with hypertension. However, success of any clinical intervention requires a high degree of patient compliance and acceptability. Guided imagery was acceptable, based on reported use and intent to use it for future stress and hypertension. Guided imagery can be used by hypertensive pregnant women to promote relaxation. Further research is required to determine whether it can improve physical and psychological health outcomes during pregnancy, birthing and postpartum. Copyright © 2012

  13. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-01-01

    /R) directions, respectively. In the treatment protocol, adjustment of couch was guided by US images. Residual setup errors as assessed by kV images were found to be: μ residual = (−0.4, 0.2, 0.2) mm, Σ residual = (1.0, 1.0,0.7) mm, and σ residual = (2.5, 2.3, 1.8) mm. Intrafraction prostate motion, evaluated using electromagnetic transponders, was: μ intrafxn = (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) mm, Σ intrafxn = (1.3, 1.5, 0.6) mm, and σ intrafxn = (2.6, 2.4, 1.4) mm. Shifts between pre- and post-treatment kV images were: μ kV(post–pre) = (−0.3, 0.8, −0.2), Σ kV(post–pre) = (2.4, 2.7, 2.1) mm, and σ kV(post–pre) = (2.7, 3.2, 3.1) mm. Relative to skin tattoos, planning margins for setup error were within 10–11 mm for all image-based modalities. The use of image guidance was shown to reduce these margins to less than 5 mm. Margins to compensate for both residual setup (interfraction) errors as well as intrafraction motion were 6.6, 6.8, and 3.9 mm in the A/P, S/I, and L/R directions, respectively. Conclusions: Analysis of interfraction setup errors, performed with US, CBCT, planar kV images, and electromagnetic transponders, from a large dataset revealed intermodality shifts were comparable (within 3–4 mm). Interfraction planning margins, relative to setup based on skin marks, were generally within the 10 mm prostate-to-planning target volume margin used in our clinic. With image guidance, interfraction residual planning margins were reduced to approximately less than 4 mm. These findings are potentially important for dose escalation studies using smaller margins to better protect normal tissues.

  14. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Lu Mei [Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States); Stricker, Hans [Department of Urology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    -posterior (A/P), superior-inferior (S/I), and the left-right (L/R) directions, respectively. In the treatment protocol, adjustment of couch was guided by US images. Residual setup errors as assessed by kV images were found to be: {mu}{sub residual}= (-0.4, 0.2, 0.2) mm, {Sigma}{sub residual}= (1.0, 1.0,0.7) mm, and {sigma}{sub residual}= (2.5, 2.3, 1.8) mm. Intrafraction prostate motion, evaluated using electromagnetic transponders, was: {mu}{sub intrafxn}= (0.0, 0.0, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (1.3, 1.5, 0.6) mm, and {sigma}{sub intrafxn}= (2.6, 2.4, 1.4) mm. Shifts between pre- and post-treatment kV images were: {mu}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (-0.3, 0.8, -0.2), {Sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.4, 2.7, 2.1) mm, and {sigma}{sub kV(post-pre)}= (2.7, 3.2, 3.1) mm. Relative to skin tattoos, planning margins for setup error were within 10-11 mm for all image-based modalities. The use of image guidance was shown to reduce these margins to less than 5 mm. Margins to compensate for both residual setup (interfraction) errors as well as intrafraction motion were 6.6, 6.8, and 3.9 mm in the A/P, S/I, and L/R directions, respectively. Conclusions: Analysis of interfraction setup errors, performed with US, CBCT, planar kV images, and electromagnetic transponders, from a large dataset revealed intermodality shifts were comparable (within 3-4 mm). Interfraction planning margins, relative to setup based on skin marks, were generally within the 10 mm prostate-to-planning target volume margin used in our clinic. With image guidance, interfraction residual planning margins were reduced to approximately less than 4 mm. These findings are potentially important for dose escalation studies using smaller margins to better protect normal tissues.

  15. Correlation of carrier localization with relaxation time distribution and electrical conductivity relaxation in silver-nanoparticle-embedded moderately doped polypyrrole nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swarup; Dutta, Bula; Bhattacharya, Subhratanu

    2014-02-01

    The electrical conductivity relaxation in moderately doped polypyrrole and its nanocomposites reinforced with different proportion of silver nanoparticles was investigated in both frequency and time domain. An analytical distribution function of relaxation times is constructed from the results obtained in the frequency domain formalism and is used to evaluate the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) type decay function in the time domain. The thermal evolution of different relaxation parameters was analyzed. The temperature-dependent dc electrical conductivity, estimated from the average conductivity relaxation time is observed to depend strongly on the nanoparticle loading and follows Mott three-dimensional variable range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism. The extent of charge carrier localization calculated from the VRH mechanism is well correlated to the evidences obtained from the structural characterizations of different nanostructured samples.

  16. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  17. Relaxation of polarized nuclei in superconducting rhodium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuuttila, T.A.; Tuoriniemi, J.T.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates were measured in normal and superconducting (sc) rhodium with nuclear polarizations up to p = 0.55. This was sufficient to influence the sc state of Rh, whose T, and B-c, are exceptionally low. Because B-c ... is unchanged, the nuclear spin entropy was fully sustained across the sc transition. The relaxation in the sc state was slower at all temperatures without the coherence enhancement close to T-c. Nonzero nuclear polarization strongly reduced the difference between the relaxation rates in the sc and normal...

  18. Spin relaxation in nanowires by hyperfine coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria-Arrondo, C.; Sherman, E.Ya.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperfine interactions establish limits on spin dynamics and relaxation rates in ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots. It is the confinement of electrons which determines nonzero hyperfine coupling and leads to the spin relaxation. As a result, in nanowires one would expect the vanishing of this effect due to extended electron states. However, even for relatively clean wires, disorder plays a crucial role and makes electron localization sufficient to cause spin relaxation on the time scale of the order of 10 ns. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  20. Universal Mechanism of Spin Relaxation in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene

    2006-03-01

    Conventional elastic theory ignores internal local twists and torques. Meantime, spin-lattice relaxation is inherently coupled with local elastic twists through conservation of the total angular momentum (spin + lattice). This coupling gives universal lower bound (free of fitting parameters) on the relaxation of the atomic or molecular spin in a solid [1] and on the relaxation of the electron spin in a quantum dot [2]. [1] E. M. Chudnovsky, D. A. Garanin, and R. Schilling, Phys. Rev. B 72, 094426 (2005). [2] C. Calero, E. M. Chudnovsky, and D. A. Garanin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166603 (2005).

  1. Collisional relaxation of electron tail distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Masao.

    1985-05-01

    Relaxation due to the Coulomb collisions of the electron velocity distribution function with a high energy tail is investigated in detail. In the course of the relaxation, a 'saddle' point can be created in velocity space owing to upsilon -3 dependence of the deflection rate and a positive slope or a 'dip' appears in the tail direction. The time evolution of the electron tail is studied analytically. A comparison is made with numerical results by using a Fokker-Planck code. Also discussed is the kinetic instability concerned with the positive slope during the relaxation. (author)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Barker, G J; MacKay, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The theory of relaxation processes and their measurements are described. An overview is presented of the literature on relaxation time measurements in the normal and the developing brain, in experimental diseases in animals, and in patients with multiple sclerosis. RESULTS...... AND CONCLUSION: Relaxation time measurements provide insight into development of multiple sclerosis plaques, especially the occurrence of oedema, demyelination, and gliosis. There is also evidence that normal appearing white matter in patients with multiple sclerosis is affected. What is now needed are fast...

  3. Stress Relaxation in Entangled Polymer Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Ji-Xuan; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    We present an extensive set of simulation results for the stress relaxation in equilibrium and step-strained bead-spring polymer melts. The data allow us to explore the chain dynamics and the shear relaxation modulus, G(t), into the plateau regime for chains with Z=40 entanglements...... and into the terminal relaxation regime for Z=10. Using the known (Rouse) mobility of unentangled chains and the melt entanglement length determined via the primitive path analysis of the microscopic topological state of our systems, we have performed parameter-free tests of several different tube models. We find...

  4. Slow relaxation in weakly open rational polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokshenev, Valery B; Vicentini, Eduardo

    2003-07-01

    The interplay between the regular (piecewise-linear) and irregular (vertex-angle) boundary effects in nonintegrable rational polygonal billiards (of m equal sides) is discussed. Decay dynamics in polygons (of perimeter P(m) and small opening Delta) is analyzed through the late-time survival probability S(m) approximately equal t(-delta). Two distinct slow relaxation channels are established. The primary universal channel exhibits relaxation of regular sliding orbits, with delta=1. The secondary channel is given by delta>1 and becomes open when m>P(m)/Delta. It originates from vertex order-disorder dual effects and is due to relaxation of chaoticlike excitations.

  5. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  6. Multicenter study for the evaluation of a dedicated biopsy device for MR-guided vacuum biopsy of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlet, C.; Sittek, H.; Schneider, P.; Reiser, M.; Heinig, A.; Stets, C.; Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Prat, X.; Lamarque, J.; Taourel, P.; Casselman, J.; Baath, L.; Anderson, I.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to determine the accuracy and clinical value of a dedicated breast biopsy system which allows for MR-guided vacuum biopsy (VB) of contrast-enhancing lesions. In five European centers, MR-guided 11-gauge VB was performed on 341 lesions. In 7 cases VB was unsuccessful. This was immediately realized on postinterventional images or direct follow-up combined with histopathology-imaging correlation; thus, a false-negative diagnosis was avoided. Histology of 334 successful biopsies yielded 84 (25%) malignancies, 17 (5%) atypical ductal hyperplasias, and 233 (70%) benign entities. Verification of malignant or borderline lesions included reexcision of the biopsy cavity. Benign histologic biopsy results were verified by retrospective correlation with the pre- and postinterventional MRI and by subsequent follow-up. Our results indicate that MR-guided VB, in combination with the dedicated biopsy coil, offers the possibility to accurately diagnose even very small lesions that can only be visualized or localized by MRI. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation and rational design of guide RNAs for efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in Ciona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Shashank; Haeussler, Maximilian; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Christiaen, Lionel; Stolfi, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has emerged as an important tool for various genome engineering applications. A current obstacle to high throughput applications of CRISPR/Cas9 is the imprecise prediction of highly active single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). We previously implemented the CRISPR/Cas9 system to induce tissue-specific mutations in the tunicate Ciona. In the present study, we designed and tested 83 single guide RNA (sgRNA) vectors targeting 23 genes expressed in the cardiopharyngeal progenitors and surrounding tissues of Ciona embryo. Using high-throughput sequencing of mutagenized alleles, we identified guide sequences that correlate with sgRNA mutagenesis activity and used this information for the rational design of all possible sgRNAs targeting the Ciona transcriptome. We also describe a one-step cloning-free protocol for the assembly of sgRNA expression cassettes. These cassettes can be directly electroporated as unpurified PCR products into Ciona embryos for sgRNA expression in vivo, resulting in high frequency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in somatic cells of electroporated embryos. We found a strong correlation between the frequency of an Ebf loss-of-function phenotype and the mutagenesis efficacies of individual Ebf-targeting sgRNAs tested using this method. We anticipate that our approach can be scaled up to systematically design and deliver highly efficient sgRNAs for the tissue-specific investigation of gene functions in Ciona. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDoseTM MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Coffey, Charles W

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  9. Time evaluation of image-guided radiotherapy in patients with spinal bone metastases. A single-center study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, H.; Habermehl, D.; Schubert, K.; Debus, J.; Combs, S.E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Time is an important factor during immobilization for radiotherapy (RT) of painful spinal bone metastases. The different RT techniques currently in use have differing impacts on medical staff requirements, treatment planning and radiation delivery. This prospective analysis aimed to evaluate time management during RT of patients with spine metastases, focusing particularly on the impact of image-guided RT (IGRT). Between 21 March 2013 and 17 June 2013, we prospectively documented the time associated with the core work procedures involving the patient during the first day of RT at three different linear accelerators (LINACs). The study included 30 patients; 10 in each of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 were treated with a single photon field in the posterior-anterior direction; group 3 received a three-dimensional conformal treatment plan. The median overall durations of one treatment session were 24 and 25.5 min for the conventional RT groups and 15 min for IGRT group. The longest single procedure was patient immobilization in group 1 (median 9.5 min), whereas this was image registration and matching in groups 2 and 3 (median duration 9.5 and 5 min, respectively). Duration of irradiation (beam-on time) was similar for all groups at 4 or 5 min. The shortest immobilization procedure was observed in group 3 with a median of 3 min, compared to 4 min in group 2 and 9.5 min in group 1. With this analysis, we have shown for the first time that addition of modern IGRT does not extend the overall treatment time for patients with painful bone metastases and can be applied as part of clinical routine in a palliative setting. The choice of treatment technique should be based upon the patient's performance status, as well as the size of the target volume and location of the metastasis. (orig.) [German] Der Zeitfaktor ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil bei der Immobilisation waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) bei schmerzhaften Knochenmetastasen der Wirbelsaeule. Unterschiedliche RT

  10. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA issues Safety Requirements and Safety Guides pertaining to nuclear power plants and activities in the field of nuclear energy, on the basis of its Safety Fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations. The present Safety Guide, which supplements the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, concerns the effects of a nuclear power plant on the surrounding region and the consideration of population distribution in the siting of a plant. This Safety Guide makes recommendations on how to meet the requirements of the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, on the basis of knowledge of the mechanisms for the dispersion of effluents discharged into the atmosphere and into surface water and groundwater. Relevant site characteristics and safety considerations are discussed. Population distribution, the projected population growth rate, particular geographical features, the capabilities of local transport networks and communications networks, industry and agriculture in the region, and recreational and institutional activities in the region should be considered in assessing the feasibility of developing an emergency response plan. In the selection of a site for a facility using radioactive material, such as a nuclear power plant, account should be taken of any local features that might be affected by the facility and of the feasibility of off-site intervention, including emergency response and protective actions. This is in addition to the evaluation of any features of the site itself that might affect the safety of the facility. This Safety Guide recommends methods for the assessment of regional and local characteristics. This Safety Guide supersedes four earlier IAEA Safety Guides, namely: Atmospheric Dispersion in Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S3 (1980)); Site Selection and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plants with Respect to Population Distribution (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S4 (1980)); Hydrological

  11. Dispersion of radioactive material in air and water and consideration of population distribution in site evaluation for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA issues Safety Requirements and Safety Guides pertaining to nuclear power plants and activities in the field of nuclear energy, on the basis of its Safety Fundamentals publication on The Safety of Nuclear Installations. The present Safety Guide, which supplements the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, concerns the effects of a nuclear power plant on the surrounding region and the consideration of population distribution in the siting of a plant. This Safety Guide makes recommendations on how to meet the requirements of the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Siting, on the basis of knowledge of the mechanisms for the dispersion of effluents discharged into the atmosphere and into surface water and groundwater. Relevant site characteristics and safety considerations are discussed. Population distribution, the projected population growth rate, particular geographical features, the capabilities of local transport networks and communications networks, industry and agriculture in the region, and recreational and institutional activities in the region should be considered in assessing the feasibility of developing an emergency response plan. In the selection of a site for a facility using radioactive material, such as a nuclear power plant, account should be taken of any local features that might be affected by the facility and of the feasibility of off-site intervention, including emergency response and protective actions. This is in addition to the evaluation of any features of the site itself that might affect the safety of the facility. This Safety Guide recommends methods for the assessment of regional and local characteristics. This Safety Guide supersedes four earlier IAEA Safety Guides, namely: Atmospheric Dispersion in Nuclear Power Plant Siting (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S3 (1980)). Site Selection and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plants with Respect to Population Distribution (Safety Series No. 50-SG-S4 (1980)). Hydrological

  12. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm. The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap.

  13. CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour cutting needle biopsy: retrospective evaluation of diagnostic yield, safety, and risk factors for diagnostic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Hiraki, Takao; Matsui, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Jun; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Gobara, Hideo; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the diagnostic yield, safety, and risk factors for diagnostic failure of computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy. Biopsies were performed for 208 tumours (mean diameter 2.3 cm; median diameter 2.1 cm; range 0.9-8.5 cm) in 199 patients. One hundred and ninety-nine tumours were ≤4 cm. All 208 initial procedures were divided into diagnostic success and failure groups. Multiple variables related to the patients, lesions, and procedures were assessed to determine the risk factors for diagnostic failure. After performing 208 initial and nine repeat biopsies, 180 malignancies and 15 benign tumours were pathologically diagnosed, whereas 13 were not diagnosed. In 117 procedures, 118 Grade I and one Grade IIIa adverse events (AEs) occurred. Neither Grade ≥IIIb AEs nor tumour seeding were observed within a median follow-up period of 13.7 months. Logistic regression analysis revealed only small tumour size (≤1.5 cm; odds ratio 3.750; 95% confidence interval 1.362-10.326; P = 0.011) to be a significant risk factor for diagnostic failure. CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy is a safe procedure with a high diagnostic yield. A small tumour size (≤1.5 cm) is a significant risk factor for diagnostic failure. • CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy has a high diagnostic yield. • CT fluoroscopy-guided renal tumour biopsy is safe. • Small tumour size (≤1.5 cm) is a risk factor for diagnostic failure.

  14. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking.......To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  15. Relaxation processes during amorphous metal alloys heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinochka, E.Ya.; Durachenko, A.M.; Borisov, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    Behaviour of Te+15 at.%Ge and Fe+13 at.%P+7 at.%C amorphous metal alloys during heating has been studied using the method of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the most convenient one for determination of the value of heat effects, activation energies, temperature ranges of relaxation processes. Thermal effects corresponding to high-temperature relaxation processes taking place during amorphous metal alloys (AMA) heating are detected. The change of ratio of relaxation peaks values on DSC curves as a result of AMA heat treatment can be explained by the presence of a number of levels of inner energy in amorphous system, separated with potential barriers, the heights of which correspond to certain activation energies of relaxation processes

  16. The relaxation of plasmas with dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutov, Yu.I.; Kravchenko, A.Yu.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Various parameters of relaxing plasmas with dust particles including the electron and ion energy distributions function are numerically simulated at various parameters of the dust particles using the PIC method and taking into account the dynamics of the dust particle charge without the assumption about the equilibrium of electrons and ions. Coulomb collisions are taken into account in the framework of the method of stochastic differential equations. The relaxation of bounded plasma clouds expanding into a vacuum as well as the relaxation of a uniform plasma, in which dust particles appear at some initial time, are investigated. The obtained results show that the relaxation of plasmas can be accompanied by a deviation of the ion distribution function from equilibrium as well as a change of the mean energy of electrons and ions because of the dependence of the collection of electrons and ions by dust particles on their energy. (author)

  17. Multiscale dipole relaxation in dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Dipole relaxation from thermally induced perturbations is investigated on different length scales for dielectric materials. From the continuum dynamical equations for the polarisation, expressions for the transverse and longitudinal dipole autocorrelation functions are derived in the limit where ...

  18. Generalized approach to non-exponential relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-exponential relaxation is a universal feature of systems as diverse as glasses, spin ... which changes from a simple exponential to a stretched exponential and a power law by increasing the constraints in the system. ... Current Issue

  19. Oxygen-17 relaxation in aqueous agarose gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablett, S.; Lillford, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation of oxygen-17 in H 2 17 O enriched agarose gels shows that existing explanations of water behaviour are oversimplified. Satisfactory models must include at least three proton phases, two of which involve water molecules. (Auth.)

  20. Relaxation and hypnosis in pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, B

    1996-01-01

    Relaxation and hypnosis are methods which, may solve the problem of extreme dental anxiety, when all other methods, behavioral or pharmacological may not be used. A simple definition of hypnosis is suggestion and repetition. Suggestion is the process whereby an individual accepts a proposition put to him by another, without having the slightest logical reason for doing so. Relaxation is one method of inducing hypnosis. A case of using hypnosis on an 11-year-old boy is described.

  1. Ghost lines in Moessbauer relaxation spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The appearance in Moessbauer relaxation spectra of 'ghost' lines, which are narrow lines that do not correspond to transitions between real hyperfine energy levels of the resonant system, is examined. It is shown that in many cases of interest, the appearance of these 'ghost' lines can be interpreted in terms of the relaxational averaging of one or more of the static interactions of the ion. (orig.)

  2. Dynamics of helicity transport and Taylor relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Malkov, M.

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of the dynamics of Taylor relaxation is derived using symmetry principles alone. No statistical closure approximations are invoked or detailed plasma model properties assumed. Notably, the model predicts several classes of nondiffusive helicity transport phenomena, including traveling nonlinear waves and superdiffusive turbulent pulses. A universal expression for the scaling of the effective magnetic Reynolds number of a system undergoing Taylor relaxation is derived. Some basic properties of intermittency in helicity transport are examined

  3. Regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manukova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental data, characterizing the regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation in the polycrystalline Mo-N 2 system at 77 K are given. The method of molecular beam has been used in the investigation. The analytical expressions of change regularity in the relaxation process of full and specific rates - of transition from intermediate state into ''non-reversible'', of desorption into the gas phase and accumUlation of the particles in the intermediate state are obtained

  4. Relaxation of synchronization on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong; Hong, Hyunsuk

    2008-07-01

    We study collective synchronization in a large number of coupled oscillators on various complex networks. In particular, we focus on the relaxation dynamics of the synchronization, which is important from the viewpoint of information transfer or the dynamics of system recovery from a perturbation. We measure the relaxation time tau that is required to establish global synchronization by varying the structural properties of the networks. It is found that the relaxation time in a strong-coupling regime (K>Kc) logarithmically increases with network size N , which is attributed to the initial random phase fluctuation given by O(N-1/2) . After elimination of the initial-phase fluctuation, the relaxation time is found to be independent of the system size; this implies that the local interaction that depends on the structural connectivity is irrelevant in the relaxation dynamics of the synchronization in the strong-coupling regime. The relaxation dynamics is analytically derived in a form independent of the system size, and it exhibits good consistency with numerical simulations. As an application, we also explore the recovery dynamics of the oscillators when perturbations enter the system.

  5. Stress relaxation in viscous soft spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschan, Julia; Vasudevan, Siddarth A; Boukany, Pouyan E; Somfai, Ellák; Tighe, Brian P

    2017-10-04

    We report the results of molecular dynamics simulations of stress relaxation tests in athermal viscous soft sphere packings close to their unjamming transition. By systematically and simultaneously varying both the amplitude of the applied strain step and the pressure of the initial condition, we access both linear and nonlinear response regimes and control the distance to jamming. Stress relaxation in viscoelastic solids is characterized by a relaxation time τ* that separates short time scales, where viscous loss is substantial, from long time scales, where elastic storage dominates and the response is essentially quasistatic. We identify two distinct plateaus in the strain dependence of the relaxation time, one each in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The height of both plateaus scales as an inverse power law with the distance to jamming. By probing the time evolution of particle velocities during relaxation, we further identify a correlation between mechanical relaxation in the bulk and the degree of non-affinity in the particle velocities on the micro scale.

  6. Relaxation strain measurements in cellular dislocation structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.Y.; Quesnel, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The conventional picture of what happens during a stress relaxation usually involves imagining the response of a single dislocation to a steadily decreasing stress. The velocity of this dislocation decreases with decreasing stress in such a way that we can measure the stress dependence of the dislocation velocity. Analysis of the data from a different viewpoint enables us to calculate the apparent activation volume for the motion of the dislocation under the assumption of thermally activated glie. Conventional thinking about stress relaxation, however, does not consider the eventual fate of this dislocation. If the stress relaxes to a low enough level, it is clear that the dislocation must stop. This is consistent with the idea that we can determine the stress dependence of the dislocation velocity from relaxation data only for those cases where the dislocation's velocity is allowed to approach zero asymptotically, in short, for those cases where the dislocation never stops. This conflict poses a dilemma for the experimentalist. In real crystals, however, obstacles impede the dislocation's progress so that those dislocations which are stopped at a given stress will probably never resume motion under the influence of the steadily declining stress present during relaxation. Thus one could envision stress relaxation as a process of exhaustion of mobile dislocations, rather than a process of decreasing dislocation velocity. Clearly both points of view have merit and in reality both mechanisms contribute to the phenomena

  7. Tensile, creep and relaxation characteristics of zircaloy cladding at 3850C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murty, K.L.; McDonald, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Axial creep tests were carried out at stresses ranging form 30 ksi to 50 ksi. Steady-state creep rates were evaluated from stress change tests to minimize the number of samples. The secondary creep rate was related to the applied stress through a Sinh function. The functional dependence of the strain rate on the stress was also evaluated from load relaxation tests. It is demonstrated that the strain rates derived from load relaxation tests are identical to the creep data when the relaxation testing was carried out at the point of maximum load in a tensile test. In addition, the creep and relaxation results are identical to the true ultimate tensile stress versus applied strain-rate data derived from tensile tests. (orig./HP)

  8. Paramagnetic metal complexes as potential relaxation agents for NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, Ilioara; Demco, D. E.; Darabont, Al.; Bogdan, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging technique as a clinical diagnostic modality has prompted the need for a new class of pharmaceuticals. These drugs must be administered to a patient in order to enhance the image contrast between the normal and diseased tissue and/or indicate the status of organ function or blood flow. Paramagnetic compounds are presently undergoing extensive evaluation as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These agents increase contrast in MRI by differentially localizing in tissue where they increase the relaxation rates of nearby water protons. The longitudinal R 1 and transverse R 2 relaxivities were measured as a function of molar concentrations for some new paramagnetic complexes like the following: dysprosium, erbium and gadolinium citrates, gadolinium methylene diphosphonate, dysprosium and gadolinium iminodiacetate, manganese para-aminobenzoate and copper nicotinate. The available theoretical approaches for quantitative understanding are presented. (authors)

  9. Multimodal targeted high relaxivity thermosensitive liposome for in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijten, Maayke M. P.; Hannah Degeling, M.; Chen, John W.; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Azzi, Jamil; Nicolay, Klaas; Tannous, Bakhos A.

    2015-11-01

    Liposomes are spherical, self-closed structures formed by lipid bilayers that can encapsulate drugs and/or imaging agents in their hydrophilic core or within their membrane moiety, making them suitable delivery vehicles. We have synthesized a new liposome containing gadolinium-DOTA lipid bilayer, as a targeting multimodal molecular imaging agent for magnetic resonance and optical imaging. We showed that this liposome has a much higher molar relaxivities r1 and r2 compared to a more conventional liposome containing gadolinium-DTPA-BSA lipid. By incorporating both gadolinium and rhodamine in the lipid bilayer as well as biotin on its surface, we used this agent for multimodal imaging and targeting of tumors through the strong biotin-streptavidin interaction. Since this new liposome is thermosensitive, it can be used for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery at specific sites, such as tumors, and can be guided by magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Prospective evaluation of the radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions; Prospektive Evaluation der Handdosis des Radiologen im Rahmen von CT-gestuetzten Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogits, B.; Jungnickel, K.; Loewenthal, D.; Dudeck, O.; Pech, M.; Ricke, J. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kropf, S. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Biometry and Medical Informatics; Nekolla, E.A. [The Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Protection and Health; Wieners, G. [Charite CVC, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Assessment of radiologist's hand dose in CT-guided interventions and determination of influencing factors. Materials and Methods: The following CT-guided interventions were included: Core biopsy, drainage, periradicular therapy, and celiac plexus neurolysis. The hand dose was measured with an immediately readable dosimeter, the EDD-30 (Unfors, Sweden). The default parameters for CT fluoroscopy were 120 kV, 90 mA and a 4 mm slice thickness. All interventions were performed on a 16-slice CT unit (Aquilion 16 Toshiba, Japan). The tumor size, degree of difficulty (1 - 3), level of experience and device parameters (mAs, dose-length product, scan time) were documented. Results: 138 CT-guided interventions (biopsy n = 99, drainage n = 23, pain therapy n = 16) at different locations (lung n = 41, retroperitoneum n = 53, liver n = 25, spine n = 19) were included. The lesion size was 4 - 240 mm (median: 23 mm). The fluoroscopy time per intervention was 4.6 - 140.2 s (median: 24.2 s). The measured hand dose ranged from 0.001 - 3.02 mSv (median: 0.22 mSv). The median hand dose for lung puncture (n = 41) was slightly higher (median: 0.32 mSv, p = 0.01) compared to that for the liver, retroperitoneum and other. Besides physical influencing factors, the degree of difficulty (p = 0.001) and summed puncture depth (p = 0.004) correlated significantly with the hand dose. Conclusion: The median hand dose for different CT-guided interventions was 0.22 mSv. Therefore, the annual hand dose limit would normally only be reached with about 2000 interventions. (orig.)

  11. The effect of relaxation therapy on autonomic functioning, symptoms and daily functioning, in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo; Vanderheiden, Tanja; Baert, Isabel; Descheemaeker, Filip; Struyf, Filip

    2015-03-01

    To establish the effects of relaxation therapy on autonomic function, pain, fatigue and daily functioning in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. A systematic literature study was performed. Using specific keywords related to fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome and relaxation therapy, the electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science were searched. Included articles were assessed for their risk of bias and relevant information regarding relaxation was extracted. The review was conducted and reported according to the PRISMA-statement. Thirteen randomized clinical trials of sufficient quality were included, resulting in a total of 650 fibromyalgia patients (11 studies) and 88 chronic fatigue syndrome patients (3 studies). None of the studies reported effects on autonomic function. Six studies reported the effect of guided imagery on pain and daily functioning in fibromyalgia. The acute effect of a single session of guided imagery was studied in two studies and seems beneficial for pain relief. For other relaxation techniques (eg. muscle relaxation, autogenic training) no conclusive evidence was found for the effect on pain and functioning in fibromyalgia patients comparison to multimodal treatment programs. For fatigue a multimodal approach seemed better than relaxation, as shown in the sole three studies on chronic fatigue syndrome patients. There is moderate evidence for the acute effect of guided imagery on pain, although the content of the visualization is a matter of debate. Other relaxation formats and the effects on functionality and autonomic function require further study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Evaluation of Morphological and Functional Nerve Recovery of Rat Sciatic Nerve with a Hyaff11-Based Nerve Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Jansen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of a Hyaff11-based nerve guide was studied in rats. Functional tests were performed to study motor nerve recovery. A withdrawal reflex test was performed to test sensory recovery. Morphology was studied by means of histology on explanted tissue samples. Motor nerve recovery was established within 7 weeks. Hereafter, some behavioral parameters like alternating steps showed an increase in occurence, while others remained stable. Sensory function was observed within the 7 weeks time frame. Nerve tissue had bridged the 10-mm gap within 7 weeks. The average nerve fiber surface area increased significantly in time. In situ degradation of the nerve conduit was fully going on at week 7 and tubes had collapsed by then. At weeks 15 and 21, the knitted tube wall structure was completely surrounded by macrophages and giant cells, and matrix was penetrating the tube wall. We conclude that a Hyaff11-based nerve guide can be used to bridge short peripheral nerve defects in rat. However, adaptations need to be made.

  13. Evaluation of pipeline defect's characteristic axial length via model-based parameter estimation in ultrasonic guided wave-based inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Tse, Peter W; Dordjevich, Alexandar

    2011-01-01

    The reflection signal from a defect in the process of guided wave-based pipeline inspection usually includes sufficient information to detect and define the defect. In previous research, it has been found that the reflection of guided waves from even a complex defect primarily results from the interference between reflection components generated at the front and the back edges of the defect. The respective contribution of different parameters of a defect to the overall reflection can be affected by the features of the two primary reflection components. The identification of these components embedded in the reflection signal is therefore useful in characterizing the concerned defect. In this research, we propose a method of model-based parameter estimation with the aid of the Hilbert–Huang transform technique for the purpose of decomposition of a reflection signal to enable characterization of the pipeline defect. Once two primary edge reflection components are decomposed and identified, the distance between the reflection positions, which closely relates to the axial length of the defect, could be easily and accurately determined. Considering the irregular profiles of complex pipeline defects at their two edges, which is often the case in real situations, the average of varied axial lengths of such a defect along the circumference of the pipeline is used in this paper as the characteristic value of actual axial length for comparison purpose. The experimental results of artificial defects and real corrosion in sample pipes were considered in this paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method

  14. Using evaluation methods to guide the development of a tobacco-use prevention curriculum for youth: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, P D; Gallagher, R E; Berry-Bobovski, L C

    2000-01-01

    Fundamental to the development of educational programs and curricula is the evaluation of processes and outcomes. Unfortunately, many otherwise well-designed programs do not incorporate stringent evaluation methods and are limited in measuring program development and effectiveness. Using an advertising lesson in a school-based tobacco-use prevention curriculum as a case study, the authors examine the role of evaluation in the development, implementation, and enhancement of the curricular lesson. A four-phase formative and summative evaluation design was developed to divide the program-evaluation continuum into a structured process that would aid in the management of the evaluation, as well as assess curricular components. Formative and summative evaluation can provide important guidance in the development, implementation, and enhancement of educational curricula. Evaluation strategies identified unexpected barriers and allowed the project team to make necessary "time-relevant" curricular adjustments during each stage of the process.

  15. Can relaxation interventions reduce anxiety in patients receiving radiotherapy? outcomes and study validity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elith, C.A.; Perkins, B.A.; Johnson, L.S.; Skelly, M.H.; Dempsey, S.

    2001-01-01

    This study piloted the use of three relaxation interventions in an attempt to reduce levels of anxiety in patients who are immobilised for radiotherapy treatment of head and neck cancers, as well as trying to validate the study methodology. In addition to receiving normal radiation therapy treatment, 14 patients were assigned to either a control group not receiving the relaxation intervention or one of three validated relaxation intervention techniques; music therapy, aromatherapy or guided imagery. Patients in the intervention groups underwent the relaxation technique daily for the first seven days of treatment. On days 1, 3, 5 and 7 of treatment patients were required to complete the State Anxiety Inventory survey. While caution should be taken in accepting the results due to the small numbers of patients involved in the study and the non-randomised assignment of patients within the study, the results of the study demonstrate a clinically significant reduction in anxiety levels in each of the three relaxation interventions compared to the control group. The study demonstrated good study validity due to the ease of implementation, the unambiguous results generated, and the use of already validated anxiety intersections and measurement tools. Copyright (2001) Australian Institute of Radiography

  16. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  17. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  18. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin; Ansell, Steve; Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark; Jaffray, David A.; Chung, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  19. A double-blind randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the influence of oral long-acting muscle relaxant (Mebeverine MR), and insufflation with CO{sub 2} on pain associated with barium enema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, A.S.; Chapman, A.H.; Wilson, D.; Culpan, A.G. [Department of Radiology, St. James' s University Hospital, Beckett Street, LS9 7TF, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Previous investigators have shown significant benefit using CO{sub 2} for bowel insufflation. Others have suggested that the long-acting smooth muscle relaxant, Mebeverine, may be of benefit. We subjected this to a randomised double-blind trial. A total of 181 outpatients were randomised to receive either Mebeverine or placebo as pre-medication, and either air or CO{sub 2} for bowel insufflation, thus creating four treatment groups. Visual-analogue lines were used to record pain scores before, during, and up to 8 h following the enema. All groups showed increased pain scores during the enema, with peak pain scores at the end of the examination, falling to baseline scores by 8 h. Patients receiving the combination of C0{sub 2} and placebo had significantly lower pain scores at 1 and 4 h (P=0.00 and P=0.014, respectively; Kruskal-Wallis test) compared with all other groups. Having Mebeverine as a pre-medication did not significantly lower pain scores compared with placebo, and decreased the amount of benefit received from the CO{sub 2}. We confirm that CO{sub 2} is of benefit in decreasing pain during barium enema, and we recommend its routine use to improve the comfort of patients. Mebeverine is not of benefit, and its use as a pre-medication for enemas is not recommended. (orig.)

  20. Use of relaxation skills in differentially skilled athletes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kudlackova, K.; Eccles, D. W.; Dieffenbach, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the use of relaxation skills by differentially skilled athletes in relation to the deliberate practice framework. Design: Differentially skilled athletes completed a survey about their use of relaxation skills. Method: 150 athletes representing three skill levels (recreational, college, and professional) completed the deliberate relaxation for sport survey, which assessed relaxation on three deliberate practice dimensions (relevancy, concentration, and ...

  1. The use of (double) relaxation oscillation SQUIDs as a sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duuren, M.J.; Brons, G.C.S.; Kattouw, H.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1997-01-01

    Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (ROSs) and Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUIDs (DROSs) are based on relaxation oscillations that are induced in hysteretic dc SQUIDs by an external L-R shunt. The relaxation frequency of a ROS varies with the applied flux Φ, whereas the output of a DROS is a dc

  2. Parametric evaluation of laser ablation and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with ion guide cooling cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ding; He Jian; Yu Quan; Chen Lizhi; Hang Wei; Huang Benli

    2008-01-01

    A novel laser ablation and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been used for direct elemental analysis of alloys. The system was incorporated with an ion guide cooling cell to reduce the kinetic energy distribution for the purpose of better resolution. Parametric studies have been conducted on the system with respect to the buffer gas pressure and the distance from sample to the nozzle to obtain the maximal signal intensities. In order to obtain satisfactory relative sensitivity coefficients (RSC) for different elements, the influence of the laser irradiance, nozzle voltage, rf frequency and voltage of the hexapole were also investigated. Under the optimized conditions, the RSC of different elements were available for direct semi-quantitative analysis. The mass resolving power (FWHM) of the spectrometer was approximately 7000 (m/Δm) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 10 -6 g/g

  3. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG ampersand G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort

  4. CT-guided puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noeldge, G.; Richter, G.M.; Grenacher, L.; Brado, M.; Kauffmann, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    Sonographic and CT-guided punctures allow the evaluation of suspected lesions in the head, thorax, abdomen, retroperitoneum and skeletal system. The size of the lesion to be evaluated determines the size and the diameter of the puncture needle. The quantity of the material obtained will be defined by the diameter of the needle, i.e. fine-needle biopsy is more adequate for cytological than for histological evaluation. Strict adherence to the indications and contraindications for puncture and painstaking performance of the procedure go a long why towards minimizing the complications. The advantage of CT-guided puncture, in contrast to an ultrasound-guided procedure, is visualization during the puncture procedure free from overshadowing. This permits punctures of lesions located deep in the thorax or the abdomen which are overshadowed by the lungs, by air in the small or large bowel or by bone structures. Moreover, this technique yields much more information about the tissues and organs surrounding the suspected lesion. This information is much more investigator-related with ultrasoundguided puncture. Therefore, the CT-guided puncture has become mandatory in the evaluation of suspected lesions. Moreover, using the same technique, percutaneous drainage of fluids in the interpleural space, abscesses in organs, hematomas, lymphoceles and urinomas; ablation of metastases; and sympathicolysis can be carried out. CT-guided puncture thus changes from a minimally invasive diagnostic procedure to a minimally invasive therapy. (orig./MG) [de

  5. NOTE: Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Raghu B.; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; George, Rohini; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery.

  6. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); George, Rohini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: Paul.Keall@stanford.edu

    2008-06-07

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  7. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J; George, Rohini

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  8. Changes for the new AMA Guides to impairment ratings, 6th Edition: implications and applications for physician disability evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinelli, Robert D

    2009-07-01

    U.S. Disability Systems share a common procedural approach to the determination of disability for purposes of compensation. The structural and anatomical consequences of the injury or disease are defined and measured according to medical impairment, which is used to estimate the individual's loss in terms of their capacity to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and, presumptively, their losses in terms of vocational and non-vocational pursuits and quality of life. The physician is traditionally empowered to rate the severity of impairment in terms of a percentage loss to the "whole person" and according to criteria specific to each disability system. Often, the impairment percentage so derived, then is directly translated into a monetary sum for purposes of compensating these losses. The AMA periodically publishes and updates a physician impairment rating guide (the AMA Guides). The 6th Edition, published in 2008, incorporates the definitions and terminology of the ICF and provides a simple means of assessment of ADLs as part of the rating process. It also has shifted the ratings criteria towards a diagnosis-based approach, ostensibly to improve inter-rater consistency and reliability. Further work is needed to refine and validate ADL-based functional assessment tools applicable to medical impairment ratings, and to demonstrate the levels of consistency and reliability of the new rating method. Of equal importance, operational standardization across systems is also needed to enable common criteria and metrics to be developed and applied when determining the non-medical aspects of disability according to vocational and non-vocational pursuits and quality of life. Impairment ratings cannot be optimally designed to serve as the singular determinant of, nor be held solely accountable for, the disability awards.

  9. Dynamical X-ray scattering from the relaxed structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benediktovitch, A.; Feranchuk, I.; Ulyanenkov, A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction is now widely used analytical tool for investigation of nano scale multilayered structures in semiconductor and optical technologies. The HRXRD method delivers unique information on the crystallographic lattice of the samples, concentration of solid solutions, lattice mismatches, layer thicknesses, defect distribution, and relaxation degree of the epitaxial layers. The evaluation of the experimental results, however, requires a robust and precise theory due to complex dynamical scattering of X-rays from near perfect crystallographic structure of the samples. Usually, the Takagi-Taupin approach [1] or the recurrent matrix methods [2] are used for the simulation of the X-ray diffraction profiles from the epitaxial multilayered structures. The use of these theories, however, becomes essentially difficult, when the lateral lattice mismatches are present in multilayers, for example, in the case of partially or fully relaxed epitaxially grown samples. In the present work, the general solution of this problem is found analytically. The angular divergence of the incident beam is also considered and the algorithm for the diffracted profile mapping in the reciprocal space is developed. The experimental reciprocal space mapping of typical AlGaN/GaN/AlN samples with partially relaxed layers is compared to the simulated maps, which describe well the location and character of the diffraction spots caused by different layers. (author)

  10. Excitation relaxation and structure of TPPS4 J-aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelbauskas, L.; Bagdonas, S.; Dietel, W.; Rotomskis, R.

    2003-01-01

    The energy relaxation kinetics and the structure of the J-aggregates of water-soluble porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrasulphonatophenyl porphine (TPPS 4 ) were investigated in aqueous medium by means of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. The excitation of the J-aggregates, at excitation intensities higher than ∼10 15 photons/cm 2 per pulse, results in a remarkable decrease of the fluorescence quantum yield and in the appearance of an additional, non-exponential energy relaxation channel with a decay constant that depends on the excitation intensity. This relaxation mechanism was attributed to the exciton single-singlet annihilation. The exciton lifetime in the absence of the annihilation was calculated to be ∼150 ps. Using exciton annihilation theory, the exciton migration within the J-aggregates could be characterized by determining the exciton diffusion constant (1.8±0.9) 10 -3 cm 2 /s and the hopping time (1.2±0.6) ps. Using the experimental data, the size of the J-aggregate could be evaluated and was seen to yield at least 20 TPPS 4 molecules per aggregate. It was shown by means of confocal fluorescence laser scanning microscopy that TPPS 4 does self-associate in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at acidic pH forming molecular macro-assemblies on a scale of ∼1 μm in PVA matrices

  11. RADTRAN 4: User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer's Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ''RADTRAN III'' by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code

  12. A major trauma course based on posters, audio-guides and simulation improves the management skills of medical students: Evaluation via medical simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisinier, Adrien; Schilte, Clotilde; Declety, Philippe; Picard, Julien; Berger, Karine; Bouzat, Pierre; Falcon, Dominique; Bosson, Jean Luc; Payen, Jean-François; Albaladejo, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Medical competence requires the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and technical skills. Severe trauma management teaching is poorly developed during internship. Nevertheless, the basics of major trauma management should be acquired by every future physician. For this reason, the major trauma course (MTC), an educational course in major traumatology, has been developed for medical students. Our objective was to evaluate, via a high fidelity medical simulator, the impact of the MTC on medical student skills concerning major trauma management. The MTC contains 3 teaching modalities: posters with associated audio-guides, a procedural workshop on airway management and a teaching session using a medical simulator. Skills evaluation was performed 1 month before (step 1) and 1 month after (step 3) the MTC (step 2). Nineteen students were individually evaluated on 2 different major trauma scenarios. The primary endpoint was the difference between steps 1 and 3, in a combined score evaluating: admission, equipment, monitoring and safety (skill set 1) and systematic clinical examinations (skill set 2). After the course, the combined primary outcome score improved by 47% (P<0.01). Scenario choice or the order of use had no significant influence on the skill set evaluations. This study shows improvement in student skills for major trauma management, which we attribute mainly to the major trauma course developed in our institution. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  14. The evaluation of the role of ultrasonography and ultrasound-guided aspiration as an initial screening test in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, Hassan D.I.; Dar, Manzoor A.; Shukla, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The role of ultrasonography (US) as an initial screening test was evaluated in 3000 consecutive cases of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Seventy-three were positive for free fluid collection or organ injury. US-guided aspiration was used to rule out the hollow visceral injury in those referred to nonsurgical therapy. Sixty patients underwent laparotomy. These included 53 clinically unstable patients, three stable patients with positive US-guided aspiration for bile or intestinal contents and four who deteriorated upon conservative treatment. The remaining patients with US negative for fluid had some evidence of abdominal injury on clinical examination. Ultrasonoraphy complemented the clinical examination. Both the sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of free fluid were 100%. The overall sensitivity was 92% in spleen injuries, 88% in liver injuries and 100% in kidney injuries, with positive predictive value of 96%, 100% and 100% and a specificity of 97%, 100% and 100% respectively. Retrospective correlation of US with laparotomy findings regarding free fluid showed that 50-100 mL of free fluid was minimal, 100-500 mL significant. Thirteen patients completed conservative treatment with an uneventful course in hospital. Both the US findings and the clinical condition of the patient should be considered in decision-making in BAT. Unnecessary laparotomies can be avoided when the major bleeding site is not in the abdomen and such patients can be safely observed after excluding the hollow visceral injury by US-guided aspiration. US, being rapid to perform, sensitive and easily repeatable, is quite useful as an initial screening test in BAT patients. (author)

  15. CT fluoroscopy-guided preoperative short hook wire placement for small pulmonary lesions: evaluation of safety and identification of risk factors for pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Yusuke; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the safety of computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided short hook wire placement for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and the risk factors for pneumothorax associated with this procedure. We analyzed 267 short hook wire placements for 267 pulmonary lesions (mean diameter, 9.9 mm). Multiple variables related to the patients, lesions, and procedures were assessed to determine the risk factors for pneumothorax. Complications (219 grade 1 and 4 grade 2 adverse events) occurred in 196 procedures. No grade 3 or above adverse events were observed. Univariate analysis revealed increased vital capacity (odds ratio [OR], 1.518; P = 0.021), lower lobe lesion (OR, 2.343; P =0.001), solid lesion (OR, 1.845; P = 0.014), prone positioning (OR, 1.793; P = 0.021), transfissural approach (OR, 11.941; P = 0.017), and longer procedure time (OR, 1.036; P = 0.038) were significant predictors of pneumothorax. Multivariate analysis revealed only the transfissural approach (OR, 12.171; P = 0.018) and a longer procedure time (OR, 1.048; P = 0.012) as significant independent predictors. Complications related to CT fluoroscopy-guided preoperative short hook wire placement often occurred, but all complications were minor. A transfissural approach and longer procedure time were significant independent predictors of pneumothorax. Complications related to CT fluoroscopy-guided preoperative short hook wire placement often occur. Complications are usually minor and asymptomatic. A transfissural approach and longer procedure time are significant independent predictors of pneumothorax.

  16. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Alexander, E-mail: schubert@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Meier, Christoph [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats et Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR CNRS 5589, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Falvo, Cyril [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2016-08-07

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the “surfaces” for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  17. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  18. Asymptotic representation of relaxation oscillations in lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Elena V

    2017-01-01

    In this book we analyze relaxation oscillations in models of lasers with nonlinear elements controlling light dynamics. The models are based on rate equations taking into account periodic modulation of parameters, optoelectronic delayed feedback, mutual coupling between lasers, intermodal interaction and other factors. With the aim to study relaxation oscillations we present the special asymptotic method of integration for ordinary differential equations and differential-difference equations. As a result, they are reduced to discrete maps. Analyzing the maps we describe analytically such nonlinear phenomena in lasers as multistability of large-amplitude relaxation cycles, bifurcations of cycles, controlled switching of regimes, phase synchronization in an ensemble of coupled systems and others. The book can be fruitful for students and technicians in nonlinear laser dynamics and in differential equations.

  19. Relaxation of the magnetization in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, S.; Bianchi, A.; Liviotti, E.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.

    2006-04-01

    Several mechanisms characterize the relaxation dynamics in magnetic molecules. We investigate two of them, spin-lattice coupling and incoherent quantum tunneling. The effect of the phonon heat bath is studied by analyzing the exponential time decay of the autocorrelation of the magnetization. We show that in ferromagnetic (Cu6) and antiferromagnetic (Fe6) molecular rings this decay is characterized by a single characteristic time. At very low temperature, relaxation through incoherent quantum tunneling may occur in nanomagnets such as Fe8 or Ni4. The mixing between levels with different values of the total spin (S mixing) greatly influences this mechanism. In particular, we demonstrate that a fourth-order anisotropy term O44, required to interpret experimental electron paramagnetic resonance and relaxation data in Ni4, naturally arises when S mixing is considered in calculations.

  20. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.