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Sample records for evaluating bacterial activity

  1. The Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination of Active Radiography Apparatus in Dental Centers of Hamadan City

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    A. Eskandarloo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: During the most dental procedures, contamination of devices with blood, saliva and other body fluids, which is the most important factor for transmission of infectious diseases, is inevitable. Therefore principles of infection control should be carefully considered in the dentistry. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of bacterial contamination of active radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan city in year 2003. Materials & Methods : In this cross-sectional study 37 radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan were evaluated. Samples were collected from four area (25 cm2 each that are frequently touched by dentists, personnel, etc. using a swab. The swab was inserted into the carrier media containing thioglycolate, a smear was obtained from the solution and remaining solution was cultured in blood agar. Smear and blood agar cultures were transferred to microbiology lab to determine bacterial contamination level as well as bacterial typing. According to WHO criteria the area which has more than 10 microorganism/cm2 is considered as contaminated. Results: It was found that 13 of radiographic apparatus(35% were contaminated, the most frequent bacterial type detected in this study was micrococcus (75.7% and the least were enterobacter and nocardia (2.7% each. Antiseptic materials used for decontamination of the devices were as follow : Alcohol (43.2% , Deconex (32.4% , Micro10 (18.9% , Savlon (10.8% , Hypochlorid (5.4% , Glutaraldehyde (2.7%. Conclusion: Based on the results (35% bacterial contamination it can be concluded that careful performance of infection control principles, daily decontamination of devices and offering periodic instructions for dental personnel are essential.

  2. Psychometric evaluation of the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and activity impairment assessment in acute bacterial sinusitis.

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    Quadri, Nuz; Lloyd, Andrew; Keating, Karen N; Nafees, Beenish; Piccirillo, Jay; Wild, Diane

    2013-07-01

    To validate the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 and Activity Impairment Assessment in patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Data were used from a phase III clinical trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin 400 mg once daily for 5 consecutive days in the treatment of acute bacterial sinusitis. The psychometric properties and factor structure of the 2 measures were assessed. Participants were given the measures to self-complete using either a telephone voice response system or a paper-and-pencil format. Three hundred seventy-four patients with acute bacterial sinusitis were used in the analysis. Patients received either a placebo or 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily. Patients were then reviewed at test of cure and follow-up. All analyses were conducted on a combined sample of placebo and active treatment patients. The Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 was associated with minimal missing data at baseline but a higher proportion by test of cure. There was no evidence of floor or ceiling effects and no significant skew. The Activity Impairment Assessment also had low missing data at baseline and no obvious floor or ceiling effects, but the data were not normally distributed. Both measures had good internal consistency. Convergent and divergent validity as well as sensitivity and the minimally important difference are also reported. The measures both have good psychometric properties and are suitable for use with patients with acute bacterial sinusitis. Both instruments are sensitive. The minimal important difference estimates for the Sinonasal Outcome Test-16 are quite high but are similar to estimates reported previously.

  3. Evaluating Bacteriocin Production by Environmental Enterococci: An Inquiry-Based Activity in Bacterial Antgonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, June

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriocins, bacteriocidal proteins produced by bacteria, have a very restricted killing range. In this exercise each student isolates an environmental "Enterococcus spp." culture using selective media and then evaluates it for bacteriocin activity against "Enterococcus" strains isolated by classmates.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of Luffa operculata Cogn. and its main active principle in the treatment of bacterial rhinosinusitis.

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    Silva, Leonardo; Costa, Henrique Olival; Souza, Flávia Coelho de; Lopes, Elaine Monteiro Cardoso; Ueda, Suely Mitoi Ykko

    2016-12-26

    The prevalence of rhinosinusitis is quite high. Despite the widespread use of antibiotics for rhinosinusitis, there are other forms of treatment, including phytotherapy. One of the most widely used herbal medicines for treatment of rhinosinusitis is Luffa operculata. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of topical nasal solution of the aqueous extract of L. operculata, determining the toxicity to its use and identifying the active principles presented in the aqueous extract. The secondary objective was to evaluate the action of active principles on bacteria commonly involved in acute rhino sinusitis. The study was conducted in experimental model of sinusitis. Three different concentrations of L. operculata were used as local treatment of rhino sinusitis. The results were compared with those observed in control groups that received nasal saline solution. Histological examination of the liver, kidney, spleen, myocardium, brain and lungs of all animals evaluated the toxicity of L. operculata. The aqueous extract used was subjected to chromatographic analysis and an active principle was isolated and tested for in vitro inhibition of bacterial colonies usually found in rhino sinusitis. Intranasal treatment of sinusitis with L. operculata showed better clinical evolution than control group. Statistically significant difference (p>0.10) between the treated group and the control group was observed in the histologic evaluation for inflammatory pattern. The aqueous extract of L. operculata used presented a predominance of 2,3-dicafeoilglicaric acid, a substance not yet described in the literature. There was a significant difference in bacterial growth of Streptococcus pyogenes on blood-agar plates when under the influence of both the aqueous extract and the active substance. Topical nasal solution of the aqueous extract of L. operculata is effective compared to the application of saline solution for the treatment of bacterial rhinosinusitis in an experimental model. L

  5. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of selected plant extracts by rapid XTT colorimetry and bacterial enumeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, Amal G; Afifi, Fatma U

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of indigenous Jordanian plant extracts, dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide, using the rapid XTT assay and viable count methods. XTT rapid assay was used for the initial screening of antimicrobial activity for the plant extracts. Antimicrobial activity of potentially active plant extracts was further assessed using the "viable plate count" method. Four degrees of antimicrobial activity (high, moderate, weak and inactive) against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively, were recorded. The plant extracts of Hypericum triquetrifolium, Ballota undulata, Ruta chalepensis, Ononis natrix, Paronychia argentea and Marrubium vulgare had shown promising antimicrobial activity. This study showed that while both XTT and viable count methods are comparable when estimating the overall antimicrobial activity of experimental substances, there is no strong linear correlation between the two methods.

  6. Optimization of niosomes for enhanced antibacterial activity and reduced bacterial resistance: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

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    Abdelaziz, Ahmed A; Elbanna, Tarek E; Sonbol, Fatma I; Gamaleldin, Noha M; El Maghraby, Gamal M

    2015-02-01

    The aim was to optimize norfloxacin niosomes for enhanced antibacterial activity and reduced bacterial resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a biofilm forming bacterium, was used as the test organism. Different norfloxacin niosomes were evaluated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, for antibacterial activity compared with aqueous drug solution. The influence of norfloxacin niosomes on biofilm formation was investigated. The interaction of niosomes with bacterial cells was also monitored using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The efficacy of niosomes depended on their composition. Standard niosomes of Span 60 and cholesterol were similar to drug solution. Incorporation of Tween 80, oleic acid (OA), OA/propylene glycol or lecithin produced fluid niosomes which reduced the MIC and inhibited biofilm formation compared with drug solution. Incorporation of a positively charged agent into fluid niosomes enhanced the antibacterial activity and reduced biofilm formation significantly. SEM showed evidence of vesicle adsorption to the bacteria with possible adhesion or fusion with the cell membrane. The in vivo skin model confirmed the in vitro results with optimum niosomes being more efficient than drug solution. Niosomes are promising for enhanced antibacterial activity and reduced resistance to antibiotics. The later can be achieved by inhibition of biofilm formation.

  7. Development of a high-throughput method to evaluate serum bactericidal activity using bacterial ATP measurement as survival readout.

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    Francesca Necchi

    Full Text Available Serum Bactericidal Activity (SBA assay is the method of choice to evaluate the complement-mediated functional activity of both infection- and vaccine-induced antibodies. To perform a typical SBA assay, serial dilutions of sera are incubated with target bacterial strains and complement. The conventional SBA assay is based on plating on agar the SBA reaction mix and counting the surviving bacterial colony forming units (CFU at each serum dilution. Even with automated colony counting, it is labor-intensive, time-consuming and not amenable for large-scale studies. Here, we have developed a luminescence-based SBA (L-SBA method able to detect surviving bacteria by measuring their ATP. At the end of the SBA reaction, a single commercially available reagent is added to each well of the SBA plate, and the resulting luminescence signal is measured in a microplate reader. The signal obtained is proportional to the ATP present, which is directly proportional to the number of viable bacteria. Bactericidal activity is subsequently calculated. We demonstrated the applicability of L-SBA with multiple bacterial serovars, from 5 species: Citrobacter freundii, Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis, Shigella flexneri serovars 2a and 3a, Shigella sonnei and Neisseria meningitidis. Serum bactericidal titers obtained by the luminescence readout method strongly correlate with the data obtained by the conventional agar plate-based assay, and the new assay is highly reproducible. L-SBA considerably shortens assay time, facilitates data acquisition and analysis and reduces the operator dependency, avoiding the plating and counting of CFUs. Our results demonstrate that L-SBA is a useful high-throughput bactericidal assay.

  8. Evaluation of anti-bacterial and wound healing activity of the fruits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As the traditional Chinese medicine, the fresh fruits of Amorpha fruticosa L. were applied for the treatment of carbuncle, eczema and burn (Das et al., 2007). However, little is known about the functional roles of the fruits of Amorpha fruticosa L. during wound healing progress. In the present study, we evaluated both ...

  9. A new approach for evaluating transformations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) via high-resolution mass spectrometry and relating it to bacterial activity.

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    Kamjunke, Norbert; von Tümpling, Wolf; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Norf, Helge; Weitere, Markus; Herzsprung, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Streams are important sites of transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM). The molecular characterization of DOM-quality changes requires sophisticated analytical evaluation techniques. The goal of our study was to link molecular DOM transformation with bacterial activity. We measured the degradation of leaf leachate over a gradient of bacterial production obtained by different rates of percolation of sediments in seven experimental flumes on five sampling dates. We developed a new strategy for evaluating molecular formula data sets obtained by ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS), in which the time-dependent change of component abundance was fitted by a linear regression model after normalization of mass peak intensities. All components were categorized by calculating the slope (change of percent intensity per day) in each of the seven flumes. These slopes were then related to cumulative bacterial production. The concentration of DOM decreased quickly in all flumes. Bacterial activity was higher in flumes with percolated sediment than in those without percolation, whereas plankton bacterial activity was higher in flumes without percolation or without sediment. There were no differences in molecular-DOM characteristics between flumes, but there were distinct changes over time. Positive slopes, i.e. increasing intensities over time, were found for small molecules (MW < 450 Da) and high O/C ratios, whereas decreasing intensities were observed less often and only for large molecules and low O/C ratios. The positive slopes of produced components showed a positive relationship to bacterial production for small and for oxygen-rich components. The negative slopes of degraded components were negatively related to bacterial production for large and for oxygen-deficient molecules. Overall, the approach provided new insights into the transformation of specific molecular DOM components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel aryldiketo acids with enhanced antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant bacterial strains.

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    Cvijetić, Ilija N; Verbić, Tatjana Ž; Ernesto de Resende, Pedro; Stapleton, Paul; Gibbons, Simon; Juranić, Ivan O; Drakulić, Branko J; Zloh, Mire

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a major health problem worldwide, because of ability of bacteria, fungi and viruses to evade known therapeutic agents used in treatment of infections. Aryldiketo acids (ADK) have shown antimicrobial activity against several resistant strains including Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Our previous studies revealed that ADK analogues having bulky alkyl group in ortho position on a phenyl ring have up to ten times better activity than norfloxacin against the same strains. Rational modifications of analogues by introduction of hydrophobic substituents on the aromatic ring has led to more than tenfold increase in antibacterial activity against multidrug resistant Gram positive strains. To elucidate a potential mechanism of action for this potentially novel class of antimicrobials, several bacterial enzymes were identified as putative targets according to literature data and pharmacophoric similarity searches for potent ADK analogues. Among the seven bacterial targets chosen, the strongest favorable binding interactions were observed between most active analogue and S. aureus dehydrosqualene synthase and DNA gyrase. Furthermore, the docking results in combination with literature data suggest that these novel molecules could also target several other bacterial enzymes, including prenyl-transferases and methionine aminopeptidase. These results and our statistically significant 3D QSAR model could be used to guide the further design of more potent derivatives as well as in virtual screening for novel antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Autoproteolytic Activation of Bacterial Toxins

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    Aimee Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease domains within toxins typically act as the primary effector domain within target cells. By contrast, the primary function of the cysteine protease domain (CPD in Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX-like (MARTX and Clostridium sp. glucosylating toxin families is to proteolytically cleave the toxin and release its cognate effector domains. The CPD becomes activated upon binding to the eukaryotic-specific small molecule, inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6, which is found abundantly in the eukaryotic cytosol. This property allows the CPD to spatially and temporally regulate toxin activation, making it a prime candidate for developing anti-toxin therapeutics. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to defining the regulation of toxin function by the CPD and the development of inhibitors to prevent CPD-mediated activation of bacterial toxins.

  12. Effect of bacterial media on the evaluation of the antibacterial activity of a biomaterial containing inorganic antibacterial reagents or antibiotics.

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    Ando, Yoshiki; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Noda, Iwao; Miyaji, Fumiaki; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Yonekura, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao

    2010-03-01

    Several studies have been performed to assess the effectivesness of the antibacterial coating of a biomaterial to reduce surgical site infection. However, evaluations of these materials are inconsistent, and therefore it is difficult to compare their antibacterial performance. In this study, we evaluated the influence of different media such as nutrient broth (NB), Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) on the antibacterial activity of AgNO3- or gentamicin-added bone cement using a modified ISO 22196 standard to devise a method to evaluate the antibacterial activity of biomaterials in vitro. The antibacterial activity results against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coil were different in each medium. The antibacterial activity of AgNO3 in FBS was lower than the other media, whereas the antibacterial activity of gentamicin in FBS was higher than in the other media. It was assumed that the fluctuating antibacterial activity was influenced by serum components. The results showed that the ISO 22196 antibacterial evaluation method is suitable to evaluate antibacterial biomaterials after modifying the medium to FBS.

  13. Copper effects on bacterial activity of estuarine silty sediments

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    Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela; Fernandes, Sandra; Sobral, Paula; Alcântara, Fernanda

    2007-07-01

    Bacteria of silty estuarine sediments were spiked with copper to 200 μg Cu g -1 dry weight sediment in order to assess the impact of copper on bacterial degradation of organic matter and on bacterial biomass production. Bacterial density was determined by direct counting under epifluorescence microscopy and bacterial production by the incorporation of 3H-Leucine. Leucine turnover rate was evaluated by 14C-leucine incorporation and ectoenzymatic activities were estimated as the hydrolysis rate of model substrates for β-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase. The presence of added copper in the microcosms elicited, after 21 days of incubation, generalised anoxia and a decrease in organic matter content. The non-eroded surface of the copper-spiked sediment showed, when compared to the control, a decrease in bacterial abundance and significant lower levels of bacterial production and of leucine turnover rate. Bacterial production and leucine turnover rate decreased to 1.4% and 13% of the control values, respectively. Ectoenzymatic activities were also negatively affected but by smaller factors. After erosion by the water current in laboratory flume conditions, the eroded surface of the control sediment showed a generalised decline in all bacterial activities. The erosion of the copper-spiked sediment showed, however, two types of responses with respect to bacterial activities at the exposed surface: positive responses of bacterial production and leucine turnover rate contrasting with slight negative responses of ectoenzymatic activities. The effects of experimental erosion in the suspended cells were also different in the control and in the copper-spiked sediment. Bacterial cells in the control microcosm exhibited, when compared to the non-eroded sediment cells, decreases in all activities after the 6-h suspension. The response of the average suspended copper-spiked sediment cell differed from the control by a less sharp decrease in ectoenzymatic activities and

  14. Evaluation of Reciprocal Pharmaceutical Effects and Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles and Methanolic Extract of Crocus sativus L. (Saffron on Some Bacterial Strains

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    Anahita Samiee Zafarghandi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs are the most prominent nanoparticles which are recognized for their high antimicrobial efficacy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the reciprocal pharmaceutical effects and antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs and methanolic extract of Crocus sativus L. (saffron on some bacterial strains. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs and methanolic extract of C. sativus L. (saffron on some bacteria, agar well diffusion method was used. Minimal inhibition concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined for saffron extract, Ag-NPs, and their combination on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and S. pyogenes and S. epidermidis. Results: The combination of medium concentrations of Ag-NPs (500 μg/mL and saffron extract (50 mg/mL was in the optimum mode to eliminate S. epidermidis and S. pyogenes. The results showed that saffron extract, Ag-NPs, and their combined form had antibacterial effects on these bacteria. Conclusion: It is suggested to evaluate the synergistic effects of active components of the extract and antimicrobial preservatives used in food, health, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries.

  15. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of Cuminum Cyminum Essential Oil and Extract against Bacterial Strains Isolated from Patients with Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection

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    Yasaman Saee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many efforts have been done to find effective agents against resistant pathogens. Cuminum cyminum L. (Cumin is an aromatic plant within the Apiaceae family. It has a variety of purposes and demonstrates antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. This study evaluated the activity of C. cyminum extract and essential oil against bacterial isolates which cause urinary tract infection, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus agalactiae, group A streptococci, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolated from patients with urinary tract infection.Materials and Methods: Extract was prepared by maceration and essential oil was prepared by hydrodistillation from C. cyminum seeds. The study population was 95 patients with urinary tract infection without malignant diseases, diabetes and immunosupression. After identification of organism, susceptibility testing was carried out by disc diffusion method and MIC values by broth microdilution testing.Results: C. cyminum essential oil can have a better effect on the gram-negative bacteria causing urinary tract infection than gram-positive bacteria. In addition, C. cyminum extract have good activity against both gram- positive and gram-negative bacteria. Our findings also showed that essential oil and extract of C. cyminum has better antibacterial activity on uropathogen isolates than amoxicillin and the difference was significant (P value<0.05 but the activity is not superior to other antibiotics.Conclusion: These results suggest that the essential oil and extract of C. cyminum seeds might be considered as interesting sources of antibacterial components against uropathogenic bacteria.

  16. ANTI BACTERIAL ACTIVITY AND MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    The antibacterial activity and medicinal properties of Carica papaya (paw paw) were studied. ... KEY WORDS: Paw paw, Antibacterial activity, inhibition of bacterial growth, Terpenoids and Medical. Properties. INTRODUCTION. Paw paw (Carica papaya), known in many ... Nutrient agar medium was prepared by dissolving.

  17. evaluation of bacterial vaginosis {ev} using nugent scoring system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in healthy women 1' and our recent genomic study has shown that Nigerian women .2 ;-;- colonized with some Lactohac as species with probiotic capabilities 1”. The two most widely accepted methods for the zi-jgllzosis of bacterial a}! rosis are. 1-: el's composite criteria is and Nngent's. Gram stain evaluation of bacterial.

  18. Inhibition of cathelicidin activity by bacterial exopolysaccharides.

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    Foschiatti, Michela; Cescutti, Paola; Tossi, Alessandro; Rizzo, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    The interaction of bacterial exopolysaccharides, produced by opportunistic lung pathogens, with antimicrobial peptides of the innate primate immune system was investigated. The exopolysaccharides were produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Inquilinus limosus and clinical isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, bacteria that are all involved in lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. The effects of the biological activities of three orthologous cathelicidins from Homo sapiens sapiens, Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan) and Presbitys obscurus (dusky leaf monkey) were examined. Inhibition of the antimicrobial activity of peptides was assessed using minimum inhibitory concentration assays on a reference Escherichia coli strain in the presence and absence of exopolysaccharides, whereas complex formation between peptides and exopolysaccharides was investigated by means of circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Biological assays revealed that the higher the negative charge of exopolysaccharides the stronger was their inhibiting effect. Spectroscopic studies indicated the formation of molecular complexes of varying stability between peptides and exopolysaccharides, explaining the inhibition. Atomic force microscopy provided a direct visualization of the molecular complexes. A model is proposed where peptides with an alpha-helical conformation interact with exopolysaccharides through electrostatic and other non-covalent interactions.

  19. Rapid antibacterial activity of 2 novel hand soaps: evaluation of the risk of development of bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents.

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    Geraldo, Ingrid M; Gilman, Allan; Shintre, Milind S; Modak, Shanta M

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of and risk of organisms developing resistance to 2 novel hand soaps: (1) a soap containing triclosan, polyhexamethylene biguanide, and benzethonium chloride added to a soap base (TPB soap); and (2) a soap containing farnesol, polyhexamethylene biguanide, and benzethonium chloride added to a soap base (FPB soap). Tests also included soaps containing only triclosan. The risk of emergence of resistant bacterial mutants was investigated by determining the susceptibility changes after repeated exposure of bacteria to the drugs and soaps in vitro. The effectiveness of the soaps was evaluated using an in vitro tube dilution method, a volunteer method (the ASTM standard), and 2 pig skin methods. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of triclosan against Staphylococcus aureus increased 8- to 62.5-fold, whereas those of TPB and FPB (both alone and in soap) were unchanged. In vitro, TPB and FPB soaps produced higher log(10) reductions in colony-forming units of all tested organisms (4.95-8.58) than did soaps containing triclosan alone (0.29-4.86). In the test using the pig skin and volunteer methods, TPB soap produced a higher log(10) reduction in colony-forming units (3.1-3.3) than did the soap containing triclosan alone (2.6-2.8). The results indicate that TPB and FPB soaps may provide superior rapid and broad-spectrum efficacy with a lower risk of organisms developing resistance than do soaps containing triclosan alone. Pig skin methods may be used to predict the efficacy of antibacterial soaps in the rapid disinfection of contaminated hands. Hand washing with TPB and FPB soaps by healthcare workers and the general population may reduce the transmission of pathogens, with a lower risk of promoting the emergence of resistant organisms.

  20. A Small Group Activity About Bacterial Regulation And Complementation

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    Susan M. Merkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  1. A small group activity about bacterial regulation and complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Susan; Hanson, Buck; Parks, Adam

    2010-01-01

    As teachers, we well understand the need for activities that help develop critical-thinking skills in microbiology. In our experience, one concept that students have difficulty understanding is transcriptional regulation of bacterial genes. To help with this, we developed and evaluated a paper-based activity to help students understand and apply the concepts of bacterial transcriptional regulation. While we don't identify it as such, we use a complementation experiment to assess student understanding of how regulation changes when new DNA is introduced. In Part 1 of this activity, students complete an open-book, take-home assignment that asks them to define common terminology related to regulation, and draw the regulatory components of different scenarios involving positive and negative regulation. In Part 2, students work in small groups of 3-4 to depict the regulatory components for a different scenario. They are asked to explain the results of a complementation experiment based on this scenario. They then predict the results of a slightly different experiment. Students who completed the Regulation Activity did significantly better on post-test questions related to regulation, compared to pre-test questions.

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and toxic metal removal of chemically synthesized magnetic iron oxide titanium coated nanoparticles and application in bacterial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhady, Yasser A M; El-Shazly, Mona M; El-Kased, Reham F

    2017-11-17

    Co-precipitation method was used for preparation of two types of iron oxide nanoparticles coated by titanium dioxide according to divalent salts used. The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles coated by titanium dioxide measured by particle size analyzer, ranged approximately between 20 nm and 100 nm with mean particle size of 60 nm. Characterization of the prepared nanoparticles was done by X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscope indicating the sole existence of inverse cubic spinel phase of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Further, the antibacterial activity of two prepared iron oxide nanoparticles was evaluated against four pathogenic bacteria where both preparations showed promising antibacterial activities against Gram positive and Gram negative strains which offers a potential application in pharmaceutical and biomedical industries. The antibacterial activity showed high reduction percent after 30 min by 150 μg mL-1 of nanoparticles prepared. Also, high reduction percent was achieved for removal of iron and manganese ions from polluted water and good effect on decreasing chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand concentrations with decreased percent of total nitrogen concentration.

  3. Soil bacterial flora and enzymatic activities in zinc and lead ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    Abstract. Soil bacterial flora and enzymatic activities in lead and zinc contaminated soil of Ishiagu, ... concentration. This showed that the higher the heavy metal concentration the lower the enzymatic activities. Urease, dehydrogenase activity, hydrogen peroxidase and polyphenol ..... high concentrations and even inhibit the.

  4. Community structure of actively growing bacterial populations in plant pathogen suppressive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, K.; Lembke, A.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.; Jansson, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community in soil was screened by using various molecular approaches for bacterial populations that were activated upon addition of different supplements. Plasmodiophora brassicae spores, chitin, sodium acetate, and cabbage plants were added to activate specific bacterial populations

  5. Comparison of methods to evaluate bacterial contact-killing materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de lagemaat, Marieke; Grotenhuis, Arjen; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Roest, Steven; Loontjens, Ton J. A.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Ren, Yijin

    2017-01-01

    Cationic surfaces with alkylated quaternary-ammonium groups kill adhering bacteria upon contact by membrane disruption and are considered increasingly promising as a non-antibiotic based way to eradicate bacteria adhering to surfaces. However, reliable in vitro evaluation methods for bacterial

  6. Evaluation of bacterial profile and biodegradation potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stages of abattoir wastewater treatment were evaluated through determination of physicochemical parameters such as pH, conductivity, total dissolved solid, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, phosphate, nitrate and iron using standard procedures. Bacterial plate counts were ...

  7. Evaluation of bacterial profile and biodegradation potential of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEBAYO1

    Abattoir wastewater treatments were monitored using physicochemical parameters, bacterial profile and biodegradation potential for 28 days at 7 days intervals. The stages of abattoir wastewater treatment were evaluated through determination of physicochemical parameters such as pH, conductivity, total dissolved solid, ...

  8. Bioassays for evaluation of medical products derived from bacterial toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesardic, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Bioassays play central role in evaluation of biological products and those derived from bacterial toxins often rely exclusively on in vivo models for assurance of safety and potency. This chapter reviews existing regulatory approved methods designed to provide information on potency and safety of complex biological medicines with an insight into strategies considered for alternative procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of 6 Methods for Aerobic Bacterial Sanitization of Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Mia T; Madden, Carolyn M; Ma, Eric J; Fox, James G

    2018-01-01

    Smartphones are ubiquitous devices that offer a variety of useful applications for human and veterinary medical professionals and the biomedical research community. Smartphones can serve as fomites and potentially transmit pathogens, including bacterial species such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The goal of this study was to evaluate 6 methods to decrease aerobic bacterial colonies on smartphones, including two 254-nm UVC devices, 70% ethanol spray, quaternary ammonium disinfectant spray, sodium hypochlorite-impregnated wipes, and delicate-task wipes. All methods were individually effective at decreasing aerobic bacterial counts after sanitization. In addition, 254-nm UVC devices providing a dose of 60 mJ/cm2, with UVC bulbs exposing both sides of the smartphone, were an effective nonliquid method for smartphone sanitization.

  10. Evaluation of posttraumatic recurrent bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveci, Özcan; Uysal, Cem; Varol, Sefer; Tekin, Recep; Bozkurt, Fatma; Bekçibaşı, Muhammed; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2015-07-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may develop as a complication after head trauma. The aim of this study was to present the demographic, clinical, microbiological and radiological characteristics of adult patients who presented with recurrent bacterial meningitis attacks after trauma. Using a retrospective approach, the medical records of patients with acute recurrent bacterial meningitis (RBM) were reviewed, and those who had a history of trauma were included into the study. RBM was diagnosed based on clinical, bacteriologic and laboratory results. Demographic characteristics, clinical course, laboratory test results including cerebrospinal fluid analysis (CSF), radiological images, and the applied treatments were evaluated. A total of two hundred and twelve patients with acute bacterial meningitis were included into the study. RBM was diagnosed in twenty-five patients (11.8%), and in 18 of these patients (8.5%), the attacks had occurred subsequent to a trauma. In the CSF cultures of four patients, S. pneumoniae growth was observed. CT cisternography indicated CSF leaks in eleven patients. Moreover, bone fractures were observed in the CT images of ten patients. Ceftriaxone therapy was prescribed to 83% of the patients. Eight patients had a history of a fall in childhood, and five were involved in traffic accidents before acute bacterial meningitis. Four of the patients developed epilepsy and one developed deafness as sequelae. Since RBM attacks are frequently observed following trauma, in patients with a history of trauma who present with meningitis, the risk of recurrence should be considered.

  11. Experimental bacterial meningitis in rabbit; evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chu, Sung Nam; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography(CT) and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in experimental bacterial meningitis. CT and MR images of experimental bacterial meningitis were obtained after inoculation of 1ml suspension of 10-6/ml Staphylococcus aureus directly into the supratentorial arachnoid space of 18 New Zealand white rabbits. Each animal was studied with both pre-enhanced and post-enhanced CT and MRI at 12, 24, 48 hours and 1 week. Cerebrospinal fluid of all of 18 rabbits were sampled and cultured for bacterial growth. All of 18 rabbits had the clinical symptoms such as neck stiffness and anorexia within 24 hours after the inoculation. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus growth. Gd-enhanced MRI exhibited diffuse enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement along the thickened supratentorial meninges earlier than CT. In Gd-enhanced MRI, the mean contrast enhancement ratio(CER) at supratentorial meninges increased to 1.93 at 12 hours and 2.99 at 24 hours from 1.06 at 0 hour. Histologic evaluation demonstrated inflammatory cell infiltration into the meninges. MRI also identified the complications of meningitis such as ependymitis and hydrocephalus more effectively than CT. These results indicated that Fd-enhanced MRI detectred earlier the abnormal findingfs of bacterial meningitis and evaluated more effectively the complications of meningitis compared with CT. MRI was more useful than CT in evaluation of the bacterial meningitis.

  12. Lysozyme-coated silver nanoparticles for differentiating bacterial strains on the basis of antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Sumaira; Chatha, Mariyam Asghar; Ejaz, Wardah; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed; Hussain, Irshad

    2014-10-01

    Lysozyme, an antibacterial enzyme, was used as a stabilizing ligand for the synthesis of fairly uniform silver nanoparticles adopting various strategies. The synthesized particles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM to observe their morphology and surface chemistry. The silver nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against several bacterial species and various bacterial strains within the same species. The cationic silver nanoparticles were found to be more effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa 3 compared to other bacterial species/strains investigated. Some of the bacterial strains of the same species showed variable antibacterial activity. The difference in antimicrobial activity of these particles has led to the conclusion that antimicrobial products formed from silver nanoparticles may not be equally effective against all the bacteria. This difference in the antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles for different bacterial strains from the same species may be due to the genome islands that are acquired through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). These genome islands are expected to possess some genes that may encode enzymes to resist the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. These silver nanoparticles may thus also be used to differentiate some bacterial strains within the same species due to variable silver resistance of these variants, which may not possible by simple biochemical tests.

  13. Isolation of biologically active nanomaterial (inclusion bodies from bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peternel Špela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs were recognised as highly pure deposits of active proteins inside bacterial cells. Such active nanoparticles are very interesting for further downstream protein isolation, as well as for many other applications in nanomedicine, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. To prepare large quantities of a high quality product, the whole bioprocess has to be optimised. This includes not only the cultivation of the bacterial culture, but also the isolation step itself, which can be of critical importance for the production process. To determine the most appropriate method for the isolation of biologically active nanoparticles, three methods for bacterial cell disruption were analyzed. Results In this study, enzymatic lysis and two mechanical methods, high-pressure homogenization and sonication, were compared. During enzymatic lysis the enzyme lysozyme was found to attach to the surface of IBs, and it could not be removed by simple washing. As this represents an additional impurity in the engineered nanoparticles, we concluded that enzymatic lysis is not the most suitable method for IBs isolation. During sonication proteins are released (lost from the surface of IBs and thus the surface of IBs appears more porous when compared to the other two methods. We also found that the acoustic output power needed to isolate the IBs from bacterial cells actually damages proteins structures, thereby causing a reduction in biological activity. High-pressure homogenization also caused some damage to IBs, however the protein loss from the IBs was negligible. Furthermore, homogenization had no side-effects on protein biological activity. Conclusions The study shows that among the three methods tested, homogenization is the most appropriate method for the isolation of active nanoparticles from bacterial cells.

  14. Antifungal activity of bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the antifungal action of biomolecules produced from the secondary metabolism of bacterial strains found in the rhizosphere of semi arid plants against human pathogenic Candida albicans. Crude extracts were obtained using ethyl acetate as an organic solvent and the bioactivity was assessed with a ...

  15. Antifungal activity of bacterial strains from the rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... This study evaluated the antifungal action of biomolecules produced from the secondary metabolism of bacterial strains found in the rhizosphere of semi arid plants against human pathogenic Candida albicans. .... negative control, was obtained by extraction from the nutrient broth in ethyl acetate without ...

  16. Efficacy of antimicrobial activity of garlic extracts on bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of antimicrobial activity of garlic extracts on bacterial pathogens commonly found to contaminate meat. ... Abstract. Background: Meat is a major source of food and raw materials for a number of industries, yet a lot of meat is wasted each year due to deterioration as a result of spoilage by microorganisms such as ...

  17. Anti-bacterial activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; de Souza Luna, Josiane; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; de Andrade, Maria Cristina Caño; Sant'Ana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Marquez, Béatrice; Neuville, Luc; Moreau, Nicole

    2006-04-21

    Extracts from various organs of 25 plants of Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed with respect to their anti-bacterial activities against Escherichia coli, a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus and two resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus harbouring the efflux pumps NorA and MsrA. Amongst the 49 extracts studied, 14 presented anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including the ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Jatropha elliptica, from the stem barks of Schinus terebinthifolius and Erythrina mulungu, from the stems and leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Serjania lethalis, and from the stem bark and leaves of Lafoensia pacari. The classes of compounds present in the active extracts were determined as a preliminary step towards their bioactivity-guided separation. No extracts were active against Escherichia coli.

  18. Metatranscriptomics reveals overall active bacterial composition in caries lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Simón-Soro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying the microbial species in caries lesions is instrumental to determine the etiology of dental caries. However, a significant proportion of bacteria in carious lesions have not been cultured, and the use of molecular methods has been limited to DNA-based approaches, which detect both active and inactive or dead microorganisms. Objective: To identify the RNA-based, metabolically active bacterial composition of caries lesions at different stages of disease progression in order to provide a list of potential etiological agents of tooth decay. Design: Non-cavitated enamel caries lesions (n=15 and dentin caries lesions samples (n=12 were collected from 13 individuals. RNA was extracted and cDNA was constructed, which was used to amplify the 16S rRNA gene. The resulting 780 bp polymerase chain reaction products were pyrosequenced using Titanium-plus chemistry, and the sequences obtained were used to determine the bacterial composition. Results: A mean of 4,900 sequences of the 16S rRNA gene with an average read length of 661 bp was obtained per sample, giving a comprehensive view of the active bacterial communities in caries lesions. Estimates of bacterial diversity indicate that the microbiota of cavities is highly complex, each sample containing between 70 and 400 metabolically active species. The composition of these bacterial consortia varied among individuals and between caries lesions of the same individuals. In addition, enamel and dentin lesions had a different bacterial makeup. Lactobacilli were found almost exclusively in dentin cavities. Streptococci accounted for 40% of the total active community in enamel caries, and 20% in dentin caries. However, Streptococcus mutans represented only 0.02–0.73% of the total bacterial community. Conclusions: The data indicate that the etiology of dental caries is tissue dependent and that the disease has a clear polymicrobial origin. The low proportion of mutans streptococci

  19. Chitinolytic bactery activity isolated from the mud fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuniek Herdyastuti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A chitinolytic microorganism had been isolated from mud fields in Ketintang Surabaya area by using a minimal media containing 0.4% colloidal chitin. Activity assay is based on released N-acetyl-glucosamine which reacted with 3,5 dinitrosalicyclic acid. Mud fields produce 63 bacterial isolates with chitinase activity (TNH1 – TNH63 isolates. The highest activity was shown by TNH11 isolate with specific activity 1.27 U/mg. TNH11 isolates was Gram negative, rod-cocoid cell, has a colony of yellow, round shape, convex elevation, flat margin and the colony diameter 3–5 mm.

  20. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Mace; Lisbeth Truelstrup-Hansen; Vasantha Rupasinghe, H. P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis. The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory activities of 25 natural phenolic compounds against three strains of S. pyogenes. Methods: After an initial screening, the minimum inhibito...

  1. Mercury methylation and bacterial activity associated to tropical phytoplankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho-Souza, Sergio A. [Laboratorio de Tracadores Wolfgang Pfeiffer, SL 62, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Bloco G, Ilha do Fundao, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBCCF/UFRJ), RJ, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil); Guimaraes, Jean R.D. [Laboratorio de Tracadores Wolfgang Pfeiffer, SL 62, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Bloco G, Ilha do Fundao, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBCCF/UFRJ), RJ, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil)]. E-mail: jeanrdg@biof.ufrj.br; Mauro, Jane B.N. [Laboratorio de Tracadores Wolfgang Pfeiffer, SL 62, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Bloco G, Ilha do Fundao, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBCCF/UFRJ), RJ, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil); Miranda, Marcio R. [Laboratorio de Tracadores Wolfgang Pfeiffer, SL 62, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Bloco G, Ilha do Fundao, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IBCCF/UFRJ), RJ, CEP 21949-900 (Brazil); Azevedo, Sandra M.F.O. [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, IBCCF/UFRJ, RJ (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The methylated form of mercury (Hg), methylmercury (MeHg), is one of the most toxic pollutants. Biotic and/or abiotic methylation, often associated to sulfate-reducing bacteria metabolism, occurs in aquatic environments and in many tropical areas, mostly in the periphyton associated to floating macrophyte roots. Data about mercury methylation by phytoplankton are scarce and the aim of this study was to verify the biotic influence in the methylation process in Microcystis aeruginosa and Sineccocystis sp. laboratory strains and in natural populations of phytoplankton from two different aquatic systems, the mesotrophic Ribeirao das Lajes reservoir and hypereutrophic oligohaline Jacarepagua lagoon, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Adapted radiochemical techniques were used to measure sulfate-reduction, mercury methylation and bacterial activity in phytoplankton samples. Methyl-{sup 203}Hg formation from added inorganic {sup 203}Hg and {sup 3}H-Leucine uptake were measured by liquid scintillation as well as sulfate-reduction, estimated as H{sub 2} {sup 35}S produced from added Na{sub 2} {sup 35}SO{sub 4}. There was no significant difference in low methylation potentials (0.37%) among the two cyanobacterium species studied in laboratory conditions. At Ribeirao das Lajes reservoir, there was no significant difference in methylation, bacterial activity and sulfate-reduction of surface sediment between the sampling points. Methylation in sediments (3-4%) was higher than in phytoplankton (1.5%), the opposite being true for bacterial activity (sediment mean 6.6 against 150.3 nmol gdw{sup -1} h{sup -1} for phytoplankton samples). At Jacarepagua lagoon, an expressive bacterial activity (477.1 x 10{sup 3} nmol gdw{sup -1} h{sup -1} at a concentration of 1000 nM leucine) and sulfate-reduction ({approx}21% H{sub 2} {sup 35}S trapped) associated to phytoplankton (mostly cyanobacteria M. aeruginosa) was observed, but mercury methylation was not detected.

  2. Microbial activity and bacterial community structure during degradation of microcystins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; Lyck, Susanne; Winding, A.

    2002-01-01

    experiment to evaluate the effects of organic lysates on bacterial proliferation in the absence of microcystin. An exponential decline of the dissolved toxins was observed in all cases with toxins present, and the degradation rates ranged between 0.5 and 1.0 d(-1). No lag phases were observed but slow......Degradation of realistic microcystin concentrations in lake water with indigenous bacteria was studied in laboratory and field experiments following inoculation with lysed toxic algal material containing microcystin primarily from Microcystis sp. or purified commercial microcystin-LR to microcosms....... It was hypothesised that the bacterial community from a lake with frequent occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria can degrade microcystin along with other organic compounds. The initial dissolved microcystin concentrations ranged between 10 and 136 mug 1(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents) in the laboratory experiment, using...

  3. EPITHERMAL NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR BACTERIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF CHROMIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Ya. Tsibakhashvili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Most powerful primary analytical technique, neutron activation analysis, was applied to study indigenous bacteria, namely, Arthrobacter genera which can be successfully used in detoxification and immobilization of toxic substances. In the present study the effect of Cr(VI on the elemental content of these bacteria has been examined. The concentrations from 12 to 19 elements such as Na, Al, Cl, K, Fe, Co, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Sb, Ba, Tb, Th, U were determined in the bacterial cells. The high rate of Cr accumulation in the tested bacterial cells was shown. In bacteria treated with chromate some similarity in the behaviour of the following essential elements − potassium, sodium, chlorine − was observed. Such non-essential elements as Ag, As, Br and U were determined in all bacteria and have to be considered by cells as toxins.

  4. Kombucha-synthesized bacterial cellulose: preparation, characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changlai; Li, Feng; Zhou, Xinyang; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Tianyi

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a natural biomaterial with unique properties suitable for tissue engineering applications, but it has not yet been used for preparing nerve conduits to repair peripheral nerve injuries. The objectives of this study were to prepare and characterize the Kampuchea-synthesized bacterial cellulose (KBC) and further evaluate the biocompatibility of KBC with peripheral nerve cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo. KBC membranes were composed of interwoven ribbons of about 20-100 nm in width, and had a high purity and the same crystallinity as that of cellulose Iα. The results from light and scanning electron microscopy, MTT assay, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR indicated that no significant differences in the morphology and cell function were observed between Schwann cells (SCs) cultured on KBC membranes and glass slips. We also fabricated a nerve conduit using KBC, which was implanted into the spatium intermusculare of rats. At 1, 3, and 6 weeks post-implantation, clinical chemistry and histochemistry showed that there were no significant differences in blood counts, serum biochemical parameters, and tissue reactions between implanted rats and sham-operated rats. Collectively, our data indicated that KBC possessed good biocompatibility with primary cultured SCs and KBC did not exert hematological and histological toxic effects on nerve tissues in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Performance evaluation and bacterial characterization of membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sher Jamal; Parveen, Fozia; Ahmad, Aman; Hashmi, Imran; Hankins, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    A bench-scale conventional membrane bioreactor (C-MBR), a moving bed membrane bioreactor (MB-MBR) and an anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O-MBR), operating under similar feed, environmental and operating conditions, were each evaluated for their treatment performance and bacterial diversity. MBRs were compared for the removal of organics (COD) and nutrients (N and P) while pure culture techniques were employed for bacterial isolation and an API 20E kit was used to identify the isolates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, selected as a representative of denitrifying microorganisms, was isolated only from the A/O-MBR using Citrimide Agar. Using PCR, the nitrifying bacteria Nitrosomonas europaea was detected only in the MB-MBR. On the other hand, Nitrobacter winogradskyi was detected in all three reactors. Addition of media and maintenance of a lesser DO resulted in the highest TN removal in the A/O-MBR as compared to the C-MBR and the MB-MBR, whereas better nitrification was observed in the MB-MBR than in the C-MBR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis and Anti-Bacterial Activities of Some Novel Schiff Bases Derived from Aminophenazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman A Khan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-3H-pyrazol-3-one-containing Schiff bases were synthesized, characterized and screened for their antibacterial activities. The structures of the synthesized compounds were established by spectroscopic (FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, MS and elemental analyses. The anti-bacterial activities (with MIC values of compounds were evaluated. The anti-bacterial screening results reveal that among the six compounds screened, four compounds showed moderate to good anti-bacterial activity. Among the tested compounds, the most effective compounds against four bacterial strains, viz. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes, are [(2-Chlorobenzylideneamino]-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (4 and [(1,5-Dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-yliminomethyl]benzonitrile (5 with MIC values of 6.25 μg/mL.

  7. Evaluation of method bias for determining bacterial populations in bacterial community analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Kita, Yasuko; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2017-10-01

    Various methods are used for analyzing a bacterial community. We recently developed a method for quantifying each bacterium constituting the microbiota by combining a next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (NGS-qPCR) assay. Our NGS-qPCR method is useful for analyzing a comprehensive bacterial community because it is enables the easy calculation of the amounts of each bacterium constituting the microbiota. However, it has not been confirmed whether the estimated bacterial community obtained using this NGS-qPCR method corresponds to the results obtained using conventional methods. Accordingly, we prepared model bacterial community samples and analyzed them by several methods (NGS-qPCR, species-specific qPCR, flow cytometry, total direct counting by epifluorescent microscopy [TDC], and plate count). The total bacterial cell densities determined by the PCR-based methods were largely consistent with those determined by the TDC method. There was a difference between the amounts of each bacterium analyzed by NGS-qPCR and species-specific qPCR, although the same trend was shown by both species-specific qPCR and NGS-qPCR. Our findings also demonstrated that there is a strong positive correlation between the cell densities of a specific bacterial group in craft beer samples determined by group-specific qPCR and NGS-qPCR, and there were no significant differences among quantification methods (we tested two bacterial groups: lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria). Thus, the NGS-qPCR method is a practical method for analyzing a comprehensive bacterial community based on a bacterial cell density. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening of anti-bacterial activity of medicinal plants from Belize (Central America).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, A; Balick, M J; Arvigo, R; Esposito, R G; Morsellino, N; De Simone, F; Tubaro, A

    2003-07-01

    Twenty-one extracts from seven herbal drugs, Aristolochia trilobata (Aristolochiaceae) leaves and bark, Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) bark, Guazuma ulmifolia (Sterculiaceae) bark, Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) leaves and Syngonium podophyllum (Araceae) leaves and bark, used in traditional medicine of Belize (Central America) as deep and superficial wound healers, were evaluated for their anti-bacterial properties. Activity was tested against standard strains of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Almost all the extracts were able to inhibit the growth of one or more of the bacterial strains, except that of Enterococcus faecalis. For the first time an anti-microbial activity is reported for Aristolochia trilobata as well as for Syngonium podophyllum. The hexane extracts of Aristolochia trilobata leaves and bark were the most active extracts against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=0.31 and 0.625mg/ml, respectively).

  9. Bacterial community dynamics and taxa-time relationships within two activated sludge bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuan; Du, Zhize

    2014-01-01

    Biological activated sludge process must be functionally stable to continuously remove contaminants while relying upon the activity of complex microbial communities. However the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community dynamic is the taxa-time relationship (TTR). Although the TTR of animal and plant species has been well documented, knowledge is still lacking in regard to TTR of microbial communities in activated sludge bioreactors. 1) To characterize the temporal dynamics of bacterial taxa in activated sludge from two bioreactors of different scale and investigate factors affecting such dynamics; 2) to evaluate the TTRs of activated sludge microbial communities in two bioreactors of different scale. Temporal variation of bacterial taxa in activated sludge collected from a full- and lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor was monitored over a one-year period using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. TTR was employed to quantify the bacterial taxa shifts based on the power law equation S = cTw. The power law exponent w for the full-scale bioreactor was 0.43 (R2 = 0.970), which is lower than that of the lab-scale bioreactor (w = 0.55, R2 = 0.971). The exponents for the dominant phyla were generally higher than that of the rare phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) result showed that the bacterial community variance was significantly associated with water temperature, influent (biochemical oxygen demand) BOD, bioreactor scale and dissolved oxygen (DO). Variance partitioning analyses suggested that wastewater characteristics had the greatest contribution to the bacterial community variance, explaining 20.3% of the variance of bacterial communities independently, followed by operational parameters (19.9%) and bioreactor scale (3.6%). Results of this study suggest bacterial community dynamics were likely driven partly by wastewater and operational parameters and provide evidence that

  10. Synthesis, Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Evaluation of Pyrazoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin D. Panchal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Series of N-(5-(Substituted phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-amine compounds were prepared by reaction of 4-amino-1,2,4-Triazole with Acetyl Chloride followed by different aromatic aldehydes and cyclization with hydrazine hydrate. The structures of new compounds were confirmed by IR and 1H-NMR spectral data. Anti-bacterial and Anti-fungal activities were evaluated and compared with the standard drugs, some compounds of the series exhibited promising anti-microbial and anti-fungal activity compared to standard drugs.

  11. Evaluation of fungal laccase immobilized on natural nanostructured bacterial cellulose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the possibility of using native bacterial nanocellulose (BC as a carrier for laccase immobilization. BC was synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus, which was statically cultivated in a mannitol-based medium and was freeze-dried to form BC sponge after purification. For the first time, fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was immobilized on the native nanofibril network-structured BC sponge through physical adsorption and cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. The properties including morphologic and structural features of the BC as well as the immobilized enzyme were thoroughly investigated. It was found that enzyme immobilized by cross-linking exhibited broader pH operation range of high catalytic activity as well as higher running stability compared to free and adsorbed enzyme. Using ABTS as substrate, the optimum pH value was 3.5 for the adsorption-immobilized laccase and 4.0 for the crosslinking-immobilized laccase. The immobilized enzyme retained 69% of the original activity after being recycled 7 times. Novel applications of the BC-immobilized enzyme tentatively include active packaging, construction of biosensors, and establishment of bioreactors.

  12. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Mace

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis. The objective of this study was to assess the inhibitory activities of 25 natural phenolic compounds against three strains of S. pyogenes. Methods: After an initial screening, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of the nine most effective phenolic compounds were determined. The effect of four compounds with the lowest MIC and MBC on streptococcal growth and biofilm formation was also studied. Results: 1,2-Naphthoquinone and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone elicited the greatest anti-S. pyogenes activities with MICs ranging from 0.39 to 6.25 µg mL−1 and MBCs of 100 µg mL−1. Both naphthoquinones inhibited the biofilm formation at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 µg mL−1. Biofilm reduction and altered bacterial cell structures were visible in scanning electron microscopy images of naphthoquinone-treated cells. Conclusion: In conclusion, 1,2-naphthoquinone and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone inhibit S. pyogenes and should be further investigated as candidates for the management of streptococcal pharyngitis.

  13. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active againstStaphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at 90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  14. Field evaluation of improved cowpea lines for resistance to bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... resistance to bacterial blight, virus and striga under natural infestation in the West ... Key words: Bacterial blight, cowpea, virus, striga, grain yield, West Africa Savanna. INTRODUCTION. Cowpea [Vigna .... The data recorded were analysed using computer program GenStat. Discovery Edtion2 and Least ...

  15. Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults: part I. Evaluation | Scheid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although often caused by viruses, it sometimes is caused by bacteria, a condition that is called acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. The signs and symptoms of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis and prolonged viral upper respiratory infection are similar, which makes accurate clinical diagnosis difficult. South African Family Practice Vol.

  16. Anti-enteric bacterial activity of the traditional medicinal plants of Kanyakumari coast, Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyambu Rajan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial potentials of 6 traditionally used medicinal plants to treat gastrointestinal infection against pathogenic bacteria, as most of the pathogens develop drug resistance against commonly used antibiotics. Methods: Crude extracts from different parts of different plants were tested against bacterial strains of clinical significance. Extraction of bioactive principles was done with water and ethanol. Evaluation of antibacterial activity was done by disc diffusion assay against selected bacterial stains. Results: Of the 6 different plant materials tested, extracts prepared from Psidium guajava leaves showed significantly higher efficacy. Extracts prepared using alcohol exhibited higher antibacterial activity when compared to their corresponding aqueous extracts. Conclusions: The findings of the present study suggested that phytochemical extracts of the presently studied plant materials possess significant anti-enteric bacterial activity, and thus lend pharmacological credibility to the suggested traditional use of the plant as a natural remedy for the treatment, management and/or control of gastrointestinal diseases in the coastal tracts of Kanyakumari district, Tamilnadu, India.

  17. Evaluation of bacterial translocation in patients with chronic HCV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Daniela; Negru, Anca; Radulescu, Mihaela; Mihailescu, Raluca; Arama, St S; Arama, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The factors involved in the progression of liver disease towards decompensated cirrhosis are not completely elucidated. It seems that bacterial translocation (BT) from the gut to the systemic blood flow has an important role in the disease progression, but literature data are controversial. Our objectives were to evaluate the presence of BT in patients with chronic HCV infection and to assess the correlation between BT and liver fibrosis stages and inflammatory state. We conducted a cross-sectional study on patients with chronic HCV infection in a tertiary care hospital between January and July 2013. Blood samples were collected for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, platelets, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis-alpha (TNFα). Plasma LPS were measured by ELISA (Kamiya Biomedical Company Seattle, SUA) and TNFα by DIAsource ImmunoAssay (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) kits. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by means of FibroMax (BioPredictive, Paris, France) in all patients. We enrolled 116 patients with CHC, with a sex ratio M/F of 0.55 and a median age of 54 (45-61) years. Most of the patients (32) had compensated cirrhosis (F4). LPS levels were higher in patients with mild fibrosis--median value of 60.34 (32-91.7) ng/mL, than in cirrhotic patients--median value 40.39 (20.2-74.4) ng/mL (p = 0.051). We found no statistical correlation between LPS levels and fibrosis (p = 0.068) or TNFα levels (p = 0.097) CONCLUSIONS: There was BT in patients with CHC but it was not correlated with liver fibrosis stages or systemic inflammation. This may suggest that LPS evaluation may not be the best technique to assess baterial translocation, but further studies are needed.

  18. Comparative biocidal activity of peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde on 77 bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridier, A; Briandet, R; Thomas, V; Dubois-Brissonnet, F

    2011-07-01

    Despite numerous reports on biocide activities, it is often difficult to have a reliable and relevant overview of bacterial resistance to disinfectants because each work challenges a limited number of strains and tested methods are often different. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of three different disinfectants commonly used in industrial or medical environments (peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde) against 77 bacterial strains from different origins using one standard test method (NF EN 1040). Results highlight the existence of high interspecific variability of resistance to disinfectants and, contrary to widespread belief, Gram-positive strains generally appeared more resistant than Gram-negative strains. Resistance was also variable among strains of the same species such as Bacillus subtilis to peracetic acid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride and Staphylococcus aureus to ortho-phthalaldehyde. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Bacterial Clinical Infectious Diseases Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Claire L.; Pouch, Stephanie; Cowell, Lindsay G.; Boland, Mary Regina; Platt, Heather L.; Goldfain, Albert; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    With antimicrobial resistance increasing worldwide, there is a great need to use automated antimicrobial decision support systems (ADSSs) to lower antimicrobial resistance rates by promoting appropriate antimicrobial use. However, they are infrequently used mostly because of their poor interoperability with different health information technologies. Ontologies can augment portable ADSSs by providing an explicit knowledge representation for biomedical entities and their relationships, helping to standardize and integrate heterogeneous data resources. We developed a bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology (BCIDO) using Protégé-OWL. BCIDO defines a controlled terminology for clinical infectious diseases along with domain knowledge commonly used in hospital settings for clinical infectious disease treatment decision-making. BCIDO has 599 classes and 2355 object properties. Terms were imported from or mapped to Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine, Unified Medical Language System, RxNorm and National Center for Bitechnology Information Organismal Classification where possible. Domain expert evaluation using the “laddering” technique, ontology visualization, and clinical notes and scenarios, confirmed the correctness and potential usefulness of BCIDO. PMID:24551353

  20. Microbial activity of soil with sulfentrazone associated with phytoremediator species and inoculation with a bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Augusta Diniz Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Phytostimulation plays a key role in the process of rhizodegradation of herbicides in soil. Additionally, bio-enhancement associated with phytoremediation may increase the efficiency of the decontamination process of soils with herbicides. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass and microbial activity of soil contaminated with sulfentrazone and cultivated with phytoremediator species plus a bacterial consortium. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse, carried out with a 2 × 4 × 4 completely randomized factorial design with 4 replications. The first factor consisted of the presence or absence of bio-enhancement with a bacterial consortium composed of Pseudomonas bacteria; the second factor consisted of a monoculture or mixed cultivation of 2 phytoremediator species Canavalia ensiformis and Helianthus annuus, besides the absence of cultivation; the third factor was made up by the bio-remediation time (25, 45, 65, and 85 days after thinning. Uncultivated soils displayed low values of microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient as well as high values of metabolic quotient throughout the bio-remediation time, indicating the importance of cultivating phytoremediator species for the stimulation of soil microbiota. Bio-enhancement with the bacterial consortium, in general, promoted an increase in the microbial biomass and activity of soil contaminated with sulfentrazone. In the presence of the bacterial consortium, Canavalia ensiformis stimulated a greater activity of associated microbiota and supported a higher microbial biomass. Phytoremediation associated with microbial bio-enhancement are thus promising techniques for the bio-remediation for soils contaminated with sulfentrazone. This technique enhances the biomass and activity of soil microorganisms.

  1. In vitro evaluation of the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyo Ikai

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 and comparing this with existing antibacterial agents. We tested seven antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, cefepime hydrochloride, erythromycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin hydrochloride, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, and minocycline hydrochloride, as positive controls for validation of the assay protocol. For all of the agents tested, at least one of the four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus salivarius was resistant to these agents by repeated exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of the agents up to 10 times. In contrast, antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial species tested (S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli, S. salivarius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was not affected by repeated exposure to the disinfection treatment up to 40 times. This finding suggested that the risk of inducing bacterial resistance by disinfection treatment was low. The active ingredient of this disinfection treatment is hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H2O2. Therefore, hydroxyl radicals interact with several cell structures and different metabolic pathways in microbial cells, probably resulting in a lack of development of bacterial resistance. In conclusion, disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 appears to be a potential alternative for existing antimicrobial agents in terms of a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance.

  2. Screening bacterial species for antagonistic activities against the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, 23 bacteria strains that belong to 19 bacterial species were tested against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) De Bary. In vivo and in vitro testing of bacterial strains showed that Serratia plymuthica strains IK-150 and IK-139, Burkholderia cepacia strain IK-16, Pseudomonas flourocens strain IK-3, Pseudomonas ...

  3. evaluation of the spoilage potential of selected bacterial isolates on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACTERIAL ISOLATES ON EFHIOPIAN SAUCES AND. EFFECT OF TWO ... The ingredients of the various spices may also affect the extent of proliferation of .... of growth was seen in “berbere” medium than in control in four strains. (p>0.05).

  4. Aseptic and Bacterial Meningitis: Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Hillary R; Boyle, Sean D

    2017-09-01

    The etiologies of meningitis range in severity from benign and self-limited to life-threatening with potentially severe morbidity. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency that requires prompt recognition and treatment. Mortality remains high despite the introduction of vaccinations for common pathogens that have reduced the incidence of meningitis worldwide. Aseptic meningitis is the most common form of meningitis with an annual incidence of 7.6 per 100,000 adults. Most cases of aseptic meningitis are viral and require supportive care. Viral meningitis is generally self-limited with a good prognosis. Examination maneuvers such as Kernig sign or Brudzinski sign may not be useful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis because of variable sensitivity and specificity. Because clinical findings are also unreliable, the diagnosis relies on the examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from lumbar puncture. Delayed initiation of antibiotics can worsen mortality. Treatment should be started promptly in cases where transfer, imaging, or lumbar puncture may slow a definitive diagnosis. Empiric antibiotics should be directed toward the most likely pathogens and should be adjusted by patient age and risk factors. Dexamethasone should be administered to children and adults with suspected bacterial meningitis before or at the time of initiation of antibiotics. Vaccination against the most common pathogens that cause bacterial meningitis is recommended. Chemoprophylaxis of close contacts is helpful in preventing additional infections.

  5. Evaluating sulphate removal and identifying the bacterial community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial community analyses using next generation sequencing showed that Chlorobium spp. dominated at a relative percentage of 36% followed by Magnetospirillum spp. and Ornithobacterium spp. The effect of a resident biofilm in the bioreactors showed dominance of Chlorobium spp. at a relative percentage of 62% ...

  6. Evaluation of various pesticides-degrading pure bacterial cultures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to the intensive use of pesticides within the greenhouse-rose production, remediation of polluted soils has become a hot topic for researchers in recent decades. Several bacterial strains having the ability to utilize various pesticides as a sole source of carbon and energy were isolated from pesticidecontaminated soils ...

  7. Community practice patterns for bacterial corneal ulcer evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jennifer; Lee, Kim M; Zhou, Helen; Rabin, Moriah; Jwo, Kevin; Burton, William B; Gritz, David C

    2015-01-01

    To examine current practice patterns in the management of bacterial keratitis among U.S. ophthalmologists and differences in the management and opinions between cornea specialists and non-cornea specialists. A questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected ophthalmologists in July 2011 using an online survey system. It inquired about the number of patients with corneal ulcers seen monthly, frequency of Gram staining and culturing corneal ulcers, maintenance of diagnostic supplies, opinions on when culturing is necessary for corneal ulcers, treatment preferences for different severities of bacterial corneal ulcers, and opinions regarding relative efficacy of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones and fortified broad-spectrum antibiotics. One thousand seven hundred one surveys were distributed, and 486 (28.6%) surveys were returned. A minority of corneal ulcers was Gram stained (23.7%±34.1%, mean±SD) or cultured (35.1%±38.0%), but cornea specialists were more likely to perform both. The most popular antibiotic for the treatment of less severe ulcers was moxifloxacin (55.4%), and the most popular treatment of more severe ulcers was fortified broad-spectrum antibiotics (62.7%). Cornea specialists were significantly more likely than non-cornea specialists to prescribe fortified antibiotics for more severe corneal ulcers (78.1% vs. 53.7%, P<0.0001). A greater number of cornea specialists stated that fourth-generation fluoroquinolones were less effective than fortified antibiotics for the treatment of more severe corneal ulcers (79.6% of cornea specialists vs. 60.9% of non-cornea specialists, P<0.001). Cornea specialists and non-cornea specialists manage bacterial keratitis differently, with cornea specialists more likely to perform diagnostic testing and prescribe fortified broad-spectrum antibiotics for severe bacterial keratitis. Additional prospective studies demonstrating visual outcomes after differential treatment of bacterial keratitis are needed.

  8. Anti-Bacterial Activity of Phenolic Compounds against Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Sabrina; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; P. Vasantha Rupasinghe, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, Streptococcus pyogenes is the leading cause of bacterial pharyngitis. To reduce the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial phytochemical-containing remedies, which have long been in use in traditional medicine, may provide new approaches for management of streptococcal pharyngitis...

  9. (MDR) Bacterial Activity of Endophytic Fungi Isolated from the Mang

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MDR) bacterial potential of culturable endophytes from A. corniculatum in Beibu Gulf, China. Methods: The plant parts were collected from healthy-looking A. corniculatum. The endophytes were isolated and identified by colonial morphology and ...

  10. Desulfurization activity and reusability of magnetite nanoparticle-coated Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardania, Hassan; Raheb, Jamshid; Mohammad-Beigi, Hossein; Rasekh, Behnam; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-01-01

    The application of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles to the separation of desulfurizing bacterial cells and their influence on the desulfurization activity and reusability of the two bacterial strains Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the reverse coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the magnetite nanoparticles had sizes of 5.35 ± 1.13 (F1 nanoparticles) and 8.74 ± 1.18 nm (F2 nanoparticles) when glycine was added during the synthesis of nanoparticles and when it was absent from the reaction mixture, respectively. Glycine was added after the synthesis of both F1 and F2 nanoparticles to stabilize the nanoparticle dispersion. TEM images of cells treated with magnetite nanoparticles indicated that F1 nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of bacterial cells more evenly than the F2 nanoparticles. Desulfurization activities of the F1 magnetite nanoparticle-coated R. erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 cells (with sulfur-removal percentage values of 70 ± 4 and 73 ± 3, respectively), as examined with the spectrophotometric Gibbs assay (based on dibenzothiophene degradation and sulfur-removal percentage), were not significantly different from those for the free bacterial cells (67 ± 3 and 69 ± 4, respectively). These results indicate that magnetite nanoparticles cannot affect the desulfurization activity of cells examined in this work. Isolation of bacterial cells from the suspension using a magnet and evaluation of desulfurization activity of separated cells showed that Fe3 O4 nanoparticles can provide a high-efficiency recovery of bacterial cells from a suspension, with the reused magnetite nanoparticle-coated bacterial cells being able to maintain their desulfurization activity efficiently. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active against Staphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at ≤1 mg/L and all isolates at ≤2 mg/L (MIC5090, 0.25/2 mg/L. National MRSA rates ranged from a low of 28.8% in Colombia to a high of 68.1% in Chile. All Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC50/90 values were at ≤0.015/≤0.015 mg/L for both. All Streptococcus pneumoniae were susceptible to ceftaroline, linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone was at 88.4% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 73.9% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for all S. pneumoniae. Ceftriaxone susceptibility was only at 33.3% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 0.0% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for penicillin-intermediate (penicillin MIC, 4 mg/L strains. All Haemophilus influenzae (29.4% β-lactamase-positive isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline, amoxicillin–clavulanate, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin. For the Latin American region, the ESBL-phenotype rate was 37.6% for Escherichia coli and 53.3% for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Ceftaroline was not active against ESBL-phenotype strains but was active against >90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  12. Diversity and biological activities of the bacterial community associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior (Porifera, Demospongiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, S; Carré-Mlouka, A; Descarrega, F; Ereskovsky, A; Longeon, A; Mouray, E; Florent, I; Bourguet-Kondracki, M L

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the cultivable microbiota of the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea was investigated, and its potential as a source of antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiplasmodial compounds was evaluated. The cultivable bacterial community was studied by isolation, cultivation and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Twenty-three bacterial strains were isolated and identified in the Proteobacteria (α or γ classes) and Actinobacteria phyla. Furthermore, three different bacterial morphotypes localized extracellularly within the sponge tissues were revealed by microscopic observations. Bacterial strains were assigned to seven different genera, namely Vibrio, Photobacterium, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Ruegeria, Pseudovibrio and Citricoccus. The strains affiliated to the same genus were differentiated according to their genetic dissimilarities using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. Eleven bacterial strains were selected for evaluation of their bioactivities. Three isolates Pseudovibrio P1Ma4, Vibrio P1MaNal1 and Citricoccus P1S7 revealed antimicrobial activity; Citricoccus P1S7 and Vibrio P1MaNal1 isolates also exhibited antiplasmodial activity, while two Vibrio isolates P1Ma8 and P1Ma5 displayed antioxidant activity. These data confirmed the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria associated with marine sponges as a reservoir of bioactive compounds. This study presents the first report on the diversity of the cultivable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Phorbas tenacior, frequently found in the Mediterranean Sea. Evaluation of the antiplasmodial, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of the isolates has been investigated and allowed to select bacterial strains, confirming the importance of Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria as sources of bioactive compounds. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roja Rani Pallavali

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS, Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100% were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence

  14. Mutagenic activity of phthalate esters in bacterial liquid suspension assays.

    OpenAIRE

    Seed, J L

    1982-01-01

    The mutagenic activities of several phthalate esters have been evaluated in an 8-azaguanine resistance assay in Salmonella typhimurium. Three phthalate esters were found to be mutagenic: dimethyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate. A number of other phthalate esters were not found to be mutagenic, including di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, di-n-octyl phthalate, diallyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate and diisodecyl phthalate. A metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, 2-ethylhe...

  15. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Aebli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about genetic complementation experiments, and students must evaluate how genetic mutations in the lux operon affect gene expression and overall phenotype. The worksheet promotes critical thinking and problem solving skills, and emphasizes the roles of diffusible signaling molecules, regulatory proteins, and structural proteins in quorum sensing.

  16. ITS evaluations and activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations are critical in promoting innovative practices which may help to provide a safe and efficient transportation system. By conducting such evaluations, we develop quantifiable measures for those in policy development to appreciate and compre...

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Polyphenolic Fraction of Kombucha Against Enteric Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Patra, Madhu Manti; Chakravorty, Somnath; Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakraborty, Writachit; Koley, Hemanta; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant enteric pathogens has prompted the scientist community to explore the therapeutic potentials of traditional foods and beverages. The present study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of Kombucha, a fermented beverage of sugared black tea, against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella flexneri and Salmonella Typhimurium followed by the identification of the antibacterial components present in Kombucha. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the inhibition zone diameter, minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Kombucha fermented for 14 days showed maximum activity against the bacterial strains. Its ethyl acetate extract was found to be the most effective upon sequential solvent extraction of the 14-day Kombucha. This potent ethyl acetate extract was then subjected to thin layer chromatography for further purification of antibacterial ingredients which led to the isolation of an active polyphenolic fraction. Catechin and isorhamnetin were detected as the major antibacterial compounds present in this polyphenolic fraction of Kombucha by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Catechin, one of the primary antibacterial polyphenols in tea was also found to be present in Kombucha. But isorhamnetin is not reported to be present in tea, which may thereby suggest the role of fermentation process of black tea for its production in Kombucha. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of isorhamnetin in Kombucha. The overall study suggests that Kombucha can be used as a potent antibacterial agent against entero-pathogenic bacterial infections, which mainly is attributed to its polyphenolic content.

  18. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Background: Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the etiology of this condition. Objectives: To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Methods: Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by AKTA-FPLC. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Results: Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of MMP-9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of Il-8 and TNF-alpha production. Conclusions: Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea.

  19. Demodex-associated bacterial proteins induce neutrophil activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, N; Bergin, D; Reeves, E P; McElvaney, N G; Kavanagh, K

    2012-04-01

    Patients with rosacea demonstrate a higher density of Demodex mites in their skin than do controls. A bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite from a patient with papulopustular rosacea (PPR) was previously shown to provoke an immune response in patients with PPR or ocular rosacea, thus suggesting a possible role for bacterial proteins in the aetiology of this condition. To examine the response of neutrophils to proteins derived from a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite. Bacterial cells were lysed and proteins were partially purified by ÄKTA fast protein liquid chromatography. Isolated neutrophils were exposed to bacterial proteins and monitored for alterations in migration, degranulation and cytokine production. Neutrophils exposed to proteins from Bacillus cells demonstrated increased levels of migration and elevated release of matrix metalloprotease 9, an enzyme known to degrade collagen, and cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide. In addition, neutrophils exposed to the bacterial proteins demonstrated elevated rates of interleukin 8 and tumour necrosis factor-α production. Proteins produced by a bacterium isolated from a Demodex mite have the ability to increase the migration, degranulation and cytokine production abilities of neutrophils. These results suggest that bacteria may play a role in the inflammatory erythema associated with rosacea. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis among sexually active women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial, superficial vaginal infection involving a reduction in the amount of hydrogen peroxide-producing Lactobacillus and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria. Common symptoms include increased fishy smelling vaginal discharge which is usually white or gray in color.

  1. Calcium phosphate coating containing silver shows high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity and inhibits bacterial adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Yoshiki, E-mail: andoy@jmmc.jp [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Noda, Iwao; Sakurai, Nobuko [Research Department, Japan Medical Materials Corporation, Uemura Nissei Bldg.9F 3-3-31 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-0003 (Japan); Akiyama, Tomonori [Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan); Yonekura, Yutaka; Shimazaki, Takafumi; Miyazaki, Masaki; Mawatari, Masaaki; Hotokebuchi, Takao [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, 5-1-1 Nabeshima, Saga 849-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the serious complications of orthopedic implants. In order to reduce the incidence of implant-associated infections, we developed a novel coating technology of calcium phosphate (CP) containing silver (Ag), designated Ag-CP coating, using a thermal spraying technique. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial efficacy and biological safety of this coating. In vitro antibacterial activity tests showed that the growths of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are completely suppressed on Ag-CP coating. In vitro bacterial adherence tests revealed that the number of adherent bacteria on the surface of this coating is significantly less (p < 0.02) than that on the surface of the CP coating. Moreover, the Ag-CP coating completely inhibits MRSA adhesion [<10 colony-forming units (CFU)] when 10{sup 2} CFU MRSA is inoculated. On the other hand, V79 Chinese hamster lung cells were found to grow on the Ag-CP coating as well as on the CP coating in a cytotoxicity test. These results indicate that the Ag-CP coating on the surface of orthopedic implants exhibits antibacterial activity and inhibits bacterial adhesion without cytotoxicity.

  2. Bacterial abundance, communities and heterotrophic activities in the coastal waters off Tamil Nadu

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, C.; Sheelu, G.; Chandramohan, D.

    abundance of CAHB and TDC was observed in most locations. Microbial heterotrophic uptake and respiration rates of labelled glucose were high (except off Madras) suggesting a highly active microflora at most of these locations. Many bacterial genera were seen...

  3. Spectral analysis and anti-bacterial activity of methanolic fruit extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectral analysis and anti-bacterial activity of methanolic fruit extract of Citrullus colocynthis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Salah Ali Idan, Ali Hussein Al-Marzoqi, Imad Hadi Hameed ...

  4. Comparison of bacterial communities of conventional and A-stage activated sludge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, A.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Lotti, T.; Garcia-Ruiz, M.J.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of 10 different wastewater treatment systems and their influents has been investigated through pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 283486 reads. These bioreactors had different technological configurations: conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems and very highly

  5. Effect of flow and active mixing on bacterial growth in a colon-like geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jonas; Segota, Igor; Arnoldini, Markus; Groisman, Alex; Hwa, Terence

    The large intestine harbors bacteria from hundreds of species, with bacterial densities reaching up to 1012 cells per gram. Many different factors influence bacterial growth dynamics and thus bacterial density and microbiota composition. One dominant force is flow which can in principle lead to a washout of bacteria from the proximal colon. Active mixing by Contractions of the colonic wall together with bacterial growth might counteract such flow-forces and allow high bacterial densities to occur. As a step towards understanding bacterial growth in the presence of mixing and flow, we constructed an in-vitro setup where controlled wall-deformations of a channel emulate Contractions. We investigate growth along the channel under a steady nutrient inflow. In the limits of no or very frequent Contractions, the device behaves like a plug-flow reactor and a chemostat respectively. Depending on mixing and flow, we observe varying spatial gradients in bacterial density along the channel. Active mixing by deformations of the channel wall is shown to be crucial in maintaining a steady-state bacterial population in the presence of flow. The growth-dynamics is quantitatively captured by a simple mathematical model, with the effect of mixing described by an effective diffusion term.

  6. Evaluation of Bacterial & Fungal Culture Practices in School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J. Scott

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of activities may be undertaken in elementary and secondary school science laboratories as part of regular curricular activities or optional classroom activities, including science fair projects. Among these is the culturing of microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi. There are various potential educational opportunities associated…

  7. Evaluation of procalcitonin and neopterin level in serum of patients with acute bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Pourakbari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fever as a common presenting complaint in pediatric patients can be due to various causes. Differentiating bacterial infection from other causes is important because the prompt use of antibiotics is critical in bacterial infection. Traditional markers of infection such as BT and WBC count may be unspecific and culture may be late or absent. CRP and Procalcitonin (PCT have been considered to evaluate the evolution of infections and sepsis in patients presenting with SIRS. Neopterin has also been proposed to aid in the diagnosis of bacterial infection. In this study, we compared the value of the serum PCT, neopterin level, and WBC count for predicting bacterial infection and outcome in children with fever. METHODS: 158 pediatric (2-120-month-old patients suspected to have acute bacterial infection, based on clinical judgment in which other causes of SIRS were ruled out were included in the study. WBC count with differential was determined and PCT and neopterin levels were measured. RESULTS: PCT level was higher in bacterial infection and patients who were complicated or expired. CONCLUSION: Rapid PCT test is superior to neopterin and WBC count for anticipating bacterial infection, especially in ED where prompt decision making is critical. ABBREVIATIONS: BT, body temperature; WBC, white blood cell; PCT, procalcitonin; CRP, C-reactive protein; SIRS, systemic inflammatory response syndrome; ED, emergency department.

  8. Evaluation of aztreonam in the treatment of severe bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Vivas, J; Rodríguez-Créixems, M; Bouza, E; Hellín, T; Guerrero, A; Martínez-Beltrán, J; García de la Torre, M

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the clinical efficacy and safety of aztreonam in the treatment of 50 episodes of infection in 46 adult patients. The clinical condition of patients at the beginning of treatment was critical or poor in 28 of the episodes of infection. Episodes treated were 39 urinary tract infections (12 of them with concomitant bacteremia), 2 soft tissue infections, 8 patients with osteomyelitis (1 with concomitant bacteremia), and one episode of pneumonia. Significant isolated microorganisms were aerobic or facultative gram-negative rods and were responsible for the following episodes of infection (number of episodes): members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (49), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5), and Haemophilus influenzae (1). The overall rate of clinical response to aztreonam was 94% of the treated episodes. Colonization or superinfection or both occurred in 29 episodes, but only 8 episodes required antimicrobial therapy. Aztreonam seems to be an effective single agent therapy for many bacterial infections. Colonization and superinfection by Candida sp., Streptococcus faecalis or Staphylococcus aureus must be monitored. PMID:3834832

  9. Bacterial diversity is strongly associated with historical penguin activity in an Antarctic lake sediment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Shi, Yu; Ma, Dawei; Wang, Can; Xu, Hua; Chu, Haiyan

    2015-11-25

    Current penguin activity in Antarctica affects the geochemistry of sediments and their microbial communities; the effects of historical penguin activity are less well understood. Here, bacterial diversity in ornithogenic sediment was investigated using high-throughput pyrosequencing. The relative abundances of dominant phyla were controlled by the amount of historical penguin guano deposition. Significant positive correlations were found between both the bacterial richness and diversity, and the relative penguin number (p penguin activity drove the vertical distribution of the bacterial communities. The lowest relative abundances of individual phyla corresponded to lowest number of penguin population at 1,800-2,300 yr BP during a drier and colder period; the opposite was observed during a moister and warmer climate (1,400-1,800 yr BP). This study shows that changes in the climate over millennia affected penguin populations and the outcomes of these changes affect the sediment bacterial community today.

  10. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  11. Evaluating bacterial gene-finding HMM structures as probabilistic logic programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Holmes, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Probabilistic logic programming offers a powerful way to describe and evaluate structured statistical models. To investigate the practicality of probabilistic logic programming for structure learning in bioinformatics, we undertook a simplified bacterial gene-finding benchmark in PRISM...... modeling and three-state versions of the five model structures. The models are all represented as probabilistic logic programs and evaluated using the PRISM machine learning system in terms of statistical information criteria and gene-finding prediction accuracy, in two bacterial genomes. Neither of our...

  12. Effects of chromium(III) on enzyme activities and bacterial communities during swine manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanan; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Wen; Zhang, Kaiyu; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Chunya; Liu, Jiayao

    2017-11-01

    The present study investigated the effects of different concentrations of chromium (i.e., 200 and 700mgkg-1 Cr corresponding to Cr200 and Cr700, respectively) on the microorganisms in swine manure compost. The results demonstrated that a high concentration of Cr(III) could inhibit the activity of key microbial enzymes (i.e., dehydrogenase, cellulase, and urease) in the early composting stages, with maximal inhibition rates of 54.9%, 32.8%, and 46.7% for cellulase, urease, and dehydrogenase, respectively. Furthermore, the bacterial abundances were determined by quantitative PCR and their compositions were evaluated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Cr200 and Cr700 had significant inhibitory effects on the abundances of bacteria. The DGGE results showed that Cr200 and Cr700 changed the bacterial community structure and diversity, where Cr(III) might enhance the abundance of pathogenic bacteria (e.g., Saccharomonospora) and decrease the abundances of bacteria that degrade cellulose and lignin (e.g., Paenibacillus) during composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacterial colonization of colonic crypt mucous gel and disease activity in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To optimize total bacterial 16S rRNA quantification in microdissected colonic crypts in healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to characterize the findings with disease activity. BACKGROUND: Microscopic and molecular techniques have recently converged to allow bacterial enumeration in remote anatomic locations [eg, crypt-associated mucous gel (CAMG)]. The aims of this study were to combine laser capture microdissection (LCM) and 16S rRNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine total bacterial copy number in CAMG both in health and in UC and to characterize the findings with disease activity. METHODS: LCM was used to microdissect CAMG from colonic mucosal biopsies from controls (n = 20) and patients with acute (n = 10) or subacute (n = 10) UC. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA copy number per millimeter square in samples from 6 locations across the large bowel was obtained by qPCR using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans as a reference strain. Copy numbers were correlated with the UC disease activity index (UCDAI) and the simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI). RESULTS: Bacterial colonization of CAMG was detectable in all groups. Copy numbers were significantly reduced in acute UC. In subacute colitis, there was a positive correlation between copy number and UCDAI and SCCAI in the ascending, transverse and sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a sensitive method of quantitatively assessing bacterial colonization of the colonic CAMG. A positive correlation was found between CAMG bacterial load and subacute disease activity in UC, whereas detectable bacterial load was reduced in acute UC.

  14. Characterization of bacterial functional groups and microbial activity in microcosms with glyphosate application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, Sofia; Bonetto, Mariana; Baigorria, Tomas; Pegoraro, Vanesa; Ortiz, Jimena; Faggioli, Valeria; Conde, Belen; Cazorla, Cristian; Boccolini, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate is a worldwide used herbicide as c. 90% of transgenic crops are tolerant to it. Microbial degradation of glyphosate molecule in soil is considered the most important process that determines its persistence in the environment. However, the impact of this herbicide on target groups of soil biota remains poorly understood. Our objective was to characterize the abundance of bacterial groups and global microbial activity, under controlled conditions with application of increasing doses of glyphosate. A bioassay was carried out in microcosms using an agricultural soil (Typic Argiudoll) with registered history of glyphosate application from National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA, EEA Marcos Juarez, Argentina). Glyphosate of commercial formulation (74.7%) was used and the following treatments were evaluated: Soil without glyphosate (control), and Soil with doses equivalent to 1.12 and 11.2 kg ai ha-1. Microbiological parameters were estimated at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after herbicide application by counting heterotrophic, cellulolytic, nitrogen fixing (N), and nitrifying bacteria; and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA), microbial respiration (MR) and microbial biomass (C-BM). The N cycle related bacteria showed greater sensitivity to glyphosate with significant increases in abundance. On the other hand the C cycle parameters were strongly conditioned by the time elapsed since the application of the herbicide, as did the MR. The FDA declined with the highest dose, while the C-BM was not affected. Therefore, we conclude that in the studied experimental conditions glyphosate stimulated bacterial growth (i.e. target abundances) representing a source of N, C and nutrients. On the other hand, enzymatic activity (FDA) decreased when glyphosate was applied in the highest dose, whereas, it had no effect on the MR nor C-BM, which could be attributable to the organic matter content of the soil. However, future research in field conditions is necessary, for

  15. In vitro evaluation of the implant-abutment bacterial seal: the locking taper system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibart, Serge; Warbington, Martha; Su, Ming Fan; Skobe, Ziedonis

    2005-01-01

    To test in vitro whether the seal provided by the locking taper used in the implant-abutment connection was capable of preventing the invasion of oral microorganisms. Twenty-five wide-body implants (5 x 11 mm) and 25 abutments were divided into 2 groups for a 2-phase experiment. The first phase tested the ability of the seal to shield the implant well from outside bacteria; the second phase tested the ability of the seal to prevent bacteria present in the implant well from seeping out. For phase 1, 10 implant-abutment units were immersed in a bacterial broth for 24 hours. The abutments were then separated from the implants and bacterial presence was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. In phase 2, the tested abutments were inoculated with a droplet of soft agar bacterial gel and assembled with the implant. These units were incubated in a sterile nutrient broth for 72 hours, sampled, and plated to assess bacterial presence. In phase 1, no bacteria were detected in any of the implant wells. In phase 2, no bacteria were detected in the nutrient broth or on the agar plates at 72 hours. In implants where a microgap is present, microbial leakage could lead to inflammation and bone loss; thus, it is important to minimize bacterial presence in and around the the implant-abutment junction. The seal provided by the locking taper design has been demonstrated to be hermetic with regard to bacterial invasion in vitro.

  16. Bacterial Enzymatic Activity and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Sediments from Boa Viagem Beach (Guanabara Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Crapez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the quality of the organic matter that reaches the sediment from Boa Viagem Beach and through the evaluation of the total bacterial count, the electron transport system activity (ETSA, the esterase activity (EST, as well as the protein and the organic matter contents. Seasonal variations of organic matter, protein content and the number of bacteria were particularly notable in the summer. ETSA reached a maximum of 7.48 µl O 2 h-1 g-1 in the summer. EST activity presented a different pattern once it reached a maximum of 0.17 µg fluorescein h-1 g-1 in the winter. The temporal variation of ETSA and EST activity indicated that biopolymers predominated in the winter, and oligomers or monomers predominated in the summer. These results suggest that organic carbon turnover is more likely to be controlled by organic matter quality. The heavy metals concentrations, especially for Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, indicated absence of the inhibition of dehydrogenase activity, and they are not bioavailable in the EC 50 values

  17. Polymer-Ag nanocomposites with enhanced antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Lu, Zhentan; Zhang, Xinge; Li, Chaoxing; Jia, Yanxia

    2014-09-24

    Herein, a nontoxic nanocomposite is synthesized by reduction of silver nitrate in the presence of a cationic polymer displaying strong antimicrobial activity against bacterial infection. These nanocomposites with a large concentration of positive charge promote their adsorption to bacterial membranes through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, the synthesized nanocomposites with polyvalent and synergistic antimicrobial effects can effectively kill both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria without the emergence of bacterial resistance. Morphological changes obtained by transmission electron microscope observation show that these nanocomposites can cause leakage and chaos of intracellular contents. Analysis of the antimicrobial mechanism confirms that the lethal action of nanocomposites against the bacteria started with disruption of the bacterial membrane, subsequent cellular internalization of the nanoparticles, and inhibition of intracellular enzymatic activity. This novel antimicrobial material with good cytocompatibility promotes healing of infected wounds in diabetic rats, and has a promising future in the treatment of other infectious diseases.

  18. Bacterial vaginosis presence in sexually active women in Tuzla Canton area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numanović, Fatima; Hukić, Mirsada; Gegić, Merima; Nukić, Mahmud; Delibegović, Zineta; Pasić, Selma; Cicko, Elsada

    2008-11-01

    The goal of our research was to determine the presence of bacterial vaginosis in sexually active women in Tuzla Canton area. Diagnosis determination for bacterial vaginosis was conducted on the basis of three out of four internationally accepted criteria according to Amsel and isolation and identification of Gardnerella vaginalis (G. vaginalis) by standard microbiological procedures. Bacterial vaginosis was diagnosed in 20,5 % (41/200) women who asked for gynaecologist's help due to their personal discomfort, since significantly higher percentage of diagnosed bacterial vaginosis of 48,80% (41/84) was determined in women with personal discomfort typical for this disease. All relevant factors, according to available literature, for genesis of bacterial vaginosis were processed in this research. In respect to the obtained outputs, bacterial vaginosis is significantly more frequent occurrence in women who are not married, since the number of sexual partners, the time of the first sexual intercourse, the use of intrauterine contraceptive device and smoking do not cause the genesis of bacterial vaginosis. According to Nugent, an increased vaginal discharge with unpleasant odour after sexual discourse, its pH>4,5, a positive amino odour test, an occurrence of clue cells in a direct microscopic concoction of vaginal discharge and assessment of the state of vaginal flora for bacterial vaginosis are significantly more frequent occurrences in women with individual discomforts. It was proved that G. vaginalis is a dominant micro organism in 95% of women with clinical signs of vaginosis although it was isolated from vaginal discharge in 40 to 50% of healthy women. In our research, G. vaginalis was isolated in 63,41% of examined women with all signs of bacterial vaginosis, in 36,59% of examined women with one or more clinical signs of bacterial vaginosis and in 2,58% of examined women of control group without clinical signs.

  19. Bacterial membrane activity of a-peptide/b-peptoid chimeras: Influence of amino acid composition and chain length on the activity against different bacterial strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M; Franzyk, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells and subseq...... of the bacterial cell envelope, and the outer membrane may act as a barrier in Gram-negative bacteria. The tolerance of S. marcescens to chimeras may be due to differences in the composition of the lipopolysaccharide layer also responsible for its resistance to polymyxin B.......BACKGROUND: Characterization and use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires that their mode of action is determined. The interaction of membrane-active peptides with their target is often established using model membranes, however, the actual permeabilization of live bacterial cells...... and subsequent killing is usually not tested. In this report, six α-peptide/β-peptoid chimeras were examined for the effect of amino acid/peptoid substitutions and chain length on the membrane perturbation and subsequent killing of food-borne and clinical bacterial isolates. RESULTS: All six AMP analogues...

  20. Exploring the links between groundwater quality and bacterial communities near oil and gas extraction activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Inês C; Martin, Misty S; Reyes, Michelle L; Carlton, Doug D; Stigler-Granados, Paula; Valerio, Melissa A; Whitworth, Kristina W; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Schug, Kevin A

    2018-03-15

    Bacterial communities in groundwater are very important as they maintain a balanced biogeochemical environment. When subjected to stressful environments, for example, due to anthropogenic contamination, bacterial communities and their dynamics change. Studying the responses of the groundwater microbiome in the face of environmental changes can add to our growing knowledge of microbial ecology, which can be utilized for the development of novel bioremediation strategies. High-throughput and simpler techniques that allow the real-time study of different microbiomes and their dynamics are necessary, especially when examining larger data sets. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) is a workhorse for the high-throughput identification of bacteria. In this work, groundwater samples were collected from a rural area in southern Texas, where agricultural activities and unconventional oil and gas development are the most prevalent anthropogenic activities. Bacterial communities were assessed using MALDI-TOF MS, with bacterial diversity and abundance being analyzed with the contexts of numerous organic and inorganic groundwater constituents. Mainly denitrifying and heterotrophic bacteria from the Phylum Proteobacteria were isolated. These microorganisms are able to either transform nitrate into gaseous forms of nitrogen or degrade organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. Overall, the bacterial communities varied significantly with respect to the compositional differences that were observed from the collected groundwater samples. Collectively, these data provide a baseline measurement of bacterial diversity in groundwater located near anthropogenic surface and subsurface activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  2. Bacterial activity dynamics in the water phase during start-up of recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Tirado, Paula Andrea; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2017-01-01

    tMicrobial water quality in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) is important for successful RAS opera-tion but difficult to assess and control. There is a need to identify factors affecting changes in the bacterialdynamics – in terms of abundance and activity – to get the information needed...... to manage microbial sta-bility in RAS. This study aimed to quantify bacterial activity in the water phase in six identical, pilot scalefreshwater RAS stocked with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during a three months period fromstart-up. Bacterial activity and dynamics were investigated by the use...... of a patented method, BactiQuant®.The method relies on the hydrolysis of a fluorescent enzyme-substrate and is a rapid technique for quan-tifying bacterial enzyme activity in a water sample. The results showed a forty-fold increase in bacterialactivity within the first 24 days from start-up. Average Bacti...

  3. Eggshell and Bacterial Cellulose Composite Membrane as Absorbent Material in Active Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ummartyotin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cellulose and eggshell composite was successfully developed. Eggshell was mixed with bacterial cellulose suspension and it was casted as a composite film. CaCO3 derived from eggshell was compared with its commercial availability. It can be noted that good dispersion of eggshell particle was prepared. Eggshell particle was irregular in shape with a variation in size. It existed in bacterial cellulose network. Characterization on composite was focused on thermal and mechanical properties. It showed that flexibility and thermal stability of composite were enhanced. No significant effect of mechanical properties was therefore observed. The thermal stability of composite was stable up to 300°C. The adsorption experiment on water and vegetable oil capacity was performed. The enhancement on adsorption was due to the existence of eggshell in bacterial cellulose composite. It exhibited the potential to be a good candidate for absorbent material in active packaging.

  4. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda-Cepa, M; Syrek, K; Brzychczy-Wloch, M; Sulka, G D; Kotarba, A

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function-bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro antibacterial activity of venom protein isolated from sea snake Enhydrina schistosa against drugresistant human pathogenic bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palani Damotharan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of sea snake (Enhydrina schistosa venom protein against drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains. Methods: The venom was collected by milking process from the live specimens of sea snake are using capillary tubes or glass plates. Venom was purified by ion exchange chromatography and it was tested for in-vitro antibacterial activity against 10 drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains using the standard disc diffusion method. Results: The notable antibacterial activity was observed at 150 µg/mL concentration of purified venom and gave its minimum inhibitory concentrations values exhibited between 200-100 µg/mL against all the tested bacterial strains. The maximum zone of inhibition was observed at 16.4 mm against Salmonella boydii and the minimum activity was observed at 7.5 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After the sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis there were a clear single band was detected in the gel that corresponding to purified venom protein molecular weight of 44 kDa. Conclusions: These results suggested that the sea snake venom might be a feasible source for searching potential antibiotics agents against human pathogenic diseases.

  6. Anti-bacterial activities and phytochemical screening of extracts of different parts of Thalictrum rhynchocarpum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeku, Philip Wafula; Hassanali, Ahmed; Kiremire, Bernard Turyagenda; Odalo, Josiah Ochieng; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Parts of the plant Thalictrum rhyncocarpum are used in herbal medicine in Kenya to treat various infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate in-vitro anti-bacteria activities and phytochemical profiles of solvent extracts of the leaves, stem bark and root of Thalictrum rhyncocarpum against Bacillus subtilis-6633, Staphylococcus aures-SG 511, Escherichia coli SG 458, Pseudomonus aeruginosa-K799/61 and Mycobacterium vaccae-10670. Anti-bacterial activity tests were carried out using disc diffusion assay and tube dilution technique, and phytochemical screening was carried out through Thin Layer Chromatography. The crude extracts showed antibacterial effects on M. vaccae, P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. M. vaccae was most sensitive, particularly to the methanol root extract. Phytochemical screening of the extracts suggested the presence of glycosides and alkaloids in the stem bark and root extracts, and flavonoids and triterpenes in the leaf extracts. The study showed interesting levels of activities of solvent extracts of different parts of T. rhyncocarpum against some of the bacteria tested (M. vaccae, P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis). The results provide some scientific rationale for the traditional use of the plant in Kenya to treat different microbial infections.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of penem inhibitors of bacterial signal peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David A; Powers, Michael E; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2009-07-15

    We report the first synthesis of a 5S penem, known to bind bacterial type I signal peptidase, from the commercially available and inexpensive 6-aminopenicillanic acid. We report the first in vivo activity of the compound and use structure-activity relationship studies to begin to define the determinants of signal peptidase binding and also to begin to optimize the penem as an antibiotic.

  8. Distribution of bacterial growth activity in flow-chamber biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Christensen, Bjarke B.; Johansen, Tove

    1999-01-01

    In microbial communities such as those found in biofilms, individual organisms most often display heterogeneous behavior with respect to their metabolic activity, growth status, gene expression pattern, etc. In that context, a novel reporter system for monitoring of cellular growth activity has...... been designed. It comprises a transposon cassette carrying fusions between the growth rate-regulated Escherichia coli rrnBP1 promoter and different variant gfp genes. It is shown that the pi promoter is regulated in the same way in E. coli and Pseudomonas putida, making it useful for monitoring...... of growth activity in organisms outside the group of enteric bacteria. Construction of fusions to genes encoding unstable Gfp proteins opened up the possibility of the monitoring of rates of rRNA synthesis and, in this way, allowing on-line determination of the distribution of growth activity in a complex...

  9. Profiling bacterial kinase activity using a genetic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Bech, Rasmus; Lehning, Christina Eva

    Phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that regulates the activity of several key proteins in bacteria and eukaryotes. Accordingly, a variety of tools has been developed to measure kinase activity. To couple phosphorylation to an in vivo fluorescent readout we used the Bacillus...... reported FatR Y45E mutation1 attenuates operator repression. This genetic circuit provides a starting point for computational protein design and a metagenomic library-screening tool....

  10. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity in marsh sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lijun; Zheng, Yanling; Liu, Min; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yin, Guoyu; You, Li

    2013-07-01

    ammonium oxidation (anammox) as an important process of nitrogen cycle has been studied in estuarine environments. However, knowledge about the dynamics of anammox bacteria and their interactions with associated activity remains scarce in these environments. Here we report the anammox bacterial diversity, abundance, and activity in the Yangtze Estuary, using molecular and isotope-tracing techniques. The phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA indicated that high anammox bacterial diversity occurred in this estuary, including Scalindua, Brocadia, Kuenenia, and two novel clusters. The patterns of community composition and diversity of anammox bacteria differed across the estuary. Salinity was a key environmental factor defining the geographical distribution and diversity of the anammox bacterial community at the estuarine ecosystem. Temperature and organic carbon also had significant influences on anammox bacterial biodiversity. The abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 2.63 × 106 and 1.56 × 107 gene copies g-1, and its spatiotemporal variations were related significantly to salinity, temperature, and nitrite content. The anammox activity was related to temperature, nitrite, and anammox bacterial abundance, with values of 0.94-6.61 nmol N g-1 h-1. The tight link between the anammox and denitrification processes implied that denitrifying bacteria may be a primary source of nitrite for the anammox bacteria in the estuarine marshes. On the basis of the 15N tracing experiments, the anammox process was estimated to contribute 6.6%-12.9% to the total nitrogen loss whereas the remainder was attributed to denitrification.

  11. Active bacterial community structure along vertical redox gradients in Baltic Sea sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Janet; Edlund, Anna; Hardeman, Fredrik; Jansson, Janet K.; Sjoling, Sara

    2008-05-15

    Community structures of active bacterial populations were investigated along a vertical redox profile in coastal Baltic Sea sediments by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and clone library analysis. According to correspondence analysis of T-RFLP results and sequencing of cloned 16S rRNA genes, the microbial community structures at three redox depths (179 mV, -64 mV and -337 mV) differed significantly. The bacterial communities in the community DNA differed from those in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled DNA, indicating that the growing members of the community that incorporated BrdU were not necessarily the most dominant members. The structures of the actively growing bacterial communities were most strongly correlated to organic carbon followed by total nitrogen and redox potentials. Bacterial identification by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from clones of BrdU-labeled DNA and DNA from reverse transcription PCR (rt-PCR) showed that bacterial taxa involved in nitrogen and sulfur cycling were metabolically active along the redox profiles. Several sequences had low similarities to previously detected sequences indicating that novel lineages of bacteria are present in Baltic Sea sediments. Also, a high number of different 16S rRNA gene sequences representing different phyla were detected at all sampling depths.

  12. Functioned silver nanoparticle loaded activated carbon for the recovery of bioactive molecule from bacterial fermenter for its bactericidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arivizhivendhan, Villalan; Mahesh, Mannacharaju; Boopathy, Ramasamy; Karthikeyan, Sekar; Mary, Rathanasamy Regina; Sekaran, Ganesan

    2018-01-01

    A novel continuous production and extraction of bacterial bioactive prodigiosin (PG) from fermented using silver nanoparticle impregnated functioned activated carbon composite is proposed for cost-effective and ecofriendly microbial technique. Hence, in this investigation silver nanoparticle was impregnated onto functioned activated carbon ([AC]F) as a support matrix and to enable the separation of PG conjugated silver nanoparticle from the fermented medium. A laboratory scale experiment was carried out to evaluate the continuous production and recovery of PG using [AC@Ag]F. Ag nanoparticle impregnated [AC]F ([AC@Ag]F) characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA, DSC and SEM. Instrumental analyses confirmed that Ag nanoparticles significantly impregnated on AC through the functionalization of AC with diethanolamine and it enhances the binding capacity between AC and Ag. The various process parameters, such as contact time, pH, and mass of [AC@Ag]F, were statistically optimized for the recovery of PG using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The maximum extraction of PG in [AC@Ag]F was found to be 16.2 ± 0.2 mg g-1, its twofold higher than [AC]F. Further, PG conjugated [AC@Ag]F and ([AC@Ag]F-PG) were checked for the growth inhibition of gram negative and gram positive bacteria without formation of biofilm upto 96 h. Hence, the developed matrix could be eco-friendly, viable and lower energy consumption step for separation of the bacterial bioactive PG from fermented broth. In additionally, [AC@Ag]F-PG was used as an antifouling matrix without formation of biofilm.

  13. Diversity of Dominant Bacterial Taxa in Activated Sludge Promotes Functional Resistance following Toxic Shock Loading

    KAUST Repository

    Saikaly, Pascal

    2010-12-14

    Examining the relationship between biodiversity and functional stability (resistance and resilience) of activated sludge bacterial communities following disturbance is an important first step towards developing strategies for the design of robust biological wastewater treatment systems. This study investigates the relationship between functional resistance and biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa by subjecting activated sludge samples, with different levels of biodiversity, to toxic shock loading with cupric sulfate (Cu[II]), 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), or 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Respirometric batch experiments were performed to determine the functional resistance of activated sludge bacterial community to the three toxicants. Functional resistance was estimated as the 30 min IC50 or the concentration of toxicant that results in a 50% reduction in oxygen utilization rate compared to a referential state represented by a control receiving no toxicant. Biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa was assessed using polymerase chain reaction-terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-T-RFLP) targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene. Statistical analysis of 30 min IC50 values and PCR-T-RFLP data showed a significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between functional resistance and microbial diversity for each of the three toxicants tested. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a positive correlation between biodiversity of dominant bacterial taxa in activated sludge and functional resistance. In this system, activated sludge bacterial communities with higher biodiversity are functionally more resistant to disturbance caused by toxic shock loading. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. [Breath hydrogen test to evaluate lactose absorption and small bowel bacterial overgrowth in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, J C; de Morais, M B; Fagundes Neto, U

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the lactose absorption capacity and possible existence of bacterial overgrowth in the small bowel in asymptomatic school children of low social economic level in Marilia, a city located in the interior of São Paulo state. Eighty three children aging 7 to 15 years old without any gastrointestinal manifestations at least 30 days prior to the tests were studied. All the patients had fasted for at least 8 hours before the tests were performed. Lactose absorption was evaluated by breath hidrogen test after an overload of lactose 18 g in 10% aquous solution. Lactose intolerance was determined by the occurrence of clinical symptoms, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, etc in the following 24 hours after the test was performed. Bacterial overgrowth was evaluated by the breath hidrogen test after a 10 g lactulose load in aqueous solution. Lactose malabsorption was detected in 19 (22.9%) children and lactose intolerance was observed in 10 (12%) children. Lactose intolerance was more frequently observed in children who showed lactose malabsorption (6/19; 31.6%) than in those who presented a normal test (4/64; 6.3%) (P = 0.008). Bacterial overgrowth was detected in six (7.2%) children and showed no statistical relationship with lactose malabsorption. Ontogenetic lactose malabsorption verified in this group of school children is similar to the reported for Caucasian populations. Presence of bacterial overgrowth confirms the existence of asymptomatic environmental enteropathy in children of low social economic level.

  15. Metabolic and molecular methods to evaluate the organoclay effects on a bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Cristina; Ambrosoli, Roberto; Minati, Josè Luis; Gennari, Mara; Arena, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence exerted by two different commercial organoclays (DELLITE 43B and DELLITE 67G) on a model microbial consortium using microbial metabolic characterization with BIOLOG system and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) molecular approach. The information obtained from the molecular analyses, in their complex, account for the differences in species composition induced on the reference consortium by the contact with the organoclays under study. DELLITE 43B resulted to produce a marked selective effect, stimulating the quantitative increase especially of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. A weaker effect was found for DELLITE 67G. On the other hand, Biolog analyses indicated a depressing action exerted by DELLITE 43B on the metabolic activity of the model microbial consortium as a whole. The presence of P. pseudoalcaligenes and B. borstelensis in the bacterial community after the treatments confirmed that a positive change in the microbial structure consortium occurred. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-bacterial, free radical scavenging activity and cytotoxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Quantitative analysis of the scavenging ability showed that acetone extracts exhibited good free radical scavenging activity in a dose-dependent manner. The berries extract had the highest LC50 (lowest toxicity) of 551.68 68 µg/mL. Conclusion: Acetone extract of leaves and roots of Grewia flava contain ...

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes profibrotic activation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts play a critical role in intestinal wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of commensal gut bacteria. The effects of LPS on intestinal fibroblast activation were characterized. METHODS: Expression of the LPS receptor, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, was assessed in cultured primary human intestinal fibroblasts using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Fibroblasts were treated with LPS and\\/or transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. Nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) pathway activation was assessed by inhibitory kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and NFkappaB promoter activity. Fibroblast contractility was measured using a fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. Smad-7, a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression were assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The NFkappaB pathway was inhibited by IkappaBalpha transfection. RESULTS: TLR-4 was present on the surface of intestinal fibroblasts. LPS treatment of fibroblasts induced IkappaBalpha degradation, enhanced NFkappaB promoter activity and increased collagen contraction. Pretreatment with LPS (before TGF-beta1) significantly increased CTGF production relative to treatment with TGF-beta1 alone. LPS reduced whereas TGF-beta1 increased smad-7 expression. Transfection with an IkappaBalpha plasmid enhanced basal smad-7 expression. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fibroblasts express TLR-4 and respond to LPS by activating NFkappaB and inducing collagen contraction. LPS acts in concert with TGF-beta1 to induce CTGF. LPS reduces the expression of the TGF-beta1 inhibitor, smad-7.

  18. Classroom Activities to Engage Students and Promote Critical Thinking about Genetic Regulation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Aebli; Elizabeth Hutchison

    2016-01-01

    We developed an interactive activity to mimic bacterial quorum sensing, and a classroom worksheet to promote critical thinking about genetic regulation of the lux operon. The interactive quorum sensing activity engages students and provides a direct visualization of how population density functions to influence light production in bacteria. The worksheet activity consists of practice problems that require students to apply basic knowledge of the lux operon in order to make predictions about g...

  19. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  20. Soil-borne bacterial structure and diversity does not reflect community activity in Pampa biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupatini, Manoeli; Suleiman, Afnan Khalil Ahmad; Jacques, Rodrigo Josemar Seminoti; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Würdig

    2013-01-01

    The Pampa biome is considered one of the main hotspots of the world's biodiversity and it is estimated that half of its original vegetation was removed and converted to agricultural land and tree plantations. Although an increasing amount of knowledge is being assembled regarding the response of soil bacterial communities to land use change, to the associated plant community and to soil properties, our understanding about how these interactions affect the microbial community from the Brazilian Pampa is still poor and incomplete. In this study, we hypothesized that the same soil type from the same geographic region but under distinct land use present dissimilar soil bacterial communities. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the soil bacterial communities from four land-uses within the same soil type by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and by soil microbial activity analyzes. We found that the same soil type under different land uses harbor similar (but not equal) bacterial communities and the differences were controlled by many microbial taxa. No differences regarding diversity and richness between natural areas and areas under anthropogenic disturbance were detected. However, the measures of microbial activity did not converge with the 16S rRNA data supporting the idea that the coupling between functioning and composition of bacterial communities is not necessarily correlated.

  1. Monocyte-mediated inhibition of TLR9-dependent IFN-α induction in plasmacytoid dendritic cells questions bacterial DNA as the active ingredient of bacterial lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Jens M; Coch, Christoph; Busch, Nicolas; Boehm, Olaf; Schlee, Martin; Janke, Markus; Zillinger, Thomas; Schildgen, Oliver; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther

    2010-12-15

    Bacterial DNA contains unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is a potent ligand for TLR9. Bacterial DNA has been claimed the active ingredient in bacterial lysates used for immunotherapy. Whereas the detection of viral DNA by TLR9 expressed in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) with subsequent IFN-α production is well defined, the role of bacterial DNA during microbial infection is less clear. In fact, IFN-α is not a hallmark of antibacterial immune responses. Unlike in mice, TLR9 expression in humans is restricted to PDCs and B cells; thus, conclusions from murine models of infection have limitations. In this study, we demonstrate that lysates of heat-killed Escherichia coli containing bacterial DNA induced IFN-α in isolated PDCs but not in the mixed cell populations of human PBMCs. Depletion of monocytes restored IFN-α secretion by PDCs within PBMCs. We found that monocyte-derived IL-10 and PGs contribute to monocyte-mediated inhibition of IFN-α release in PDCs. We conclude that human PDCs can be stimulated by bacterial DNA via TLR9; however, in the physiological context of mixed-cell populations, PDC activation is blocked by factors released from monocytes stimulated in parallel by other components of bacterial lysates such as LPS. This functional repression of PDCs by concomitantly stimulated monocytes avoids production of antiviral IFN-α during bacterial infection and thus explains how the innate immune system is enabled to distinguish bacterial from viral CpG DNA and thus to elicit the appropriate responses despite the presence of CpG DNA in both types of infection.

  2. Characterization and biological activity of bacterial glycoconjugates in cold adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Casillo, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The cryosphere, covering about one-fifth of the surface of the Earth, comprises several components: snow, river and lake ice, sea ice, ice sheets, ice shelves, glaciers and ice caps, and frozen ground which exist, both on land and beneath the oceans (Vaughan DG, et al. 2013). All these habitats, combining the low temperature and the low liquid water activity, are challenging for all the forms of life (Casanueva et al., 2010). These extreme environments are inhabited by microorganisms of all t...

  3. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golda-Cepa, M., E-mail: golda@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Syrek, K. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Brzychczy-Wloch, M. [Department of Bacteriology, Microbial Ecology and Parasitology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Czysta 18, 31-121 Krakow (Poland); Sulka, G.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Kotarba, A., E-mail: kotarba@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function–bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces. - Highlights: • The correlation between work function and bacteria adhesion was discovered. • The discovered correlation is rationalized in terms of electrostatic bacteria–surface repulsion. • The results provide basis for the simple evaluation of implant surfaces against infection.

  4. Anti-bacterial activity of Plumbago zeylanica L. roots on some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti bacterial activity of polar and non-polar extracts prepared from the roots of Plumbago zeylanica L. (Plumbaginaceae), a plant widely used in Ethiopian traditional medicine for various ailments were investigated using hole plate diffusion method against some pneumonia causing pathogens. The aqueous extract did ...

  5. Chemotactic activity of CXCL5 in cerebrospinal fluid of children with bacterial meningitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, P.J.G.; Bie, de HM; Roord, J.J.; Poll, van der T.; Furth, van A.M.

    2003-01-01

    CXCL5 (epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating protein (ENA-)78) is a CXC-chemokine that specifically acts on neutrophils. To obtain insight into the extent of local presence and action of CXCL5 during bacterial meningitis, we measured its concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of

  6. Antagonistic activity of Bacillus subtilis SB1 and its biocontrol effect on tomato bacterial wilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potential biocontrol agent of bacterial wilt, Bacillus subtilis SB1, isolated from tomato roots, showed a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity in in vitro experiments. It inhibited the growth of many plant pathogens, including Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Fusarium ox...

  7. Spectral analysis and anti-bacterial activity of methanolic fruit extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    Spectral analysis and anti-bacterial activity of methanolic fruit extract of Citrullus colocynthis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Salah Ali Idan, Ali Hussein Al-Marzoqi and Imad Hadi Hameed*. Department of Biology, Babylon University, Hilla City, Iraq. Received 1 September, 2015; Accepted 5 November, 2015.

  8. Chemical composition and anti-bacterial activity of essential oil from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work assesses the chemical compositions and in vitro anti-bacterial activities of seed essential oil from Cedrela sinesis (A. Juss.) Roem. seed. which has abundant mineral elements such as K, Ca, Fe. The fatty acid profiles of seed essential oil are characterized by considerable unsaturated fatty acids (90.39%) ...

  9. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Liquidambar Orientalis Mill. Various Extracts Against Bacterial Pathogens Causing Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülten Ökmen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is being constantly developed worldwide. Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNS and Staphylococcus aureus are common causes of bovine subclinical mastitis. Bioactive compound of medicinal plants shows anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and anti-oxidant effects. The anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant activities of Liquidambar orientalis (L. orientalis extracts on subclinical mastitis causing bacteria in cows have not been reported to date. The aim of the present study was to examine anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant effects of L. orientalis leaf extracts on S. aureus and CNS isolated from cows with subclinical mastitis symptoms. In this study, 3.2 mg/mL minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ethanol extracts of L. orientalis has shown to be a most potent anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant for all isolated bacterial species from mastitis cows. In this study, it was investigated anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant potentials of acetone, methanol and ethanol extracts of the L. orientalis. The acetone extract showed maximum inhibition zone against S. aureus numbered 17 (12 mm. In addition to anti-bacterial properties, anti-oxidant activity of L. orientalis extract was examined by ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid] free radical assay. Trolox was used as a positive control anti-oxidant. Ethanol extract exhibited a strong anti-oxidant activity like Trolox anti-oxidant which was effective at 2.58 mM concentration. Bioactive compounds of sweet gum may be useful to screening mastitis causing bacteria for clinical applications.

  10. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase reagent strip test to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef Bafandeh; Masoud Khodaei

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a frequent and sever complication of cirrhotic patients with ascites. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic value of leukocyte esterase reagent strip test (Medi-Test Combi) for the rapid diagnosis of SBP in cirrhotic patients with ascites in the University Hospital of Imam Reza in Tabriz, Iran. In this study, 132 consecutive samples from cirrhotic patients who underwent abdominal paracentesis were evaluated. These samples were tested by 3 me...

  11. Development of method for evaluating cell hardness and correlation between bacterial spore hardness and durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of conventional devices for making single-cell manipulations, determining the hardness of a single cell remains difficult. Here, we consider the cell to be a linear elastic body and apply Young’s modulus (modulus of elasticity), which is defined as the ratio of the repulsive force (stress) in response to the applied strain. In this new method, a scanning probe microscope (SPM) is operated with a cantilever in the “contact-and-push” mode, and the cantilever is applied to the cell surface over a set distance (applied strain). Results We determined the hardness of the following bacterial cells: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and five Bacillus spp. In log phase, these strains had a similar Young’s modulus, but Bacillus spp. spores were significantly harder than the corresponding vegetative cells. There was a positive, linear correlation between the hardness of bacterial spores and heat or ultraviolet (UV) resistance. Conclusions Using this technique, the hardness of a single vegetative bacterial cell or spore could be determined based on Young’s modulus. As an application of this technique, we demonstrated that the hardness of individual bacterial spores was directly proportional to heat and UV resistance, which are the conventional measures of physical durability. This technique allows the rapid and direct determination of spore durability and provides a valuable and innovative method for the evaluation of physical properties in the field of microbiology. PMID:22676476

  12. Resolution of ion translocating proteolipid subclasses active in bacterial calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, L.D.; Renthal, R.D.; Boyan, B.D. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Formation of calcium hydroxyapatite occurs on membrane surfaces via interaction of calcium, inorganic phosphate, phospholipids, calcifiable proteolipids, and ion flux to and from the nucleating site. Recently, this laboratory reported that proteolipids from the calcifying bacterium, Bacterionema matruchotti, act as an ionophore when reconstituted into bacteriorhodopsin-proteoliposomes. This ionophoric activity is blocked by (14C)dicyclohexylcarbodiimide ((14C)DCCD). SDS-PAGE shows that (14C)DCCD binds to a single band of Mr 8500. To determine whether proteins other than the (14C)DCCD-binding protein are involved, we examined the function of proteolipid species extracted by solvents of differing polarity. Proteolipids were isolated independently from chloroform:methanol (2:1) and chloroform:methanol:HCl (200:100:1) extracts of the bacteria by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and were electrophoresed on 12.5% acrylamide gels. The chloroform:methanol extract contained a major hand at Mr 10,000 that was not present in gels of proteolipid isolated by acidified solvent. Proteolipids extracted in chloroform:methanol:HCl included a broad band at Mr 8500, which co-migrated with the (14C) DCCD-binding protein. The rate and extent of proton translocation were not altered when either proteolipid extract was added individually to bacteriorhodopsin proteoliposomes. However, when proteolipids isolated from the chloroform:methanol and chloroform:methanol:HCl extracts were combined, the rate and extent of translocation were increased. These data demonstrate that at least two proteolipid proteins are necessary for ionophoric activity, the Mr 10,000 protein isolated by chloroform:methanol 2:1 and the (14C)DCCD-binding protein requiring acidified solvent for extraction.

  13. Chemical Composition, Modulatory Bacterial Resistance and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil the Hyptis martiusii Benth by Direct and Gaseous Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Allan Demetrius Leite; Galvao Rodrigue, Fabiola Fernandes; Douglas Melo Coutinho, Henrique; da Costa, Jose Galberto Martins; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have shown that species of the genus Hyptis, have promising antimicrobial and antifungal effects. Identify of chemical constituents of essential oil from leaves of Hyptis martiusii and evaluate its effect against bacterial strains by direct and gaseous contact. Essential oil was extracted from leaves of Hyptis martiusii Benth using hydro-distillation, and its composition was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chemical analysis showed that there was a predominance of sesquiterpenes. The leaf essential oil was screened for its minimal inhibitory concentration and modulatory effect of aminoglycoside by the direct (MIC) and gaseous (MID) micro-dilution assays for various pathogenic microorganisms. The essential oil remarkably inhibited the growth of all of the tested bacteria (MIC essential oil of leaves were characterized; δ -3-carene (6.88%), 1, 8-cineole (7.01%), trans-caryophyllene (9.21%), Cariophyllene oxide (7.47%) and bicyclogermacrene (10.61%) were found as the major components. Modulatory aminoglycoside effect, by direct contact, was showed antagonistic relationship with antimicrobial activity. The gaseous component of the oil inhibited the bacterial growth of all of the tested bacteria in 50% and 25% of oil concentration and demonstrated synergistic interactions can be attributed to the constituting the oil compounds. These results show that this oil influences the activity of the antibiotic and may be used as an adjuvant in the antibiotic therapy of respiratory tract bacterial pathogens.

  14. Impedance spectroscopy of micro-Droplets reveals activation of Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channels in Hypotonic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad A.

    Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens is of great importance in healthcare, food safety, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. Most bacterial detection platforms rely on binary fission (i.e. cell growth) to reach a threshold cell population that can be resolved by the sensing method. Since cell division depends on the bacteria type, the detection time of such methods can vary from hours to days. In contrast, in this work, we show that bacteria cells can be detected within minutes by relying on activation of specific protein channels, i.e. mechanosensitive channels (MS channels). When cells are exposed to hypotonic solutions, MS channels allow efflux of solutes to the external solution which leads to release the excessive membrane tension. Release of the cytoplasmic solutes, in turn, results in increase of the electrical conductance measured by droplet-based impedance sensing. The approach can be an effective technique for fast, pre-screening of bacterial contamination at ultra-low concentration.

  15. COMPARATIVE ACTIVITY OF CECROPIN A AND POLYMYXIN B AGAINST FROG BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermin Schadich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of two antimicrobial peptides, cecropin A and polymyxin B against different bacterial pathogens associated with bacterial dermatosepticemia, a fatal bacterial infectious disease of frogs was investigated. The peptides were tested in serial of concentrations (100-0.19 µg/ml for growth inhibition of seven pathogens: Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia liquefaciens. Their antimicrobial activity was compared with that of two antimicrobial peptides from frog skin, magainin 2 and aurein 2.1. Both cecropin A and polymyxin B, completely inhibited the growth of three pathogens: C. freundii, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa at a concentration some sixteen times less than two skin peptides. Furthermore, cecropin A inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the two skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and P. mirabilis. Polymyxin B also inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and S. liquefaciens. Cecropin A and polymyxin B have marked antibacterial activity against different frog bacterial pathogens indicating potential for therapeutic measures.Keywords: frogs, antimicrobial, bacteria, cecropin, polymyxin, resistance

  16. Dynamic changes of bacterial community in activated sludge with pressurized aeration in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Wei-Li; Qin, Yang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Xu, Rui-Xiao; Xie, Biao

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the organic removal efficiency and microbial population dynamics in activated sludge with pressurized aeration. The activated sludge was fed with synthetic wastewater composed of simple carbon source to avoid the effect of complex components on microbial communities. The pressurized acclimation process was conducted in a bench-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under 0.3 MPa gage pressure. Another SBR was running in atmospheric environment as a control reactor, with the same operation parameters except for the pressure. Bacterial diversity was investigated by Illumina sequencing technology. The results showed that the total organic carbon removal efficiency of the pressurized reactor was significantly higher, while the mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations were much lower than those of the control reactor. Moderate pressure of 0.3 MPa had little effect on Alpha-diversity of bacterial communities due to the similar running conditions, e.g., feed water, solids retention time (SRT) and the cyclic change of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. Although the relative percentage of the bacterial community changed among samples, there was no major change of predominant bacterial populations between the pressurized group and the control group. Pressurized aeration would have a far-reaching impact on microbial community in activated sludge when treating wastewaters being unfavorable to the dissolution of oxygen.

  17. Activation of Microglyocytes in the Anterior Horns of Rat Spinal Cord after Administration of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolos, E A; Korzhevskii, D E

    2017-08-01

    We studied the reaction of the microglia of the anterior horns of the rat spinal cord to intraperitoneal administration of bacterial LPS. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that acute systemic inflammation leads to activation of more than half of microglial cells as soon as in 24 h after LPS injection, while the total number of microglial cells does not change significantly. It was hypothesized that activated microglial cells are involved in the reorganization of synaptic connections, but do not have a neurotoxic effect.

  18. Bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity in temperate streambed sediment during drying and rewetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pohlon

    Full Text Available Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany. Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes

  19. Flow Chamber System for the Statistical Evaluation of Bacterial Colonization on Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Menzel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation on materials leads to high costs in industrial processes, as well as in medical applications. This fact has stimulated interest in the development of new materials with improved surfaces to reduce bacterial colonization. Standardized tests relying on statistical evidence are indispensable to evaluate the quality and safety of these new materials. We describe here a flow chamber system for biofilm cultivation under controlled conditions with a total capacity for testing up to 32 samples in parallel. In order to quantify the surface colonization, bacterial cells were DAPI (4`,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained and examined with epifluorescence microscopy. More than 100 images of each sample were automatically taken and the surface coverage was estimated using the free open source software g’mic, followed by a precise statistical evaluation. Overview images of all gathered pictures were generated to dissect the colonization characteristics of the selected model organism Escherichia coli W3310 on different materials (glass and implant steel. With our approach, differences in bacterial colonization on different materials can be quantified in a statistically validated manner. This reliable test procedure will support the design of improved materials for medical, industrial, and environmental (subaquatic or subaerial applications.

  20. Disinfectant and antibiotic activities: a comparative analysis in Brazilian hospital bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Márcia Aparecida

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. It has been shown that appropriate environmental hygienic and disinfection practices can be very helpful to hospital infection control. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of some disinfectants against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant hospital bacterial isolates. The susceptibility of 27 clinical isolates to disinfectants and antibiotics was determined by the Association of Official Analytical Chemist?s (AOAC Use-Dilution method and by the Kirby-Bauer method, respectively. All strains tested were susceptible to sodium hypochlorite, glutaraldehyde and to the association quaternary ammonium - formaldehyde - ethyl alcohol disinfectants. However, the susceptibility of strains to phenol and to one quaternary ammonium compound was variable. Among twenty-one antibiotic-multiresistant strains (methicillin-resistant staphylococci, Enterococcus spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli eleven (52% and eight (38% strains were resistant to the quaternary ammonium and phenol compounds, respectively. Among six isolates that demonstrated susceptibility to antibiotics (staphylococci, Enterococcus spp, P. mirabilis, E. cloacae and E. coli two strains (33% showed resistance to these disinfectants. The results demonstrated the lack of correlation between antibiotic-susceptibility and susceptibility to disinfectants in hospital strains.

  1. Presepsin as a novel diagnostic biomarker for differentiating active pulmonary tuberculosis from bacterial community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi-Jiang; Yu, Han; Zhang, Jing; Li, Chun-Sheng

    2018-03-01

    The expression of presepsin in active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB) is unknown. We observed the expression of presepsin in APTB, and to evaluate the value for discriminating between APTB and bacterial community acquired pneumonia (BCAP). Consecutive APTB patients who were accurately diagnosed by sputum culture and BCAP patients were enrolled from August 2013 to July 2015. Clinical data were collected, and plasma presepsin concentrations were tested. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for diagnostic analysis. In all, 133 healthy individuals, 103 APTB and 202 BCAP patients were enrolled. Presepsin concentrations in APTB group (218.0 [146.0, 368.0] pg/ml) were higher than those in the healthy control group (128.0 [101.5, 176.5] pg/ml, P<0.001), and lower than the concentrations measured in the BCAP group (532.0 [364.0, 852.3] pg/ml, P<0.001). Simple APTB and miliary tuberculosis patients showed no significant differences in presepsin concentrations. Compared with both Gram-positive and negative bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis caused a limited increase of presepsin. With the cut-off value set at 401pg/ml, presepsin demonstrated high positive predictive value, allowing initial discriminating between APTB and BCAP. Presepsin combined with CURB-65 score could significantly improve the discrimination ability. Presepsin concentrations in APTB patients were slightly increased, and may be helpful for initial discrimination between APTB and BCAP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial meningitis: insights into pathogenesis and evaluation of new treatment options: a perspective from experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechti, Fabian D; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Bacterial components induce an overshooting inflammatory reaction, eventually leading to brain damage. Pathological correlates of neurofunctional deficits include cortical necrosis, damage of the inner ear and hippocampal apoptosis. The hippocampal dentate gyrus is important for memory acquisition and harbors a neuronal stem cell niche, thus being potentially well equipped for regeneration. Adjuvant therapies aimed at decreasing the inflammatory reaction, for example, dexamethasone, and those protecting the brain from injury have been evaluated in animal models of the disease. They include nonbacteriolytic antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), metalloproteinase inhibitors and modulators of the immunological response, for example, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Increasing research interest has recently been focused on interventions aimed at supporting regenerative processes.

  3. Biological Evaluation of Benzothiazole Ethyl Urea Inhibitors of Bacterial Type II Topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Neil R.; Thomaides-Brears, Helena B.; Barker, Stephanie; Bennett, James M.; Berry, Joanne; Collins, Ian; Czaplewski, Lloyd G.; Gamble, Vicki; Lancett, Paul; Logan, Alastair; Lunniss, Christopher J.; Peasley, Hilary; Pommier, Stéphanie; Price, Daniel; Smee, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The type II topoisomerases DNA gyrase (GyrA/GyrB) and topoisomerase IV (ParC/ParE) are well-validated targets for antibacterial drug discovery. Because of their structural and functional homology, these enzymes are amenable to dual targeting by a single ligand. In this study, two novel benzothiazole ethyl urea-based small molecules, designated compound A and compound B, were evaluated for their biochemical, antibacterial, and pharmacokinetic properties. The two compounds inhibited the ATPase activity of GyrB and ParE with 50% inhibitory concentrations of compounds potently inhibited the growth of a range of bacterial organisms, including staphylococci, streptococci, enterococci, Clostridium difficile, and selected Gram-negative respiratory pathogens. MIC90s against clinical isolates ranged from 0.015 μg/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae to 0.25 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. No cross-resistance with common drug resistance phenotypes was observed. In addition, no synergistic or antagonistic interactions between compound A or compound B and other antibiotics, including the topoisomerase inhibitors novobiocin and levofloxacin, were detected in checkerboard experiments. The frequencies of spontaneous resistance for S. aureus were compound A and compound B at concentrations equivalent to 8× the MICs. These values indicate a multitargeting mechanism of action. The pharmacokinetic properties of both compounds were profiled in rats. Following intravenous administration, compound B showed approximately 3-fold improvement over compound A in terms of both clearance and the area under the concentration-time curve. The measured oral bioavailability of compound B was 47.7%. PMID:24041906

  4. Activity of Norspermidine on Bacterial Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates Associated with Persistent Extremity Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardile, Anthony P; Woodbury, Ronald L; Sanchez, Carlos J; Becerra, Sandra C; Garcia, Rebecca A; Mende, Katrin; Wenke, Joseph C; Akers, Kevin S

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor for numerous pathogenic bacteria and is cited as a central event in the pathogenesis of chronic human infections, which is in large part due to excessive extracellular matrix secretion and metabolic changes that occur within the biofilm rendering them highly tolerant to antimicrobial treatments. Polyamines, including norspermidine, play central roles in bacterial biofilm development, but have also recently been shown to inhibit biofilm formation in select strains of various pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the biofilm dispersive and inhibitory activities of norspermidine against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii(n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 4) associated with chronic extremity wound infections using the semi-quantitative 96-well plate method and confocal laser microscopy. In addition to the antibiofilm activity, biocompatibility of norspermidine was also evaluated by measuring toxicity in vitro to human cell lines and whole porcine tissue explants using MTT viability assay and histological analysis. Norspermidine (5-20 mM) had variable dispersive and inhibitory activity on biofilms which was dependent on both the strain and species. Of the clinical bacterial species evaluated herein, A. baumannii isolates were the most sensitive to the effect of norspermidine, which was in part due to the inhibitory effects of norspermidine on bacterial motility and expression of genes involved in the production of homoserine lactones and quorum sensing molecules both essential for biofilm formation. Importantly, exposure of cell lines and whole tissues to norspermidine for prolonged periods of time (≥24 h) was observed to reduce viability and alter tissue histology in a time and concentration dependent manner, with 20 mM exposure having the greatest negative effects on both tissues and individual

  5. Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model for assessing the protective activity of probiotics against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Nardis, Chiara; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    The antagonistic activity against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens is an important property of probiotic bacteria and a desirable feature for pre-selection of novel strains with probiotic potential. Pre-screening of candidate probiotics for antibacterial activity should be based on in vitro and in vivo tests. This study investigated whether the protective activity of probiotic bacteria against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens can be evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae as an in vivo model. Larvae were pre-inoculated with either of two widely used probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Clostridium butyricum Miyairi 588, and then challenged with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli or Listeria monocytogenes. Survival rates increased in the probiotic pretreated larvae compared with control larvae inoculated with pathogens only. The hemocyte density increased as well in the probiotic pretreated larvae, indicating that both probiotics induce an immune response in the larvae. The antibacterial activity of probiotics against the pathogens was also assayed by an in vitro agar spot test: results were partially consistent with those obtained by the G. mellonella protection assay. The results obtained, as a whole, suggest that G. mellonella larvae are a potentially useful in vivo model that can complement in vitro assays for pre-screening of candidate probiotics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Predictors of bacterial pneumonia in Evaluation of Subcutaneous Interleukin-2 in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, S L; Carey, C; Lin, E; Wentworth, D; Lazovski, J; Miró, J M; Gordin, F; Angus, B; Rodriguez-Barradas, M; Rubio, R; Tambussi, G; Cooper, D A; Emery, S

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial pneumonia still contributes to morbidity/mortality in HIV infection despite effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Evaluation of Subcutaneous Interleukin-2 in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT), a trial of intermittent recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) with cART vs. cART alone (control arm) in HIV-infected adults with CD4 counts ≥300cells/μL, offered the opportunity to explore associations between bacterial pneumonia and rIL-2, a cytokine that increases the risk of some bacterial infections. Baseline and time-updated factors associated with first-episode pneumonia on study were analysed using multivariate proportional hazards regression models. Information on smoking/pneumococcal vaccination history was not collected. IL-2 cycling was most intense in years 1-2. Over ≈7 years, 93 IL-2 [rate 0.67/100 person-years (PY)] and 86 control (rate 0.63/100 PY) patients experienced a pneumonia event [hazard ratio (HR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79, 1.42; P=0.68]. Median CD4 counts prior to pneumonia were 570cells/μL (IL-2 arm) and 463cells/μL (control arm). Baseline risks for bacterial pneumonia included older age, injecting drug use, detectable HIV viral load (VL) and previous recurrent pneumonia; Asian ethnicity was associated with decreased risk. Higher proximal VL (HR for 1 log(10) higher VL 1.28; 95% CI 1.11, 1.47; P<0.001) was associated with increased risk; higher CD4 count prior to the event (HR per 100 cells/μL higher 0.94; 95% CI 0.89, 1.0; P=0.04) decreased risk. Compared with controls, the hazard for a pneumonia event was higher if rIL-2 was received <180 days previously (HR 1.66; 95% CI 1.07, 2.60; P=0.02) vs.≥180 days previously (HR 0.98; 95% CI 0.70, 1.37; P=0.9). Compared with the control group, pneumonia risk in the IL-2 arm decreased over time, with HRs of 1.41, 1.71, 1.16, 0.62 and 0.84 in years 1, 2, 3-4, 5-6 and 7, respectively. Bacterial pneumonia rates in cART-treated adults with moderate

  7. Neutrophils to the ROScue: Mechanisms of NADPH Oxidase Activation and Bacterial Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. Nguyen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by NADPH oxidase play an important role in antimicrobial host defense and inflammation. Their deficiency in humans results in recurrent and severe bacterial infections, while their unregulated release leads to pathology from excessive inflammation. The release of high concentrations of ROS aids in clearance of invading bacteria. Localization of ROS release to phagosomes containing pathogens limits tissue damage. Host immune cells, like neutrophils, also known as PMNs, will release large amounts of ROS at the site of infection following the activation of surface receptors. The binding of ligands to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, toll-like receptors, and cytokine receptors can prime PMNs for a more robust response if additional signals are encountered. Meanwhile, activation of Fc and integrin directly induces high levels of ROS production. Additionally, GPCRs that bind to the bacterial-peptide analog fMLP, a neutrophil chemoattractant, can both prime cells and trigger low levels of ROS production. Engagement of these receptors initiates intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in activation of downstream effector proteins, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex, and ultimately, the production of ROS by this complex. Within PMNs, ROS released by the NADPH oxidase complex can activate granular proteases and induce the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. Additionally, ROS can cross the membranes of bacterial pathogens and damage their nucleic acids, proteins, and cell membranes. Consequently, in order to establish infections, bacterial pathogens employ various strategies to prevent restriction by PMN-derived ROS or downstream consequences of ROS production. Some pathogens are able to directly prevent the oxidative burst of phagocytes using secreted effector proteins or toxins that interfere with translocation of the NADPH oxidase complex or signaling pathways needed for its activation

  8. Vitamin D receptor negatively regulates bacterial-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-kappaB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR(-/-) mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR(-/-) mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR(+/+) mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR(-/-) mice. NF-kappaB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR(-/-) mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection.

  9. Seasonal Evaluation of Antigenic Bacterial Infections Among Working Class in the Inner City of Houston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the monthly, quarterly, and seasonal variation of antigenic bacterial infections among the working class in the inner city of Houston using the Wellcogen Rapid Test methods. One of the aims was to demonstrate how this method could be used effectively in screening patients at risk and preventing the spread of antigenic bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae b, Streptococcus (Strep b, and Neisseria meningitidis (mainly group c and b. A total of 2,837 patients were screened for bacterial infections; 908 (32% were male and 1,929 (68% were female. The age range was between 2 and 70 years. Of the total group, 356 (12.5% patients were positive; 203 (57% were female while 153 (43% were male (male/female ratio of 1:1.3. Medically underserved and immune suppressed populations are the most affected by these bacterial infections. Blacks are the most affected (48% compared to Native Americans (1%, but children under 10 years of age have the highest incidence. This research showed, in addition, that the Wellcogen Rapid Tests are effective (356 cases identified for a rapid screening of infectious bacteria. Explanation for these results was probably due to poor living conditions, poor hygiene, and viral immune suppression in adults and immature immune systems in neonates and children under 10 years of age.

  10. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luna-Ramirez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  11. Inactivation of bacterial biofilms using visible-light-activated unmodified ZnO nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponiene, Kristina; Serevičius, Tomas; Luksiene, Zivile; Juršėnas, Saulius

    2017-09-01

    Various zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are widely used for photocatalytic antibacterial applications. Since ZnO possesses a wide bandgap, it is believed that only UV light may efficiently assist bacterial inactivation, and diverse crystal lattice modifications should be applied in order to narrow the bandgap for efficient visible-light absorption. In this work we show that even unmodified ZnO nanorods grown by an aqueous chemical growth technique are found to possess intrinsic defects that can be activated by visible light (λ = 405 nm) and successfully applied for total inactivation of various highly resistant bacterial biofilms rather than more sensitive planktonic bacteria. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis has revealed that visible-light excitation creates long-lived charge carriers (τ > 1 μs), which might be crucial for destructive biochemical reactions achieving significant bacterial biofilm inactivation. ZnO nanorods covered with bacterial biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis MSCL 302 after illumination by visible light (λ = 405 nm) were inactivated by 2 log, and Listeria monocytogenes ATCL3C 7644 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms by 4 log. Heterogenic waste-water microbial biofilms, consisting of a mixed population of mesophilic bacteria after illumination with visible light were also completely destroyed.

  12. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ramirez, Karen; Skaljac, Marisa; Grotmann, Jens; Kirfel, Phillipp; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops. PMID:28837113

  13. Evaluation of pyraclostrobin and acibenzolar-S-methyl on common bacterial blight of snap bean

    OpenAIRE

    Renata de Cássia Camara; Antonio Carlos Maringoni; Sandra Cristina Vigo; Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima

    2012-01-01

    Assays were done under greenhouse conditions in order to evaluate the effect of pyraclostrobin (0.0375, 0.0750 and 0.150 mL.L-1) and acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L-1) in common bacterial blight, using leaves of snap beans cultivar Bragança. These chemicals were sprayed at three different times: five days before; five days before + five days after; and five days after leaf inoculation with an isolate of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. They were determinate the levels of polyphenolo...

  14. A novel bacterial transport mechanism of Acinetobacter baumannii via activated human neutrophils through interleukin-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoshida, Go; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Kikuchi-Ueda, Takane; Nakano, Ryuichi; Hikosaka, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Ubagai, Tsuneyuki; Higashi, Shouichi; Ono, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired infections as a result of Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. Although neutrophils play a critical role in early protection against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. To elucidate the interactions between A. baumannii and human neutrophils, we cocultured these cells and analyzed them by microscopy and flow cytometry. We found that A. baumannii adhered to neutrophils. We next examined neutrophil and A. baumannii infiltration into Matrigel basement membranes by an in vitro transmigration assay. Neutrophils were activated by A. baumannii, and invasion was enhanced. More interestingly, A. baumannii was transported together by infiltrating neutrophils. Furthermore, we observed by live cell imaging that A. baumannii and neutrophils moved together. In addition, A. baumannii-activated neutrophils showed increased IL-8 production. The transport of A. baumannii was suppressed by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration by blocking the effect of IL-8. A. baumannii appears to use neutrophils for transport by activating these cells via IL-8. In this study, we revealed a novel bacterial transport mechanism that A. baumannii exploits human neutrophils by adhering to and inducing IL-8 release for bacterial portage. This mechanism might be a new treatment target. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  15. Bioprospecting saline gradient of a Wildlife Sanctuary for bacterial diversity and antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Mara; King, Riley; Morsy, Mustafa

    2017-08-11

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are becoming a global crisis, causing death of thousands of people and significant economic impact. The discovery of novel antibiotics is crucial to saving lives and reducing healthcare costs. To address the antibiotic-resistant crisis, in collaboration the Small World Initiative, which aims to crowdsource novel antibiotic discovery, this study aimed to identify antimicrobial producing bacteria and bacterial diversity in the soil of the Stimpson Wildlife Sanctuary, an inland area with a soil salt gradient. Approximately 4500 bacterial colonies were screened for antimicrobial activity and roughly 100 bacteria were identified as antimicrobial producers, which belong to Entrococcaceae (74%), Yersiniaceae (19%), and unidentified families (7%). Several bacterial isolates showed production of broad spectrum inhibitory compounds, while others were more specific to certain pathogens. The data obtained from the current study provide a resource for further characterization of the soil bacteria with antimicrobial activity, with an aim to discover novel ones. The study showed no correlation between soil salt level and the presence of bacteria with antimicrobial activities. However, most of the identified antimicrobial producing bacteria do not belong to actinomycetes, the most common phyla of antibiotic producing bacteria and this could potentially lead to the discovery of novel antibiotics.

  16. Screening of Bacterial Strains for Polygalacturonase Activity: Its Production by Bacillus sphaericus (MTCC 7542

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranveer Singh Jayani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At present almost all the pectinolytic enzymes used for industrial applications are produced by fungi. There are a few reports of pectinase production by bacterial strains. Therefore, in the present study, seventy-four bacterial strains, isolated from soil and rotten vegetable samples, were screened for polygalacturonase production. The strain PG-31, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Bacillus sphaericus (MTCC 7542. Maximal quantities of polygalacturonase were produced when a 16-hours-old inoculum was used at 7.5% (v/v in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (160 rpm for 72 hours. The optimal temperature and pH for bacterial growth and polygalacturonase production were found to be 30∘C and 6.8, respectively. Maximum enzyme production resulted when citrus pectin was used as the carbon source at a concentration of 1.25% (w/v, whereas other carbon sources led to a decrease (30%–70% in enzyme production. Casein hydrolysate and yeast extract used together as organic nitrogen source gave best results, and ammonium chloride was found to be the most suitable inorganic nitrogen source. The supplementation of media with 0.9% (w/v D-galacturonic acid led to a 23% increase in activity. Bacillus sphaericus, a bacterium isolated from soil, produced good amount of polygalacturonase activity at neutral pH; hence, it would be potentially useful to increase the yield of banana, grape, or apple juice.

  17. Usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-SPECT in evaluation of bacterial meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Kentaro; Ando, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Keiko; Matsuyuki, Makado; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Ono, Eiichiro; Katsuragi, Makoto [St. Maria Hospital, Kurume, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT was performed to detect the periodical changes of blood flow distribution in 6 infants (average age 5.5 months) with bacterial meningitis and was compared with findings by CT and MRI imaging, by DQ (developmental quotient) and by neurological examinations. SPECT was done with Shimadzu HEADTOME SET 70 for 20 min at 5 min after intravenous administration of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO (111 MBq) at the stage of 16-26 days (SPECT I) after hospitalization, of 39-105 days (II) and/or of 138-197 days (III). The region of interest was set in both cerebellar hemispheres to calculate the mean pixel count c1 and in other 16 areas for the count c2. SPECT image was evaluated together with c2/c1 ratios. Head CT was performed at hospitalization or at the period around the SPECT I, and head MRI, at 39-183 days. At 3-5 months after crisis, evaluation was done for DQ and neurological signs. Periodical brain SPECT was found useful for the precise evaluation of bacterial meningitis and for prediction of its prognosis. (K.H.)

  18. Drivers shaping the diversity and biogeography of total and active bacterial communities in the South China Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Dai, M.; Jiao, N.; Herndl, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that different drivers shape the diversity and biogeography of the total and active bacterial community, we examined the bacterial community composition along two transects, one from the inner Pearl River estuary to the open waters of the South China Sea (SCS) and the other

  19. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  20. Proinflammatory effects of bacterial lipoprotein on human neutrophil activation status, function and cytotoxic potential in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    Bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) is the most abundant protein in gram-negative bacterial cell walls, heavily outweighing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Herein we present findings demonstrating the potent in vitro effects of BLP on neutrophil (PMN) activation status, function, and capacity to transmigrate an endothelial monolayer. PMNs are the principal effectors of the initial host response to injury or infection and constitute a significant threat to invading bacterial pathogens. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterised by significant host tissue injury mediated, in part, by uncontrolled regulation of PMN cytotoxic activity. We found that BLP-activated human PMN as evidenced by increased CD11b\\/CD18 (Mac-1) expression. Up-regulation of PMN Mac-1 in response to BLP occurred independently of membrane-bound CD14 (mCD14). A similar up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on endothelial cells was observed whilst E-Selectin expression was unaffected. PMN transmigration across a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was markedly increased after treating either PMN\\'s or HUVEC independently with BLP. This increased transmigration did not occur as a result of any direct effect of BLP on HUVEC monolayer permeability, assessed objectively using the passage of FITC-labeled Dextran-70. BLP primed PMN for enhanced respiratory burst and superoxide anion production in response to PMA, but did not influence phagocytosis of opsonized Escherichia coli. BLP far exceeds LPS as a gram-negative bacterial wall component, these findings therefore implicate BLP as an additional putative mediator of SIRS arising from gram-negative infection.

  1. Larvicidal Activities of Indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis Isolates and Nematode Symbiotic Bacterial Toxins against the Mosquito Vector, Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases and the resistance of mosquitoes to conventional pesticides have recently caused a panic to the authorities in the endemic countries. This study was conducted to identify native larvicidal biopesticides against Culex pipiens for utilization in the battle against mosquito-borne diseases.Methods: Larvicidal activities of new indigenous Bacillus thuringiensis isolates and crude toxin complexes (TCs of two nematode bacterial-symbionts, Photorhabdus luminescens akhurstii (HRM1 and Ph. luminescens akhurstii (HS1 that tested against Cx. pipiens. B. thuringiensis isolates were recovered from different environmental samples in Saudi Arabia, and the entomopathogenic nematodes, Heterorhabditis indica (HRM1 and He. sp (HS1 were iso­lated from Egypt. Larvicidal activities (LC50 and LC95 of the potentially active B. thuringiensis strains or TCs were then evaluated at 24 and 48h post-treatment.Results: Three B. thuringiensis isolates were almost as active as the reference B. thuringiensis israelensis (Bti-H14, and seven isolates were 1.6–5.4 times more toxic than Bti-H14. On the other hand, the TCs of the bacterial sym­bionts, HRM1 and HS1, showed promising larvicidal activities. HS1 showed LC50 of 2.54 folds that of HRM1 at 24h post-treatment. Moreover, histopathological examinations of the HS1-treated larvae showed deformations in midgut epithelial cells at 24h post-treatment.Conclusion: Synergistic activity and molecular characterization of these potentially active biocontrol agents are currently being investigated. These results may lead to the identification of eco-friend mosquito larvicidal product(s that could contribute to the battle against mosquito-borne diseases.

  2. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Alexander R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  3. Nano-TiO2 affects Cu speciation, extracellular enzyme activity, and bacterial communities in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Liu, Tong; Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yilin

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) coexist with heavy metals and influence the existing forms and toxicities of the metal in water. However, limited information is available regarding the ecological risk of this coexistence in sediments. In this study, the effect of nano-TiO2 on Cu speciation in sediments was investigated using sequential extraction. The microcosm approach was also employed to analyze the effects of the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu on extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial communities in sediments. Results showed that nano-TiO2 decreased the organic matter-bound fraction of Cu and increased the corresponding residual fraction Cu. As a result, speciation of exogenous Cu in sediments changed. During the course of the 30-day experiment, the presence of nano-TiO2 did not affect Cu-induced changes in bacterial community structure. However, the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu restrained the activity of bacterial extracellular enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase. The degree of inhibition also varied because of the different properties of extracellular enzymes. This research highlighted the importance of understanding and predicting the effects of the coexistence of nanomaterials and other pollutants in sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Active depinning of bacterial droplets: the collective surfing of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennes, Marc; Tailleur, Julien; Daerr, Adrian

    2016-11-01

    How systems are endowed with migration capacity is a fascinating question with implications ranging from the design of novel active systems to the control of microbial populations. Bacteria, which can be found in a variety of environments, have developed among the richest set of locomotion mechanisms both at the microscopic and collective levels. Here, we uncover experimentally a new mode of collective bacterial motility in humid environment through the depinning of bacterial droplets. While capillary forces are notoriously enormous at the bacterial scale, even capable of pinning water droplets of millimetric size on inclined surfaces, we show that bacteria are able to harness a variety of mechanisms to unpin contact lines, hence inducing a collective sliding of the colony. Contrary to flagella-dependent migration modes like swarming we show that this much faster colony surfing still occurs in mutant strains of Bacillus subtilis lacking flagella. The diversity of mechanisms involved in the active unpinning seen in our experiments suggests that collective surfing should be a generic mode of migration of microorganisms in humid environments. Bacttern Grant.

  5. Bacterial expression of an active class Ib chitinase from Castanea sativa cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allona, I; Collada, C; Casado, R; Paz-Ares, J; Aragoncillo, C

    1996-12-01

    Ch3, an endochitinase of 32 kDa present in Castanea sativa cotyledons, showed in vitro antifungal properties when assayed against Trichoderma viride. The characterization of a cDNA clone corresponding to this protein indicated that Ch3 is a class Ib endochitinase that is synthesized as a preprotein with a signal sequence preceding the mature polypeptide. Bacterial expression of mature Ch3 fused to the leader peptide of the periplasmic protein ompT resulted in active Ch3 enzyme. A plate assay was adapted for semi-quantitative determination of chitinase activity secreted from cultured bacteria, which should facilitate the identification of mutants with altered capacity to hydrolyse chitin.

  6. Effects of Biochar Amendment on Tomato Bacterial Wilt Resistance and Soil Microbial Amount and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt is a serious soilborne disease of Solanaceae crops which is caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. The important role of biochar in enhancing disease resistance in plants has been verified; however, the underlying mechanism remains not fully understood. In this study, two different biochars, made from peanut shell (BC1 and wheat straw (BC2, were added to Ralstonia solanacearum-infected soil to explore the interrelation among biochar, tomato bacterial wilt, and soil microbial properties. The results showed that both BC1 and BC2 treatments significantly reduced the disease index of bacterial wilt by 28.6% and 65.7%, respectively. The populations of R. solanacearum in soil were also significantly decreased by biochar application. Ralstonia solanacearum infection significantly reduced the densities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and increased the ratio of soil fungi/bacteria in the soil. By contrast, BC1 and BC2 addition to pathogen-infected soil significantly increased the densities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes but decreased the density of fungi and the ratios of soil fungi/bacteria and fungi/actinomycetes. Biochar treatments also increased soil neutral phosphatase and urease activity. Furthermore, higher metabolic capabilities of microorganisms by biochar application were found at 96 and 144 h in Biolog EcoPlates. These results suggest that both peanut and wheat biochar amendments were effective in inhibiting tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum. The results suggest a relationship between the disease resistance of the plants and the changes in soil microbial population densities and activity.

  7. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of cinnamaldehyde derivatives as inhibitors of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Sheng, Juzheng; Huang, Guihua; Ma, Ruixin; Yin, Fengxin; Song, Di; Zhao, Can; Ma, Shutao

    2015-06-05

    In an attempt to discover potential antibacterial agents against the increasing bacterial resistance, novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antibacterial activity against nine significant pathogens using broth microdilution method, and their cell division inhibitory activity against four representative strains. In the in vitro antibacterial activity, the newly synthesized compounds generally displayed better efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 than the others. In particular, compounds 3, 8 and 10 exerted superior or comparable activity to all the reference drugs. In the cell division inhibitory activity, all the compounds showed the same trend as their in vitro antibacterial activity, exhibiting better activity against S. aureus ATCC25923 than the other strains. Additionally, compounds 3, 6, 7 and 8 displayed potent cell division inhibitory activity with an MIC value of below 1 μg/mL, over 256-fold better than all the reference drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of cellulolytic activities of environmental bacterial consortia from an Argentinian native forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Nelson; Gioffré, Andrea; Sede, Silvana M; Campos, Eleonora; Cataldi, Angel; Talia, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Cellulolytic activities of three bacterial consortia derived from a forest soil sample from Chaco region, Argentina, were characterized. The phylogenetic analysis of consortia revealed two main highly supported groups including Achromobacter and Pseudomonas genera. All three consortia presented cellulolytic activity. The carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and total cellulase activities were studied both quantitatively and qualitatively and optimal enzymatic conditions were characterized and compared among the three consortia. Thermal and pH stability were analyzed. Based on its cellulolytic activity, one consortium was selected for further characterization by zymography. We detected a specific protein of 55 kDa with CMCase activity. In this study, we have shown that these consortia encode for cellulolytic enzymes. These enzymes could be useful for lignocellulosic biomass degradation into simple components and for different industrial applications.

  9. Germa-gamma-lactones as novel inhibitors of bacterial urease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amtul, Zareen; Follmer, Cristian; Mahboob, Sumera; Atta-Ur-Rahman; Mazhar, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid M; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Muhammad, Sajjad; Kazmi, Syed A; Choudhary, Mohammad Iqbal

    2007-05-04

    Organogermanium compounds have been used as pharmacological agents. However, very few reports are available on the synthesis and antibacterial activities of lactones containing organogermaniums. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of different lactone-substituted organogermaniums on bacterial growth and their urease activity. We report synthesis of 12 germa-gamma-lactones (GeL) and their antimicrobial activities against several bacterial pathogens. Antibacterial action of all GeL was highly selective against Gram-negative bacilli, particularly Proteus mirabilis, an important pathogen infecting the urinary tract. Furthermore, our data indicate that 8-quinoline derivatives were more potent against P. mirabilis than 2-methyl-8-quinoline. For example, the beta-(o-methylphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone and beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone were maximally active with MIC(90) of 61 and 94 microM, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated a linear correlation between antibacterial activity and inhibition of P. mirabilis urease enzyme. Further kinetic analyses revealed that inhibition occurred in a noncompetitive and concentration-dependent manner with the minimum IC(50) of 31 microM for beta-(o-methoxyphenyl)-gamma,gamma-bis(8-quinolinoxy)germa-gamma-lactone. In conclusion, these findings suggest that GeL have potential to be developed as antimicrobial agents against P. mirabilis infection.

  10. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  11. Novel Cu@SiO{sub 2}/bacterial cellulose nanofibers: Preparation and excellent performance in antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Bo [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute of Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Xiao Ling Wei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China); Department of Life Sciences of Lianyungang Teacher' s College, Sheng Hu Lu 28, Lianyungang 222006 (China); Huang, Yang; Zhu, Chunlin; Chen, Chuntao; Chen, Xiao; Fan, Mengmeng [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute of Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Xiao Ling Wei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun, Dongping, E-mail: sundpe301@163.com [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute of Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Xiao Ling Wei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2016-05-01

    The antibacterial composite based on bacterial cellulose (BC) was successfully prepared by in-situ synthesis of SiO{sub 2} coated Cu nanoparticles (Cu@SiO{sub 2}/BC) and its properties were characterized. Its chemical structures and morphologies were evaluated by Fourier transformation infrared spectrum (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results demonstrated that the SiO{sub 2} coated Cu particles were well homogeneously precipitated on the surface of BC. The Cu@SiO{sub 2}/BC was more resistant to oxidation than the Cu nanoparticles impregnated into BC (Cu/BC) and then Cu@SiO{sub 2}/BC could prolong the antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the preparation of Cu@SiO{sub 2}/BC. Due to its unique structure, the Cu@SiO{sub 2}/BC membrane shows excellent antibacterial effects and can be used for a long time. - Highlights: • This work paves the novel way to fabricate antibacterial nanomaterial with good efficiency. • We prepare the antibacterial membrane based on bacterial cellulose by in-situ synthesis of SiO{sub 2}-coated Cu nanoparticles. • The antibacterial membrane is more resistant to oxidation and can prolong the antimicrobial activity.

  12. Bacterial production, glucosidase activity and particle-associated carbohydrates in Dona Paula bay, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Size-fractionated bacterial production, abundance and Alpha - and Beta - glucosidase enzyme activities were studied with respect to changes in hydrography, total suspended matter (TSM), chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen ratio...

  13. Evaluation of bacterial colonization in patients with the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Nisa Akay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL. Bacterial infections are a common complication of MF/Sezary syndrome (SS. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causes of skin infections in patients with MF/SS. However, the role of infectious agents and their effects on the clinical course is controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of the colonization of bacterial pathogens among individuals with MF/SS in comparison with control subjects. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six patients with MF/SS and 66 healthy control subjects were included in this study. The subjects were swabbed in the nose, throat and axilla and the samples were evaluated according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI criteria. Results: The mean age of the patients was 55.9±14.8 years (range: 21-84 years. Forty-eight patients were with ≤stage 2A, 18 were ≥stage 2B SS and MF. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the nose and axilla between the two groups. However, in the throat it was statistically higher in MF/SS (p=0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of S.aureus colonization. The frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the throat cultures were significant (p=0.004 for patients with late stage disease compared to those with early stages, but this was not shown in axilla and nose cultures. Conclusion: In this study, bacterial colonization in the throat and nasal carriage of S.aureus were found to be higher in patients with MF/SS. Further studies on the benefits of controlling this problem, possibly with simple and inexpensive methods that might ameliorates the symptoms such as itching, scaling and erythema are needed.

  14. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vitamin D Receptor Negatively Regulates Bacterial-Stimulated NF-κB Activity in Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P.; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R. Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-κB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR−/− mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR−/− mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR+/+ mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR−/− mice. NF-κB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR−/− mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-κB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-κB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection. PMID:20566739

  16. Bacterial Community Structure Shifted by Geosmin in Granular Activated Carbon System of Water Treatment Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc Dung; Lee, Eun-Hee; Chae, Seon-Ha; Cho, Yongdeok; Shin, Hyejin; Son, Ahjeong

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relation between the presence of geosmin in water and the bacterial community structure within the granular activated carbon (GAC) system of water treatment plants in South Korea. GAC samples were collected in May and August of 2014 at three water treatment plants (Sungnam, Koyang, and Yeoncho in Korea). Dissolved organic carbon and geosmin were analyzed before and after GAC treatment. Geosmin was found in raw water from Sungnam and Koyang water treatment plants but not in that from Yeoncho water treatment plant. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, the 16S rRNA clone library indicated that the bacterial communities from the Sungnam and Koyang GAC systems were closely related to geosmin-degrading bacteria. Based on the phylogenetic tree and multidimensional scaling plot, bacterial clones from GAC under the influence of geosmin were clustered with Variovorax paradoxus strain DB 9b and Comamonas sp. DB mg. In other words, the presence of geosmin in water might have inevitably contributed to the growth of geosmin degraders within the respective GAC system.

  17. A Novel Bacterial Enzyme with d-Glucuronyl C5-epimerase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raedts, John; Lundgren, Magnus; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Li, Jin-Ping; van der Oost, John

    2013-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans are biologically active polysaccharides that are found ubiquitously in the animal kingdom. The biosynthesis of these complex polysaccharides involves complicated reactions that turn the simple glycosaminoglycan backbone into highly heterogeneous structures. One of the modification reactions is the epimerization of d-glucuronic acid to its C5-epimer l-iduronic acid, which is essential for the function of heparan sulfate. Although l-iduronic acid residues have been shown to exist in polysaccharides of some prokaryotes, there has been no experimental evidence for the existence of a prokaryotic d-glucuronyl C5-epimerase. This work for the first time reports on the identification of a bacterial enzyme with d-glucuronyl C5-epimerase activity. A gene of the marine bacterium Bermanella marisrubri sp. RED65 encodes a protein (RED65_08024) of 448 amino acids that has an overall 37% homology to the human d-glucuronic acid C5-epimerase. Alignment of this peptide with the human and mouse sequences revealed a 60% similarity at the carboxyl terminus. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed epimerization activity toward substrates generated from heparin and the E. coli K5 capsular polysaccharide, thereby providing the first evidence for bacterial d-glucuronyl C5-epimerase activity. These findings may eventually be used for modification of mammalian glycosaminoglycans. PMID:23824188

  18. Nucleoside analogues are activated by bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases in a species-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, Anders; On, Stephen L. W.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the bactericidal activity of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues against a variety of pathogenic bacteria and characterize the activating enzymes, deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). Several FDA-approved nucleoside analogue drugs were screened for their potential...... bactericidal activity against several clinical bacterial isolates and type strains. We identified and subcloned the genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases in Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens...... phosphorylated AZT efficiently with a Km of 73.3 µM and kcat/Km of 6.6 × 10^4 s-1 M-1 and is the activator of this drug in vivo. 2",2"-Difluoro-2"-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine) was a potent antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria in the concentration range between 0.001 and 1.0 µM. The B. cereus deoxyadenosine...

  19. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peptidomimetic Small Molecules Disrupt Type IV Secretion System Activity in Diverse Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Shaffer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria utilize complex type IV secretion systems (T4SSs to translocate diverse effector proteins or DNA into target cells. Despite the importance of T4SSs in bacterial pathogenesis, the mechanism by which these translocation machineries deliver cargo across the bacterial envelope remains poorly understood, and very few studies have investigated the use of synthetic molecules to disrupt T4SS-mediated transport. Here, we describe two synthetic small molecules (C10 and KSK85 that disrupt T4SS-dependent processes in multiple bacterial pathogens. Helicobacter pylori exploits a pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS to inject an oncogenic effector protein (CagA and peptidoglycan into gastric epithelial cells. In H. pylori, KSK85 impedes biogenesis of the pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS, while C10 disrupts cag T4SS activity without perturbing pilus assembly. In addition to the effects in H. pylori, we demonstrate that these compounds disrupt interbacterial DNA transfer by conjugative T4SSs in Escherichia coli and impede vir T4SS-mediated DNA delivery by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in a plant model of infection. Of note, C10 effectively disarmed dissemination of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient bacterial population, thus demonstrating the potential of these compounds in mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants driven by conjugation. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of synthetic small molecules that impair delivery of both effector protein and DNA cargos by diverse T4SSs.

  1. Evaluating the consistency of gene sets used in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintle Nathan L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statistical analyses of whole genome expression data require functional information about genes in order to yield meaningful biological conclusions. The Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG are common sources of functionally grouped gene sets. For bacteria, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide alternative, complementary sources of gene sets. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the data obtained from these resources has been performed. Results We define a series of gene set consistency metrics directly related to the most common classes of statistical analyses for gene expression data, and then perform a comprehensive analysis of 3581 Affymetrix® gene expression arrays across 17 diverse bacteria. We find that gene sets obtained from GO and KEGG demonstrate lower consistency than those obtained from the SEED and MicrobesOnline, regardless of gene set size. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of GO and KEGG gene sets in bacterial gene expression data analysis, the SEED and MicrobesOnline provide more consistent sets for a wide variety of statistical analyses. Increased use of the SEED and MicrobesOnline gene sets in the analysis of bacterial gene expression data may improve statistical power and utility of expression data.

  2. Ethylene removal evaluation and bacterial community analysis of vermicompost as biofilter material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuming; Shao, Lingzhi; Liu, Hui; Tong, Ling; Liu, Hong

    2011-08-30

    Biofiltration of ethylene provides an environmentally friendly and economically beneficial option relative to physical/chemical removal, where selection of appropriate bed material is crucial. Here the vermicompost with indigenous microorganisms as bed material was evaluated for ethylene removal through batch test and biofilter experiment. Temporal and spatial dynamics of bacterial community in the vermicompost-biofilter under different ethylene loads were characterized by culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) methods. The results showed that ethylene was effectively degraded by the vermicompost under conditions of 25-50% moisture content and 25-35°C temperature. The vermicompost-biofilter achieved nearly 100% ethylene removal up to an inlet load of 11mg m(-3)h(-1). Local nitrogen lack of the vermicompost in the biofilter was observed over operation time, but the change of pH was slight. DGGE analysis demonstrated that the bacterial abundance and community structure of vermicompost-biofilter varied with the height of biofilter under different ethylene loads. Pseudomonads and Actinobacteria were predominant in the biofilter throughout the whole experiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between the color of carious dentin with varying lesion activity, and bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Hayashi, Norifumi; Takeshige, Fumio; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between the color of carious dentin with varying lesion activity, and bacterial detection in the lesions. In 26 extracted human molars with coronal dentin caries and four extracted sound human molars, dentin was removed by a round bur every 150 microm from the dentin surface, in the direction of the pulp chamber. Before and after removal, images of nine-color samples and the dentin surface stained with a caries detector dye (1% acid red in propylene glycol) were taken simultaneously by a charge-coupled device (CCD), and dentinal tissue samples were taken with a new round bur. From the images, corrected L*, a* and b* values (CIE 1976 L*a*b* color system) of the dentin surfaces were calculated from the color changes of the nine-color samples. Bacterial DNA in the dentinal tissues was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Before removal of dentin, the L* of sound molars (L*>50) was significantly larger than that of carious molars (L*type I (a*>20, characteristics of active caries) and type II (a*types, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of L* was significantly larger than that of a* or b* (univariate Z score test, Pdentinal tissue increased, and bacterial DNA was not detected when L* was >60. Sound and types I and II carious dentin were discriminated by the combination of L* and a* values of dentinal tissue stained with the caries detector dye before removal of dentin. In carious lesions, the a* values of carious dentin stained with the dye were related to the carious lesion activity before removal of carious tissue, and the L* values were related to the degree of caries progression.

  4. Anti-bacterial Activity of Prenylated Xanthone from The Bark of Garcinia lowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwati Darwati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivity-guided fractionation of a ethyl acetate extract of Garcinia lowa bark has led to the isolation and identification of a known prenylated xanthone, mangosharin, (2,6-dihydroxy-8-methoxy-5-(3-methylbut-2-enyl-xanthone (1, 15.4 mg The structure of the compound was identified from analysis of their spectroscopic data and by comparison with previous studies.Compound 1 showed anti-bacterial activity against Sreptococcus mutans with MIC value of 7.25 mg/mL. DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.15408/jkv.v0i0.4057

  5. Evaluation of PCR based assays for the improvement of proportion estimation of bacterial and viral pathogens in diarrheal surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia eGuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDiarrhea can be caused by a variety of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms. Laboratory diagnosis is essential in the pathogen-specific burden assessment. In the pathogen spectrum monitoring in the diarrheal surveillance, culture methods are commonly used for the bacterial pathogens’ detection whereas nucleic acid based amplification, the non-cultural methods are used for the viral pathogens. Different methodology may cause the inaccurate pathogen spectrum for the bacterial pathogens because of their different culture abilities with the different media, and for the comparison of bacterial vs. viral pathogens. The application of nucleic acid-based methods in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens will likely increase the number of confirmed positive diagnoses, and will be comparable since all pathogens will be detected based on the same nucleic acid extracts from the same sample. In this study, bacterial pathogens, including diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae, were detected in 334 diarrheal samples by PCR-based methods using nucleic acid extracted from stool samples and associated enrichment cultures. A protocol was established to facilitate the consistent identification of bacterial pathogens in diarrheal patients. Five common enteric viruses were also detected by RT-PCR, including rotavirus, sapovirus, norovirus (I and II, human astrovirus, and enteric adenovirus. Higher positive rates were found for the bacterial pathogens, showing the lower proportion estimation if only using culture methods. This application will improve the quality of bacterial diarrheagenic pathogen survey, providing more accurate information pertaining to the pathogen spectrum associated with finding of food safety problems and disease burden evaluation.

  6. Anti-bacterial activity and brine shrimp lethality bioassay of methanolic extracts of fourteen different edible vegetables from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M. Obayed; Haque, Mahmuda; Urmi, Kaniz Fatima; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md.; Anita, Elichea Synthi; Begum, Momtaj; Hamid, Kaiser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of fourteen different edible vegetables methanolic extract from Bangladesh. Methods The antibacterial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion assay method against 12 bacteria (both gram positive and gram negative). The plant extracts were also screened for cytotoxic activity using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay method and the lethal concentrations (LC50) were determined at 95% confidence intervals by analyzing the data on a computer loaded with “Finney Programme”. Results All the vegetable extracts showed low to elevated levels of antibacterial activity against most of the tested strains (zone of inhibition=5-28 mm). The most active extract against all bacterial strains was from Xanthium indicum which showed remarkable antibacterial activity having the diameter of growth inhibition zone ranging from 12 to 28 mm followed by Alternanthera sessilis (zone of inhibition=6-21 mm). All extracts exhibited considerable general toxicity towards brine shrimps. The LC50 value of the tested extracts was within the range of 8.447 to 60.323 µg/mL with respect to the positive control (vincristine sulphate) which was 0.91 µg/mL. Among all studied extracts, Xanthium indicum displayed the highest cytotoxic effect with LC50 value of 8.447 µg/mL. Conclusions The results of the present investigation suggest that most of the studied plants are potentially good source of antibacterial and anticancer agents. PMID:23570009

  7. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental ... most common vaginal infection in sexually active teenaged girls . It appears to be caused by a bacterial ...

  8. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  9. Effects of Fertilization and Sampling Time on Composition and Diversity of Entire and Active Bacterial Communities in German Grassland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Sarah; Wemheuer, Franziska; Wemheuer, Bernd; Daniel, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Soil bacteria are major players in driving and regulating ecosystem processes. Thus, the identification of factors shaping the diversity and structure of these communities is crucial for understanding bacterial-mediated processes such as nutrient transformation and cycling. As most studies only target the entire soil bacterial community, the response of active community members to environmental changes is still poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fertilizer application and sampling time on structure and diversity of potentially active (RNA-based) and the entire (DNA-based) bacterial communities in German grassland soils. Analysis of more than 2.3 million 16S rRNA transcripts and gene sequences derived from amplicon-based sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that fertilizer application and sampling time significantly altered the diversity and composition of entire and active bacterial communities. Although the composition of both the entire and the active bacterial community was correlated with environmental factors such as pH or C/N ratio, the active community showed a higher sensitivity to environmental changes than the entire community. In addition, functional analyses were performed based on predictions derived from 16S rRNA data. Genes encoding the uptake of nitrate/nitrite, nitrification, and denitrification were significantly more abundant in fertilized plots compared to non-fertilized plots. Hence, this study provided novel insights into changes in dynamics and functions of soil bacterial communities as response to season and fertilizer application. PMID:26694644

  10. Specific antibiotics and nematode trophic groups agree in assessing fungal:bacterial activity in agricultural soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S; Dam, M; Vestergaard, M

    2012-01-01

    -induced respiration (SIR) inhibition approach. Here we compare fungal contribution to the microbial active biomass assessed by the SIR inhibition method with the contribution of fungal-feeding nematodes to the microbial-feeding nematode community. Four cultivation systems on the same soil that differ in carbon inputs......There are no methods at hand with a long and proven record for assessing the relative contribution of fungi and bacteria to decomposer activity in soil. Whereas a multitude of methods to determine fungal and bacterial biomass are available, activity assays traditionally relied on the substrate...... with a factor two ranked exactly the same with the two methods. A conventionally farmed rotation with low organic input had the lowest fungal fraction, while three organically farmed soils ranked higher....

  11. Minimum inhibitory concentration of irradiated silk protein powder for bacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuntivisoottikul, Kunya; Bunnak, Jintana [King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Chaokhun Taharn Ladkrabang, Faculty of Industrial Education, Dept. of Agricultural Educaiton, Bangkok (Thailand); Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this research was to study a minimum concentration level of irradiated silk protein powder, which inhibited bacterial activity. The concentration of 100 kGy irradiated silk protein powder (ISP) solution was ranged from 5 to 15% in distilled water. The activities of three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli B/r, Bacillus subtilis M3-1 and Staphylococcus aureus K, were tested by using minimum inhibition concentration method (MIC). The results indicated that the minimum concentration level that inhibited growth of E. coli B/r and S. aureus K was 5% ISP and all concentration levels studied could not inhibit the Bacilus subtilis M3-1 activity. (author)

  12. A Thiazole Orange Derivative Targeting the Bacterial Protein FtsZ Shows Potent Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Sun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of multidrug resistance among clinically significant bacteria calls for the urgent development of new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action. In this study, a new small molecule exhibiting excellent inhibition of bacterial cell division with potent antibacterial activity was discovered through cell-based screening. The compound exhibits a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity, including the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and NDM-1 Escherichia coli. The in vitro and in vivo results suggested that this compound disrupts the dynamic assembly of FtsZ protein and Z-ring formation through stimulating FtsZ polymerization. Moreover, this compound exhibits no activity on mammalian tubulin polymerization and shows low cytotoxicity on mammalian cells. Taken together, these findings could provide a new chemotype for development of antibacterials with FtsZ as the target.

  13. In search of alternative antibiotic drugs: Quorum-quenching activity in sponges and their bacterial isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar eSaurav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the extensive development of drug resistance in pathogens against the available antibiotic arsenal, antimicrobial resistance is now an emerging major threat to public healthcare. Anti-virulence drugs are a new type of therapeutic agent aiming at virulence factors rather than killing the pathogen, thus providing less selective pressure for evolution of resistance. One promising example of this therapeutic concept targets bacterial quorum sensing (QS, because QS controls many virulence factors responsible for bacterial infections. Marine sponges and their associated bacteria are considered a still untapped source for unique chemical leads with a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we screened extracts of fourteen sponge species collected from the Red and Mediterranean Sea for their quorum-quenching (QQ potential. Half of the species showed QQ activity in at least 2 out of 3 replicates. Six out of the 14 species were selected for bacteria isolation, to test for QQ activity also in isolates, which, once cultured, represent an unlimited source of compounds. We show that approximately 20% of the isolates showed QQ activity based on a Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 screen, and that the presence or absence of QQ activity in a sponge extract did not co-relate with the abundance of isolates with the same activity from the same sponge species. This can be explained by the unknown source of QQ compounds in sponge-holobionts (host or symbionts, and further by the possible non-symbiotic nature of bacteria isolated from sponges. The potential symbiotic nature of the isolates showing QQ activity was tested according to the distribution and abundance of taxonomically close bacterial Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs in a dataset including 97 sponge species and 178 environmental samples (i.e., seawater, freshwater and marine sediments. Most isolates were found not to be enriched in sponges, and may simply have been trapped in the

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolines as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno, Gabriella M; Chan, Katie M; Huynh, Valerie; Martin, Kevin S; Moore, Jared T; O'Brien, Terrence E; Pollo, Luiz A E; Sarabia, Francisco J; Tadeus, Clarissa; Yao, Zi; Anderson, David E; Ames, James B; Shaw, Jared T

    2015-03-12

    The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is one of many potential targets for the development of novel antibiotics. Recently, zantrin Z3 was shown to be a cross-species inhibitor of FtsZ; however, its specific interactions with the protein are still unknown. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues that contain a more tractable core structure and an analogue with single-digit micromolar inhibition of FtsZ's GTPase activity, which represents the most potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli FtsZ reported to date. In addition, the zantrin Z3 core has been converted to two potential photo-cross-linking reagents for proteomic studies that could shed light on the molecular interactions between FtsZ and molecules related to zantrin Z3.

  15. Nucleoside analogues are activated by bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases in a species-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrini, Michael P B; Clausen, Anders R; On, Stephen L W; Aarestrup, Frank M; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Piskur, Jure

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the bactericidal activity of antiviral and anticancer nucleoside analogues against a variety of pathogenic bacteria and characterize the activating enzymes, deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). Several FDA-approved nucleoside analogue drugs were screened for their potential bactericidal activity against several clinical bacterial isolates and type strains. We identified and subcloned the genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases in Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella enterica, Yersinia enterocolitica, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens and Listeria monocytogenes. These genes were tested for their ability to increase the susceptibility of a dNK-deficient E. coli strain to various analogues. We overexpressed, purified and characterized the substrate specificity and kinetic properties of the recombinant enzymes from S. enterica and B. cereus. The tested Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) in the concentration range 0.032-31.6 microM except for a single E. coli isolate and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates which were resistant to the tested AZT concentrations. Purified recombinant S. enterica thymidine kinase phosphorylated AZT efficiently with a Km of 73.3 microM and k(cat)/Km of 6.6 x 10(4) s(-1) M(-1) and is the activator of this drug in vivo. 2',2'-Difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine) was a potent antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria in the concentration range between 0.001 and 1.0 microM. The B. cereus deoxyadenosine kinase had a Km for gemcitabine of 33.5 microM and k(cat)/Km of 5.1 x 10(3) s(-1) M(-1) and activates gemcitabine in vivo. S. enterica and B. cereus are now amongst the first bacteria with a completely characterized set of dNK enzymes. Bacterial dNKs efficiently activate nucleoside analogues in a species-specific manner. Therefore, nucleoside analogues have a potential to be employed as antibiotics in the fight against emerging multiresistant bacteria.

  16. In Vitro Assessment of Early Bacterial Activity on Micro/Nanostructured Ti6Al4V Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Salas, Benjamin; Beltrán-Partida, Ernesto; Castillo-Uribe, Sandra; Curiel-Álvarez, Mario; Zlatev, Roumen; Stoytcheva, Margarita; Montero-Alpírez, Gisela; Vargas-Osuna, Lidia

    2017-05-18

    It is imperative to understand and systematically compare the initial interactions between bacteria genre and surface properties. Thus, we fabricated a flat, anodized with 80 nm TiO₂ nanotubes (NTs), and a rough Ti6Al4V surface. The materials were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We cultured in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) to evaluate the bacterial-surface behavior by FE-SEM and viability calculation. In addition, the initial effects of human osteoblasts were tested on the materials. Gram-negative bacteria showed promoted adherence and viability over the flat and rough surface, while NTs displayed opposite activity with altered morphology. Gram-positive bacteria illustrated similar cellular architecture over the surfaces but with promoted surface adhesion bonds on the flat alloy. Rough surfaces supported S. epidermidis viability, whilst NTs exhibited lower vitality. NTs advocated promoted better osteoblast organization with enhanced vitality. Gram-positive bacteria suggested preferred adhesion capability over flat and carbon-rich surfaces. Gram-negative bacteria were strongly disturbed by NTs but largely stimulated by flat and rough materials. Our work proposed that the chemical profile of the material surface and the bacterial cell wall characteristics might play an important role in the bacteria-surface interactions.

  17. In Vitro Assessment of Early Bacterial Activity on Micro/Nanostructured Ti6Al4V Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Valdez-Salas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative to understand and systematically compare the initial interactions between bacteria genre and surface properties. Thus, we fabricated a flat, anodized with 80 nm TiO2 nanotubes (NTs, and a rough Ti6Al4V surface. The materials were characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and atomic force microscopy (AFM. We cultured in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa to evaluate the bacterial-surface behavior by FE-SEM and viability calculation. In addition, the initial effects of human osteoblasts were tested on the materials. Gram-negative bacteria showed promoted adherence and viability over the flat and rough surface, while NTs displayed opposite activity with altered morphology. Gram-positive bacteria illustrated similar cellular architecture over the surfaces but with promoted surface adhesion bonds on the flat alloy. Rough surfaces supported S. epidermidis viability, whilst NTs exhibited lower vitality. NTs advocated promoted better osteoblast organization with enhanced vitality. Gram-positive bacteria suggested preferred adhesion capability over flat and carbon-rich surfaces. Gram-negative bacteria were strongly disturbed by NTs but largely stimulated by flat and rough materials. Our work proposed that the chemical profile of the material surface and the bacterial cell wall characteristics might play an important role in the bacteria-surface interactions.

  18. Comparative testing of disinfectant efficacy on planktonic bacteria and bacterial biofilms using a new assay based on kinetic analysis of metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, F; Scherrer, M; Kaiser, S J; DeRosa, A; Mutters, N T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a new reproducible method for disinfectant efficacy testing on bacterial biofilms and to evaluate the efficacy of different disinfectants against biofilms. Clinical multidrug-resistant strains were chosen as test isolates to ensure practical relevance. We compared the standard qualitative suspension assay for disinfectant testing, which does not take into account biofilm formation, to the new biofilm viability assay that uses kinetic analysis of metabolic activity in biofilms after disinfectant exposure to evaluate disinfectant efficacy. In addition, the efficacy of four standard disinfectants to clinical isolates was tested using both methods. All tested disinfectants were effective against test isolates when in planktonic state using the standard qualitative suspension assay, while disinfectants were only weakly effective against bacteria in biofilms. Disinfectant efficacy testing on planktonic organisms ignores biofilms and overestimates disinfectant susceptibility of bacteria. However, biofilm forming, e.g. on medical devices or hospital surfaces, is the natural state of bacterial living and needs to be considered in disinfectant testing. Although bacterial biofilms are the predominant manner of bacterial colonization, most standard procedures for antimicrobial susceptibility testing and efficacy testing of disinfectants are adapted for application to planktonic bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study to use a newly developed microplate-based biofilm test system that uses kinetic analysis of the metabolic activity in biofilms, after disinfectant exposure, to evaluate disinfectant efficacy. Our study shows that findings obtained from disinfectant efficacy testing on planktonic bacteria cannot be extrapolated to predict disinfectant efficacy on bacterial biofilms of clinically relevant multidrug-resistant organisms. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Comparison and evaluation of experimental mediastinitis models: precolonized foreign body implants and bacterial suspension inoculation seems promising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kose Necmi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-sternotomy mediastinitis (PSM is a devastating surgical complication affecting 1–3% of patients that undergo cardiac surgery. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial pathogen cultured from mediastinal samples obtained from patients with PSM. A component of the membrane of the gram positive bacteria, lipoteichoic acid, stimulates the blood monocytes and macrophages to secrete cytokines, radicals and nitrogen species leading to oxido-inflammatory damage. This seems to be responsible for the high mortality rate in PSM. For the evaluation of the pathogenesis of infection or for the investigation of alternative treatment models in infection, no standard model of mediastinitis seems to be available. In this study, we evaluated four mediastinitis models in rats. Methods The rats were divided into four groups to form different infection models. Group A: A suspension of 1 × 107 colony-forming units Staphylococcus aureus in 0,5 mL was inoculated from the right second intercostal space into the mediastinum. Group B: A hole was created in the right second intercostal space and a piece of stainless-steel implant with a length of 0.5 cm was inserted into the mediastinum and a suspension of 1 × 107 cfu bacteria in 0,5 mL was administered via the tail vein. Group C: Precolonized stainless-steel implant was inserted into the mediastinum. Group D: Precolonized stainless-steel implant was inserted into the mediastinum and the bacteria suspension was also injected into the mediastinum. On the 10th day, rats were sacrificed and the extension of infection in the mediastenae was evaluated by quantitative cultures. Myeloperoxidase activity (MPO and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were determined in the sera to evaluate the neutrophil activation and assess the inflammatory oxidation. Results The degree of infection in group C and D were 83.3% and 100% respectively (P P Conclusion Infected implants and high

  20. Multisubstrate isotope labeling and metagenomic analysis of active soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verastegui, Y; Cheng, J; Engel, K; Kolczynski, D; Mortimer, S; Lavigne, J; Montalibet, J; Romantsov, T; Hall, M; McConkey, B J; Rose, D R; Tomashek, J J; Scott, B R; Charles, T C; Neufeld, J D

    2014-07-15

    Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon ((12)C) or stable-isotope-labeled ((13)C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the (13)C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Importance: The ability to identify genes based on function, instead of sequence homology, allows the discovery of genes that would not be identified through sequence alone. This

  1. Impaired activation of the innate immune response to bacterial challenge in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidinger, Elif; Krause, Daniela; Wildenauer, Agnes; Meyer, Sebastian; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus J; Müller, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Infections resulting in immune activation have been proposed to play an etiological role in a subgroup of patients with Tourette syndrome (TS). In order to further characterize the interaction between pathogens and the innate immune system the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 on CD14 + monocytes and soluble CD14 (sCD14) levels were analyzed in the serum of 33 Tourette patients and 31 healthy controls. Moreover, collected blood samples were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mimicking a bacterial infection. TLR4 was analysed by flow cytometry, sCD14 was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients had a lower receptor expression of TLR4 after stimulation with LPS (P = 0.045) and higher levels of sCD14 (unstimulated P = 0.014, after LPS P = 0.045). The increase in TLR4 expression after stimulation with LPS was significantly higher in the control group (P = 0.041). Higher levels of sCD14, lower levels of TLR4 expression after stimulation and a diminished up-regulation of TLR4 expression after LPS stimulation in patients might represent an impaired activation of the innate immune response in TS, especially in regard to bacterial infection. The impaired response to pathogens could eventually lead to a higher susceptibility for infections. Recurring infections and a chronic inflammation could trigger and maintain the symptoms of TS.

  2. Nitrate reducing bacterial activity in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaching experiments of solid matrices (bitumen and cement pastes have been first implemented to define the physicochemical conditions that microorganisms are likely to meet at the bitumen-concrete interface (see the paper of Bertron et al.. Of course, as might be suspected, the cement matrix imposes highly alkaline pH conditions (10 bacterial strains led us to select Halomonas desiderata as a model bacterium capable of catalyzing the reaction of nitrate reduction in these extreme conditions of pH. The denitrifying activity of Halomonas desiderata was quantified in batch bioreactor in the presence of solid matrices and / or leachate from bitumen and cement matrices. Denitrification was relatively fast in the presence of cement matrix (<100 hours and 2 to 3 times slower in the presence of bituminous matrix. Overall, the presence of solid cement promoted the kinetics of denitrification. The observation of solid surfaces at the end of the experiment revealed the presence of a biofilm of Halomonas desiderata on the cement paste surface. These attached bacteria showed a denitrifying activity comparable to planktonic bacterial culture. On the other side, no colonization of bitumen could be highlighted as either by SEM or epifluorescence microscopy. Now, we are currently developing a continuous experimental bioreactor which should allow us a more rational understanding of the bitumen-cement-microbe interactions.

  3. Activated fluid transport regulates bacterial-epithelial interactions and significantly shifts the murine colonic microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keely, Simon; Kelly, Caleb J.; Weissmueller, Thomas; Burgess, Adrianne; Wagner, Brandie D.; Robertson, Charles E.; Harris, J. Kirk; Colgan, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Within the intestinal mucosa, epithelial cells serve multiple functions to partition the lumen from the lamina propria. As part of their natural function, intestinal epithelial cells actively transport electrolytes with passive water movement as a mechanism for mucosal hydration. Here, we hypothesized that electrogenic Cl- secretion, and associated mucosal hydration, influences bacterial-epithelial interactions and significantly influences the composition of the intestinal microbiota. An initial screen of different epithelial secretagogues identified lubiprostone as the most potent agonist for which to define these principles. In in vitro studies using cultured T84 cells, lubiprostone decreased E. coli translocation in a concentration-dependent manner (p lubiprostone delivered orally to mice fundamentally shifted the intestinal microbiota, with notable changes within the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes phyla of resident colonic bacteria. Such findings document a previously unappreciated role for epithelial Cl- secretion and water transport in influencing bacterial-epithelial interactions and suggest that active mucosal hydration functions as a primitive innate epithelial defense mechanism. PMID:22614705

  4. The metabolically active bacterial microbiome of tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes of slaughter pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne eMann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of microbiomes in lymphatic organs is relevant for basic and applied research into explaining microbial translocation processes and understanding cross-contamination during slaughter. This study aimed to investigate whether metabolically active bacteria (MAB could be detected within tonsils and mandibular lymph nodes (MLNs of pigs. The hypervariable V1-V2 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes was amplified from cDNA from tonsils and MLNs of eight clinically healthy slaughter pigs. Pyrosequencing yielded 82,857 quality-controlled sequences, clustering into 576 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, which were assigned to 230 genera and 16 phyla. The actual number of detected OTUs per sample varied highly (23-171 OTUs. Prevotella zoogleoformans and Serratia proteamaculans (best type strain hits were most abundant (10.6% and 41.8% respectively in tonsils and MLNs, respectively. To explore bacterial correlation patterns between samples of each tissue, pairwise Spearman correlations (rs were calculated. In total, 194 strong positive and negative correlations |rs| ≥ 0.6 were found. We conclude that (i lymphatic organs harbor a high diversity of metabolically active bacteria, (ii the occurrence of viable bacteria in lymph nodes is not restricted to pathological processes and (iii lymphatic tissues may serve as a contamination source in pig slaughterhouses. This study confirms the necessity of the EFSA regulation with regard to a meat inspection based on visual examinations to foster a minimization of microbial contamination.

  5. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Facilitates Bacterial Dissemination in Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; Brands, Xanthe; Duitman, JanWillem; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Borensztajn, Keren S; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Hollenberg, Morley D; Spek, C Arnold; Schultz, Marcus J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2018-02-05

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed by different cell types in the lungs and can mediate inflammatory responses. We sought to determine the role of PAR2 during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumococcal pneumonia or sepsis was induced in wild-type and PAR2 knock-out (Par2-/-) mice by infection with viable S. pneumoniae. Par2-/- mice demonstrated improved host defense, a largely preserved lung barrier integrity, and reduced mortality during pneumococcal pneumonia. PAR2 deficiency did not influence bacterial growth after intravenous infection. Inhibition of the endogenous PAR2 activating proteases tissue factor/factor VIIa or tryptase did not impact on bacterial burdens during pneumonia. In a PAR2 reporter cell line it was demonstrated that S. pneumoniae-derived proteases are able to cleave PAR2. These results show that S. pneumoniae is able to cleave and exploit PAR2 to disseminate systemically from the airways. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Gustatory-mediated avoidance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides via TRPA1 activation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldano, Alessia; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Franco, Luis; López-Requena, Alejandro; Liu, Guangda; Mora, Natalia; Yaksi, Emre; Voets, Thomas; Vennekens, Rudi; Hassan, Bassem A; Talavera, Karel

    2016-06-14

    Detecting pathogens and mounting immune responses upon infection is crucial for animal health. However, these responses come at a high metabolic price (McKean and Lazzaro, 2011, Kominsky et al., 2010), and avoiding pathogens before infection may be advantageous. The bacterial endotoxins lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are important immune system infection cues (Abbas et al., 2014), but it remains unknown whether animals possess sensory mechanisms to detect them prior to infection. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster display strong aversive responses to LPS and that gustatory neurons expressing Gr66a bitter receptors mediate avoidance of LPS in feeding and egg laying assays. We found the expression of the chemosensory cation channel dTRPA1 in these cells to be necessary and sufficient for LPS avoidance. Furthermore, LPS stimulates Drosophila neurons in a TRPA1-dependent manner and activates exogenous dTRPA1 channels in human cells. Our findings demonstrate that flies detect bacterial endotoxins via a gustatory pathway through TRPA1 activation as conserved molecular mechanism.

  7. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Janek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84% was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota.

  8. Evaluation of bacterial diversity recovered from petroleum samples using different physical matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Martins Dellagnezze

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Unraveling the microbial diversity and its complexity in petroleum reservoir environments has been a challenge throughout the years. Despite the techniques developed in order to improve methodologies involving DNA extraction from crude oil, microbial enrichments using different culture conditions can be applied as a way to increase the recovery of DNA from environments with low cellular density for further microbiological analyses. This work aimed at the evaluation of different matrices (arenite, shale and polyurethane foam as support materials for microbial growth and biofilm formation in enrichments using a biodegraded petroleum sample as inoculum in sulfate reducing condition. Subsequent microbial diversity characterization was carried out using Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE and 16S rRNA gene libraries in order to compare the microbial biomass yield, DNA recovery efficiency and diversity among the enrichments. The DNA from microbial communities in petroleum enrichments was purified according to a protocol established in this work and used for 16S rRNA amplification with bacterial generic primers. The PCR products were cloned, and positive clones were screened by Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the bacterial community was mostly represented by members of the genera Petrotoga, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Geobacillus and Rahnella. The use of different support materials in the enrichments yielded an increase in microbial biomass and biofilm formation, indicating that these materials may be employed for efficient biomass recovery from petroleum reservoir samples. Nonetheless, the most diverse microbiota were recovered from the biodegraded petroleum sample using polyurethane foam cubes as support material.

  9. Dysregulation of the host mevalonate pathway during early bacterial infection activates human TCR gamma delta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Rossy, Emmanuel; Sansano, Sebastiano; Gober, Hans-Jürgen; Landmann, Regine; Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-08-01

    Primates, but not rodents, have T cell receptor Vgamma9-Vdelta2 T cells bridging innate and adaptive antimicrobial immunity. This T cell population is activated by prenyl pyrophosphates isolated from microbial or eukaryotic cells. Although the microbial metabolites are more active than the cellular ones, their involvement in TCR gammadelta activation during infection has not been studied. Here, we show that, during the initial phases of infections with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, TCR gammadelta cells are activated by endogenous mevalonate metabolites. Infections with low bacteria inocula up-regulate the production and accumulation of host-derived TCR gammadelta stimulatory antigens within 1 h, which is followed by a peak of TCR gammadelta cell activation at 5 h. Infections induce the accumulation and dephosphorylation of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, resulting in increased activity of this enzyme and in increased synthesis of intermediate metabolites. Thus, primates have evolved the ability to readily respond to bacterial infection by sensing the dysregulation of the mevalonate pathway within infected cells, as a mechanism of immediate antimicrobial immunity.

  10. Scutellarin Suppresses NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Macrophages and Protects Mice against Bacterial Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Jing, Yan-Yun; Zeng, Chen-Ying; Li, Chen-Guang; Xu, Li-Hui; Yan, Liang; Bai, Wen-Jing; Zha, Qing-Bing; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in mediating the innate immune defense against pathogenic infections, but aberrant activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases. Thus targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome represents a promising therapeutic for the treatment of such diseases. Scutellarin is a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. and has been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory activities, but the underlying mechanism is only partly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether scutellarin could affect the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages. The results showed that scutellarin dose-dependently reduced caspase-1 activation and decreased mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed macrophages upon ATP or nigericin stimulation, indicating that scutellarin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages. Consistent with this, scutellarin also suppressed pyroptotic cell death in LPS-primed macrophages treated with ATP or nigericin. ATP or nigericin-induced ASC speck formation and its oligomerization were blocked by scutellarin pre-treatment. Intriguingly, scutellarin augmented PKA-specific phosphorylation of NLRP3 in LPS-primed macrophages, which was completely blocked by selective PKA inhibitor H89, suggesting that PKA signaling had been involved in the action of scutellarin to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Supporting this, the inhibitory effect of scutellarin on NLRP3 inflammasome activation was completely counteracted by H89 or adenyl cyclase inhibitor MDL12330A. As NLRP3-dependent release of IL-1β has a critical role in sepsis, the in vivo activity of scutellarin was assayed in a mouse model of bacterial sepsis, which was established by intraperitoneally injection of a lethal dose of viable Escherichia coli . Oral administration of scutellarin significantly improved the survival of mice with bacterial sepsis

  11. Root and Rhizosphere Bacterial Phosphatase Activity Varies with Tree Species and Soil Phosphorus Availability in Puerto Rico Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine G. Cabugao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forests generally occur on highly weathered soils that, in combination with the immobility of phosphorus (P, often result in soils lacking orthophosphate, the form of P most easily metabolized by plants and microbes. In these soils, mineralization of organic P can be the major source for orthophosphate. Both plants and microbes encode for phosphatases capable of mineralizing a range of organic P compounds. However, the activity of these enzymes depends on several edaphic factors including P availability, tree species, and microbial communities. Thus, phosphatase activity in both roots and the root microbial community constitute an important role in P mineralization and P nutrient dynamics that are not well studied in tropical forests. To relate phosphatase activity of roots and bacteria in tropical forests, we measured phosphatase activity in roots and bacterial isolates as well as bacterial community composition from the rhizosphere. Three forests in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico were selected to represent a range of soil P availability as measured using the resin P method. Within each site, a minimum of three tree species were chosen to sample. Root and bacterial phosphatase activity were both measured using a colorimetric assay with para-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate for the phosphomonoesterase enzyme. Both root and bacterial phosphatase were chiefly influenced by tree species. Though tree species was the only significant factor in root phosphatase activity, there was a negative trend between soil P availability and phosphatase activity in linear regressions of average root phosphatase and resin P. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance of bacterial community composition based on 16S amplicon sequencing indicated that bacterial composition was strongly controlled by soil P availability (p-value < 0.05. These results indicate that although root and bacterial phosphatase activity were influenced by tree species

  12. Evaluation of two real time PCR assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón de Velasco-Sada, Patricia; Falces-Romero, Iker; Quiles-Melero, Inmaculada; García-Perea, Adela; Mingorance, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two non-commercial Real-Time PCR assays for the detection of microorganisms in amniotic fluid followed by identification by pyrosequencing. We collected 126 amniotic fluids from 2010 to 2015 for the evaluation of two Real-Time PCR assays for detection of bacterial DNA in amniotic fluid (16S Universal PCR and Ureaplasma spp. specific PCR). The method was developed in the Department of Microbiology of the University Hospital La Paz. Thirty-seven samples (29.3%) were positive by PCR/pyrosequencing and/or culture, 4 of them were mixed cultures with Ureaplasma urealyticum. The Universal 16S Real-Time PCR was compared with the standard culture (81.8% sensitivity, 97.4% specificity, 75% positive predictive value, 98% negative predictive value). The Ureaplasma spp. specific Real-Time PCR was compared with the Ureaplasma/Mycoplasma specific culture (92.3% sensitivity, 89.4% specificity, 50% positive predictive value, 99% negative predictive value) with statistically significant difference (p=0.005). Ureaplasma spp. PCR shows a rapid response time (5h from DNA extraction until pyrosequencing) when comparing with culture (48h). So, the response time of bacteriological diagnosis in suspected chorioamnionitis is reduced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of long-term industrial waste effluent pollution on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shen, Ju-Pei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Archana, Gattupalli; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the influence of exogenous pollutants on microorganisms, the effect of long-term industrial waste effluent (IWE) pollution on the activity and diversity of soil bacteria was still unclear. Three soil samples characterized as uncontaminated (R1), moderately contaminated (R2), and highly contaminated (R3) receiving mixed organic and heavy metal pollutants for more than 20 years through IWE were collected along the Mahi River basin, Gujarat, western India. Basal soil respiration and in situ enzyme activities indicated an apparent deleterious effect of IWE on microbial activity and soil function. Community composition profiling of soil bacteria using 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method indicated an apparent bacterial community shift in the IWE-affected soils. Cloning and sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that the dominated bacterial phyla in polluted soil were affiliated with Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, indicating that these bacterial phyla may have a high tolerance to pollutants. We suggested that specific bacterial phyla along with soil enzyme activities could be used as relevant biological indicators for long-term pollution assessment on soil quality. Graphical Abstract Bacterial community profiling and soil enzyme activities in long-term industrial waste effluent polluted soils.

  14. Bacterial components are the major contributors to the macrophage stimulating activity exhibited by extracts of common edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Heather L; Haron, Mona H; Pugh, Nirmal D; Zhang, Jin; Jackson, Colin R; Pasco, David S

    2016-10-12

    Recent studies have indicated that a major contributor to the innate immune enhancing properties of some medicinal plants is derived from the cell wall components of bacteria colonizing these plants. The purpose of the current study was to assess if the bacteria present within edible and medicinal mushrooms substantially contribute to the innate immune stimulating potential of these mushrooms. Whole mushrooms from thirteen types of edible fungi and individual parts from Agaricus bisporus were analyzed for in vitro macrophage activation as well as bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) content, cell load, and community composition. Substantial variation between samples was observed in macrophage activation (over 500-fold), total bacterial load (over 200-fold), and LPS content (over 10 million-fold). Both LPS content (ρ = 0.832, p mushroom extracts. Extract activity was negated by treatment with NaOH, conditions that inactivate LPS and other bacterial components. Significant correlations between macrophage activation and total bacterial load (ρ = 0.723, p = 0.0001) and LPS content (ρ = 0.951, p mushroom associated bacteria contribute substantially to the innate immune enhancing activity exhibited by mushrooms and may result in similar therapeutic actions as reported for ingestion of bacterial preparations such as probiotics.

  15. Interplay between daily rhythmic serum-mediated bacterial killing activity and immune defence factors in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Gesto, Manuel; Madsen, Lone

    2018-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is emerging as an important regulator of immune functions. However, there is a paucity of information on the influence of this biological phenomenon in the antimicrobial factors in teleost fish. This study investigated the dynamics and interplay of serum-mediated bacterial killing...... serum bactericidal activity exhibit daily rhythm. Serum-mediated bacterial killing activity against F. psychrophilum and Y. ruckeri displayed significant daily rhythm in both emergence fractions, where the peak of activity was identified during the light phase. Moreover, several serum defence factors...

  16. Bacterial production in Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil evaluated by ³H-leucine incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Gonzalez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the necessary ³H-leucine concentration to estimate bacterial production in Guanabara Bay through saturation curves. A second aim was to collect preliminary data of bacterial production in two distinct sites corresponding to different water qualities: Urca inlet and Governador Island. Saturation curves were made with water samples taken at the main circulation channel of the bay, Paquetá Island, and the two sites mentioned before. The ³H-leucine curves showed similar pattern for all studied areas, indicating the ideal isotope concentration to be 10 nM. Bacterial biomass production ranged from 0.40 to 4.53 µgC L-1 h-1 in Urca and from 3.86 to 73.72 µgC L-1 h-1 in Governador Island indicating the relationship between nutrients and organic matter supply and bacterial productivity. This work is an important reference for studies on trophodynamics, biogeochemical cycles and modelling in Guanabara Bay.O objetivo desse trabalho foi realizar curvas de saturação a fim de otimizar a concentração de ³H-leucina necessária para avaliar produção bacteriana na Baía de Guanabara. Objetivou-se ainda a aquisição de dados preliminares de produção bacteriana em dois locais distintos em termos de qualidade de água : enseada da Urca e Ilha do Governador. As amostras para as curvas foram obtidas na região do Canal Central e na Ilha de Paquetá, além dos dois locais de coleta citados acima. Seguiu-se a metodologia descrita por Kirchman et al. (1985 e modificada por Smith & Azam (1992. As curvas de ³H-leucina mostraram um padrão semelhante para todas as áreas estudadas, indicando a concentração ótima de isótopo de 10 nM. A produção de biomassa bacteriana variou de 0,40 a 4,53 µgC L-1 h-1 na Urca e de 3,86 a 73,72 µgC L-1 h-1 na Ilha do Governador confirmando a relação entre a disponibilidade de nutrientes e matéria orgânica e o aumento da produtividade bacteriana. Essas análises poderão ser

  17. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  18. Endogenous bacterial toxins are required for the injurious action of platelet-activating factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X M; MacKendrick, W; Tien, J; Huang, W; Caplan, M S; Hsueh, W

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), an endogenous mediator for experimental sepsis, has been shown to induce shock and intestinal necrosis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether PAF exerts its injurious effects on the intestinal tissue directly or via synergism with other endogenous products. The aim of this study was to examine the role of endogenous bacterial products, such as endotoxin, in PAF-induced intestinal injury. PAF (3 micrograms/kg) was injected intravenously into normally colonized rats, germfree rats, and normal rats pretreated with a combination of antibiotics, and the systemic response and intestinal injury were assessed. PAF did not cause prolonged shock, leukopenia, hemoconcentration, and bowel necrosis in germfree rats. When germfree rats were primed with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg) of endotoxin, the protection was lost. Combined treatment of the normally colonized rats with neomycin, polymyxin B, and metronidazole for 7 days largely protected the animal from PAF-induced shock and intestinal necrosis. PAF does not directly induce prolonged hypotension, hemoconcentration, persistent leukopenia, and gross intestinal necrosis but causes these changes via a synergism with endogenous bacterial toxins, presumably from the gut flora.

  19. Community dynamics and glycoside hydrolase activities of thermophilic bacterial consortia adapted to switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, J.M.; Allgaier, M.; Miller, C.S.; Hazen, T.C.; VanderGheynst, J.S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Simmons, B.A.; Singer, S.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale biofuel production requires robust enzymatic cocktails to produce fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass. Thermophilic bacterial consortia are a potential source of cellulases and hemicellulases adapted to harsher reaction conditions than commercial fungal enzymes. Compost-derived microbial consortia were adapted to switchgrass at 60 C to develop thermophilic biomass-degrading consortia for detailed studies. Microbial community analysis using small-subunit rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing and short-read metagenomic sequencing demonstrated that thermophilic adaptation to switchgrass resulted in low-diversity bacterial consortia with a high abundance of bacteria related to thermophilic paenibacilli, Rhodothermus marinus, and Thermus thermophilus. At lower abundance, thermophilic Chloroflexi and an uncultivated lineage of the Gemmatimonadetes phylum were observed. Supernatants isolated from these consortia had high levels of xylanase and endoglucanase activities. Compared to commercial enzyme preparations, the endoglucanase enzymes had a higher thermotolerance and were more stable in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), an ionic liquid used for biomass pretreatment. The supernatants were used to saccharify [C2mim][OAc]-pretreated switchgrass at elevated temperatures (up to 80 C), demonstrating that these consortia are an excellent source of enzymes for the development of enzymatic cocktails tailored to more extreme reaction conditions.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations on interaction between bacterial proteins: Implication on pathogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2017-12-18

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation studies on interaction between bacterial proteins: an outer-membrane protein STY3179 and a yfdX protein STY3178 of Salmonella Typhi. STY3179 has been found to be involved in bacterial adhesion and invasion. STY3178 is recently biophysically characterized. It is a soluble protein having antibiotic binding and chaperon activity capabilities. These two proteins co-occur and are from neighboring gene in Salmonella Typhi-occurrence of homologs of both STY3178 and STY3179 are identified in many Gram-negative bacteria. We show using homology modeling, docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation that they can form a stable complex. STY3178 belongs to aqueous phase, while the beta barrel portion of STY3179 remains buried in DPPC bilayer with extra-cellular loops exposed to water. To understand the molecular basis of interaction between STY3178 and STY3179, we compute the conformational thermodynamics which indicate that these two proteins interact through polar and acidic residues belonging to their interfacial region. Conformational thermodynamics results further reveal instability of certain residues in extra-cellular loops of STY3179 upon complexation with STY3178 which is an indication for binding with host cell protein laminin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluation of triticale accessions for resistance to wheat bacterial leaf streak caused by Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa (Xtu) causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS) on wheat and other small grains. Several triticale accessions were reported to possess high levels of resistance to wheat Xtu strains. In this study, we evaluated a worldwide collection of 502 triticale acces...

  2. Actividad sialidasa en mujeres con vaginosis bacteriana Sialidase activity in women with bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Ombrella

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La vaginosis bacteriana (VB es un síndrome caracterizado por el sobrecrecimiento bacteriano de flora endógena Gram negativa, que desplaza a la flora lactobacilar normal. Dentro de las enzimas bacterianas, las sialidasas han sido consideradas factores de virulencia de muchos microorganismos patógenos que colonizan las distintas mucosas. Su presencia en fluidos vaginales puede estar correlacionada con VB. El propósito de este estudio fue comprobar la actividad de dicha enzima en mujeres con este síndrome y sin evidencia clínica de infección genital. Se estudiaron 112 mujeres (51 fueron pacientes con VB y 61 mujeres con flora colonizante habitual. Para la cuantificación de la actividad sialidasa se empleó la técnica basada en la hidrólisis enzimática de un derivado ácido del ácido metoxifenil acetil murámico. En la población estudiada se encontró que ambos grupos mostraron valores comprendidos entre 0.5 a 5.1 nmoles de metoxifenol, mientras que 11 de 52 pacientes con VB (21.17%, registraron valores superiores a 5.1 nmoles. La presencia de actividad sialidasa solamente no es índice de VB, excepto para valores mayores de 5.5 nmoles de metoxifenol, producidos en la reacción enzimática.Bacterial vaginosis (VB is a syndrome characterized by overgrowth of endogenous Gram negative bacterial flora and the lack of the normal flora. Within bacterial enzymes, sialidases have been considered a virulence factor of many pathogenic microorganisms colonizing the different mucous membranes. Their presence in vaginal discharges can be correlated with VB. The aim of this study was to detect the activity of this enzyme in women with this syndrome and without clinical evidence of genital infection. Out of a total 112 women studied, 51 were patients with VB and the other 61 women presented normal vaginal flora. For the quantification of enzyme activity, the technique based on the enzymatic hydrolysis of a derivative acid of the acetyl metoxifenil

  3. Bacterial Nucleotidyl Cyclase Inhibits the Host Innate Immune Response by Suppressing TAK1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenxi; Zhou, Yilong; Liu, Feng; Liu, Haipeng; Tan, Hao; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui; Ge, Baoxue

    2017-09-01

    Exoenzyme Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY is a soluble nucleotidyl cyclase that increases the cytoplasmic levels of nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates (cNMPs) to mediate endothelial Tau phosphorylation and permeability, its functional role in the innate immune response is still poorly understood. Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is critical for mediating Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and subsequent activation of NF-κB and AP-1, which are transcriptional activators of innate immunity. Here, we report that ExoY inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production through suppressing the activation of TAK1 as well as downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Mice infected with ExoY-deficient P. aeruginosa had higher levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), more neutrophil recruitment, and a lower bacterial load in lung tissue than mice infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa Taken together, our findings identify a previously unknown mechanism by which P. aeruginosa ExoY inhibits the host innate immune response. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Variability in In Vitro Macrophage Activation by Commercially Diverse Bulk Echinacea Plant Material is Predominantly Due to Bacterial Lipoproteins and Lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously reported that the majority of in vitro monocyte/macrophage activation exhibited by extracts of Echinacea and other botanicals depends upon bacterial lipopolysaccharides and Braun-type bacterial lipoproteins. We determined the contribution made by these bacterial components to the overa...

  5. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITIES FROM WATER-DAMAGED CEILING TILE MATERIAL FOLLOWING INCUBATION ON BLOOD AGAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samples of ceiling tiles with high levels of bacteria exhibited cytotoxic activities on a HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Ceiling tiles containing low levels of bacterial colonization did not show cytotoxic activities on the HEP-2 tissue culture assay. Using a spread plate procedure ...

  6. evaluation of enset clones against enset bacterial wilt abstract résumé

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Sidama, Gurage, Kembata Tembaro and Hadyia zones were assessed for resistance/tolerance to enset bacterial .... enset bacterial wilt. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Assessing enset clones from the Gurage,. Hadyia, Kembata Tembaro and Sidama zones. A total of 103 enset ..... genetic diversity and crop ecology of enset.

  7. In Vivo Evaluation of Bacterial Infection Involving Morphologically Different Surgical Meshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, Anton F.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    Objective: To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. Background: The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal

  8. Analysis of anti-bacterial and anti oxidative activity of Azadirachta indica bark using various solvents extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raid Al Akeel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medications have been used for relief of symptoms of disease. Regardless of the great advances observed in current medicine in recent decades, plants still make a significant contribution to health care. An alarming increase in bacterial strains resistant to a number of antimicrobial agents demands that a renewed effort be made to seek antibacterial agents effective against pathogenic bacteria resistant to or less sensitive to current antibiotics. Anti-bacterial activity of Azadirachta indica stem bark was tested against pathogenic Salmonella paratyphi and Salmonella typhi using various solvent extracts. The in vitro anti-bacterial activity was performed by agar well diffusion method and the results were expressed as the average diameter of zone of inhibition of bacterial growth around the well. The ethanol and methanol extracts showed better anti-bacterial activity with zone of inhibition (20–25 mm when compared with other tested extracts and standard antibiotic Erythromycin (15 mcg with zone of inhibition (13–14 mm. Using Fisher’s exact test of significance difference was found between two Salmonella strains sensitivity patterns against tested extracts (P ⩽ 0.035. Extracts of A. indica stem bark also exhibited significant antioxidant activity, thus establishing the extracts as an antioxidant. The results obtained in this study give some scientific support to the A. indica stem bark for further investigation of compounds and in future could be used as drug.

  9. Screening of bacterial strains for pectinolytic activity: characterization of the polygalacturonase produced by Bacillus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Márcia M.C.N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty eight bacterial strains, isolated from soil and samples of vegetable in decomposition, were screened for the use of citrus pectin as the sole carbon source. 102 were positive for pectinase depolymerization in assay plates as evidenced by clear hydrolization halos. Among them, 30% presented considerable pectinolytic activity. The cultivation of these strains by submerged and semi-solid fermentation for polygalacturonase production indicated that five strains of Bacillus sp produced high quantities of the enzyme. The physico-chemical characteristics, such as optimum pH of 6.0 - 7.0, optimum temperatures between 45oC and 55oC, stability at temperatures above 40oC and in neutral and alkaline pH, were determined.

  10. A bacterial ortholog of class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase activates lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sarath

    2010-07-16

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalytic core of lysyl-tRNA synthetase, but it lacks the amino terminal anticodon binding domain of the latter enzyme. We show that, in agreement with its well-conserved lysine binding site, GenX can activate in vitro l-lysine and lysine analogs, but does not acylate tRNA(Lys) or other cellular RNAs. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low level bacterial endotoxin activates two distinct signaling pathways in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weintraub Neal L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial endotoxin, long recognized as a potent pro-inflammatory mediator in acute infectious processes, has more recently been identified as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. When endotoxin enters the bloodstream, one of the first cells activated is the circulating monocyte, which exhibits a wide range of pro-inflammatory responses. Methods We studied the effect of low doses of E. coli LPS on IL-8 release and superoxide formation by freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Results IL-8 release was consistently detectable at 10 pg/ml of endotoxin, reaching a maximum at 1 ng/ml, and was exclusively produced by monocytes; the lymphocytes neither produced IL-8, nor affected monocyte IL-8 release. Superoxide production was detectable at 30 pg/ml of endotoxin, reaching a maximum at 3 ng/ml. Peak respiratory burst activity was seen at 15-20 min, and superoxide levels returned to baseline by 1 h. IL-8 release was dependent on both membrane-associated CD14 (mCD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Superoxide production was dependent on the presence of LBP, but was not significantly affected by a blocking antibody to TLR4. Moreover, treatment with lovastatin inhibited LPS-dependent IL-8 release and superoxide production. Conclusions These findings suggest that IL-8 release and the respiratory burst are regulated by distinct endotoxin-dependent signaling pathways in PBMC in low level of endotoxin exposure. Selectively modulating these pathways could lead to new approaches to treat chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis, while preserving the capacity of monocytes to respond to acute bacterial infections.

  12. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages with lytic activity against common bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Shende

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Present investigation was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriophages with lytic activity against common bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 samples of animal waste disposal from cattle (42 and buffalo (18 farms were collected from three different strata, i.e., top, mid, and bottom of collection tank. Samples were primarily subjected to rapid detection methods, and then isolation of phage was done by double agar layer method using Bacillus subtilis (BsH and Escherichia coli (EH as host system. Phages were characterized on the basis of plaque morphology, temperature, pH susceptibility, and host range. Results: Recovery of phages was higher from dairy cattle farm waste (78.57% as compared to buffalo farm waste (72.22% and bottom layer of tank showed maximum recovery. Bacillus subtilis (91% supported the growth of more phages as compared to E. coli (9%. Three different phage morphotypes were observed each against Bacillus subtilis (BsHR1, BsHR2, and BsHR3 and E. coli (EHR1, EHR2, and EHR3. Mean phage titer of above six phage isolates ranged between 3x1010 and 5x1012 plaque forming units/ml. Viability of phages was by, and large unaffected at 70°C within 2-3 min, and phage isolates were completely inactivated below pH 3 and above 11. Coliphage EHR1 had widest host range followed by BsHR1 and BsHR2 while EHR2, EHR3, and BsHR3 had low lytic activity. Conclusion: It could be concluded from the present study that the Bacillus and Coli phage has wide host range and thus exhibits the potential to be used as drug substitute tool against common bacterial pathogens.

  13. Identification of redox partners and development of a novel chimeric bacterial nitric oxide synthase for structure activity analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jeffrey K; Lim, Nathan; Poulos, Thomas L

    2014-10-17

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) requires electrons to reduce the heme iron for substrate oxidation. Both FAD and FMN flavin groups mediate the transfer of NADPH derived electrons to NOS. Unlike mammalian NOS that contain both FAD and FMN binding domains within a single polypeptide chain, bacterial NOS is only composed of an oxygenase domain and must rely on separate redox partners for electron transfer and subsequent activity. Here, we report on the native redox partners for Bacillus subtilis NOS (bsNOS) and a novel chimera that promotes bsNOS activity. By identifying and characterizing native redox partners, we were also able to establish a robust enzyme assay for measuring bsNOS activity and inhibition. This assay was used to evaluate a series of established NOS inhibitors. Using the new assay for screening small molecules led to the identification of several potent inhibitors for which bsNOS-inhibitor crystal structures were determined. In addition to characterizing potent bsNOS inhibitors, substrate binding was also analyzed using isothermal titration calorimetry giving the first detailed thermodynamic analysis of substrate binding to NOS. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Evaluating Seismic Activity in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Asmara; in 1921, Massawa was completely des- troyed (10, 11) and the people of Eritrea remember these years as 11 011 } R:a c)>ac)> ; in 1960, an earthquake of magnitude 6.3 hit a few kilometers west of Sheshamane near the dormant volcano. Chabbi; in 1961, the seismic activity was centered in Wollo where Majete ...

  15. Evaluation and subsequent optimizations of the quantitative AmpliSens Florocenosis/Bacterial vaginosis-FRT multiplex real-time PCR assay for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantseva, Tatiana; Shipitsyna, Elena; Guschin, Alexander; Unemo, Magnus

    2016-12-01

    Traditional microscopy-based methods for diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) are underutilized in many settings, and molecular techniques may provide opportunities for rapid, objective, and accurate BV diagnosis. This study evaluated the quantitative AmpliSens Florocenosis/Bacterial vaginosis-FRT multiplex real-time PCR (Florocenosis-BV) assay. Vaginal samples from a previous study including unselected female subjects (n = 163) and using Amsel criteria and 454 pyrosequencing for BV diagnosis were examined with the Florocenosis-BV test and additionally tested for the presence and quantity of Gardnerella vaginalis clades 3 and 4. The Florocenosis-BV assay demonstrated 100% and 98% sensitivity compared with the Amsel criteria and 454 pyrosequencing, respectively, with 91% specificity. The modified Florocenosis-BV assay (detecting also G. vaginalis clades 3 and 4) resulted in 100% sensitivity vs the Amsel criteria and 454 pyrosequencing with specificity of 86% and 88%, respectively. Further optimizations of thresholds for the quantitative parameters used in the kit resulted in 99-100% accuracy vs Amsel criteria and 454 pyrosequencing for selected parameters. The Florocenosis-BV assay is an objective, accurate, sensitive, and specific method for BV diagnosis; however, the performance of the test can be further improved with some minor optimizations. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of leukocyte esterase reagent strip test to detect spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Bafandeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is a frequent and sever complication of cirrhotic patients with ascites. The aim of this study was to assess diagnostic value of leukocyte esterase reagent strip test (Medi-Test Combi for the rapid diagnosis of SBP in cirrhotic patients with ascites in the University Hospital of Imam Reza in Tabriz, Iran. In this study, 132 consecutive samples from cirrhotic patients who underwent abdominal paracentesis were evaluated. These samples were tested by 3 methods: i manual cell count with differential study, SBP was defined as having poly-morphonuclear cells count of ≥250/mm3; ii culture of ascetic fluid samples; iii all samples were tested by leukocyte esterase dipsticks. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of two different colorimetric cut-off scales (1+ and 2+ were calculated and compared. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 1+ and 2+ cut-off scales to diagnose SBP were 97.5%, 84.6%, 74% and 98.7% for the 1+ cut-off scale and 87.8%, 96.7%, 92.3% and 94.6% for the 2+ cut-off scale. Leukocyte esterase reagent strip test can be used as a rapid test for screening of SBP. The higher cut-off colorimetric scale has a better specificity and positive predictive value but a lower sensitivity.

  17. Parabolic Flight Evaluation of Bacterial Adhesion on Multiple Antimicrobial Surface Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a test method and the evaluation of the effectiveness of antimicrobial technologies in reduced gravity based on parabolic flight experiments. Microbial growth is a common occurrence on fully immersed wetted surfaces in spacecraft environmental control and life support systems despite the use of chemical and/or physical \\disinfection. Many materials and surface treatments with antimicrobial properties are commercially available but none have been vetted for spaceflight applications. Herein a test method is explained that included ground and reduced gravity parabolic flight experiments with a standard microorganism recovered from spacecraft, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, added at a concentration of 1 x 10(exp 5) cells per milliliter (mL) onto challenge material coupon surfaces. Several experimental materials were observed to slightly reduce microbial attachment in reduced gravity flight experiments, but none were capable of eliminating all challenge bacteria. Lunar gravity had an increased antimicrobial effect in 28 out of 36 test coupons compared to microgravity when provided otherwise identical conditions for growth, suggesting trace .amounts of gravity may be required for maximum antimicrobial performance. Bacterial cells exposed to variable gravity had more than twice as ,much intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) when compared to control cells exposed only to Earth gravity due to a short duration response to environmental stress. An ATP luminescence assay was the method most amenable to development of an in-flight microbial monitoring assay

  18. Bacterial profiles and proteolytic activity in peri-implantitis versus healthy sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilands, J; Wickström, C; Kinnby, B; Davies, J R; Hall, J; Friberg, B; Svensäter, G

    2015-10-01

    Peri-implantitis is a biofilm-induced destructive inflammatory process that, over time, results in loss of supporting bone around an osseointegrated dental implant. Biofilms at peri-implantitis sites have been reported to be dominated by Gram-negative anaerobic rods with a proteolytic metabolism such as, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Tannerella, as well as anaerobic Gram-positive cocci. In this study, we hypothesized that protease activity is instrumental in driving bone destruction and we therefore compared the microbial composition and level of protease activity in samples of peri-implant biofluid (PIBF) from 25 healthy subjects (H group) and 25 subjects with peri-implantitis (PI group). Microbial composition was investigated using culture techniques and protease activity was determined using a FITC-labelled casein substrate. The microbial composition was highly variable in subjects both in the H and PI groups but one prominent difference was the prevalence of Porphyromonas/Prevotella and anaerobic Gram positive cocci which was significantly higher in the PI than in the H group. A subgroup of subjects with peri-implantitis displayed a high level of protease activity in the PIBF compared to healthy subjects. However, this activity could not be related to the presence of specific bacterial species. We propose that a high level of protease activity may be a predictive factor for disease progression in peri-implantitis. Further longitudinal studies are however required to determine whether assessment of protease activity could serve as a useful method to identify patients at risk for progressive tissue destruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  20. Root and Rhizosphere Bacterial Phosphatase Activity Varies with Tree Species and Soil Phosphorus Availability in Puerto Rico Tropical Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabugao, Kristine G; Timm, Collin M; Carrell, Alyssa A; Childs, Joanne; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Pelletier, Dale A; Weston, David J; Norby, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Tropical forests generally occur on highly weathered soils that, in combination with the immobility of phosphorus (P), often result in soils lacking orthophosphate, the form of P most easily metabolized by plants and microbes. In these soils, mineralization of organic P can be the major source for orthophosphate. Both plants and microbes encode for phosphatases capable of mineralizing a range of organic P compounds. However, the activity of these enzymes depends on several edaphic factors including P availability, tree species, and microbial communities. Thus, phosphatase activity in both roots and the root microbial community constitute an important role in P mineralization and P nutrient dynamics that are not well studied in tropical forests. To relate phosphatase activity of roots and bacteria in tropical forests, we measured phosphatase activity in roots and bacterial isolates as well as bacterial community composition from the rhizosphere. Three forests in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico were selected to represent a range of soil P availability as measured using the resin P method. Within each site, a minimum of three tree species were chosen to sample. Root and bacterial phosphatase activity were both measured using a colorimetric assay with para-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate for the phosphomonoesterase enzyme. Both root and bacterial phosphatase were chiefly influenced by tree species. Though tree species was the only significant factor in root phosphatase activity, there was a negative trend between soil P availability and phosphatase activity in linear regressions of average root phosphatase and resin P. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance of bacterial community composition based on 16S amplicon sequencing indicated that bacterial composition was strongly controlled by soil P availability (p-value tree species; bacterial community composition was chiefly influenced by P availability. Although the sample size is limited given the

  1. Evaluating the effects of variable water chemistry on bacterial transport during infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Nordin, Nahjan Amer; Olson, Mira S.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial infiltration through the subsurface has been studied experimentally under different conditions of interest and is dependent on a variety of physical, chemical and biological factors. However, most bacterial transport studies fail to adequately represent the complex processes occurring in natural systems. Bacteria are frequently detected in stormwater runoff, and may present risk of microbial contamination during stormwater recharge into groundwater. Mixing of stormwater runoff with groundwater during infiltration results in changes in local solution chemistry, which may lead to changes in both bacterial and collector surface properties and subsequent bacterial attachment rates. This study focuses on quantifying changes in bacterial transport behavior under variable solution chemistry, and on comparing the influences of chemical variability and physical variability on bacterial attachment rates. Bacterial attachment rate at the soil-water interface was predicted analytically using a combined rate equation, which varies temporally and spatially with respect to changes in solution chemistry. Two-phase Monte Carlo analysis was conducted and an overall input-output correlation coefficient was calculated to quantitatively describe the importance of physiochemical variation on the estimates of attachment rate. Among physical variables, soil particle size has the highest correlation coefficient, followed by porosity of the soil media, bacterial size and flow velocity. Among chemical variables, ionic strength has the highest correlation coefficient. A semi-reactive microbial transport model was developed within HP1 (HYDRUS1D-PHREEQC) and applied to column transport experiments with constant and variable solution chemistries. Bacterial attachment rates varied from 9.10 × 10- 3 min- 1 to 3.71 × 10- 3 min- 1 due to mixing of synthetic stormwater (SSW) with artificial groundwater (AGW), while bacterial attachment remained constant at 9.10 × 10- 3 min- 1 in a

  2. In vitro activity of tigecycline, a new glycylcycline, tested against 1,326 clinical bacterial strains isolated from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Gales

    Full Text Available The in vitro activity of tigecycline (former GAR-936, a new semisynthetic tetracycline, was evaluated in comparison with tetracycline and other antimicrobial agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 1,326 contemporary clinical isolates collected from the Latin American region were collected in 2000-2002 period and tested with microdilution broth according to the CLSI guidelines. The bacterial pathogens evaluated included Staphylococcus aureus (505, Streptococcus pneumoniae (269, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 227, Haemophilus influenzae (129, Enterococcus spp. (80, Moraxella catarrhalis (54, beta-haemolytic streptococci (28, viridans group streptococci (26, and Neisseria meningitidis (8 RESULTS:Tigecycline demonstrated excellent activity against all Gram-positive cocci, with 90% of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains being inhibited at 0.12 µg/mL, while the same isolates had an MIC90 of > 16 µg/mL for tetracycline. All Enterococcus spp. were inhibited at 0.25 µg/mL of tigecycline. Tigecycline (MIC50, 0.25 µg/mL was eight-fold more potent than minocycline (MIC50, 2 µg/mL against oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (ORSA; all ORSA were inhibited at < 2 µg/mL of tigecycline. Tigecycline demonstrated excellent activity (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL against CoNS with reduced susceptibility to teicoplanin (MIC, 16 µg/mL. Tigecycline also showed high potency against respiratory pathogens such as M. catarrhalis (MIC50, 0.12 µg/mL and H. influenzae (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL. No tigecycline resistant isolates were detected when the proposed susceptible breakpoints (< 4 µg/mL was applied. CONCLUSIONS: This results indicate that tigecycline has potent in vitro activity against clinically important pathogenic bacteria, including Gram-positive isolates resistant to both tetracycline and minocycline.

  3. Effect of platelet-activating factor antagonists (BN-52021, WEB-2170, and BB-882) on bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, L J; Sampietre, S N; Assis, R S; Knowles, C H; Leite, K R; Jancar, S; Monteiro Cunha, J E; Machado, M C

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is an important source of pancreas infection in acute pancreatitis. The effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has been proved in various studies. The aim of this study was to determine whether potent PAF antagonists influence bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in 62 Wistar rats by injection of 2.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. The rats treated with PAF factor antagonists received intravenous injection of WEB-2170 (10 mg/kg), lexipafant (5 mg/kg), and BN-52021 (5 mg/kg) 30 minutes before induction of acute pancreatitis. Six hours after induction of acute pancreatitis, bacteriologic cultures and histologic scoring of tissues were performed. There was a statistically significant reduction in bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and liver but not to the pancreas of the rats treated with PAF antagonists. No significant increase in the intestinal bacterial population of any group was found. There were no statistical differences between the pancreatic histologic scores of the groups. PAF antagonists reduced bacterial translocation to distant sites other than the pancreas, preventing the bacterial dissemination that occurs in the early phase of acute pancreatitis and may have beneficial effects on the evolution of this disease.

  4. Evaluation of the Sysmex UF1000i flow cytometer for ruling out bacterial urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Rita; Grosso, Shamanta; Bruschetta, Graziano; Avolio, Manuela; Stano, Paola; Modolo, Maria Luisa; Camporese, Alessandro

    2010-08-05

    Urine culture is one of the most frequently requested tests in microbiology, and it represents the gold standard for the diagnosis of UTIs. Considering the high prevalence of negative results and the long TAT of the culture test, the use of a rapid and reliable screening method is becoming more and more important, as it reduces the workload, the TAT of negative results, and above all, unnecessary antibiotic prescription. The Sysmex UF1000i is a new urine flow cytometry analyzer capable of quantifying urinary particles, including BACT, WBCs, and YLCs. To evaluate the analytical performance of the UF1000i as a method for ruling out UTIs, we examined 1349 urine samples and compared the UF1000i results with standard urine culture results. With instrument cut-off values of 170BACTx10(6)/L and 150WBCsx10(6)/L, we obtained a sensitivity of 98.8%, a specificity of 76.5%, a NPV of 99.5%, and four false negative results (1.2%), avoiding the culture of 57.1% of samples. The Sysmex UF1000i was capable of improving the efficiency of a routine microbiology laboratory by processing 100samples/h and providing negative results in a few minutes, thus reducing unnecessary testing with an acceptable number of false negative results. In addition, the preliminary evaluation of B_FSC and B_FLH parameters from bacteria histograms seems to be useful for the distinction of bacterial strains detected (Gram-negatives versus Gram-positives). In fact when B_FSC was less than 30 ch, it allowed the distinction of Gram-negative bacteria in 97% of the samples. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The chemical composition of the pharmacologically active Thymus species, its antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and the antiadherent effects of T. vulgaris on the bacterial colonization of the in situ pellicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schött, Gesche; Liesegang, Stefanie; Gaunitz, Franziska; Gleß, Alexandra; Basche, Sabine; Hannig, Christian; Speer, Karl

    2017-09-01

    The pharmacological active genus Thymus L. comprises over 200 species. Besides its traditional pharmacological use, thyme may reduce the risk of caries disease, however, there is very little respective literature. The pharmacological effects can be attributed to the secondary plant metabolites. The composition of the essential oil and the polyphenols is important for the evaluation of the pharmacological activity. Nevertheless, there are no studies regarding a comparative analysis of the different pharmacological thyme species. In the present study, four different pharmacology Thymus species were cultivated under comparable conditions, and the volatile compounds as well as the polyphenols were characterized. In addition, the in vitro antibacterial activity against S. mutans, one of the primary cariogenic bacterial species, as well as of the essential oil and of the polyphenols were investigated. Furthermore, the bacterial viability and its effect on the initial bacterial adhesion under oral conditions were evaluated in situ for the essential oil and the polyphenols. By GC-MS, 69 volatile compounds, and by LC-DAD-MS/MS, 46 polyphenols could be identified. The comprehensive examination of the essential oils and the polyphenols revealed that the main compounds were equal. However, the yield of the essential oil and the polyphenol content differed clearly. The essential oils of the four investigated Thymus species exhibited an antibacterial activity against S. mutans in vitro, in contrast to the polyphenols of T. vulgaris. Rinsing with polyphenol-rich infusions reduced the initial bacterial colonization while the essential oil inhibited the bacterial growth on dental enamel in situ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237, phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512, and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260. The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups P>0.05. Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections.

  7. Bacterial composition of activated sludge - importance for floc and sludge properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Thomsen, Trine R.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.

    2003-07-01

    Activated sludge flocs consist of numerous constituents which, together with other factors, are responsible for floc structure and floc properties. These properties largely determine the sludge properties such as flocculation, settling and dewaterability. In this paper we briefly review the present knowledge about the role of bacteria in relation to floc and sludge properties, and we present a new approach to investigate the identity and function of the bacteria in the activated sludge flocs. The approach includes identification of the important bacteria and a characterization of their physiological and functional properties. It is carried out by use of culture-independent molecular biological methods linked with other methods to study the physiology and function maintaining a single cell resolution. Using this approach it was found that floc-forming properties differed among the various bacterial groups, e.g. that different microcolony-forming bacteria had very different sensitivities to shear and that some of them deflocculated under anaerobic conditions. in our opinion, the approach to combine identity with functional analysis of the dominant bacteria in activated sludge by in situ methods is a very promising way to investigate correlations between presence of specific bacteria, and floc and sludge properties that are of interest. (author)

  8. Frequency of dental caries in active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous patients: salivary and bacterial factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyola Rodriguez, J P; Galvan Torres, L J; Martinez Martinez, R E; Abud Mendoza, C; Medina Solis, C E; Ramos Coronel, S; Garcia Cortes, J O; Domínguez Pérez, R A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine dental caries frequency and to analyze salivary and bacterial factors associated with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) patients. Also, a proposal to identify dental caries by a surface, teeth, and the patient was developed. A cross-sectional, blinded study that included 60 SLE patients divided into two groups of 30 subjects each, according to the Activity Index for Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLEDAI). The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index and Integrative Dental Caries Index (IDCI) were used for analyzing dental caries. The saliva variables recorded were: flow, pH, and buffer capacity. The DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus were estimated by real-time PCR. The caries frequency was 85% for SLE subjects (73.3% for inactive systemic lupus erythematous (ISLE) and 100% for active systemic lupus erythematous (ASLE)); DMFT for the SLE group was 12.6 ± 5.7 and the IDCI was (9.8 ± 5.9). The ASLE group showed a salivary flow of 0.65 compared with 0.97 ml/1 min from the ISLE group; all variables mentioned above showed a statistical difference (p dental caries in epidemiological studies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of coumarin derivatives metal complexes: An in vitro evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik B Vyas

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of 3-[ {-(3’,4’-di methoxy phenyl }-prop-2-enoyl]-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2H-chromene-2-one with Cu(II, Ni(II, Fe(II, Co(II and Mn(II have been synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, IR spectra and conductivity measurements. These studies revealed that they are having octahedral geometry of the type [ML2(H2O2]. In vitro antimicrobial activity of all synthesized compounds and standard drugs have been evaluated against four strains of bacterial culture and one fungus, which includes two gram +ve bacterial culture and two gram -ve bacterial culture. The compounds show net enhancement in activity on coordination of metals with ligand but moderate activity as compared to standard drugs.

  10. Serum lipoproteins attenuate macrophage activation and Toll-Like Receptor stimulation by bacterial lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydia trachomatis was previously shown to express a lipoprotein, the macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip), exposed at the bacterial surface, and able to stimulate human primary monocytes/macrophages through Toll Like Receptor (TLR)2/TLR1/TLR6, and CD14. In PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells the proinflammatory activity of Mip was significantly higher in the absence than in the presence of serum. The present study aims to investigate the ability of different serum factors to attenuate Mip proinflammatory activity in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells and in primary human differentiated macrophages. The study was also extend to another lipoprotein, the Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein (Osp)A. The proinflammatory activity was studied through Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin (IL)-8 release. Finally, TLR1/2 human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) transfected cells were used to test the ability of the serum factors to inhibit Mip and OspA proinflammatory activity. Results In the absence of any serum and in the presence of 10% delipidated FBS, production of Mip-induced TNF-α and IL-8 in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells were similar whereas they were significantly decreased in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting an inhibiting role of lipids present in FBS. In the presence of 10% human serum, the concentrations of TNF-α and IL-8 were 2 to 5 times lower than in the presence of 10% FBS suggesting the presence of more potent inhibitor(s) in human serum than in FBS. Similar results were obtained in primary human differentiated macrophages. Different lipid components of human serum were then tested (total lipoproteins, HDL, LDL, VLDL, triglyceride emulsion, apolipoprotein (apo)A-I, B, E2, and E3). The most efficient inhibitors were LDL, VLDL, and apoB that reduced the mean concentration of TNF-α release in Mip-induced macrophages to 24, 20, and 2%, respectively (p lipoproteins and suggested that serum lipoproteins interact with acyl chains

  11. Evaluation of environmental bacterial communities as a factor affecting the growth of duckweed Lemna minor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi; Morikawa, Masaaki; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-01-01

    ... the plant-microbial interactions of a duckweed, Lemna minor, focusing on the growth promotion/inhibition effects so as to assess the possibility of accelerated duckweed production by modifying co-existing bacterial community...

  12. Rapid Detection of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance: Preliminary Evaluation of PCR Assays Targeting Tetracycline Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Doxycycline Brucella spp. Brucellosis Aminoglycosides, Doxycycline, Tetracyclines Burkholderia mallei Glanders Penicillins, Tetracyclines...antibiotics: Mode of action, applications, molecular biology, and epidemiology of bacterial resistance. Molecular Biology Reviews 65: 232-260 5

  13. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate that ...

  14. Eggshell and Bacterial Cellulose Composite Membrane as Absorbent Material in Active Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ummartyotin; P. Pisitsak; Pechyen, C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose and eggshell composite was successfully developed. Eggshell was mixed with bacterial cellulose suspension and it was casted as a composite film. CaCO3 derived from eggshell was compared with its commercial availability. It can be noted that good dispersion of eggshell particle was prepared. Eggshell particle was irregular in shape with a variation in size. It existed in bacterial cellulose network. Characterization on composite was focused on thermal and mechanical propert...

  15. Chitosan-propolis nanoparticle formulation demonstrates anti-bacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teik Hwa Ong

    Full Text Available Propolis obtained from bee hives is a natural substance with antimicrobial properties. It is limited by its insolubility in aqueous solutions; hence ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Malaysian propolis were prepared. Both the extracts displayed antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against Enterococcus faecalis, a common bacterium associated with hospital-acquired infections. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of propolis revealed the presence of flavonoids like kaempferol and pinocembrin. This study investigated the role of propolis developed into nanoparticles with chitosan for its antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against E. faecalis. Bacteria that grow in a slimy layer of biofilm are resistant to penetration by antibacterial agents. The use of nanoparticles in medicine has received attention recently due to better bioavailability, enhanced penetrative capacity and improved efficacy. A chitosan-propolis nanoformulation was chosen based on ideal physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, encapsulation efficiency and the rate of release of the active ingredients. This formulation inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and reduced the number of bacteria in the biofilm by ~90% at 200 μg/ml concentration. When tested on pre-formed biofilms, the formulation reduced bacterial number in the biofilm by ~40% and ~75% at 200 and 300 μg/ml, respectively. The formulation not only reduced bacterial numbers, but also physically disrupted the biofilm structure as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Treatment of biofilms with chitosan-propolis nanoparticles altered the expression of biofilm-associated genes in E. faecalis. The results of this study revealed that chitosan-propolis nanoformulation can be deemed as a potential anti-biofilm agent in resisting infections involving biofilm formation like chronic wounds and surgical site infections.

  16. Chitosan-propolis nanoparticle formulation demonstrates anti-bacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Teik Hwa; Chitra, Ebenezer; Ramamurthy, Srinivasan; Siddalingam, Rajinikanth Paruvathanahalli; Yuen, Kah Hay; Ambu, Stephen Periathamby; Davamani, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Propolis obtained from bee hives is a natural substance with antimicrobial properties. It is limited by its insolubility in aqueous solutions; hence ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of Malaysian propolis were prepared. Both the extracts displayed antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against Enterococcus faecalis, a common bacterium associated with hospital-acquired infections. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of propolis revealed the presence of flavonoids like kaempferol and pinocembrin. This study investigated the role of propolis developed into nanoparticles with chitosan for its antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties against E. faecalis. Bacteria that grow in a slimy layer of biofilm are resistant to penetration by antibacterial agents. The use of nanoparticles in medicine has received attention recently due to better bioavailability, enhanced penetrative capacity and improved efficacy. A chitosan-propolis nanoformulation was chosen based on ideal physicochemical properties such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, encapsulation efficiency and the rate of release of the active ingredients. This formulation inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and reduced the number of bacteria in the biofilm by ~90% at 200 μg/ml concentration. When tested on pre-formed biofilms, the formulation reduced bacterial number in the biofilm by ~40% and ~75% at 200 and 300 μg/ml, respectively. The formulation not only reduced bacterial numbers, but also physically disrupted the biofilm structure as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Treatment of biofilms with chitosan-propolis nanoparticles altered the expression of biofilm-associated genes in E. faecalis. The results of this study revealed that chitosan-propolis nanoformulation can be deemed as a potential anti-biofilm agent in resisting infections involving biofilm formation like chronic wounds and surgical site infections.

  17. [Bacterial outer membrane vesicles as nano carriers to study immunological activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chen; Min, W U; Hongzhen, Bai; Zeling, Guo; Jun, Zhou; Qingqing, Wang; Guping, Tang

    2017-03-25

    Objective: To prepare a nano-carrier based on combining bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV) with three block polymer pluronic F127 (PEO 100 -PPO 65 -PEO 100 ) (OMV-F127) and to investigate its immunological activity. Methods: Attenuated salmonella (sal) was cultivated. OMV were separated by centrifugal ultrafiltration or ultrasonication, and OMV-F127 was prepared by mechanical extrudation method. The protein contents and compositions were tested with BCA and SDS-PAGE; the morphology of OMV, F127 and OMV-F127 were observed with FM and TEM; the particle sizes and their zeta potential were determined with DLS. Mouse macrophage RAW246.7 cells were treated with OMV-F127 (50 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL) in vitro, and the concentrations of IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ in culture supernatant were measured with ELISA kits. Results: The contents of protein in separated OMV by centrifugal ultrafiltration and ultrasonication were 2.8 mg/mL and 2.7 mg/mL, respectively. SDS-PAGE showed the marker protein OmpF/C in OMV. Under the FM and TEM, ball-like structure of F127 and OMV-F127 was observed. Size analysis revealed that the diameters of OMV, F127 and OMV-F127 were 72±2 nm, 90±3 nm and 92±2 nm, respectively. ELISA tests revealed that OMV-F127 significantly stimulated the secretion of IL-12, TNF-α and IFN-γ in RAW246.7 cells. Conclusion: A nano-carrier based on bacterial outer membrane vesicles has been prepared, which can stimulate the secretion of cytokines and may have immunomodulatory effects.

  18. Evaluating Metacognitive Scaffolding in Guided Invention Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Ido; Holmes, Natasha G.; Day, James; Bonn, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Invention and Productive Failure activities ask students to generate methods that capture the important properties of some given data (e.g., uncertainty) before being taught the expert solution. Invention and Productive Failure activities are a class of scientific inquiry activities in that students create, implement, and evaluate mathematical…

  19. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

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    Bakhrouf Amina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510. Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50 was reached with 22 and 60 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential.

  20. Molecular microbiological evaluation of passive ultrasonic activation as a supplementary disinfecting step: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Simone S M; Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Carmo, Flávia L; Leite, Deborah C A; Ferreira, Dennis C; Rachid, Caio T C; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2013-02-01

    This in vivo study used molecular microbiology methods to evaluate the effects of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) as a supplementary disinfecting step after root canal preparation. Samples were taken from 10 necrotic root canals of teeth with apical periodontitis before (S1) and after rotary nickel-titanium instrumentation using 2.5% NaOCl as the irrigant (S2) and then after PUI for NaOCl activation (S3). The parameters examined included the incidence of positive broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results for bacterial presence, the impact on bacterial diversity evaluated by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), the quantitative bacterial reduction determined by real-time PCR, and the identification of persistent species by clone library analysis. All S1 samples were positive for bacteria in all tests. Treatment procedures were significantly effective in reducing the incidence of positive results for bacteria, the number of bacterial cells (infectious bioburden), and the bacterial diversity (number of species and abundance). However, the supplementary PUI approach did not succeed in significantly enhancing disinfection beyond that achieved by chemomechanical preparation. Several bacterial species/phylotypes were identified in post-treatment samples that were positive for bacteria. Findings from this clinical study including a small sample size suggest that PUI can be ineffective in significantly improving disinfection of the main root canal after chemomechanical procedures. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feedbacks between protistan single-cell activity and bacterial physiological structure reinforce the predator/prey link in microbial foodwebs

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    Eva eSintes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The trophic interactions between bacteria and their main predators, the heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF, play a key role in the structuring and functioning of aquatic microbial food webs. Grazing regulation of bacterial communities, both of biomass and community structure, have been frequently reported. Additionally, bottom-up responses of the HNF at the population level (numerical responses have also been extensively described. However, the functional response of HNF at the single cell level has not been well explored. In this study, we concurrently measured the physiological structure of bacterial communities and HNF single cell activities during re-growth cultures of natural aquatic communities. We found that changes in the abundance and proportion of the preferred, highly-active bacterial prey, caused by the feeding activity of their predators (HNF, induced a negative feedback effect on the single cell activity of these HNF. These shifts in the specific cellular activity of HNF occur at a much shorter time scale than population-level shifts in flagellate abundance, and offer a complementary mechanism to explain not only the tight coupling between bacteria and HNF, but also the relative constancy of bacterial abundance in aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity

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    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A–G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  3. Parameters that enhance the bacterial expression of active plant polyphenol oxidases.

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    Mareike E Dirks-Hofmeister

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs, EC 1.10.3.1 are type-3 copper proteins that enzymatically convert diphenolic compounds into their corresponding quinones. Although there is significant interest in these enzymes because of their role in food deterioration, the lack of a suitable expression system for the production of soluble and active plant PPOs has prevented detailed investigations of their structure and activity. Recently we developed a bacterial expression system that was sufficient for the production of PPO isoenzymes from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale. The system comprised the Escherichia coli Rosetta 2 (DE3 [pLysSRARE2] strain combined with the pET-22b(+-vector cultivated in auto-induction medium at a constant low temperature (26 °C. Here we describe important parameters that enhance the production of active PPOs using dandelion PPO-2 for proof of concept. Low-temperature cultivation was essential for optimal yields, and the provision of CuCl2 in the growth medium was necessary to produce an active enzyme. By increasing the copper concentration in the production medium to 0.2 mM, the yield in terms of PPO activity per mol purified protein was improved 2.7-fold achieving a v(max of 0.48 ± 0.1 µkat per mg purified PPO-2 for 4-methylcatechol used as a substrate. This is likely to reflect the replacement of an inactive apo-form of the enzyme with a correctly-folded, copper-containing counterpart. We demonstrated the transferability of the method by successfully expressing a PPO from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum showing that our optimized system is suitable for the analysis of further plant PPOs. Our new system therefore provides greater opportunities for the future of research into this economically-important class of enzymes.

  4. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Bacterial Protein Toxins and Their Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Boyer, Anne E; Barr, John R

    2015-08-31

    Mass spectrometry has recently become a powerful technique for bacterial identification. Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum, the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. One such example is botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), a potent neurotoxin produced by C. botulinum. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, and many of the serotypes can be further differentiated into toxin variants, which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. Mass spectrometric proteomic techniques have been established to differentiate the serotype or toxin variant of BoNT produced by varied strains of C. botulinum. Detection of potent biological toxins requires high analytical sensitivity and mass spectrometry based methods have been developed to determine the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal toxins produced by B. anthracis. This enzymatic activity, unique for each toxin, is assessed with detection of the toxin-induced cleavage of strategically designed peptide substrates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry offering unparalleled specificity. Furthermore, activity assays allow for the assessment of the biological activity of a toxin and its potential health risk. Such methods have become important diagnostics for botulism and anthrax. Here, we review mass spectrometry based methods for the enzymatic activity of BoNT and the anthrax lethal factor toxin.

  5. Activation of Innate Immunity by Bacterial Ligands of Toll-like Receptors

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    Nelli K. Akhmatova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tγδ and B1 lymphocytes are essential components of the mucosal immune system, activating different bacterial and viral ligands without costimulatory signals and preprocessing of other immune effectors. This ability enables the immune system to provide rapid protection against pathogens and contributes to the decoding mechanism of the sensitizing activity of mucosal antigens, because the interaction of these cells produces antibodies for immunoglobulin M (IgM and IgA, but not for IgE. We studied 3 routes of introducing antigens for opportunistic microorganisms to activate Tγδ and B1 lymphocytes: subcutaneous, intranasal, and oral. The subcutaneous and intranasal routes produced a significant increase of these cells in lymph nodes associated with the nasal cavity (NALT and in those associated with bronchial tissue (BALT. The oral route significantly increased levels of these cells in the spleen, in NALT, BALT, and in nodes associated with the gut (GALT. We found that mucosal application of the immunomodulator Immunovac-VP-4 (contains antigens of conditionally pathogenic microorganisms, in conjunction with the activation of Tγδ and B1, induces adaptive immune mechanisms not only in the lymphoid formations associated with the respiratory system and with GALT, but also in the spleen (increased expression of cluster of differentiation 3 [CD3], CD4, CD8, CD19, and CD25. This indicates that there is migration of lymphoid cells from the regional lymph nodes and mucosal lymphoid tissues via the lymph and blood to distant organs, lymphoid development, and both local and systemic immunity. Mucosal application of Immunovac-VP-4 in mice potentiates the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in the NALT, BALT and GALT. The highest cytotoxicity was observed in cells, derived from lymphoid tissue of the intestine after oral immunization. Although we found that cytokine production was increased by all 3 immunization routes, it was most intensive after subcutaneous

  6. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

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    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  7. The anti-bacterial activity of titanium-copper sintered alloy against Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro.

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    Bai, Bing; Zhang, Erlin; Liu, Junchao; Zhu, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the anti-bacterial property of Ti-Cu sintered alloys against Porphyromonas gingivalis. The anti-anaerobic property of Ti-Cu sintered alloys against P. gingivalis was investigated by antibacterial activity test, DNA measurement, DAPI staining and morphology observation. The antibacterial rates of the Ti-5Cu against P. gingivalis after 18 and 24 h incubation were 36.04 and 54.39%, and those of Ti-10Cu were 68.69 and 75.39%, which were lower than their anti-aerobic abilities. The concentration of P. gingivalis DNA gradually decreased with the increasing Cu content, which was nearly 50% after 24 h incubation on Ti-10Cu. SEM results showed that the shape of P. gingivalis changed and the bacteria broke apart with the addition of Cu and the extension of the culture time. Ti-Cu sintered alloys could not only kill anaerobic bacteria but also reduce the activity of the survived bacteria. The anti-anaerobic mechanism was thought to be in associated with the Cu ion released from Ti-Cu alloy.

  8. Pioneering bacterial and algal communities and potential extracellular enzyme activities of stream biofilms.

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    Pohlon, Elisabeth; Marxsen, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-03-01

    Microbial biofilms are important for the turnover of organic matter in small streams. A rapid colonization of the epilithic surface will become more important given the predicted increase of flood events. Here, we elucidated the pioneering community structure and activity of stream biofilms. Colonization of glass slides exposed in a small stream for 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h was compared with those exposed for 7 days or 5 months. Forty thousand microbial cells and 10 algae cm(-2) attached to the glass slides within 1 h of exposure. Catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH demonstrated that the pioneer community that settled within 12 h was dominated by Cytophago-Flavobacteria. Later stages were characterized by an enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. However, a major fraction of the detected bacterial cells could not be identified beyond the domain level. Green algae dominated the pioneering algal groups, but were outnumbered by filamentous algae after the attachment period. Potential activity of alkaline phosphatase was already detected after 4 h, beta-glucosidase after 8 h, and beta-xylosidase only after 7 days of biofilm formation. Thus, biofilm formation occurred rapidly and the functionality of the assemblages was evident within a few hours. However, the ratios of beta-xylosidase : beta-glucosidase suggested that the initial biofilms relied more on autochthonous than on allochthonous carbon sources in contrast to mature biofilms.

  9. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should Screening Be Included in the Pre-fecal Microbiota Transplantation Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Jessica R; Kassam, Zain; Chan, Walter W

    2018-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is safe and effective for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) and often involves terminal ileal (TI) stool infusion. Patients report gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms post-FMT despite rCDI resolution. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) screening is not routinely performed pre-FMT. The effect of donor/recipient SIBO status on FMT outcomes and post-FMT GI symptoms is unclear. We aim to evaluate the value of pre-FMT SIBO screening on post-FMT outcomes and symptoms. This was a prospective pilot study of consecutive adults with rCDI undergoing FMT by colonoscopy at a tertiary center. Routine pre-FMT screening and baseline lactulose breath tests (LBTs) were performed for donors and recipients. Positive LBT required a rise > 20 ppm in breath hydrogen or any methane level > 10 ppm within 90 min. The presence of GI symptoms and CDI resolution were assessed 8 weeks post-FMT. Fisher's exact/Student's t tests were performed for statistical analyses. Twenty recipients (58.3 years, 85% women) enrolled in the study. Fourteen (70%) FMTs involved TI stool infusion. Four (20%) recipients and six (30%) donors had positive LBT pre-FMT. At 8 weeks post-FMT, 17 (85%) recipients had CDI resolution and five (25%) reported GI symptoms. Pre-FMT LBT result was not associated with post-FMT CDI resolution or GI symptoms. There was a trend toward increased GI symptoms among recipients receiving stool from LBT-positive donors (50 vs 14.2%, p = 0.09). FMT is effective and well tolerated for rCDI. Positive LBT in asymptomatic donors may have an effect on post-FMT GI symptoms. Larger studies are needed.

  10. Evaluation of small intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with functional dyspepsia through H2 breath test

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    Michelle Bafutto Gomes Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Functional dyspepsia is a condition in which symptoms are not related to organic underlying disease; its pathogenesis is not well known. The small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is characterized by the increase in the number and/or type of colonic bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The hypothesis of SIBO being associated to functional dyspepsia must be considered, since the impaired motility of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the main etiologic factors involved on both pathologies. OBJECTIVE: To determine if there is SIBO in patients with functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Case-control study, evaluating 34 patients: 23 functional dyspeptic and 11 non-dyspeptic (control group. Questionnaire applied based on Rome III criteria. The patients underwent H2-lactulose breath test, considered positive when: H2 peak exceeding 20 ppm, in relation to fasting, or two peaks exceeding 10 ppm sustained until 60 minutes. RESULTS: Of the 23 dyspeptic patients, 13 (56.5% obtained positive results for SIBO trough the H2-lactulose breath test. On control group, SIBO was not observed. The association between the dyspeptic group and the control group regarding SIBO was statistically significant, with P = 0.0052. In the group of dyspeptic patients, 12 (52.2% were using proton pump inhibitor; of these 9 (75% were positive for SIBO. In the control group, none of the 11 patients used proton pump inhibitors and SIBO was not observed. The association of the dyspeptic group using proton pump inhibitor that were positive for SIBO and the control group was statistically significant, with P = 0.0011. CONCLUSION: It was found that, patients with functional dyspepsia presented SIBO, when they underwent to H2-lactulose breath test, compared to the non-dyspeptic. In addition, it was observed a higher prevalence of SIBO in dyspeptic patients that were using proton pump inhibitors, compared to control group.

  11. An evaluation of minimal cellular functions to sustain a bacterial cell

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    Ota Motonori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both computational and experimental approaches have been used to determine the minimal gene set required to sustain a bacterial cell. Such studies have provided clues to the minimal cellular-function set needed for life. We evaluate a minimal cellular-function set directly, instead of a geneset. Results We estimated the essentialities of KEGG pathway maps as the entities of cellular functions, based on comparative genomics and metabolic network analyses. The former examined the evolutionary conservation of each pathway map by homology searches, and detected "conserved pathway maps". The latter identified "organism-specific pathway maps" that supply compounds required for the conserved pathway maps. We defined both pathway maps as "autonomous pathway maps". Among the set of autonomous pathway maps, the one that could synthesize all of the biomass components (the essential constituents for the cellular component of Escherichia coli/Bacillus subtilis, and that was composed of a minimal number of pathway maps, was determined for each of E. coli and B. subtilis, as "minimal pathway maps". We consider that they correspond to a minimal cellular-function set. The network of minimal pathway maps, composed of 20 conserved pathway maps and 21 organism-specific pathway maps for E. coli, starts a sequence of catabolic processes from carbohydrate metabolism. The catabolized compounds are used for anabolism, thus creating materials for cell components and for genetic information processing. Conclusion Our analyses of these pathway maps revealed that those functioning in "genetic information processing" are likely to be conserved, but those for catabolism are not, reflecting an evolutionary aspect of cellular functions. Minimal pathway maps were compared with a systematic gene knockout experiment, other computational results and parasitic genomes, and showed qualitative agreement, with some reasonable exceptions due to the experimental

  12. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of Monarda punctata essential oil and its main components against common bacterial pathogens in respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tian; Li, Fei-Yan; Yao, Yan; Sun, Zhong-Min

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current research work was to study the chemical composition of the essential oil of Monarda punctata along with evaluating the essential oil and its major components for their antibacterial effects against some frequently encountered respiratory infection causing pathogens. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of 13 chemical constituents with thymol (75.2%), p-cymene (6.7%), limonene (5.4), and carvacrol (3.5%) as the major constituents. The oil composition was dominated by the oxygenated monoterpenes. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil and its major constituents (thymol, p-cymene, limonene) was evaluated against Streptococcus pyogenes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli. The study revealed that the essential oil and its constituents exhibited a broad spectrum and variable degree of antibacterial activity against different strains. Among the tested strains, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the most susceptible bacterial strain showing lowest MIC and MBC values. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most resistant bacterial strain to the essential oil treatment showing relatively higher MIC and MBC values. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the essential oil induced potent and dose-dependent membrane damage in S. pyogenes and MRSA bacterial strains. The reactive oxygen species generated by the Monarda punctata essential oil were identified using 2’, 7’-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA).This study indicated that the Monarda punctata essential oil to a great extent and thymol to a lower extent triggered a substantial increase in the ROS levels in S. pyogenes bacterial cultures which ultimately cause membrane damage as revealed by SEM results. PMID:25550774

  13. Molecular characterization of total and metabolically active bacterial communities of "white colonizations" in the Altamira Cave, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, M Carmen; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo; Gonzalez, Juan M

    2009-01-01

    Caves with paleolithic paintings are influenced by bacterial development. Altamira Cave (Spain) contains some of the most famous paintings from the Paleolithic era. An assessment of the composition of bacterial communities that have colonized this cave represents a first step in understanding and potentially controlling their proliferation. In this study, areas showing colonization with uncolored microorganisms, referred to as "white colonizations", were analyzed. Microorganisms present in these colonizations were studied using DNA analysis, and those showing significant metabolic activity were detected in RNA-based RNA analysis. Bacterial community fingerprints were obtained both from DNA and RNA analyses, indicating differences between the microorganisms present and metabolically active in these white colonizations. Metabolically active microorganisms represented only a fraction of the total bacterial community present in the colonizations. 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to identify the major representative members of the studied communities. Proteobacteria constituted the most frequently found division both among metabolically active microorganisms (from RNA-based analysis) and those present in the community (from DNA analysis). Results suggest the existence of a huge variety of taxa in white colonizations of the Altamira Cave which represent a potential risk for the conservation of the cave and its paintings.

  14. Application of a microalgal slurry to soil stimulates heterotrophic activity and promotes bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Evan A N; Miñón, Jorge; Pascual, Ana; Montero, Olimpio; Navas, Luis Manuel; Rad, Carlos

    2017-12-15

    Active microalgae biomass from wastewater treatment may be given added value as a biofertilizer, but little is known about how this may affect soil nutrient dynamics and biology. If the goal is to recycle waste nutrients and matter, live algae applied in a liquid slurry to soil may add both organic carbon and nutrients while providing other benefits such as biological carbon fixation. However, the potential persistence of unicellular green algae after such an application is not known, nor the influence of their photosynthetic activity on soil organic carbon - the aim of the present study was to probe these basic questions. In a controlled laboratory microcosm experiment, suspensions of Chlorella sp. microalga culture and sterile filtrates were applied to an agricultural soil and incubated for 42days, whereas the effect of darkness was also tested to understand the importance of photosynthetic activity of the algae. Autotrophic microorganism development was 3.5 times higher in treatments with algae application as measured by chlorophyll pigment concentration. Against expectations that increased photosynthetic activity would decrease the CO 2 -C flux, the algal suspension with a photoperiod significantly increased soil respiration compared to culture filtrates without algal cells, with accumulated quantities of 1.8 and 0.7gCO 2 -Cm -2 , respectively. Also, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses showed that the suspension accelerated the development of a stable community of eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the soil surface, whereas bacterial PLFA biomarkers were significantly associated with eukaryote biomarkers on the study level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatiotemporal changes in bacterial community and microbial activity in a full-scale drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Luanfeng; Zhou, Qin; Wu, Qingping; Gu, Qihui; Sun, Ming; Zhang, Jumei

    2017-12-29

    To gain insight into the bacterial dynamics present in drinking water treatment (DWT) systems, the microbial community and activity in a full-scale DWT plant (DWTP) in Guangzhou, South China, were investigated using Illumina Hiseq sequencing analyses combined with cultivation-based techniques during the wet and dry seasons. Illumina sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed a large shift in the proportion of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes during the treatment process, with the proportion of Actinobacteria decreased sharply, whereas that of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased and predominated in treated water. Both microbial activity and bacterial diversity during the treatment process showed obvious spatial variation, with higher levels observed during the dry season and lower levels during the wet season. Clustering analysis and principal component analysis indicated dramatic shifts in the bacterial community after chlorination, suggesting that chlorination was highly effective at influencing the bacterial community. The bacterial community structure of finished water primarily comprised Pseudomonas, Citrobacter, and Acinetobacter, and interestingly showed high similarity to biofilms on granular activated carbon. Additionally, the abundance of bacterial communities was relatively stable in finished water and did not change with the season. A large number of unique operational taxonomic units were shared during treatment steps, indicating the presence of a diverse core microbiome throughout the treatment process. Opportunistic pathogens, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Citrobacter, Mycobacterium, Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Legionella, Streptococcus and Enterococcus, were detected in water including finished water, suggesting a potential threat to drinking-water safety. We also detected bacteria isolated from each treatment step using the pure-culture method. In particular, two isolates, identified as Mycobacterium sp. and Blastococcus

  16. Activated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Interact with Antibiotics and Host Innate Immune Responses to Control Chronic Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Valerie; Webb, Tracy; Norman, Annalis; Coy, Jonathan; Kurihara, Jade; Regan, Daniel; Dow, Steven

    2017-08-29

    Chronic bacterial infections associated with biofilm formation are often difficult to resolve without extended courses of antibiotic therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exert antibacterial activity in vitro and in acute bacterial infection models, but their activity in chronic infection with biofilm models has not been previously investigated. Therefore, we studied the effects of MSC administration in mouse and dog models of chronic infections associated with biofilms. Mice with chronic Staphylococcus aureus implant infections were treated by i.v. administration of activated or non-activated MSC, with or without antibiotic therapy. The most effective treatment protocol was identified as activated MSC co-administered with antibiotic therapy. Activated MSC were found to accumulate in the wound margins several days after i.v. administration. Macrophages in infected tissues assumed an M2 phenotype, compared to untreated infections which contained predominately M1 macrophages. Bacterial killing by MSC was found to be mediated in part by secretion of cathelicidin and was significantly increased by antibiotics. Studies in pet dogs with spontaneous chronic multi drug-resistant wound infections demonstrated clearance of bacteria and wound healing following repeated i.v. administration of activated allogeneic canine MSC. Thus, systemic therapy with activated MSC may be an effective new, non-antimicrobial approach to treatment of chronic, drug-resistant infections.

  17. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  18. In vitro characterization of the anti-bacterial activity of SQ109 against Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris O Makobongo

    Full Text Available The most evident challenge to treatment of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium responsible for gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer, is the increasing rate of resistance to all currently used therapeutic antibiotics. Thus, the development of novel therapies is urgently required. N-geranyl-N'-(2-adamantyl ethane-1, 2-diamine (SQ109 is an ethylene diamine-based antitubercular drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of SQ109 revealed that persistently high concentrations of SQ109 remain in the stomach 4 hours post oral administration in rats. This finding, combined with the need for new anti-Helicobacter therapies, prompted us to define the in vitro efficacy of SQ109 against H. pylori. Liquid broth micro-dilution was used for susceptibility studies to determine the antimicrobial activity of SQ109 against a total of 6 laboratory strains and 20 clinical isolates of H. pylori; the clinical isolates included a multi-drug resistant strain. All strains tested were susceptible to SQ109 with MIC and MBC ranges of 6-10 µM and 50-60 µM, respectively. SQ109 killing kinetics were concentration- and time-dependent. SQ109 killed H. pylori in 8-10 h at 140 µM (2MBCs or 4-6 h at 200 µM (~3MBCs. Importantly, though the kinetics of killing were altered, SQ109 retained potent bactericidal activity against H. pylori at low pH. Additionally, SQ109 demonstrated robust thermal stability and was effective at killing slow growing or static bacteria. In fact, pretreatment of cultures with a bacteriostatic concentration of chloramphenicol (Cm synergized the effects of typically bacteriostatic concentrations of SQ109 to the level of five-logs of bacterial killing. A molar-to-molar comparison of the efficacy of SQ109 as compared to metronidazole (MTZ, amoxicillin (AMX, rifampicin (RIF and clarithromycin (CLR, revealed that SQ109 was superior to MTZ, AMX and RIF but not to CLR. Finally, the

  19. In vitro characterization of the anti-bacterial activity of SQ109 against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makobongo, Morris O; Einck, Leo; Peek, Richard M; Merrell, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    The most evident challenge to treatment of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium responsible for gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer, is the increasing rate of resistance to all currently used therapeutic antibiotics. Thus, the development of novel therapies is urgently required. N-geranyl-N'-(2-adamantyl) ethane-1, 2-diamine (SQ109) is an ethylene diamine-based antitubercular drug that is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). Previous pharmacokinetic studies of SQ109 revealed that persistently high concentrations of SQ109 remain in the stomach 4 hours post oral administration in rats. This finding, combined with the need for new anti-Helicobacter therapies, prompted us to define the in vitro efficacy of SQ109 against H. pylori. Liquid broth micro-dilution was used for susceptibility studies to determine the antimicrobial activity of SQ109 against a total of 6 laboratory strains and 20 clinical isolates of H. pylori; the clinical isolates included a multi-drug resistant strain. All strains tested were susceptible to SQ109 with MIC and MBC ranges of 6-10 µM and 50-60 µM, respectively. SQ109 killing kinetics were concentration- and time-dependent. SQ109 killed H. pylori in 8-10 h at 140 µM (2MBCs) or 4-6 h at 200 µM (~3MBCs). Importantly, though the kinetics of killing were altered, SQ109 retained potent bactericidal activity against H. pylori at low pH. Additionally, SQ109 demonstrated robust thermal stability and was effective at killing slow growing or static bacteria. In fact, pretreatment of cultures with a bacteriostatic concentration of chloramphenicol (Cm) synergized the effects of typically bacteriostatic concentrations of SQ109 to the level of five-logs of bacterial killing. A molar-to-molar comparison of the efficacy of SQ109 as compared to metronidazole (MTZ), amoxicillin (AMX), rifampicin (RIF) and clarithromycin (CLR), revealed that SQ109 was superior to MTZ, AMX and RIF but not to CLR. Finally, the frequency of

  20. Synthesis and anti-microbial activity evaluation of some new 1-benzoyl-isothiosemicarbazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumitallo, A; Cardia, M C; Distinto, S; DeLogu, A; Maccioni, E

    2004-12-01

    The synthesis of some aroylisothiosemicarbazides was accomplished and their biological activity against bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria was investigated. Different synthetic pathways were followed according to the kind of substituents that were introduced on both the aroyl ring and the sulfur atom. Anti-bacterial activity was measured against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae and S. faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhi, while antifungal activity was evaluated against C. albicans. Two species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RV and Mycobacterium avium ATCC19421, were employed to evaluate antimycobacterial activity.

  1. Experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. II. Active and passive immunization as protection against a lethal bacterial dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Jensen, E T; Klausen, B

    1990-01-01

    Immunization against a lethal dose of Salmonella typhimurium was studied in athymic and thymus-bearing LEW rats. Active immunization was performed with formalin-killed whole cell vaccine or sublethal infection prior to the lethal infection. After vaccination with killed bacteria the euthymic...... animals produced antibodies against S.typhimurium, but neither the euthymic nor the athymic animals survived the infection. After non-lethal infection euthymic and thymus-grafted nude rats were not affected by the second and otherwise lethal bacterial dose, and had high antibody titres. All the athymic...... nude rats died after the second and lethal bacterial challenge. Passive immunization with plasma from immunized euthymic animals did not protect any of the animals against the lethal bacterial dose. However, all animals survived when treated with large doses of spleen cells from immunized euthymic rats...

  2. Evaluation of indigenous bacterial strains for biocontrol of the frogeye leaf spot of soya bean caused by Cercospora sojina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, E; Carmona, M A; Scandiani, M M; García, A F; Luque, A G; Correa, O S; Balestrasse, K B

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of biological control of Cercospora sojina, causal agent of frogeye leaf spot (FLS) of soya bean, using three indigenous bacterial strains, BNM297 (Pseudomonas fluorescens), BNM340 and BNM122 (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens). From cultures of each bacterial strain, cell suspensions and cell-free supernatants were obtained and assayed to determine their antifungal activity against C. sojina. Both mycelial growth and spore germination in vitro were more strongly inhibited by bacterial cell suspensions than by cell-free supernatants. The Bacillus strains BNM122 and BNM340 inhibited the fungal growth to a similar degree (I ≈ 52-53%), while cells from P. fluorescens BNM297 caused a lesser reduction (I ≈ 32-34%) in the fungus colony diameter. The foliar application of the two Bacillus strains on soya bean seedlings, under greenhouse conditions, significantly reduced the disease severity with respect to control soya bean seedlings and those sprayed with BNM297. This last bacterial strain was not effective in controlling FLS in vivo. Our data demonstrate that the application of antagonistic bacteria may be a promising and environmentally friendly alternative to control the FLS of soya bean.   To our knowledge, this is the first report of biological control of C. sojina by using native Bacillus strains. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Protective Activity of the Mixtures of Pine Oil and Copper Hydroxide against Bacterial Spot and Anthracnose on Red Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Woo Soh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was performed to examine the protective activities of the mixtures of pine oil and copper hydroxide against bacterial spot and anthracnose on pepper plants. As for bacterial spot, the treatment of pine oil alone displayed high disease incidence (59.6% and low protective effect (28.9%. In comparison, the treatments of mixtures and copper hydroxide alone showed protective activities of 66.8-76.1%. The mixture of pine oil and copper hydroxide (4:1 suppressed the most effectively bacterial spot on pepper. On the other hand, the mixture of pine oil and copper hydroxide (4:1 also showed the strongest protective effect against pepper anthracnose among the 4 treatments tested; its disease incidence and disease control value were 49.8% and 41.7%, respectively. The other treatments showed low protective activities with control values of 7.4-17.1%. These results suggested that the mixture of pine oil and copper hydroxide (4:1 can be used for the environmental-friendly disease control of bacterial spot and anthracnose on pepper.

  4. Evaluation of environmental bacterial communities as a factor affecting the growth of duckweed Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Hidehiro; Kuroda, Masashi; Morikawa, Masaaki; Ike, Michihiko

    2017-01-01

    Duckweed (family Lemnaceae) has recently been recognized as an ideal biomass feedstock for biofuel production due to its rapid growth and high starch content, which inspired interest in improving their productivity. Since microbes that co-exist with plants are known to have significant effects on their growth according to the previous studies for terrestrial plants, this study has attempted to understand the plant-microbial interactions of a duckweed, Lemna minor, focusing on the growth promotion/inhibition effects so as to assess the possibility of accelerated duckweed production by modifying co-existing bacterial community. Co-cultivation of aseptic L. minor and bacterial communities collected from various aquatic environments resulted in changes in duckweed growth ranging from -24 to +14% compared to aseptic control. A number of bacterial strains were isolated from both growth-promoting and growth-inhibitory communities, and examined for their co-existing effects on duckweed growth. Irrespective of the source, each strain showed promotive, inhibitory, or neutral effects when individually co-cultured with L. minor. To further analyze the interactions among these bacterial strains in a community, binary combinations of promotive and inhibitory strains were co-cultured with aseptic L. minor, resulting in that combinations of promotive-promotive or inhibitory-inhibitory strains generally showed effects similar to those of individual strains. However, combinations of promotive-inhibitory strains tended to show inhibitory effects while only Aquitalea magnusonii H3 exerted its plant growth-promoting effect in all combinations tested. Significant change in biomass production was observed when duckweed was co-cultivated with environmental bacterial communities. Promotive, neutral, and inhibitory bacteria in the community would synergistically determine the effects. The results indicate the possibility of improving duckweed biomass production via regulation of co

  5. Pleiotropic enhancement of bacterial pathogenesis resulting from the constitutive activation of the Listeria monocytogenes regulatory factor PrfA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kimberly J; Freitag, Nancy E

    2005-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes serious disease in immunocompromised individuals, pregnant women, and neonates. Bacterial virulence is mediated by the expression of specific gene products that facilitate entry into host cells and enable bacterial replication; the majority of these gene products are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. L. monocytogenes strains containing prfA E77K or prfA G155S mutations exhibit increased expression of virulence genes in broth culture and are hypervirulent in mice. To define the scope of the influences of the prfA E77K and prfA G155S mutations on L. monocytogenes pathogenesis, multiple aspects of bacterial invasion and intracellular growth were examined. Enhanced bacterial invasion of host epithelial cells was dependent on the expression of a number of surface proteins previously associated with invasion, including InlA, InlB, and ActA. In addition to these surface proteins, increased production of the hly-encoded secreted hemolysin listeriolysin O (LLO) was also found to significantly enhance bacterial invasion into epithelial cell lines for both prfA mutant strains. Although prfA E77K and prfA G155S strains were similar in their invasive phenotypes, the infection of epithelial cells with prfA E77K strains resulted in host cell plasma membrane damage, whereas prfA G155S strains did not alter plasma membrane integrity. Bacterial infection of human epithelial cells, in which the production of LLO is not required for bacterial entry into the cytosol, indicated that prfA E77K cytotoxic effects were mediated via LLO. Both prfA E77K and prfA G155S strains were more efficient than wild-type bacteria in gaining access to the host cell cytosol and in initiating the polymerization of host cell actin, and both were capable of mediating LLO-independent lysis of host cell vacuoles in cell lines for which L. monocytogenes vacuole disruption normally requires LLO activity

  6. Evaluation of Results from Sales Promotion Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Ban

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An essential element of the sales promotion strategy and not only is the evaluation of the results obtained from the activities performed. Due to their nature and applicability, the evaluation of the sales promotion is much easier to be achieved, but it raises some problems. Using a hypothetical example, we have tried to develop a "classic" evaluation model of the specialty literature.

  7. Anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activity of probiotic bacteria against oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taheur, Fadia; Kouidhi, Bochra; Fdhila, Kais; Elabed, Hamouda; Ben Slama, Rihab; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina; Chaieb, Kamel

    2016-08-01

    In this study, three lactic acid bacteria (LAB), isolated from barley, traditional dried meat and fermented olive were characterized and tested for their anti-bacterial and anti-biofilm activities against oral bacteria. Our results revealed that the tested LAB were γ-hemolytic and were susceptible to four antibiotics. All the strains were resistant to low pH, bile salt, pepsin and pancreatin. Furthermore, FB2 displayed a high aut-oaggregative phenotype (99.54%) while FF2 exhibited the best co-aggregation rate. Concerning the microbial adhesion to solvent, FB2 was the most hydrophobic strain (data obtained with chloroform and n-hexadecane). In addition Pediococcus pentosaceus FB2 and Lactobacillus brevis FF2 displayed a significant inhibitory effect against Streptococcus salivarius B468 (MIC = 10%). Moreover the selected strains were able to inhibit biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 (MBIC50 = 28.16%) and S. salivarius B468 (MBIC50 = 42.28%). The selected LAB could be considered as candidate probiotics for further application in functional food and mainly in the prevention of oral diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive radical-driven bacterial inactivation by hydrogen-peroxide-enhanced plasma-activated-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songjie; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects of plasma activated water (PAW) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), PAW/HP, in sterilization were investigated in this study. To assess the synergistic effects of PAW/HP, S. aureus was selected as the test microorganism to determine the inactivation efficacy. Also, the DNA/RNA and proteins released by the bacterial suspensions under different conditions were examined to confirm membrane integrity. Additionally, the intracellular pH (pHi) of S. aureus was measured in our study. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was employed to identify the presence of radicals. Finally, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP), conductivity and pH were measured. Our results revealed that the inactivation efficacy of PAW/HP is much greater than that of PAW, while increased H2O2 concentration result in higher inactivation potential. More importantly, as compared with PAW, the much stronger intensity ESR signals and higher ORP in PAW/HP suggests that the inactivation mechanism of the synergistic effects of PAW/HP: more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially OH and NO radicals, are generated in PAW combined with H2O2 resulting in more deaths of the bacteria.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of heterotrophic bacterial communities from the marine sponge Erylus discophorus (Astrophorida, Geodiidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Patrícia Graça

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic bacteria associated with two specimens of the marine sponge Erylus discophorus were screened for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds against a panel of human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus wild type and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, fish pathogen (Aliivibrio fischeri and environmentally relevant bacteria (Vibrio harveyi. The sponges were collected in Berlengas Islands, Portugal. Of the 212 isolated heterotrophic bacteria belonging to Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, 31% produced antimicrobial metabolites. Bioactivity was found against both Gram positive and Gram negative and clinically and environmentally relevant target microorganisms. Bioactivity was found mainly against B. subtilis and some bioactivity against S. aureus MRSA, V. harveyi and A. fisheri. No antifungal activity was detected. The three most bioactive genera were Pseudovibrio (47.0%, Vibrio (22.7% and Bacillus (7.6%. Other less bioactive genera were Labrenzia, Acinetobacter, Microbulbifer, Pseudomonas, Gordonia, Microbacterium, Micrococcus and Mycobacterium, Paenibacillus and Staphylococcus. The search of polyketide I synthases (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs genes in 59 of the bioactive bacteria suggested the presence of PKS-I in 12 strains, NRPS in 3 strains and both genes in 3 strains. Our results show the potential of the bacterial community associated with Erylus discophorus sponges as producers of bioactive compounds.

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Heterotrophic Bacterial Communities from the Marine Sponge Erylus discophorus (Astrophorida, Geodiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Ana Patrícia; Bondoso, Joana; Gaspar, Helena; Xavier, Joana R.; Monteiro, Maria Cândida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Vicente, Francisca; Lage, Olga Maria

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria associated with two specimens of the marine sponge Erylus discophorus were screened for their capacity to produce bioactive compounds against a panel of human pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus wild type and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus), fish pathogen (Aliivibrio fischeri) and environmentally relevant bacteria (Vibrio harveyi). The sponges were collected in Berlengas Islands, Portugal. Of the 212 isolated heterotrophic bacteria belonging to Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, 31% produced antimicrobial metabolites. Bioactivity was found against both Gram positive and Gram negative and clinically and environmentally relevant target microorganisms. Bioactivity was found mainly against B. subtilis and some bioactivity against S. aureus MRSA, V. harveyi and A. fisheri. No antifungal activity was detected. The three most bioactive genera were Pseudovibrio (47.0%), Vibrio (22.7%) and Bacillus (7.6%). Other less bioactive genera were Labrenzia, Acinetobacter, Microbulbifer, Pseudomonas, Gordonia, Microbacterium, Micrococcus and Mycobacterium, Paenibacillus and Staphylococcus. The search of polyketide I synthases (PKS-I) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) genes in 59 of the bioactive bacteria suggested the presence of PKS-I in 12 strains, NRPS in 3 strains and both genes in 3 strains. Our results show the potential of the bacterial community associated with Erylus discophorus sponges as producers of bioactive compounds. PMID:24236081

  11. Whole-cell bacterial bioreporter for actively searching and sensing of alkanes and oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dayi; He, Yi; Wang, Yun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Lin; Aries, Eric; Huang, Wei E

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 was found to tolerate seawater and have a special ability of adhering to an oil-water interface of 10-80 µm emulsified mineral and crude oil droplets. These properties make ADP1 an ideal bacterial chassis for constructing bioreporters that are able to actively search and sense oil spill in water and soils. Acinetobacter baylyi bioreporter ADPWH_alk was developed and applied to the detection of alkanes and alkenes in water, seawater and soils. Bioreporter ADPWH_alk was able to detect a broad range of alkanes and alkenes with carbon chain length from C7 to C36. So far, ADPWH_alk is the only bioreporter that is able to detect alkane with carbon chain length greater than C18. This bioreporter responded to the alkanes in about 30 min and it was independent to the cell growth phase because of two point mutations in alkM promoter recognized by alkane regulatory protein ALKR. ADPWH_alk was applied to detect mineral oil, Brent, Chestnut and Sirri crude oils in water and seawater in the range 0.1-100 mg l(-1), showing that the bioreporter oil detection was semi-quantitative. This study demonstrates that ADPWH_alk is a rapid, sensitive and semi-quantitative bioreporter that can be useful for environmental monitoring and assessment of oil spills in seawater and soils. © 2011 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Monoramnholipids Produced by Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Ross Sea (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Tedesco

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms living in extreme environments represent a huge reservoir of novel antimicrobial compounds and possibly of novel chemical families. Antarctica is one of the most extraordinary places on Earth and exhibits many distinctive features. Antarctic microorganisms are well known producers of valuable secondary metabolites. Specifically, several Antarctic strains have been reported to inhibit opportunistic human pathogens strains belonging to Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc. Herein, we applied a biodiscovery pipeline for the identification of anti-Bcc compounds. Antarctic sub-sea sediments were collected from the Ross Sea, and used to isolate 25 microorganisms, which were phylogenetically affiliated to three bacterial genera (Psychrobacter, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas via sequencing and analysis of 16S rRNA genes. They were then subjected to a primary cell-based screening to determine their bioactivity against Bcc strains. Positive isolates were used to produce crude extracts from microbial spent culture media, to perform the secondary screening. Strain Pseudomonas BNT1 was then selected for bioassay-guided purification employing SPE and HPLC. Finally, LC-MS and NMR structurally resolved the purified bioactive compounds. With this strategy, we achieved the isolation of three rhamnolipids, two of which were new, endowed with high (MIC < 1 μg/mL and unreported antimicrobial activity against Bcc strains.

  13. Antiproliferative and antibacterial activity evaluation of red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiproliferative activity of three extracts obtained from red microalgae Rhodosorus marinus was evaluated against cervical (HeLa), colon (HCT 116), lung (A549), prostate (22Rv-1) and breast (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines. Antibacterial activity of these extracts was also tested against Salmonella ...

  14. [Evaluation of Seeplex Pneumobacter multiplex PCR kit for the detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joowon; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Rheem, Insoo; Kim, Jongwan

    2009-08-01

    Rapid identification of the causative agent among potential bacterial and viral pathogens is important for the management of acute respiratory disease. In this study, we evaluated the analytical performance and clinical usefulness of a recently-introduced multiplex PCR assay, Seeplex Pneumobacter detection kit (Seegene Inc., Korea) for the identification of respiratory bacterial pathogens. One hundred and eighty one nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from pediatric patients with respiratory symptoms and analysed by multiplex PCR for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S.P), Haemophilus influenzae (H.I), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M.P), Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C.P), Bordetella pertussis (B.P) and Legionella pneumophila (L.P). A comparison of multiplex PCR with conventional culture for the isolation of S.P and H.I was performed on 112 specimens. The cross reactivity of multiplex PCR was also evaluated. Of 181 cases, 81 cases were positive by multiplex PCR (44.8%): 52 cases for S.P (28.7%), 47 cases for H.I (26.0%), 9 cases for M.P (5.0%), 3 cases for B.P (1.7%) and 1 case for C.P (0.6%) including multiple infection cases. The agreement rates between multiplex PCR and culture for S.P and H.I were 92.9% (kappa index=0.84, P<0.001) and 91.1% (kappa index=0.75, P<0.001), respectively. There was no cross reactivity with common bacterial and viral pathogens. Seeplex Pneumobacter detection kit could be a useful screening tool for the rapid detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens. Further studies with lower respiratory tract specimens would be needed for the clinical evaluation of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae detected by multiplex PCR.

  15. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  16. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...

  17. Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Fungal Activity of Xanthones Obtained via Semi-Synthetic Modification of α-Mangostin from Garcinia mangostana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narasimhan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The microbial contamination in food packaging has been a major concern that has paved the way to search for novel, natural anti-microbial agents, such as modified α-mangostin. In the present study, twelve synthetic analogs were obtained through semi-synthetic modification of α-mangostin by Ritter reaction, reduction by palladium-carbon (Pd-C, alkylation, and acetylation. The evaluation of the anti-microbial potential of the synthetic analogs showed higher bactericidal activity than the parent molecule. The anti-microbial studies proved that I E showed high anti-bacterial activity whereas I I showed the highest anti-fungal activity. Due to their microbicidal potential, modified α-mangostin derivatives could be utilized as active anti-microbial agents in materials for the biomedical and food industry.

  18. Propolis-Sahara honeys preparation exhibits antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity against bacterial biofims formed on urinary catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Aissat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial effect of Sahara honeys (SHs against bacterial biofilms formed on urinary catheters in combination with propolis-Sahara honeys (P-SHs. Methods: Three clinical isolates were subjected to biofilm detection methods. The antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity for SHs and P-SHs were determined using agar well diffusion and the percentage of biofilm inhibition (PBI methods. Results: The PBI for Gram-positive bacteria [Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus] was in the range of 0%–20%, while PBI for Gram-negative bacteria [Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli (E. coli] were in range of 17%–57% and 16%–65%, respectively. The highest PBI (65% was produced by SH2 only on E. coli. In agar well diffusion assay, zones of inhibition ranged from 11–20 mm (S. aureus, 9–19 mm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 11–19 mm (E. coli. The highest inhibition (20 mm was produced by SH1 only on S. aureus. In addition, the treatment of SHs and P-SHs catheters with a polymicrobial biofilms reduced biofilm formation after 48 h exposure period. Conclussions: SHs and P-SHs applied as a natural agent can be used as a prophylactic agent to prevent the formation of in vitro biofilm.

  19. OGSA Globus Toolkits evaluation activity at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, D; Foster, D; Kalyaev, V; Kryukov, A; Lamanna, M; Pose, V; Rocha, R; Wang, C

    2004-01-01

    An Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) Globus Toolkit 3 (GT3) evaluation group is active at CERN since GT3 was available in early beta version (Spring 2003). This activity focuses on the evaluation of the technology as promised by the OGSA/OGSI paradigm and on GT3 in particular. The goal is to study this new technology and its implications with the goal to provide useful input for the large grid initiatives active in the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) project. A particular effort has been devoted to investigate performance and deployment issues, having in mind the LCG requirements, in particular scalability and robustness.

  20. Evaluating portable wire-flooring models for inducing bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilley, A D; Lester, H; Pevzner, I Y; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2014-06-01

    Rearing broilers on flat or sloping wire flooring is an effective method for consistently triggering lameness attributable to bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO). Portable obstacles known as speed bumps (SB) also consistently trigger modest incidences of BCO when they are installed between feed and water lines in litter flooring facilities. Two experiments were conducted to determine the most effective broiler age for introducing the SB into litter flooring pens, and to evaluate alternative configurations of the traditional SB with the expectation that amplified mechanical challenges to the legs of broilers should increase the incidence of BCO. Broiler chicks obtained from commercial hatcheries (lines B and D in experiment 1, lines A and B in experiment 2) were reared in floor pens with ad libitum feed and water and a 23L:1D photoperiod. In experiment 1, the 5 floor treatments included wood shavings litter only (L), flat wire only (W), or litter plus SB installed at 14, 28, or 42 d of age. Line B was more susceptible to lameness than line D (25.9 vs. 15.3% for all treatments combined; P = 0.001). Both lines developed low incidences of lameness on L (11 to 13%), intermediate incidences on SB regardless of day of installation (12 to 23%), and high incidences on W (21 to 39%). In experiment 2, broilers were reared with 7 floor treatments, including L, W, SB with a 50% slope (SB50%); SB50% with a limbo bar installed over the apex; SB with a 66% slope and limbo bar; SB50% with a nipple water line suspended over the apex; and a pagoda-top SB. All SB were inserted on d 28. Line B was more susceptible to lameness than line A (20.2 vs. 16.1% for all treatments combined; P < 0.05), and for both lines combined the lameness percentages averaged 7.7 (L), 29.2 (W), 17.3 (SB50%), 16.2 (SB50% with a limbo bar), 21.5 (SB with a 66% slope and limbo bar), 20.8 (SB50% with a nipple water line), and 11.5% (pagoda-top). These studies demonstrate the portable SB can be

  1. Activation of innate immunity by bacterial ligands of toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmatova, Nelli K; Egorova, Nadezhda B; Kurbatova, Ekaterina A; Akhmatov, Elvin A

    2014-01-01

    Tγδ and B1 lymphocytes are essential components of the mucosal immune system, activated directly by different bacterial and viral ligands without additional costimulatory signals and preprocessing of other immune effectors. This ability enables the immune system to provide rapid protection against pathogens and contributes to the decoding mechanism of the sensitizing activity of mucosal antigens. The early interaction of these cells results in the production of antibodies of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA isotypes, but not immunoglobulin E (IgE). We studied the subcutaneous, intranasal, and oral delivery as three major routes of potential entry for antigens of opportunistic microorganisms, using the immunomodulator Immunovac-VP-4, which is able to activate Tγδ and B1 lymphocytes. The subcutaneous and intranasal routes produced a significant increase of these cells in lymph nodes associated with the nasal cavity (NALT) and in those associated with bronchial tissue (BALT). The oral route significantly increased levels of these cells in the spleen, in NALT, BALT, and in nodes associated with the gut (GALT). We found that mucosal application of Immunovac-VP-4, which contains antigens of conditionally pathogenic microorganisms, in conjunction with the activation of Tγδ and B1, induces adaptive immune mechanisms not only in the lymphoid formations associated with the respiratory system and with GALT, but also in the spleen [increased expression of cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3), CD4, CD8, CD19, and CD25]. This indicates that there is migration of lymphoid cells from the regional lymph nodes and mucosal lymphoid tissues via the lymph and blood to distant organs, resulting in lymphoid development, and both local and systemic immunity. Mucosal application of Immunovac-VP-4 in mice potentiates the cytotoxic activity of NK cells in the NALT, BALT, and GALT. The highest cytotoxicity was observed in cells, derived from lymphoid tissue of the intestine after oral

  2. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. IN VITRO EVALUATION OF INTRACANAL BACTERIAL REDUCTION USING TWO DIFFERENT INSTRUMENTATION TECHNIQUES AND IRRIGATION REGIMENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilnayagam Kalyanasundaram

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Enterococcus faecalis, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccus is involved in the endodontic failures. The bacterial elimination from the infected root canal is often achieved by mechanical cleaning and shaping along with irrigants. This study compares the intracanal bacterial reduction using two instrumentation techniques and irrigation regimens. METHODS 50 extracted human mandibular bicuspid teeth with single canal were decoronated at cemento-enamel junction and pulpectomy done. Working length determined and apical foramen sealed with acrylic resin and specimens autoclaved at 1210 centigrade for 20 minutes. Samples were divided in to six groups. Group I - Hand instrumentation with 0.9% saline irrigant; Group II - Hand instrumentation with 5% sodium hypochlorite as irrigant; Group III - Rotary instrumentation with 0.9% saline irrigant; Group IV - Rotary instrumentation with 5% sodium hypochlorite as irrigant; Group V - Control-Only saline irrigation; Group VI - Samples taken immediately after sterilization. Sterilized teeth infected with E. faecalis and incubated for one day at 370 centigrade. Samples were collected from the canals before and after instrumentation and irrigation. The colony forming units were then counted and transformed to log numbers and analysed statistically. RESULTS The reduction in number of colony-forming units was statistically significant. Statistical analysis reveals bacterial reduction in the following order GIV>GIII>GII>GI>GV. CONCLUSION Bacterial reduction is higher with greater taper (0.06 mm/mm instrumentation and it is enhanced with the use of 5% sodium hypochlorite compared to 0.9% saline solution.

  4. evaluation of enset clones against enset bacterial wilt abstract résumé

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    clones in fields, but each clone is grown for its specific use. A large number of enset clones collected from the. Sidama, Gurage, Kembata Tembaro and Hadyia zones were assessed for resistance/tolerance to enset bacterial wilt, Xanthomonas campestris pv. musacearum (Xcm) at the Awassa Agricultural Research Center, ...

  5. A coexisting fungal-bacterial community stabilizes soil decomposition activity in a microcosm experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Ushio

    Full Text Available How diversity influences the stability of a community function is a major question in ecology. However, only limited empirical investigations of the diversity-stability relationship in soil microbial communities have been undertaken, despite the fundamental role of microbial communities in driving carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a microcosm experiment to investigate the relationship between microbial diversity and stability of soil decomposition activities against changes in decomposition substrate quality by manipulating microbial community using selective biocides. We found that soil respiration rates and degradation enzyme activities by a coexisting fungal and bacterial community (a taxonomically diverse community are more stable against changes in substrate quality (plant leaf materials than those of a fungi-dominated or a bacteria-dominated community (less diverse community. Flexible changes in the microbial community composition and/or physiological state in the coexisting community against changes in substrate quality, as inferred by the soil lipid profile, may be the mechanism underlying this positive diversity-stability relationship. Our experiment demonstrated that the previously found positive diversity-stability relationship could also be valid in the soil microbial community. Our results also imply that the functional/taxonomic diversity and community ecology of soil microbes should be incorporated into the context of climate-ecosystem feedbacks. Changes in substrate quality, which could be induced by climate change, have impacts on decomposition process and carbon dioxide emission from soils, but such impacts may be attenuated by the functional diversity of soil microbial communities.

  6. Anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity of fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio-; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención; Ronquillo de Jesús, Elba

    2015-05-01

    Produced worldwide at 1.2m tons per year, fibrous clays are used in the production of pet litter, animal feed stuff to roof parcels, construction and rheological additives, and other applications needing to replace long-fiber length asbestos. To the authors' knowledge, however, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and cytotoxic activity by sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejon El Rubio, Spain). The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) methods. Histological cuts were obtained for quantifying leukocytes found in the epidermis. Palygorkite and sepiolite caused edema inhibition and migration of neutrophils ca. 68.64 and 45.54%, and 80 and 65%, respectively. Fibrous clays yielded high rates of infiltration, explained by cleavage of polysomes and exposure of silanol groups. Also, fibrous clays showed high inhibition of myeloperoxidase contents shortly after exposure, but decreased sharply afterwards. In contrast, tubular clays caused an increasing inhibition of myeloperoxidase with time. Thus, clay structure restricted the kinetics and mechanism of myeloperoxidase inhibition. Fibrous clays were screened in vitro against human cancer cell lines. Cytotoxicity was determined using the protein-binding dye sulforhodamine B (SRB). Exposing cancer human cells to sepiolite or palygorskite showed growth inhibition varying with cell line. This study shows that fibrous clays served as an effective anti-inflammatory, limited by chemical transfer and cellular-level signals responding exclusively to an early exposure to clay, and cell viability decreasing significantly only after exposure to high concentrations of sepiolite. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An active bacterial community linked to high chl-a concentrations in Antarctic winter-pack ice and evidence for the development of an anaerobic sea-ice bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva; Luhtanen, Anne-Mari; Rintala, Janne-Markus; Delille, Bruno; Dieckmann, Gerhard; Karkman, Antti; Tison, Jean-Louis

    2017-10-01

    Antarctic sea-ice bacterial community composition and dynamics in various developmental stages were investigated during the austral winter in 2013. Thick snow cover likely insulated the ice, leading to high (sea-ice bacterial genera, for example, Octadecabacter, Polaribacter and Glaciecola, often abundant in spring and summer during the sea-ice algal bloom, predominated in the communities. The variability in bacterial community composition in the different ice types was mainly explained by the chl-a concentrations, suggesting that as in spring and summer sea ice, the sea-ice bacteria and algae may also be coupled during the Antarctic winter. Coupling between the bacterial community and sea-ice algae was further supported by significant correlations between bacterial abundance and production with chl-a. In addition, sulphate-reducing bacteria (for example, Desulforhopalus) together with odour of H2S were observed in thick, apparently anoxic ice, suggesting that the development of the anaerobic bacterial community may occur in sea ice under suitable conditions. In all, the results show that bacterial community in Antarctic sea ice can stay active throughout the winter period and thus possible future warming of sea ice and consequent increase in bacterial production may lead to changes in bacteria-mediated processes in the Antarctic sea-ice zone.

  8. Bacterial conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, John

    2012-02-20

    Most cases of conjunctivitis in adults are probably due to viral infection, but children are more likely to develop bacterial conjunctivitis than they are viral forms. The main bacterial pathogens are Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults and children, and Moraxella catarrhalis in children. Contact lens wearers may be more likely to develop gram-negative infections. Bacterial keratitis occurs in up to 30 per 100,000 contact lens wearers. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment in adults and children with suspected bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with bacteriologically confirmed bacterial conjunctivitis? What are the effects of treatment in adults and children with clinically confirmed gonococcal conjunctivitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 44 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ocular decongestants, oral antibiotics, parenteral antibiotics, saline, topical antibiotics, and warm compresses.

  9. [Evaluation of the concentration of cerebrospinal fluid ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in patients with purulent, bacterial meningitis--own observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepa, Lucjan

    2012-01-01

    THE AIM of the study was evaluation of usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) concentration assessment in adults with purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. The investigation was performed in 14 subjects hospitalized at the Department of Infectious Diseases of Medical University of Silesia in Bytom from 2007 - 2009 due to purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis. All patients were divided into to groups according to the severity of their clinical condition: I group - very severe course of the disease, II group - moderate and mild course of the disease. In all individuals CSF CNTF concentration was evaluated during the first 24 hours of hospitalization. Mean CSF CNTF concentration in patients in very severe clinical condition (group I) was 14,73 pg/ mL compared to 6,79 pg/mL in subjects of group II with moderate and mild course of disease. The difference between CSF mean concentration of this cytokine was statistically significant (p CNTF concentrations and other CSF inflammatory parameters. Control assays performed in 4 patients from group I revealed evident decrease of CSF CNTF level in fatal course of the disease. In survivals with recovery CSF concentration of this cytokine was only slightly decreased compared to initial level. CONCLUSIONS. The obtained results indicate the usefulness of CSF CNTF concentration assessment in estimation of severity of the patient's clinical condition. The level of this cytokine concentration also seems to be helpful as prognostic marker in purulent, bacterial meningoencephalitis.

  10. Heterotrophic activity, bacterial types and abundance in different ecosystems of the Queen Maud Land

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Kodagali, J.; Nair, S.; Sheelu, G.; Chandramohan, D.

    Microbiological studies from the marine, limnetic, terrestrial and glacial ecosystems were carried out during the Ninth Indian Expedition (1989-90) to estimate the bacterial numbers, to characterise the generic types and also to estimate the uptake...

  11. Comparison of fluid filtration and bacterial leakage techniques for evaluation of microleakage in endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Moradi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Apical leakage assessment is a way to compare the efficiency of a filling material to seal the apical region of the tooth. Many microleakage testing techniques have been introduced through the years, but there has been no agreement as to which technique gives the most accurate results. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of fluid filtration and bacterial leakage techniques in the assessment of the apical sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and calcium enriched mixture (CEM. Materials and Methods: A sample of 34 extracted single-rooted human teeth were selected and prepared. The samples were divided in to 2 experimental groups. The apical 3 mm of each root was resected at 90° to its long axis and root end preparation was done with ultrasonic tips to a depth of 3 mm and filled with MTA and CEM, respectively. Assessment of apical sealing ability was done with fluid filtration technique and bacterial leakage technique along 90 days with Enterococcus faecalis bacteria. Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square test were used to analyze the data using SPSS (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA. P less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was no significant difference in apical sealing ability between MTA and CEM in bacterial leakage and fluid filtration techniques. Samples which had bacterial leakage showed higher leakage values by fluid filtration technique. Conclusion: Both techniques showed same results and there was no significant difference between fluid filtration and bacterial leakage techniques in assessment of apical microleakage.

  12. Evaluation of free-stall mattress bedding treatments to reduce mastitis bacterial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristula, M.A.; Dou, Z.; Toth, J.D.; Smith, B.I.; Harvey, N.; Sabo, M. [University of Penn, Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    Bacterial counts were compared in free-stall mattresses and teat ends exposed to 5 treatments in a factorial study design on 1 dairy farm. Mattresses in five 30-cow groups were subjected to 1 of 5 bedding treatments every other day: 0.5 kg of hydrated limestone, 120 mL of commercial acidic conditioner, 1 kg of coal fly ash, 1 kg of kiln-dried wood shavings, and control (no bedding). Counts of coliforms, Klebsiella spp., Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus spp. were lowest on mattresses bedded with lime. Mattresses bedded with the commercial acidic conditioner had the next lowest counts for coliforms, Klebsiella spp., and Streptococcus spp. Wood shavings and the no-bedding control had the highest counts for coliform and Klebsiella spp. Compared with wood shavings or control, fly ash reduced the counts of coliforms, whereas for the other 3 bacterial groups, the reduction was not always significant. Streptococcus spp. counts were greatest in the control group and did not differ among the shavings and fly ash groups. Teat swab results indicated that hydrated lime was the only bedding treatment that significantly decreased the counts of both coliforms and Klebsiella spp. There were no differences in Streptococcus spp. numbers on the teats between any of the bedding treatments. Bacterial populations grew steadily on mattresses and were generally higher at 36 to 48 h than at 12 to 24 h, whereas bacterial populations on teats grew rapidly by 12 h and then remained constant. Hydrated lime was the only treatment that significantly reduced bacterial counts on both mattresses and teat ends, but it caused some skin irritation.

  13. Community structure of the metabolically active rumen bacterial and archaeal communities of dairy cows over the transition period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Noel, Samantha Joan; Difford, Gareth Frank

    2017-01-01

    over the transition period, likely in response to the dramatic changes in physiology and nutritional factors like dry matter intake and feed composition. It should be noted however that for the methanogens, the observed community changes were influenced by the analyzed gene (mcrA or 16S rRNA).......Dairy cows experience dramatic changes in host physiology from gestation to lactation period and dietary switch from high-forage prepartum diet to high-concentrate postpartum diet over the transition period (parturition +/- three weeks). Understanding the community structure and activity...... was extracted from the rumen samples and cDNA thereof was subsequently used for characterizing the metabolically active bacterial (16S rRNA transcript amplicon sequencing) and archaeal (qPCR, T-RFLP and mcrA and 16S rRNA transcript amplicon sequencing) communities. The metabolically active bacterial community...

  14. Surviving chytridiomycosis: differential anti-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis activity in bacterial isolates from three lowland species of Atelopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra V Flechas

    Full Text Available In the Neotropics, almost every species of the stream-dwelling harlequin toads (genus Atelopus have experienced catastrophic declines. The persistence of lowland species of Atelopus could be explained by the lower growth rate of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd at temperatures above 25 °C. We tested the complementary hypothesis that the toads' skin bacterial microbiota acts as a protective barrier against the pathogen, perhaps delaying or impeding the symptomatic phase of chytridiomycosis. We isolated 148 cultivable bacterial strains from three lowland Atelopus species and quantified the anti-Bd activity through antagonism assays. Twenty-six percent (38 strains representing 12 species of the bacteria inhibited Bd growth and just two of them were shared among the toad species sampled in different localities. Interestingly, the strongest anti-Bd activity was measured in bacteria isolated from A. elegans, the only species that tested positive for the pathogen. The cutaneous bacterial microbiota is thus likely a fitness-enhancing trait that may (adaptation or not (exaptation have appeared because of natural selection mediated by chytridiomycosis. Our findings reveal bacterial strains for development of local probiotic treatments against chytridiomycosis and also shed light on the mechanisms behind the frog-bacteria-pathogen interaction.

  15. Microbiological analysis of common preservatives used in food items and demonstration of their in vitro anti-bacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohora Sultana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the microorganisms contaminating the common preservatives used in food as well as to detect their in vitro anti-bacterial traits. Methods: A total of 9 preservatives were subjected to conventional cultural and biochemical methods for microbial enumeration. Anti-bacterial activities were demonstrated through the agar well diffusion method. Results: All samples were found to be contaminated with bacteria up to 105 CFU/g and with the fungal flora within a range of 1 01-1 02 CFU/g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were demonstrated in most of the samples. Sodium sulfite and citric acid possessed the strongest anti-bacterial trait against all of the test bacteria. Acetic acid exhibited activity against 6 out of 8 test bacteria while vinegar exhibited the activity against 4 bacteria. Activity of salt was demonstrated only against Listeria spp. and Bacillus spp., while activity of sugar and honey was found only against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp., respectively. Conclusions: According to the current investigation, sodium sulfite and citric acid samples were found to be satisfactory preservatives both in terms of microbiological criteria and their antibacterial traits.

  16. EDTA addition enhances bacterial respiration activities and hydrocarbon degradation in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kharusi, Samiha; Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The low number and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the low solubility and availability of hydrocarbons hamper bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils in arid deserts, thus bioremediation treatments that circumvent these limitations are required. We tested the effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition, at different concentrations (i.e. 0.1, 1 and 10 mM), on bacterial respiration and biodegradation of Arabian light oil in bioaugmented (i.e. with the addition of exogenous alkane-degrading consortium) and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils. Post-treatment shifts in the soils' bacterial community structure were monitored using MiSeq sequencing. Bacterial respiration, indicated by the amount of evolved CO2, was highest at 10 mM EDTA in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented soils, reaching an amount of 2.2 ± 0.08 and 1.6 ± 0.02 mg-CO2 g(-1) after 14 days of incubation, respectively. GC-MS revealed that 91.5% of the C14-C30 alkanes were degraded after 42 days when 10 mM EDTA and the bacterial consortium were added together. MiSeq sequencing showed that 78-91% of retrieved sequences in the original soil belonged to Deinococci, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteia and Bacilli. The same bacterial classes were detected in the 10 mM EDTA-treated soils, however with slight differences in their relative abundances. In the bioaugmented soils, only Alcanivorax sp. MH3 and Parvibaculum sp. MH21 from the exogenous bacterial consortium could survive until the end of the experiment. We conclude that the addition of EDTA at appropriate concentrations could facilitate biodegradation processes by increasing hydrocarbon availability to microbes. The addition of exogenous oil-degrading bacteria along with EDTA could serve as an ideal solution for the decontamination of oil-contaminated desert soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Activation effectiveness evaluation of innovation activity processes of the enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Александровна Плахотник

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the national importance of innovative activity development in Ukraine, clear relationship to the innovative process has not yet formed. There are a number of outstanding issues concerning the methods for activation effectiveness evaluation of innovative activity of the enterprises, identifying priority allocation of financial resources in the course of innovation. The ways of improving analytical methods for activity effectiveness evaluation of innovative activity of the enterprises in different sectors of the national economy are discussed in the article. They are based on the performances of their economic, social and technological development. The practical aspects of implementation of the methodology for effectiveness evaluation of innovative activity are developed. They can be used as the basis for approaches to the formation and evaluation of the implementation of the state industrial policy of Ukraine. It is proved that economy modernization, based on the formation of high-tech resources in the real economy, and effective participation of innovative activities in economic circulation allows economic growth in the conditions of new economy. Technology can effectively develop only under appropriate forms and methods of institutionalization and socialization. The complex nature of the processes of innovative development of domestic enterprises has predetermined the need for effective implementation of innovation level measurement system based on the definition of the integral performance index of their implementation and related sub-indices in its structure, based on a four-level hierarchical model. Integral performance indicator is a vector with the components of the sub-indices by kinds of influence factors. The proposed approach to the analysis of the activation effectiveness of innovative activity of the enterprises can be the basis for approaches to the development and evaluation of the implementation of the state industrial

  18. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity among and within individual venous leg ulcers using bacterial tag-encoded FLX and Titanium amplicon pyrosequencing and metagenomic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 1 out of every 100 individuals has some form of venous insufficiency, which can lead to chronic venous disease and Venous Leg Ulcer (VLU. There are known underlying pathologies which contribute to the chronic nature of VLU including biofilm phenotype infections. Results Using pyrosequencing based approaches we evaluated VLU to characterize their microbial ecology. Results show that VLU infections are polymicrobial with no single bacterium colonizing the wounds. The most ubiquitous and predominant organisms include a previously uncharacterized bacteroidales, various anaerobes, Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and Serratia. Topological analysis of VLU show some notable differences in bacterial populations across the surface of the wounds highlighting the importance of sampling techniques during diagnostics. Metagenomics provide a preliminary indication that there may be protozoa, fungi and possibly an undescribed virus associated with these wounds. Conclusion The polymicrobial nature of VLU and previous research on diabetic foot ulcers and surgical site infections suggest that the future of therapy for such wounds lies in the core of the logical and proven multiple concurrent strategy approach, which has been termed "biofilm-based wound care" and the use of individualized therapeutics rather than in a single treatment modality.

  19. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity in the feces of cattle using 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The microbiota of an animal's intestinal tract plays important roles in the animal's overall health, productivity and well-being. There is still a scarcity of information on the microbial diversity in the gut of livestock species such as cattle. The primary reason for this lack of data relates to the expense of methods needed to generate such data. Here we have utilized a bacterial tag-encoded FLX 16s rDNA amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach that is able to perform diversity analyses of gastrointestinal populations. bTEFAP is relatively inexpensive in terms of both time and labor due to the implementation of a novel tag priming method and an efficient bioinformatics pipeline. We have evaluated the microbiome from the feces of 20 commercial, lactating dairy cows. Results Ubiquitous bacteria detected from the cattle feces included Clostridium, Bacteroides, Porpyhyromonas, Ruminococcus, Alistipes, Lachnospiraceae, Prevotella, Lachnospira, Enterococcus, Oscillospira, Cytophage, Anaerotruncus, and Acidaminococcus spp. Foodborne pathogenic bacteria were detected in several of the cattle, a total of 4 cows were found to be positive for Salmonella spp (tentative enterica and 6 cows were positive for Campylobacter spp. (tentative lanienae. Conclusion Using bTEFAP we have examined the microbiota in the feces of cattle. As these methods continue to mature we will better understand the ecology of the major populations of bacteria the lower intestinal tract. This in turn will allow for a better understanding of ways in which the intestinal microbiome contributes to animal health, productivity and wellbeing.

  20. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  1. Protocol for Evaluating the Permissiveness of Bacterial Communities Toward Conjugal Plasmids by Quantification and Isolation of Transconjugants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of conjugal plasmids is the main bacterial process of horizontal gene transfer to potentially distantly related bacteria. These extrachromosomal, circular DNA molecules host genes that code for their own replication and transfer to other organisms. Because additional accessory genes...... transfer, the ability of a plasmid to invade a mixed community is crucial. The main parameter that controls the possible extent of horizontal plasmid transfer (HGT) in a bacterial community is the in situ community permissiveness for the considered plasmid. Permissiveness describes the fraction...... a gfp-tagged plasmid in a mCherry red fluorescently tagged donor strain repressing gfp expression. We take advantage of fluorescent marker genes to microscopically detect plasmid transfer events and use subsequent high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate...

  2. Bacterial burden of worn therapeutic silver textiles for neurodermitis patients and evaluation of efficacy of washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschlein, G; Assadian, O; Arnold, A; Haase, H; Kramer, A; Jünger, M

    2010-01-01

    To reduce pruritus and colonization with Staphylococcus aureus, textiles containing silver are increasingly used as therapeutic option for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). While wearing such textiles, the contained silver is in close contact with the patient's skin. The silver serves two purposes: to reduce bacterial colonization of the skin, and to prevent contamination of the textile with ensuing growth of microorganisms. It is unknown whether the silver impregnation is able to reduce bacterial contamination of the textile during wearing and to prevent bacterial growth within the textile. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination in textiles containing silver versus placebo worn by patients with AD and to determine the efficacy of processing worn textiles by manual and machine-based washing. Additionally, the effect of silver textiles on S. aureus and total bacterial counts colonizing the skin of AD patients was analyzed. The reduction factor of silver textile compared to placebo was 0.5 log steps against S. aureus and 0.4 log steps against total bacteria. Silver textiles exhibited significantly less S. aureus as well as total bacterial colonization after 2 days of wearing without washing, as compared with a placebo textile. On placebo textiles 385.6 +/- 63.5 CFU total bacteria and 236.5 +/- 49.9 CFU S. aureus, and on silver textiles 279.9 +/- 78.7 CFU total bacteria and 119.3 +/- 39.4 CFU S. aureus were found on the inner side of the textiles facing the neurodermitis lesions. However, the unexpectedly high residual contamination despite the silver exposure represents a potential risk as recontamination source of S. aureus that could maintain the proinflammatory process in AD. This contamination is nearly completely eliminated by machine-based washing at 60 degrees C using conventional washing powder. AD patients wearing silver textiles should change their used clothes at least daily and wash them in a washing machine at 60 degrees

  3. Value of Serum Cholinesterase Activity in the Diagnosis of Septic Shock Due to Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahloul, Mabrouk; Baccouch, Najeh; Chtara, Kamilia; Turki, Mouna; Turki, Olfa; Hamida, Chokri Ben; Chelly, Hedi; Ayedi, Fatma; Chaari, Anis; Bouaziz, Mounir

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate whether serum cholinesterase (SChE) activity can be helpful for the diagnosis of septic shock and to evaluate its usefulness in comparison with procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A prospective single-blinded study conducted in an intensive care unit of university hospital. Patients were classified as having cardiogenic shock, septic shock, or hemorrhagic shock. We also included a control group without neither hemodynamic instability nor sepsis. For all included patients, SChE, PCT, and CRP were simultaneously sampled. The comparison of sepsis markers between all groups showed that the mean values of PCT and CRP were significantly higher in patients with septic shock. However, SChE activity was significantly lower in this group. The SChE activity was found to be more accurate than PCT and CRP for the diagnosis of septic shock. In fact, an SChE activity ≤ 4000 UI/L predicted the diagnosis of septic shock with a sensitivity of 78%, a specificity of 89%, a predictive negative value of 97%, and a predictive positive value of 65%. However, the prognostic value of SChE activity was poor in multivariate analysis. The SChE activity level was significantly decreased in patients with septic shock. However, its prognostic value is poor. Our results suggest that SChE activity is useful for the diagnosis of septic shock. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  4. Antibacterial activity of tannins isolated from Sapium baccatum extract and use for control of tomato bacterial wilt.

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    Thuy Thu Vu

    Full Text Available In the search for new antibacterial agents from natural sources, we revealed that a crude methanol extract of Sapium baccatum was highly active against Ralstonia solanacearum, a causal agent of a serious disease called bacterial wilt of tomato. The bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract resulted in the isolation of seven known active compounds, including gallic acid, methyl gallate, corilagin, tercatain, chebulagic acid, chebulinic acid, and quercetin 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside. Their chemical structures were determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An in vitro antibacterial bioassay using a broth microdilution method revealed that, except for quercetin 3-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (MIC = 250 μg/mL, the isolated compounds exhibited strong antibacterial activity against R. solanacearum (MIC = 26-52 μg/mL. Among the seven compounds, methyl gallate exhibited the strongest broad-spectrum activity against most of the plant pathogenic bacteria tested (MIC = 26-250 μg/mL. In the in vivo experiments, the crude extract of S. baccatum at 2000 and 1000 μg/mL reduced the development of tomato bacterial wilt by 83 and 63%, respectively, under greenhouse conditions after 14 days of infection. The results suggested that the extracts of S. baccatum or isolated tannins could be used as natural bactericides for the control of bacterial wilt of tomato.

  5. Biodegradation of malathion and evaluation of kinetic parameters using three bacterial species

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    S.R. Geed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of three different bacterial species for biodegradation of malathion and its secondary products have been investigated. The concentration range of malathion under investigation was 25–200 mg⋅L−1. It has been observed that Pseudomonas putida was found to be most efficient for degradation of malathion. The removal of malathion was 72% at its concentration of 125 mg⋅L−1. The optimum parameters were studied for all three bacterial species in batch mode. The average values of Ks and μmax were obtained for all these species for degradation of malathion. Results indicate that P. putida has high degradation potential than Rhodoccocus rhodochrous and Sphingomonas sp. The degradation of P. putida was maximum at concentration of 125 mg⋅L−1, pH and temperature at 7 ± 0.2, 80 °C respectively. Metabolites were obtained using GCMS analysis.

  6. Evaluation of bacterial meningitis surveillance data of the northern region, Ghana, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburi, Basil Benduri; Kubio, Chrysantus; Kenu, Ernest; Ameme, Donne Kofi; Mahama, Jacob Yakubu; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Afari, Edwin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of major public health importance especially for countries such as Ghana; whose northern part lies within the meningitis belt. The Northern region of Ghana has been recording cases with outbreaks over the years. In order to generate evidence to improve surveillance, we described the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis using surveillance data of the northern region. Bacterial meningitis datasets from January 2010 to December 2015 for all the 26 districts of the Northern region were retrieved from line lists. Data were analyzed in terms of person, place, time, and identity of causative organisms using descriptive statistics. The results were presented as proportions, rates, tables and graphs. A total of 1,176 cases were reported. Of these, 53.5% (629/1,176) were males. The proportion of cases aged 0 to 29 years was 77.4%. The Overall Case Fatality Rate (CFR) was 9.7% (114/1,176). About 65% of all cases were recorded from January to April. Only 23.7% (279/1,176) of cases were laboratory-confirmed. Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia accounted for 91.4% of confirmed cases. Over the period, the incidence reduced from 9.0/100,000 population to 3.8/100,000 population and CFR reduced from 16.6% to 5.7%. Most cases of bacterial meningitis were recorded in the dry season and in persons younger than 30 years. Less than a quarter of cases were laboratory confirmed, and no new bacteria species were identified. Both morbidity and mortality rates were on the decline. There is the need to consolidate these gains by intensifying meningitis surveillance and improving on the rate of laboratory case confirmation.

  7. Evaluation of temperature–pulse centile charts in identifying serious bacterial illness: observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy; Thompson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Background Distinguishing serious bacterial infection (SBI) from milder/self-limiting infections is often difficult. Interpretation of vital signs is confounded by the effect of temperature on pulse and respiratory rate. Temperature–pulse centile charts have been proposed to improve the predictive value of pulse rate in the clinical assessment of children with suspected SBI. Objectives To assess the utility of proposed temperature–pulse centile charts in the clinical assessment of children wi...

  8. Evaluation of Innate Immune Biomarkers in Saliva for Diagnostic Potential of Bacterial and Viral Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    up-regulated in bacterial and viral infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza virus, and plays a key role in cell-mediated immunity... Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 2 58 male white Saliva/serum Cough, fatigue, fever, Vitek 2 Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 3 52...fever, fatigue, Vitek 2 Streptococcus sore throat compact pneumoniae 8 44 female white Saliva/serum Cough, fever, muscle Vitek 2 Klebsiella

  9. Reconstruction and Evaluation of the Synthetic Bacterial MEP Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Siavash Partow; Verena Siewers; Laurent Daviet; Michel Schalk; Jens Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids, which are a large group of natural and chemical compounds with a variety of applications as e.g. fragrances, pharmaceuticals and potential biofuels, are produced via two different metabolic pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here, we attempted to replace the endogenous MVA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a synthetic bacterial MEP pathway integrated into the genome to benefit from its superior properties in term...

  10. Evaluation of the bacterial diversity of Pressure ulcers using bTEFAP pyrosequencing

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    Wolcott Randall D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decubitus ulcers, also known as bedsores or pressure ulcers, affect millions of hospitalized patients each year. The microflora of chronic wounds such as ulcers most commonly exist in the biofilm phenotype and have been known to significantly impair normal healing trajectories. Methods Bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP, a universal bacterial identification method, was used to identify bacterial populations in 49 decubitus ulcers. Diversity estimators were utilized and wound community compositions analyzed in relation to metadata such as Age, race, gender, and comorbidities. Results Decubitus ulcers are shown to be polymicrobial in nature with no single bacterium exclusively colonizing the wounds. The microbial community among such ulcers is highly variable. While there are between 3 and 10 primary populations in each wound there can be hundreds of different species present many of which are in trace amounts. There is no clearly significant differences in the microbial ecology of decubitus ulcer in relation to metadata except when considering diabetes. The microbial populations and composition in the decubitus ulcers of diabetics may be significantly different from the communities in non-diabetics. Conclusions Based upon the continued elucidation of chronic wound bioburdens as polymicrobial infections, it is recommended that, in addition to traditional biofilm-based wound care strategies, an antimicrobial/antibiofilm treatment program can be tailored to each patient's respective wound microflora.

  11. An evaluation of multiple annealing and looping based genome amplification using a synthetic bacterial community

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yong

    2016-02-23

    The low biomass in environmental samples is a major challenge for microbial metagenomic studies. The amplification of a genomic DNA was frequently applied to meeting the minimum requirement of the DNA for a high-throughput next-generation-sequencing technology. Using a synthetic bacterial community, the amplification efficiency of the Multiple Annealing and Looping Based Amplification Cycles (MALBAC) kit that is originally developed to amplify the single-cell genomic DNA of mammalian organisms is examined. The DNA template of 10 pg in each reaction of the MALBAC amplification may generate enough DNA for Illumina sequencing. Using 10 pg and 100 pg templates for each reaction set, the MALBAC kit shows a stable and homogeneous amplification as indicated by the highly consistent coverage of the reads from the two amplified samples on the contigs assembled by the original unamplified sample. Although GenomePlex whole genome amplification kit allows one to generate enough DNA using 100 pg of template in each reaction, the minority of the mixed bacterial species is not linearly amplified. For both of the kits, the GC-rich regions of the genomic DNA are not efficiently amplified as suggested by the low coverage of the contigs with the high GC content. The high efficiency of the MALBAC kit is supported for the amplification of environmental microbial DNA samples, and the concerns on its application are also raised to bacterial species with the high GC content.

  12. Bacterial population dynamics in a laboratory activated sludge reactor monitored by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroyasu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Ranasinghe, Purnika; Li, Ning; Gunawardana, Egodaha Gedara Wasana; Hattori, Masahira; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The microbial population in a laboratory activated sludge reactor was monitored for 245 d at 75 time points by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA. Synthetic wastewater was used as the influent, and the reactor was operated under the same conditions throughout the experiment. The behaviors of different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed. Multiple OTUs showed periodic propagation and recession. One of the OTUs showed sharp recession, which suggests that cells in the OTU were selectively killed. The behaviors of different phylogenetic lineages of Candidatus 'Accumulibacter phosphatis' were also visualized. It was clearly demonstrated that pyrosequencing with barcoded primers is a very effective tool to clarify the dynamics of the bacterial population in activated sludge.

  13. Impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the bacterial communities of biological activated carbon filter intended for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyuan, Liu; Shuili, Yu; Heedeung, Park; Qingbin, Yuan; Guicai, Liu; Qi, Li

    2016-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are inevitably present in the aquatic environment owing to their increasing production and use. However, knowledge of the potential effects of TiO2 NPs on the treatment of drinking water is scarce. Herein, the effects of two types of anatase TiO2 NPs (TP1, 25 nm; TP2, 100 nm) on the bacterial community in a biological activated carbon (BAC) filter were investigated via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) analysis, ATP quantification, and 454 pyrosequencing analysis. Both TP1 and TP2 significantly inhibited the bacterial ATP level (p treatment, whereas those of Bacilli class and Gammaproteobacteria class increased. TiO2 NP size showed a greater effect on the bacterial composition than did the dose based on Bray-Curtis distances. These findings identified negative effects of TiO2 NPs on the bacterial community in the BAC filter. Given the fact that BAC filters are used widely in drinking water treatment plants, these results suggested a potential threat by TiO2 NP to drinking water treatment system.

  14. Measuring bacterial activity and community composition at high hydrostatic pressure using a novel experimental approach: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannicke, Nicola; Frindte, Katharina; Gust, Giselher; Liskow, Iris; Wacker, Alexander; Meyer, Andreas; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we describe a high-pressure incubation system allowing multiple subsampling of a pressurized culture without decompression. The system was tested using one piezophilic (Photobacterium profundum), one piezotolerant (Colwellia maris) bacterial strain and a decompressed sample from the Mediterranean deep sea (3044 m) determining bacterial community composition, protein production (BPP) and cell multiplication rates (BCM) up to 27 MPa. The results showed elevation of BPP at high pressure was by a factor of 1.5 ± 1.4 and 3.9 ± 2.3 for P. profundum and C. maris, respectively, compared to ambient-pressure treatments and by a factor of 6.9 ± 3.8 fold in the field samples. In P. profundum and C. maris, BCM at high pressure was elevated (3.1 ± 1.5 and 2.9 ± 1.7 fold, respectively) compared to the ambient-pressure treatments. After 3 days of incubation at 27 MPa, the natural bacterial deep-sea community was dominated by one phylum of the genus Exiguobacterium, indicating the rapid selection of piezotolerant bacteria. In future studies, our novel incubation system could be part of an isopiestic pressure chain, allowing more accurate measurement of bacterial activity rates which is important both for modeling and for predicting the efficiency of the oceanic carbon pump. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Seasonal fluctuations of bacterial population and microbial activity in soils cultivated with eucalyptus and pinus

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    Rigobelo Everlon Cid

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and decomposition of litter in soils under forests depend on climatic and biotic conditions. This work evaluated the effect of monthly rainfall and temperature on total bacteria, and on the dehydrogenase and respiration microbial activities. The effects of organic matter, total organic C and soil moisture were also evaluated. Performed from April, 1999 to March, 2000 in an Eucalyptus-cultivated and Pinus-cultivated Oxisol (Typic Haplustox, the study showed that climate and the soil variables affect the total number of bacteria and the microbial activities. The highest air temperatures and rainfall intensities were found during the Summer and, consequently, all the studied variables were maximal during this period. Minimal values varied from Autumn to Winter or, for some parameters, up to Spring. A positive correlation proved the influence of the organic matter, organic C and soil moisture on the total bacteria and on the respiratory and dehydrogenase activities. Litter content was also higher in the Summer as compared to the Winter, but it correlated only with the total bacteria (r = 0.52***. However, the correlation between the litter content and organic matter (r = 0.64*** and soil moisture (r = 0.49** suggest that the soil organic matter may have influenced microbial activity. All variables found in the Eucalyptus soil were higher than that of Pinus soil, probably favored by the best soil fertility and higher pH value.

  16. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

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    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of anise wastes against some multidrug resistant bacterial isolates

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    Mohamed Khaled Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is becoming a serious problem, especially after the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains. To overcome this problem, new and effective antibacterials or resistance modulators are highly needed and plant kingdom represents a valuable source of these compounds. In this study we investigated the antibacterial and resistance modulatory activity of Aniseeds waste Residue Extract (ASWRE and Star Anise Waste Residue Extract (SAWRE (post-distillation against 100 isolates belonging to two Gram positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus and four Gram negative bacteria (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Phenolic compounds of anise wastes were determined by HPLC. The antibacterial activity of anise waste extracts assays were performed by using inhibition zone diameters, MIC and MBC. Evaluation of synergy interaction between anise waste extracts and certain known antibacterial drugs like Cephradine, Chloramphenicol, Tetracycline and Amoxicillin was carried out using disc diffusion method, MIC and the fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC. The results showed that HPLC method has been developed for the determination of 25 phenolic compounds from waste extracts. Both ASWRE and SAWRE have significant antibacterial activity against all of the test bacteria. SAWRE was found to have higher amounts of phenolic compounds contents that might be responsible for their comparatively higher antibacteria activity than ASWRE. Irradiation at 10 and 30 kGy did not significantly affect the antibacterial activity of both ASWRE and SAWRE. The combination of anise waste extracts and the tested antibiotics mostly showed synergistic effect. Synergistic interaction was most expressed against Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp1 and Staphylococcus aureus (Sa1 by Tetracycline and chloramphenicol; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P2, Klebsiella pneumoniae (K3, Acinetobacter baumannii

  18. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  19. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity of Some Traditionally Used Medicinal Plants against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Marasini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide increase of multidrug resistance in both community- and health-care associated bacterial infections has impaired the current antimicrobial therapy, warranting the search for other alternatives. We aimed to find the in vitro antibacterial activity of ethanolic extracts of 16 different traditionally used medicinal plants of Nepal against 13 clinical and 2 reference bacterial species using microbroth dilution method. The evaluated plants species were found to exert a range of in vitro growth inhibitory action against the tested bacterial species, and Cynodon dactylon was found to exhibit moderate inhibitory action against 13 bacterial species including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, multidrug-resistant Salmonella typhi, and S. typhimurium. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of tested ethanolic extracts were found from 31 to >25,000 μg/mL. Notably, ethanolic extracts of Cinnamomum camphora, Curculigo orchioides, and Curcuma longa exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against S. pyogenes with a MIC of 49, 49, and 195 μg/mL, respectively; whereas chloroform fraction of Cynodon dactylon exhibited best antibacterial activity against S. aureus with a MIC of 31 μg/mL. Among all, C. dactylon, C. camphora, C. orchioides, and C. longa plant extracts displayed a potential antibacterial activity of MIC < 100 μg/mL.

  20. Antibiotic activity and concentrations in clinical samples from patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Cañas, V; Gutiérrez-Soto, B; Almonte-Fernández, H; Lara-Oya, A; Navarro-Marí, J M; Garrido-Frenich, A; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Gutiérrez-Fernández, J

    2017-12-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is the most common urological disease in patients younger than 50 years, whose long-standing symptoms could be related to an inappropriate therapeutic regimen. The objective was to analyse the sensitivity of microorganisms isolated from patients with CBP and measure the weekly antibiotic concentrations in serum, semen and urine. For the antibiotic sensitivity study, 60 clinical isolates were included between January 2013 and December 2014 from semen samples from patients with microbiologically confirmed CBP. Broth microdilution was performed on the samples. For the antibiotic concentration study from January to May 2014, urine, blood and semen samples were collected weekly, over 4 weeks of treatment from 8 patients with positive cultures for CBP. The concentrations were measured using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The antibiotics fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin had the highest activity (95.2% in both cases). The mean antibiotic concentrations in semen during the 4 weeks studied were as follows: 1.68mg/L, 8.30mg/L, 2.61mg/L, 0.33mg/L and 2.90mg/L, respectively, for patients 1 to 5, who were treated with levofloxacin; 1.625mg/L for patient 6, who was treated with ciprofloxacin; 2.67mg/L for patient 7, who was treated with ampicillin; and 1.05mg/L for patient 8, who was treated with doxycycline. Higher concentrations were obtained in the urine samples than in serum and semen, the latter 2 of which were comparable. Fosfomycin is proposed as the primary alternative to the empiric treatment of CBP due to its high in vitro activity. The antibiotic concentration in semen was higher than the minimal inhibitory concentration against the aetiological agent, although microbiological negativisation was not always correlated with a favourable clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pyrosequencing Reveals Soil Enzyme Activities and Bacterial Communities Impacted by Graphene and Its Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yan; Wang, Yi; Guan, Yina; Ma, Jiangtao; Cai, Zhiqiang; Yang, Guanghua; Zhao, Xiyue

    2017-10-25

    Graphene (GN) and graphene oxides (GOs) are novel carbon nanomaterial; they have been attracting much attention because of their excellent properties and are widely applied in many areas, including energy, electronics, biomedicine, environmental science, etc. With industrial production and consumption of GN/GO, they will inevitably enter the soil and water environments. GN/GO may directly cause certain harm to microorganisms and lead to ecological and environmental risks. GOs are GN derivatives with abundant oxygen-containing functional groups in their graphitic backbone. The structure and chemistry of GN show obvious differences compared to those of GO, which lead to the different environmental behaviors. In this study, four different types of soil (S1-S4) were employed to investigate the effect of GN and GO on soil enzymatic activity, microbial population, and bacterial community through pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The results showed that soil enzyme activity (invertase, protease, catalase, and urease) and microbial population (bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi) changed after GN/GO release into soils. Soil microbial community species are more rich, and the diversity also increases after GO/GN application. The phylum of Proteobacteria increased at 90 days after treatment (DAT) after GN/GO application. The phylum of Chloroflexi occurred after GN application at 90 DAT in S1 soil and reached 4.6%. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in S2, S3, and S4 soils; it ranged from 43.6 to 71.4% in S2 soil, from 45.6 to 73.7% in S3 soil, and from 38.1 to 56.7% in S4 soil. The most abundant genera were Bacillus (37.5-47.0%) and Lactococcus (28.0-39.0%) in S1 soil, Lysobacter and Flavobacterium in S2 soil, Pedobacter in S3 soil, and Massilia in S4 soil. The effect of GN and GO on the soil microbial community is time-dependent, and there are no significant differences between the samples at 10 and 90 DAT.

  2. Bacterial Genotoxins Promote Inside-Out Integrin β1 Activation, Formation of Focal Adhesion Complexes and Cell Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Laura; Toyooka, Tatsushi; Patarroyo, Manuel; Frisan, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are membrane bound receptors that regulate several cellular processes, such as cell adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation, and may contribute to tumor initiation/progression in cells exposed to genotoxic stress. The extent of integrin activation and its role in cell survival upon intoxication with bacterial genotoxins are still poorly characterized. These toxins induce DNA strand breaks in the target cells and activate the DNA damage response (DDR), coordinated by the Ataxia Telangectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase. In the present study, we demonstrate that induction of DNA damage by two bacterial genotoxins promotes activation of integrin β1, leading to enhanced assembly of focal adhesions and cell spreading on fibronectin, but not on vitronectin. This phenotype is mediated by an ATM-dependent inside-out integrin signaling, and requires the actin cytoskeleton remodeler NET1. The toxin-mediated cell spreading and anchorage-independent survival further relies on ALIX and TSG101, two components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), known to regulate integrin intracellular trafficking. These data reveal a novel aspect of the cellular response to bacterial genotoxins, and provide new tools to understand the carcinogenic potential of these effectors in the context of chronic intoxication and infection. PMID:25874996

  3. Characterization of a teleost membrane-associated protein that is involved in the regulation of complement activation and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo-Fei; Sun, Li

    2018-02-01

    In mammals, membrane-associated complement regulatory proteins (MCRP) can protect host cells from the damaging of the activated complement. In teleost, few studies on the function of MCRP have been documented. In the present report, we identified a MCRP (named CsMCRP) from the teleost fish tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis and examined its immune function. CsMCRP shares moderate sequence identities with fish DAF-like molecules. CsMCRP was predicted to be a transmembrane protein with three short consensus repeats located in the extracellular region. CsMCRP expression occurred in nine different tissues, especially blood, and in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Recombinant CsMCRP inhibited complement activation and interacted with bacterial pathogen, the latter in a highly selective manner. Antibody blocking the CsMCRP on PBL significantly inhibited bacterial infection of PBL. These results indicate that teleost CsMCRP is both a regulator of complement activation and a cellular receptor involved in bacterial invasion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous spatiotemporal mapping of in situ pH and bacterial activity within an intact 3D microcolony structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Kim, Dongyeop; Sun, Victor; Aviles-Reyes, Alejandro; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Lemos, Jose A.; Koo, Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are comprised of bacterial-clusters (microcolonies) enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Streptococcus mutans can produce exopolysaccharides (EPS)-matrix and assemble microcolonies with acidic microenvironments that can cause tooth-decay despite the surrounding neutral-pH found in oral cavity. How the matrix influences the pH and bacterial activity locally remains unclear. Here, we simultaneously analyzed in situ pH and gene expression within intact biofilms and measured the impact of damage to the surrounding EPS-matrix. The spatiotemporal changes of these properties were characterized at a single-microcolony level following incubation in neutral-pH buffer. The middle and bottom-regions as well as inner-section within the microcolony 3D structure were resistant to neutralization (vs. upper and peripheral-region), forming an acidic core. Concomitantly, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter to monitor expression of the pH-responsive atpB (PatpB::gfp) by S. mutans within microcolonies. The atpB expression was induced in the acidic core, but sharply decreased at peripheral/upper microcolony regions, congruent with local pH microenvironment. Enzymatic digestion of the surrounding matrix resulted in nearly complete neutralization of microcolony interior and down-regulation of atpB. Altogether, our data reveal that biofilm matrix facilitates formation of an acidic core within microcolonies which in turn activates S. mutans acid-stress response, mediating both the local environment and bacterial activity in situ.

  5. Evaluation of Anticaries Activity of Selected Mouthwash Marketed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    this prevents both the initiation and progression of dental caries. The use of preservatives in mouthwash formulations should be done with caution as this may interfere with mouthwash activity. Keywords: Mouthwash, Thymol, Anticaries activity, Bacterial isolates. Received: 3 May 2010. Revised accepted: 1 September 2010.

  6. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Ethyl Acetate the Extract of Noni Fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.) Against Bacterial Spoilage in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheni, E. R.; Adriani, G. R.; Munawaroh, H.

    2017-04-01

    Noni fruit (Morinda citrifolia L.) contains compounds that have potential as antibacterial agent. Antibacterial compounds produced noni fruit (M. citrifolia L.) can inhibit bacterial growth. This study was conducted to test the antibacterial activity of ethyl acetate extract of noni fruit (M. citrifolia L.) against spoilage bacterial in fish. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Enterobacter aerogenes isolates and examine antibacterial phytochemical profile. Extraction of noni compounds was done by maceration, followed by partition with ethyl acetate to obtain the soluble and insoluble ethyl acetate fraction. Previews result show that the ethyl acetate extract had very strong activity. Extraction process continued by separation and isolation used preparative thin layer chromatography method, so that obtained five isolates and mark them as A, B, C, D and E. Antibacterial activity assay performed on isolates A, B, C, D, and E with 20 and 30% concentration. The test results showed that isolates A could not be inhibit the growth of bacteria, isolates B, C, D, and E has antibacterial activity with weak to strong inhibition. Isolate B had the greatest inhibition activity against the B. cereus, whereas isolates E had the greatest inhibition activity against P. aeroginosa. MIC (Minimum Inhibitor Concentration) and MBC (Minimum Bactericidal Concentration) test result showed that MIC and MBC values could not be determined. Analysis of compounds by TLC showed that isolate B suspected contains coumarin or flavonoids compounds that have antibacterial activity.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of antibacterial activities of andrographolide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaojian; Yu, Pei; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Zhongli; Yang, Zhaoqi; Tian, Zhiming; Wright, Susan C; Larrick, James W; Wang, Yuqiang

    2009-07-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), the main active component of the herb Andrographis paniculata, has been used for many years to treat a variety of diseases including bacterial and viral infections. Andro was recently reported to act by inhibiting the bacterial quorum sensing system. We have synthesized several Andro analogues and investigated their antibacterial activity and mechanism of action. The new compounds were found to be much more potent than the parent Andro in inhibiting bacterial growth and quorum sensing system. Compounds 5 and 7 significantly reduced virulence factor production. Compound 7 completely inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilm formation, and exhibited synergistic activity with conventional antibiotics. These findings suggest that compound 7 may be the basis for future drug development to combat the unmet needs of virulence factor production, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance.

  9. Evaluating the efficacy of bioremediating a diesel-contaminated soil using ecotoxicological and bacterial community indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudur, Leadin Salah; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Miranda, Ana F; Morrison, Paul D; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Ball, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Diesel represents a common environmental contaminant as a result of operation, storage, and transportation accidents. The bioremediation of diesel in a contaminated soil is seen as an environmentally safe approach to treat contaminated land. The effectiveness of the remediation process is usually assessed by the degradation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration, without considering ecotoxicological effects. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of two bioremediation strategies in terms of reduction in TPH concentration together with ecotoxicity indices and changes in the bacterial diversity assessed using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The biostimulation strategy resulted in a 90 % reduction in the TPH concentration versus 78 % reduction from the natural attenuation strategy over 12 weeks incubation in a laboratory mesocosm-containing diesel-contaminated soil. In contrast, the reduction in the ecotoxicity resulting from the natural attenuation treatment using the Microtox and earthworm toxicity assays was more than double the reduction resulting from the biostimulation treatment (45 and 20 % reduction, respectively). The biostimulated treatment involved the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus in order to stimulate the microorganisms by creating an optimal C:N:P molar ratio. An increased concentration of ammonium and phosphate was detected in the biostimulated soil compared with the naturally attenuated samples before and after the remediation process. Furthermore, through PCR-DGGE, significant changes in the bacterial community were observed as a consequence of adding the nutrients together with the diesel (biostimulation), resulting in the formation of distinctly different bacterial communities in the soil subjected to the two strategies used in this study. These findings indicate the suitability of both bioremediation approaches in treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, particularly biostimulation. Although

  10. Fabrication, characterization and evaluation of bacterial cellulose-based capsule shells for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Hanif; Badshah, Munair; Mäkilä, Ermei

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) was investigated for the first time for the preparation of capsule shells for immediate and sustained release of drugs. The prepared capsule shells were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The BC...... capsule shells were studied for drug release using an USP type-I dissolution apparatus. Irrespective of the drying method and the thickness of the BC sheet, the capsule shells displayed an immediate drug release profile. Moreover, the addition of release-retardant cellulosic polymers sustained the drug...

  11. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodrich David E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible, and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI P Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of different endodontic sealers: An in vitro evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbes are considered as the primary etiological agents in endodontic diseases. The ways of reducing these agents are root canal debridement, antimicrobial irrigants, and antibacterial filling materials. But the complexity of the pulp canal system presents a problem for chemomechanical preparation. One of the factors determining the success of endodontic treatment is the sealing material with a potent bactericidal effect. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of endodontic sealers of different bases - in vitro. Materials and Method: The antimicrobial activity of three root canal sealers (endomethasone, AH 26, and apexit was evaluated against seven strains of bacteria at various time intervals using the agar diffusion test. The freshly mixed sealers were placed in prepared wells of agar plates inoculated with the test microorganisms. The plates were incubated for 24, 48, 72 hours, and 7 and 15 days. The mean zones of inhibition were measured. Statistical Analysis: All statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 13 statistical software version. The analysis of variance (ANOVA, post-hoc Bonferroni test, and paired t test were performed to reveal the statistical significance. Results: Statistically significant zones of bacterial growth inhibition were observed in descending order of antimicrobial activity: endomethasone, AH 26, and apexit. Conclusion: Zinc oxide eugenol based root canal sealer produced largest inhibitory zones followed in decreasing order by epoxy resin based sealer and least by calcium hydroxide based root canal sealer.

  13. The first latent green fluorophores for the detection of azoreductase activity in bacterial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Mercier, Claire; Saurel, Laura; Orenga, Sylvain; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2013-10-09

    An efficient synthesis of original bio-reductive probes suitable for the detection of azoreductases from the fluorescent rhodamine 110 dye is presented. A "turn-on" green fluorescence response upon reduction of the two diazo bonds of these latent fluorophores was observed both in vitro and in the context of bacterial cultures.

  14. Transcriptional activity around bacterial cell death reveals molecular biomarkers for cell viability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, R.; Keijser, B.J.; Caspers, M.P.M.; Schuren, F.H.; Montijn, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In bacteriology, the ability to grow in selective media and to form colonies on nutrient agar plates is routinely used as a retrospective criterion for the detection of living bacteria. However, the utilization of indicators for bacterial viability-such as the presence of specific

  15. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: in vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharamah, Abdullah A; Moharram, Ahmed M; Ismail, Mady A; Al-Hussaini, Ashraf K

    2014-02-01

    This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2), sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin). Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss.

  16. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: In vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A Gharamah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Results: Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2, sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin. Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss.

  17. A framework for evaluating national space activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2012-04-01

    Space technology and resources are used around the world to address societal challenges. Space provides valuable satellite services, unique scientific discoveries, surprising technology applications and new economic opportunities. Many developing countries formally recognize the advantages of space resources and pursue national level activity to harness them. There is limited data or documentation on the space activities of developing countries. Meanwhile, traditional approaches to summarize national space activity do not necessarily capture the types of activity that developing countries pursue in space. This is especially true if they do not have a formal national space program or office. Developing countries pursue national space activity through activities of many types—from national satellite programs to commercial use of satellite services to involvement with international space institutions. This research aims to understand and analyze these trends. This paper introduces two analytical frameworks for evaluating space activity at the national level. The frameworks are specifically designed to capture the activity of countries that have traditionally been less involved in space. They take a broad view of space related activity across multiple societal sectors and disciplines. The discussion explains the approach for using the frameworks as well as illustrative examples of how they can be applied as part of a research process. The first framework is called the Mission and Management Ladders. This framework considers specific space projects within countries and ranks them on "Ladders" that measure technical challenge and managerial autonomy. This first method is at a micro level of analysis. The second framework is called the Space Participation Metric (SPM). The SPM can be used to assign a Space Participation score to countries based on their involvement in various space related activities. This second method uses a macro level of analysis. The authors

  18. Activation of the unfolded protein response is required for defenses against bacterial pore-forming toxin in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry J Bischof

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs constitute the single largest class of proteinaceous bacterial virulence factors and are made by many of the most important bacterial pathogens. Host responses to these toxins are complex and poorly understood. We find that the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response (UPR is activated upon exposure to PFTs both in Caenorhabditis elegans and in mammalian cells. Activation of the UPR is protective in vivo against PFTs since animals that lack either the ire-1-xbp-1 or the atf-6 arms of the UPR are more sensitive to PFT than wild-type animals. The UPR acts directly in the cells targeted by the PFT. Loss of the UPR leads to a normal response against unrelated toxins or a pathogenic bacterium, indicating its PFT-protective role is specific. The p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAPK kinase pathway has been previously shown to be important for cellular defenses against PFTs. We find here that the UPR is one of the key downstream targets of the p38 MAPK pathway in response to PFT since loss of a functional p38 MAPK pathway leads to a failure of PFT to properly activate the ire-1-xbp-1 arm of the UPR. The UPR-mediated activation and response to PFTs is distinct from the canonical UPR-mediated response to unfolded proteins both in terms of its activation and functional sensitivities. These data demonstrate that the UPR, a fundamental intracellular pathway, can operate in intrinsic cellular defenses against bacterial attack.

  19. Evaluation of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection system to decrease bacterial contamination in operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haddad, Lynn; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Stibich, Mark; Fleming, Jason B; Segal, Cindy; Ware, Kathy M; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-10-10

    Environmental cleanliness is one of the contributing factors for surgical site infections in the operating rooms (ORs). To decrease environmental contamination, pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV), an easy and safe no-touch disinfection system, is employed in several hospital environments. The positive effect of this technology on environmental decontamination has been observed in patient rooms and ORs during the end-of-day cleaning but so far, no study explored its feasibility between surgical cases in the OR. In this study, 5 high-touch surfaces in 30 ORs were sampled after manual cleaning and after PX-UV intervention mimicking between-case cleaning to avoid the disruption of the ORs' normal flow. The efficacy of a 1-min, 2-min, and 8-min cycle were tested by measuring the surfaces' contaminants by quantitative cultures using Tryptic Soy Agar contact plates. We showed that combining standard between-case manual cleaning of surfaces with a 2-min cycle of disinfection using a portable xenon pulsed ultraviolet light germicidal device eliminated at least 70% more bacterial load after manual cleaning. This study showed the proof of efficacy of a 2-min cycle of PX-UV in ORs in eliminating bacterial contaminants. This method will allow a short time for room turnover and a potential reduction of pathogen transmission to patients and possibly surgical site infections.

  20. Characterization and comparison of bacterial communities selected in conventional activated sludge and membrane bioreactor pilot plants: a focus on Nitrospira and Planctomycetes bacterial phyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Munz, Giulio; Petroni, Giulio; Lubello, Claudio; Mori, Gualtiero; Verni, Franco; Vannini, Claudia

    2013-07-01

    A pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a conventional activated sludge system (CAS) were in parallel operated to investigate the impact of the separation technology on the structure and functionality of the selected microbial community. Microbial communities as well as nitrogen removal efficiency of the biomass were characterized. Kinetics and microbial community structure turned out to be duly correlated. The impact of the separation technology on selective conditions and, in particular, the higher variability of solid separation efficiency in CAS with respect to MBR pilot plant possibly represented the main factor influencing the selection of bacterial communities. Concerning nitrifiers, bacteria of the genus Nitrospira were predominant in the MBR. This was in accordance with kinetics of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that suggested the presence of k-strategists, while r-strategists were selected in the CAS plant, possibly because of the presence of transient higher concentrations of nitrite (in the range of 0.05-0.18 and of 0.05-4.4 mg [Formula: see text]-N L(-1) in the MBR and CAS effluents, respectively). An unexpectedly high presence of bacteria belonging to two specific phylogenetic clades of Planctomycetes was found in both reactors.

  1. Different bulk and active bacterial communities in cryoconite from the margin and interior of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Cameron, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes in the supraglacial ecosystem, including cryoconite, contribute to nutrient cycling within the cryosphere and may affect surface melting, yet little is known of the diversity of the active microbes in these environments. We examined the bacterial abundance and community...... composition of cryoconite over a melt season at two contrasting sites at the margin and in the interior of the Greenland ice sheet, using sequence analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of coextracted 16S rDNA and rRNA. Significant differences were found between bulk (rDNA) and potentially active...

  2. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  3. Bacterial community dynamics in full-scale activated sludge bioreactors: operational and ecological factors driving community assembly and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Toro-Labrador, Gladys; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A

    2012-01-01

    The assembling of bacterial communities in conventional activated sludge (CAS) bioreactors was thought, until recently, to be chaotic and mostly unpredictable. Studies done over the last decade have shown that specific, and often, predictable random and non-random factors could be responsible for that process. These studies have also motivated a "structure-function" paradigm that is yet to be resolved. Thus, elucidating the factors that affect community assembly in the bioreactors is necessary for predicting fluctuations in community structure and function. For this study activated sludge samples were collected during a one-year period from two geographically distant CAS bioreactors of different size. Combining community fingerprinting analysis and operational parameters data with a robust statistical analysis, we aimed to identify relevant links between system performance and bacterial community diversity and dynamics. In addition to revealing a significant β-diversity between the bioreactors' communities, results showed that the largest bioreactor had a less dynamic but more efficient and diverse bacterial community throughout the study. The statistical analysis also suggests that deterministic factors, as opposed to stochastic factors, may have a bigger impact on the community structure in the largest bioreactor. Furthermore, the community seems to rely mainly on mechanisms of resistance and functional redundancy to maintain functional stability. We suggest that the ecological theories behind the Island Biogeography model and the species-area relationship were appropriate to predict the assembly of bacterial communities in these CAS bioreactors. These results are of great importance for engineers and ecologists as they reveal critical aspects of CAS systems that could be applied towards improving bioreactor design and operation.

  4. A novel, sensitive method to evaluate potato germplasm for bacterial wilt resistance using a luminescent Ralstonia solanacearum reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andrea Paola Zuluaga; Ferreira, Virginia; Pianzzola, María Julia; Siri, María Inés; Coll, Núria S; Valls, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Several breeding programs are under way to introduce resistance to bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in solanaceous crops. The lack of screening methods allowing easy measurement of pathogen colonization and the inability to detect latent (i.e., symptomless) infections are major limitations when evaluating resistance to this disease in plant germplasm. We describe a new method to study the interaction between R. solanacearum and potato germplasm that overcomes these restrictions. The R. solanacearum UY031 was genetically modified to constitutively generate light from a synthetic luxCDABE operon stably inserted in its chromosome. Colonization of this reporter strain on different potato accessions was followed using life imaging. Bacterial detection in planta by this nondisruptive system correlated with the development of wilting symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that quantitative detection of the recombinant strain using a luminometer can identify latent infections on symptomless potato plants. We have developed a novel, unsophisticated, and accurate method for high-throughput evaluation of pathogen colonization in plant populations. We applied this method to compare the behavior of potato accessions with contrasting resistance to R. solanacearum. This new system will be especially useful to detect latency in symptomless parental lines before their inclusion in long-term breeding programs for disease resistance.

  5. [Algicidal activity against red-tide algaes by marine bacterial strain N3 isolated from a HABs area, southern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rong-jun; Huang, Hong-hui; Qi, Zhan-hui; Hu, Wei-an; Tian, Zi-yang; Dai, Ming

    2013-05-01

    A marine algicidal bacterium N3 was isolated from a HABs area in Mirs Bay, a subtropical bay, in southern China. Algicidal activity and algicidal mode against Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Prorocentrum micans and Skeletonema costatum were observed by the liquid infection method. The results showed that there were no algicidal activities against P. tricornutum and S. costatum. However, when the bacterial volume fractions were 2% and 10% , S. trochoidea and P. micans could be killed, respectively. S. trochoidea cells which were exposed to strain N3 became irregular in shape and the cellular components lost their integrity and were decomposed. While, the P. micans cells became inflated and the cellular components aggregated, followed by cell lysis. Strain N3 killed S. trochoidea and P. micans directly, and the algicidal activities of the bacterial strain N3 was concentration-dependent. To S. trochoidea, 2% (V/V) of bacteria in algae showed the strongest algicidal activity, all of the S. trochoidea cells were killed within 120 h. But the growth rates of cells, in the 1% and 0. 1% treatment groups, were only slightly lower than that in the control group. In all treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 were in declining trends. While, to P. micans, 10% and 5% of bacteria in algae showed strong algicidal activities, 78% and 70% of the S. trochoidea were killed within 120 h, respectively. However, the number of S. trochoidea after exposure to 1% of bacterial cultures still increased up to 5 incubation days. And in the three treatment groups, the densities of strain N3 experienced a decrease process. The isolated strain N3 was identified as Bacillus sp. by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical characterization, and homology comparisons based on 16S rRNA sequences.

  6. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia asiatica essential oil against some common respiratory infection causing bacterial strains and its mechanism of action in Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiehui; Qian, Chao; Xu, Hongjie; Huang, Yanjie

    2017-12-11

    The main objective of the current study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil of Artemisia asiatica together with investigating the antibacterial effects it exerts on several common respiratory infection causing bacteria including Haemophilus influenzae. Its mechanism of action was studied using various state-of-the-art assays like scanning electron microscopy, DNA, RNA and protein leakage assays, growth curve assays etc. The essential oil was extracted from the leaves of A. asiatica by supercritical CO2 fluid extraction technology. Chemical composition of essential oils was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated against 6 bacteria by the paper disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericide concentration (MBC) values of the essential oil were estimated by agar dilution method. The antibacterial mechanism was evaluated by growth curve, the integrity of cell membrane and scanning electronmicroscope (SEM). Gas chromatographic analysis of the A. asiatica essential oil led to the identification of 16 chemical constituents accounting for 97.2% of the total oil composition. The major components were found to be Piperitone, (z)-davanone, p-cymene and 1, 8-cineole. The essential oil showed maximum growth inhibition against Haemophilus influenzae with a zone of inhibition of 24.5 mm and MIC/MBC values of 1.9/4.5 mg/mL respectively. Bacteria treated with the essential oil led to a rapid decrease in the number of viable cells. On adding the essential oil of A. asiatica to the bacterial culture, the constituents of the bacterial cell got released into the medium and this cell constituent release increased with increasing doses of the essential oil. SEM showed that the bacterial cells treated with the essential oil showed damaged cell wall, deformed cell morphology and shrunken cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of the Isolation Ethyl Acetate-Soluble Extract Noni Fruit (Morindra citrifolia L.) against Meat Bacterial Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraheni, E. R.; Nurrakhman, M. B. E.; Munawaroh, H.; Saputri, L.

    2017-02-01

    Noni (Morindra citrifolia L.) is native to Indonesia which have medicinal properties. One of them as an antibacterial. This study aims to determine the antibacterial activity of isolates from the ethanol extract noni fruit to bacterial decay meat is Bacillus licheniformis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Bacillus alvei, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. The extraction process using the maceration method, and then made a partition by centrifugation ethyl acetate. Soluble part partition showed bacterial growth inhibition activity of the strong to very strong. Furthermore, the ethyl acetate soluble partition on preparative thin layer chromatography produced 5 isolates. Isolates obtained antibacterial activity test performed with a concentration of 20% and 30%. The results of antibacterial test against bacteria test isolates, showing isolates A can not inhibit the growth of bacteria, isolates B and C have medium activity and strong, isolates D and E isolates have activity against bacteria that were tested. MIC and MBC test results showed that the isolates B gives an inhibitory effect (bacteriostatic) against all bacteria. Content analysis of compounds by TLC using the reagents cerium (IV) sulfate indicates a phenol group. Isolates B contains a major compound which can be used as an antibacterial candidate in food preservation replace chemical preservatives.

  8. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  9. Exposure of P. gingivalis to noradrenaline reduces bacterial growth and elevates ArgX protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takayuki; Inagaki, Satoru; Sakurai, Kaoru; Okuda, Katsuji; Ishihara, Kazuyuki

    2011-03-01

    Periodontitis, an infectious disease caused by periodontopathic bacteria, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, is reported to be accelerated by stress, under which noradrenaline levels are increased in the bloodstream. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of noradrenaline on P. gingivalis. P. gingivalis was incubated in the presence of 25μM, 50μM, or 100μM adrenaline or noradrenaline at 37°C for 12, 24 or 36h and growth was evaluated by OD(660). Auto-inducer-2 (AI-2) was measured by luminescence of Vibrio harveyi BB 170. Expression of P. gingivalis genes was evaluated using a microarray and RT-PCR. Rgp activity of arg-gingipainA and B (Rgp) was measured with a synthetic substrate. Growth of P. gingivalis FDC381 was inhibited by noradrenaline at 24 and 36h. Growth inhibition by noradrenaline increased dose-dependently. Inhibition of growth partially recovered with addition of propranolol. AI-2 production from P. gingivalis showed a marked decrease with addition of noradrenaline compared with peak production levels in the control group. Microarray analysis revealed an increase in expression in 18 genes and a decrease in expression in 2 genes. Amongst these genes, expression of the protease arg-gingipainB (RgpB) gene, a major virulence factor of P. gingivalis, was further analysed. Expression of rgpB showed a significant increase with addition of noradrenaline, which was partially reduced by addition of propranolol. Cell-associated Rgp activity also increased with addition of noradrenaline. These results suggest that stressors influence the expression of the virulence factors of P. gingivalis via noradrenaline. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of simultaneous autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification processes and bacterial community structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guihua; Peng, Jingjing; Feng, Cuijie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Shaohua; Xu, Yuanjian; Wang, Xingzu

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrated that a combined heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD) process is highly effective for the simultaneous removal of acetate, nitrate, and sulfide at an efficiency of 100, 80, and 100 %, respectively. In the HAD system, simultaneous sulfide, acetate, and nitrate removals were observed, which indicated that heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification occurred simultaneously. When the sulfide was existed in HAD reactor, the main product of sulfide biooxidation was S(0). Once the sulfide was exhausted, the sulfate concentration in the HAD reactor increased and became the main end product. These results provided an alternative method to control the end sulfide biooxidation product by online monitoring sulfide concentration. Nearly half (43 %) of the total clones in our mix-trophic reactor were amphitrophy denitrifiers. The autotrophic denitrifiers, heterotrophic denitrifiers, and amphitrophy denitrifiers coexisted in the HAD reactor to complete the denitrification process. Retrieved bacterial 16S rRNA gene clones affiliated with uncultured Xanthomonadaceae, Thauera, Thiobacillus, and Chromatiales were dominant.

  11. [Evaluation of Nugent and Amsel criteria for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, P; Domínguez, M; Castro, E; Zemelman, R

    2000-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common disease in reproductive-age women and is associated to important gynecologic and obstetric complications. To study the occurrence of BV in apparently healthy women attending family planning clinics, using Amsel and Nugent diagnostic criteria. Two hundred thirty nine women consulting for symptoms associated to cervicovaginitis, were studied. A sample from the lateral walls of the vagina was obtained with a sterile swab for microscopic analysis, Gram stain and amine test. According to Amsel and Nugent criteria a 31.1% and 31.8% BV prevalence was observed. The sensitivity and specificity of Nugent criteria, compared with Amsel criteria were 83.3% and 92.1%, respectively. The high prevalence of BV found in this study suggests that this vaginal infection should be diagnosed with standardized methods. Nugent criteria are economic easy to perform and sensitive and we propose that they should be used in local health centers.

  12. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Appropriate Management of Patients With Coexistent Bacterial Vaginosis and Cervicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Schwebke

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study was performed to obtain preliminary data regarding the need for targeted therapy of bacterial vaginosis (BV when it accompanies clinically defined cervicitis. Specifically, women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD clinic with clinically defined BV and cervicitis were treated in the first phase of the study with doxycycline alone. In phase II, the patients received doxycycline and concomitant intravaginal metronidazole gel. All patients were reexamined 3–4 weeks after therapy. Persistence of BV occurred in 18/19 (95% of women in phase I vs. 1/7 (14% of women in phase II (P < 0.001. We concluded that, in women with coexistent clinically defined cervicitis and BV, the treatment of cervicitis does not result in a normalization of the vaginal flora.

  13. Evaluation of bacterial strategies to promote the bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsen, A.R.; Karlson, U. [Dept. of Environmental Chemistry and Microbiology, National Environmental Research Inst., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs)-degrading bacteria may enhance the bioavailability of PAHs by excreting biosurfactants, by production of extracellular polymeric substances, or by forming biofilms. We tested these hypotheses in pure cultures of PAHs-degrading bacterial strains. Most of the strains did not substantially reduce the surface tension when grown on PAHs in liquid shaken cultures. Thus, pseudo-solubilization of PAHs in biosurfactant micelles seems not to be a general strategy for these isolates to enhance PAHs-bioavailability. Three semi-colloid Sphingomonas polysaccharides all increased the solubility of PAHs (Gellan 1.3- to 5.4-fold, Welan 1.8- to 6.0-fold and Rhamsan 2.4- to 9.0-fold). The increases were most pronounced for the more hydrophobic PAHs. The polysaccharide-sorbed PAHs were bioavailable. Mineralization rates of 9-[{sup 14}C]-phenanthrene and 3-[{sup 14}C]-fluoranthene by Sphingobium EPA505, were similar with and without sphingans, indicating that mass-transfer rates from PAHs crystals to the bulk liquid were unaffected by the polysaccharides. Biofilm formation on PAHs crystals may favor the diffusive mass transfer of PAHs from crystals to the bacterial cells. A majority of the PAHs-degraders tested formed biofilms in microtiter wells coated with PAHs crystals. For strains capable of growing on different PAHs; the more soluble the PAHs, the lower the percentage of cells attached. Biofilm formation on PAHs-sources was the predominant mechanism among the tested bacteria to overcome mass transfer limitations when growing on poorly soluble PAHs. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of zinc oxide nanoparticles on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) growth and soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiangbing; Luo, Xiaosan; Wang, Yanling; Feng, Youzhi

    2018-02-01

    The wide spread of nanoparticles (NPs) has caused tremendous concerns on agricultural ecosystem. Some metallic NPs, such as zinc oxide (ZnO), can be utilized as a nano-fertilizer when used at optimal doses. However, little is known about the responses of plant development and concomitant soil bacteria community to ZnO NPs. The present pot experiment studied the impacts of different doses of ZnO NPs and bulk ZnO (0, 1, 10, 100 mg ZnO/kg), on the growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and the associated rhizospheric soil bacterial community. Results showed that at a dose of 10 mg/kg, ZnO NPs and bulk ZnO, enhanced the lettuce biomass and the net photosynthetic rate; whereas, the Zn content in plant tissue was higher in NPs treatment than in their bulk counterpart at 10 mg/kg dose or higher. For the underground observations, 10 mg/kg treatment doses (NPs or bulk) significantly changed the soil bacterial community structure, despite the non-significant variations in alpha diversity. Taxonomic distribution revealed that some lineages within Cyanobacteria and other phyla individually demonstrated similar or different responses to ZnO NPs and bulk ZnO. Moreover, some lineages associated with plant growth promotion were also influenced to different extents by ZnO NPs and bulk ZnO, suggesting the distinct microbial processes occurring in soil. Collectively, this study expanded our understanding of the influence of ZnO NPs on plant performance and the associated soil microorganisms.

  15. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez José

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic. In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm and the maximum growth rate (vm but only in specific cases the lag phase (λ was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,τ was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model. The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals.

  16. Mechanism of Penicillin Action: Penicillin and Substrate Bind Covalently to the Same Active Site Serine in Two Bacterial D-alanine Carboxypeptidases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. Rogers Yocum; David J. Waxman; James R. Rasmussen; Jack L. Strominger

    1979-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that penicillin acts as a structural analog of the acyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine terminus of nascent bacterial cell wall and that it consequently binds to and acylates the active site of the enzyme...

  17. Serotonin Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing and Enhances the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie D. Knecht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in humans play an important role in health and disease. Considerable emphasis has been placed in understanding the role of bacteria in host-microbiome interkingdom communication. Here we show that serotonin, responsible for mood in the brain and motility in the gut, can also act as a bacterial signaling molecule for pathogenic bacteria. Specifically, we found that serotonin acts as an interkingdom signaling molecule via quorum sensing and that it stimulates the production of bacterial virulence factors and increases biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo in a novel mouse infection model. This discovery points out at roles of serotonin both in bacteria and humans, and at phenotypic implications not only manifested in mood behavior but also in infection processes in the host. Thus, regulating serotonin concentrations in the gut may provide with paradigm shifting therapeutic approaches.

  18. Serotonin Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing and Enhances the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Leslie D; O'Connor, Gregory; Mittal, Rahul; Liu, Xue Z; Daftarian, Pirouz; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in humans play an important role in health and disease. Considerable emphasis has been placed in understanding the role of bacteria in host-microbiome interkingdom communication. Here we show that serotonin, responsible for mood in the brain and motility in the gut, can also act as a bacterial signaling molecule for pathogenic bacteria. Specifically, we found that serotonin acts as an interkingdom signaling molecule via quorum sensing and that it stimulates the production of bacterial virulence factors and increases biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo in a novel mouse infection model. This discovery points out at roles of serotonin both in bacteria and humans, and at phenotypic implications not only manifested in mood behavior but also in infection processes in the host. Thus, regulating serotonin concentrations in the gut may provide with paradigm shifting therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibacterial activity of different extracts of prawn shell (Macrobrachium nipponense against human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Karimzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Bioactive compounds existing in crustacean shells have the potential to inhibit the growth of some pathogenic microorganism. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antibacterial effects of different extracts of prawn shells (Macrobrachium nipponense on some human pathogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods: Sampling (prawn was conducted in summer 2014 from Anzali wetland in southern coast of Caspian Sea. Then, the hydroalcoholic, methanolic, and acetone extracts of prawn shells were applied for this purpose. Two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis Staphylococcus aureus and three Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Vibrio cholerae, and Escherichia coli were used as test organisms. The antibacterial activity was determined by paper disk diffusion. Results: The prawn shell extracts showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. The highest antibacterial activities were measured in B. subtilis, S. aureus, and V. cholerae with the zone of inhibition being 12.12 ± 0.32 mm, 12.51 ± 0.14 mm, and 12.35 ± 0.27 mm, respectively. Among all the strains, S. aureus exhibits a significant zone of inhibition against all extracts (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The findings of this research showed that different prawn shell extracts, particularly hydroalcoholic, have bactericidal effect on B. subtilis, S. aureus, and V. cholerae species.

  20. Protein corona between nanoparticles and bacterial proteins in activated sludge: Characterization and effect on nanoparticle aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, You-Peng; Xiao, Meng-Qian; Feng, Bo; Tian, Kai-Xun; Chen, Yue-Hui; Dai, You-Zhi

    2017-11-06

    In this work, the protein coronas of activated sludge proteins on TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs) and ZnO nanoparticles (ZNPs) were characterized. The proteins with high affinity to TNPs and ZNPs were identified by shotgun proteomics, and their effects of on the distributions of TNPs and ZNPs in activated sludge were concluded. In addition, the effects of protein coronas on the aggregations of TNPs and ZNPs were evaluated. Thirty and nine proteins with high affinities to TNPs and ZNPs were identified, respectively. The proteomics and adsorption isotherms demonstrated that activated sludge had a higher affinity to TNPs than to ZNPs. The aggregation percentages of ZNPs at 35, 53, and 106 mg/L of proteins were 13%, 14%, and 18%, respectively, whereas those of TNPs were 21%, 30%, 41%, respectively. The proteins contributed to ZNPs aggregation by dissolved Zn ion-bridging, whereas the increasing protein concentrations enhanced the TNPs aggregation through macromolecule bridging flocculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of a conventional orthodontic composite containing silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Akhavan, Azam; Hashemi, Ehsan; Arab, Sepideh; Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Sodagar, Kosar; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important complications of fixed orthodontic treatment is the formation of white spots which are initial carious lesions. Addition of antimicrobial agents into orthodontic adhesives might be a wise solution for prevention of white spot formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a conventional orthodontic adhesive containing three different concentrations of silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. One hundred and sixty-two Transbond XT composite discs containing 0, 1, 5, and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were prepared and sterilized. Antibacterial properties of these composite groups against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Streptococcus sanguinis were investigated using three different antimicrobial tests. Disk agar diffusion test was performed to assess the diffusion of antibacterial agent on brain heart infusion agar plate by measuring bacterial growth inhibition zones. Biofilm inhibition test showed the antibacterial capacity of composite discs against resistant bacterial biofilms. Antimicrobial activity of eluted components from composite discs was investigated by comparing the viable counts of bacteria after 3, 15, and 30 days. Composite discs containing 5 and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were capable of producing growth inhibition zones for all bacterial types. Results of biofilm inhibition test showed that all of the study groups reduced viable bacterial count in comparison to the control group. Antimicrobial activity of eluted components from composite discs was immensely diverse based on the bacterial type and the concentration of nanoparticles. Transbond XT composite discs containing 5 and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles produce bacterial growth inhibition zones and show antibacterial properties against biofilms.

  2. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of a conventional orthodontic composite containing silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sodagar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most important complications of fixed orthodontic treatment is the formation of white spots which are initial carious lesions. Addition of antimicrobial agents into orthodontic adhesives might be a wise solution for prevention of white spot formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a conventional orthodontic adhesive containing three different concentrations of silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Methods One hundred and sixty-two Transbond XT composite discs containing 0, 1, 5, and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were prepared and sterilized. Antibacterial properties of these composite groups against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Streptococcus sanguinis were investigated using three different antimicrobial tests. Disk agar diffusion test was performed to assess the diffusion of antibacterial agent on brain heart infusion agar plate by measuring bacterial growth inhibition zones. Biofilm inhibition test showed the antibacterial capacity of composite discs against resistant bacterial biofilms. Antimicrobial activity of eluted components from composite discs was investigated by comparing the viable counts of bacteria after 3, 15, and 30 days. Results Composite discs containing 5 and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were capable of producing growth inhibition zones for all bacterial types. Results of biofilm inhibition test showed that all of the study groups reduced viable bacterial count in comparison to the control group. Antimicrobial activity of eluted components from composite discs was immensely diverse based on the bacterial type and the concentration of nanoparticles. Conclusions Transbond XT composite discs containing 5 and 10 % silver/hydroxyapatite nanoparticles produce bacterial growth inhibition zones and show antibacterial properties against biofilms.

  3. Anti-enteric bacterial activity and phytochemical analysis of the seed kernel extract of Mangifera indica Linnaeus against Shigella dysenteriae (Shiga, corrig.) Castellani and Chalmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S; Thirunalasundari, T; Jeeva, S

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the phytochemical and anti-bacterial efficacy of the seed kernel extract of Mangifera indica (M. indica) against the enteropathogen, Shigella dysenteriae (S. dysenteriae), isolated from the diarrhoeal stool specimens. The preliminary phytochemical screening was performed by the standard methods as described by Harborne. Cold extraction method was employed to extract the bioactive compounds from mango seed kernel. Disc diffusion method was adopted to screen antibacterial activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was evaluated by agar dilution method. The crude extracts were partially purified by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and the fractions were analyzed by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) to identify the bioactive compounds. Phytochemical scrutiny of M. indica indicated the presence of phytochemical constituents such as alkaloids, gums, flavanoids, phenols, saponins, steroids, tannins and xanthoproteins. Antibacterial activity was observed in two crude extracts and various fractions viz. hexane, benzene, chloroform, methanol and water. MIC of methanol fraction was found to be (95±11.8) μg/mL. MIC of other fractions ranged from 130-380 μg/mL. The present study confirmed that each crude extracts and fractions of M. indica have significant antimicrobial activity against the isolated pathogen S. dysenteriae. The antibacterial activity may be due to the phytochemical constituents of the mango seed kernel. The phytochemical tannin could be the reason for its antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2011 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Conjugative DNA Transfer Induces the Bacterial SOS Response and Promotes Antibiotic Resistance Development through Integron Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bikard, David; Mazel, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Conjugation is one mechanism for intra- and inter-species horizontal gene transfer among bacteria. Conjugative elements have been instrumental in many bacterial species to face the threat of antibiotics, by allowing them to evolve and adapt to these hostile conditions. Conjugative plasmids are transferred to plasmidless recipient cells as single-stranded DNA. We used lacZ and gfp fusions to address whether conjugation induces the SOS response and the integron integrase. The SOS response controls a series of genes responsible for DNA damage repair, which can lead to recombination and mutagenesis. In this manuscript, we show that conjugative transfer of ssDNA induces the bacterial SOS stress response, unless an anti-SOS factor is present to alleviate this response. We also show that integron integrases are up-regulated during this process, resulting in increased cassette rearrangements. Moreover, the data we obtained using broad and narrow host range plasmids strongly suggests that plasmid transfer, even abortive, can trigger chromosomal gene rearrangements and transcriptional switches in the recipient cell. Our results highlight the importance of environments concentrating disparate bacterial communities as reactors for extensive genetic adaptation of bacteria. PMID:20975940

  5. Conjugative DNA transfer induces the bacterial SOS response and promotes antibiotic resistance development through integron activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baharoglu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Conjugation is one mechanism for intra- and inter-species horizontal gene transfer among bacteria. Conjugative elements have been instrumental in many bacterial species to face the threat of antibiotics, by allowing them to evolve and adapt to these hostile conditions. Conjugative plasmids are transferred to plasmidless recipient cells as single-stranded DNA. We used lacZ and gfp fusions to address whether conjugation induces the SOS response and the integron integrase. The SOS response controls a series of genes responsible for DNA damage repair, which can lead to recombination and mutagenesis. In this manuscript, we show that conjugative transfer of ssDNA induces the bacterial SOS stress response, unless an anti-SOS factor is present to alleviate this response. We also show that integron integrases are up-regulated during this process, resulting in increased cassette rearrangements. Moreover, the data we obtained using broad and narrow host range plasmids strongly suggests that plasmid transfer, even abortive, can trigger chromosomal gene rearrangements and transcriptional switches in the recipient cell. Our results highlight the importance of environments concentrating disparate bacterial communities as reactors for extensive genetic adaptation of bacteria.

  6. In vitro evaluation of the sealing ability of three newly developed root canal sealers: A bacterial microleakage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Ehsan; Samadi-Kafil, Hossein; Pirzadeh, Ahmad; Jafari, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of MTA Fillapex, Apatite Root Canal Sealer and AH26 sealers. Material and Methods The present in vitro study was carried out on 142 extracted single-rooted human mature teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n=44) and two control groups (n=5). Three root canal sealers were MTA Fillapex, Apatite Root Canal Sealer and AH26. The teeth in the control groups were either filled with no sealer or made completely impermeable. The root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and one of the sealers. The teeth were sterilized with ethylene oxide gas prior to the bacterial leakage assessment using Enterococcus faecalis. Leakage was evaluated every 24 hours for 90 days. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods and chi-squared test. If the data were significant, a proper post hoc test was used. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results The positive control specimens exhibited total bacterial penetration whilst the negative control specimens showed no evidence of bacterial penetration. At the end of the study, the analysis of microleakage with chi-squared test showed no significant differences between the experimental groups (P<0.05). The results of chi-squared test analyzing the pair-wise differences between the groups considering the numerical values for leakage day indicated the lowest leakage with AH26 and the highest with Apatite root sealer. Conclusions According to the results of the present study, sealing ability of AH26 was significantly higher than that of MTA Fillapex and Apatite Root Canal Sealer. Key words:Mineral Trioxide aggregate, root canal obturation, dental seal. PMID:27957271

  7. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of an herbal dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas Yogesh; Bhatnagar Maheep; Sharma Kanika

    2008-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of a herbal dentifrice Arodent against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was evaluated using Colgate ® as standard. Both bacterial strains were isolated from the oral cavity on selective media and identified by standard methods. The antibacterial activity was assayed by cup-well method. The bacterial lawn of facultative anaerobe S. mutans was established between two layers of agar under microaerophilic conditions. Five and a half millimete...

  8. Antibacterial activity of seneciolactone isolated from Senecio scandens against some common gastrointestinal tract disease causing bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the antibacterial effect of seneciolactone isolated from the methanolic extract of Senecio scandens against five bacterial pathogens which are known to cause several gastrointestinal tract diseases. Disc diffusion assay and agar well diffusion assays were used to examine the antibacterial efficacy of this compound by measuring zones of inhibition and MIC/MBC values. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was involved to study the effect of this compound on cellular morphology of Shigella dysenteriae. Results revealed that seneciolactone exhibited moderate to potent antibacterial activity against different bacterial strains. Zones of inhibition and MIC/MBC values indicated that seneciolactone was most potent against S. dysenteriae followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli. SEM results indicated that seneciolactone induced potent damage to the cell membrane of the tested bacteria. As compared to the untreated control which exhibited normal cellular morphology, the seneciolactone treated bacterial cells revealed severe damage to the cellular membrane particularly at the higher doses.

  9. Plant growth-promoting activities for bacterial and fungal endophytes isolated from medicinal plant of Teucrium polium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad El-Din Hassan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial and fungal endophytes are widespread inhabitants inside plant tissues and have been shown to assist plant growth and health. However, little is known about plant growth-promoting endophytes (PGPE of medicinal plants. Therefore, the aims of this study were to identify bacterial and fungal endophytes of Teucrium polium and to characterize plant growth-promoting (PGP properties of these endophytes. Seven bacterial endophytes were isolated and identified as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis, where five endophytic fungi were obtained and assigned to Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicillium crustosum. The isolated endophytes differentially produced indole acetic acid (IAA and ammonia, and in addition to their enzymatic and antimicrobial activities, they exhibited variable capacity for phosphate solubilization. In order to investigate the effect of endophytes on plant growth, four representative endophytes and their consortiums were selected concerning to their potential ability to promote plant growth. The results indicated that microbial endophytes isolated from medicinal plants possessing a vital role to improve plant growth and could be used as inoculants to establish a sustainable crop production system.

  10. Purification and structural characterization of bacillomycin F produced by a bacterial honey isolate active against Byssochlamys fulva H25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Churey, J J; Worobo, R W

    2008-09-01

    Isolate and characterize antifungal peptides exhibiting activity against Byssochlamys fulva H25, a spoilage mould associated with juices and beverages. A bacterium (H215) isolated from honey showed high antifungal activity against B. fulva H25. The antifungal producer strain was identified as Bacillus subtilis using 16S rDNA sequencing. The antifungal peptide was purified by 20% ammonium sulfate precipitation of the bacterial culture supernatant, followed by Octyl-Sepharose CL-4B and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The five active fractions were lyophilized and subjected to mass, tandem mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis to deduce their corresponding molecular masses and structural characteristics. The five peaks were determined to be identical to bacillomycin F, varying in the length of the fatty acid chain moiety from C14 to C16. The broad-spectrum antifungal activity produced by a bacterium from honey was determined to be due to the production of bacillomycin F. The antifungal compound produced by a bacterial strain isolated from honey was determined to be stable over a broad pH range and was stable to heat treatments up to 100 degrees C. This is the first report of honey microflora producing bacillomycin F or any antifungal compound.

  11. Proteolytically Stable Foldamer Mimics of Host-Defense Peptides with Protective Activities in a Murine Model of Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssières, Emilie; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Antunes, Stephanie; Rougeot, Catherine; Dugave, Christophe; Jouvion, Grégory; Claudon, Paul; Mikaty, Guillain; Douat, Céline; Goossens, Pierre L; Guichard, Gilles

    2016-09-22

    The synthesis of bioinspired unnatural backbones leading to foldamers can provide effective peptide mimics with improved properties in a physiological environment. This approach has been applied to the design of structural mimics of membrane active antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for which activities in vitro have been reported. Yet activities and pharmacokinetic properties in vivo in animal models have remained largely unexplored. Here, we report helical oligourea AMP mimics that are active in vitro against bacterial forms of Bacillus anthracis encountered in vivo, as well as in vivo in inhalational and cutaneous mouse models of B. anthracis infection. The pharmacokinetic profile and the tissue distribution were investigated by β-radio imager whole-body mapping in mice. Low excretion and recovery of the native oligourea in the kidney following intravenous injection is consistent with high stability in vivo. Overall these results provide useful information that support future biomedical development of urea-based foldamer peptide mimics.

  12. Agonistic and antagonistic activities of bacterially derived Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A: comparison with activities of synthetic material of the proposed structure and analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J R; Christ, W J; Bristol, J R; Kawata, T; Rossignol, D P

    1995-03-01

    Lipid A from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLA) has been previously shown to antagonize many of the effects of endotoxins from more pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. We have reported on the synthesis of the proposed structure of RSLA and determined that bacterially derived RSLA is not identical to its proposed structure (W.J. Christ, P. D. McGuinness, O. Asano, Y. Wang, M. A. Mullarkey, M. Perez, L. D. Hawkins, T. A. Blythe, G. R. Dubuc, and A. L. Robidoux, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116:3637-3638, 1994). Here we report results of analyzing the antagonistic and agonistic activities of bacterially derived RSLA in comparison with the activities of chemically synthesized material of the proposed structure of RSLA and analogs. Results indicated that all compounds were approximately equally potent at inhibiting endotoxin-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha from human monocytes and human whole blood as well as endotoxin-induced generation of nitric oxide in murine macrophages. In addition, all compounds were of equivalent potencies at inhibiting the binding of 125I-labelled lipopolysaccharide derivatized with 2-(p-azido-salicylamido) ethyl-1-3'-dithiopropionate to murine macrophages. Higher concentrations of bacterially derived RSLA (10 to 100 microM) were agonistic in human and murine assays. In gamma interferon-treated murine macrophages, agonism was exhibited at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In contrast, all synthetic materials were either dramatically less agonistic or devoid of agonistic activity when tested at concentrations as high as 100 microM. It is possible either that bacterially derived RSLA contains a small amount of a highly agonistic impurity or that the agonistic activity of RSLA is intrinsic to its molecular structure. In either case, these biological results support our previous report concluding that biologically derived RSLA is not identical to synthetic material of its proposed structure.

  13. Dietary influence on some proposed risk factors for colon cancer: fecal and urinary mutagenic activity and the activity of some intestinal bacterial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, G; Holmén, A; Persson, L; Högstedt, B; Wassén, C; Ottova, L; Gustafsson, J A

    1997-01-01

    This investigation studied the effects of a shift from a well-balanced mixed diet to a lacto-vegetarian diet on the mutagenic activity in urine and feces and on some cancer-associated bacterial enzymes in human feces (beta-glucuronidase, beta-glucosidase, and sulphatase). Three months after the shift to the lacto-vegetarian diet, there was a significant decrease in mutagenic activity in urine and feces, beta-glucuronidase, beta-glucosidase, and sulphatase per gram feces wet weight. In contrast, the fecal mutagenic activity and the enzyme activities remained unchanged if expressed per daily output. However, the urinary mutagenic activity expressed as total daily output decreased. Part of the explanation for the decreased fecal mutagenic activity and the decreased enzyme activities is obviously a dilution effect, because much of the increased fecal weight after the shift in diet was associated with a higher water content.

  14. Evaluation of the gene encoding the enzyme βHPMEH for the bacterial wilt inhibition caused by Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Fernandez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralstonia solanacearum is the causal agent of the devastating bacterial wilt disease that attacks important agricultural crops such as potato, tomato, banana, among others, causing serious yield losses. Control of R. solanacearum is difficult because of its wide range of alternate hosts, its long survival in soil, its biological and genetic variation, the lack of natural resistance sources and the insufficiency of the appropriate chemical control measures. Quorum sensing is the term that describes the phenomenon whereby the accumulation of molecules allows bacteria to know the number of bacteria found in the environment (population density. R. solanacearum has a quorum sensing system for the regulation of the expression of virulence genes; the molecule 3-OH-PAME is the self-regulatory signal. The molecule ΒHPMEH hydrolyzes 3-OH-PAME nullifying the signal of virulence, and thus, the quorum sensing communication in R. solanacearum. In order to evaluate the βhpmeh gene we designed two vectors that express this gene under the control of two different promoters. Both vectors were verified by restriction analysis and sequencing. Agroinfiltration assays were used to analyze gene expression and the effect against R. solanacearum in potato (Solanum tuberosum leaves. The results of the transient expression experiments showed that the expression of gene βhpmeh caused a delay in the appearance of symptoms of bacterial wilt and thus is a good candidate for whole genetic plant transformation.

  15. Evaluation of reagent strips for ascitic fluid leukocyte determination: is it a possible alternative for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis rapid diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarsila C.R. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the accuracy of a urine reagent dipstick (Multistix 10SG® to determine ascitic fluid leukocyte count, we prospectively studied 106 cirrhotic patients from April 2003 to December 2004, in two different centers (Federal University of São Paulo - UNIFESP-EPM and Federal University of Juiz de Fora - HU-UFJF for the rapid bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The mean age 54 ± 12 years, there was a predominance of males (eighty-two patients, 77%, and alcohol was the most frequent etiology (43%. Forty-four percent of patients were classified as Child B and fifty-one as Child C (51%. Abdominal paracentesis was performed both in outpatient and inpatient settings and the Multistix 10SG® was tested. Eleven cases of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were identified by means of polymorphonuclear count. If we considered the positive Multistix 10SG® result of 3 or more, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were respectively 71%, 99%, 91% and 98%. With a positive reagent strip result taken as grade 2 (traces or more, sensitivity was 86% and specificity was 96% with positive and negative predictive values of 60% and 99%, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was 95%. We concluded that the use of a urine reagent dipstick (Multistix 10SG® could be considered a quick, easy and cheap method for ascitic fluid cellularity determination in SBP diagnosis.

  16. Synthesis of dodecavalent fullerene-based glycoclusters and evaluation of their binding properties towards a bacterial lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecioni, Samy; Oerthel, Vincent; Iehl, Julien; Holler, Michel; Goyard, David; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Imberty, Anne; Nierengarten, Jean-François; Vidal, Sébastien

    2011-03-07

    Multivalency is playing a major role in biological processes and particularly in lectin-carbohydrate interactions. The design of high-affinity ligands of lectins should provide molecules capable of interfering with these biological processes and potentially inhibit bacterial or viral infections. Azide-alkyne "click" chemistry was applied to the synthesis of dodecavalent fullerene-based glycoclusters. The conjugation could be efficiently performed from alkyne or azide functions on either partners (i.e. hexakis-fullerene adduct or glycoside). PA-IL is a bacterial lectin from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and is involved in the recognition of glycoconjugates on human tissues. The glycoclusters obtained were evaluated as ligands of PA-IL and for their potential for competing with its binding to glycosylated surfaces. The affinities measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay (HIA), enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA), and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) displayed a significant "glycoside cluster effect" with up to a 12,000-fold increase in binding when comparing a monovalent carbohydrate reference probe with a dodecavalent fullerene-based glycocluster, albeit with some differences depending on the analytical technique. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  18. Lipoproteins attenuate TLR2 and TLR4 activation by bacteria and bacterial ligands with differences in affinity and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Rutten, Lieke; Garssen, Johan; Vos, Arjan P; Hartog, Anita

    2016-10-28

    The small intestine is a specialized compartment were close interactions take place between host, microbes, food antigens and dietary fatty acids. Dietary fats get absorbed by epithelial cells and processed into a range of lipoprotein particles after which they are basolaterally secreted and collected in the lymphatics. In contrast to the colon, the small intestine is covered only by a thin mucus coat that allows for intimate interactions between host-cells and microbes. Lipoproteins have long been recognized as protective factors in infectious diseases via the neutralization of bacterial toxins like lipopolysaccharides. Much less attention has been given to the potential role of lipoproteins as factors contributing to the maintenance of small intestinal immune homeostasis via modulating bacteria-induced immune responses. Lipoproteins VLDL, LDL and HDL were found to neutralize TLR responses towards specific TLR-ligands or a selection of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Attenuation of TLR2 activity was acute and only slightly improved by longer pre-incubation times of ligands and lipoproteins with no differences between bacterial-lipopeptides or bacteria. In contrast, attenuation of TLR4 responses was only observed after extensive preincubation of lipoproteins and LPS. Preincubation of bacteria and lipoproteins led only to a modest attenuation of TLR4 activity. Moreover, compared to TLR2, TLR4 activity could only be attenuated by lipoproteins over a small ligand dose range. These results demonstrate the ability of lipoproteins VLDL, LDL and HDL to inhibit TLR responses towards bacterial-ligands and bacteria. Presence of lipoproteins was found to modulate the MAMP-induced cytokine release by primary human monocytes measured as changes in the release of IL-6, TNFα, GM-CSF and IFNγ. Using TLR2 and TLR4-reporter cells, lipoproteins were found to inhibit TLR responses with differences in affinity and kinetics. These data establish a role for lipoproteins as

  19. The bacterial effector HopX1 targets JAZ transcriptional repressors to activate jasmonate signaling and promote infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Gimenez-Ibanez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR, which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile. Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome.

  20. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Type IB DNA Topoisomerase Reveals a Preassembled Active Site in the Absence of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Asmita; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (SKI)

    2010-03-08

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases are found in all eukarya, two families of eukaryotic viruses (poxviruses and mimivirus), and many genera of bacteria. They alter DNA topology by cleaving and resealing one strand of duplex DNA via a covalent DNA-(3-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate. Bacterial type IB enzymes were discovered recently and are described as poxvirus-like with respect to their small size, primary structures, and bipartite domain organization. Here we report the 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans topoisomerase IB (DraTopIB), a prototype of the bacterial clade. DraTopIB consists of an amino-terminal (N) {beta}-sheet domain (amino acids 1-90) and a predominantly {alpha}-helical carboxyl-terminal (C) domain (amino acids 91-346) that closely resemble the corresponding domains of vaccinia virus topoisomerase IB. The five amino acids of DraTopIB that comprise the catalytic pentad (Arg-137, Lys-174, Arg-239, Asn-280, and Tyr-289) are preassembled into the active site in the absence of DNA in a manner nearly identical to the pentad configuration in human topoisomerase I bound to DNA. This contrasts with the apoenzyme of vaccinia topoisomerase, in which three of the active site constituents are either displaced or disordered. The N and C domains of DraTopIB are splayed apart in an 'open' conformation, in which the surface of the catalytic domain containing the active site is exposed for DNA binding. A comparison with the human topoisomerase I-DNA cocrystal structure suggests how viral and bacterial topoisomerase IB enzymes might bind DNA circumferentially via movement of the N domain into the major groove and clamping of a disordered loop of the C domain around the helix.

  1. Anti-viral and anti-bacterial activities of an extract of blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Kazufumi; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Mori, Shuichi; Ohashi, Kazutaka; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2012-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of an extract of the blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum L.) against pathogens associated with oral, nasopharyngeal and upper respiratory infectious diseases; namely respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus A and B (IFV-A and IFV-B), adenovirus (AdV), herpes simplex virus type 1, Haemophilus influenzae type B, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans, were investigated. Less than 1% concentration of extract of blackcurrant inhibited replication of RSV, IFV-A and -B and HSV-1 by over 50% and a 10% extract inhibited adsorption of these viruses onto the cell surface by over 95%. The effects on AdV were much less pronounced; the half minimal inhibitory concentration of AdV replication was 2.54 ± 0.26, and a 10% concentration of the extract inhibited AdV adsorption on the cell surface by 72.9 ± 3.4%. The antibacterial activities of the blackcurrant were evaluated based on its efficacy as a disinfectant. A 10% extract disinfected 99.8% of H. Influenzae type B and 78.9% of S. pneumoniae in 10 min, but had no demonstrable effect against S. mutans. The blackcurrant extract still showed antiviral and antibacterial activities after the pH had been made neutral with sodium hydroxide, suggesting that these activities are not the result of acidic reactions or of components precipitated at a neutral pH. These findings demonstrate the potential of blackcurrant extract as a functional food for oral care. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Evaluation of leucocyte esterase reagent strip test for the rapid bedside diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Sithara K; Sainu, Ashik; Thomas, Varghese

    2010-03-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common serious complication of cirrhosis, and carries a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid diagnosis and prompt treatment of this condition may improve survival of such patients. To validate the diagnostic efficacy of a leukocyte esterase reagent (LER) strip test for rapid, bedside diagnosis of SBP. We prospectively studied 175 patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites [mean age 48 (SD 16.4) years; 146 men] between August 2007 and December 2008. Alcohol was the most common (124 of 175; 70.8%) cause of liver cirrhosis. All patients underwent abdominal paracentesis, and the ascitic fluid was processed for cell count, LER strip (Magistik 10) test and culture. Two different cut-offs for calling the LER strip test positive were tried, namely when the color turned light blue [grade 2: >125 polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL)/microL] or it turned purple (grade 3: >500 PMNL/microL). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value were calculated, using PMN count by microscopy exceeding 250 PMNL/microL. LER strip using the more stringent purple-color cut off to diagnose SBP had a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 100%. The corresponding figures using the light-blue color cut-off were 97% and 89%, respectively. LER strip testing of ascitic fluid is a rapid, cheap and sensitive bed side tool for the diagnosis of SBP.

  3. Reconstruction and evaluation of the synthetic bacterial MEP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partow, Siavash; Siewers, Verena; Daviet, Laurent; Schalk, Michel; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids, which are a large group of natural and chemical compounds with a variety of applications as e.g. fragrances, pharmaceuticals and potential biofuels, are produced via two different metabolic pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here, we attempted to replace the endogenous MVA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a synthetic bacterial MEP pathway integrated into the genome to benefit from its superior properties in terms of energy consumption and productivity at defined growth conditions. It was shown that the growth of a MVA pathway deficient S. cerevisiae strain could not be restored by the heterologous MEP pathway even when accompanied by the co-expression of genes erpA, hISCA1 and CpIscA involved in the Fe-S trafficking routes leading to maturation of IspG and IspH and E. coli genes fldA and fpr encoding flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase believed to be responsible for electron transfer to IspG and IspH.

  4. Reconstruction and evaluation of the synthetic bacterial MEP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Partow

    Full Text Available Isoprenoids, which are a large group of natural and chemical compounds with a variety of applications as e.g. fragrances, pharmaceuticals and potential biofuels, are produced via two different metabolic pathways, the mevalonate (MVA pathway and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway. Here, we attempted to replace the endogenous MVA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a synthetic bacterial MEP pathway integrated into the genome to benefit from its superior properties in terms of energy consumption and productivity at defined growth conditions. It was shown that the growth of a MVA pathway deficient S. cerevisiae strain could not be restored by the heterologous MEP pathway even when accompanied by the co-expression of genes erpA, hISCA1 and CpIscA involved in the Fe-S trafficking routes leading to maturation of IspG and IspH and E. coli genes fldA and fpr encoding flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase believed to be responsible for electron transfer to IspG and IspH.

  5. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu K Shrestha

    Full Text Available Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12 and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5. The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18 were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C

  6. Effect of host tree species on cellulase activity and bacterial community composition in the gut of larval Asian longhorned beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Scott M; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria Del Mar; Carlson, John E; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2009-06-01

    Anoplophora glabripennis, the Asian longhorned beetle, is a wood-boring insect that can develop in a wide range of healthy deciduous hosts and requires gut microbes to aid in wood degradation and digestion. Here we show that larval A. glabripennis harbor a diverse gut bacterial community, and this community can be extremely variable when reared in different host trees. A. glabripennis reared in a preferred host (Acer saccharum) had the highest gut bacterial diversity compared with larvae reared either in a secondary host (Quercus palustris), a resistant host (Pyrus calleryana), or on artificial diet. The gut microbial community of larval A. glabripennis collected from field populations on Brooklyn, NY, showed the highest degree of complexity among all samples in this study. Overall, when larvae fed on a preferred host, they harbored a broad diversity of gut bacteria spanning the alpha-, beta-, gamma-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Cellulase activities (beta-1,4-endoglucanase, beta-1,4-exoglucanase, and beta-1,4-glucosidase) in the guts of larvae fed in a preferred host (A. saccharum) or a secondary host (Q. palustris) were significantly higher than that of artificial diet fed larvae. Larvae that fed on wood from a resistant host (P. calleryana) showed suppressed total gut cellulase activity. Results show that the host tree can impact both gut microbial community complexity and cellulase activity in A. glabripennis.

  7. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of an herbal dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyas Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of a herbal dentifrice Arodent™ against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was evaluated using Colgate ® as standard. Both bacterial strains were isolated from the oral cavity on selective media and identified by standard methods. The antibacterial activity was assayed by cup-well method. The bacterial lawn of facultative anaerobe S. mutans was established between two layers of agar under microaerophilic conditions. Five and a half millimeters and 10 mm zones of inhibition were produced by Arodent against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic conditions. On the other hand, the standard dentifrice Colgate produced 5.83 mm and 10.17 mm zones of inhibition against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic condition. The results suggest that Arodent is an effective antibacterial herbal dentifrice.

  8. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of an herbal dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Yogesh Kumar; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Sharma, Kanika

    2008-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of a herbal dentifrice Arodent against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was evaluated using Colgate as standard. Both bacterial strains were isolated from the oral cavity on selective media and identified by standard methods. The antibacterial activity was assayed by cup-well method. The bacterial lawn of facultative anaerobe S. mutans was established between two layers of agar under microaerophilic conditions. Five and a half millimeters and 10 mm zones of inhibition were produced by Arodent against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic conditions. On the other hand, the standard dentifrice Colgate produced 5.83 mm and 10.17 mm zones of inhibition against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic condition. The results suggest that Arodent is an effective antibacterial herbal dentifrice.

  9. A Bacterial Ortholog of Class II Lysyl-tRNA Synthetase Activates Lysine

    OpenAIRE

    Ambrogelly, Alexandre; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Söll, Dieter; Moses, Sharath

    2010-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases produce aminoacyl-tRNAs, essential substrates for accurate protein synthesis. Beyond their central role in translation some of these enzymes or their orthologs are recruited for alternative functions, not always related to their primary cellular role. We investigate here the enzymatic properties of GenX (also called PoxA and YjeA), an ortholog of bacterial class II lysyl-tRNA synthetase. GenX is present in most Gram-negative bacteria and is homologous to the catalyt...

  10. Using evaluation strategically to promote active learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münster, Marie

    Rationale: The challenge presented here is how to utilise evaluation to promote active learning. The method used is constructive alignment (Biggs & Tang, 2007) of learning objectives, learning and evaluation along with further considerations including which competences are promoted, the time...... the principle of inductive learning (Prince & Felder, 2006) with the students being presented with the case from the beginning and subsequently achieving the tools to perform the projects. This is both frustrating and motivating for the students as they know why they need to have the tools, but they feel...... they get them too late. The students have formerly been assessed through two group reports (each 25% of final grade) and an individual oral examination (50% of final grade). The students work a lot and learn a lot through working with the reports, but it is also very time consuming to write them as well...

  11. INVESTIGATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY COMBINED PREPARATIONS FOR CLINICAL STRAINS OF MICROORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH BACTERIAL VAGINIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslanian M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of bacterial vaginit in some cases the cause of severe infectious diseases genitalia of the fetus and newborn, which can impair the health of future generations. It is noted that the treatment of antibacterial agents observed numerous negative side effects- reducing the biochemical activity of the intestinal microflora, abuse microbiota, leading to the development of dysbiosis, increasing the number of resistant strains of pathogens, the risk of allergic reaction sand immunological disorders. A study was conducted towards finding effective combinations of drugs from different pharmacological groups means to create a combination of drugs. The aim of the study was to develop and explore and Flamini combination of miramistin combined medicines to treat bacterial vaginit. As a result of studies in patients with bacterial vaginit pathological material was isolated and identified 72 strains of microorganisms (Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus spp, Enterococcus spp, Escherichia coli, Haemophillu sssp, Candida albican sand various strains of anaerobic microorganisms. For the combined treatment of infectious and in flammatory diseases (mixed infections in humans the combined drugin tablet form. All clinical strains of microorganisms isolated from patients with bacterial vaginit were tested for sensitivity to the combined preparation in tablet form with Flamini and miramistin. The greatest sensitivity to the drugs found clinical strains of microorganisms: Staphylococcu saureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Peptococcus niger (diameter zone growth retardation is 25,5-23,5 mm. composition tablets number 1 (0.05 g Flamini, miramistini 0.02 g, which was selected for further study shows bacteriostatic effect against a wide range of microorganisms and fungi Rod Candida. IPC for Staphylococcus sp was 20-25 pg / mL for Streptococcus sp 35,0-40,0 mg / ml, for intestinal group 35,0-40,0 for fungi 30,0 mg / ml unlike pills number 2 and number 3, where the

  12. Evaluation of gaseous concentrations, bacterial diversity and microbial quantity in different layers of deep litter system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective An experiment was conducted to investigate the environment of the deep litter system and provided theoretical basis for production. Methods The bedding samples were obtained from a pig breeding farm and series measurements associated with gases concentrations and the bacterial diversity as well as the quantity of Escherichia coli, Lactobacilli, Methanogens were performed in this paper. Results The concentrations of CO2, CH4, and NH3 in the deep litter system increased with the increasing of depth while the N2O concentrations increased fiercely from the 0 cm to the −10 cm depth but then decreased beneath the −10 cm depth. Meanwhile, the Shannon index, the dominance index as well as the evenness index at the −20 cm layer was significantly different from the other layers (p<0.05. On the other hand, the quantity of Escherichia coli reached the highest value at the surface beddings and there was a significant drop at the −20 cm layer with the increasing depth. The Lactobacilli numbers increased with the depth from 0 cm to −15 cm and then decreased significantly under the −20 cm depth. The expression of Methanogens reached its largest value at the depth of −35 cm. Conclusion The upper layers (0 cm to −5 cm of this system were aerobic, the middle layers (−10 cm to −20 cm were micro-aerobic, while that the bottom layers (below −20 cm depth were anaerobic. In addition, from a standpoint of increasing the nitrification pathway and inhibiting the denitrification pathway, it should be advised that the deep litter system should be kept aerobic.

  13. Biological activities of Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts on clinically important bacterial pathogens, their phytochemical and FT-IR spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Uzma Azeem; Ali, Shaukat; Shahnawaz, Amna Mir; Shafique, Irsa; Zafar, Atiya; Khan, Muhammad Abdul Rauf; Ghous, Tahseen; Saleem, Azhar; Andleeb, Saiqa

    2017-05-01

    The spread of bacterial infectious diseases is a major public threat. Herbs and spices have offered an excellent, important and useful source of antimicrobial agents against many pathological infections. In the current study, the antimicrobial potency of fresh, naturally and commercial dried Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts had been investigated against seven local clinical bacterial isolates such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Serratia marcesnces by the agar disc diffusion method. All tested pathogens except P. aeruginosa and E. coli were most susceptible to ethanolic and methanolic extracts of A. sativum. Similarly, chloroform and diethyl ether extracts of Z. officinale showed a greater zone of inhibition of tested pathogens except for P. aeruginosa and E. coli. We found that all extracts of A. sativum and Z. officinale have a strong antibacterial effect compared to recommended standard antibiotics through activity index. All results were evaluated statistically and a significant difference was recorded at Ppathogenic bacteria and potentially considered as cost-effective in the management of diseases and to the threat of drug resistance phenomenon.

  14. Benzoyl peroxide formulated polycarbophil/carbopol 934P hydrogel with selective antimicrobial activity, potentially beneficial for treatment and prevention of bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiqi; Cavera, Veronica L; Rogers, Michael A; Huang, Qingrong; Zubovskiy, Konstantin; Chikindas, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    The human vagina is colonized by a variety of indigenous microflora; in healthy individuals the predominant bacterial genus is Lactobacillus while those with bacterial vaginosis (BV) carry a variety of anaerobic representatives of the phylum Actinobacteria. In this study, we evaluated the antimicrobial activity of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) encapsulated in a hydrogel against Gardnerella vaginalis, one of the causative agents of BV, as well as indicating its safety for healthy human lactobacilli. Herein, it is shown that in well diffusion assays G. vaginalis is inhibited at 0.01% hydrogel-encapsulated BPO and that the tested Lactobacillus spp. can tolerate concentrations of BPO up to 2.5%. In direct contact assays (cells grown in a liquid culture containing hydrogel with 1% BPO or BPO particles), we demonstrated that hydrogels loaded with 1% BPO caused 6-log reduction of G. vaginalis. Conversely, three of the tested Lactobacillus spp. were not inhibited while L. acidophilus growth was slightly delayed. The rheological properties of the hydrogel formulation were probed using oscillation frequency sweep, oscillation shear stress sweep, and shear rate sweep. This shows the gel to be suitable for vaginal application and that the encapsulation of BPO did not alter rheological properties.

  15. Broad-spectrum in vitro antibacterial activities of clay minerals against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.; REMENIH, CHRISTINE M.; WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives The capacity to properly address the worldwide incidence of infectious diseases lies in the ability to detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. Therefore, identifying and analyzing inhibitory agents are worthwhile endeavors in an era when few new classes of effective antimicrobials have been developed. The use of geological nanomaterials to heal skin infections has been evident since the earliest recorded history, and specific clay minerals may prove valuable in the treatment of bacterial diseases, including infections for which there are no effective antibiotics, such as Buruli ulcer and multi-drug resistant infections. Methods We have subjected two iron-rich clay minerals, which have previously been used to treat Buruli ulcer patients, to broth culture testing of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant pathogenic bacteria to assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as therapeutic agents. Results One specific mineral, CsAg02, demonstrated bactericidal activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) E. coli, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium marinum and a combined bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Mycobacterium smegmatis, while another mineral with similar structure and bulk crystal chemistry, CsAr02, had no effect on or enhanced bacterial growth. The <0.2 μm fraction of CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 200°C or 550°C retained bactericidal activity, while cation-exchanged CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 900°C no longer killed E. coli. Conclusions Our results indicate that specific mineral products have intrinsic, heat-stable antibacterial properties, which could provide an inexpensive treatment against numerous human bacterial infections. PMID:18070832

  16. Evaluating the possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater for bacterial cellulose production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Yang, X-Y; Xiong, L; Guo, H-J; Luo, J; Wang, B; Zhang, H-R; Lin, X-Q; Chen, X-D

    2015-05-01

    To reduce the cost of bacterial cellulose (BC) production, the possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater with high COD value (18 050 mg l(-1) ) for BC production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was evaluated. After 7 days of fermentation, the highest BC yield (1·34 g l(-1) ) was obtained. The carbon sources including sugars (glucose and xylose), organic acids (acetic acid and butyric acid) and alcohol compounds (ethanol and butanol) were utilized by G. xylinus simultaneously during fermentation. Although the COD decrease ratio (about 14·7%) was low, the highest BC yield on COD consumption (56·2%, g g(-1) ) was relatively high and the remaining wastewater could be used for further BC fermentation. Besides, the environment of ABE fermentation wastewater showed small influence on the BC structure by comparison with the BC products obtained in traditional HS medium using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Overall, ABE fermentation wastewater is one promising substrate for BC production. The possibility of using acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation wastewater for bacterial cellulose (BC) production by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was evaluated in this study. This is the first time that ABE fermentation wastewater was used as substrate for BC fermentation. The results provide detail information of metabolism of G. xylinus in ABE fermentation wastewater and the influence of wastewater environment on the structure of BC samples. Overall, this bioconversion could reduce the cost of BC production greatly. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  18. Impact of seawater-quality and water treatment procedures on the active bacterial assemblages at two desalination sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, C-L de O; Barbe, C; West, N J; Rapenne, S; Lebaron, P

    2011-07-15

    Inorganic and organic compounds, particles and microorganisms in intake waters are mainly responsible for fouling of reverse osmosis membranes, which reduces the efficiency of the desalination process. The characterization of seawater quality to better predict its fouling potential remains a challenge for the desalination field and little is known about the seasonal variability of water quality parameters in the coastal waters used to supply desalination plants. In this study, standard water quality methods were combined with flow cytometry and molecular methods (16S rRNA sequencing and fingerprinting) to assess in parallel, the physicochemical properties, the microbial abundance and the active microbial community composition of the intake waters and their associated pretreated waters at two desalination sites from July 2007 to July 2008. The overall assessment of quality parameters revealed that microfiltration followed by slow sand filtration were the most efficient in removing microorganisms than the conventional dual media filtration routinely used in full-scale desalination plants, and that all treatments were inefficient for organic matter reduction. Temporal variation of the environmental parameters such as temperature, turbidity and silt density index only moderately affected the bacterial community structure in raw waters, but that interestingly, water treatment compartments changed the composition and diversity of the metabolically active bacterial populations and thus create distinct ecological post-treatment niches.

  19. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) and dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE 15) on soil microbial activity and bacterial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lu, E-mail: liulu519@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhu Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Xiao Lin, E-mail: xiaolin@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Yang Liuyan, E-mail: yangly@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2011-02-15

    There is now increasing concern regarding the effect of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on the environment. These compounds are widely used as fire retardants and by the electronic industry. Our study examined the effects of adding different doses of BDE 15 and BDE 209 on the soil microbial activities and function by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and soil enzymatic activity analyses. Soils were spiked with 1, 10, and 100 mg kg{sup -1} BDE 209 and BDE 15, respectively, and incubated for up to 180 days. No degradation of BDE 209 was observed; however, about 40% of the added BDE 15 underwent declining extractable concentration. Bacterial counts were significantly higher in the microcosms amended with BDE 15, while the suppression effect increased as the BDE 209 concentration increased. Pseudomonas, Bacillus and uncultured bacteria dominated the bacterial communities in all soil treatments, and PCA analysis showed that high doses of BDE 209 and BDE 15 altered the soil microbial community structure. This study provides new information on the effect of higher and lower PBDEs on the soil microbial community in an aerobic environment.

  20. Antitumor activity of bacterial exopolysaccharides from the endophyte Bacillus amyloliquefaciens sp. isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Tao; Yuan, Qiang; Shan, LE-Tian; Lin, Mei-Ai; Cheng, Dong-Qing; Li, Chang-Yu

    2013-06-01

    The endophytic bacterium, MD-b1, was isolated from the medicinal plant Ophiopogon japonicas and identified as the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens sp. with 99% similarity based on the partial sequence analysis of 16S rDNA. Exopolysaccharides were extracted from the endophyte for the evaluation of its antitumor activity against gastric carcinoma cell lines (MC-4 and SGC-7901). 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and microscopy were performed to estimate the cell viability and morphological changes of the MC-4 and SGC-7901 cells following treatment with the exopolysaccharides at 14, 22 and 30 μg/μl. The results revealed that the exopolysaccharides displayed concentration-dependent inhibitory effects against the MC-4 and SGC-7901 cells, with an IC50 of 19.7 and 26.8 μg/μl, respectively. The exopolysaccharides also induced morphological abnormalities in the cells. These effects indicated the the exopolysaccharides had an antitumoral mechanism of action associated with the mitochondrial dysfunction of the treated cells. This is the first study to investigate the endophytic microorganism isolated from O. japonicas and also the first discovery of such antitumoral exopolysaccharides derived from the genus Bacillus. This provides a promising and reproducible natural product source with high therapeutic value for anticancer treatment, thereby facilitating the development of new anticancer agents.

  1. Shrimp TAB1 interacts with TAK1 and p38 and activates the host innate immune response to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Mengqiao; Yin, Bin; Li, Haoyang; Xiao, Bang; Lǚ, Kai; Huang, Zhijian; Li, Sedong; He, Jianguo; Li, Chaozheng

    2017-08-01

    Mammalian TAB1 has been previously identified as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) binding protein, which functions as the activator of TAK1 and p38. This report, for the first time, identified and characterized the homolog of TAB1 in shrimp, to be specific, the homolog gene from Litopenaeus vannamei, containing a 1560-bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a putative protein of 519 amino acids with the conserved PP2Cc (Serine/threonine phosphatases, family 2C, catalytic) domain in N-terminal and a TAK1 binding motif in C-terminus, has been cloned and named LvTAB1. LvTAB1 was most abundant in gills and its expression could respond significantly to a series of stimuli, including LPS, Vibrio parahemolyticus and Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) experiments showed that LvTAB1 could combine with LvTAK1 as well as Lvp38, two members of IMD-NF-κB/MAPK pathway, which meant LvTAB1 could have a role in regulating the activities of these kinases. Over-expression of LvTAB1 in drosophila S2 cells could improve the transcriptional levels of antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs) such as Diptericin (Dpt), the hallmark of drosophila NF-κB activated genes, indicating its activation effect on NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, suppression of LvTAB1 expression in vivo by RNA-interference increased the sensibility of shrimps to V. parahaemolyticus infection, implying its protective role against bacterial infection. In conclusion, these results provide some insight into the function of LvTAB1 during bacterial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of coating activated carbon with milk proteins to prevent binding of bacterial cells from foods for PCR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opet, Nathan J; Levin, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Foods contaminated with pathogens are common sources of illness. Currently, the most common and sensitive rapid detection method involves the PCR. However, food matrices are complex and contain inhibitors that limit the sensitivity of the PCR. The use of coated activated carbon can effectively facilitate the removal of PCR inhibitors without binding targeted bacterial cells from food samples. With the use of activated carbon coated with milk proteins, a cell recovery at pH 7.0 of 95.7%±2.0% was obtained, compared to control uncoated activated carbon, which yielded a cell recovery of only 1.1%±0.8%. In addition, the milk protein coated activated carbon was able to absorb similar amounts of soluble compounds as uncoated activated carbon, with the exception of bovine hemoglobin. This suggests that the use of milk proteins to coat activated carbon may therefore serve as a suitable replacement for bentonite in the coating of activated carbon, which has previously been used for the removal of PCR inhibitors from food. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis of enhanced activity of supercritical carbon dioxide treated bacterial alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kaninika; Dutta, Sayantani; Bhattacharjee, Paramita

    2017-09-01

    Our previous investigation on high pressure supercritical carbon dioxide treatment of a bacterial α-amylase had revealed enhanced activity of the same. 1H NMR analysis of the activity enhanced enzyme led the authors to hypothesize that the enhancement was possibly owing to alterations in the active site of the enzyme. In the present study, the changes in the active site of the treated enzyme was analysed by Fourier-transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. The spectra obtained revealed shifting of bands in the active site of α-amylase indicating a nudging effect of the bonds in this region consequent to high pressure treatment. Also, shifts in bands in the OH stretching vibration of water were observed in the enzyme spectra. These variations in the spectra confirmed changes in the active site as well as in the water associated with the same that perhaps had a concerted effect on the increased activity of α-amylase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and anti-bacterial activity of 5-(alkenyl)-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    All the newly synthesized compounds were screened for their antibacterial activity. Compounds 2c, 2d, 3a, 3c and 3d showed good antimicrobial activity against E. coli where as compounds 2a and 2d were found active against all the bacteria. Keywords. 1,3,4-Oxadiazoles; antibacterial activity; MIC; IR; NMR; mass spectra.

  5. Synthesis and study of anti-bacterial activity of complexes of diallyldisulphide from garlic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, ShashiPrabha; Bajpai, Meenakshi; Razdan, BalKishen

    2012-01-01

    ... active constituents among which Diallyldisulphide shows antibacterial and antifungal activity. Considering the biological activities of Garlic and the fact that transition metals such as silver possess antimicrobial properties, it is proposed to complex the biologically active ligand of garlic such as Diallyldisulphide with metals such as silve...

  6. Evaluation of the Bacterial Status of Water Samples at Umudike Abia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bacteriological status of different water samples (borehole, sachet, bottled, stream and rain) from Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria and its environs was evaluated. The total viable count (TVC) for the borehole I (MOUAU) and borehole II (Umuwaya) were 14.7x102 and 15.7x102 cfu/ml respectively, while the sachet water ...

  7. Evaluation of measures to decrease intra-operative bacterial contamination in orthopaedic implant surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, BAS; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether behavioural and systemic measures wilt decrease intra-operative contamination during total hip or knee replacements. The influence of these measures on subsequent prolonged wound discharge, superficial surgical site infection and deep periprosthetic

  8. Specific inflammatory response of Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria) after bacterial injection causes tissue reaction and enzymatic activity alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, M R; Parisi, M G; Parrinello, D; Sanfratello, M A; Benenati, G; Palla, F; Cammarata, M

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms was marked by adaptations to protect against pathogens. The mechanisms for discriminating the ''self'' from ''non-self" have evolved into a long history of cellular and molecular strategies, from damage repair to the co-evolution of host-pathogen interactions. We investigated the inflammatory response in Anemonia sulcata (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) following injection of substances that varied in type and dimension, and observed clear, strong and specific reactions, especially after injection of Escherichia coli and Vibrio alginolyticus. Moreover, we analyzed enzymatic activity of protease, phosphatase and esterase, showing how the injection of different bacterial strains alters the expression of these enzymes and suggesting a correlation between the appearance of the inflammatory reaction and the modification of enzymatic activities. Our study shows for the first time, a specific reaction and enzymatic responses following injection of bacteria in a cnidarian. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity and antibacterial activity of the bacterial communities associated with two Mediterranean sea pens, Pennatula phosphorea and Pteroeides spinosum (Anthozoa: Octocorallia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, E M D; Lo Giudice, A; Michaud, L; De Domenico, E; Spanò, N

    2013-10-01

    A description of the bacterial communities associated with the Mediterranean pennatulids (sea pens) Pennatula phosphorea and Pteroeides spinosum from the Straits of Messina (Italy) is reported. The automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis showed a marked difference between coral (tissues and mucus) and non-coral (underlying sediment and surrounding water) habitats. The diversity of the coral-associated communities was more deeply analysed by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of bacterial clones. P. phosphorea and P. spinosum harbour distinct bacterial communities, indicating the occurrence of species-specific coral-associated bacteria. In addition, only few phylotypes were shared between mucus and tissues of the same pennatulid species, suggesting that there might be a sort of microhabitat partitioning between the associated microbial communities. The predominance of Alphaproteobacteria was observed for the communities associated with both tissues and mucus of P. phosphorea (84 and 58.2 % of total sequences, respectively). Conversely, the bacterial community in the mucus layer of P. spinosum was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (74.2 %) as opposed to the tissue library that was dominated by the Gammaproteobacteria and Mollicutes (40.6 and 35.4 %, respectively). The antibacterial activity of 78 bacterial isolates against indicator organisms was assayed. Active isolates (15.4 %), which predominantly affiliated to Vibrio spp., were mainly obtained from coral mucus. Results from the present study enlarge our knowledge on the composition and antibacterial activity of coral-associated bacterial communities.

  10. Effects of temperature and fertilization on the structure of total versus active bacterial communities from sub-Antarctic seawater exposed to crude oil and diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Rodríguez-Blanco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polar environments are exposed to the risk of oil pollution. However, there is limited knowledge regarding how the variation of physicochemical factors influencing biodegradation may affect bacterial community structure. The effects of temperature (4, 10 and 20°C and organic fertilization (Inipol EAP 22 on community structure and diversity of bacteria inhabiting Kerguelen sub-Antarctic waters were studied in crude- and diesel-amended microcosms. Dynamics of total (i.e., 16S rDNA-based and metabolically active (i.e., 16S rRNA-based bacterial community structure and diversity were monitored using capillary-electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results showed that total and active community structures were differently influenced by temperature and fertilization in the presence of hydrocarbons. Both fertilization and temperature induced changes in total community structure in the presence of crude oil and diesel. However, temperature showed a limited influence on active community structure, and fertilization induced changes in the presence of crude oil only. Simpson's index decreased for total bacterial communities at all temperatures in the presence of crude oil and diesel, whereas a lower reduction was observed for active bacterial populations. In the presence of fertilizer, the diversity of the whole community approached control values after seven incubation weeks; this was not observed for the active bacterial community. This study evidenced qualitative differences in total and active bacterial community structures of Kerguelen seawaters in the presence of hydrocarbons and different responses relative to variation in temperature and fertilization. These factors and hydrocarbons composition have to be taken into account to understand bacterial community dynamics after an oil spill.

  11. Malaria-induced NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation mediates inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial superinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Ataide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14(+CD16(-Caspase-1(+ and CD14(dimCD16(+Caspase-1(+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria.

  12. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  13. Bacterial Infection and Implant Loosening in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Evaluation of 209 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Dapunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate bacteria species detected in a large number of patients treated for prosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee at a single specialized center. Furthermore, the rate of implant loosening was investigated in a time-dependent manner for the most frequently detected bacteria species. A retrospective analysis of patients (n = 209 treated for prosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee was performed. The following parameters were evaluated: C-Reactive Protein (CRP concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, loosening of the implant, the time that had elapsed since the primary prosthetic joint replacement, and the duration since the last surgical intervention. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most frequently detected, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. Differences in CRP concentration were detected among various bacteria species. Osteolysis was not associated with one causative agent in particular. Patients who had undergone previous revision surgery had a higher probability of implant loosening. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. are the most common causative agents of prosthetic joint infection and show no significant differences with regard to implant loosening or the time-course when compared to S. aureus. Infections with Enterococcus spp. seem to develop faster than with other bacteria species. The risk of implant loosening increases with revision surgery, in particular in the hip joint.

  14. Mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of Artemisia absinthium volatile oil by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Taherkhani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of Artemisia absinthium L. (A. absinthium essential oil by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium strains. Methods: Water-distilled essential oil of A. absinthium collected from Ardabil, NorthWestern Iran, was investigated for mutagenic and antimutagenic activities. In present study, the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of A. absinthium oil were investigated by the bacterial revere mutation assay in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains with and without S9 (microsomal mutagenesis assay. Results: The comparative mutagenicity effect was seen in 1.5 mg/plate by the bacterial reverse mutation assay in S. typhimurium TA98 strains, without S9 and the excellent antimutagenicity effect was seen in 1.5 mg/plate against S. typhimurium TA100, without S9. Conclusions: The mutagenicity and antimutagenicity effects of the volatile oil of A. absinthium were seen without the presence of metabolic activation.

  15. Comparative in vitro activity of ceftibuten (Sch 39720) against bacterial enteropathogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Shawar, R; LaRocco, M; Cleary, T G

    1989-01-01

    Ceftibuten is a new orally active cephalosporin with significant bioavailability. Its in vitro activity was compared with those of other agents against 383 strains of enteric pathogens derived from clinical specimens. Ceftibuten was very active against the strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae tested (overall MIC for 90% of strains tested, 0.25 microgram/ml) but was less active against Campylobacter jejuni (MIC for 90% of strains, 16 micrograms/ml). The MBC was one to two dilutions higher ...

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorine-18 labelled compounds for imaging of bacterial infections with pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, S; Gunawan, J; Freytag, C; Burchert, W

    2006-07-01

    Syntheses of no carrier added (n.c.a.) 6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-1-cyclopropyl-4-oxo-7-[4-[18F]fluoro-phenacyl-1-piperacinyl]-chinolincarboxylic acid ([18F]COPCA) and n.c.a. 4-[18F]fluoro-benzoyl-ubiquicidin 29-41 ([18F]UBI 29-41) are described. [18F]COPCA was synthesised within 120 min with a radiochemical yield of 9-12%. [18F]UBI 29-41 was synthesised within 150 min with a radiochemical yield of 15-20%. Both compounds had a specific activity of more than 35 GBq/micromol. The biological activity was verified by measuring its binding to Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Specific binding was found for [18F]UBI 29-41 (12-17%), whereas no specific binding for [18F]COPCA was found.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorine-18 labelled compounds for imaging of bacterial infections with pet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijlstra, S. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biophysik, Radiopharmazie und Nuklearmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum, Georgstrasse 11, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany)]. E-mail: szijlstra@hdz-nrw.de; Gunawan, J. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biophysik, Radiopharmazie und Nuklearmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum, Georgstrasse 11, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Freytag, C. [Institut fuer Laboratoriums-und Transfusionsmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum, Georgstrasse 11, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Burchert, W. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biophysik, Radiopharmazie und Nuklearmedizin, Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum, Georgstrasse 11, 32545 Bad Oeynhausen (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Syntheses of no carrier added (n.c.a.) 6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-1-cyclopropyl-4-oxo-7-[4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-phenacyl -1-piperacinyl]-chinolincarboxylic acid ([{sup 18}F]COPCA) and n.c.a. 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-benzoyl-ubiquicidin 29-41 ([{sup 18}F]UBI 29-41) are described. [{sup 18}F]COPCA was synthesised within 120 min with a radiochemical yield of 9-12%. [{sup 18}F]UBI 29-41 was synthesised within 150 min with a radiochemical yield of 15-20%. Both compounds had a specific activity of more than 35 GBq/{mu} mol. The biological activity was verified by measuring its binding to Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Specific binding was found for [{sup 18}F]UBI 29-41 (12-17%), whereas no specific binding for [{sup 18}F]COPCA was found.

  18. Distinct summer and winter bacterial communities in the active layer of Svalbard permafrost revealed by DNA- and RNA-based analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schostag, Morten; Stibal, Marek; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2015-01-01

    N) by co-extracting DNA and RNA from 12 soil cores collected monthly over a year. PCR amplicons of 16S rRNA genes (DNA) and reverse transcribed transcripts (cDNA) were quantified and sequenced to test for the effect of low winter temperature and seasonal variation in concentration of easily degradable......The active layer of soil overlaying permafrost in the Arctic is subjected to dramatic annual changes in temperature and soil chemistry, which likely affect bacterial activity and community structure. We studied seasonal variations in the bacterial community of active layer soil from Svalbard (78º...

  19. The synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam3CSK4 modulates respiratory syncytial virus infection independent of TLR activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tien Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of acute respiratory disease in infants, immunocompromised subjects and the elderly. However, it is unclear why most primary RSV infections are associated with relatively mild symptoms, whereas some result in severe lower respiratory tract infections and bronchiolitis. Since RSV hospitalization has been associated with respiratory bacterial co-infections, we have tested if bacterial Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists influence RSV-A2-GFP infection in human primary cells or cell lines. The synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam3-Cys-Ser-Lys4 (Pam3CSK4, the prototype ligand for the heterodimeric TLR1/TLR2 complex, enhanced RSV infection in primary epithelial, myeloid and lymphoid cells. Surprisingly, enhancement was optimal when lipopeptides and virus were added simultaneously, whereas addition of Pam3CSK4 immediately after infection had no effect. We have identified two structurally related lipopeptides without TLR-signaling capacity that also modulate RSV infection, whereas Pam3CSK4-reminiscent TLR1/2 agonists did not, and conclude that modulation of infection is independent of TLR activation. A similar TLR-independent enhancement of infection could also be demonstrated for wild-type RSV strains, and for HIV-1, measles virus and human metapneumovirus. We show that the effect of Pam3CSK4 is primarily mediated by enhanced binding of RSV to its target cells. The N-palmitoylated cysteine and the cationic lysines were identified as pivotal for enhanced virus binding. Surprisingly, we observed inhibition of RSV infection in immortalized epithelial cell lines, which was shown to be related to interactions between Pam3CSK4 and negatively charged glycosaminoglycans on these cells, which are known targets for binding of laboratory-adapted but not wild-type RSV. These data suggest a potential role for bacterial lipopeptides in enhanced binding of RSV and other viruses to their target cells, thus affecting

  20. Evaluation of Personnel Activities in CZ, a.s. Company

    OpenAIRE

    Řeřábková, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of the company and it's personnel activities, focusing on selected areas (communication, interpersonal relationships and training managers). Evaluation of personnel activities and proposal for improvement.

  1. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae against bacterial multiresistant strains isolated from nosocomial patients

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    Adalberto Coelho da Costa

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are considered the main therapeutic option to treat bacterial infections; however, there is the disadvantage of increasing bacterial resistance. Thus, the research of antimicrobials of plant origin has been an important alternative. This work aimed at determining the in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae on multiresistant bacteria isolated from biological materials. 24 strains of nosocomial bacteria were used and divided into six different species that were inhibited by the essential oil in the preliminary "screening" which was accomplished by the diffusion technique in agar. MIC was determined by the microdilution method, beginning with solutions with the final concentrations: 8 up to 0.125% with the following results: The four samples (100% of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and MRSA were inhibited by the essential oil at the concentration of 0.125%. Three samples (75% of Acinetobacter baumannii at 0.125% and a sample (25% at 0.5%; Klebsiella pneumoniae (75% at 0.125% and 25% at 0.25%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (75% at 0.5% and 25% at 0.25%. MIC varied from 78 to 83%. It was concluded through the obtained data that there was not difference in the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.5% of the referred oil for Gram positive as well for Gram negative microorganisms.

  2. Benthic Foraminifera and Bacterial Activity as a Proxy for Environmental Characterization in Potengi Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico S. da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify possible zonation patterns and assess the environmental impact on the Potengi River Estuary, Rio Grande do Norte State, through the distribution of benthic foraminifera associated to bacterial activity and abiotic parameters. Six sediment samples were collected from locations that presented clear signs of pollution. The environment was predominantly anaerobic and fermentation occurred at all sites. Forty-two species of foraminifera were identified. The dominant species were Ammonia tepida and Arenoparrella mexicana, which are known to be opportunistic, and able to adapt to rapidly changing conditions. CCA analyses showed that salinity and organic matter, followed by bacterial carbon, were more strongly linked to organism distribution in the Potengi River Estuary. Dissolved oxygen concentration, temperature and total organic matter were higher at the estuary mouth than at the other sites, creating favorable conditions for foraminiferal growth and allowing the faunistic succession on the upper estuary. As foraminifera assemblages when associated to environmental parameters can be used as efficient proxies for environmental diagnosis, these results suggest that the Potengi Estuary is under great stress from the surrounding urban development.

  3. POTENTIAL ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF BACTERIAL ENDOPHYTES ISOLATED FROM FLACOURTIA JANGOMAS (LOUR.RAEUSCH, A LESS EXPLORED MEDICINAL PLANT

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    Swati Shukla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently focus on research has increased on natural products, new and useful compounds like antibiotics, chemotherapeutic agents, agrochemicals that are low toxic, highly effective and minor environment impact. The study was designed to screen the antibacterial potential of bacterial endophytes isolated from different medicinal plants against Gram positive and Gram negative human pathogenic bacteria. Endophytes were isolated by using standard protocols from three medicinal plants. Primary screening and secondary screening were done by perpendicular streaking and agar well diffusion method respectively to check antimicrobial property of endophytes. Antibiotic susceptibility test of pathogenic bacteria was determined by disc diffusion method against a number of antibiotics. After screening, it was found that FjR1 and FjF2 isolated from Flacourtia jangomas (Lour. Raeusch showed potential antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative pathogenic bacteria. The present study shows that F. jangomas is a good source for bacterial endophytes which can be promising source for production of effective antimicrobial compound with pharmacological importance.

  4. Randomized clinical study for comparative evaluation of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones with the combination of fortified antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vinit Mahendra; Tandon, Radhika; Satpathy, Gita; Nayak, Niranjan; Chawla, Bhavna; Agarwal, Tushar; Sharma, Namrata; Titiyal, Jeewan S; Vajpayee, Rasik B

    2010-07-01

    Comparative evaluation of efficacy of monotherapy with moxifloxacin (0.5%) or gatifloxacin (0.3%) with combination therapy of cefazolin (5%) and tobramycin (1.3%) in treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Patients diagnosed with bacterial keratitis (ulcer diameter 2-8 mm) were randomized to 1 of the 3 treatment groups (tobramycin 1.3% and cefazolin 5%, gatifloxacin 0.3%, or moxifloxacin 0.5%). After obtaining corneal scrapings, assigned study medication was instilled hourly for 48 hours and tapered as per clinical response. Healing of ulcer, duration to cure, adverse reactions, antibiogram profile, treatment failures, final visual acuity, and corneal opacity size were evaluated. A total of 61 patients were enrolled [cefazolin and tobramycin (n = 20), gatifloxacin (n = 21), and moxifloxacin (n = 20)]. Overall, 57 patients (93%) healed on treatment. On comparison of the mean time taken to heal, no statistically significant difference was found among all the 3 treatment groups (P = 0.98). Positive bacterial culture was obtained in only 38 patients (62%). There was no significant difference in the bacterial isolates in each treatment group. There were 4 (7%) treatment failures (perforation or nonhealing ulcer): 1 (5%) each in moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin group and 2 (10%) in fortified antibiotics group. All regimens were well tolerated. The study failed to find a difference in the efficacy of monotherapy with fourth-generation fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers of 2-8 mm size when compared with combination therapy of fortified antibiotics.

  5. Establishment of rat model of central venous catheter (CVC): associated infection and evaluation of the virulence of bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lian-Hua; Huang, Yun-Chao; Guo, Feng-Li; Liu, Xin; Zhao, Guang-Qiang; Duan, Lin-Can; Jin, Cong-Guo

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC)-associated infection model was established in rats to investigate and evaluate the effect of biofilms on the virulence of the pathogens. Twenty-four adult SD rats were randomly divided into biofilm positive (BF+) and biofilm negative (BF-) groups to be challenged with strains of S.epidermidis. Serum levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured and the infection rate and counts of bacteria cells were studied. Compared to rats of BF- group, the serum level of TNF and IL-6 significantly increased in rats of BF+ group (P infection rate and bacterial counts in tissues and blood of rats of BF + group were significantly higher than those of rats of BF- group (P associated infection model can be successfully reproduced in rats by injecting 5 × 10(6) CFU of S.epidermidis. Biofilm formation can significantly enhance the virulence of the bacteria, leading to uncontrolled infection. The serum level of inflammatory cytokines, infection rate and the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration are important markers for evaluating the virulence of biofilm.

  6. Activity of telithromycin and comparators against bacterial pathogens isolated from 1,336 patients with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis

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    Cohen Robert

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing antimicrobial resistance among the key pathogens responsible for community-acquired respiratory tract infections has the potential to limit the effectiveness of antibiotics available to treat these infections. Since there are regional differences in the susceptibility patterns observed and treatment is frequently empirical, the selection of antibiotic therapy may be challenging. PROTEKT, a global, longitudinal multicentre surveillance study, tracks the activity of telithromycin and comparator antibacterial agents against key respiratory tract pathogens. Methods In this analysis, we examine the prevalence of antibacterial resistance in 1,336 bacterial pathogens, isolated from adult and paediatric patients clinically diagnosed with acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS. Results and discussion In total, 58.0%, 66.1%, and 55.8% of S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefuroxime, and clarithromycin respectively. Combined macrolide resistance and reduced susceptibility to penicillin was present in 200/640 (31.3 % of S. pneumoniae isolates (128 isolates were resistant to penicillin [MIC >= 2 mg/L], 72 intermediate [MIC 0.12–1 mg/L] while 99.5% and 95.5% of isolates were susceptible to telithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively. In total, 88.2%, 87.5%, 99.4%, 100%, and 100% of H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to ampicillin, clarithromycin, cefuroxime, telithromycin, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively. In vitro, telithromycin demonstrated the highest activity against M. catarrhalis (MIC50 = 0.06 mg/L, MIC90 = 0.12 mg/L. Conclusion The high in vitro activity of against pathogens commonly isolated in ABS, together with a once daily dosing regimen and clinical efficacy with 5-day course of therapy, suggest that telithromycin may play a role in the empiric treatment of ABS.

  7. Expression of recombinant staphylokinase, a fibrin-specific plasminogen activator of bacterial origin, in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszberg, Aneta; Wiktorek-Smagur, Aneta; Hnatuszko-Konka, Katarzyna; Łuchniak, Piotr; Kononowicz, Andrzej K

    2012-03-01

    One of the most dynamically developing sectors of green biotechnology is molecular farming using transgenic plants as natural bioreactors for the large scale production of recombinant proteins with biopharmaceutical and therapeutic values. Such properties are characteristic of certain proteins of bacterial origin, including staphylokinase. For many years, work has been carried out on the use of this protein in thrombolytic therapy. In this study, transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants expressing a CaMV::sak-mgpf-gusA gene fusion, were obtained. AGL1 A. tumefaciens strain was used in the process of transformation. The presence of the staphylokinase gene was confirmed by PCR in 22.5% of the investigated plants. The expression of the fusion transgene was detected using the β-glucuronidase activity assay in 32 putative transgenic plants. Furthermore, on the basis of the GUS histochemical reaction, the transgene expression pattern had a strong, constitutive character in seven of the transformants. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a protein extract from the SAK/PCR-positive plants, revealed the presence of a119 kDa protein that corresponds to that of the fusion protein SAK-mGFP-GUSA. Western blot analysis, using an antibody against staphylokinase, showed the presence of the staphylokinase domain in the 119 kDa protein in six analyzed transformants. However, the enzymatic test revealed amidolytic activity characteristic of staphylokinase in the protein extract of only one plant. This is the first report on a Solanum tuberosum plant producing a recombinant staphylokinase protein, a plasminogen activator of bacterial origin.

  8. Induced polarization and self-potential geophysical signature of bacterial activity in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2013-12-01

    The first part of the presentation will be dedicated to the spectral induced polarization signature of bacteria in porous media. We developed a quantitative model to investigate frequency-domain induced polarization response of suspensions of bacteria and bacteria growth in porous media. Induced polarization of bacteria (alpha-polarization) is related to the properties of the electrical double layer of the bacteria. Surface conductivity and alpha-polarization are due to the Stern layer of counterions occurring in a brush of polymers coating the surface of the bacteria. These phenomena can be related to the cation exchange capacity of the bacteria. The mobility of the counterions in this Stern layer is found to be very small (4.7×10-10 m2s-1 V-1 at 25°C). This implies a very low relaxation frequency for the alpha-polarization of the bacteria cells (typically around 0.1 to 5 Hertz) in agreement with experimental observations. This new model can be coupled to reactive transport modeling codes in which the evolution of bacterial populations are usually described by Monod kinetics. We show that the growth rate and endogenous decay coefficients of bacteria in a porous sand can be inferred non-intrusively from time lapse frequency-domain induced polarization data. The second part of the presentation will concern the biogeobattery mechanism showing new data, the concept of transient biogeobattery and the influence of the concentration of the electron acceptors in the process.

  9. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural and enzymatic characterization of ABgp46, a novel phage endolysin with broad anti-Gram-negative bacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo eOliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the antibacterial potential of a phage endolysin against Gram-negative pathogens, particularly on A. baumannii multidrug resistant strains. We have cloned, heterologously expressed and characterized a novel endolysin (ABgp46 from Acinetobacter phage vb_AbaP_CEB1 and tested its antibacterial activity against several multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. LC-MS revealed ABgp46 is an N-acetylmuramidase, that is also active at a broad pH range (4.0-10.0 and up to 50°C. Interestingly, ABgp46 has intrinsic and specific anti-A. baumannii activity, reducing up to 2 logs of multidrug resistant strains, in a 2 hour-time frame. By combining ABgp46 with several organic acids that act as outer membrane permeabilizing agents, it is possible to increase and broaden its antibacterial activity to other Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Especially in the presence of citric and malic acid, ABgp46 reduces A. baumannii below detection limit (> 5 log and more than 4 logs P. aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhimurium strains. Overall, this globular endolysin presents a broad and high activity against Gram-negative pathogens, that can be enhanced in presence of citric and malic acid, and be used in human and veterinary medicine.

  11. Structural and Enzymatic Characterization of ABgp46, a Novel Phage Endolysin with Broad Anti-Gram-Negative Bacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Hugo; Vilas Boas, Diana; Mesnage, Stéphane; Kluskens, Leon D; Lavigne, Rob; Sillankorva, Sanna; Secundo, Francesco; Azeredo, Joana

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the antibacterial potential of a phage endolysin against Gram-negative pathogens, particularly against multidrug resistant strains of Acinetobacter baumannii. We have cloned, heterologously expressed and characterized a novel endolysin (ABgp46) from Acinetobacter phage vb_AbaP_CEB1 and tested its antibacterial activity against several multidrug-resistant A. baumannii strains. LC-MS revealed that ABgp46 is an N-acetylmuramidase, that is also active over a broad pH range (4.0-10.0) and temperatures up to 50°C. Interestingly, ABgp46 has intrinsic and specific anti-A. baumannii activity, reducing multidrug resistant strains by up to 2 logs within 2 h. By combining ABgp46 with several organic acids that act as outer membrane permeabilizing agents, it is possible to increase and broaden antibacterial activity to include other Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. In the presence of citric and malic acid, ABgp46 reduces A. baumannii below the detection limit (>5 log) and more than 4 logs Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium strains. Overall, this globular endolysin exhibits a broad and high activity against Gram-negative pathogens, that can be enhanced in presence of citric and malic acid, and be used in human and veterinary medicine.

  12. Evaluation of a new rapid diagnostic kit (FemExam) for bacterial vaginosis in patients with vaginal discharge syndrome in The Gambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    West, Beryl; Morison, Linda; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten; Gooding, Euphemia; Awasana, Akum Aveika; Demba, Edward; Mayaud, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in resource-poor primary health care settings is often overlooked; there is a need for a cheap, rapid, objective point-of-care diagnostic test. The goal was to determine the prevalence of BV and to evaluate the performance of a new commercial diagnostic test kit

  13. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  14. Comparative in vitro activity of ceftibuten (Sch 39720) against bacterial enteropathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawar, R; LaRocco, M; Cleary, T G

    1989-01-01

    Ceftibuten is a new orally active cephalosporin with significant bioavailability. Its in vitro activity was compared with those of other agents against 383 strains of enteric pathogens derived from clinical specimens. Ceftibuten was very active against the strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae tested (overall MIC for 90% of strains tested, 0.25 microgram/ml) but was less active against Campylobacter jejuni (MIC for 90% of strains, 16 micrograms/ml). The MBC was one to two dilutions higher than the corresponding MICs for most pathogens tested. PMID:2751289

  15. Evaluation of bacterial adherence of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus sp. using a competitive model: An in vitro approach to the "race for the surface" theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, M; Perez-Jorge, C; Lozano, D; Portal-Nuñez, S; Perez-Tanoira, R; Conde, A; Arenas, M A; Hernandez-Lopez, J M; de Damborenea, J J; Gomez-Barrena, E; Esbrit, P; Esteban, J

    2017-05-01

    Implant-related infection is one of the most devastating complications in orthopaedic surgery. Many surface and/or material modifications have been developed in order to minimise this problem; however, most of the in vitro studies did not evaluate bacterial adhesion in the presence of eukaryotic cells, as stated by the 'race for the surface' theory. Moreover, the adherence of numerous clinical strains with different initial concentrations has not been studied. We describe a method for the study of bacterial adherence in the presence of preosteoblastic cells. For this purpose we mixed different concentrations of bacterial cells from collection and clinical strains of staphylococci isolated from implant-related infections with preosteoblastic cells, and analysed the minimal concentration of bacteria able to colonise the surface of the material with image analysis. Our results show that clinical strains adhere to the material surface at lower concentrations than collection strains. A destructive effect of bacteria on preosteoblastic cells was also detected, especially with higher concentrations of bacteria. The method described herein can be used to evaluate the effect of surface modifications on bacterial adherence more accurately than conventional monoculture studies. Clinical strains behave differently than collection strains with respect to bacterial adherence.Cite this article: M. Martinez-Perez, C. Perez-Jorge, D. Lozano, S. Portal-Nuñez, R. Perez-Tanoira, A. Conde, M. A. Arenas, J. M. Hernandez-Lopez, J. J. de Damborenea, E. Gomez-Barrena, P. Esbrit, J. Esteban. Evaluation of bacterial adherence of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus sp. using a competitive model: An in vitro approach to the "race for the surface" theory. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:315-322. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.65.BJR-2016-0226.R2. © 2017 Martinez-Perez et al.

  16. Bacterial Species-Specific Activity of a Fluoroquinolone against Two Closely Related Pasteurellaceae with Similar MICs: Differential In Vitro Inoculum Effects and In Vivo Efficacies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lhermie

    Full Text Available We investigated the antimicrobial activity of a fluoroquinolone against two genetically close bacterial species belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family. Time-kill experiments were used to measure the in vitro activity of marbofloxacin against two strains of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida with similar MICs. We observed that marbofloxacin was equally potent against 105 CFU/mL inocula M. haemolytica and P. multocida. However, an inoculum effect was observed with P. multocida, meaning that marbofloxacin activity was decreased against a 108 CFU/mL inoculum, whereas no inoculum effect was observed with M. haemolytica. Marbofloxacin activity was also tested in a lung infection model with immunocompromised mice intratracheally infected with 109 CFU of each bacteria. At the same dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were much better for mice infected with M. haemolytica than for those infected with P. multocida. Moreover, bacteriological eradication was obtained with a lower marbofloxacin dose for mice infected with M. haemolytica. Our results suggest that the differential in vivo marbofloxacin efficacy observed with the two bacterial species of similar MIC could be explained by a differential inoculum effect. Consequently, MICs determined on 105 CFU inocula were not predictive of the differences in antibiotic efficacies against high bacterial inocula of closely related bacterial strains. These results could stimulate further investigations on bacterial species-specific antibiotic doses in a clinical setting.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu-Rim; Choi, Min-Seon; Choi, Geun-Won; Park, Il-Kwon; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs) originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. PMID:27493612

  18. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Rim Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit.

  19. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  20. Rapid nanoparticle-mediated monitoring of bacterial metabolic activity and assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood with magnetic relaxation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Kaittanis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased incidence of bacterial infections and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria at the global level, we designed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nanosensors for the assessment of antimicrobial susceptibility through magnetic relaxation. In this report, we demonstrate that iron oxide nanosensors, either dextran-coated supplemented with Con A or silica-coated conjugated directly to Con A, can be used for the fast (1 quantification of polysaccharides, (2 assessment of metabolic activity and (3 determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in blood. The use of these polysaccharide nanosensors in the determination of antimicrobial susceptibility in the clinic or the field, and the utilization of these nanoprobes in pharmaceutical R&D are anticipated.

  1. Activation of toll-like receptors and dendritic cells by a broad range of bacterial molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, L.C.L.; Bajramovic, J.J.; Vries, A.M.M.B.C. de; Voskamp-Visser, I.A.I.; Kaman, W.E.; Kleij, D. van der

    2009-01-01

    Activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by pathogens leads to activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC), which orchestrate the development of the adaptive immune response. To create an overview of the effects of a broad range of pathogenic bacteria,

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum aqueous seed extracts against some pathogenic bacterial strains

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-daihan, Sooad

    2014-01-01

    Seeds aqueous extracts from Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum were investigated for antibacterial activity by disc diffusion method and protein profile. Both seed aqueous extracts show moderate inhibition against pathogenic bacteria, both gram positive including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacilllus subtillis and gram negative bacteria including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Overall analysis of the antibacterial activity of tested samples revealed ...

  3. Safety evaluation and bacterial community of kung-som using PCR-DGGE technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutanate Saelao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the safety of kung-som which was distributed in local markets and using PCR-DGGE technique to identify microflora in kung-som. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were found at counts of more than 7 log CFU g-1 in all samples and the total viable counts were about 5-8 log CFU g-1 . Bacillus cereus and yeasts were detected at around 2 log CFU g-1 and 5-6log CFU g-1, respectively. For DGGE analysis, LAB and coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS bacteria dominated over other microorganisms. The sequencing of the DNA bands from DGGE gels corresponding to kung-som samples showed the presence of LAB as the major microflora in the products, namely: Lactobacillus farciminis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus garvieae, Tetragenococcus halophilus and Weissella thailandensis. In addition, Staphylococcus carnosus was detected in kung-som as minor microflora. These dominant strains would allow the development of defined starter cultures for improving the quality of kung-som.

  4. Isolation, characterization, and evaluation of bacterial root and nodule endophytes from chickpea cultivated in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Ranjana; Dudeja, Surjit Singh; Giri, Rupa; Kumar, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria from roots (12 isolates) and nodules (76 isolates) of chickpea legume grown under CCS Haryana Agricultural University farm were isolated. Among the endophytic bacteria, 50% from roots and 93.4% from nodules were Gram positive spore formers. Large number of endophytes from roots and nodules solubilized phosphate and produced ammonia. Isolate CRE3, and CNE215, were most efficient P solubilizers and. CRE12 and CNE76 being most efficient ammonia producer. Interestingly, few endophytic bacteria produced organic acid. Further selected 62 isolates were used to determine molecular diversity by RFLP of PCR amplified 16S rDNA. Endophytes from roots formed five separate clusters and nodule endophytes formed 13 clusters. Isolate CNE215 from nodules and CRE1 from roots possessed multiple beneficial traits and belonged two different clusters. These two isolates were identified after amplification and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene. Isolate CNE215 showed more than 98% similarity with partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene of Bacillus subtilis, whereas CRE1 showed more than 98% similarity with Bacillus licheniformis. Efficacy of these two strains was evaluated under field conditions and an increase up to 22.5% in grain yield over uninoculated control was observed with B. subtilis strain CNE215, whereas all the recommended biofertilizers were able to record an increase upto 14.4%. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The Effect of Reduced Bacterial Dilution on Human Amniotic Membrane Antibacterial Activity, in Vitro

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    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan-Dallal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human amniotic membrane is the inner most layer of placenta and has antimicrobial effect, due to the presence of human beta-defensins and elafins. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of dilution reduction of 0.5 McFarland prepared from standard bacterial strains of Salmonella enterica BAA-708, Escherichia coli ATCC25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC7881, and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC29212 on antibacterial effect of human amniotic membranes in vitro.Materials and Methods: The amniotic membranes were obtained from the bank of organ transplantation in Imam Khomeini hospital, of women with elective cesarean section whose HIV, HBV, HCV and VDRL serological tests were negative. They were cut to 1.5×1.5 cm pieces. Then 0.5 McFarland suspensions of 1.5×108, 0.5×107 and 1.5×106 dilutions were prepared from bacteria which then were spread on Mueller Hinton medium agar and a piece of membrane was put in the center of each plate. After 24 hours incubation at 37ᵒC, the results were observed.Results: In 0.5 McFarland standard dilution an inhibition zone was created in three standard strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica unlike the other two strains. There was no change in the above results with two other dilutions and inhibition zone of sensitive strains was not created.Conclusion: Dilution reduction of microbial strains does not affect the antibacterial impact of amniotic membrane and dilution reduction does not yield to a false positive response and the conversion of resistant to sensitive strains.

  6. Evidence of intense archaeal and bacterial methanotrophic activity in the Black Sea water column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisch-Kaiser, Edith; Klauser, Lucia; Wehrli, Bernhard; Schubert, Carsten

    2005-12-01

    In the northwestern Black Sea, methane oxidation rates reveal that above shallow and deep gas seeps methane is removed from the water column as efficiently as it is at sites located off seeps. Hence, seeps should not have a significant impact on the estimated annual flux of approximately 4.1 x 10(9) mol methane to the atmosphere [W. S. Reeburgh, B. B. Ward, S. C. Wahlen, K. A. Sandbeck, K. A. Kilatrick, and L. J. Kerkhof, Deep-Sea Res. 38(Suppl. 2):S1189-S1210, 1991]. Both the stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved methane and the microbial community structure analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization provide strong evidence that microbially mediated methane oxidation occurs. At the shelf, strong isotope fractionation was observed above high-intensity seeps. This effect was attributed to bacterial type I and II methanotrophs, which on average accounted for 2.5% of the DAPI (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole)-stained cells in the whole oxic water column. At deep sites, in the oxic-anoxic transition zone, strong isotopic fractionation of methane overlapped with an increased abundance of Archaea and Bacteria, indicating that these organisms are involved in the oxidation of methane. In underlying anoxic water, we successfully identified the archaeal methanotrophs ANME-1 and ANME-2, eachof which accounted for 3 to 4% of the total cell counts. ANME-1 and ANME-2 appear as single cells in anoxicwater, compared to the sediment, where they may form cell aggregates with sulfate-reducing bacteria (A. Boetius, K. Ravenschlag, C. J. Schubert, D. Rickert, F. Widdel, A. Giesecke, R. Amann, B. B. Jørgensen, U. Witte, and O. Pfannkuche, Nature 407:623-626, 2000; V. J. Orphan, C. H. House, K.-U. Hinrichs, K. D. McKeegan, and E. F. DeLong, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:7663-7668, 2002).

  7. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

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    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  8. Polyphasic bacterial community analysis of an aerobic activated sludge removing phenols and thiocyanate from coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfoldi, T.; Szekely, A.J.; Goral, R.; Barkacs, K.; Scheirich, G.; Andras, J.; Racz, A.; Marialigeti, K. [Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Microbiology

    2010-05-15

    Biological purification processes are effective tools in the treatment of hazardous wastes such as toxic compounds produced in coal coking. In this study, the microbial community of a lab-scale activated sludge system treating coking effluent was assessed by cultivation-based (strain isolation and identification, biodegradation tests) and culture-independent techniques (sequence-aided T-RFLP, taxon-specific PCR). The results of the applied polyphasic approach showed a simple microbial community dominated by easily culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Comamonas badia was identified as the key microbe of the system, since it was the predominant member of the bacterial community, and its phenol degradation capacity was also proved. Metabolism of phenol, even at elevated concentrations (up to 1500 mg/L), was also presented for many other dominant (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter, Oligella) and minor (Alcaligenes, Castellaniella, Microbacterium) groups, while some activated sludge bacteria (Sphingomonas, Rhodopseudomonas) did not tolerate it even in lower concentrations (250 mg/L). In some cases, closely related strains showed different tolerance and degradation properties. Members of the genus Thiobacillus were detected in the activated sludge, and were supposedly responsible for the intensive thiocyanate biodegradation observed in the system. Additionally, some identified bacteria (e.g. C. badia and the Ottowia-related strains) might also have had a significant impact on the structure of the activated sludge due to their floc-forming abilities.

  9. Evaluation of a 2-aminoimidazole variant as adjuvant treatment for dermal bacterial infections

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    Draughn GL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available G Logan Draughn,1 C Leigh Allen,1 Patricia A Routh,2 Maria R Stone,2 Kelly R Kirker,3 Laura Boegli,3 Ryan M Schuchman,1 Keith E Linder,2 Ronald E Baynes,2 Garth James,3 Christian Melander,4 Angela Pollard,5 John Cavanagh1 1Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, 2Department of Population Health and Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 3Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 5Agile Sciences Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: 2-Aminoimidazole (2-AI-based compounds have been shown to efficiently disrupt biofilm formation, disperse existing biofilms, and resensitize numerous multidrug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, we provide initial pharmacological studies regarding the application of a 2-AI as a topical adjuvant for persistent dermal infections. In vitro assays indicated that the 2-AI H10 is nonbactericidal, resensitizes bacteria to antibiotics, does not harm the integument, and promotes wound healing. Furthermore, in vivo application of H10 on swine skin caused no gross abnormalities or immune reactions. Taken together, these results indicate that H10 represents a promising lead dermal adjuvant compound. Keywords: transdermal absorption, antimicrobial activity, skin irritation, synergism, oroidin derivative, drip-flow reactor, ESKAPE pathogens

  10. Evaluation of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Some Common Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Qadir, Muhammad; Shahzadi, Syeda Kiran; Bashir, Asad; Munir, Adil; Shahzad, Shabnam

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the phenolic, flavonoid contents and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum), mint (Mentha spicata), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), oak (Quercus), aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis Miller), and ginger (Zingiber officinale). All extracts showed a wide range of total phenolic contents, that is, 4.96 to 98.37 mg/100 g gallic acid equivalents, and total flavonoid contents, that is, 0.41 to 17.64 mg/100 g catechin equivalents. Antioxidant activity (AA) was determined by measuring reducing power, inhibition of peroxidation using linoleic acid system, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity. Different extracts inhibited oxidation of linoleic acid by 16.6-84.2% while DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 values) ranged from 17.8% to 79.1 μg/mL. Reducing power at 10 mg/mL extract concentration ranged from 0.11 to 0.84 nm. Furthermore the extracts of these medicinal herbs in 80% methanol, 80% ethanol, 80% acetone, and 100% water were screened for antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion method against selected bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Pasteurella multocida, and fungal strains, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus solani, and Alternaria alternata. The extracts show better antimicrobial activity against bacterial strains as compared to fungal strains. Results of various assays were analyzed statistically by applying appropriate statistical methods.

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): evaluation from clinical, immunological and bacterial pathogenesis perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Borchers, Michael T; Panos, Ralph J

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disease manifested by significantly impaired airflow, afflicts ∼14.2 million cases in the United States alone with an estimated 63 million people world-wide. Although there are a number of causes, the predominant cause is excessive tobacco smoke. In fact, in China, there have been estimates of 315,000,000 people that smoke. Other less frequent causes are associated with indirect cigarette smoke, air pollutants, biomass fuels, and genetic mutations. COPD is often associated with heart disease, lung cancer, osteoporosis and conditions can worsen in patients with sudden falls. COPD also affects both innate and adaptive immune processes. Cigarette smoke increases the expression of matrix metalloproteases and proinflammatory chemokines and increases lung titers of natural killer cells and neutrophils. Yet, neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by the phagocytic respiratory burst and phagocytosis is impaired by nicotine. In contrast to innate immunity in COPD, dendritic cells represent leukocytes recruited to the lung that link the innate immune responses to adaptive immune responses by activating naïve T cells through antigen presentation. The autoimmune process that is also a significant part of inflammation associated with COPD. Moreover, coupled with restricted FEV1 values, are the prevalence of patients with single or multiple infections by bacteria, viruses and fungi. Finally, we focus on one of the more problematic infectious agents, the Gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Specifically, we delve into the development of highly problematic biofilm infections that are highly refractory to conventional antibiotic therapies in COPD. We offer a non-conventional, biocidal treatment that may be effective for COPD airway infections as well as with combinations of current antibiotic regimens for more effective treatment outcomes and relief for patients with COPD.

  12. Detection of carboxylesterase and esterase activity in culturable gut bacterial flora isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus, from India and its possible role in indoxacarb degradation

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    Shanivarsanthe Leelesh Ramya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diamondback moth (DBM, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus, is a notorious pest of brassica crops worldwide and is resistant to all groups of insecticides. The insect system harbors diverse groups of microbiota, which in turn helps in enzymatic degradation of xenobiotic-like insecticides. The present study aimed to determine the diversity of gut microflora in DBM, quantify esterase activity and elucidate their possible role in degradation of indoxacarb. We screened 11 geographic populations of DBM in India and analyzed them for bacterial diversity. The culturable gut bacterial flora underwent molecular characterization with 16S rRNA. We obtained 25 bacterial isolates from larvae (n = 13 and adults (n = 12 of DBM. In larval gut isolates, gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant (76%, followed by bacilli (15.4%. Molecular characterization placed adult gut bacterial strains into three major classes based on abundance: gammaproteobacteria (66%, bacilli (16.7% and flavobacteria (16.7%. Esterase activity from 19 gut bacte