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Sample records for evaluating antiretroviral therapy

  1. A Mathematical Model of Antiretroviral Therapy Evaluation for HIV Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio; Mo Yang, Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Treating HIV-infected patients with a combination of several antiretroviral drugs can lead to emergence of the drug-resistant strain. This work proposes a mathematical model to evaluate the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistant during antiretroviral therapy. The model assumes that all susceptible individuals who can be infected by the wildtype strain (sensible to the treatment) or by drug-resistant virus receive antiretroviral therapy. Patients on treatment regimen can evolve to a state of success or failure and for the individuals in therapeutic fail the therapeutic schema is changed. The analysis of system is performed. The existence and stability of the steady states are considered. We address an analytical expression for the reproductive number in a community where antiretroviral therapy are widely used to treat HIV and where both drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are co-circulating.

  2. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of lipodystrophy in HIV-positive patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, K; Bickel, T M; Klauke, S; Eisen, J; Vogl, T J; Zangos, S

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated retrospectively an automated method for the separate detection of subcutaneous and visceral fat in the abdominal region by magnetic resonance studies in HIV-positive patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The patients were divided into four different groups: lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, mixed and the control group. The use of software for the automated detection of abdominal compartment visceral adipose tissue (VAT), total adipose tissue (TAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was compared to manual evaluation methods (fuzzy C-mean). The results of ROC analysis showed that the parameters, particularly the VAT, are better than the VAT/TAT and at identifying patients with the symptoms of abdominal fat accumulation. A sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 79.5% resulted from a threshold VAT value of >87 cm(2). Moreover, the manual evaluation method was shown to provide greater values for VAT and the VAT/TAT ratio than those given by the automated method. In the present study, a rapid MRI protocol for the detection and assessment of the course of lipodystrophy was presented and tested on a group of patients with signs of HALS, as well as on an antiretroviral naïve control group. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Evaluation of quantitative liver function tests in HIV-positive patients under anti-retroviral therapy

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    Miller M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Quantitative tests of liver function (QTLF which are based on the hepatic metabolism or clearance of test substances have been successfully used to predict prognosis of a variety of different liver diseases. Still sufficient data in HIV-patients under anti-retroviral therapy (ART are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this prospective study was to investigate if and to what extent ART influences a broad panel of quantitative tests of liver function in patients with HIV-infection. Patients and methods Nineteen patients (14 males, 5 females, mean age 40 years with HIV-infection underwent QTLF including lidocaine half-life test (LHT, galactose elimination capacity (GEC, and indocyanine green clearance (IGC. These tests were performed before and 3 to 6 months after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy. Twenty age-matched healthy, medication-and virus-free adults served as controls. Results Lidocaine half-life was significantly lower in HIV-patients without ART. Combining anti-retroviral therapies shifted cytochrome p450 activity back into standard ranges. Galactose elimination capacity as a parameter of cytosolic liver function and indocyanine green clearance as a parameter of liver perfusion were not affected by ART. Conclusions QTLF may be a tool to predict prognosis or hepatic complications in HIV-infected patients with liver disease. Early determination of lidocaine half-life seems to be useful - this should be considered during the treatment of HIV-positive individuals.

  5. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Oral Levofloxacin in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects Receiving Concomitant Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Villani, P.; Viale, P.; Signorini, L.; Cadeo, B.; Marchetti, F.; Villani, A.; Fiocchi, C; Regazzi, M B; Carosi, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) profile of oral levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients in steady-state treatment with nelfinavir (NFV) or with efavirenz (EFV) and to determine the effects of levofloxacin on the PK parameters of these two antiretroviral agents. For levofloxacin, plasma samples were obtained at steady state during a 24-h dosing interval. Plasma NFV and EFV concentrations were evaluated before and after 4 days of levofl...

  6. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices. Margaret Williams, Dalena R.M. Van Rooyen, Esmeralda Jennifer Ricks. Abstract. Despite efforts to scale up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly at primary health care (PHC) facilities, antiretroviral therapy (ART) continues to be out of reach for ...

  7. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy Search ... Vaccine? What is a Preventive HIV Vaccine? HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials ... HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics Just Diagnosed: Next Steps ...

  8. Effects of antiretroviral therapy on semen quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Repping, Sjoerd; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, Jan Karel M.; Reiss, Peter; van der Veen, Fulco; Prins, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on semen quality. DESIGN: A longitudinal cohort study. SETTING: The HIV outpatient clinic of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. SUBJECTS: A cohort of 34 male patients with different estimated

  9. HIV-1 transmission during early antiretroviral therapy: evaluation of two HIV-1 transmission events in the HPTN 052 prevention study.

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    Li-Hua Ping

    Full Text Available In the HPTN 052 study, transmission between HIV-discordant couples was reduced by 96% when the HIV-infected partner received suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. We examined two transmission events where the newly infected partner was diagnosed after the HIV-infected partner (index initiated therapy. We evaluated the sequence complexity of the viral populations and antibody reactivity in the newly infected partner to estimate the dates of transmission to the newly infected partners. In both cases, transmission most likely occurred significantly before HIV-1 diagnosis of the newly infected partner, and either just before the initiation of therapy or before viral replication was adequately suppressed by therapy of the index. This study further strengthens the conclusion about the efficacy of blocking transmission by treating the infected partner of discordant couples. However, this study does not rule out the potential for HIV-1 transmission to occur shortly after initiation of ART, and this should be recognized when antiretroviral therapy is used for HIV-1 prevention.

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected subjects in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the early days of antiretroviral therapy, adherence has emerged a milestone to success. The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors militating against adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected individuals in the resource - limited setting of the Niger Delta of Nigeria. A structured interviewer- ...

  11. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam: results from a national evaluation.

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    Duc Bui Nguyen

    Full Text Available Vietnam has significantly scaled up its national antiretroviral therapy (ART program since 2005. With the aim of improving Vietnam's national ART program, we conducted an outcome evaluation of the first five years of the program in this concentrated HIV epidemic where the majority of persons enrolled in HIV care and treatment services are people who inject drugs (PWID. The results of this evaluation may have relevance for other national ART programs with significant PWID populations.Retrospective cohort analysis of patients at 30 clinics randomly selected with probability proportional to size among 120 clinics with at least 50 patients on ART.Charts of patients whose ART initiation was at least 6 months prior to the study date were abstracted. Depending on clinic size, either all charts or a random sample of 300 charts were selected. Analyses were limited to treatment-naïve patients. Multiple imputations were used for missing data.Of 7,587 patient charts sampled, 6,875 were those of treatment-naïve patients (74.4% male, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 72.4-76.5, median age 30, interquartile range [IQR]: 26-34, 62.0% reported a history of intravenous drug use, CI: 58.6-65.3. Median baseline CD4 cell count was 78 cells/mm(3 (IQR: 30-162 and 30.4% (CI: 25.8-35.1 of patients were at WHO stage IV. The majority of patients started d4T/3TC/NVP (74.3% or d4T/3TC/EFV (18.6%. Retention rates after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months were 88.4% (CI: 86.8-89.9, 84.0% (CI: 81.8-86.0, 78.8% (CI: 75.7-81.6, and 74.6% (CI: 69.6-79.0. Median CD4 cell count gains after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months were 94 (IQR: 45-153, 142 (IQR: 78-217, 213 (IQR: 120-329, and 254 (IQR: 135-391 cells/mm(3. Patients who were PWID showed significantly poorer retention.The study showed good retention and immunological response to ART among a predominantly PWID group of patients despite advanced HIV infections at baseline.

  12. Adult antiretroviral therapy guidelines 2014

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    G. Meintjes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available These guidelines are intended as an update to those published in the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine in 2012. Since the release of the previous guidelines, the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in southern Africa has continued. Cohort studies from the region show excellent clinical outcomes; however, ART is still being initiated late (in advanced disease in some patients, resulting in relatively high early mortality rates. New data on antiretroviral drugs have become available. Although currently few, there are patients in the region who are failing protease-inhibitor-based second-line regimens. To address this, guidelines on third-line therapy have been expanded.Please find a link to the update of this guideline: http://sajhivmed.org.za/index.php/hivmed/article/view/428

  13. When to start antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred M

    2013-01-01

    Strategies for use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) have traditionally focused on providing treatment to persons who stand to benefit immediately from initiating the therapy. There is global consensus that any HIV+ person with CD4 counts less than 350 cells/μl should initiate ART. However......, it remains controversial whether ART is indicated in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts above 350 cells/μl, or whether it is more advisable to defer initiation until the CD4 count has dropped to 350 cells/μl. The question of when the best time is to initiate ART during early HIV infection has...

  14. Economic evaluation of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected patients: an update of Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Giorgio L; Di Matteo, Sergio; Antinori, Andrea; Medaglia, Massimo; Murachelli, Silvia; Rizzardini, Giuliano

    2013-10-03

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has allowed many HIV-infected patients to enjoy longer survival and a better quality of life. We performed an economic analysis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HAART regimens in Italy for managing HIV-naïve infected patients with a viral load below 100,000 copies/mL. The population considered in the model consisted of adult subjects with an HIV viral load below 100,000 copies/mL who received antiretroviral HAART treatment for the first time, according to the Italian National Guidelines with recommendation grade A1. The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) was carried out by means of a Markov model. Both the outcomes (QALYs) and the costs were discounted by 3.5%. The time horizon adopted in the model was 10 years. The point of view of the analysis was that of the Italian national health service. The tenofovir (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC)/rilpivirine (RPV) single-tablet regimen (STR) (€7,417.00) revealed the lowest mean treatment cost. TDF/FTC + raltegravir (RAL) showed a better quality of life (0.906 QALY/year), followed by TDF/FTC/RPV (STR; 0.900 QALY/year), TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen) (0.889 QALY/year), and TDF/FTC + atazanavir (ATV/r) (0.886 QALY/year). TDF/FTC/RPV (STR) appeared to be the most cost-effective therapeutic choice (€13,655.00), followed by TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen) (€15,803.00), and TDF/FTC + efavirenz (EFV) (€16,181.00). The sensitivity analysis on the main variables confirmed the validity of the base case scenario. STR (TDF/FTC/RPV) is the most cost-effective treatment strategy compared with the other therapeutic regimens recommended by the Italian guidelines for the treatment of naïve patients with a viral load HIV-infected patients affects the cost-effectiveness ratio of all HAART regimens.

  15. Efavirenz decreases etonogestrel exposure: a pharmacokinetic evaluation of implantable contraception with antiretroviral therapy.

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    Chappell, Catherine A; Lamorde, Mohammed; Nakalema, Shadia; Chen, Beatrice A; Mackline, Hope; Riddler, Sharon A; Cohn, Susan E; Darin, Kristin M; Achilles, Sharon L; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2017-09-10

    The primary objective of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of etonogestrel (ENG) released from a contraceptive implant in Ugandan women living with HIV who were receiving efavirenz (EFV) or nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared with ART-naive women over 24 weeks. Nonrandomized, parallel-group study with three arms: ART-naive, NVP, or EFV-based ART (N = 20/group). Sparse pharmacokinetic sampling of ENG, NVP, or EFV were performed at screening, entry, and then 1, 4, 12, and 24-week postimplant insertion. The primary endpoint was ENG concentrations at week 24, compared between the ART-naive group and each ART group, using geometric mean ratio (GMR) with 90% confidence intervals. Sixty participants competed the 24-week study and data from 58 participants are included; one participant each was excluded from the NVP group and EFV group because of a sample processing error and ART nonadherence, respectively. At week 24, geometric mean ENG was 362, 341, and 66 pg/ml in the ART-naive, NVP, and EFV groups, respectively [GMR: NVP : ART-naive 0.94 (0.90-1.01); EFV : ART-naive 0.18 (0.17-0.20)]. NVP and EFV concentrations were lower at week 24 compared to preimplant [NVP: geometric mean 5.7 versus 6.8 mg/l, respectively, GMR 0.84 (0.83-0.85); EFV: geometric mean 3.6 versus 4.9 mg/l, respectively, GMR 0.73 (0.69-0.80)]. After 24 weeks of combined use, ENG exposure was 82% lower in women using EFV-based ART compared with ART-naive women. In contrast, NVP did not significantly impact ENG exposure. These results raise concerns about reduced effectiveness of implantable contraception for women taking EFV-based ART.

  16. Scaling-up access to antiretroviral therapy for children: A cohort study evaluating care and treatment at mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. van Dijk (Janneke); W.J. Moss (William); F. Hamangaba (Francis); B. Munsanje (Bornface); C.G. Sutcliffe (Catherine)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Travel time and distance are barriers to care for HIV-infected children in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Decentralization of care is one strategy to scale-up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), but few programs have been evaluated. We compared outcomes for children receiving

  17. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Hermans, Sabine; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Auerbach, Brandon; Semeere, Aggrey; Sempa, Joseph; Ssennono, Mark; Ssewankambo, Fred; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness in Uganda of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods The cost-effectiveness of ART was evaluated on the assumption that ART reduces the risk of an HIV-positive pregnant

  18. Economic evaluation of initial antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected patients: an update of Italian guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo GL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio L Colombo,1,2 Sergio Di Matteo,2 Andrea Antinori,3 Massimo Medaglia,4 Silvia Murachelli,3 Giuliano Rizzardini51Department of Drug Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; 2SAVE – Studi Analisi Valutazioni Economiche, Milan, Italy; 3National Institute for Infectious Diseases L Spallanzani, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; 4Pharmaceutical Department, L. Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5First Division of Infectious Disease, L. Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy Introduction: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has allowed many HIV-infected patients to enjoy longer survival and a better quality of life. We performed an economic analysis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HAART regimens in Italy for managing HIV-naïve infected patients with a viral load below 100,000 copies/mL.Patients and methods: The population considered in the model consisted of adult subjects with an HIV viral load below 100,000 copies/mL who received antiretroviral HAART treatment for the first time, according to the Italian National Guidelines with recommendation grade A1. The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs was carried out by means of a Markov model. Both the outcomes (QALYs and the costs were discounted by 3.5%. The time horizon adopted in the model was 10 years. The point of view of the analysis was that of the Italian national health service.Results: The tenofovir (TDF/emtricitabine (FTC/rilpivirine (RPV single-tablet regimen (STR (€7,417.00 revealed the lowest mean treatment cost. TDF/FTC + raltegravir (RAL showed a better quality of life (0.906 QALY/year, followed by TDF/FTC/RPV (STR; 0.900 QALY/year, TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen (0.889 QALY/year, and TDF/FTC + atazanavir (ATV/r (0.886 QALY/year. TDF/FTC/RPV (STR appeared to be the most cost-effective therapeutic choice (€13,655.00, followed by TDF/FTC + RPV (multipill regimen (€15,803.00, and TDF/FTC + efavirenz (EFV (€16,181.00. The sensitivity analysis on

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy Dose Adjustments Based On Calculated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Whereas therapy for HIV is dependent on level of creatinine clearance, most laboratories locally only report an absolute creatinine value. There is likelihood that the patients already on antiretroviral therapy (ART) may have required dosage adjustment at the time of initiation of therapy or sometime during ...

  20. Economic evaluation of task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of anti-retroviral therapy

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    Foster Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A scarcity of human resources for health has been identified as one of the primary constraints to the scale-up of the provision of Anti-Retroviral Treatment (ART. In South Africa there is a particularly severe lack of pharmacists. The study aims to compare two task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of ART: Indirectly Supervised Pharmacist’s Assistants (ISPA and Nurse-based pharmaceutical care models against the standard of care which involves a pharmacist dispensing ART. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods study design was used. Patient exit interviews, time and motion studies, expert interviews and staff costs were used to conduct a costing from the societal perspective. Six facilities were sampled in the Western Cape province of South Africa, and 230 patient interviews conducted. Results The ISPA model was found to be the least costly task-shifting pharmaceutical model. However, patients preferred receiving medication from the nurse. This related to a fear of stigma and being identified by virtue of receiving ART at the pharmacy. Conclusions While these models are not mutually exclusive, and a variety of pharmaceutical care models will be necessary for scale up, it is useful to consider the impact of implementing these models on the provider, patient access to treatment and difficulties in implementation.

  1. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy in adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... Disclaimer: Specific recommendations provided here are intended only as a guide to clinical therapy, based on expert consensus and ... up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Southern Africa has continued to grow. ...... and third trimester, because the neural tube is formed in the first 4 weeks of pregnancy.

  2. Anaemia and zidovudine-containing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric antiretroviral programmes in the IeDEA Paediatric West African Database to evaluate AIDS

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    Lorna A Renner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a risk of anaemia among HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART containing zidovudine (ZDV recommended in first-line regimens in the WHO guidelines. We estimated the risk of severe anaemia after initiation of a ZDV-containing regimen in HIV-infected children included in the IeDEA West African database. Methods: Standardized collection of data from HIV-infected children (positive PCR<18 months or positive serology ≥18 months followed up in HIV programmes was included in the regional IeDEA West Africa collaboration. Ten clinical centres from seven countries contributed (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Mali and Senegal to this collection. Inclusion criteria were age <16 years and starting ART. We explored the data quality of haemoglobin documentation over time and the incidence and predictors of severe anaemia (Hb<7g/dL per 100 child-years of follow-up over the duration of first-line antiretroviral therapy. Results: As of December 2009, among the 2933 children included in the collaboration, 45% were girls, median age was five years; median CD4 cell percentage was 13%; median weight-for-age z-score was−2.7; and 1772 (60.4% had a first-line ZDV-containing regimen. At baseline, 70% of the children with a first-line ZDV-containing regimen had a haemoglobin measure available versus 76% in those not on ZDV (p≤0.01: the prevalence of severe anaemia was 3.0% (n=38 in the ZDV group versus 10.2% (n=89 in those without (p<0. 01. Over the first-line follow-up, 58.9% of the children had ≥1 measure of haemoglobin available in those exposed to ZDV versus 60.4% of those not (p=0.45. Severe anaemia occurred in 92 children with an incidence of 2.47 per 100 child-years of follow-up in those on a ZDV-containing regimen versus 4.25 in those not (p≤0.01. Adjusted for age at ART initiation and first-line regimen, a weight-for-age z-score ≤−3 was a strong predictor associated with a 5.59 times risk of

  3. Usefulness of pharmacy dispensing records in the evaluation of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazilian children and adolescents

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    Aline Santarem Ernesto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adherence, which is crucial to the success of antiretroviral therapy (HAART, is currently a major challenge in the care of children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of nonadherence to HAART using complementary instruments in a cohort of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS followed in a reference service in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS: The level of adherence of 108 patients and caregivers was evaluated by an adapted standardized questionnaire and pharmacy dispensing records (PDR. Non-adherence was defined as a drug intake lower than 95% (on 24-hour or seven-day questionnaires, or as an interval of 38 days or more for pharmacy refills. The association between adherence and clinical, immunological, virological, and psychosocial characteristics was assessed by multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Non-adherence prevalence varied from 11.1% (non-adherent in three instruments, 15.8% (24-hour self-report, 27.8% (seven-day self-report, 45.4% (PDR, and 56.3% (at least one of the outcomes. 24-hour and seven-day self-reports, when compared to PDR, showed low sensitivity (29% and 43%, respectively but high specificity (95% and 85%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, medication intolerance, difficulty of administration by caregiver, HAART intake by the patient, lower socioeconomical class, lack of virological control, missed appointments in the past six months, and lack of religious practice by caregiver were significantly associated with non-adherence. CONCLUSION: A high prevalence of HAART non-adherence was observed in the study population, and PDR was the most sensitive of the tested instruments. The instruments employed were complementary in the identification of non-adherence.

  4. The association between HIV, antiretroviral therapy, and gestational diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soepnel, Larske M; Norris, Shane A; Schrier, Verena J M M; Browne, Joyce L; Rijken, Marcus J; Gray, Glenda; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The widespread, chronic use of antiretroviral therapy raises questions concerning the metabolic consequences of HIV infection and treatment. Antiretroviral therapy, and specifically protease inhibitors, has been associated with hyperglycemia. As pregnant women are vulnerable to

  5. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on pregnancy outcomes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.834. ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on pregnancy outcomes. C D Aniji,1. FCOG (SA); O A Towobola,1 PhD; M E Hoque,2 MSc; T J Mashamba,1 MB ChB; S Monokoane,1 FCOG (SA). 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Limpopo, Medunsa Campus, ...

  6. CHANGING ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN CHILDREN CLINICAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important maxim in treating patients with HIV is that the first regimen is your best chance for success. Get it right the first time. Recent data show that the response of children to antiretroviral therapy (ART) both overseas and locally has been phenomenal.1-4. Nevertheless, inevitably, increasing numbers of children will ...

  7. Preferences for antiretroviral therapy services: Qualitative evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is one of the interventions meant to prolong the progression from HIV to AIDS for People Living with HIV (PLHIVs). Although ART was introduced in Ghana in 2003, there is little or no information about the preferences of those on ART services. The main objective of the study therefore was to ...

  8. Antiretroviral changes during the first year of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Antonio Carlos Policarpo Carmo Sá; Elias, Darcielle Bruna Dias; Cavalcante, Malena Gadelha; Lima, Denise Girão Limaverde; Távora, Lara Gurgel Fernandes

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian HIV/AIDS management and treatment guideline (PCDT), published in 2013, recommends and standardizes the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in all adult patients, in spite of LTCD4 count. This study aimed to analyze the first year of HAART use in patients from a reference center on HIV/AIDS management in Fortaleza, Ceará. This descriptive study reviewed all prescription forms of antiretroviral regimens initiation and changes from January to July 2014. All antiretroviral regimen changes that occurred during the first year of therapy were evaluated. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 20. Mean, standard deviation and frequency, Student's t and Mann-Whitney tests calculations were used, with significance at pLTCD4 lymphocytes since fifth month (p<0.001). The main cause of initial HAART changes was adverse reaction and most patients had only one change in the HAART regimen. HAART prescription was in accordance to the PCDT from 2013.

  9. The cost of antiretroviral therapy in Haiti

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    Fitzgerald Daniel W

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We determined direct medical costs, overhead costs, societal costs, and personnel requirements for the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART to patients with AIDS in Haiti. Methods We examined data from 218 treatment-naïve adults who were consecutively initiated on ART at the GHESKIO Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti between December 23, 2003 and May 20, 2004 and calculated costs and personnel requirements for the first year of ART. Results The mean total cost of treatment per patient was $US 982 including $US 846 in direct costs, $US 114 for overhead, and $US 22 for societal costs. The direct cost per patient included generic ART medications $US 355, lab tests $US 130, nutrition $US 117, hospitalizations $US 62, pre-ART evaluation $US 58, labor $US 51, non-ART medications $US 39, outside referrals $US 31, and telephone cards for patient retention $US 3. Higher treatment costs were associated with hospitalization, change in ART regimen, TB treatment, and survival for one year. We estimate that 1.5 doctors and 2.5 nurses are required to treat 1000 patients in the first year after initiating ART. Conclusion Initial ART treatment in Haiti costs approximately $US 1,000 per patient per year. With generic first-line antiretroviral drugs, only 36% of the cost is for medications. Patients who change regimens are significantly more expensive to treat, highlighting the need for less-expensive second-line drugs. There may be sufficient health care personnel to treat all HIV-infected patients in urban areas of Haiti, but not in rural areas. New models of HIV care are needed for rural areas using assistant medical officers and community health workers.

  10. In vivo assessment of antiretroviral therapy-associated side effects

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    Eduardo Milton Ramos-Sanchez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has been associated with side effects, either from the drug itself or in conjunction with the effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Here, we evaluated the side effects of the protease inhibitor (PI indinavir in hamsters consuming a normal or high-fat diet. Indinavir treatment increased the hamster death rate and resulted in an increase in triglyceride, cholesterol and glucose serum levels and a reduction in anti-oxLDL auto-antibodies. The treatment led to histopathological alterations of the kidney and the heart. These results suggest that hamsters are an interesting model for the study of the side effects of antiretroviral drugs, such as PIs.

  11. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Meintjes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available These guidelines are intended as an update to those published in the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine in January 2008. Since the release of the previous guidelines, the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in Southern Africa has continued to grow. Cohort studies from the region show excellent clinical outcomes; however, ART is still being started late (in advanced disease, resulting in relatively high early mortality rates. New data on antiretroviral (ARV tolerability in the region and several new ARV drugs have become available. Although currently few in number, some patients in the region are failing protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line regimens. To address this, guidelines on third-line (or ‘salvage’ therapy have been expanded.

  12. Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Meintjes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available These guidelines are intended as an update to those published in the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine in January 2008. Since the release of the previous guidelines, the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART in Southern Africa has continued to grow. Cohort studies from the region show excellent clinical outcomes; however, ART is still being started late (in advanced disease, resulting in relatively high early mortality rates. New data on antiretroviral (ARV tolerability in the region and several new ARV drugs have become available. Although currently few in number, some patients in the region are failing protease inhibitor (PI-based second-line regimens. To address this, guidelines on third-line (or ‘salvage’ therapy have been expanded.

  13. Manifestações otoneurológicas associadas à terapia anti-retroviral Otoneurological manifestations associated with antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrêza Batista Cheloni Vieira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ototoxicidade e terapia anti-retroviral parecem estar associadas. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar essa possível correlação. Foram avaliados 779 prontuários médicos de pacientes infectados pelo HIV e regularmente acompanhados, sendo 162 tratados com terapia anti-retroviral e 122 não tratados (controle. Pacientes em tratamento eram mais velhos (média 42 anos, com maior tempo de confirmação sorológica (80 meses e com menor carga viral (p=0,00. CD4+ foi semelhante entre os grupos (P=0,60. No grupo tratado, três (1,8% casos de perda auditiva idiopática e dois (1,3% de perda auditiva relacionada a otosclerose foram observadas e ambas iniciadas após terapia anti-retroviral. Nenhuma diferença estatística relacionada à perda auditiva idiopática foi encontrada entre os grupos. Enquanto estudos descritivos consideram possível ototoxidade associada à terapia anti-retroviral, esse possível efeito adverso não foi relacionado à terapia anti-retroviral neste estudo. Contrariamente, otosclerose poderia estar correlacionada à terapia anti-retroviral. Este assunto merece ser estudado.Ototoxicity and antiretroviral therapy seem to be associated. The aim of this study was to evaluate this possible correlation. Evaluations were carried out on 779 medical records from HIV-infected patients who were being regularly followed up, of whom 162 were being treated with antiretroviral therapy and 122 were untreated (controls. The patients undergoing treatment were older (mean: 42 years, had had serological confirmation for longer times (80 months and had smaller viral loads (P = 0.00. CD4+ was similar between the groups (P = 0.60. In the treated group, three cases (1.8% of idiopathic hearing loss and two (1.3% of otosclerosis-related hearing loss were observed, which both started after antiretroviral therapy. No statistical difference relating to idiopathic hearing loss was found between the groups. While descriptive studies consider possible

  14. Evaluation of the association between Addiction Severity Index and depression with adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydary, Koosha; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Noori, Mehri; Rad, Mona V; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad

    2015-01-01

    Adequate adherence to anti-retroviral therapy is required to achieve viral suppression and desirable treatment outcomes among HIV patients. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between adherence and severity of substance use as well as adherence and severity of depressive symptoms among Iranian HIV patients. In a prospective study, HIV patients with current substance use were assessed for adherence level via self report and pill count methods, severity of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory- II) and substance use (Addiction Severity Index) during a three months follow up after initiating antiretroviral therapy. The adherence level, severity of depressive symptoms and substance use were assessed one month, two months and three months after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy. Addiction Severity Index (ASI) composite scores were calculated for each domain and the associations between ASI domains and adherence as well as severity of depressive symptoms and adherence were assessed. Twenty six HIV patients with current substance use disorder completed the study. At the end of the first month, adherence to therapy via pill count and self-report were 80%±31.9% and 85.12%±32%, respectively. At the end of the second month, adherence to therapy via pill count and self report were 87%±32% and 93.94%±23% respectively. At the end of the third month, the measured adherence via pill count and self report were 85%±33.7% and 90.1%±25.7% respectively. Adherence was higher among married patients and those who used reminder systems. Composite scores of the medical status and psychiatric status were related to higher adherence after first month. Substance use was inversely associated with adherence at the second follow up (r=-0.4, p=0.04). Also, severity of depressive symptoms was not related to adherence level. The repeated measurement analysis showed a significant decrease in psychiatric status domain of the ASI composite score after three months

  15. changing therapy changing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-01

    Nov 1, 2005 ... abacavir hypersensitivity reaction occurs, all ART should be stopped until the ... Historically children have always lagged behind adults in their (virological) response to antiretrovirals (ARVs).1-3. However, with ..... therapy in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Pediatr Infect Dis J ...

  16. changing therapy changing antiretroviral therapy in paediatric patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-01

    Nov 1, 2005 ... Historically children have always lagged behind adults in their (virological) response to antiretrovirals (ARVs).1-3. However ... children, response to therapy in children is now approximating that in adults.4-6 Nevertheless, it is inevitable that over time, for a variety of .... Don't add one drug to a failing regimen.

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy in the Malawi Police Force: Access to Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A national survey was carried out in all the 103 public sector and 38 private sector facilities in Malawi providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to determine uptake of ART and subsequent treatment outcomes in police force personnel. All patients registered for ART and their subsequent treatment outcomes were censored on ...

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Response to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in a South African ART Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher J. Hoffmann; Salome Charalambous; Desmond J. Martin; Craig Innes; Gavin J. Churchyard; Richard E. Chaisson; Alison D. Grant; Katherine L. Fielding; Chloe L. Thio

    2008-01-01

    .... We evaluated the impact of chronic hepatitis B on HIV virologic response, changes in CD4 cell count, hepatotoxicity, and mortality among Africans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART...

  19. Antiretroviral therapy in a community clinic - early lessons from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy in a community clinic - early lessons from a pilot project. L Bekker, C. Orrell, L. Reader, K. Matoti, K Cohen, R Martell, F Abdullah, R Wood. Abstract. Objectives. To report on operational and clinical problems encountered during the first 6 months of a community-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  20. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    Abstract. Background: Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought ...

  1. Rate and Predictors of Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has resulted reduction of mortality and improved quality of life of peoples living with HIV/AIDS. Maximum benefits can only be achieved through maximum adherence. We designed this study to assess rate and predictors of adherence to antiretroviral therapy at Tepi health center.

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBMED search by Akanmu et al from Lagos in 2001 to reports in 2013, it is undeniable that HIV scientists in Nigeria have produced a good number of very informative and relevant results in the area of anti-retroviral therapy research in Nigeria. Key words: Medical History, Anti-retroviral therapy, HAART, Nigeria mother to ...

  3. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Lighthouse Trust in Lilongwe, Malawi serves approximately 25,000 patients with HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens standardized according to national treatment .... Table 2: Most common non-standard antiretroviral therapy regimens. The most .... patients, three-NRTI regimens can maintain HIV-RNA.

  4. Determinants of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SITWALA COMPUTERS

    Determinants of Optimal Adherence to Antiretroviral. Therapy among People Living With HIV/AIDS. Registered for Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe. 1. 2. L Gonah , A Mukwirimba .... and Shona (native language in Masvingo province) language speakers trained on quantitative research methodology participated in data ...

  5. Accessing antiretroviral therapy for children: Caregivers' voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret (Maggie Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to scale up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART, particularly at primary health care (PHC facilities, antiretroviral therapy (ART continues to be out of reach for many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive children in sub-Saharan Africa. In resource limited settings decentralisation of ART is required to scale up access to essential medication. Traditionally, paediatric HIV care has been provided in tertiary care facilities which have better human and material resources, but limited accessibility in terms of distance for caregivers of HIV-positive children. The focus of this article is on the experiences of caregivers whilst accessing ART for HIV-positive children at PHC (decentralised care facilities in Nelson Mandela Bay (NMB in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design was used. The target population comprised caregivers of HIV-positive children. Data were collected by means of in-depth individual interviews, which were thematically analysed. Guba's model was used to ensure trustworthiness. Barriers to accessing ART at PHC clinics for HIV-positive children included personal issues, negative experiences, lack of support and finance, stigma and discrimination. The researchers recommend standardised programmes be developed and implemented in PHC clinics to assist in providing treatment, care and support for HIV-positive children.

  6. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the newest research about the effects of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on cancer risk. RECENT FINDINGS: HIV+ persons are at increased risk of cancer. As this risk is higher for malignancies driven by viral and bacterial coinfections, classifying malignancies...... initiation in reducing cancer risk, understand the relationship between long-term cART exposure and cancer incidence and assess whether adjuvant anti-inflammatory therapies can reduce cancer risk during treated HIV infection....... into infection-related and infection-unrelated has been an emerging trend. Cohorts have detected major reductions in the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) following cART initiation among immunosuppressed HIV+ persons. However, recent randomized data indicate that cART reduces risk...

  7. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-retroviral drugs(ARVs) are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is vital to improve the patient's state of well-being ... weerstand bied teen anti-retrovirale behandeling (ARB). Persone met ARB-weerstandbiedende MIV stamme kan dit versprei na ander mense toe, wat ...

  8. Southern African HIV Clinicians Society adult antiretroviral therapy guidelines: Update on when to initiate antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Meintjes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent version of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s adult antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines was published in December 2014. In the 27 August 2015 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, two seminal randomised controlled trials that addressed the optimal timing of ART in HIV-infected patients with high CD4 counts were published: Strategic timing of antiretroviral therapy (START and TEMPRANO ANRS 12136 (Early antiretroviral treatment and/or early isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults. The findings of these two trials were consistent: there was significant individual clinical benefit from starting ART immediately in patients with CD4 counts higher than 500 cells/μL rather than deferring until a certain lower CD4 threshold or clinical indication was met. The findings add to prior evidence showing that ART reduces the risk of onward HIV transmission. Therefore, early ART initiation has the public health benefits of potentially reducing both HIV incidence and morbidity. Given this new and important evidence, the Society took the decision to provide a specific update on the section of the adult ART guidelines relating to when ART should be initiated.

  9. Southern African HIV Clinicians Society adult antiretroviral therapy guidelines: Update on when to initiate antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Meintjes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The most recent version of the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society’s adult antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines was published in December 2014. In the 27 August 2015 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, two seminal randomised controlled trials that addressed the optimal timing of ART in HIV-infected patients with high CD4 counts were published: Strategic timing of antiretroviral therapy (START and TEMPRANO ANRS 12136 (Early antiretroviral treatment and/or early isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults. The findings of these two trials were consistent: there was significant individual clinical benefit from starting ART immediately in patients with CD4 counts higher than 500 cells/μL rather than deferring until a certain lower CD4 threshold or clinical indication was met. The findings add to prior evidence showing that ART reduces the risk of onward HIV transmission. Therefore, early ART initiation has the public health benefits of potentially reducing both HIV incidence and morbidity. Given this new and important evidence, the Society took the decision to provide a specific update on the section of the adult ART guidelines relating to when ART should be initiated.

  10. HIV Testing and Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation at Birth: Views from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PMTCT) programme, 14 000 children in South Africa became HIV-infected in 2012. There are many reasons for this gap in PMTCT efforts. Late maternal diagnosis of HIV, late antenatal antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, seroconversion in ...

  11. the effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (haart)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ymphocyt@ count in a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been found to profoundly and durably inhibit HIV production, extend overall long term effectiveness, help in the preservation of overall- term term effect and provide a salvage ...

  12. Evaluation of viral load thresholds for predicting new WHO Stage 3 and 4 events in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siberry, George K; Harris, D. Robert; Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo; Krauss, Margot R.; Hofer, Cristina B.; Tiraboschi, Adriana Aparecida; Marques, Heloisa; Succi, Regina C.; Abreu, Thalita; Negra, Marinella Della; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Hazra, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated a wide range of viral load (VL) thresholds to identify a cut-point that best predicts new clinical events in children on stable highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the adjusted risk of World Health Organization stage 3 or 4 clinical events (WHO events) as a function of time-varying CD4, VL, and hemoglobin values in a cohort study of Latin American children on HAART ≥ 6 months. Models were fit using different VL cut-points between 400 and 50,000 copies/mL, with model fit evaluated on the basis of the minimum Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) value, a standard model fit statistic. Results Models were based on 67 subjects with WHO events out of 550 subjects on study. The VL cutpoints of > 2600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL corresponded to the lowest AIC values and were associated with the highest hazard ratios [2.0 (p = 0.015) and 2.1 (p = 0.0058), respectively] for WHO events. Conclusions In HIV-infected Latin American children on stable HAART, two distinct VL thresholds (> 2,600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL) were identified for predicting children at significantly increased risk of HIV-related clinical illness, after accounting for CD4 level, hemoglobin level, and other significant factors. PMID:22343177

  13. Barriers to Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence : Descriptive literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to the treatment regimen is essential to the success of highly active antiretrovi-ral therapy for patients who are infected with HIV. The evidence suggests that poor ad-herence to antiretroviral drug therapy is a major problem that has the potential to diminish effective viral suppression, promote viral resistance, and place patients at risk for hospital-ization, opportunistic infections, and an increased risk of HIV transmission. The primary aim of this study was review was to find...

  14. Antiretroviral changes during the first year of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Policarpo Carmo Sá Bandeira

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: The Brazilian HIV/AIDS management and treatment guideline (PCDT, published in 2013, recommends and standardizes the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in all adult patients, in spite of LTCD4 count. This study aimed to analyze the first year of HAART use in patients from a reference center on HIV/AIDS management in Fortaleza, Ceará. Method: This descriptive study reviewed all prescription forms of antiretroviral regimens initiation and changes from January to July 2014. All antiretroviral regimen changes that occurred during the first year of therapy were evaluated. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 20. Mean, standard deviation and frequency, Student’s t and Mann-Whitney tests calculations were used, with significance at p<0.05. Results: From 527 patients initiating HAART, 16.5% (n=87 had a regimen change in the first year. These patients were mostly male (59.8%; n=52, aged 20 to 39 years, with only one HAART change (72.4%; n=63. Efavirenz was the most often changed drug, followed by tenofovir, zidovudine and lopinavir/ritonavir. Mean time of HAART changes was 120 days, with adverse reactions as the most prevalent cause. HAART was effective in decreasing viral load since second month of treatment (p=0.003 and increasing LTCD4 lymphocytes since fifth month (p<0.001. Conclusion: The main cause of initial HAART changes was adverse reaction and most patients had only one change in the HAART regimen. HAART prescription was in accordance to the PCDT from 2013.

  15. HIV-Antiretroviral Therapy Induced Liver, Gastrointestinal, and Pancreatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela G. Neuman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes possible connections between antiretroviral therapies (ARTs used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and adverse drug reactions (ADRs encountered predominantly in the liver, including hypersensitivity syndrome reactions, as well as throughout the gastrointestinal system, including the pancreas. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has a positive influence on the quality of life and longevity in HIV patients, substantially reducing morbidity and mortality in this population. However, HAART produces a spectrum of ADRs. Alcohol consumption can interact with HAART as well as other pharmaceutical agents used for the prevention of opportunistic infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. Other coinfections that occur in HIV, such as hepatitis viruses B or C, cytomegalovirus, or herpes simplex virus, further complicate the etiology of HAART-induced ADRs. The aspect of liver pathology including liver structure and function has received little attention and deserves further evaluation. The materials used provide a data-supported approach. They are based on systematic review and analysis of recently published world literature (MedLine search and the experience of the authors in the specified topic. We conclude that therapeutic and drug monitoring of ART, using laboratory identification of phenotypic susceptibilities, drug interactions with other medications, drug interactions with herbal medicines, and alcohol intake might enable a safer use of this medication.

  16. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide information on responses to combination antiretroviral therapy in children, adolescents and older HIV-infected persons. DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. SUBJECTS:: Forty-nine thousand nine hundred and twenty-one antiretroviral-naive indiv...... CD4 cell counts, may place this group at increased clinical risk. The poorer virological responses in children may increase the likelihood of emergence of resistance....

  17. Antiretroviral changes during the first year of therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bandeira, Antonio Carlos Policarpo Carmo Sá; Elias, Darcielle Bruna Dias; Cavalcante, Malena Gadelha; Lima,Denise Girão Limaverde; Távora,Lara Gurgel Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The Brazilian HIV/AIDS management and treatment guideline (PCDT), published in 2013, recommends and standardizes the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in all adult patients, in spite of LTCD4 count. This study aimed to analyze the first year of HAART use in patients from a reference center on HIV/AIDS management in Fortaleza, Ceará. Method: This descriptive study reviewed all prescription forms of antiretroviral regimens initiation and changes from Ja...

  18. Can measuring immunity to HIV during antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vexing issue of whether the immune system can be reconstituted during HIV infection by supplying antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been a question asked about HIV-infected adults and children receiving therapy.1-9 Knowing that the immune system is sufficiently plastic in adults to show restoration of specific and ...

  19. the effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (haart)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A case control study of 70 HIV-infected subjects placed on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thirty. HIV-infected yet to ... on HAART for 12 weeks while controls that were yet to start therapy were monitored as controls. CD4 lymphocyte count ..... conversion to development of full blown AIDS. J. Aquir Immune Defic ...

  20. Adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy Part II: which interventions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interventions to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) can be classified into four categories: cognitive, behavioural and affective interventions and (modified) directly observed therapy (DOT.) Cognitive interventions improve HIV- and ART-related knowledge, but this is not consistently associated with better ...

  1. Timing of antiretroviral therapy initiation in adults with HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality in people living with HIV infection (PLHIV),1 with almost 1 in 4 deaths attributed to HIV-associated TB.1 A crucial question in caring for patients who are co-infected has been the timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) after commencing TB therapy.2 This is ...

  2. Evaluation of oral manifestations and oral health status among pediatric human immunodeficiency virus patients-under anti-retroviral therapy: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Aroquiadasse

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV acquired immunodeficiency syndrome disease has evolved to become a social and economic catastrophe, with far-reaching implications affecting every phase of life of the diseased individual. Data on adults and children diagnosed with HIV infection are useful for determining populations needing prevention and treatment services. Oral lesions may be the presenting symptoms of HIV infection and may differ entirely from those manifested in the adult population. Aim and Objective: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HIV related oral lesions among pediatric HIV patients and to assess the oral health status of HIV infected children residing in a selected childcare facility in Puducherry. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted during September 2015 in child care facility for HIV infected children located in Puducherry U.T, India. All children <18 years, who are diagnosed with HIV infection and are put on anti-retroviral therapy (ART or pre-ART care, were included in the study. After obtaining informed consent from the care-givers and assent of the children, they were interviewed and examined by a team comprising a qualified dental surgeon and a trained physician. Results: Majority of the children were under first-line ART (73% and were on ART for more than 4 years. The CD4 count of 23 (52.3 was between 500–1000 cells/μL. The recent viral load assay in 32 (72.7 patients was <150/not detected. Tooth decay was the most common oral manifestation with 28 (63.6 being affected. Nonspecific lymphadenopathy 26 (59.1 was the most common coexisting systemic illness. Conclusion: This study proves that constant surveillance by monitoring the general health status, CD4 counts, viral load coupled with stringent ART care has improved the overall quality of life of these children and consequently resulted in lesser oral manifestations.

  3. Better antiretroviral therapy outcomes at primary healthcare facilities: an evaluation of three tiers of ART services in four South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Grimwood, Ashraf; Bock, Peter

    2010-09-21

    There are conflicting reports of antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness comparisons between primary healthcare (PHC) facilities and hospitals in low-income settings. This comparison has not been evaluated on a broad scale in South Africa. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including ART-naïve adults from 59 facilities in four provinces in South Africa, enrolled between 2004 and 2007. Kaplan-Meier estimates, competing-risks Cox regression, generalised estimating equation population-averaged models and logistic regression were used to compare death, loss to follow-up (LTFU) and virological suppression (VS) between PHC, district and regional hospitals. 29 203 adults from 47 PHC facilities, nine district hospitals and three regional hospitals were included. Patients at PHC facilities had more advanced WHO stage disease when starting ART. Retention in care was 80.1% (95% CI: 79.3%-80.8%), 71.5% (95% CI: 69.1%-73.8%) and 68.7% (95% CI: 67.0%-69.7%) at PHC, district and regional hospitals respectively, after 24 months of treatment (PART. District and regional hospital patients had independently reduced probabilities of VS, aOR 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59-0.97) and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.56-0.75) respectively compared to PHC facilities over 24 months of treatment. ART outcomes were superior at PHC facilities, despite PHC patients having more advanced clinical stage disease when starting ART, suggesting that ART can be adequately provided at this level and supporting the South African government's call for rapid up-scaling of ART at the primary level of care. Further prospective research is required to determine the degree to which outcome differences are attributable to either facility level characteristics or patient co-morbidity at hospital level.

  4. Lipid profile and body composition of HIV-1 infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. R. Pontes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been associated with the development of a clinical group and metabolic disorders such as peripheral lipodystrophy syndrome in AIDS. The aim of this study was to analyze the lipid profile, the clinical aspects, and the body composition of HIV-1 infected individuals treated with or without protease inhibitor (PI during the highly active antiretroviral therapy. In total, 62 individuals were evaluated in this study; 15 healthy individuals (Control Group: CG, 11 HIV-1 infected individuals treated without antiretroviral therapy (Group 1: G1, 14 HIV-1 infected individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy plus protease inhibitor (Group 2: G2, and 22 HIV-1 infected individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy without protease inhibitor (Group 3: G3, mean age 35 years old. The time interval for G2 and G3 was greater than or equal to nine months. Patients receiving HAART with PI had significantly lower viral loads, hypertriglyceridemia, and low HDL levels (p<0.05. There were no differences between groups in relation to the lean body mass percentage obtained by mid-arm muscle circumference adequacy or by bioelectrical impedance. The lower percentage of body fat observed in all the HIV-1 infected patients by antropometric assessment and the decreased tricipital skinfold adequacy in the group treated with PI in relation to CG may suggest lipodystrophy in the upper limbs, especially on those treated with PI.

  5. Evaluation of T-cell response to CD3 plus CD28 monoclonal antibodies in HIV-1 infected subjects treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesimo, M; Bernardi, M L; Mattiacci, G; Pierdominici, M; Ferrara, R; Donnanno, S; Alario, C; Aiuti, F

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) could improve CD28 molecule expression and CD28-costimulation pathway function we tested the effect of CD28-costimulation on T cell receptor/CD3 induced proliferative responses in a group of HIV-1-infected subjects with CD4+ cells>200/mmc before and after HAART. CD3-mediated responses are recovered or improved after HAART. However the ability of potentiating the responses through CD28-costimulation seemed conserved before therapy and decreased in parallel with increase of response to CD3 alone. These results confirm the integrity of CD28-pathway of costimulation in patients with CD4+ cells>200/mmc and suggest an inverse correlation between magnitude of response to CD3 alone and increase of CD3 response due to anti-CD28 addition.

  6. Evaluation of portable point-of-care CD4 counter with high sensitivity for detecting patients eligible for antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari C Manabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate, inexpensive point-of-care CD4+ T cell testing technologies are needed that can deliver CD4+ T cell results at lower level health centers or community outreach voluntary counseling and testing. We sought to evaluate a point-of-care CD4+ T cell counter, the Pima CD4 Test System, a portable, battery-operated bench-top instrument that is designed to use finger stick blood samples suitable for field use in conjunction with rapid HIV testing. METHODS: Duplicate measurements were performed on both capillary and venous samples using Pima CD4 analyzers, compared to the BD FACSCalibur (reference method. The mean bias was estimated by paired Student's t-test. Bland Altman plots were used to assess agreement. RESULTS: 206 participants were enrolled with a median CD4 count of 396 (range; 18-1500. The finger stick PIMA had a mean bias of -66.3 cells/µL (95%CI -83.4-49.2, P500 cells/µL with a mean bias of -120.6 (95%CI -162.8, -78.4, P<0.001. The sensitivity (95%CI of the Pima CD4 analyzer was 96.3% (79.1-99.8% for a <250 cells/ul cut-off with a negative predictive value of 99.2% (95.1-99.9%. CONCLUSIONS: The Pima CD4 finger stick test is an easy-to-use, portable, relatively fast device to test CD4+ T cell counts in the field. Issues of negatively-biased CD4 cell counts especially at higher absolute numbers will limit its utility for longitudinal immunologic response to ART. The high sensitivity and negative predictive value of the test makes it an attractive option for field use to identify patients eligible for ART, thus potentially reducing delays in linkage to care and ART initiation.

  7. Randomized pharmacokinetic evaluation of different rifabutin doses in African HIV- infected tuberculosis patients on lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiker, Suhashni; Connolly, Cathy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Kellerman, Tracey; Reddy, Tarylee; Harries, Anthony; McIlleron, Helen; Lienhardt, Christian; Pym, Alexander

    2014-11-19

    Pharmacokinetic interactions between rifampicin and protease inhibitors (PIs) complicate the management of HIV-associated tuberculosis. Rifabutin is an alternative rifamycin, for patients requiring PIs. Recently some international guidelines have recommended a higher dose of rifabutin (150 mg daily) in combination with boosted lopinavir (LPV/r), than the previous dose of rifabutin (150 mg three times weekly {tiw}). But there are limited pharmacokinetic data evaluating the higher dose of rifabutin in combination with LPV/r. Sub-optimal dosing can lead to acquired rifamycin resistance (ARR). The plasma concentration of 25-O-desacetylrifabutin (d-RBT), the metabolite of rifabutin, increases in the presence of PIs and may lead to toxicity. Sixteen patients with TB-HIV co-infection received rifabutin 300 mg QD in combination with tuberculosis chemotherapy (initially pyrazinamide, isoniazid and ethambutol then only isoniazid), and were then randomized to receive isoniazid and LPV/r based ART with rifabutin 150 mg tiw or rifabutin 150 mg daily. The rifabutin dose with ART was switched after 1 month. Serial rifabutin and d-RBT concentrations were measured after 4 weeks of each treatment. The median AUC0-48 and Cmax of rifabutin in patients taking 150 mg rifabutin tiw was significantly reduced compared to the other treatment arms. Geometric mean ratio (90% CI) for AUC0-48 and Cmax was 0.6 (0.5-0.7) and 0.5 (0.4-0.6) for RBT 150 mg tiw compared with RBT 300 mg and 0.4 (0.4-0.4) and 0.5 (0.5-0.6) for RBT 150 mg tiw compared with 150 mg daily. 86% of patients on the tiw rifabutin arm had an AUC0-24 ART, and grade 3 neutropenia (asymptomatic) was reported in 4 patients. These events were not associated with increases in rifabutin or metabolite concentrations. A daily 150 mg dose of rifabutin in combination with LPV/r safely maintained rifabutin plasma concentrations in line with those shown to prevent ARR. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00640887.

  8. Malarial infection among HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malarial infection among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) attending Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State was investigated between April and August 2008 to determine the level of malaria infection in HIV/AIDS patients on ART and those not on ART with respect to CD4+ counts, age and gender. A total of ...

  9. The perspectives of users of antiretroviral therapy on structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... Abstract. Background: The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the importance of adherence to treatment regimens are widely known. ... Kagee A, PhD, MPH, Professor of Psychology. Nothling J, MA, Master's ..... don't benefit from sick benefits, including time off work to attend appointments.

  10. The Evolution of Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Nigeria | Michael ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Areas of research highlighted are the Monitoring of ART, adherence to ART, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy in Nigeria. From the first report on the PUBMED search by Akanmuet al from Lagos in 2001 to reports in 2013, it is undeniable that HIV scientists in Nigeria have produced a good number of very informative ...

  11. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: Case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although good adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for successful treatment outcomes, some patients may have specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Objectives: To study specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Methods: Quantitative data on patients' health status, ART adherence ...

  12. The art of HAART: a practical approach to antiretroviral therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    In adults it is rarely used as an antiretroviral in its own right (600 mg twice daily) due to increased adverse events (e.g. diarrhoea). Table II ... antiepileptics, rifampicin, flu- conazole, erythromycin or pep- tic ulcer therapy?) • Keep the daily number of tablets low — remember supple- ments add up too. • The patient's budget is a ...

  13. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2003-03-01

    From March 1, 2003 to June 30, 2004, HAART eligible patients aged 15 years and older, with limited financial resources as defined by a standardized indigence score scale, were initiated on HAART and followed during 18 months in a pilot Antiretroviral Therapy (PART) initiative. This initiative of the Ministry of Public Health ...

  14. Factors affecting first-month adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the influence of baseline factors on first-month adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among adults. The study design involved a review of routinely collected patient information in the CAPRISA AIDS Treatment (CAT) programme, at a rural and an urban clinic in KwaZulu-Natal ...

  15. Cutting the cost of South African antiretroviral therapy using newer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-28

    Jan 28, 2017 ... South Africa (SA) may be able to provide antiretroviral therapy. (ART) to several million more people with HIV by 2019, using the current drug budget. While planned simplification of HIV service delivery promises to reduce expenditure, the drug cost of ART provision consumes the bulk of most HIV ...

  16. Effect of Simultaneous Administration of Antiretroviral Therapy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The simultaneous effect of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and nutritional supplements on cluster of differentiation4 (CD4)count of 100 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) was investigated. CD4 cell count was determined using the Cyflow SL-3. Individuals with baseline CD4 counts less than 200 cells/ìl were ...

  17. The perspectives of users of antiretroviral therapy on structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and the importance of adherence to treatment regimens are widely known. Yet, suboptimal adherence to ART and retention in care of patients still persists and, by many accounts, is fairly widespread. The aim of this study was to identify the structural barriers that ...

  18. Non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non-adherence reduces the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. Knowledge of factors associated with non-adherence would assist clinicians and program planners to design and implement interventions to improve adherence and therefore treatment outcomes. Objective: To determine the prevalence and ...

  19. an equity advocacy opportunity for access to antiretroviral therapy in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-03-07

    Mar 7, 2006 ... From 3 by 5 to universal access: an equity advocacy opportunity for access to antiretroviral therapy in. Malawi? Sally Theobald'f, lreen Makwiza', ... posal writing for 5 year programmes and resubmitting after 2 years is problematic as it can result in decision making delays and risks of interrupted supplies of ...

  20. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected children receiving care at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC), Northern Tanzania: A cross- sectional analytical study. Amos Haki Nsheha, Dorothy Elizabeth Dow, Gabriel Erick Kapanda, Bernardus Carolus Hamel, Levina January Msuya ...

  1. End-user centeredness in antiretroviral therapy services in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the perception of end users with regard to end-user centeredness in antiretroviral therapy (ART) service provision in Nigerian public health facilities. Design: A qualitative design was followed. Subjects and setting: Unstructured focus group discussions were conducted with end users (n = 64) in six ...

  2. Personal barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence: case studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Although good adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for successful treatment outcomes, some patients may have specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Objectives: To study specific personal barriers to ART adherence. Methods: Quantitative data on patients' health status, ART ...

  3. Antiretroviral therapy programme on control of HIV transmission in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the role of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme on control of HIV transmission in order to assist and inform policy makers to design and implement effective ART programmes.The study used a crosssectional design involving ninety-three people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV). Descriptive statistics ...

  4. Determinants of optimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Successful Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was shown to rely on high levels of medication adherence to enable maximum and durable viral suppression for the prolongation of life among people living with HIV/AIDS. Objective: The study sought to determine individual and environmental factors that influence ...

  5. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 90 No. 12 (Supplement) December 2013. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs) IN ROUTINE CLINICAL CARE OVER ONE YEAR. PERIOD IN A COHORT OF HAART NAIVE, HIV POSITIVE KENYAN PATIENTS. C. F. Otieno, MBChB, MMed (Int. Med), ...

  6. The intersection of antiretroviral therapy, peer support programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV infection and HIV stigma interact cyclically, creating and reinforcing economic and social exclusion for individuals living with HIV. Evidence suggests that interventions for ... of these factors is warranted. Keywords: antiretroviral therapy , economic empowerment, HIV stigma, hope, peer support, psychological well-being ...

  7. When to start antiretroviral therapy in infants and children | Cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We review the background and key studies that inform decisions on when to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in infants and children. The World Health Organization staging system from 2006 was based on conditions commonly seen in Africa and provided an impetus for advancing ART in children. Because of poor ...

  8. Attitudes and perceived impact of antiretroviral therapy on sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drawing on focus group discussions with young people, this paper examines perception about ART and the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on risk sexual behaviour in rural Tanzania. Participants included a purposively selected .... In most cases attitudes about ART were described in relation to conducts of HIV ...

  9. Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy management and its impact on direct out-of-pocket spending. Monique Lines, Fatima Suleman. Abstract. Background: Geographical and financial barriers hamper accessibility to HIV services for rural communities. The government has introduced the nurse ...

  10. Highly active antiretroviral therapy and employment status in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study investigated the immunologic responses and employment history of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) patients. Design: We interviewed patients and reviewed medical records to collect demographic, clinical, and employ-ment history while on HAART. Demographic charac-teristics were ...

  11. Determination of eligibility to antiretroviral therapy in resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    body mass index. Methods. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at. University of Gondar Hospital. At the time of the study the hospital gives pre-antiretroviral therapy to 3000 HIV positive patients. In this study, only adult patients under pre-ART follow up were included. However, pregnant women, smokers ...

  12. Changing antiretroviral therapy in children | Levin | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is an update of a similar article published in the November 2005 edition of this journal. The rapid pace of changes in this field necessitates this update. Alarming numbers of children are failing both first- and secondline antiretroviral therapy regimens in a very short space of time, underscoring the importance of ...

  13. Barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barriers and facilitators of antiretroviral therapy adherence in rural Eastern province, Zambia: the role of household economic status. ... Programmes that provide economic opportunities and life-skills training may help PLHIV to overcome economic, social, and psychological barriers. Keywords: asset ownership, debt, HIV ...

  14. Christian identity and men's attitudes to antiretroviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially in urban areas in Zambia, has transformed the landscape of the HIV epidemic to include hope. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic research, this article briefly describes the religious ideas of a cohort of former students of a Catholic mission boarding school for ...

  15. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study determined the effect of adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on body mass index (BMI) and immunological and virological parameters of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending University College Hospital, Ibadan. Methodology: Prospective cohort of consenting PLWHA ...

  16. HIV post-exposure prophylaxis and antiretroviral therapy for adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The introduction of triple antiretroviral therapy has resulted in substantial reductions in progression to AIDS, opportunistic infections, hospitalisations, and deaths.1 HIV has become a chronic, manageable condition with HIV-infected patients living longer and consequently undergoing more surgical procedures. The current ...

  17. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Margaret T.; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C.; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S.; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C.; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R.; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M. John; Crane, Heidi M.; Saag, Michael S.; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Boulle, Andrew; Chêne, Geneviève; Gill, John; Hans-Ulrich Haerry, David; Hogg, Robert; Justice, Amy; Kitahata, Mari; Lampe, Fiona; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael; Sterling, Timothy; Williams, Matthew; Zangerle, Robert; Sterne, Jonathan; May, Margaret; Ingle, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the

  18. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... and protease inhibitors, low body mass index, low platelet count and deranged renal functions prior ART initiation are associated with ... Risk factors for liver injury should be evaluated before initiating anti-retroviral therapy .... Event. Number. Haepatomegaly and ascites. 6. Haepatomegaly and gall stones.

  19. Optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence as evaluated by CASE index score tool is associated with virological suppression in HIV-infected adults in Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabene, A K; Fortes-Déguénonvo, L; Niang, K; Manga, M N; Bulabula, A N H; Nachega, J B; Seydi, M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological failure (VLF) among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the national ART programme at the teaching hospital of Fann, Dakar, Senegal. Cross-sectional study from 1 September 2013 to 30 January 2014. (1) optimal ART adherence by the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) Index Score (>10) and (2) VLF (HIV RNA > 1000 copies/ml). Diagnostic accuracy of CASE Index Score assessed using sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with optimal adherence and VLF. Of 98 HIV-infected patients on ART, 68% were female. The median (IQR) age was 42 (20-50) years. A total of 57 of 98 (60%) were on ART more than 3 years, and majority (88%) were on NNRTI-based first-line ART regimen. A total of 79 of 98 (80%) patients reported optimal ART adherence, and only five of 84 (5.9%) had documented VLF. Patients with VLF were significantly more likely to have suboptimal ART adherence (17.7% vs. 2.9%; P = 0.02). CASE Index Score showed the best trade-off in Se (78.9%, 95% CI: 54.4-93.9%), Sp (20.0%, 95% CI: 11.1-31.7), PPV (22.4, 95% CI: 13.1-34.2%) and NPV (76.5%, 95% CI: 50.1-93.2), when used VLF threshold of HIV RNA >50 copies/ml. Factors independently associated with VLF were CASE Index Score <10 ([aOR] = 13.0, 95% CI: 1.1-147.9; P = 0.04) and being a boosted PI-based ART regimen ([aOR] = 27.0, 95% CI: 2.4-309.4; P = 0.008). Optimal ART adherence is achievable in a high proportion of HIV-infected adults in this study population. CASE Index Score was independently associated with virological outcomes, supporting usefulness of this low-cost ART adherence monitoring tool in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Absolute lymphocyte count as a surrogate marker for CD4+ cell count in monitoring of antiretroviral therapy, Northwest Ethiopia: retrospective evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaw, Aschalew; Shiferaw, Yitayal; Molla, Rahel; Felegetibeb, Nahom; Asefa, Mebratu; Birhan, Wubet; Gelaw, Baye

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the use of total lymphocyte count as a surrogate marker for CD4+ cell count among HIV infected patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Methods A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted at the University of Gondar Hospital antiretroviral therapy laboratory from December 2011 to May 2012. Data on CD4+ cell count, total lymphocyte count, sex, and age were collected from 2964 HIV infected patients and analyzed using SPSS version 16 computer software. Results Total lymphocyte count was significantly correlated with CD4+ cell count (Plymphocyte countlymphocyte countlymphocyte count and CD4+ cell count was positively correlated. Hence, lymphocyte count less than or equal to 1 000/mm3 can be used as a cutoff value in place where there is no CD4+ cell counting machine.

  1. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    than 250 per cubic millimeter and then the use of therapy until the CD4+ count increased to more than 350 per cubic millimeter. The primary end point was the development of an opportunistic disease or death from any cause. An important secondary end point was major cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic......+ count, as used in our study, significantly increased the risk of opportunistic disease or death from any cause, as compared with continuous antiretroviral therapy, largely as a consequence of lowering the CD4+ cell count and increasing the viral load. Episodic antiretroviral therapy does not reduce...... had a CD4+ cell count of more than 350 per cubic millimeter to the continuous use of antiretroviral therapy (the viral suppression group) or the episodic use of antiretroviral therapy (the drug conservation group). Episodic use involved the deferral of therapy until the CD4+ count decreased to less...

  2. Preliminary guidelines for the evaluation and management of dyslipidemia in adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus and receiving antiretroviral therapy: Recommendations of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trial Group Cardiovascular Disease Focus Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubé, M. P.; Sprecher, D.; Henry, W. K.; Aberg, J. A.; Torriani, F. J.; Hodis, H. N.; Schouten, J. [=Judith; Levin, J.; Myers, G.; Zackin, R.; Nevin, T.; Currier, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a prevalent condition that affects patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy, These preliminary recommendations summarize the current understanding in this area and propose guidelines for management. Existing guidelines for the

  3. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesselring, Anouk M.; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Lundgren, Jens D.; Gill, M. John; Gatell, Jose M.; Rauch, Andri; Montaner, Julio S.; de Wolf, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Mocroft, Amanda; Bronsveld, W.; Hillebrand-Haverkort, M. E.; Prins, J. M.; Bos, J. C.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; van Leth, F. C.; Lowe, S. H.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Pogány, K.; van der Poll, T.; Ruys, T. A.; Sankatsing, Raaj R.; Steingrover, R.; vanTwillert, G.; van der Valk, M.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; van Eeden, A.; ten Veen, J. H.; van Dam, P. S.; Roos, J. C.; Brinkman, K.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Weigel, H. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Veenstra, J.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Perenboom, R. M.; Rijkeboer, A.; van Vonderen, M.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; van Leusen, R.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Kauffman, R. H.; Koger, E. L. W.; HAGA, A. N.; Bravenboer, B.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Sprenger, H. G.; Miesen, W. M. A. J.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; ten Kate, R. W.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polee, M.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, A. N.; van Dissel, J. T.; Schippers, E. F.; Schreij, G.; van de Geest, S.; Verbon, A.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; Post, F.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; Gyssens, I. C.; van der Feltz, M.; den Hollander, J. G.; de Marie, S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Juttmann, J. R.; van de Heul, C.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Borleffs, J. C. C.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Schouten, I.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Blok, W. L.; Tanis, A. A.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alexander, Chris; Barrios, Rolando; Braitstein, Paula; Brumme, Zabrina; Chan, Keith; Cote, Helen; Gataric, Nada; Geller, Josie; Guillemi, Silvia; Richard Harrigan, P.; Harris, Marrianne; Hogg, Robert; Joy, Ruth; Levy, Adrian; Montaner, Julio; Montessori, Val; Palepu, Anita; Phillips, Elizabeth; Phillips, Peter; Press, Natasha; Tyndall, Mark; Wood, Evan; Yip, Benita; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; de Wit, S.; Delforge, M.; Clumeck, N.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Pedersen, C.; Oestergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Girard, J.-P.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Pradier, C.; Dabis, F.; Neau, D.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Bogner, J.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Chiesi, A.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Antonucci, G.; Iacomi, F.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Finazzi, R.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Rozentale, B.; Aldins, P.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Bruun, J.; Maeland, A.; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Prokopowicz, D.; Flisiak, R.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Babes, Victor; Rakhmanova, A.; Vinogradova, A.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Domingo, P.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Persson, P. O.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Weber, R.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Antoniak, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Gatell, J.; Gazzard, B.; D'Arminio Montforte, A.; Lundgren, J.; Kirk, O.; Mocroft, A.; Friis-Møller, N.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Bannister, W.; Ellefson, M.; Borch, A.; Podlekareva, D.; Kjaer, J.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Kowalska, J.; Perez, Iñaki; Gatell, Jose; Gill, John; Read, Ron; Krentz, Hartmut; Beckthold, Brenda; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, Ph; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Erb, P.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Fux, C.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hirsch, H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, Ch; Kaiser, L.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, Th; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Opravil, M.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Yerly, S.; Phillips, Andrew N.; Gilson, Richard; Easterbrook, Philippa; Fisher, Martin; Gazzard, Brian; Johnson, Margaret; Walsh, John; Leen, Clifford; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Pillay, Deenan; Delpech, Valerie; Schwenk, Achim; Dunn, David; Gompels, Mark; Hill, Teresa; Porter, Kholoud; Babiker, Abdel; Sabin, Caroline; Bansi, Loveleen; Phillips, Andrews; Sheehan, Stephen; Waters, Anele; Crates, Dorian; Mohamed-Saad, Siti; Perry, Nick; Pullin, Anthony; Churchill, Duncan; Harris, Wendy; Bulbeck, Steve; Mandalia, Sundhiya; Clarke, Jemima; Dodds, Julie; Rider, Andy; Williams, Ian; Youle, Mike; Lampe, Fiona; Smith, Colette; Gumley, Helen; Chaloner, Clinton; Puradiredja, Dewi Ismajani; Weber, Jonathan; Cashin, Shane; Kemble, Christian; Mackie, Nicky; Winston, Alan; Thomas, Rachel; Jones, Kevin; Gann, Selina; Wilson, Alan; Ainsworth, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1

  4. Service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage, retention and adherence to antiretroviral therapy and HIV care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacPherson, Peter; Munthali, Chigomezgo; Ferguson, Jane; Armstrong, Alice; Kranzer, Katharina; Ferrand, Rashida A; Ross, David A

    2015-01-01

    ... antiretroviral prevention of mother‐to‐child transmission was widely available are now surviving in adolescence due to increased availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Adolescents infected with HIV fac...

  5. Diagnosis, antiretroviral therapy, and emergence of resistance to antiretroviral agents in HIV-2 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Hightower

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and type 2 (HIV-2 are the causative agents of AIDS. HIV-2 is prevalent at moderate to high rates in West African countries, such as Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, and Cape Verde. Diagnosis of HIV-2 is made with a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 ELISA or simple/rapid assay, followed by one or two confirmatory tests specific for HIV-2. Following CD4+ T cell counts, HIV-2 viral burden and clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are beneficial in monitoring HIV-2 disease progression. Although non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are ineffective in treating HIV-2, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can be effective in dual and triple antiretroviral regimens. Their use can decrease HIV-2 viral load, increase CD4+ T cell counts and improve AIDS-related symptoms. HIV-2 resistance to various nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, including zidovudine, lamivudine, ritonavir and indinavir, has been identified in some HIV-2 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The knowledge of HIV-2 peculiarities, when compared to HIV-1, is crucial to helping diagnose and guide the clinician in the choice of the initial antiretroviral regimen and for monitoring therapy success.

  6. [Enteropathogens relating to diarrhea in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupulin, Aurea Regina Telles; Carvalho, Paula Galdino; Nishi, Letícia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Guilherme, Ana Lucia Falavigna

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of the diarrheic process in AIDS may be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa or helminths, as well as HIV itself. This study evaluated enteropathogens relating to diarrhea in HIV patients who were on antiretroviral therapy. The parasitological methods used were Faust, Hoffmann and Kinyoun. Isolation and culturing of fungi were carried out in accordance with the methodology recommended by the NCCLS M27-A standard. The yeast species were identified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacteria were isolated on MacConkey and SS agar and the species were identified using Enterokit B (Probac do Brasil) and biochemical methods. Forty-nine patients were evaluated: 44.89% presented enteroparasites and 48.1% presented Candida sp, of which 61.5% were Candida albicans, 7.6% were Candida sp and 30.7% were Candida non-albicans. Bacteria were isolated from 72% of the patients, of which 49% were Escherichia coli, 13% Salmonella parathyphi, Klebsiella sp or Proteus and 6% Citrobacter freundii or Yersinia sp. There was high prevalence of Candida sp in HIV patients with diarrhea and non-albicans species were isolated. Their presence could be taken to mean that they were accomplices in or causes of the infection.

  7. The toxicogenetics of antiretroviral therapy: the evil inside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Maria del M; Mateo, M G; Vidal, F; Domingo, P

    2011-01-01

    The most important factor limiting the success of an antiretroviral therapy regimes is toxicity. Toxicity can depend on a number of factors; some of these are intrinsic to the host and may not only affect the latter's outward appearance, but also determine the intensity these toxic effects may reach. The former is exemplified by idiosyncratic or hypersensitivity reactions, whereas the latter is usually appreciated in metabolic disturbances or fat redistribution syndromes. Some of the determinants of antiretroviral toxicity are genetic in origin and have been the subject of intense study in recent years. Some of these are linked to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), whereas others depend on a complex interaction between multiple genes variations. One of these tests (HLA B*5701) is now being applied in clinical practice and widely used to prevent the risk of hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir. Many other genetic determinants of antiretroviral drug toxicity have been suggested as an explanation for nucleoside analogue toxicity; these include lactic acidosis, peripheral neuropathy and pancreatitis, and have also been suggested as a potential basis for the non-nucleoside toxicity derived from immunogenetic factors involved in nevirapine hypersensitivity to SNPs in efavirenz enzyme metabolism, amongst other things. Metabolic toxicity, mainly due to protease inhibitors (PIs) is far more complex and depends on the interaction of various genes. The same seems to be true for fat redistribution syndromes and atherosclerosis, although a clear picture of the genetic factors operating in these syndromes is yet to emerge. The ultimate goal of pharmacogenetics is to customize antiretroviral therapy by identifying the genes that can maximize efficacy whilst helping avoid known side effects of antiretroviral drugs.

  8. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens D; Babiker, Abdel G; Gordin, Fred

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data from randomized trials are lacking on the benefits and risks of initiating antiretroviral therapy in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection who have a CD4+ count of more than 350 cells per cubic millimeter. METHODS: We randomly assigned HIV...... entry, the median HIV viral load was 12,759 copies per milliliter, and the median CD4+ count was 651 cells per cubic millimeter. On May 15, 2015, on the basis of an interim analysis, the data and safety monitoring board determined that the study question had been answered and recommended that patients...... in patients with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells per cubic millimeter. The risks of a grade 4 event were similar in the two groups, as were the risks of unscheduled hospital admissions. CONCLUSIONS: The initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive adults with a CD4+ count of more than 500 cells...

  9. Optimization and simplification of antiretroviral therapy for adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Nathan; Flexner, Charles; Vella, Stefano; Ripin, David; Vitoria, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The review reflects on opportunities and challenges for HIV treatment optimization for the next 5 years. Considering all currently available options, the fixed-dose combination of tenofovir + lamivudine (or emtricitabine) + efavirenz is considered as the best option for first-line treatment for the short to medium term. Second-line therapy will likely continue to be comprised of a boosted protease inhibitor in combination with two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), with potential for combining with integrase inhibitors. For children, there is potential for simplification and harmonization with adult antiretroviral regimens. First-line therapy for children younger than 3 years of age may be best delivered using two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and a boosted protease inhibitor; above 3 years of age, the standard of care is two NRTIs and a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) as recommended for adults. Important research questions include the dosing and safety of new antiretroviral agents and formulations, particularly once-daily fixed-dose combinations, the role of integrase inhibitors and the optimal second-line regimen for NNRTI-exposed children who fail protease inhibitor-containing first-line regimens. Treatment simplification is critical to further antiretroviral therapy scaling-up and support long-term retention in care. Future guidance should consider the broader benefits of earlier antiretroviral therapy initiation beyond potential AIDS mortality reduction, notably mitigation of short- and long-term HIV-associated comorbidities, reduction of HIV transmission, increased retention in care, and enhancing programme simplification.

  10. Assessment of antiretroviral therapy knowledge and willingness of persons with HIV to support its uptake in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batamwita R

    2011-10-01

    opinion leaders reported being approached more regularly by community members for expert advice about antiretroviral therapy compared with nonopinion leaders (odds ratio [OR] 11.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.3–18.6, and opinion leaders were significantly more informed on most technical attributes of antiretroviral therapy, such as “who qualifies for antiretroviral therapy based on CD4 count” (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.0 and “the need to be evaluated for antiretroviral therapy” (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.0. Conclusion: Opinion leaders demonstrated correct knowledge and willingness to provide information on antiretroviral therapy care and treatment issues and were, in turn, consulted more frequently for antiretroviral therapy advice compared with nonopinion leaders. Training opinion leaders to work as community support personnel may increase knowledge about antiretroviral therapy in underserved communities. Keywords: opinion leaders, antiretroviral therapy, knowledge, proactive communication, Uganda, human immunodeficiency virus

  11. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  12. Health-related quality of life and survival among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a study of patients in the AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer-van der Kolk, I Marion; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Smit, Colette; de Wolf, Frank; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2010-01-15

    Previous studies have shown that health-related quality of life (HRQL) predicts survival in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, these studies predated the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, included only a few patients receiving HAART, or had a limited duration of follow-up. This study investigates whether HRQL predicts survival among HIV-infected patients receiving HAART. HIV-infected patients participating in the focus group of the AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) study and starting or already receiving HAART completed the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey at study entry (1 May 1998 through 31 December 2000). The physical health summary (PHS) and mental health summary (MHS) scores were calculated. All-cause mortality was established at 31 March 2008. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression models were performed to predict survival. The median follow-up was 8.4 years. Sixty-six patients (11.8%) died during follow-up. We found a significant relation between quartiles of PHS and survival (P < .001, log-rank test). Of patients with a PHS, 26 (20%) died in quartile 1 (indicating worst HRQL), 17 (13%) died in quartile 2, 10 (8%) died in quartile 3, and 5 (4%) died in quartile 4 (indicating best HRQL) (P< .001). The prediction of PHS on survival was independent of other (clinical) parameters (P< .001). No relation was found between MHS and survival (P= .13). Patient-reported HRQL predicted survival among HIV-infected patients receiving HAART. This information could be highly useful for physicians in determining the prognosis of their patients.

  13. Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengiz Tsertsvadze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU, 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141 cells/mm3. During followup, 152 (20% patients died, with the majority of deaths occurring within 12 months of ART initiation. Mortality was associated with advanced immunodeficiency or the presence of incurable disease at baseline. Among patients remaining on treatment, the median CD4 gain was 216 cell/mm3 and 86% of patients had viral load <400 copies/ml at the last clinical visit. The Georgia ART program has been successful in treating injection drug users infected with HIV.

  14. Does short-term virologic failure translate to clinical events in antiretroviral-naive patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugavero, M.J.; May, M.; Harris, R.; Saag, M.S.; Costagliola, D.; Egger, M.; Phillips, A.; Gunthard, H.F.; Dabis, F.; Hogg, R.; Wolf, F. de; Fatkenheuer, G.; Gill, M.J.; Justice, A.; Monforte, A. D'Arminio; Lampe, F.; Miro, J.M.; Staszewski, S.; Sterne, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether differences in short-term virologic failure among commonly used antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens translate to differences in clinical events in antiretroviral-naive patients initiating ART. DESIGN: Observational cohort study of patients initiating ART between

  15. Continuous antiretroviral therapy decreases bone mineral density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grund, Birgit; Peng, Grace; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Isaksson, Rachel L.; Shlay, Judith C.; Martinez, Esteban; Reiss, Peter; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Carr, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of anti retroviral therapy (ART) on bone mineral density (BMD) Design: Randomized comparison of continuous ART (viral suppression group; VS) with intermittent ART (drug conservation group; DC) Setting: Outpatient clinics in the United States, Australia, and Spain.

  16. using antiretroviral therapy in patients with tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snared or overlapping roxicity is common and leads ro difficult managemenr decisions if the roxicity warranrs stopping therapy. The commonest shared toxicities are peripheral neuropathy, nausea, rash and hepatitis. Peripheral neuropathy due to isoniazid can be prevenred wirh pyridoxine, and it is prudent ro give this to all ...

  17. [STRATEGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH HIV INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushchuk, N D; Fedyaeva, O N; Sirota, N A

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at identifying prognostic factors of antiretroviral therapy (ARVT) in patients with HIV infection at different stages of the disease and developing an algorithm for the three-component assessment of compliance with therapy. A total of 280 patients given ARVT for at least 6 months were available for comprehensive examination, questionnaire study for the detection of non-compliance risk factors, and psychological testing with the evaluation of non-compliance from the anxiety level (Sheehan scale) with the use of cluster analysis. The study revealed the most significant criteria for the assessment of compliance with therapy and non-compliance risk factors associated with ARVT conditions.

  18. Inflammation, Immune Activation, and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Corrilynn O; Funderburg, Nicholas T

    2017-06-01

    This review focuses on the differential effects of contemporary antiretrovirals on systemic inflammation as heightened immune activation is linked to important co-morbidities and mortality with HIV infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces dramatically systemic inflammation and immune activation, but not to levels synchronous with HIV-uninfected populations. In one ART initiation trial, integrase inhibitors appear to reduce inflammation to a greater degree than non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); however, it is not clear that there are beneficial effects on inflammation resulting from treatment with integrase inhibitors compared to PIs, between PIs and NNRTIs, between specific nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or with maraviroc in ART-naïve patients. In ART switch studies, changing to an integrase inhibitor from a PI-, NNRTI-, or enfuvirtide-containing regimen has resulted in improvement in several markers of inflammation. Additional research is needed to conclusively state whether there are clear differences in effects of specific antiretrovirals on inflammation and immune activation in HIV.

  19. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1-associated CNS disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, L; Winston, A; Walsh, J; Post, F; Porter, K; Gazzard, B; Fisher, M; Leen, C; Pillay, D; Hill, T; Johnson, M; Gilson, R; Anderson, J; Easterbrook, P; Bansi, L; Orkin, C; Ainsworth, J; Palfreeman, A; Gompels, M; Phillips, A N; Sabin, C A

    2011-02-22

    The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5-8) in 1996-1997 to 9 (8-10) in 2000-2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7-8) in 2006-2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤ 4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥ 10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤ 4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses.

  20. The Survival Benefits of Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    April, Michael D.; Wood, Robin; Berkowitz, Bethany K.; Paltiel, A. David; Anglaret, Xavier; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2013-01-01

    Background.  We sought to quantify the survival benefits attributable to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa since 2004. Methods.  We used the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications–International model (CEPAC) to simulate 8 cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients initiating ART each year during 2004–2011. Model inputs included cohort-specific mean CD4+ T-cell count at ART initiation (112–178 cells/µL), 24-week ART suppressive efficacy (78%), secon...

  1. Maternal deaths following nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Bera

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases illustrating that it is too simplistic to link nevirapine (NVP toxicity exclusively to individuals with immune preservation. Not enough is known about the mechanism of hepatotoxicity or cutaneous eruption to predict these events. This type of hypersensitivity reaction occurs rarely among HIV-exposed infants taking NVP prophylaxis or antiretroviral therapy (ART-experienced adults with complete plasma viral load suppression. Conversely, HIV-uninfected adults and ART-naive pregnant women appear to be disproportionately affected by the adverse effects of NVP.

  2. Evaluation of HIV and Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy on the Natural History of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cytopathologic Findings in HIV-Positive and High-Risk HIV-Negative Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitz, Sandra; Baxter, Joanna; Raboud, Janet; Walmsley, Sharon; Rachlis, Anita; Smaill, Fiona; Ferenczy, Alex; Coutlée, François; Hankins, Catherine; Money, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Canadian Women's HIV Study (CWHS) enrolled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and high-risk HIV-negative women in a longitudinal cohort. This analysis considered the effects of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on HPV persistence and cervical squamous

  3. The effects of intermittent, CD4-guided antiretroviral therapy on body composition and metabolic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez, Esteban; Visnegarwala, Fehmida; Grund, Birgit; Thomas, Avis; Gibert, Cynthia; Shlay, Judith; Drummond, Fraser; Pearce, Daniel; Edwards, Simon; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Carr, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of decreased antiretroviral therapy exposure on body fat and metabolic parameters. Design: Substudy of the Strategies for Management of Anti-Retroviral Therapy study, in which participants were randomized to intermittent CD4-guided [Drug Conservation (DC) group] or

  4. Changes in lipids and lipoprotein particle concentrations after interruption of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Fiona C; Duprez, Daniel A; Kuller, Lewis H

    2010-01-01

    The effect of interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on lipoprotein particle subclasses has not been studied. We examined short-term changes in lipids and lipoprotein particles among 332 HIV-infected individuals randomized to interrupt or continue ART in the "Strategies for Management...... of Antiretroviral Therapy" trial....

  5. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY RELATED LIVER INJURY (ARLI): A SERIES OF 11 CASES. A. E. O. Otedo, MBChB, MMed ... Background: HIV Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) related liver injury (ARLI) is associated with elevated liver .... and the patients were given palliative and supportive care as in-patients; ...

  6. Sclerosing cholangitis by cytomegalovirus in highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Hidalgo-Tenorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing colangitis (SC due to cytomegalovirus (CMV is very rare. It has been described mainly in immunocompromised patients. Currently, in HIV infected patients it is exceptional. The most of cases belong to pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART and those cases were in stage AIDS with less than 100 CD4/μl. The most frequently involved pathogen in pre-HAART period was Cryptosporidium parvum (30-57% and CMV (10-30%; in late HAART period this information are unaware. CMV has been implicated as a possible etiological agent in primary SC partly because of the ability to cause liver damage and its relationship with smooth muscle antibodies. The most effective treatment for SC was the combination of antiretroviral therapy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with sphincterotomy and stent placement. Following, we present the first case of late HAART period which describes a SC extrahepatic without papillary stenosis with CMV as the only cause and clinical presentation of HIV infection in a woman with 177 CD4/μl.

  7. Predictors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K J; Doxanakis, A; Fairley, C K

    2004-01-01

    To determine the risk factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Two hundred clients attending the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre completed a questionnaire about lifestyle, self-efficacy, depression, drug or alcohol use, social supports, and attitudes to health care. Self-reported adherence (SRA) was measured by missed doses in the last 4, 7 and 28 days. Routinely collected viral load levels were reviewed. Two hundred (85%) out of 231 eligible clients participated in the study. Viral load was most strongly associated with SRA for the last 28 days (P self-efficacy which included; being sure that you will be able to take medications as directed [0.2 (0.1, 0.6)] and being sure that missing doses of HIV medication will result in drug resistance [0.4 (0.2, 0.7)]. When significant questions were combined into a composite score to screen for non-adherence, the sensitivity to predict non-adherence was as high as 71% with a specificity of 59%. This study showed that a 10-min questionnaire was associated with clients past non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy and may be useful for predicting future adherence.

  8. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its determinants in AIDS patients: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiabdolbaghi M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} There are limited published investigations about adherence to antiretroviral and its determinants. Many determinants influence on adherence to therapy. The effects of some determinants on adherence are controversial. More studies are needed to be fulfilled about adherence and its determinants to compile strategies. Key to the success of antiretroviral therapies is the ability and willingness of HIV-positive individuals to adhere to antiretroviral regimens. There are different definitions for full adherence. In the most studies, adherence is defined as taking ≥95% of prescribed medication. Adherence rate needs to be >95% to prevent virologic failure and for complete supper-ssion. The consequences of poor adherence include not only diminished benefits for the patient, but also the public health threat of the emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses, as these resistant strains can then be transmitted from a patient to their contacts. Evaluating adherence has proven to be difficult and there is no gold standard for evaluating adherence to medication. Adherence is assessed in various ways. The most studies evaluate adherence to treatment by using patient's self report and the pill count method but these are methods

  9. Antiretroviral Therapy-Associated Acute Motor and Sensory Axonal Neuropathy

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    Kimberly N. Capers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of passion fruit peel flour (Passiflora edulis fo. flavicarpa on metabolic changes in HIV patients with lipodystrophy syndrome secondary to antiretroviral therapy

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    Simone do Socorro Fernandes Marques

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the effects of using passion fruit peel flour together with diet therapy and counseling in 36 patients with HIV lipodystrophy who were in an ambulatory clinic in a university hospital. The patients were divided into two groups. One received 30 g of passion fruit peel flour daily for 90 days and diet therapy counseling. The other group received only diet therapy counseling. The metabolic changes were analyzed before and after the intervention, with a significance level predetermined at p ≤ 0.05. The use of passion fruit peel flour was effective in reducing total cholesterol and triacylglycerides after 30 days. The concentrations of LDL-C decreased, while HDL-C increased in the blood of lipodystrophy patients after 90 days passion fruit peel flour treatment. No significant differences in food consumption were seen between groups. The use of 30 g of passion fruit peel flour for 90 days together with diet therapy counseling was effective in improving plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C and triacylglycerides.

  11. Liver failure in a child receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy and voriconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Hilhorst, Michaela I.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a 10-year-old child with vertically transmitted acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who was receiving antiretroviral combination therapy and died of liver failure after beginning voriconazole therapy

  12. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    .9; P=0.007) and 1.7 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5; P=0.009), respectively. Adjustment for the latest CD4+ count and HIV RNA level (as time-updated covariates) reduced the hazard ratio for the primary end point from 2.6 to 1.5 (95% CI, 1.0 to 2.1). CONCLUSIONS: Episodic antiretroviral therapy guided by the CD4......BACKGROUND: Despite declines in morbidity and mortality with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, its effectiveness is limited by adverse events, problems with adherence, and resistance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: We randomly assigned persons infected with HIV who...... had a CD4+ cell count of more than 350 per cubic millimeter to the continuous use of antiretroviral therapy (the viral suppression group) or the episodic use of antiretroviral therapy (the drug conservation group). Episodic use involved the deferral of therapy until the CD4+ count decreased to less...

  13. Agreement between physicians and non-physician clinicians in starting antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

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    Vasan Ashwin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scarcity of physicians in sub-Saharan Africa – particularly in rural clinics staffed only by non-physician health workers – is constraining access to HIV treatment, as only they are legally allowed to start antiretroviral therapy in the HIV-positive patient. Here we present a pilot study from Uganda assessing agreement between non-physician clinicians (nurses and clinical officers and physicians in their decisions as to whether to start therapy. Methods We conducted the study at 12 government antiretroviral therapy sites in three regions of Uganda, all of which had staff trained in delivery of antiretroviral therapy using the WHO Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness guidelines for chronic HIV care. We collected seven key variables to measure patient assessment and the decision as to whether to start antiretroviral therapy, the primary variable of interest being the Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation. Patients saw either a clinical officer or nurse first, and then were screened identically by a blinded physician during the same clinic visit. We measured inter-rater agreement between the decisions of the non-physician health workers and physicians in the antiretroviral therapy assessment variables using simple and weighted Kappa analysis. Results Two hundred fifty-four patients were seen by a nurse and physician, while 267 were seen by a clinical officer and physician. The majority (> 50% in each arm of the study were in World Health Organization Clinical Stages I and II and therefore not currently eligible for antiretroviral therapy according to national antiretroviral therapy guidelines. Nurses and clinical officers both showed moderate to almost perfect agreement with physicians in their Final Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendation (unweighted κ = 0.59 and κ = 0.91, respectively. Agreement was also substantial for nurses versus physicians for assigning World Health Organization Clinical

  14. HIV-1 drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive individuals with HIV-1-associated tuberculous meningitis initiating antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thao, Vu P.; Le, Thuy; Török, Estee M.; Yen, Nguyen T. B.; Chau, Tran T. H.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; van Doorn, Rogier H.; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy J.; Dunstan, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-infected individuals in Vietnam is rapidly expanding, but there are limited data on HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) to guide ART strategies. Methods: We retrospectively conducted HIVDR testing in 220 ART-naive individuals recruited to a

  15. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite declines in morbidity and mortality with the use of combination antiretroviral therapy, its effectiveness is limited by adverse events, problems with adherence, and resistance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: We randomly assigned persons infected with HIV wh...

  16. Low bone mass in behaviorally HIV-infected young men on antiretroviral therapy: adolescent trials network (ATN) study 021B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak bone mass is achieved in adolescence/early adulthood and is the key determinant of bone mass in adulthood. We evaluated the association of bone mass with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) during this critical period among behaviorally HIV infected young men and seronegative control...

  17. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

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    Awachana Jiamsakul

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods: As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results: Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI (0.55 to 0.90, p=0.006, compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00, p=0.004 and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71, p<0.001. Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67, p=0.001 compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001. Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions: We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  18. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) 14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported 2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence <95% as the outcome. Conclusions We found that SubAdh, defined as either <100% and <95%, was associated with mode of HIV exposure, ART regimen, time on ART and frequency of adherence measurement. The more frequently sites assessed patients, the lower the SubAdh, possibly reflecting site resourcing for patient counselling. Although social

  19. Nutritional and metabolic assessment of HIV patients in use of antiretroviral therapy at Northeastern Brazil

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    Liana Aguiar Braga

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate nutritional and metabolic changes in HIV infected (HIV+ patients on use of antiretroviral therapy. Methods:  A cross-sectional descriptive study involving HIV+ patients on use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. The demographic data studied were gender, birth date and time of use of antiretroviral medication. Anthropometric variables were weight and height with calculation of body mass index (BMI. Biochemical data were lipid profile, blood glucose, renal function, albumin, uric acid, oxalacetic and pyruvic transaminases and red blood cells count. Results: The study population comprised 70 patients, 36 (51.4% men and 34 (48.6% women with an average time of HAART-use of 34.5 + 16.5 months. We observed a prevalence of 42 (60% healthy weight for BMI, changes in lipid profile and reduction of lean mass in 18 (50% men and increased abdominal obesity in 23 (67.7% women. Conclusion: The studied subjects in use of HAART showed to have loss of subcutaneous fat, lipid changes and higher prevalence of abdominal obesity in women.

  20. Early antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV DNA following perinatal HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Caroline; Pace, Matthew; Kaye, Steve; Hopkins, Emily; Jones, Mathew; Robinson, Nicola; Mant, Christine; Cason, John; Fidler, Sarah; Frater, John

    2017-08-24

    : The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the size of the HIV reservoir has implications for virological remission in adults, but is not well characterized in perinatally acquired infection. In a prospective observational study of 20 children with perinatally acquired infection and sustained viral suppression on ART for more than 5 years, proviral DNA was significantly higher in deferred (>4 years) versus early (first year of life) ART recipients (P = 0.0062), and correlated with age of initiation (P = 0.13; r = 0.57). No difference was seen in cell-associated viral RNA (P = 0.36). Identifying paediatric populations with smaller reservoirs may inform strategies with potential to induce ART-free remission.

  1. Determinants of antiretroviral therapy coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa

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    Fumitaka Furuoka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 35 million people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in 2013, only 37% had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART. Despite global concerted efforts to provide the universal access to the ART treatment, the ART coverage varies among countries and regions. At present, there is a lack of systematic empirical analyses on factors that determine the ART coverage. Therefore, the current study aimed to identify the determinants of the ART coverage in 41 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. It employed statistical analyses for this purpose. Four elements, namely, the HIV prevalence, the level of national income, the level of medical expenditure and the number of nurses, were hypothesised to determine the ART coverage. The findings revealed that among the four proposed determinants only the HIV prevalence had a statistically significant impact on the ART coverage. In other words, the HIV prevalence was the sole determinant of the ART coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  2. Delayed HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodi, Sara; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Touloumi, Giota

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Europe and elsewhere, health inequalities among HIV-positive individuals are of concern. We investigated late HIV diagnosis and late initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) by educational level, a proxy of socioeconomic position. DESIGN AND METHODS: We used data from...... months) using logistic regression, and distribution of CD4 cell count at cART initiation overall and among presenters without AHD using median regression. RESULTS: Among 15 414 individuals, 52, 45,37, and 31% with uncompleted basic, basic, secondary and tertiary education, respectively, presented...... count at cART initiation was lower with poorer educational level. CONCLUSIONS: Socioeconomic inequalities in delayed HIV diagnosis and initiation of cART are present in European countries with universal healthcare systems and individuals with lower educational level do not equally benefit from timely cART...

  3. Antiretroviral therapy increases thymic output in children with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou Sandgaard, Katrine; Lewis, Joanna; Adams, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Disease progression and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected children is different to that of adults. Immune reconstitution in adults is mainly from memory T cells, whereas in children it occurs predominantly from the naive T-cell pool. It is unclear however what...... and cannot in themselves be used as quantitative estimates of thymic output. DESIGN: To compare thymic output in HIV-infected children on ART, HIV-infected children not on ART and uninfected children of different ages. METHOD: Combined T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) and proliferation data are used...... with a recently described mathematical model to give explicit measures of thymic output. RESULTS: We found that age-adjusted thymic output is reduced in untreated children with HIV, which increases significantly with length of time on ART. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that a highly active thymus in early...

  4. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

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    Anand Moodley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy in HIV-infected patients results from the HIV infection itself, post-infectious auto-immune disease, opportunistic infections and drugs. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON, a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking. We report on two HIV-infected patients with LHON mutations (m.14484T>C and m.11778G>A who developed profound visual loss with antiretroviral therapy. We postulate that the phenotypic expression of LHON in these genetically predisposed individuals was triggered by NRTI drugs lamivudine and tenofovir when used in combination, despite their relatively weak mitochondrial toxic effects. 

  5. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  6. Use of third line antiretroviral therapy in Latin America.

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    Carina Cesar

    Full Text Available Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known.Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART.Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3% failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8% received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-2.00, p = 0.001, younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86-4.10, p<0.001, and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62-2.90, p<0.001.Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted.

  7. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-06-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  8. Use of Third Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Ghidinelli, Massimo; Castro, Jose Luis; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fink, Valeria; Duran, Adriana; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine C.; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet) sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART. Results Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3%) failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8%) received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–2.00, p = 0.001), younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86–4.10, p<0.001), and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62–2.90, p<0.001). Conclusions Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted. PMID:25221931

  9. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wendel Mombaque Dos; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-11-21

    to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p terapia de antirretroviral. um estudo de corte transversal foi conduzido em 161 pessoas infectadas com o HIV. Dados de tratamentos clínicos, sociodemográficos e antirretrovirais foram coletados. Para analisar a possível interação medicamentosa, nós usamos o software Micromedex(r). A análise estatística foi feita por regressão logística binária, com um valor P de ≤0.05, considerado estatisticamente significativo. dos participantes, 52.2% foram expostos a potenciais interações droga-droga. No total, houve 218 interações droga-droga, das quais 79.8% ocorreram entre drogas usadas para a terapia antirretroviral. Houve uma associação entre o uso de cinco ou mais medicamentos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p = 0.000), e entre o período de tempo de terapia antirretroviral acima de seis anos e possíveis interações droga-droga (p terapia antirretroviral. un estudio transversal se llevó a cabo en 161 adultos con infección por VIH. Se recogieron datos clínicos, socio demográficos, y de tratamiento antirretroviral. Para analizar las posibles

  10. Challenges and perspectives of compliance with pediatric antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahourou, D L; Leroy, V

    2017-12-01

    More than 3 million children aged less than 15years are infected with HIV worldwide, mainly in Sub-Saharan Africa. The survival of HIV-infected children depends on their access to antiretroviral therapy whose success mainly depends on a good life-long compliance with antiretroviral therapy. Given its complexity and specificity, assessment and monitoring of pediatric compliance with antiretroviral therapy is a major challenge. There is no consensus on a gold standard for monitoring compliance with antiretroviral therapy. Compliance is also influenced by many factors related to the child, the caregiver, the healthcare staff, the healthcare system, and antiretroviral drugs. This review aimed to assess scientific knowledge on pediatric compliance with antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa, and to identify areas for future interventions to improve compliance. Good compliance is essential to achieve the "90% coverage of children on antiretroviral therapy" gold standard of the World Health Organization, and to eliminate HIV infection by 2030. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Evaluation of the Impact of Anti-Retroviral Therapy on the Prevalence of Oral Lesions in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Davoodi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Oral lesions have important diagnostic and prognostic roles in HIV infected patients. It seems that HAART reduces the prevalence of oral lesions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral lesions in HIV infected patients on/not on HAART. Materials & Methods: In this retrospective study, 40 HIV infected patients receiving HAART and 40 who were not on HAART were evaluated in Behavioral Consultation Center in Kermanshah. The diagnosis of the oral lesions was recorded by using established presump-tive clinical criteria. Data were gathered and analyzed using SPSS version 16 by chi-square test. Results: In the current study 80 HIV infected patients with mean age of 38.86 were chosen. 72.5% and 27.5% of participants were male and female respectively. The most common le-sions in those receiving HAART were hairy leukoplakia, hairy tongue and oral pigmentation. However the prevalence of these lesions had declined in comparison to those who were not on HAART but the difference was not significant (P>0.05. Although comparing lesions in the two groups showed no significant difference, the total number of lesions significantly reduced in patients receiving HAART (P=0.046 Conclusion: According to the results of the present study using anti retroviral therapy leaded to reduction in the oral lesions in HIV infected patients. However, more research in this field seems necessary. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:215-222

  12. Immune control of HIV-1 infection after therapy interruption: immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernaschi Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal stage for initiating antiretroviral therapies in HIV-1 bearing patients is still a matter of debate. Methods We present computer simulations of HIV-1 infection aimed at identifying the pro et contra of immediate as compared to deferred Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART. Results Our simulations highlight that a prompt specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes response is detected when therapy is delayed. Compared to very early initiation of HAART, in deferred treated patients CD8+ T cells manage to mediate the decline of viremia in a shorter time and, at interruption of therapy, the virus experiences a stronger immune pressure. We also observe, however, that the immunological effects of the therapy fade with time in both therapeutic regimens. Thus, within one year from discontinuation, viral burden recovers to the value at which it would level off in the absence of therapy. In summary, simulations show that immediate therapy does not prolong the disease-free period and does not confer a survival benefit when compared to treatment started during the chronic infection phase. Conclusion Our conclusion is that, since there is no therapy to date that guarantees life-long protection, deferral of therapy should be preferred in order to minimize the risk of adverse effects, the occurrence of drug resistances and the costs of treatment.

  13. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mangona, Luc?lia; Daca, Tim?teo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, Ant?nio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5?8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hou...

  14. Maintenance therapy after quadruple induction therapy in HIV-1 infected individuals: Amsterdam Duration of Antiretroviral Medication (ADAM) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijers, M. H.; Weverling, G. J.; Jurriaans, S.; Wit, F. W.; Weigel, H. M.; ten Kate, R. W.; Mulder, J. W.; Frissen, P. H.; van Leeuwen, R.; Reiss, P.; Schuitemaker, H.; de Wolf, F.; Lange, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to health benefits for patients infected with HIV-1. However, long-term use of multidrug regimens is difficult to sustain. Simplifying antiretroviral treatment regimens would increase patients' adherence and minimise toxicity. We

  15. HIV-1 genotypic resistance profile of patients failing antiretroviral therapy in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Virginia Michelon Toledo

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has reduced morbidity and mortality related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, but in spite of this advance, HIV mutations decrease antiretroviral susceptibility, thus contributing to treatment failure in patients. Genotyping HIV-1 allows the selection of new drugs after initial drug failure. This study evaluated the genotypic profile of HIV-1 isolates from treated (drug-experienced patients in Paraná, Brazil. The prevalence of mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT and protease (PR genes were assessed. We analyzed 467 genotypes of patients with HIV-1 viral loads above 1,000 copies/mL. Mutations at HIV-1 RT and PR genes and previously used ART regimens were recorded. The most prevalent RT mutations were: 184V (68.31%, 215YF (51.6%, 103NS (46%, 41L (39.4%, 67N (38.54%, 210W (23.5%, 190ASE (23.2%, and 181C (17.4%. PR mutations were 90M (33.33%, 82ATFS (29%, 46I (26.8% and 54V (22.2%. The prevalence of mutations was in line with previous national and international reports, except to nonnucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors related mutations, which were more prevalent in this study. Previous exposure to antiretroviral drugs was associated with genotypic resistance to specific drugs, leading to treatment failure in HIV patients.

  16. Immunopathology as a result of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foudraine, N. A.; Hovenkamp, E.; Notermans, D. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Klein, M. R.; Lange, J. M.; Miedema, F.; Reiss, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Unusual clinical inflammatory syndromes associated with underlying previously unrecognized opportunistic infections are increasingly being noted shortly after starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This study examined the possible relationship between such unexpected

  17. Social grants for people living with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social grants for people living with HIV and on antiretroviral therapy in ... The aim of this studywas to assess the predictorsof thereceipt of a disability grant (DG) ... In a multiple regression generalized estimating equation model, not being in ...

  18. Adherence to Directly Observed Antiretroviral Therapy among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Prison Inmates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David A. Wohl; Becky L. Stephenson; Carol E. Golin; C. Nichole Kiziah; David Rosen; Bich Ngo; Honghu Liu; Andrew H. Kaplan

    2003-01-01

    ...; however, the efficacy of DOT for treating HIV infection has not been determined. We prospectively assessed adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens among 31 HIV-infected prison inmates who were receiving...

  19. Pre-antiretroviral therapy serum selenium concentrations predict WHO stages 3, 4 or death but not virologic failure post-antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Gupte, Nikhil; Yang, Wei-Teng; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Tang, Alice M; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Semba, Richard D; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2014-11-13

    A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS)), was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO) stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks) or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR): 57.28-99.89) and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86-95.10 μg/L) of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR): 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.30-9.42) of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium.

  20. Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Serum Selenium Concentrations Predict WHO Stages 3, 4 or Death but not Virologic Failure Post-Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Gupte, Nikhil; Yang, Wei-Teng; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Tang, Alice M.; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Semba, Richard D.; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS)), was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO) stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks) or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR): 57.28–99.89) and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86–95.10 μg/L) of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR): 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.30–9.42) of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium. PMID:25401501

  1. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its determinants among persons living with HIV/AIDS in Bayelsa state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman IA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high level of adherence is required to achieve the desired outcomes of antiretroviral therapy. There is paucity of information about adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy in Bayelsa State of southern Nigeria. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine the level of adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy among the patients, evaluate the improvement in their immune status and identify reasons for sub-optimal adherence to therapy. Methods: The cross-sectional study involved administration of an adapted and pretested questionnaire to 601 consented patients attending the two tertiary health institutions in Bayesla State, Nigeria: The Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa and the Niger-Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri. The tool was divided into various sections such as socio-demographic data, HIV knowledge and adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy. Information on the patient's CD4+ T cells count was retrieved from their medical records. Adherence was assessed by asking patients to recall their intake of prescribed doses in the last fourteen days and subjects who had 95-100% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs were considered adherent. Results: Three hundred and forty eight (57.9% of the subjects were females and 253 (42.1% were males. The majority of them, 557 (92.7% have good knowledge of HIV and combined anti-retroviral therapy with a score of 70.0% and above. A larger proportion of the respondents, 441 (73.4%, had ≥95% adherence. Some of the most important reasons giving for missing doses include, “simply forgot” 147 (24.5%, and “wanted to avoid the side-effects of drugs” 33(5.5%. There were remarkable improvements in the immune status of the subjects with an increment in the proportion of the subjects with CD4+ T cells count of greater than 350 cells/mm3 from 33 (5.5% at therapy initiation to 338 (56.3% at study period (p<0.0001. Conclusion: The adherence level of 73.4% was low

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and its determinants among persons living with HIV/AIDS in Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Ismail A; Momo, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A high level of adherence is required to achieve the desired outcomes of antiretroviral therapy. There is paucity of information about adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy in Bayelsa State of southern Nigeria. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy among the patients, evaluate the improvement in their immune status and identify reasons for sub-optimal adherence to therapy. The cross-sectional study involved administration of an adapted and pretested questionnaire to 601 consented patients attending the two tertiary health institutions in Bayesla State. The Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa and the Niger-Delta University Teaching Hospital Okolobiri. The tool was divided into various sections such as socio-demographic data, HIV knowledge and adherence to combined antiretroviral therapy. Information on the patient's CD4+ T cells count was retrieved from their medical records. Adherence was assessed by asking patients to recall their intake of prescribed doses in the last fourteen days and subjects who had 95-100% of the prescribed antiretroviral drugs were considered adherent. Three hundred and forty eight (57.9%) of the subjects were females and 253 (42.1%) were males. The majority of them, 557 (92.7%) have good knowledge of HIV and combined anti-retroviral therapy with a score of 70.0% and above. A larger proportion of the respondents, 441 (73.4%), had ≥95% adherence. Some of the most important reasons giving for missing doses include, "simply forgot" 147 (24.5%), and "wanted to avoid the side-effects of drugs" 33(5.5%). There were remarkable improvements in the immune status of the subjects with an increment in the proportion of the subjects with CD4+ T cells count of greater than 350 cells/mm3 from 33 (5.5%) at therapy initiation to 338 (56.3%) at study period (p<0.0001). The adherence level of 73.4% was low which calls for intervention and improvement. The combined antiretroviral therapy has

  3. Osteoarticular complications related to HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Lei Munhoz Lima

    Full Text Available With the significant increase in life expectancy for HIV-infected patients in the era of high potency antiretroviral therapy, major metabolic changes have been observed due to the prolonged period of the viral infection and the treatment itself. Osteoarticular changes resulting from these processes are mainly reported in long term HIV-infected patients receiving high potency antiretroviral therapy and include osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, carpal tunnel syndrome and adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

  4. Retrospective study on cost distribution of antiretroviral therapy in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shreenivas P. Revankar; H. Vedavathi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is an RNA virus. The first case of AIDS in human beings was reported in 1981, and now spread of HIV infection is alarmingly high with around 20 million deaths. The objective of the study was to determine the cost distribution of antiretroviral therapy among autoimmune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient attending the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) center of the tertiary care center. M...

  5. Acute gouty arthritis as a manifestation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS in HIV-infected subjects initiating antiretroviral therapy most commonly involves new or worsening manifestations of previously subclinical or overt infectious diseases. Reports of non-infectious IRIS are much less common but represent important diagnostic and treatment challenges. We report on a 34-year-old HIV-infected male patient with no history of gout who developed acute gouty arthritis in a single joint one month after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  6. Treatment of HIV in the CNS: effects of antiretroviral therapy and the promise of non-antiretroviral therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluso, Michael J; Spudich, Serena

    2014-09-01

    The growing recognition of the burden of neurologic disease associated with HIV infection in the last decade has led to renewed efforts to characterize the pathophysiology of the virus within the central nervous system (CNS). The concept of the AIDS-dementia complex is now better understood as a spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which range from asymptomatic disease to severe impairment. Recent work has shown that even optimally treated patients can experience not only persistent HAND, but also the development of new neurologic abnormalities despite viral suppression. This has thrown into question what the impact of antiretroviral therapy has been on the incidence and prevalence of neurocognitive dysfunction. In this context, the last few years have seen a concentrated effort to identify the effects that antiretroviral therapy has on the neurologic manifestations of HIV and to develop therapeutic modalities that might specifically alter the trajectory of HIV within the CNS.

  7. Antiretroviral therapy improves cognitive impairment in HIV+ individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacktor, N; Nakasujja, N; Skolasky, R; Robertson, K; Wong, M; Musisi, S; Ronald, A; Katabira, E

    2006-07-25

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can improve cognitive performance in some patients with HIV-associated cognitive impairment in the United States. The effect of HAART on HIV dementia in sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. To evaluate neuropsychological test and functional performance in HIV+ individuals after 3 and 6 months of HAART in Uganda. Twenty-three HIV+ individuals receiving HAART also received a detailed clinical history, neuropsychological testing, and a functional assessment. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 3 and 6 months after baseline. Longitudinal changes in the HIV dementia stage, the mean Z score for each neuropsychological test, and the Karnofsky Functional Performance Scale were evaluated at 3 and 6 months. The mean (SD) CD4 cell count improved from 71 (15) at baseline to 161 (30) at 3 months (p = 0.005) and 222 (46) at 6 months (p dementia stage and in tests of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, and executive functioning after 3 and 6 months of HAART (p < 0.001 at 6 months for each neuropsychological test). There was also improvement in the Karnofsky Functional Performance Scale at both 3 and 6 months after the initiation of HAART (p < 0.001). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can be associated with improvement in neurocognitive and functional performance in HIV+ individuals in sub-Saharan Africa. These results suggest that HAART, if available in areas with limited resources in sub-Saharan Africa, should be provided for patients with HIV-associated cognitive impairment.

  8. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting...... patients taking potent antiretroviral therapy (> or =3 drugs) who interrupted maintenance therapy at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 50 x 10(6) cells/L. MEASUREMENTS: Recurrence of opportunistic infection after interruption of maintenance therapy. RESULTS: 379 interruptions of maintenance therapy were...... maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...

  9. CD4+ Count-Guided Interruption of Antiretroviral Treatment. The Strategies for Mangement of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, WM; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Neaton, JD

    2006-01-01

    .9; P=0.007) and 1.7 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5; P=0.009), respectively. Adjustment for the latest CD4+ count and HIV RNA level (as time-updated covariates) reduced the hazard ratio for the primary end point from 2.6 to 1.5 (95% CI, 1.0 to 2.1). CONCLUSIONS: Episodic antiretroviral therapy guided by the CD4...

  10. Does short-term virologic failure translate to clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Mugavero, Michael J; May, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether differences in short-term virologic failure among commonly used antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens translate to differences in clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating ART. DESIGN: Observational cohort study of patients initiating ART between...... January 2000 and December 2005. SETTING: The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) is a collaboration of 15 HIV cohort studies from Canada, Europe, and the United States. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: A total of 13 546 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-positive patients initiating ART with efavirenz.......04-1.56) and abacavir (1.22, 95% CI = 1.00-1.48). CONCLUSION: Among antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating therapy, between-ART regimen, differences in short-term virologic failure do not necessarily translate to differences in clinical outcomes. Our results should be interpreted with caution because...

  11. Does short-term virologic failure translate to clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Harris, Ross; Saag, Michael S.; Costagliola, Dominique; Egger, Matthias; Phillips, Andrew; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Dabis, Francois; Hogg, Robert; de Wolf, Frank; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; Gill, M. John; Justice, Amy; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Lampe, Fiona; Miró, Jose M.; Staszewski, Schlomo; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Casabona, Jordi; Geneviè, Chêne; Dabis, François; del Amo, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Gill, John; Guest, Jodie; Kitahata, Mari; Ledergerber, Bruno; Mocroft, Amanda; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael; Sterne, Jonathan; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boué, F.; Burty, C.; Cabié, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorgé, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupon, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Pariente-Khayat, A.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Rivet, A.; Abgral, S.; Guiguet, M.; Kousignian, I.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Potard, V.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J. L.; Leport, C.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Sicard, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudière, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph; Desplanque, N.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livroze, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Ravaux, I.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Laffeuillade, J.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Raffi, F.; Pugliese, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M. F.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Montroni, M.; Scalise, G.; Braschi, M. C.; Riva, A.; Tirelli, U.; Cinelli, R.; Pastore, G.; Ladisa, N.; Suter, F.; Arici, C.; Chiodo, F.; Colangeli, V.; Fiorini, C.; Carosi, G.; Cristini, G.; Torti, C.; Minardi, C.; Bertelli, D.; Quirino, T.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Cosco, L.; Scerbo, A.; Vecchiet, J.; D'Alessandro, M.; Santoro, D.; Pusterla, L.; Carnevale, G.; Zoncada, A.; Viganò, P.; Mena, M.; Ghinelli, F.; Sighinolfi, L.; Leoncini, F.; Mazzotta, F.; Pozzi, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Angarano, G.; Grisorio, B.; Saracino, A.; Ferrara, S.; Grima, P.; Grima, F.; Pagano, G.; Cassola, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Toti, M.; Trezzi, M.; Soscia, F.; Tacconi, L.; Orani, A.; Perini, P.; Scasso, A.; Vincenti, A.; Chiodera, F.; Castelli, P.; Scalzini, A.; Palvarini, L.; Moroni, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Rizzardini, G.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Galli, A.; Merli, S.; Pastecchia, C.; Moioli, M. C.; Esposito, R.; Mussini, C.; Abresci, N.; Chirianni, A.; Izzo, C. M.; Piazza, M.; de Marco, M.; Viglietti, R.; Manzillo, E.; Nappa, S.; Colomba, A.; Abbadessa, V.; Prestileo, T.; Mancuso, S.; Ferrari, C.; Pizzaferri, P.; Filice, G.; Minoli, L.; Bruno, R.; Novati, S.; Baldelli, F.; Tinca, M.; Petrelli, E.; Cioppi, A.; Cioppi, F.; Ruggieri, A.; Menichetti, F.; Martinelli, C.; de Stefano, C.; La Gala, A.; Ballardini, G.; Rizzo, E.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Arlotti, M.; Ortolani, P.; Cauda, R.; Dianzani, F.; Ippolito, G.; Antinori, A.; Antonucci, G.; Ciardi, M.; Narciso, P.; Petrosillo, N.; Vullo, V.; de Luca, A.; Zaccarelli, M.; Acinapura, R.; de Longis, P.; Brandi, A.; Trotta, M. P.; Noto, P.; Lichtne, M.; Capobianch, M. R.; Carletti, F.; Girardi, E.; Pezzotti, P.; Rezza, G.; Mura, M. S.; Mannazzu, M.; Caramello, P.; Di Perri, G.; Sciandra, M.; Orofino, G. C.; Grossi, P. A.; Basilico, C.; Poggio, A.; Bottari, G.; Raise, E.; Ebo, F.; Pellizzer, G.; Buonfrate, D.; Resta, F.; Loso, K.; Cozzi Lepri, A.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, Ph; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, Ch; Kaiser, L.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, Th; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Martinez, N.; Nadal, D.; Opravil, M.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.; Gras, L. A.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Prins, J. M.; Branger, J.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Gisolf, J.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; Lettinga, K. D.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; van der Poll, T.; Ruys, Th A.; Steingrover, R.; Vermeulen, J. N.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Pajkrt, D.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van Eeden, A.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Roos, J. C.; Schouten, W. E. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Wagenaar, J.; Veenstra, J.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Perenboom, R. M.; Rijkeboer, A.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Pogány, K.; Bravenboer, B.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; van Leeuwen, J. T. M.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; van Houte, D.; Polée, M. B.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Schippers, E. F.; Schreij, G.; van der Geest, S.; Lowe, S.; Verbon, A.; Koopmans, P. P.; van Crevel, R.; de Groot, R.; Keuter, M.; Post, F.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Warris, A.; van der Ende, M. E.; Gyssens, I. C.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; van der Flier, M.; Hartwig, N. G.; Juttman, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; van de Heul, C.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Borleffs, J. C. C.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Mudrikove, T.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Gisolf, E. H.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Faber, T.; Tanis, A. A.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; den Hollander, J. G.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Back, N. K. T.; Bakker, M. E. G.; Berkhout, B.; Jurriaans, S.; Zaaijer, H. L.; Cuijpers, Th; Rietra, P. J. G. M.; Roozendaal, K. J.; Pauw, W.; van Zanten, A. P.; Smits, P. H. M.; von Blomberg, B. M. E.; Savelkoul, P.; Pettersson, A.; Swanink, C. M. A.; Franck, P. F. H.; Lampe, A. S.; Jansen, C. L.; Hendriks, R.; Benne, C. A.; Veenendaal, D.; Storm, H.; Weel, J.; van Zeijl, J. H.; Kroes, A. C. M.; Claas, H. C. J.; Bruggeman, C. A. M. V. A.; Goossens, V. J.; Galama, J. M. D.; Melchers, W. J. G.; Poort, Y. A. G.; Doornum, G. J. J.; Niesters, M. G.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Schutten, M.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Swaans, C. A. M.; Boucher, C. A. B.; Schuurman, R.; Boel, E.; Jansz, A. F.; Veldkamp, A.; Beijnen, J. H.; Huitema, A. D. R.; Burger, D. M.; Hugen, P. W. H.; van Kan, H. J. M.; Losso, M.; Duran, A.; Vetter, N.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Clumeck, N.; de Wit, S.; Poll, B.; Colebunders, R.; Machala, L.; Rozsypal, H.; Sedlacek, D.; Nielsen, J.; Lundgren, J.; Benfield, T.; Kirk, O.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A.-B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Zilmer, K.; Viard, J.-P.; Girard, P.-M.; Saint-Marc, T.; Vanhems, P.; Dabis, F.; Dietrich, M.; Manegold, C.; van Lunzen, J.; Stellbrink, H.-J.; Staszewsk, S.; Bickel, M.; Goebel, F.-D.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Sambatakou, H.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Sthoeger, Z.; Maayan, S.; Chiesi, A.; Borghi, R.; Pristera, R.; Mazzott, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Lichtner, M.; Montesarchio, E.; Iacomi, F.; Finazzi, R.; Viksna, L.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Bruun, J.; Maeland, A.; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Prokopowicz, D.; Wiercinska-Drapalo, A.; Boron-Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Antunes, F.; Valadas, E.; Mansinho, K.; Matez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Babes, Victor; Streinu-Cercel, A.; Vinogradova, E.; Rakhmanova, A.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokrás, M.; Staneková, D.; González-Lahoz, J.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; García-Benayas, T.; Martin-Carbonero, L.; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Conejero, J.; Tural, C.; Gatell, J. M.; Miró, J. M.; Blaxhult, A.; Karlsson, A.; Pehrson, P.; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Phillips, A.; Johnson, M. A.; Mocroft, A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Brettle, R.; Loveday, C.; Antunes, Francisco; Blaxhult, Anders; Clumeck, Nathan; Gatell, Jose; Horban, Andrzej; Johnson, Anne; Katlama, Christine; Loveday, Clive; Vella, Stefano; Gjørup, I.; Friis-Moeller, N.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Bannister, W.; Mollerup, D.; Podlevkareva, D.; Holkmann Olsen, C.; Kjaer, J.; Raffanti, Stephen; Dieterch, Douglas; Becker, Stephen; Scarsella, Anthony; Fusco, Gregory; Most, Bernard; Balu, Rukmini; Rana, Rashida; Beckerman, Robin; Ising, Theodore; Fusco, Jennifer; Irek, Renae; Johnson, Bernadette; Hirani, Ashwin; DeJesus, Edwin; Pierone, Gerald; Lackey, Philip; Irek, Chip; Johnson, Alison; Burdick, John; Leon, Saul; Arch, Joseph; Helm, Eilke B.; Carlebach, Amina; Müller, Axel; Haberl, Annette; Nisius, Gabi; Lennemann, Tessa; Stephan, Christoph; Bickel, Markus; Mösch, Manfred; Gute, Peter; Locher, Leo; Lutz, Thomas; Klauke, Stephan; Knecht, Gabi; Khaykin, Pavel; Doerr, Hans W.; Stürmer, Martin; Babacan, Errol; von Hentig, Nils; Beylot, J.; Chêne, G.; Dupon, M.; Longy-Boursier, M.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Salamon, R.; Thiébaut, R.; Lewden, C.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Mercié, P.; Moreau, J. F.; Morlat, P.; Bernard, N.; Lacoste, D.; Malvy, D.; Neau, D.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Decoin, M.; Delveaux, S.; Hannapier, C.; Labarrère, S.; Lavignolle-Aurillac, V.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, B.; Palmer, G.; Touchard, D.; Balestre, E.; Alioum, A.; Jacqmin-Gadda, H.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Coadou, B.; Gellie, P.; Nouts, C.; Bocquentin, F.; Dutronc, H.; Lafarie, S.; Aslan, A.; Pistonne, T.; Thibaut, P.; Vatan, R.; Chambon, D.; de La Taille, C.; Cazorla, C.; Ocho, A.; Viallard, J. F.; Caubet, O.; Cipriano, C.; Lazaro, E.; Couzigou, P.; Castera, L.; Fleury, H.; Lafon, M. E.; Masquelier, B.; Pellegrin, I.; Breilh, D.; Blanco, P.; Loste, P.; Caunègre, L.; Bonna, F.; Farbos, S.; Ferrand, M.; Ceccaldi, J.; Tchamgoué, S.; de Witte, S.; Buy, E.; Akagi, Linda; Brandson, Eirikka; Druyts, Eric; Gataric, Kim Fernandes Nada; Harrigan, P. Richard; Harris, Marrianne; Hayden, Anna; Lima, Viviane; Montaner, Julio; Moore, David; Wood, Evan; Yip, Benita; Zhang, Wen; Bhagani, S.; Byrne, P.; Carroll, A.; Cuthbertson, Z.; Dunleavy, A.; Geretti, A. M.; Heelan, B.; Johnson, M.; Kinloch-de Loes, S.; Lipman, M.; Madge, S.; Marshall, N.; Nair, D.; Nebbia, G.; Prinz, B.; Swaden, L.; Tyrer, M.; Youle, M.; Chaloner, C.; Grabowska, H.; Holloway, J.; Puradiredja, J.; Ransom, D.; Tsintas, R.; Bansi, L.; Fox, Z.; Harris, E.; Hill, T.; Lampe, F.; Lodwick, R.; Reekie, J.; Sabin, C.; Smith, C.; Amoah, E.; Booth, C.; Clewley, G.; Garcia Diaz, A.; Gregory, B.; Labbett, W.; Tahami, F.; Thomas, M.; Read, Ron; Krentz, Hartmut; Beckthold, Brenda; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Rockstroh, Juergen; Casabona, J.; Miró, J. L.; Alquézar, A.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Romero, A.; Agustí, C.; Agüero, F.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Segura, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martinez, E.; Mallolas, J.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; BolaoF, F.; Cabellos, C.; Peña, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Amengual, Ma Jose; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Willig, James H.; Raper, James L.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette; Schumacher, Joseph E.; Wes, Andrew O.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Pisu, Maria; Moneyham, Linda; Vance, David; Bachmann, Laura; Davies, Susan L.; Berner, Eta; Acosta, Edward; King, Jennifer; Savage, Karen; Nevin, Christa; Walton, Frances B.; Marler, Malcolm L.; Lawrence, Sarah; Files-Kennedy, Barbara; Batey, D. Scott; Patil, Manoj A.; Patil, Ujavala; Varshney, Mohit; Gibson, Eugene; Guzman, Alfredo; Rinehart, Dustin; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Bryant, K.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Cohen, D.; Consorte, A.; Gordon, K.; Kidwai, F.; Levin, F.; McGinnis, K.; Rambo, M.; Rogers, J.; Skanderson, M.; Whitsett, F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether differences in short-term virologic failure among commonly used antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens translate to differences in clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating ART. DESIGN: Observational cohort study of patients initiating ART between

  12. Dyslipidemia in AIDS patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Weyler Nery

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART reduces AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, however it has been associated with metabolic abnormalities. This study estimated the prevalence of lipid abnormalities and related factors among patients on HAART. A cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients, in central Brazil. Patients were interviewed, and blood obtained for lipids measurement. Dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol (TC > 240 mg/dL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL > 160 mg/dL, triglycerides (TG > 200 and/or high-density lipoprotein (HDL < 40 mg/dL. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed (SPSS 13.0. One hundred and thirteen patients were recruited. Mean age was 39.3 years; 68.1% were males; 50.4% were on nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI in combination with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI, while 42.5% were on NRTI in combination with protease inhibitors (PIs. The prevalence of dyslipidemia was 66.7%. Low HDL was the most frequent abnormality (53.5%, followed by high TG (36.1%. Patients on a PI regimen had a 5.2-fold higher risk (95% CI: 1.8-14.8 of dyslipidemia, even after adjusting for sex, age, and duration of HIV infection/AIDS. The study discloses a high prevalence rate of dyslipidemia and points out a need for intervention programs to reduce future cardiovascular events in patients, on HAART.

  13. Costing universal access of highly active antiretroviral therapy in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounton, Sennen Houessey; Akonde, Alain; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Bashi, Jules; Meda, Nicolas; Newlands, David

    2008-05-01

    The study aimed to estimate costs of provision and access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in order to assist in planning and resource allocation regarding scaling up and sustainable access to HAART in Benin. A prospective study was carried out to collect data on costs of provision of care at the Outpatient Treatment Centre (OTC) of the National University hospital in Cotonou, Benin and on costs borne by people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and their families in accessing care. We used an Excel model, a macro costing approach and WHO guidelines for costing health services. Annual costs were subsequently extrapolated from a societal perspective over a 10-year time horizon. Sensitivity analysis was conducted on major cost categories. The study population was mostly of middle age (median age of 38, IQR 34-42), married (65%), working class (60%) with low literacy (70% primary education level or less). The main drivers of costs of HAART service provision were drugs (73%), biological monitoring (15%) and personnel (8%). Annual costs of provision of HAART and household costs borne by PLWHA and families in seeking care amounted to 1160 USD and 111 USD per PLWHA respectively. These household costs are respectively 40% and 14% of household health and education related costs and may represent catastrophic health expenditures for patients and families. The provision of drugs and biological monitoring, and household costs in accessing care, remain by far the main barriers to ensuring universal access to HAART.

  14. Patient retention and adherence to antiretrovirals in a large antiretroviral therapy program in Nigeria: a longitudinal analysis for risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Charurat

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantial resources and patient commitment are required to successfully scale-up antiretroviral therapy (ART and provide appropriate HIV management in resource-limited settings. We used pharmacy refill records to evaluate risk factors for loss to follow-up (LTFU and non-adherence to ART in a large treatment cohort in Nigeria.We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between March 2005 and July 2006 at five health facilities. Patients were classified as LTFU if they did not return >60 days from their expected visit. Pharmacy refill rates were calculated and used to assess non-adherence. We identified risk factors associated with LTFU and non-adherence using Cox and Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE regressions, respectively. Of 5,760 patients initiating ART, 26% were LTFU. Female gender (p 350 and 2 hours to the clinic (p = 0.03, had total ART duration of >6 months (p200 at ART initiation were at a higher risk of non-adherence. Patients who disclosed their HIV status to spouse/family (p = 0.01 and were treated with tenofovir-containing regimens (p < or = 0.001 were more likely to be adherent.These findings formed the basis for implementing multiple pre-treatment visit preparation that promote disclosure and active community outreaching to support retention and adherence. Expansion of treatment access points of care to communities to diminish travel time may have a positive impact on adherence.

  15. Patient retention and adherence to antiretrovirals in a large antiretroviral therapy program in Nigeria: a longitudinal analysis for risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charurat, Man; Oyegunle, Modupe; Benjamin, Renata; Habib, Abdulrazaq; Eze, Emeka; Ele, Prince; Ibanga, Iquo; Ajayi, Samuel; Eng, Maria; Mondal, Prosanta; Gebi, Usman; Iwu, Emilia; Etiebet, Mary-Ann; Abimiku, Alash'le; Dakum, Patrick; Farley, John; Blattner, William

    2010-05-11

    Substantial resources and patient commitment are required to successfully scale-up antiretroviral therapy (ART) and provide appropriate HIV management in resource-limited settings. We used pharmacy refill records to evaluate risk factors for loss to follow-up (LTFU) and non-adherence to ART in a large treatment cohort in Nigeria. We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between March 2005 and July 2006 at five health facilities. Patients were classified as LTFU if they did not return >60 days from their expected visit. Pharmacy refill rates were calculated and used to assess non-adherence. We identified risk factors associated with LTFU and non-adherence using Cox and Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) regressions, respectively. Of 5,760 patients initiating ART, 26% were LTFU. Female gender (p 350 and traveled for >2 hours to the clinic (p = 0.03), had total ART duration of >6 months (p200 at ART initiation were at a higher risk of non-adherence. Patients who disclosed their HIV status to spouse/family (p = 0.01) and were treated with tenofovir-containing regimens (p travel time may have a positive impact on adherence.

  16. High Current CD4+ T Cell Count Predicts Suboptimal Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Bruin, Marijn; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Prins, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether

  17. High current CD4+ T cell count predicts suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; de Bruin, M.; Bakker, M.; Berkhout, B.; Prins, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) are necessary for achieving and maintaining optimal virological suppression, as suboptimal adherence leads to therapy failure and disease progression. It is well known that adherence to ART predicts therapy response, but it is unclear whether

  18. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART is vital to improve the patient’s state of well-being and to prevent the development of strains of the human immunodef ciency virus (HIV that are resistant to ART. Persons with ART-resistant strains of HIV can spread these to other people, requiring more expensive ART with more severe side-effects and poorer health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was to determine nurses’ perspectives on Botswana patients’ anti-retroviral therapy (ART adherence, and to identify factors which could promote or hinder ART adherence. Four ART sites were randomly selected and all 16 nurses providing ART services at these sites participated in semi-structured interviews. These nurses indicated that patients’ ART adherence was inf uenced by service-related and patient-related factors. Service-related factors included the inaccessibility of ART clinics, limited clinic hours, health workers’ inability to communicate in patients’ local languages, long waiting times at clinics and delays in being informed about their CD4 and viral load results. Nurses could not trace defaulters nor contact them by phone, and also had to work night shifts, disrupting nurse-patient relationships. Patient-related factors included patients’ lack of education, inability to understand the significance of CD4 and viral load results, financial hardships, non-disclosure and non-acceptance of their HIV positive status, alcohol abuse, the utilisation of traditional medicines and side effects of ART. The challenges of lifelong ART adherence are multifaceted involving both patient-related and service-related factors. Supplying free ARVs does not ensure high levels of ART adherence.

    Opsomming

    Anti-retrovirale middels (ARMs word gratis verskaf in Botswana. Lewenslange getroue nakoming van ARM voorskrifte is

  19. Effects of intermittent IL-2 alone or with peri-cycle antiretroviral therapy in early HIV infection: the STALWART study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavel, Jorge A; Babiker, Abdel; Fox, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Study of Aldesleukin with and without antiretroviral therapy (STALWART) evaluated whether intermittent interleukin-2 (IL-2) alone or with antiretroviral therapy (ART) around IL-2 cycles increased CD4(+) counts compared to no therapy. METHODOLOGY: Participants not on continuous ART...... with > or = 300 CD4(+) cells/mm(3) were randomized to: no treatment; IL-2 for 5 consecutive days every 8 weeks for 3 cycles; or the same IL-2 regimen with 10 days of ART administered around each IL-2 cycle. CD4(+) counts, HIV RNA, and HIV progression events were collected monthly. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total...... of 267 participants were randomized. At week 32, the mean CD4(+) count was 134 cells greater in the IL-2 alone group (pIL-2 plus ART group (pIL-2 groups compared to 1 participant in the group...

  20. Long-term trends in adherence to antiretroviral therapy from start of HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiano, Valentina; Lampe, Fiona C; Rodger, Alison J; Smith, Colette J; Geretti, Anna M; Lodwick, Rebecca K; Puradiredja, Dewi I; Johnson, Margaret; Swaden, Leonie; Phillips, Andrew N

    2010-05-15

    People on antiretroviral therapy are likely to be required to maintain good adherence throughout their lives. We aimed to investigate long-term trends in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence to identify the main predictors and to evaluate whether participants experience periods of low adherence (start of HAART until the end of the last recorded ART prescription or death. Follow-up was divided into 6-month periods, and for each period, a value of adherence, measured as the percentage of days in the 6-month period covered by a valid prescription for at least three antiretroviral drugs, was calculated. Patients were assessed for drug coverage adherence for a median of 4.5 years [inter-quartile range (IQR) 2.4-7.2; maximum 9 years] covering a period up to 13 years from start of HAART. There was evidence of a slight increase in adherence over time [adjusted odds ratio (OR) of >95% adherence = 1.02 per year; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.04; P = 0.0053]. Independent predictors of adherence were age, demographic group, calendar year period, drug regimen and previous virologic failures. The overall rate of at least one period of low adherence was 0.12 per person-year, but this rate decrease markedly over time to 0.01 in 2007/2008. Adherence, as measured by drug coverage, does not decrease on average over more than a decade from start of HAART. This is encouraging, because it shows that patients could potentially maintain viral suppression for many years.

  1. Quality of life, anxiety and depression in patients with HIV/AIDS who present poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Narváez Betancur

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The psychological component is considered to be fundamental in the management of HIV/AIDS patients. Psychoeducation should be conducted at the initial evaluation to reduce negative beliefs regarding antiretroviral therapy Assessment of anxiety and depression symptoms should be done throughout therapy as both psycological conditions are associated with patient adherence, success of treatment, and ultimately with patients’ quality of life.

  2. Combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Weber, R; Monforte, AD; El-Sadr, WM; Reiss, P; Thiebaut, R; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Lundgren, JD; Weber, R; Monteforte, AD; Bartsch, G; Reiss, P; Dabis, F; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Houyez, F; Loeliger, E; Tressler, R; Weller, I.; Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Sjol, A; Lundgren, JD; Sawitz, A; Rickenbach, M; Pezzotti, P; Krum, E; Meester, R; Lavignolle, V.; Sundstrom, A; Poll, B; Fontas, E; Torres, F; Petoumenos, K; Kjaer, J; Hammer, S; Neaton, J; Sjol, A; de Wolf, F; van der Ven, E; Zaheri, S; Van Valkengoed, L; Meester, R; Bronsveld, W; Weigel, H; Brinkman, K; Frissen, P; ten Veen, J; Hillbrand, M; Schieveld, S; Mulder, J; van Gorp, E; Meenhorst, P; Danner, S; Claessen, F; Perenboom, R; Schattenkerk, JKE; Godfried, M; Lange, J; Lowe, S; van der Meer, J; Nellen, F; Pogany, K; van der Poll, T; Reiss, R; Ruys, T; Wit, F; Richter, C; van Leusen, R; Vriesendorp, R; Jeurissen, F; Kauffmann, R; Koger, E; Brevenboer, B; Sprenger, HG; Law, G; ten Kate, RW; Leemhuis, M; Schippers, E; Schrey, G; van der Geest, S; Verbon, A; Koopmans, P; Keuter, M; Telgt, D; van der Ven, A; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Gyssens, I.; de Marie, S; Juttmann, J; van der Heul, C; Schneider, M; Borleffs, J; Hoepelman, I.; Jaspers, C; Matute, A; Schurink, C; Blok, W; Salamon, R; Beylot, J; Dupon, M; Le Bras, M; Pellegrin, JL; Ragnaud, JM; Dabis, F; Chene, G; Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Rhiebaut, R; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Lavignolle, V.; Balestre, E; Blaizeau, MJ; Decoin, M; Formaggio, AM; Delveaux, S; Labarerre, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vimard, E; Merchadou, L; Palmer, G; Touchard, D; Dutoit, D; Pereira, F; Boulant, B; Beylot, J; Morlat, P; Bonarek, M; Bonnet, F; Coadou, B; Gelie, P; Jaubert, D; Nouts, C; Lacoste, D; Dupon, M; Dutronc, H; Cipriano, G; Lafarie, S; Chossat, I.; Lacut, JY; Leng, B; Pellegrin, JL; Mercie, P; Viallard, JF; Faure, I.; Rispal, P; Cipriano, C; Tchamgoue, S; Le Bras, M; Djossou, F; Malvy, D; Pivetaud, JP; Ragnaud, JM; Chambon, D; De La Taille, C; Galperine, T; Lafarie, S; Neau, D; Ochoa, A; Beylot, C; Doutre, MS; Bezian, JH; Moreau, JF; Taupin, JL; Conri, C; Constans, J; Couzigou, P; Castera, L; Fleury, H; Lafon, ME; Masquelier, B; Pellegrin, I.; Trimoulet, P; Moreau, F; Mestre, C; Series, C; Taytard, A; Law, M; Petoumenos, K; Bal, J; Mijch, A; Watson, K; Roth, N; Wood, H; Austin, D; Gowers, A; Baker, B; McFarlane, R; Carr, A; Cooper, D; Chuah, J; Fankhauser, W; Mallal, S; Skett, J; Calvo, G; Torres, F; Mateau, S; Domingo, P; Sambeat, MA; Gatell, J; Del Cacho, E; Cadafalch, J; Fuster, M; Codina, C; Sirera, G; Vaque, A; Clumeck, N; De Wit, S; Gerard, M; Hildebrand, M; Kabeya, K; Konopnicki, D; Payen, MC; Poll, B; Van Laethem, Y; Neaton, J; Bartsch, G; El-Sadr, WM; Krum, E; Thompson, G; Wentworth, D; Luskin-Hawk, R; Telzak, E; El-Sadr, WM; Abrams, DI; Cohn, D; Markowitz, N; Arduino, R; Mushatt, D; Friedland, G; Perez, G; Tedaldi, E; Fisher, E; Gordin, F; Crane, LR; Sampson, J; Baxter, J; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Vetter, N; Clumeck, N; Hermans, P; Colebunders, R; Machala, L; Nielsen, J; Benfield, T; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T; Roge, B; Skinhoj, P; Pedersen, C; Katlama, C; Viard, JP; Saint-Marc, T; Vanhems, P; Pradier, C; Dietrich, M; Manegold, C; van Lunzen, J; Miller, V.; Staszewski, S; Bieckel, M; Goebel, FD; Salzberger, B; Rockstroh, J; Kosmidis, J; Gargalianos, P; Sambatakou, H; Perdios, J; Panos, G; Karydis, I.; Filandras, A; Banhegyi, D; Mulcahy, F; Yust, I.; Turner, D; Pollack, S; Ben-Ishai, Z; Bentwich, Z; Maayan, S; Vella, S; Chiesi, A; Arici, C; Pristera, R; Mazzotta, F; Gabbuti, A; Esposito, R; Bedini, A; Chirianni, A; Montesarchio, E; Vullo, V.; Santopadre, P; Narciso, P; Antinori, A; Franci, P; Zaccarelli, M; Lazzarin, A; Finazzi, R; Monforte, VO; Hemmer, R; Staub, T; Reiss, P; Bruun, J; Maeland, A; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B; Gasiorowski, J; Horban, A; Prokopowicz, D; Boron-Kaczmarska, A; Pnyka, M; Beniowski, M; Trocha, H; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Proenca, R; Gonzalez-Lahoz, J; Diaz, B; Garcia-Benayas, T; Martin-Carbonero, L; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B; Jou, A; Conejero, J; Tural, C; Gatell, JM; Miro, JM; Blaxhult, A; Heidemann, B; Pehrson, P; Ledergerber, B; Weber, R; Francioli, P; Telenti, A; Hirschel, B; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Furrer, H; Fisher, M; Brettle, R; Barton, S; Johnson, AM; Mercey, D; Loveday, C; Johnson, MA; Pinching, A; Parkin, J; Weber, J; Scullard, G; Morfeldt, L; Thulin, G; Sunstrom, A; Akerlund, B; Koppel, K; Karlsson, A; Flamholc, L; Hakangard, C; Monforte, AD; Pezzotti, P; Moroni, M; Monforte, AD; Cargnel, A; Merli, S; Vigevani, GM; Pastecchia, C; Lazzarin, A; Novati, R; Caggese, L; Moioli, C; Mura, MS; Mannazzu, M; Suter, F; Arici, C; Manconi, PE; Piano, P; Mazzotta, F; Lo Caputo, S; Poggio, A; Bottari, G; Pagano, G; Alessandrini, A; Scasso, A; Vincenti, A; Abbadesse, V.; Mancuso, S; Alberici, F; Ruggieri, A; Arlotti, M; Ortolani, P; De Lalla, F; Tositti, G; Piersantelli, N; Piscopo, R; Raise, E; Pasquinucci, S; Soscia, F; Tacconi, L; Tirelli, U; Nasti, G; Santoro, D; Pusterla, L; Carosi, G; Castelli, F; Cadeo, G; Vangi, D; Carnevale, G; Galloni, D; Filice, G; Bruno, R; Sinicco, A; Sciandra, M; Caramello, P; Gennero, L; Soranzo, ML; Bonasso, M; Rizzardini, G; Migliorino, G; Chiodo, F; Colangeli, V.; Magnani, G; Ursitti, M; Menichetti, F; Martinelli, C; Esposito, R; Mussini, C; Ghinelli, F; Sighinolfi, L; Coronado, O; Zauli, T; Ballardini, G; Montroni, M; Zoli, A; Petrelli, E; Cioppi, A; Ortona, L; De Luca, A; Petrosillo, N; Noto, P; Narciso, P; Salcuni, P; Antinori, A; De Longis, P; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M; Pastore, G; Minafra, G; Chiriann, A; Loiacono, L; Piazza, M; Nappa, S; Abrescia, N; De Marco, M; Colomba, A; Prestileo, T; De Stefano, C; La Gala, A; Ferraro, T; Scerbo, A; Grima, P; Tundo, P; Pizzigallo, E; D'Alessandro, M; Grisorio, B; Ferrara, S; Pradier, C; Fontas, E; Caissotti, C; Dellamonica, P; Bentz, L; Bernard, E; Chaillou, S; De Salvador-Guillouet, F; Durant, J; Guttman, R; Heripret, L; Mondain-Miton, V.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B; Pugliese, P; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, PM; Vandenbos, F; Bernasconi, E; Bucher, H; Burgisser, P; Cattacin, S; Egger, M; Erb, P; Fierz, W; Fischer, M; Flepp, M; Fontana, A; Francioli, P; Furrer, HJ; Gorgievski, M; Hirschel, B; Kaiser, L; Kind, C; Klimkait, T; Ledergerber, B; Lauper, U; Opravil, M; Paccaud, F; Pantaleo, G; Perrin, L; Piffaretti, JC; Rickenbach, M; Rudin, C; Schupbach, J; Speck, R; Telenti, A; Trkola, A; Vernazza, P; Weber, R; Yerly, S; Ten Napel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether exposure to combination antiretroviral treatment increases the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 23,468 patients from 11 previously established cohorts from December 1999 to April 2001 and

  3. Antiretroviral effect of lovastatin on HIV-1-infected individuals without highly active antiretroviral therapy (The LIVE study: a phase-II randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoya Carlos J

    2009-06-01

    this topic, all these findings warrant further evaluation to determine if long-term administration of statins may benefit the virological and immunological evolution in HIV-1-infected individuals before the use of antiretroviral therapy is required. Trial registration Registration number NCT00721305.

  4. Changes in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors With Immediate Versus Deferred Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation Among HIV-Positive Participants in the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Sharma, Shweta; Achhra, Amit C

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: HIV infection and certain antiretroviral therapy (ART) medications increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, mediated, in part, through traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied cardiovascular disease risk factor changes in the STAR...

  5. Alcohol use disorders and antiretroviral therapy among prisoners in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Michael; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Vázquez, Mariana; Altice, Frederick L

    2013-01-01

    While Argentina has significantly improved access to HIV care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both the general population and prisoners, the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among HIV-infected prisoners and their relationship to accessing ART in Argentina is currently unknown. This study aims to characterize the substance abuse patterns of HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and to assess the independent correlates of receipt of pre-incarceration ART. An anonymous, cross-sectional survey of 100 HIV-infected federal prisoners was conducted in the Buenos Aires municipality from July-December 2010. AUDs were assessed using the AUDIT scale. A majority (63 per cent) of participants met criteria for AUDs, 45 per cent of subjects were diagnosed with HIV in prison and one-quarter had initiated ART during the current incarceration. In addition, over one-third (35 per cent) of participants did not receive ART during the pre-incarceration period despite receiving it upon incarceration. This correlated significantly with the presence of having an AUD (AOR 0.20, 95 per cent CI 0.06-0.74, p = 0.016). AUDs are prevalent among HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and are significantly related to negative secondary HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. While Argentina has provided an exemplary model of HIV-related health care reform within its prisons, future efforts to provide screening and treatment for AUDs are needed to improve the health of the nation’s incarcerated population. This paper is the first to describe pre-incarceration drug and alcohol use disorders and issues related to access to ART among prisoners in Argentina.

  6. Antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Louise-Helene; MacGillivray, Jay; Urquia, Marcelo L; Caprara, Daniela; Murphy, Kellie E; Yudin, Mark H

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy use in pregnancy, and specifically regimens containing protease inhibitors (PIs), has been associated with adverse infant outcomes including preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW) and small for gestational age (SGA) infants. However, there are conflicting results in the literature with respect to the degree of risk. These results may be related to demographic factors and confounding of maternal HIV infection and degree of immune suppression. The primary objective of our study was to assess the risk of PTB in HIV-positive pregnant women on ART compared to HIV-negative pregnant women. Secondary objectives included: comparing the risks of LBW and SGA infants in HIV-positive women on ART to HIV-negative pregnant women; comparing the risks of PTB, LBW and SGA in HIV-positive women on PI-based regimens compared to HIV-negative women. A retrospective matched cohort study of 384 women was conducted between 2007 and 2012 comparing outcomes of HIV-positive women on ART to HIV-negative women. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used, adjusting for potential confounding factors, to compare the two groups on adverse infant outcomes. Unadjusted odds ratios revealed a >2-fold increase in rates: PTB OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.3-5.1]; LBW OR 2.9 [95% CI 1.4-6.3]; SGA OR 2.5 [95% CI 1.3-4.7]. Once odds ratios were adjusted to account for race (ppower, our adjusted results are not statistically significant. A larger prospective follow-up study is needed to further explore these findings in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sex Differences in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Pediatric HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Mori

    Full Text Available The incidence and severity of infections in childhood is typically greater in males. The basis for these observed sex differences is not well understood, and potentially may facilitate novel approaches to reducing disease from a range of conditions. We here investigated sex differences in HIV-infected children in relation to antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation and post-treatment outcome. In a South African cohort of 2,101 HIV-infected children, we observed that absolute CD4+ count and CD4% were significantly higher in ART-naïve female, compared to age-matched male, HIV-infected children. Absolute CD4 count and CD4% were also significantly higher in HIV-uninfected female versus male neonates. We next showed that significantly more male than female children were initiated on ART (47% female; and children not meeting criteria to start ART by >5 yrs were more frequently female (59%; p<0.001. Among ART-treated children, immune reconstitution of CD4 T-cells was more rapid and more complete in female children, even after adjustment for pre-ART absolute CD4 count or CD4% (p=0.011, p=0.030, respectively. However, while ART was initiated as a result of meeting CD4 criteria less often in females (45%, ART initiation as a result of clinical disease in children whose CD4 counts were above treatment thresholds occurred more often in females (57%, p<0.001. The main sex difference in morbidity observed in children initiating ART above CD4 thresholds, above that of TB disease, was as a result of wasting and stunting observed in females with above-threshold CD4 counts (p=0.002. These findings suggest the possibility that optimal treatment of HIV-infected children might incorporate differential CD4 treatment thresholds for ART initiation according to sex.

  8. Incidence rate of modifying or discontinuing first combined antiretroviral therapy regimen due to toxicity during the first year of treatment stratified by age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Silva Torres

    antiretroviral therapy regimen and year of combined antiretroviral therapy initiation. These results are important because not only patients are living longer and aging with HIV, but also new diagnoses are being made among the elderly. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the safety profile of first line combined antiretroviral therapy on elderly individuals, especially in resource-limited countries, where initial regimens are mostly NNRTI-based.

  9. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...... of the antidiabetics metformin or glitazones to high dose recombinant human growth hormone therapy or switching antiretroviral regimen. When looking at the effect of switching therapy, focus has been addressed to protease inhibitor (PI) based regimens, as PI was the first component of HAART recognized to be correlated...

  10. Association of opioid agonist therapy with the initiation of antiretroviral therapy - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlunde, Linda Beatrice; Sunguya, Bruno Fokas; Mbwambo, Jessie Kazeni Kilonzo; Ubuguyu, Omary Said; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-05-01

    People who inject drugs are at high risk of HIV infection but often face barriers in accessing medical care including access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Evidence is available about the effectiveness of opioid agonist therapy on drug dependency and risk behaviors. However, it remains scattered regarding access to ART among HIV-positive people who inject drugs. We conducted a systematic review to examine the association of opioid agonist therapy with ART initiation among HIV-positive people who inject drugs. We searched the literature for evidence from seven databases. We conducted a narrative synthesis and meta-analysis to examine the association of opioid agonist therapy with ART initiation. Five out of 2,901 identified studies met the inclusion criteria. Three out of five studies reported that, HIV-positive people receiving opioid agonist therapy initiated ART more than those not receiving opioid agonist therapy. In meta-analysis, opioid agonist therapy was associated with ART initiation among HIV positive people who inject drugs (pooled odds ratio: 1.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-2.73). Opioid agonist therapy is positively associated with ART initiation among HIV-positive people who inject drugs. It is important to scale up opioid agonist therapy among people who inject drugs to improve their ART initiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Serum Selenium Concentrations Predict WHO Stages 3, 4 or Death but not Virologic Failure Post-Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Shivakoti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS, was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (<85 μg/L pre-ART and its association with outcomes were examined. Median serum selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR: 57.28–99.89 and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86–95.10 μg/L of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR: 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.30–9.42 of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium.

  12. Immediate Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection Accelerates Bone Loss Relative to Deferring Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoy, Jennifer F; Grund, Birgit; Roediger, Mollie P

    2017-01-01

    Both HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. Because the relative contributions of ART and untreated HIV to BMD loss are unclear, it is important to quantify the effect of ART on bone. We compared the effect...... progressively over 2 years. After year 1, BMD changes were similar in the immediate and deferred groups. No clinical, HIV-related, or ART characteristic predicted greater BMD loss in either group. All HIV treatment guidelines now recommend ART initiation at HIV diagnosis because of the reduced risk of serious...

  13. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (Art) for HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) means treating retroviral infections like HIV with drugs. These drugs though do not kill the virus but slowed down the growth of the virus. When the virus is slowed down, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease is also slowed down. ART drugs are referred to as ARV and ARV therapy is ...

  14. Diabetic ketoacidosis in an HIV-infected patient undergoing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, MR; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Røder, ME

    2006-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a number of metabolic and morphologic alterations, known as HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), have been increasingly common in HIV-infected patients being treated with this therapy. The use of protease...

  15. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    of the antidiabetics metformin or glitazones to high dose recombinant human growth hormone therapy or switching antiretroviral regimen. When looking at the effect of switching therapy, focus has been addressed to protease inhibitor (PI) based regimens, as PI was the first component of HAART recognized to be correlated...

  16. Effect of exercise and strength training on cardiovascular status in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scevola, Daniele; Di Matteo, Angela; Lanzarini, Paolo; Uberti, Filippo; Scevola, Silvia; Bernini, Verginia; Spoladore, Greta; Faga, Angela

    2003-04-01

    A routine evaluation of lipid metabolism and body fat distribution along with a careful cardiovascular risk stratification according to international guidelines are required for HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy. Intervention includes evaluation of patients for both epidemiological and clinical factors, and for anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Diet counseling, prescription of antihyperlipidemic drugs and exercise training are the cornerstones of programs devoted to protecting patients from side effects of therapies that compromise quality of life and the functions of organs like the pancreas and heart that are involved in lipid disorders.

  17. Interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Steve; Park, Jay J H; Chan, Keith; Socias, Maria Eugenia; Ford, Nathan; Forrest, Jamie I; Thorlund, Kristian; Nachega, Jean B; Mills, Edward J

    2017-01-01

    High adherence to antiretroviral therapy is crucial to the success of HIV treatment. We evaluated comparative effectiveness of adherence interventions with the aim of informing the WHO's global guidance on interventions to increase adherence. For this systematic review and network meta-analysis, we searched for randomised controlled trials of interventions that aimed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy regimens in populations with HIV. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, and MEDLINE for reports published up to July 16, 2015, and searched major conference abstracts from Jan 1, 2013, to July 16, 2015. We extracted data from eligible studies for study characteristics, interventions, patients' characteristics at baseline, and outcomes for the study populations of interest. We used network meta-analyses to compare adherence and viral suppression for all study settings (global network) and for studies in low-income and middle-income countries only (LMIC network). We obtained data from 85 trials with 16 271 participants. Short message service (SMS; text message) interventions were superior to standard of care in improving adherence in both the global network (odds ratio [OR] 1·48, 95% credible interval [CrI] 1·00-2·16) and in the LMIC network (1·49, 1·04-2·09). Multiple interventions showed generally superior adherence to single interventions, indicating additive effects. For viral suppression, only cognitive behavioural therapy (1·46, 1·05-2·12) and supporter interventions (1·28, 1·01-1·71) were superior to standard of care in the global network; none of the interventions improved viral response in the LMIC network. For the global network, the time discrepancy (whether the study outcome was measured during or after intervention was withdrawn) was an effect modifier for both adherence to antiretroviral therapy (coefficient estimate -0·43, 95% CrI -0·75 to -0·11) and viral suppression (-0·48; -0·84 to -0·12

  18. A longitudinal evaluation of the impact of a polylactic acid injection therapy on health related quality of life amongst HIV patients treated with anti-retroviral agents under real conditions of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Many HIV patients receiving antiretroviral treatment develop lipodystrophy. NEW-FILL® is a polylactic acid injected to treat facial lipoatrophy. The objectives of this study were to describe (1) change in quality of life (QoL) of HIV patients treated with NEW-FILL® in the management of facial lipoatrophy; (2) efficacy of NEW-FILL® using facial photographs and (3) a patient-reported “Overall Treatment Effect” (OTE) scale; and (4) safety of NEW-FILL®. Methods Doctors from 13 treatment centres recruited 230 HIV patients to receive up to 5 sessions of NEW-FILL® injections. Patients self-reported QoL with the ABCD questionnaire before the first set of injections, at 2 months and at 12 to 18 months after the last session of injections. Efficacy was evaluated at each interval through photographs and OTE scale. Safety was evaluated via Case Report Form (CRF) data. Results 64.4% of patients reported QoL improvements of >10% at 2 months, and 58.8% at 12–18 months. Lipoatrophy grades improved at each visit (“no lipoatrophy” or “limited lipoatrophy”: 20.3% at inclusion, 77.4% at 2 months, 58.4% at 12–18 months). Average OTE scores of 5.3 and 5.0 at 2 and 12–18 months indicated “moderate improvement”. Minimum Important Difference (MID) in QoL score was 7.1 points at 2 months; 7.4 points at 12–18 months. For 911 injection sessions performed, 3.4% resulted in “immediate” adverse events, 7% in “non-immediate” events, and 1.7% in “other” events. Conclusions Improvements to quality of life and diminished lipoatrophy visibility were observed in the months immediately following NEW-FILL® treatment and were maintained 12–18 months post-treatment. Most adverse events were mild and transient. ABCD MID thresholds provide clinicians with means to assess the impact of lipoatrophy therapies on QoL. PMID:23425246

  19. HIV and antiretroviral therapy: lipid abnormalities and associated cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Donald P

    2008-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy are at increased risk for developing metabolic abnormalities that include elevated levels of serum triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is similar to that seen in the metabolic syndrome, raising the concern that highly active antiretroviral therapy also potentially increases the risk for cardiovascular complications. This paper reviews the contribution of both HIV infection and the different components of highly active antiretroviral therapy to dyslipidemia and the role of these abnormalities toward increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients; therapeutic strategies to manage these risks are also considered.

  20. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Maganga

    Full Text Available Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART, yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders.In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher's exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders.HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7% vs.11/153 (7.2%, p<0.001 and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0% vs. 8/153 (5.2%, p = 0.001 than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78-11.77, p<0.001. Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%.HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune reconstitution.

  1. Transmission of HIV-1 minority-resistant variants and response to first-line antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuchant, Olivia; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Capdepont, Sophie; Lavignolle-Aurillac, Valérie; Neau, Didier; Morlat, Philippe; Dabis, François; Fleury, Hervé; Masquelier, Bernard

    2008-07-31

    The transmission of drug-resistant HIV-1 can impair the virological response to antiretroviral therapy. Minority-resistant variants have been detected in acute seroconverters. We investigated the clinical relevance of the detection of majority and minority-resistant variants in an observational study in antiretroviral therapy naive, recently infected patients. We included patients infected between 1996 and 2005, with a plasma sample obtained less than 18 months after seroconversion and prior to antiretroviral therapy initiation. Majority-resistant variants were determined by direct population sequencing. Minority-resistant variants were searched by allele-specific PCR for the mutations K103N and M184V in reverse transcriptase and L90M in protease. The association between resistance and viroimmunological response to antiretroviral therapy was estimated by using a piecewise linear mixed model. Majority-resistant variants were detected in 23/172 (13.4%) patients. Patients with majority-resistant variants had a lower mean plasma viral load and higher mean CD4 cell count at baseline compared with those without resistance. The decrease in viral load between 1 and 6 months on antiretroviral therapy was significantly steeper in patients with sensitive viruses compared with those with majority-resistant variants (P = 0.029). Minority-resistant variants were detected in 21/73 (29%) patients with wild-type viruses at sequencing analysis. The presence of minority-resistant variants did not modify baseline viral load and CD4 cell count and did not affect the changes in viral load and CD4 cell count. The transmission of majority-resistant variants, but not minority-resistant variants, influenced the response to antiretroviral therapy in this prospective study. The detection of the transmission of minority-resistant variants warrants further clinical validation.

  2. Poor functional immune recovery in aged HIV-1-infected patients following successfully treatment with antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Taissa M; Hygino, Joana; Andrade, Regis M; Monteiro, Clarice; Sacramento, Priscila M; Andrade, Arnaldo F B; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2015-10-01

    Aging is now a well-recognized characteristic of the HIV-infected population and both AIDS and aging are characterized by a deficiency of the T-cell compartment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in recovering functional response of T cells to both HIV-1-specific ENV peptides (ENV) and tetanus toxoid (TT), in young and aged AIDS patients who responded to ARV therapy by controlling virus replication and elevating CD4(+) T cell counts. Here, we observed that proliferative response of T-cells to either HIV-1-specific Env peptides or tetanus toxoid (TT) was significantly lower in older antiretroviral (ARV)-treated patients. With regard to cytokine profile, lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-21, associated with elevated IL-10 release, were produced by Env- or TT-stimulated T-cells from older patients. The IL-10 neutralization by anti-IL-10 mAb did not elevate IFN-γ and IL-21 release in older patients. Finally, even after a booster dose of TT, reduced anti-TT IgG titers were quantified in older AIDS patients and it was related to both lower IL-21 and IFN-γ production and reduced frequency of central memory T-cells. Our results reveal that ARV therapy, despite the adequate recovery of CD4(+) T cell counts and suppression of viremia, was less efficient in recovering adequate immune response in older AIDS patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Employment Status in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2003-04-01

    Apr 1, 2003 ... responses and employment history of highly-active antiretroviral .... employment history. It was piloted in focus groups comprised of nurses and clerical workers at Korle-Bu. Teaching Hospital to improve its contextual appropri- ateness. .... ment on HAART, 47 (62.7%) earned less money than before their ...

  4. The magnitude of intentional non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A structured questionnaire was used for interviewing the patients in order to assess intentional non-adherence through recall, as well as the presence of solicited antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) related side effects during the past 3, 7 and 30 days respectively, since ARV initiation. In addition, clinical (weight changes and incident ...

  5. How disclosure and antiretroviral therapy help HIV-infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa cope with stigma. ... HIV-related stigma has a major impact on the health and psychosocial wellbeing of HIV-infected children and youths. While there is some debate about the extent to which improved access to antiretroviral ...

  6. High Mortality among Patients with AIDS Who Received a Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in the First 3 Months of Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Serena P.; Riviere, Cynthia; Leger, Paul; Joseph, Patrice; Severe, Patrice; Parker, Kea; Collins, Sean; Lee, Erin; Pape, Jean W.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed mortality among 201 patients with AIDS and tuberculosis in Haiti. Patients who received a diagnosis of tuberculosis during the first 3 months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy were 3.25 times more likely to die than were other patients with AIDS and tuberculosis. Failure to recognize active tuberculosis at initiation of antiretroviral therapy leads to increased mortality. PMID:19207078

  7. Uptake of combination antiretroviral therapy and HIV disease progression according to geographical origin in seroconverters in Europe, Canada, and Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarrin, Inma; Pantazis, Nikos; Gill, M John

    2012-01-01

    We examined differences by geographical origin (GO) in time from HIV seroconversion (SC) to AIDS, death, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy (cART).......We examined differences by geographical origin (GO) in time from HIV seroconversion (SC) to AIDS, death, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy (cART)....

  8. Low-level viremia and proviral DNA impede immune reconstitution in HIV-1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Thim, Per T.

    2005-01-01

    Immunological and virological consequences of low-level viremia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remain to be determined.......Immunological and virological consequences of low-level viremia in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remain to be determined....

  9. Slower decline of plasma HIV-1 RNA following highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy in primary compared with chronic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putter, H.; Prins, J. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Roos, M.; Ferguson, N. M.; van Praag, R.; van der Hoek, L.; Schuitemaker, H.; Anderson, R. M.; Goudsmit, J.; Lange, J. M.; de Wolf, F.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy on the slopes of HIV-1 RNA decline in primary compared with chronic HIV-1 infection. METHODS: Slopes of HIV-1 RNA decline in plasma were compared before and after the start of highly suppressive antiretroviral therapy from

  10. Extensive variation in drug-resistance mutational profile of Brazilian patients failing antiretroviral therapy in five large Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Brites

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The resistance mutational profile of Brazilian patients failing antiretroviral therapy is quite variable, depending on the city where patients were tested. This variation likely reflects distinctive choice of antiretrovirals drugs to initiate therapy, adherence to specific drugs, or circulating HIV-1 strains. Overall, etravirine and DRV/r remain as the most active drugs.

  11. Changes in inflammatory and coagulation biomarkers: a randomized comparison of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Duprez, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Among a subgroup of participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) Trial that were naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART) or off ART (6 months or longer) at study entry, risk of AIDS and serious non-AIDS events were increased for participants who deferred ART compa...

  12. Treatment as prevention: are Argentinean HIV care providers willing to adopt earlier antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socías, María Eugenia; Sued, Omar; Pryluka, Daniel; Patterson, Patricia; Fink, Valeria; Cesar, Carina; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    HIV guidelines increasingly recommend antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation at a higher CD4 levels. The extent to which these evolving standards are translated into routine clinical care has not been evaluated in Argentina. During October 2012, we conducted an online survey among Argentinean HIV clinicians to assess their attitudes and practices toward ART initiation and its potential use for HIV prevention. Of the 280 physicians included, 61% would prescribe ART at CD4 ≤ 500 cells/µL for asymptomatic patients. Although, only 11% would recommend ART irrespective of CD4 cell count, 72% would do it for serodiscordant couples, and 75% for sex workers. Most participants agreed that they would consider earlier initiation of ART if transmission risk exists, and that expansion of ART could help decrease HIV incidence. These results suggest that a large proportion of Argentinean HIV care providers are willing to adopt the recently updated Argentinean guidelines recommending earlier ART, especially when high HIV transmission risk exists.

  13. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes.

  14. Duration of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy and Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation: Association with Mortality in HIV-Related Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Claudia P.; Wehbe, Firas H.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Duda, Stephany N.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Gonzalez, Elsa; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Schechter, Mauro; Padgett, Denis; Cesar, Carina; Madero, Juan Sierra; Pape, Jean W.; Masys, Daniel R.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases mortality risk in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients, but the effect of the duration of anti-tuberculosis therapy and timing of anti-tuberculosis therapy initiation in relation to ART initiation on mortality, is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study among HIV-infected persons concomitantly treated with Rifamycin-based anti-tuberculosis therapy and ART in Latin America. The study population included persons for whom 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy is recommended. Results Of 253 patients who met inclusion criteria, median CD4+ lymphocyte count at ART initiation was 64 cells/mm3, 171 (68%) received >180 days of anti-tuberculosis therapy, 168 (66%) initiated anti-tuberculosis therapy before ART, and 43 (17%) died. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for CD4+ lymphocytes and HIV-1 RNA, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation was associated with an increased risk of death compared to tuberculosis diagnosis before ART initiation (HR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15, 5.02; P = 0.02). In a separate model among patients surviving >6 months after tuberculosis diagnosis, after adjusting for CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV-1 RNA, and timing of ART initiation relative to tuberculosis diagnosis, receipt of >6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy was associated with a decreased risk of death (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08, 0.66; P=0.007). Conclusions The increased risk of death among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis after ART initiation highlights the importance of screening for tuberculosis before ART initiation. The decreased risk of death among persons receiving > 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy suggests that current anti-tuberculosis treatment duration guidelines should be re-evaluated. PMID:24066096

  15. Do disability grants influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Kagee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal data suggest that some South Africans living with HIV who receive disability grants from the state deliberately default on their antiretroviral medication in an attempt to lower their CD4 count to remain eligible for grants. No actual empirical data however exist to show that disability grants act as such perverse incentives and are a valid reason for non-adherence. This article examines some of the complexities of antiretroviral adherence in the context of a resource-constrained environment. The multitude of structural barriers, including sometimes difficult patient-doctor conversations about the renewal of disability grants, shape patients’ experiences of the clinic environment and influence their adherence to care.

  16. Rinossinusites em crianças infectadas pelo HIV sob terapia anti-retroviral Rhinosinusitis in HIV-infected children undergoing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Diógenes Pinheiro Neto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A associação dos inibidores de protease (IP à terapia anti-retroviral provocou mudanças importantes na morbidade e mortalidade de pacientes infectados pelo HIV. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o impacto desta associação na prevalência de rinossinusite (RS e na contagem sérica de linfócitos CD4 em crianças infectadas pelo HIV. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: A forma de estudo foi cross-sectional com 471 crianças infectadas pelo HIV. Em 1996, inibidores de protease foram liberados para terapia anti-retroviral. Desta forma, dois grupos de crianças foram formados: as que não fizeram uso de IP e as que fizeram uso desta droga após 1996. A prevalência de RS e a contagem sérica de linfócitos CD4 foram comparadas entre estes grupos. RESULTADOS: 14,4% das crianças infectadas pelo HIV apresentaram RS. A RS crônica foi mais prevalente que a RS aguda em ambos os grupos. Crianças menores de 6 anos tratadas com a associação de IP apresentaram maior prevalência de RS aguda. A associação de IP esteve associada à maior contagem de linfócitos CD4 séricos com menor prevalência de RS crônica. CONCLUSÕES: A terapia com IP esteve associada ao aumento na contagem de linfócitos CD4. Crianças abaixo dos 6 anos em uso de IP apresentaram menor tendência à cronificação da doença.The association of protease inhibitors (PI to antiretroviral therapy has generated sensible changes in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients. AIM: Aims at evaluating the impact of this association on the prevalence of rhinosinusitis (RS and CD4+ lymphocyte count in HIV-infected children. METHODS: Retrospective cross-sectional study of the medical charts of 471 HIV-infected children. In 1996, protease inhibitors were approved for use as an association drug in antiretroviral therapy. Children were divided into two groups: one which did not receive PI and another which received PI after 1996. The prevalence of RS and CD4+ lymphocyte counts were compared between these groups

  17. Reactivity of routine HIV antibody tests in children who initiated antiretroviral therapy in early infancy as part of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, H; Mkhize, NN; Otwombe, K; Lewis, J; Panchia, R; Callard, R; Morris, L; Babiker, A; Violari, A; Cotton, MF; Klein, N; Gibb, DM

    2015-01-01

    Background Early ART and virological suppression may impact on evolving antibody responses to HIV-infection. We evaluated frequency and predictors of seronegativity in infants starting early ART. Methods HIV-antibody results were compared between two of three arms of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) trial: HIV-infected infants aged HIV-infection was diagnosed by DNA PCR and RNA >1000 copies/ml. ART started at median age 7 and 23 weeks respectively. Antibody was measured from all available stored samples, ART-96W (n=109) and ART-Def (n=75), at trial week 84 (median age 92 (IQR 90.6–93.4) weeks) using 3 assays: 4th generation EIA HIV-antigen/antibody combination; HIV-1/2 rapid-antibody test and quantitative anti-gp120 IgG ELISA. Findings More ART-96W were seronegative than ART-Def by EIA (46% versus 11%, ptest (53% versus 14%, p24 weeks were seropositive. Cumulative viral load to week 84 correlated with anti-gp120 IgG levels (coefficient=0.54, pHIV-seronegative by at aged ∼2 years. HIV-antibody tests cannot be used to re-confirm HIV-diagnosis in children starting early-ART. Long-term consequences of seronegativity need further study. Funding Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, National Institutes of Health. PMID:26043884

  18. Implementing a pharmacovigilance program to evaluate cutaneous adverse drug reactions in an antiretroviral access program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Sibanda, Marvelous; Gavi, Samuel; Maponga, Charles Chiedza; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (cADRs) can cause significant morbidity and distress in patients especially in the HIV infected population on antiretroviral therapy. Adverse Drug Reaction monitoring and ascertaining causality in resource limited settings still remains a challenge. This study was carried out to evaluate causality and measure incidence of cADRs in HIV infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy. The study was also designed to test a 3-step approach in the monitoring and evaluation of ADRs in resource limited settings. Methodology A retrospective patient medical records review was carried out at the Parirenyatwa Family Care Centre, (Harare, Zimbabwe). Cases of cADRs were reported to the Medicines Control Authority of Zimbabwe (Drug regulating body in Zimbabwe) for assessment and causality classification. Results Two hundred and twenty-one patient records were randomly selected and reviewed to determine if any diagnosis of cADRs was made by clinicians. Causality assessment revealed 13.1% of cADRs which were due to an offending agent in the antiretroviral therapy against an initial incidence of 17.6% which had been determined by the physicians. Conclusions cADRs had an incidence of 13.1% within the population under study due to non nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Most reactions were due to the NNRTIs which contributed 72.4 % of all cADRs. A panel of experts from the drug regulatory authority can be used as an implementation based mechanism in ascertaining causality objectively in settings where resources are constrained. PMID:23277506

  19. Polymorphisms associated with renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in a Southern Brazilian HIV cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Ivete M; Gasparotto, Aline S; Lazzaretti, Rosmeri K; Notti, Regina K; Sprinz, Eduardo; Mattevi, Vanessa S

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms in five candidate genes (ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCC4, SLC22A6, and SLC22A11) in relation to nephrotoxicity associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected individuals. The following single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped by real-time PCR: ABCB1 rs1045642, ABCC2 rs717620 and rs2273697, ABCC4 rs1751034 and rs3742106, SLC22A6 rs11568626, and SLC22A11 rs11231809 in 507 HIV-infected patients from the city of Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil, receiving HAART for, at least, 1 year. From the 507 HIV-infected patients recruited, 19.1% presented a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A total of 16 (3.2%) patients fulfilled the criteria for chronic kidney disease (defined as eGFRT (rs717620) presented lower eGFR than C/C homozygotes (104 ± 22 vs. 108 ± 22 ml/min/1.73 m, independent-samples t-test, P=0.040). In multivariate analysis, the predictors associated with decreased eGFR were time of treatment, tenofovir use, atazanavir/ritonavir use, and carrying one T allele of ABCC2 -24 C>T. Our data support the importance of genetic factors in the etiology of nephrotoxicity in patients treated with HAART. Studies to verify treatment implications of genotyping before HAART initiation may be advisable to guide the selection of an appropriate antiretroviral therapy regimen.

  20. Nutritional status and CD4 cell counts in patients with HIV/AIDS receiving antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Celia Oliveira dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Even with current highly active antiretroviral therapy, individuals with AIDS continue to exhibit important nutritional deficits and reduced levels of albumin and hemoglobin, which may be directly related to their cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 cell counts. The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS and relate the findings to the albumin level, hemoglobin level and CD4 cell count. Methods Patients over 20 years of age with AIDS who were hospitalized in a university hospital and were receiving antiretroviral therapy were studied with regard to clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and sociodemographic characteristics. Body mass index, percentage of weight loss, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and arm muscle circumference were analyzed. Data on albumin, hemoglobin, hematocrit and CD4 cell count were obtained from patient charts. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test for independent variables and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of significance was set to 0.05 (α = 5%. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. Results Of the 50 patients evaluated, 70% were male. The prevalence of malnutrition was higher when the definition was based on arm circumference and triceps skinfold measurement. The concentrations of all biochemical variables were significantly lower among patients with a body mass index of less than 18.5kg/m2. The CD4 cell count, albumin, hemoglobin and hematocrit anthropometric measures were directly related to each other. Conclusions These findings underscore the importance of nutritional follow-up for underweight patients with AIDS, as nutritional status proved to be related to important biochemical alterations.

  1. Nutritional status and CD4 cell counts in patients with HIV/AIDS receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Célia Oliveira dos; Almeida, Ana Maria Rampeloti

    2013-01-01

    Even with current highly active antiretroviral therapy, individuals with AIDS continue to exhibit important nutritional deficits and reduced levels of albumin and hemoglobin, which may be directly related to their cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell counts. The aim of this study was to characterize the nutritional status of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and relate the findings to the albumin level, hemoglobin level and CD4 cell count. Patients over 20 years of age with AIDS who were hospitalized in a university hospital and were receiving antiretroviral therapy were studied with regard to clinical, anthropometric, biochemical and sociodemographic characteristics. Body mass index, percentage of weight loss, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and arm muscle circumference were analyzed. Data on albumin, hemoglobin, hematocrit and CD4 cell count were obtained from patient charts. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Student's t-test for independent variables and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The level of significance was set to 0.05 (α = 5%). Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 17.0 software for Windows. Of the 50 patients evaluated, 70% were male. The prevalence of malnutrition was higher when the definition was based on arm circumference and triceps skinfold measurement. The concentrations of all biochemical variables were significantly lower among patients with a body mass index of less than 18.5kg/m2. The CD4 cell count, albumin, hemoglobin and hematocrit anthropometric measures were directly related to each other. These findings underscore the importance of nutritional follow-up for underweight patients with AIDS, as nutritional status proved to be related to important biochemical alterations.

  2. French 2013 guidelines for antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1 infection in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoen, Bruno; Bonnet, Fabrice; Delaugerre, Constance; Delobel, Pierre; Goujard, Cécile; L'Hénaff, Marianne; Persiaux, Renaud; Rey, David; Rouzioux, Christine; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Morlat, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    These guidelines are part of the French Experts' recommendations for the management of people living with HIV/AIDS, which were made public and submitted to the French health authorities in September 2013. The objective was to provide updated recommendations for antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV-positive adults. Guidelines included the following topics: when to start, what to start, specific situations for the choice of the first session of antiretroviral therapy, optimization of antiretroviral therapy after virologic suppression, and management of virologic failure. Ten members of the French HIV 2013 expert group were responsible for guidelines on ART. They systematically reviewed the most recent literature. The chairman of the subgroup was responsible for drafting the guidelines, which were subsequently discussed within, and finalized by the whole expert group to obtain a consensus. Recommendations were graded for strength and level of evidence using predefined criteria. Economic considerations were part of the decision-making process for selecting preferred first-line options. Potential conflicts of interest were actively managed throughout the whole process. ART should be initiated in any HIV-positive person, whatever his/her CD4 T-cell count, even when >500/mm3. The level of evidence of the individual benefit of ART in terms of mortality or progression to AIDS increases with decreasing CD4 cell count. Preferred initial regimens include two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine) plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz or rilpivirine), or a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (atazanavir or darunavir). Raltegravir, lopinavir/r, and nevirapine are recommended as alternative third agents, with specific indications and restrictions. Specific situations such as HIV infection in women, primary HIV infection, severe immune suppression with or without identified opportunistic infection

  3. French 2013 guidelines for antiretroviral therapy of HIV-1 infection in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hoen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: These guidelines are part of the French Experts’ recommendations for the management of people living with HIV/AIDS, which were made public and submitted to the French health authorities in September 2013. The objective was to provide updated recommendations for antiretroviral treatment (ART of HIV-positive adults. Guidelines included the following topics: when to start, what to start, specific situations for the choice of the first session of antiretroviral therapy, optimization of antiretroviral therapy after virologic suppression, and management of virologic failure. Methods: Ten members of the French HIV 2013 expert group were responsible for guidelines on ART. They systematically reviewed the most recent literature. The chairman of the subgroup was responsible for drafting the guidelines, which were subsequently discussed within, and finalized by the whole expert group to obtain a consensus. Recommendations were graded for strength and level of evidence using predefined criteria. Economic considerations were part of the decision-making process for selecting preferred first-line options. Potential conflicts of interest were actively managed throughout the whole process. Results: ART should be initiated in any HIV-positive person, whatever his/her CD4 T-cell count, even when >500/mm3. The level of evidence of the individual benefit of ART in terms of mortality or progression to AIDS increases with decreasing CD4 cell count. Preferred initial regimens include two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (tenofovir/emtricitabine or abacavir/lamivudine plus a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (efavirenz or rilpivirine, or a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (atazanavir or darunavir. Raltegravir, lopinavir/r, and nevirapine are recommended as alternative third agents, with specific indications and restrictions. Specific situations such as HIV infection in women, primary HIV infection, severe immune suppression

  4. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  5. Normal Myocardial Flow Reserve in HIV-Infected Patients on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Christensen, Thomas E; Ghotbi, Adam Ali

    2015-01-01

    ), which can quantify the coronary microvascular function. MFR has proved highly predictive of future coronary artery disease and cardiovascular events in the general population.In a prospective cross-sectional study, HIV-infected patients all receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) with full viral...

  6. The effect of combined antiretroviral therapy on the overall mortality of HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, A. N.; Gilson, R.; Easterbrook, P.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Johnson, M.; Walsh, J.; Leen, C.; Orkin, C.; Anderson, J.; Pillay, D.; Delpech, V.; Schwenk, A.; Dunn, D.; Gompels, M.; Hill, T.; Porter, K.; Babiker, A.; Sabin, C.; Waters, A.; Crates, D.; Mohamed-Saad, S.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Harris, W.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Dodds, J.; Rider, A.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Gumley, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani, D.; Weber, J.; Cashin, S.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Gann, S.; Wilson, A.; Ainsworth, J.; de Wolf, F.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zhang, S.; Zaheri, S.; Prins, J. M.; Bos, J. C.; Eeftinck-Schattenkerk, J. K. M.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Lange, J. M. A.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Olszyna, D. P.; van der Poll, M.; Reiss, P.; Sankatsing, S. U. C.; Steingrover, R.; van der Valk, M.; Vermeulen, J. N.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Schreij, G.; van der Geest, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Lowe, S.; Verbon, A.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Pajkrt, D.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Ende, M. E.; Bax, H.; van der Feltz, M.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Schurink, C. A. M.; de Vries, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; van der Flier, M.; Hartwig, N. G.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Bronsveld, W.; Vriesendorp, R.; Jeurissen, F. J. F.; Leyten, E. M. S.; van Houte, D.; Polée, M. B.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Wagenaar, J.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Veenstra, J.; Vasmel, W. L. E.; Koopmans, P. P.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; de Groot, R.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; van Leeuwen, J. T. M.; Stek, C. J.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; Mudrikova, T.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Weijer, S.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Hillebrand, M. E.; de Jong, E. V.; Kortmann, W.; Perenboom, R. M.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Gisolf, E. H.; Tanis, A. A.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Elisabeth, S. T.; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boué, F.; Burty, C.; Cabié, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorgé, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Liévre, L.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J. M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P. M.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudière, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, P. H.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J. P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M. F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Daures, J. P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J. L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Legrand, M. F. Thiercelin; Pontonnier, G.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Aebi, C.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Brazzola, P.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, P. H.; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Cheseaux, J.-J.; Drack, G.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H. J.; Fux, C.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Gerber, S.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Gyr, T. H.; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Hüsler, M.; Kaiser, L.; Kahlert, C. H.; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T. H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Raio, L.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Wyler, C.-A.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Miró, J. M.; Alquézar, A.; Isern, V.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Agüero, F.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Romero, A.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; Bolao, F.; Cabellos, C.; Peña, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Amengual, M. J.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Berenguer, J.; del Amo, J.; García, F.; Gutiérrez, F.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Muñoz, M. A.; Caro-Murillo, A. M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Sirvent, J. L. Gómez; Rodríguez, P.; Alemán, M. R.; Alonso, M. M.; López, A. M.; Hernández, M. I.; Soriano, V.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M. E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; de Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, R. I.; Iribarren, J. A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M. J.; Camino, X.; Rodríguez-Arrondo, F.; von Wichmann, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M. A.; Masiá, M.; Ramos, J. M.; Padilla, S.; Sánchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; López, J. C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sánchez, M.; Gutiérrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Viladés, C.; López-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J. L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; de los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J. A.; Blanco, J. R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M. J.; Irigoyen, C.; Antela, A.; Casado, J. L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M. J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L. F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J. L.; Hernán, M. A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J. M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Phillips, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Fidler, S.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; McLean, K.; Porter, Kholoud; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Lodi, Sara; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Gwynedd, Ysbyty; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, A. J.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, D. N.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; DeSouza, C. B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; Franca, A.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Mazhude, C.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; Mchale, J.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Rice, P.; Mullaney, S. A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M. R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A. M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, S. V.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Luzzi, G.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, J.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M. T.; Bergmann, J. F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Parrinello, M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A. P.; Allègre, T.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; de Boever, C. Merle; Tramoni, C.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Morelon, S.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J. D.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumaître, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M. C.; Drenou, B.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Tubiana, R.; Mohand, H. Ait; Chermak, A.; Abdallah, S. Ben; Touam, F.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J. M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Bornarel, D.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Amirat, N.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Belan, A. Greder; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A. M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; Szmania, I. De Lacroix; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Drogoul, M. P.; Martin, I. Poizot; Fabre, G.; de Cursay, G. Lambert; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J. L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A. S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J. J.; Quinsat, D. T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G. A.; Levy, A.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M. S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne- Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Colasante, U.; Nouaouia, W.; Vilde, J. L.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J. L.; Pietrie, M. P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Bourdillon, F.; Lelievre, J. D.; Obenga, G.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Schneider, L.; Iguertsira, M.; Tomei, C.; Dhiver, C.; Dupont, H. Tissot; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J. P.; Karsenti, J. M.; Venti, H.; Ceppi, C.; Krivitsky, J. A.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Hoyos, S. Pérez; Ferreros, I.; Hurtado, I.; González, C.; Caro, A. M.; Muga, R.; Sanvicens, A.; Tor, J.; del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; García, Soledad; Alastrue, I.; Belda, J.; Trullen, P.; Fernández, E.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Zafra, T.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Ruiz, I.; Nuñez, R.; Pérez, R.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; de Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) on mortality among HIV-infected individuals after appropriate adjustment for time-varying confounding by indication. DESIGN: A collaboration of 12 prospective cohort studies from Europe and the United States (the HIV-CAUSAL

  7. Opportunistic infections and AIDS malignancies early after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Sara; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Bucher, Heiner C.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Logan, Roger; Sterne, Jonathan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Jarrín, Inma; Phillips, Andrew; Olson, Ashley; Van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Jose, Sophie; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; Miró, José M.; Ferrer, Elena; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Rémonie; Vourli, Georgia; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Dabis, Francois; Vandenhede, Mari-Anne; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie; Hernán, Miguel A.; Hernan, Miguel; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Sabin, C.; Dunn, D.; Porter, K.; Glabay, A.; Orkin, C.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Fisher, M.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Gazzard, B.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Delpech, V.; Anderson, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Easterbrook, P.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Gilson, R.; Man, S.-L.; Williams, I.; Gompels, M.; Dooley, D.; Schwenk, A.; Ainsworth, J.; Johnson, M.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Bansi, L.; Hill, T.; Phillips, A.; Sabin, C.; Walsh, J.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Leen, C.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D.O.; Gras, L.A.J.; Kesselring, A.M.; Van Sighem, A.I.; Zaheri, S.; Van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Branger, J.; Prins, J.M.; Kuijpers, T.W.; Scherpbier, H.J.; Van Der Meer, J.T.M.; Wit, F.W.M.N.; Godfried, M.H.; Reiss, P.; Van Der Poll, T.; Nellen, F.J.B.; Lange, J.M.A.; Geerlings, S.E.; Van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J.C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M.L.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W.L.; Frissen, P.H.J.; Schouten, W.E.M.; Van Den Berk, G.E.L.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K.D.; Mulder, J.W.; Vrouenraets, S.M.E.; Lauw, F.N.; Van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D.W.M.; Van Agtmael, M.A.; Perenboom, R.M.; Claessen, F.A.P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E.J.G.; Richter, C.; Van Der Berg, J.P.; Gisolf, E.H.; Schippers, E.F.; Van Nieuwkoop, C.; Van Elzakker, E.P.; Leyten, E.M.S.; Gelinck, L.B.S.; Pronk, M.J.H.; Bravenboer, B.; Kootstra, G.J.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprenger, H.G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E.H.; Van Assen, S.; Bierman, W.F.W.; Soetekouw, R.; Ten Kate, R.W.; Van Vonderen, M.G.A.; Van Houte, D.P.F.; Kroon, F.P.; Van Dissel, J.T.; Arend, S.M.; De Boer, M.G.J.; Jolink, H.; Ter Vollaard, H.J.M.; Bauer, M.P.; Weijer, S.; El Moussaoui, R.; Lowe, S.; Schreij, G.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Koopmans, P.P.; Keuter, M.; Van Der Ven, A.J.A.M.; Ter Hofstede, H.J.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Warris, A.; Van Crevel, R.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; De Vries-Sluijs, T.E.M.S.; Schurink, C.A.M.; Nouwen, J.L.; Nispen Tot Pannerden, M.H.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B.J.A.; Van Gorp, E.C.M.; Hassing, R.J.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Driessen, G.J.A.; Den Hollander, J.G.; Pogany, K.; Juttmann, J.R.; Van Kasteren, M.E.E.; Hoepelman, A.I.M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M.M.E.; Jaspers, C.A.J.J.; Ellerbroek, P.M.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Arends, J.E.; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Barth, R.E.; Geelen, S.P.M.; Wolfs, T.F.W.; Bont, L.J.; Van Den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Groeneveld, P.H.P.; Alleman, M.A.; Bouwhuis, J.W.; Barin, F.; Burty, C.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Khuong, M.A.; Mahamat, A.; Pilorgé, F.; Tattevin, P.; Salomon, Valérie; Jacquemet, N.; Abgrall, S.; Costagliola, D.; Grabar, S.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Mary-Krause, M.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J.M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Katlama, C.; Simon, A.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P.M.; Meynard, J.L.; Meyohas, M.C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Pialoux, G.; Clauvel, J.P.; Decazes, J.M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J.M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Bentata, M.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J.L.; Matheron, S.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; De Truchis, P.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Gilquin, J.; Roudière, L.; Viard, J.P.; Boué, F.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph.; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Lang, J.M.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J.P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M.F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J.P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Reynes, J.; Daures, J.P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J.L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M.F.; Pontonnier, G.; Viget, N.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pradier, C.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Delmont, J.P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J.A.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J.M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P.A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J.P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Billaud, E.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J.M.; Touraine, J.L.; Cotte, L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Cabié, A.; Gaud, C.; Contant, M.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Haerry, D.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez De Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Gallois, A.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J.M.; Manzardo, C.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Riera, M.; Segura, F.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Cifuentes, C.; Dalmau, D.; Jaen, À.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Pérez, I.; Gargoulas, Freyra; Blanco, J.L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Martínez, E.; Mallolas, J.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J.F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou, A.; Negredo, E.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M.C.; Saumoy, M.; Imaz, A.; Tiraboschi, J.M.; Murillo, O.; Bolao, F.; Peña, C.; Cabellos, C.; Masó, M.; Vila, A.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Jose Amengual, Ma.; Navarro, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Bejarano, G.; Molina, J.; Guadarrama, M.; Alvaro, M.; Mercadal, J.; Fernandez, Juanse; Ospina, Jesus E.; Muñoz, M.A.; Caro-Murillo, A.M.; Sobrino, P.; Jarrín, I.; Gomez Sirvent, J.L.; Rodríguez, P.; Aleman, M.R.; Alonso, M.M.; Lopez, A.M.; Hernandez, M.I.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M.E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; De Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, Rl.; Iribarren, J.A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M.J.; Camino, X.; Rodrí-guez-Arrondo, F.; Von Wichmann, M.A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M.A.; Gutierrez, F.; Masia, M.; Ramos, J.M.; Padilla, S.; Sanchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; Berenguer, J.; Lopez, J.C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sanchez, M.; Gutierrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Vilades, C.; Lopez-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J.L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; De Los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J.A.; Blanco, J.R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M.J.; Irigoyen, C.; Moreno, S.; Antela, A.; Casado, J.L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M.J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; García, F.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L.F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A.C.; Fiellin, D.A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K.A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J.L.; Hernán, M.A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J.M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Babiker, A.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Gilson, R.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Pillay, D.; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Louisa Gnatiuc, S.L.; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S.P.R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, J.A.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Roberts, M.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, N.D.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; De Souza, C.B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; McLean, K.; Franca, A.; Hawkins, D.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P.J.; Mazhude, C.; Gilson, R.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; McHale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Johnson, M.; Rice, P.; Fidler, S.; Mullaney, S.A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Tayal, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Das, R.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M.R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A.M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, V.S.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Wilkins, E.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Roberts, M.; Williams, O.; Luzzi, G.; FitzGerald, M.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Molina, J.M.; Loze, B.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Raffi, F.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M.T.; Bergmann, J.F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Diemer, M.; Parrinello, M.; Girard, P.M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Livrozet, J.M.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A.P.; Allègre, T.; Reynes, J.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle De Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Cabié, A.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Pialoux, G.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Yeni, P.; Bouvet, E.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Trepo, C.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Thomas, R.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Gourdon, F.; Rouveix, E.; Morelon, S.; Dupont, C.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J.M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J.D.; Lascaux, A.S.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumâitre, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Salmon, D.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M.C.; Drenou, B.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Katlama, C.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Bentata, M.; Touam, F.; Hoen, B.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Massip, P.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J.M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Boué, F.; Bornarel, D.; Verdon, R.; Bazin, C.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Weiss, L.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Herson, S.; Amirat, N.; Simon, A.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Picard, O.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Choutet, P.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; May, T.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; De Truchis, P.; Berthé, H.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Greder Belan, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A.M.; Zeng, A.; Fournier, L.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Dellamonica, P.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; De Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert De Cursay, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J.L.; Leprêtre, A.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A.S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J.J.; Quinsat, D.T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Caron, F.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Lepeu, G.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Galanaud, P.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G.A.; Levy, A.; Delfraissy, J.F.; Goujard, C.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M.S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Weiss, L.; Buisson, M.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Batisse, D.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Leport, C.; Colasante, U.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Duval, X.; Nouaouia, W.; Boucherit, S.; Vilde, J.L.; Girard, P.M.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Meyohas, M.C.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J.L.; Salmon, D.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Launay, O.; Pietrie, M.P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Bourdillon, F.; Lascaux, A.S.; Lelievre, J.D.; Dumont, C.; Dupont, B.; Obenga, G.; Viard, J.P.; Maignan, A.; Vittecoq, D.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Bricaire, F.; Katlama, C.; Schneider, L.; Herson, S.; Simon, A.; Iguertsira, M.; Stein, A.; Tomei, C.; Ravaux, I.; Dhiver, C.; Tissot Dupont, H.; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Gastaut, J.A.; Drogoul, M.P.; Fabre, G.; Dellamonica, P.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J.P.; Karsenti, J.M.; Venti, H.; Fuzibet, J.G.; Rosenthal, E.; Ceppi, C.; Quaranta, M.; Krivitsky, J.A.; Bentata, M.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.; Del Amo, J.; Alvarez, D.; Monge, S.; Muga, R.; Sanvisens, A.; Clotet, B.; Tor, J.; Bolao, F.; Rivas, I.; Vallecillo, G.; Del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; Vera, M.; Hurtado, I.; Belda, J.; Fernandez, E.; Alastrue, I.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Juan, A.; Trullen, J.; Garcia De Olalla, P.; Cayla, J.; Masdeu, E.; Knobel, H.; Mirò, J.M.; Sambeat, M.A.; Guerrero, R.; Rivera, E.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Gonzalez, C.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; De Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.; Ortíz, M.; Paraskevis, D.; Touloumi, G.; Pantazis, N.; Bakoyannis, G.; Gioukari, V.; Antoniadou, A.; Papadopoulos, A.; Petrikkos, G.; Daikos, G.; Psichogiou, M.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Katsarou, O.; Kouramba, A.; Ioannidou, P.; Kordossis, T.; Kontos, A.; Lazanas, M.; Chini, M.; Tsogas, N.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Leuow, K.; Kourkounti, S.; Sambatakou, H.; Mariolis, I.; Skoutelis, A.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Baraboutis, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is little information on the incidence of AIDS-defining events which have been reported in the literature to be associated with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation. These events include tuberculosis,

  8. Increased non-AIDS mortality among persons with AIDS-defining events after antiretroviral therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettit, April C; Giganti, Mark J; Ingle, Suzanne M

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: HIV-1 infection leads to chronic inflammation and to an increased risk of non-AIDS mortality. Our objective was to determine whether AIDS-defining events (ADEs) were associated with increased overall and cause-specific non-AIDS related mortality after antiretroviral therapy (ART) in...

  9. Immune function and phenotype before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, S R; Aladdin, H; Ullum, H

    1999-01-01

    Immune functions represented by equal CD4 counts before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (i.e., pre- and post-HAART) in the same HIV-infected patients, were examined. Twelve HIV-infected patients were included. Patients had equal CD4 counts pre- and post-HAART and were studied...

  10. External ophthalmoplegia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineles, Stacy L; Demer, Joseph L; Holland, Gary N; Ransome, Susan S; Bonelli, Laura; Velez, Federico G

    2012-12-01

    On rare occasions, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can develop a disorder similar to chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) while undergoing long-term treatment with antiretroviral therapy. Orbital imaging may help explain the pathogenesis of this abnormality. In this case series, 5 adult patients who presented with a CPEO-like disorder after more than 10 years of antiretroviral therapy and who underwent T1-weighted high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbits and brain were retrospectively identified. Patients also were screened for acetylcholine receptor antibody levels. All patients had bilateral external ophthalmoplegia and blepharoptosis. Acetylcholine receptor antibody titers were not increased. Brain MRI was unremarkable. Orbital MRI showed patchy bright signal inside the extraocular muscles that had conserved volume. Patients with HIV under long-term antiretroviral therapy may develop functional abnormalities of extraocular muscles that are structurally normal in size, that is, changes are similar to those observed in the orbital MRIs of patients with CPEO. This constellation of signs and symptoms suggests a possible role of HIV disease or antiretroviral therapy in the CPEO-like syndrome observed in some HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2012 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of Lipodystrophy in HIV-infected Children in Tanzania on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinabo, G.; Sprengers, M.; Msuya, L.J.; Shayo, A.M.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with lipodystrophy (LD) in adults but data are more limited for children. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for LD in Tanzanian children receiving HAART by clinical assessment

  12. CD4 + Cell Response to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ARTS) In Routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Untreated HIV/AIDS leads to severe immune depletion with opportunistic infections and other co-morbidities. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) enhances immunity by sustained HIV- viral suppression, increase in CD4+ cell count and immune restoration. HAART reduces risk of neutropaenia, ...

  13. Trend of Antiretroviral therapy interruption in a clinic cohort of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the early years of introducing antiretroviral therapy (ART), compromised adherence to ART in children, from treatment interruptions, was a challenge partly due to lack of trained or experienced personnel with expertise in adherence counselling. Over subsequent years with increasing expertise coupled with ...

  14. T Cell Subsets in HIV Infected Patients after Successful Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2012-01-01

    Immune activation is decreased by combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but residual activation remains and has been proposed as a cause of premature aging and death, but data are lacking. We analyzed the relationship between T......-cell subsets after 18 months of cART and overall survival during 12 years of follow up....

  15. When to start antiretroviral therapy and what to start with - A european perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Ferdinand W. N. M.; Reiss, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Although antiretroviral combination therapy has greatly improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals, its use is hampered by considerable toxicity, the need for life-long near-perfect adherence to strict dosing regimens in order to avoid the emergence of drug resistance, and high cost.

  16. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  17. RESEARCH Recall of lost-to-follow-up pre-antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trained in nurse initiation and maintenance of antiretroviral therapy. (NIMART). ... reviewed. Each patient's name, address, date of last attendance and .... Clinical Mentorship Manual for Integrated Services. Pretoria: ... Rosen S, Fox M. Retention in HIV care between testing and treatment in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic.

  18. Ethics - Disclosure of doctors with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Southern African HIV Clinicians Society initiated an online discussion forum on 'HIV Ethics and Policy\\' in 2007. The first case study concerned the ethical question of whether a surgeon with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy should have disclosed her HIV status to her patient when she discovered blood on the inside of ...

  19. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... for liver enzyme elevation during highly active anti-retroviral therapy in HIV – HCV co –infected patients: results from the Italian EPOKA – MASTER. COHORT. BMC infection diseases 2005; 9: 58 – 67. 3. Podzammecer D., Fumero E. The role of Nevirapine in the treatment of HIV – 1 disease. Expert. Opin.

  20. Detection of lipoatrophy in human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected children treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, K.; Verweel, G.; Groot, R. de; Hartwig, N.G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Highly active antiretroviral therapy has been associated with lipodystrophy in adults. Much is unknown about its characteristics, especially in children. OBJECTIVE: To obtain an objective case definition of the lipodystrophy syndrome. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. One

  1. False-positive HIV test results in infancy and management of uninfected children receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Catherine G; Moss, William J; Thuma, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes 2 children misdiagnosed with HIV infection in a clinic in rural Zambia and discusses the implications of false-positive HIV DNA tests in HIV-exposed infants, including the potential magnitude of the problem. Recommendations are needed to address the management of children receiving antiretroviral therapy who are suspected of being uninfected.

  2. Effect of antiretroviral therapy on some liver enzymes in HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship and effect of antiretroviral therapy with associated hepatotoxicity were investigated in different paediatric age groups using serum alanine and aspartate transaminases (ALT and AST) and alkaline phosphates (ALP) biomarkers. The study consisted of a total of one hundred and twenty (120) participants; ...

  3. Further research needed to support a policy of antiretroviral therapy as an HIV prevention initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodger, Alison J; Bruun, Tina; Vernazza, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The results from the HPTN 052 trial have increased the focus on use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of HIV transmission; however, condom use also effectively prevents HIV transmission. Studies in heterosexual serodiscordant couples with viral suppression have so far only reported...

  4. A decade of Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Nigeria: Efficacy of First Line ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    rapid scale-up in the subsequent years. Currently, nearly. 30% of about 860,000 HIV/AIDS patients requiring treatment in Nigeria are receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) according to the WHO. 2006 criteria for initiating ART; a significant, though inadequate, increase when compared with ART coverage.

  5. Gender Barriers to Access to Antiretroviral Therapy and its Link to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effect of gender on access to antiretroviral therapy and its link to neurocognitive impairment. Methods: The study used a mixed methodology. Part 1 used aqualitative approach and 34 participants who were HIV infected adults, equal numbers of men and women were recruited. These were a ...

  6. Non-AIDS-defining deaths and immunodeficiency in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, Benoît; Thiébaut, Rodolphe; Bucher, Heiner C.; Rondeau, Virginie; Costagliola, Dominique; Dorrucci, Maria; Hamouda, Osamah; Prins, Maria; Walker, Sarah; Porter, Kholoud; Sabin, Caroline; Chêne, Geneviève

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether immunodeficiency is associated with the most frequent non-AIDS-defining causes of death in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN: Observational multicentre cohorts. METHODS: Twenty-three cohorts of adults with estimated dates of human

  7. An internationally generalizable risk index for mortality after one year of antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tate, Janet P.; Justice, Amy C.; Hughes, Michael D.; Bonnet, Fabrice; Reiss, Peter; Mocroft, Amanda; Nattermann, Jacob; Lampe, Fiona C.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Crane, Heidi M.; Kitahata, Mari M.; May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), excess mortality continues for those with HIV infection. A comprehensive approach to risk assessment, addressing multiorgan system injury on ART, is needed. We sought to develop and validate a practical and generalizable mortality risk index for

  8. Year impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy on quality of life of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in a number of achievements as well as challenges. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of 48 weeks HAART of stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine on the quality of life of HIVinfected Nigerians. Materials and Method: ...

  9. Long-term exposure to combination antiretroviral therapy and risk of death from specific causes: no evidence for any previously unidentified increased risk due to antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalska, Justyna D; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Despite the known substantial benefits of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), cumulative adverse effects could still limit the overall long-term treatment benefit. Therefore we investigated changes in the rate of death with increasing exposure to cART. METHODS:: 12069 patients...... were followed from baseline, which was defined as the time of starting cART or enrolment into EuroSIDA whichever occurred later, until death or six months after last follow-up visit. Incidence rates (IR) of death were calculated per 1000 person-years of follow-up (PYFU) and stratified by time...... of exposure to cART (=3 antiretrovirals): 8 years. Duration of cART exposure was the cumulative time actually receiving cART. Poisson regression models were fitted for each cause of death separately. RESULTS:: 1297 patients died during 70613 PYFU (IR 18.3 per 1000 PYFU, 95%CI: 17.4-19.4), 413 due to AIDS (5...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achhra, Amit C; Nugent, Melinda; Mocroft, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as an important health concern in HIV-positive individuals. Preventing long-term kidney toxicity from an antiretroviral therapy is therefore critical. Selected antiretroviral agents, especially tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and some ritonavir...... require an intervention. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a TDF alternative, promises to be safer in terms of TDF-associated kidney and bone toxicity. While the short-term data on TAF does indicate lower eGFR decline and lower risk of proteinuria (vs. TDF), long-term data on renal safety of TAF are still...

  11. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load Virologic.......026) and time (P virologic response after adjustment for confounders. Stratified by period, regional differences were less evident (early cART, P = 0.967; mid cART, P = 0.291; late cART, P = 0.163). Stratified by region, temporal changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P

  12. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS.......026) and time (P changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P ....001; north: P = 0.070; east, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: There was some evidence of regional differences in initial virologic response to cART. Improvements over time were observed, suggesting that so far, the effect of primary resistance has not been of sufficient magnitude to prevent increasing suppression...

  13. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS.......026) and time (P changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P ....001; north: P = 0.070; east, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: There was some evidence of regional differences in initial virologic response to cART. Improvements over time were observed, suggesting that so far, the effect of primary resistance has not been of sufficient magnitude to prevent increasing suppression...

  14. Hormonal contraceptive use in HIV-infected women using antiretroviral therapy: A Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Julie A; Novick, Gina; Goulet, Joseph L

    2015-01-01

    While extensive research has explored pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretroviral therapy and hormonal contraception, few studies have examined whether these interactions affect clinical outcomes. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of the literature that describes hormonal contraceptive among HIV infected women who also antiretroviral therapy, focusing on papers that address clinically important outcomes such as pregnancy or ovulation. An electronic literature search was conducted of PUBMED and OVID to identify all articles that addressed hormonal contraception co-administered with antiretroviral therapy published in English between 01 January 1990 and 30 October 2014. In addition, manual reference checks of all articles of interest were conducted to identify articles not captured in the electronic search. Our search criteria identified 405 records. The title and abstract of data reports retrieved via the search were reviewed to identify potential articles of interest. Those with any indication of the main outcomes of interest were considered for inclusion (N=162). Abstracts were then reviewed to identify those manuscripts that would merit a review of the full text version (N=64). Eight articles that addressed the outcomes of interest were identified. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the quality of these articles. The studies reviewed were limited in a number of ways that precluded their providing a rigorous assessment of the efficacy of contraception when co-administered with antiretroviral therapy. None of the studies were of adequate quality to provide the guidance that providers and HIV infected women need when considering contraceptive options. High quality, well-powered studies are required to address the efficacy of hormonal contraception when co-administered with antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Trends and risk factors for obesity among HIV positive Nigerians on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezechi, L O; Musa, Z A; Otobo, V O; Idigbe, I E; Ezechi, O C

    2016-06-01

    The increased access to antiretroviral therapy has changed the once deadly infection to a chronic medical condition, resulting in a dramatic change in causes of morbidity and mortality among HIV infected individuals. Obesity and its cardiovascular sequelae are increasingly reported in the literature. However, data on the burden, trends and risk factors for obesity are sparse in countries worst hit by the epidemic. To investigate the trend and risk factors for obesity among a cohort of HIV infected adults on antiretroviral therapy. We analysed prospectively collected data in an ongoing longitudinal observational study conducted at the HIV treatment centre, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Lagos, Nigeria. Patients who started treatment between June 2004 and December 2009, and completed a five year follow up were included in the analysis. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the risk factors for obesity among the cohort. A total of 12 585 adults were enrolled in the treatment programme during the study period. Of which, 8819 (70.1%) met the inclusion criteria. At the start of treatment, 27.0% were either overweight (19.6%) or obese (7.4%) compared to 62.2% that were either overweight (35.7%) or obese (26.5%) at the end of 5 years. The observed differences were statistically significant (pobesity at multivariate analysis. Type of antiretroviral drug, age, marital status, viral load and haemoglobin level were not associated with obesity after controlling for confounding variables. Obesity is common among HIV infected Nigerians on antiretroviral therapy and is associated with.

  16. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load ART was analyzed in antiretroviral-naive EuroSIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...... suppression was achieved by 60% of 2102 patients: 57% south (n = 560), 61% central west (n = 466), 63% north (n = 606), 58% east (n = 470) (P = 0.091). An increase was observed over time: 52% early cART, 56% mid cART, 69% late cART (P

  17. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS......: Virologic response (viral load ART was analyzed in antiretroviral-naive EuroSIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...... suppression was achieved by 60% of 2102 patients: 57% south (n = 560), 61% central west (n = 466), 63% north (n = 606), 58% east (n = 470) (P = 0.091). An increase was observed over time: 52% early cART, 56% mid cART, 69% late cART (P

  18. Risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in patients starting nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesselring, Anouk M; Wit, Ferdinand W; Sabin, Caroline A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This collaboration of seven observational clinical cohorts investigated risk factors for treatment-limiting toxicities in both antiretroviral-naive and experienced patients starting nevirapine-based combination antiretroviral therapy (NVPc). METHODS: Patients starting NVPc after 1...... January 1998 were included. CD4 cell count at starting NVPc was classified as high (>400/microl/>250/microl for men/women, respectively) or low. Cox models were used to investigate risk factors for discontinuations due to hypersensitivity reactions (HSR, n = 6547) and discontinuation of NVPc due...... to treatment-limiting toxicities and/or patient/physician choice (TOXPC, n = 10,186). Patients were classified according to prior antiretroviral treatment experience and CD4 cell count/viral load at start NVPc. Models were stratified by cohort and adjusted for age, sex, nadir CD4 cell count, calendar year...

  19. Antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and early neonatal life: consequences for HIV-exposed, uninfected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Beitune, Patrícia; Duarte, Geraldo; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Figueiró-Filho, Ernesto A; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Abduch, Renata

    2004-04-01

    Women have emerged as the fastest growing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected population worldwide, mainly because of the increasing occurrence of heterosexual transmission. Most infected women are of reproductive age and one of the greatest concerns for both women and their physicians is that more than 1,600 infants become infected with HIV each day. Almost all infections are a result of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. With the advent of combination antiretroviral therapies, transmission rates lower than 2% have been achieved in clinical studies. Antiretroviral compounds differ from most other new pharmaceutical agents in that they have become widely prescribed in pregnancy in the absence of proof of safety. We reviewed antiretroviral agents used in pregnant women infected with human immunodeficiency virus, mother-to-child transmission, and their consequences for infants.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and early neonatal life: consequences for HIV-exposed, uninfected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia El Beitune

    Full Text Available Women have emerged as the fastest growing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected population worldwide, mainly because of the increasing occurrence of heterosexual transmission. Most infected women are of reproductive age and one of the greatest concerns for both women and their physicians is that more than 1,600 infants become infected with HIV each day. Almost all infections are a result of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. With the advent of combination antiretroviral therapies, transmission rates lower than 2% have been achieved in clinical studies. Antiretroviral compounds differ from most other new pharmaceutical agents in that they have become widely prescribed in pregnancy in the absence of proof of safety. We reviewed antiretroviral agents used in pregnant women infected with human immunodeficiency virus, mother-to-child transmission, and their consequences for infants.

  1. Antiretroviral therapy provided to HIV-infected Malawian women in a randomized trial diminishes the positive effects of lipid-based nutrient supplements on breast-milk B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lindsay H; Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; York, Emily R; Adair, Linda S; Flax, Valerie L; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Jamieson, Denise J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2015-12-01

    Little information is available on B vitamin concentrations in human milk or on how they are affected by maternal B vitamin deficiencies, antiretroviral therapy, or maternal supplementation. The objective was to evaluate the effects of antiretroviral therapy and/or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) on B vitamin concentrations in breast milk from HIV-infected women in Malawi. Breast milk was collected from 537 women recruited within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study at 2 or 6 wk and 24 wk postpartum. Women were assigned to receive antiretrovirals and LNSs, antiretrovirals only, LNSs only, or a control. Antiretrovirals and LNSs were given to the mothers from weeks 0 to 28. The antiretrovirals were zidovudine/lamivudine and nelfinavir or lopinavir/ritonavir. LNSs provided 93-118% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, and vitamin B-12. Infants were exclusively breastfed. LNSs increased milk concentrations of all vitamins except thiamin, whereas antiretrovirals lowered concentrations of nicotinamide, pyridoxal, and vitamin B-12. Although antiretrovirals alone had no significant effect on riboflavin concentrations, they negatively affected the LNS-induced increase in this vitamin. Thiamin was not influenced by the study interventions. Concentrations of all B vitamins were much lower than usually accepted values. All B vitamins were low in milk, and all but thiamin were increased by maternal supplementation with LNSs. Antiretrovirals alone decreased concentrations of some B vitamins in milk. When LNS was given in addition to antiretrovirals, the negative effect of antiretrovirals offset the positive effect of LNSs for all vitamins except thiamin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00164762. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. History of viral suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy as a predictor of virological failure after a treatment change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; Ledergerber, B

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: HIV-infected persons experience different patterns of viral suppression after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The relationship between such differences and risk of virological failure after starting a new antiretroviral could help with patient monitoring strategies...... to increasing the provision of adherence counselling....

  3. Health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of earlier eligibility for adult antiretroviral therapy and expanded treatment coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eaton, Jeffrey W; Menzies, Nicolas A; Stover, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New WHO guidelines recommend initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive adults with CD4 counts of 500 cells per μL or less, a higher threshold than was previously recommended. Country decision makers have to decide whether to further expand eligibility for antiretroviral th...

  4. Risk of non-AIDS-defining events among HIV-infected patients not yet on antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.; van sighem, A.; Kesselring, A.; Gras, L.; Prins, J. M.; Hassink, E.; Kauffmann, R.; Richter, C.; de Wolf, F.; Reiss, P.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zaheri, S.; van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; Diederen, B. M. W.; Branger, J.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M. L.; Wiersinga, W. J.; Goorhuis, A.; Hovius, J. W. R.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Mulder, J. W.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Lauw, F. N.; van Goyen, Jan; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Perenboom, R. M.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E. J. G.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; Schippers, E. F.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; van Elzakker, E. P.; Leyten, E. M. S.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Ziekenhuis, Catharina; Pronk, M. J. H.; Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Kootstra, G. J.; Delsing, C. E.; Sprenger, H. G.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Wilting, K. R.; Stienstra, Y.; Soetekouw, R.; ten Kate, R. W.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Kroon, F. P.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Jolink, H.; ter Vollaard, H. J. M.; Bauer, M. P.; Weijer, S.; el Moussaoui, R.; Lowe, S.; Schreij, G.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; Warris, A.; van Crevel, R.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Driessen, G. J. A.; van Rossum, A. M. C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Barth, R. E.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Bont, L. J.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; Winkel, C.; Muskiet, F.; Voigt, R.

    2015-01-01

    Certain non-AIDS-related diseases have been associated with immunodeficiency and HIV RNA levels in HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate these associations in patients not yet on cART, when potential antiretroviral-drug-related effects are absent

  5. Factors associated with non-adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakibi Samwel N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART requires high-level (> 95% adherence. Kenya is rolling out ART access programmes and, issue of adherence to therapy is therefore imperative. However, published data on adherence to ART in Kenya is limited. This study assessed adherence to ART and identified factors responsible for non adherence in Nairobi. Methods This is a multiple facility-based cross-sectional study, where 416 patients aged over 18 years were systematically selected and interviewed using a structured questionnaire about their experience taking ART. Additional data was extracted from hospital records. Patients were grouped into adherent and non-adherent based on a composite score derived from a three questions adherence tool developed by Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE. Multivariate regression model was used to determine predictors of non-adherence. Results Overall, 403 patients responded; 35% males and 65% females, 18% were non-adherent, and main (38% reason for missing therapy were being busy and forgetting. Accessing ART in a clinic within walking distance from home (OR = 2.387, CI.95 = 1.155-4.931; p = 0.019 and difficulty with dosing schedule (OR = 2.310, CI.95 = 1.211-4.408, p = 0.011 predicted non-adherence. Conclusions The study found better adherence to HAART in Nairobi compared to previous studies in Kenya. However, this can be improved further by employing fitting strategies to improve patients' ability to fit therapy in own lifestyle and cue-dose training to impact forgetfulness. Further work to determine why patients accessing therapy from ARV clinics within walking distance from their residence did not adhere is recommended.

  6. Lipodystrophy induced by combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients: a Belgrade cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragović, Gordana; Danilović, Dragana; Dimić, Aleksandra; Jevtović, Djordje

    2014-08-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to dramatic reductions in mortality and morbidity of HIV/AIDS-patients. Lipodystrophy, a syndrome including peripheral fat wasting and central obesity, is well-documented side effect of HAART. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of lipodystrophy, and to determine its risk ratios in a HIV/AIDS-cohort. This cross-sectional study included all the antiretroviral-naive HIV/AIDS patients commencing HAART from October 1, 2001 to October 1, 2010, at the HIV/AIDS Center, Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Belgrade, Serbia. Univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the odds ratios (OR) with the confidence interval (CI) of 95%, in order to establish the relative risk for lipodystrophy. The Kaplan-Meier-method was used to determine the probability of development lipodystrophy over time. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software version using 0.05 as a p-treshold for the significance. This study included 840 HIV/AIDS patients, 608 women and 232 men, followed for 5.6 +/- 2.8 years. The prevalence of lipodystrophy was 69.2%. Univariate and stepwise multivariate regression analysis identified that the female gender, hepatitis C coinfection, AIDS diagnosis prior to HAART initiation, nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitors and protease-inhibitors based regimens had a high risk for developing lipodystrophy in HIV/AIDS-patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-3.49, p = 0.04; OR = 3.31, 95% CI = 1.3-6.8, p lipodystrophy, as side effect of HAART, is particularly important.

  7. Reduced human herpesvirus-8 oropharyngeal shedding associated with protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Cattamanchi, Ashok; Krantz, Elizabeth; Magaret, Amalia; Selke, Stacy; Kuntz, Steven R; Huang, Meei-Li; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna; Casper, Corey

    2014-06-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) replication increases the risk of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). Highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces the incidence of KS, and regimens that contain protease inhibitors (PIs) may be particularly effective. To determine whether PI-based HAART regimens may more effectively inhibit HHV-8 shedding compared to regimens without PIs. Prospective, observational study of 142 HIV-1 and HHV-8 co-infected men conducted in Seattle, Washington. Quantitative HHV-8 PCR testing was performed on daily swabs of the oropharynx, the primary site of HHV-8 replication. Associations between antiretroviral regimen and detection of HHV-8 DNA in swabs were evaluated using generalized estimating equations. HHV-8 DNA was detected in 3016 (26%) of 11,608 specimens collected. PI-based HAART was associated with a statistically significantly lower frequency of detection (RR 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.5) compared to ART-naïve persons, whereas HAART without a PI was not (RR 0.7; 95% CI 0.4-1.3). Compared to ART-naïve persons, there was also a trend toward lower quantities of HHV-8 detected during treatment with HAART regimens that contained a PI. These associations between PIs and measures of HHV-8 shedding could not be attributed to use of nelfinavir, which inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro, and were independent of CD4 count and HIV plasma viral load (VL). HAART regimens that contain PIs appear to decrease HHV-8 shedding compared to NNRTIs. Further study of PI-based HAART is warranted to determine the optimal regimens for prevention and treatment of KS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dental caries prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy in kermanshah, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Davoodi, Poorandokht; Abdolsamadi, Hamid Reza; Jazaeri, Mina; Malekzadeh, Hossein

    2014-02-03

    Introduction of new approaches for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection such as anti-retroviral medicines has resulted in an increase in the life expectancy of HIV patient. Evaluating the dental health status as a part of their general health care is needed in order to improve the quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to compare the root and crown caries rate in HIV patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with that rate in HIV patients without treatment option. This cross sectional study consisting of 100 individuals of both genders with human immunodeficiency virus were divided into two groups: i. group 1 (treatment group) including 50 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) receiving HAART and ii. group 2 (control group) including 50 HIV infected patients not receiving HAART. Dental examinations were done by a dentist under suitable light using periodontal probe. For each participant, numbers of decay (D), missed (M), filled (F), Decayed missed and filled teeth (DMFT), decay surface (Ds), missed surface (Ms), filled surface (Fs), Decayed missed and filled surfaces (DMFS), and tooth and root caries were recorded. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and independent t test using SPSS 13.0, while p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant in all analysis. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of decayed, missed and filled teeth of those who were on highly active antiretroviral therapy was 6.86 ± 3.57, 6.39 ± 6.06 and 1.89 ± 1.93, respectively. There was no significant difference between these values regarding to the treatment of patients. The mean and standard deviation of DMFT, DMFS and the number of decayed root surfaces were 15.14 ± 6.09, 56.79 ± 28.56, and 4.96 ± 2.89 in patients treated by anti-retroviral medicine which were not significantly different compared to those without this treatment. According to the results of the present study, highly

  9. Correlates of age at attainment of developmental milestones in HIV-infected infants receiving early antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Eshelman, Christal; Wamalwa, Dalton; Langat, Agnes; Tapia, Ken; Okinyi, Helen Moraa; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Infant HIV-1 infection is associated with impaired neurologic and motor development. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has the potential to improve developmental outcomes but the relative contributions of pre-ART disease status, growth, treatment regimen and ART response during infancy are unknown. Kenyan ART-naive infants milestone attainment were evaluated using t tests or multivariate linear regression. Among 99 infants, pre-ART correlates of later milestone attainment included: underweight and stunted (neck control, walking and speech, all P values milestone attainment [corrected]. The long-term consequences of these delays are unknown.

  10. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in HIV-infected patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Pedersen, C; Cozzi-Lepri, A

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Within EuroSIDA, a multicenter observational cohort of more than 8500 patients from across Europe......, the incidences of NHL and subtypes (Burkitt, immunoblastic, primary brain lymphoma [PBL], and other/unknown histology) were determined according to calendar time of follow-up, and for those who initiated HAART (> or =3 drugs) also time on HAART. Potential predictive factors of NHL were evaluated in Cox...

  11. Nonadherence as 4-day Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions: Do Depression and Race/Ethnicity Matter as Much in the Modern Antiretroviral Therapy Era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda, John A; Johnson, Mallory O; Saberi, Parya

    2016-11-01

    HIV + White, Latino, and African Americans (N = 1131) completed a survey advertised on social media to re-examine the effect of depressive symptoms (via the Patient Health Questionnaire; PHQ-9) and race/ethnicity on antiretroviral therapy nonadherence (defined as past 3-month, 4-day treatment interruption). An adjusted logistic regression showed a 15 % increase in odds for a treatment interruption per 1-unit increase on the PHQ-9. The effect of depressive symptoms on nonadherence was greater for Latinos (OR = 1.80, p depressive symptomatology.

  12. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A; Siberry, George K; Seage, George R; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-10-23

    This study compared 12-month CD4 and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (-0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4% decline -3.18 percentage points (95% CI -5.25 to -1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (-1.15 log10VL). In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring.

  13. Clinical features and outcomes of AIDS-related cytomegalovirus retinitis in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arantes, Tiago Eugênio Faria e; Garcia, Claudio Renato; Saraceno, Janaína Jamile Ferreira; Muccioli, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    To describe the features and outcomes of patients with AIDS-related cytomegalovirus retinitis after highly active antiretroviral therapy availability. Retrospective chart review of 30 consecutive patients (44 eyes) with AIDS and newly diagnosed, active AIDS-related cytomegalovirus retinitis, examined from January 2005 to December 2007. The mean age was 34.8 years, 18 patients (60.0%) were male and median duration of AIDS was 90 months. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had evidence of highly active antiretroviral therapy failure and median CD4+ lymphocyte count was 12.5 cells/microl. Visual acuity at presentation was 20/40 or better in 27 eyes (61.4%). Retinitis involved Zone 1 in 13 eyes (39.5%). Despite specific anti-AIDS-related cytomegalovirus therapy, 16 eyes (36.4%) presented relapse of retinitis and 10 eyes (22.7%) lost at least three lines of vision. When compared to highly active antiretroviral therapy responsive patients, eyes of highly active antiretroviral therapy failure patients were more likely to develop relapse of retinitis (p=0.03) and loss of at least three lines of vision (p=0.03). The patients in this series are essentially young men with longstanding AIDS, non-responsive to highly active antiretroviral therapy and with a similar immunological profile as noted before highly active antiretroviral therapy era. These findings have implications for the management of the disease and confirm the magnitude of rational periodic screening after diagnosis of AIDS.

  14. Impact of antiretroviral therapy on tuberculosis incidence among HIV-positive patients in high-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Bucher, Heiner C.; Furrer, Hansjakob; Logan, Roger; Sterne, Jonathan; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Jarrín, Inma; Phillips, Andrew; Lodi, Sara; van Sighem, Ard; de Wolf, Frank; Sabin, Caroline; Bansi, Loveleen; Justice, Amy; Goulet, Joseph; Miró, José M.; Ferrer, Elena; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Rémonie; Toulomi, Giota; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Costagliola, Dominique; Abgrall, Sophie; Hernán, Miguel A.; Ainsworth, J.; Anderson, J.; Babiker, A.; Delpech, V.; Dunn, D.; Easterbrook, P.; Fisher, M.; Gazzard, B.; Gilson, R.; Gompels, M.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Leen, C.; Orkin, C.; Phillips, A.; Pillay, D.; Porter, K.; Sabin, C.; Schwenk, A.; Walsh, J.; Bansi, L.; Glabay, A.; Thomas, R.; Jones, K.; Perry, N.; Pullin, A.; Churchill, D.; Nelson, M.; Asboe, D.; Bulbeck, S.; Mandalia, S.; Clarke, J.; Munshi, S.; Post, F.; Khan, Y.; Patel, P.; Karim, F.; Duffell, S.; Man, S.-L.; Williams, I.; Dooley, D.; Youle, M.; Lampe, F.; Smith, C.; Grabowska, H.; Chaloner, C.; Ismajani Puradiredja, D.; Weber, J.; Kemble, C.; Mackie, N.; Winston, A.; Wilson, A.; Bezemer, D. O.; Gras, L. A. J.; Kesselring, A. M.; van Sighem, A. I.; Smit, C.; Zhang, S.; Zaheri, S.; Prins, J. M.; Boer, K.; Bos, J. C.; Geerlings, S. E.; Godfried, M. H.; Haverkort, M. E.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Lange, J. M. A.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Pajkrt, D.; van der Poll, T.; Reiss, P.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Valk, M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; van Vugt, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Bravenboer, B.; Pronk, M. J. H.; van der Ende, M. E.; van der Feltz, M.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Nouwen, J. L.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Verbon, A.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Driessen, G.; Hartwig, N. G.; Branger, J.; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Jolink, H.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; Vriesendorp, R.; Leyten, E. M. S.; van Houte, D.; Polée, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; Juttmann, J. R.; Brouwer, A. E.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Koopmans, P. P.; Brouwer, A. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; van der Flier, M.; de Groot, R.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; van Assen, S.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Arends, J. E.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Peters, E. J. G.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Danner, S. A.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Claessen, F. A. P.; de Jong, E. V.; Perenboom, R. M.; bij de Vaate, E. A.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J.; Gisolf, E. H.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; Duits, A. J.; Winkel, K.; Abgrall, S.; Barin, F.; Bentata, M.; Billaud, E.; Boué, F.; Burty, C.; Cabié, A.; Costagliola, D.; Cotte, L.; de Truchis, P.; Duval, X.; Duvivier, C.; Enel, P.; Fredouille-Heripret, L.; Gasnault, J.; Gaud, C.; Gilquin, J.; Grabar, S.; Katlama, C.; Khuong, M. A.; Lang, J. M.; Lascaux, A. S.; Launay, O.; Mahamat, A.; Mary-Krause, M.; Matheron, S.; Meynard, J. L.; Pavie, J.; Pialoux, G.; Pilorgé, F.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Pradier, C.; Reynes, J.; Rouveix, E.; Simon, A.; Tattevin, P.; Tissot-Dupont, H.; Viard, J. P.; Viget, N.; Jacquemet, N.; Guiguet, M.; Lanoy, E.; Lièvre, L.; Selinger-Leneman, H.; Lacombe, J. M.; Potard, V.; Bricaire, F.; Herson, S.; Desplanque, N.; Girard, P. M.; Meyohas, M. C.; Picard, O.; Cadranel, J.; Mayaud, C.; Clauvel, J. P.; Decazes, J. M.; Gerard, L.; Molina, J. M.; Diemer, M.; Sellier, P.; Honoré, P.; Jeantils, V.; Tassi, S.; Mechali, D.; Taverne, B.; Bouvet, E.; Crickx, B.; Ecobichon, J. L.; Picard-Dahan, C.; Yeni, P.; Berthé, H.; Dupont, C.; Chandemerle, C.; Mortier, E.; Tisne-Dessus, D.; Weiss, L.; Salmon, D.; Auperin, I.; Roudière, L.; Fior, R.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Goujard, C.; Jung, C.; Lesprit, Ph; Vittecoq, D.; Fraisse, P.; Rey, D.; Beck-Wirth, G.; Stahl, J. P.; Lecercq, P.; Gourdon, F.; Laurichesse, H.; Fresard, A.; Lucht, F.; Bazin, C.; Verdon, R.; Chavanet, P.; Arvieux, C.; Michelet, C.; Choutet, P.; Goudeau, A.; Maître, M. F.; Hoen, B.; Eglinger, P.; Faller, J. P.; Borsa-Lebas, F.; Caron, F.; Daures, J. P.; May, T.; Rabaud, C.; Berger, J. L.; Rémy, G.; Arlet-Suau, E.; Cuzin, L.; Massip, P.; Thiercelin Legrand, M. F.; Pontonnier, G.; Yasdanpanah, Y.; Dellamonica, P.; Pugliese, P.; Aleksandrowicz, K.; Quinsat, D.; Ravaux, I.; Delmont, J. P.; Moreau, J.; Gastaut, J. A.; Retornaz, F.; Soubeyrand, J.; Galinier, A.; Ruiz, J. M.; Allegre, T.; Blanc, P. A.; Bonnet-Montchardon, D.; Lepeu, G.; Granet-Brunello, P.; Esterni, J. P.; Pelissier, L.; Cohen-Valensi, R.; Nezri, M.; Chadapaud, S.; Laffeuillade, A.; Raffi, F.; Boibieux, A.; Peyramond, D.; Livrozet, J. M.; Touraine, J. L.; Trepo, C.; Strobel, M.; Saint-Martin, C. H.; Bissuel, F.; Pradinaud, R.; Sobesky, M.; Contant, M.; Aebi, C.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Brazzola, P.; Bucher, H. C.; Bürgisser, Ph; Calmy, A.; Cattacin, S.; Cavassini, M.; Cheseaux, J.-J.; Drack, G.; Dubs, R.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fischer, M.; Flepp, M.; Fontana, A.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H. J.; Fux, C.; Gayet-Ageron, A.; Gerber, S.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Gyr, Th; Hirsch, H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Hüsler, M.; Kaiser, L.; Kahlert, Ch; Karrer, U.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, Th; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez, B.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Paccaud, F.; Pantaleo, G.; Raio, L.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Wyler, C.-A.; Yerly, S.; Casabona, J.; Miró, J. M.; Alquézar, A.; Isern, V.; Esteve, A.; Podzamczer, D.; Murillas, J.; Gatell, J. M.; Agüero, F.; Tural, C.; Clotet, B.; Ferrer, E.; Segura, F.; Riera, M.; Navarro, G.; Force, L.; Vilaró, J.; Masabeu, A.; García, I.; Guadarrama, M.; Romero, A.; Agustí, C.; Montoliu, A.; Ortega, N.; Lazzari, E.; Puchol, E.; Sanchez, M.; Blanco, J. L.; Garcia-Alcaide, F.; Mallolas, J.; Martínez, E.; López-Dieguez, M.; García-Goez, J. F.; Sirera, G.; Romeu, J.; Jou E Negredo, A.; Miranda, C.; Capitan, M. C.; Olmo, M.; Barragan, P.; Saumoy, M.; Bolao, F.; Cabellos, C.; Peña, C.; Sala, M.; Cervantes, M.; Navarro, M.; Jose Amengual, M.; Penelo, E.; Barrufet, P.; Berenguer, J.; del Amo, J.; García, F.; Gutiérrez, F.; Labarga, P.; Moreno, S.; Muñoz, M. A.; Sobrino, P.; Alejos, B.; Monge, S.; Hernando, V.; Alvarez, D.; Jarrín, I.; Gómez Sirvent, J. L.; Rodríguez, P.; Alemán, M. R.; Alonso, M. M.; López, A. M.; Hernández, M. I.; Soriano, V.; Barreiro, P.; Medrano, J.; Rivas, P.; Herrero, D.; Blanco, F.; Vispo, M. E.; Martín, L.; Ramírez, G.; de Diego, M.; Rubio, R.; Pulido, F.; Moreno, V.; Cepeda, C.; Hervás, R. l; Iribarren, J. A.; Arrizabalaga, J.; Aramburu, M. J.; Camino, X.; Rodríguez-Arrondo, F.; von Wichmann, M. A.; Pascual, L.; Goenaga, M. A.; Masiá, M.; Ramos, J. M.; Padilla, S.; Sánchez-Hellín, V.; Bernal, E.; Escolano, C.; Montolio, F.; Peral, Y.; López, J. C.; Miralles, P.; Cosín, J.; Sánchez, M.; Gutiérrez, I.; Ramírez, M.; Padilla, B.; Vidal, F.; Sanjuan, M.; Peraire, J.; Veloso, S.; Viladés, C.; López-Dupla, M.; Olona, M.; Vargas, M.; Aldeguer, J. L.; Blanes, M.; Lacruz, J.; Salavert, M.; Montero, M.; Cuéllar, S.; de los Santos, I.; Sanz, J.; Oteo, J. A.; Blanco, J. R.; Ibarra, V.; Metola, L.; Sanz, M.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Sola, J.; Uriz, J.; Castiello, J.; Reparaz, J.; Arriaza, M. J.; Irigoyen, C.; Antela, A.; Casado, J. L.; Dronda, F.; Moreno, A.; Pérez, M. J.; López, D.; Gutiérrez, C.; Hernández, B.; Pumares, M.; Martí, P.; García, L.; Page, C.; Hernández, J.; Peña, A.; Muñoz, L.; Parra, J.; Viciana, P.; Leal, M.; López-Cortés, L. F.; Trastoy, M.; Mata, R.; Justice, A. C.; Fiellin, D. A.; Rimland, D.; Jones-Taylor, C.; Oursler, K. A.; Titanji, R.; Brown, S.; Garrison, S.; Rodriguez-Barradas, M.; Masozera, N.; Goetz, M.; Leaf, D.; Simberkoff, M.; Blumenthal, D.; Leung, J.; Butt, A.; Hoffman, E.; Gibert, C.; Peck, R.; Mattocks, K.; Braithwaite, S.; Brandt, C.; Bryant, K.; Cook, R.; Conigliaro, J.; Crothers, K.; Chang, J.; Crystal, S.; Day, N.; Erdos, J.; Freiberg, M.; Kozal, M.; Gandhi, N.; Gaziano, M.; Gerschenson, M.; Good, B.; Gordon, A.; Goulet, J. L.; Hernán, M. A.; Kraemer, K.; Lim, J.; Maisto, S.; Miller, P.; Mole, L.; O'Connor, P.; Papas, R.; Robins, J. M.; Rinaldo, C.; Roberts, M.; Samet, J.; Tierney, B.; Whittle, J.; Brettle, R.; Darbyshire, J.; Fidler, S.; Goldberg, D.; Hawkins, D.; Jaffe, H.; Johnson, A.; McLean, K.; Porter, Kholoud; Cursley, Adam; Ewings, Fiona; Fairbrother, Keith; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Murphy, Brendan; Douglas, G.; Kennedy, N.; Pritchard, J.; Andrady, U.; Rajda, N.; Maw, R.; McKernan, S.; Drake, S.; Gilleran, G.; White, D.; Ross, J.; Toomer, S.; Hewart, R.; Wilding, H.; Woodward, R.; Dean, G.; Heald, L.; Horner, P.; Glover, S.; Bansaal, D.; Eduards, S.; Carne, C.; Browing, M.; Das, R.; Stanley, B.; Estreich, S.; Magdy, A.; O'Mahony, C.; Fraser, P.; Hayman, B.; Jebakumar, S. P. R.; Joshi, U.; Ralph, S.; Wade, A.; Mette, R.; Lalik, J.; Summerfield, H.; El-Dalil, A.; France, A. J.; White, C.; Robertson, R.; Gordon, S.; McMillan, S.; Morris, S.; Lean, C.; Vithayathil, K.; McLean, L.; Winter, A.; Gale, D.; Jacobs, S.; Tayal, S.; Short, L.; Green, S.; Williams, G.; Sivakumar, K.; Bhattacharyya, D. N.; Monteiro, E.; Minton, J.; Dhar, J.; Nye, F.; DeSouza, C. B.; Isaksen, A.; McDonald, L.; Franca, A.; William, L.; Jendrulek, I.; Peters, B.; Shaunak, S.; El-Gadi, S.; Easterbrook, P. J.; Mazhude, C.; Johnstone, R.; Fakoya, A.; Mchale, J.; Waters, A.; Kegg, S.; Mitchell, S.; Byrne, P.; Rice, P.; Mullaney, S. A.; McCormack, S.; David, D.; Melville, R.; Phillip, K.; Balachandran, T.; Mabey-Puttock, S.; Sukthankar, A.; Murphy, C.; Wilkins, E.; Ahmad, S.; Haynes, J.; Evans, E.; Ong, E.; Grey, R.; Meaden, J.; Bignell, C.; Loay, D.; Peacock, K.; Girgis, M. R.; Morgan, B.; Palfreeman, A.; Wilcox, J.; Tobin, J.; Tucker, L.; Saeed, A. M.; Chen, F.; Deheragada, A.; Williams, O.; Lacey, H.; Herman, S.; Kinghorn, D.; Devendra, S. V.; Wither, J.; Dawson, S.; Rowen, D.; Harvey, J.; Bridgwood, A.; Singh, G.; Chauhan, M.; Kellock, D.; Young, S.; Dannino, S.; Kathir, Y.; Rooney, G.; Currie, J.; Fitzgerald, M.; Devendra, S.; Keane, F.; Booth, G.; Green, T.; Arumainayyagam, J.; Chandramani, S.; Rajamanoharan, S.; Robinson, T.; Curless, E.; Gokhale, R.; Tariq, A.; Luzzi, G.; Fairley, I.; Wallis, F.; Smit, E.; Ward, F.; Loze, B.; Morlat, P.; Bonarek, M.; Bonnet, F.; Nouts, C.; Louis, I.; Reliquet, V.; Sauser, F.; Biron, C.; Mounoury, O.; Hue, H.; Brosseau, D.; Ghosn, J.; Rannou, M. T.; Bergmann, J. F.; Badsi, E.; Rami, A.; Parrinello, M.; Samanon-Bollens, D.; Campa, P.; Tourneur, M.; Desplanques, N.; Jeanblanc, F.; Chiarello, P.; Makhloufi, D.; Blanc, A. P.; Allègre, T.; Baillat, V.; Lemoing, V.; Merle de Boever, C.; Tramoni, C.; Sobesky, G.; Abel, S.; Beaujolais, V.; Slama, L.; Chakvetadze, C.; Berrebi, V.; Fournier, I.; Gerbe, J.; Koffi, K.; Augustin-Normand, C.; Miailhes, P.; Thoirain, V.; Brochier, C.; Souala, F.; Ratajczak, M.; Beytoux, J.; Jacomet, C.; Montpied, G.; Morelon, S.; Olivier, C.; Lortholary, O.; Dupont, B.; Maignan, A.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Raymond, I.; Leport, C.; Jadand, C.; Jestin, C.; Longuet, P.; Boucherit, S.; Sereni, D.; Lascoux, C.; Prevoteau, F.; Sobel, A.; Levy, Y.; Lelièvre, J. D.; Dominguez, S.; Dumont, C.; Aumaître, H.; Delmas, B.; Saada, M.; Medus, M.; Guillevin, L.; Tahi, T.; Yazdanpanah, Y.; Pavel, S.; Marien, M. C.; Drenou, B.; Beck, C.; Benomar, M.; Muller, E.; Tubiana, R.; Ait Mohand, H.; Chermak, A.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Touam, F.; Drobacheff, C.; Folzer, A.; Obadia, M.; Prudhomme, L.; Bonnet, E.; Balzarin, F.; Pichard, E.; Chennebault, J. M.; Fialaire, P.; Loison, J.; Galanaud, P.; Bornarel, D.; Six, M.; Ferret, P.; Batisse, D.; Gonzales-Canali, G.; Devidas, A.; Chevojon, P.; Turpault, I.; Lafeuillade, A.; Cheret, A.; Philip, G.; Morel, P.; Timsit, J.; Amirat, N.; Brancion, C.; Cabane, J.; Tredup, J.; Stein, A.; Ravault, I.; Chavanet, C.; Buisson, M.; Treuvetot, S.; Nau, P.; Bastides, F.; Boyer, L.; Wassoumbou, S.; Oksenhendeler, E.; Gérard, L.; Bernard, L.; Poincaré, R.; Domart, Y.; Merrien, D.; Greder Belan, A.; Mignot, A.; Gayraud, M.; Bodard, L.; Meudec, A.; Beuscart, C.; Daniel, C.; Pape, E.; Vinceneux, P.; Simonpoli, A. M.; Zeng, A.; Mourier, L.; Fournier, L.; Jacquet, M.; Fuzibet, J. G.; Sohn, C.; Rosenthal, E.; Quaranta, M.; Chaillou, S.; Sabah, M.; Audhuy, B.; Schieber, A.; Pasteur, L.; Moreau, P.; Niault, M.; Vaillant, O.; Huchon, G.; Compagnucci, A.; de Lacroix Szmania, I.; Richier, L.; Lamaury, I.; Saint-Dizier, F.; Garipuy, D.; Drogoul, M. P.; Poizot Martin, I.; Fabre, G.; Lambert, G.; Abraham, B.; Perino, C.; Lagarde, P.; David, F.; Roche-Sicot, J.; Saraux, J. L.; Leprêtre, A.; Veil, S.; Fampin, B.; Uludag, A.; Morin, A. S.; Bletry, O.; Zucman, D.; Regnier, A.; Girard, J. J.; Quinsat, D. T.; Heripret, L.; Grihon, F.; Houlbert, D.; Ruel, M.; Chemlal, K.; Debab, Y.; Tremollieres, F.; Perronne, V.; Slama, B.; Perré, P.; Miodovski, C.; Guermonprez, G.; Dulioust, A.; Boudon, P.; Malbec, D.; Patey, O.; Semaille, C.; Deville, J.; Remy, G.; Béguinot, I.; Boue, F.; Chambrin, V.; Pignon, C.; Estocq, G. A.; Levy, A.; Duracinsky, M.; Le Bras, P.; Ngussan, M. S.; Peretti, D.; Medintzeff, N.; Lambert, T.; Segeral, O.; Lezeau, P.; Laurian, Y.; Piketty, C.; Karmochkine, M.; Eliaszewitch, M.; Jayle, D.; Tisne, D.; Kazatchkine, M.; Colasante, U.; Nouaouia, W.; Vilde, J. L.; Bollens, D.; Binet, D.; Diallo, B.; Fonquernie, L.; Lagneau, J. L.; Pietrie, M. P.; Sicard, D.; Stieltjes, N.; Michot, J.; Bourdillon, F.; Lelievre, J. D.; Obenga, G.; Escaut, L.; Bolliot, C.; Schneider, L.; Iguertsira, M.; Tomei, C.; Dhiver, C.; Tissot Dupont, H.; Vallon, A.; Gallais, J.; Gallais, H.; Durant, J.; Mondain, V.; Perbost, I.; Cassuto, J. P.; Karsenti, J. M.; Venti, H.; Ceppi, C.; Krivitsky, J. A.; Bouchaud, O.; Honore, P.; Delgado, J.; Rouzioux, C.; Burgard, M.; Boufassa, L.; Peynet, J.; Ferreros, I.; Hurtado, I.; González, C.; Caro, A. M.; Muga, R.; Sanvicens, A.; Tor, J.; del Romero, J.; Raposo, P.; Rodríguez, C.; Vera, M.; Garcia de Olalla, P.; Cayla, J.; Alastrue, I.; Belda, J.; Trullen, P.; Fernández, E.; Santos, C.; Tasa, T.; Zafra, T.; Guerrero, R.; Marco, A.; Quintana, M.; Ruiz, I.; Nuñez, R.; Pérez, R.; Castilla, J.; Guevara, M.; de Mendoza, C.; Zahonero, N.; Antoniadou, A.; Chrysos, G.; Daikos, G.; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, P.; Gogos, H. A.; Katsarou, O.; Kordossis, T.; Lazanas, M.; Nikolaidis, P.; Panos, G.; Paparizos, V.; Paraskevis, D.; Sambatakou, H.; Skoutelis, A.; Touloumi, G.; Pantazis, N.; Bakoyannis, G.; Vourli, G.; Gioukari, V.; Papadopoulos, A.; Petrikkos, G.; Paraskeva, D.; Hatziastros, P.; Psichogiou, M.; Xylomenos, G.; Maragos, M. N.; Kouramba, A.; Ioannidou, P.; Kontos, A.; Chini, M.; Tsogas, N.; Kolaras, P.; Metallidis, S.; Haratsis, G.; Leuow, K.; Kourkounti, S.; Mariolis, I.; Papastamopoulos, V.; Baraboutis, I.

    2012-01-01

    The lower tuberculosis incidence reported in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) is difficult to interpret causally. Furthermore, the role of unmasking immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is unclear. We aim to

  15. The clinical benefits of antiretroviral therapy in severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients with and without complete viral suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a protective effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on the development of clinical events in patients with ongoing severe immunosuppression....

  16. Low uptake of antiretroviral therapy after admission with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, R A; Sunpath, H; Taha, B; Kappagoda, S; Maphasa, K T M; Kuritzkes, D R; Smeaton, L

    2010-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected in-patients with tuberculosis (TB) or other opportunistic infections (OIs) in South Africa to estimate subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and survival.

  17. Risk for opportunistic disease and death after reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV previously receiving episodic therapy: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sadr, W M; Grund, B; Neuhaus, J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4+ cell counts is inferior to continuous antiretroviral therapy. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients who received episodic treatment reduces excess risk for opportunistic disease...... or death. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: Sites in 33 countries. PATIENTS: 5472 HIV-infected individuals with CD4(+) cell counts greater than 0.350 x 10(9) cells/L enrolled from January 2002 to January 2006. INTERVENTION: Episodic or continuous antiretroviral therapy initially, followed...... by continuous therapy in participants previously assigned to episodic treatment. MEASUREMENTS: Opportunistic disease or death was the primary outcome. RESULTS: Eighteen months after the recommendation to reinitiate continuous therapy, mean CD4+ cell counts were 0.152 x 10(9) cells/L (95% CI, 0.136 to 0.167 x 10...

  18. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: factors independently associated with reported difficulty taking antiretroviral therapy in a national sample of HIV-positive Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, J; Koelmeyer, R L; Smith, A; Pitts, M

    2011-10-01

    Given the importance of adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for the reduced morbidity and improved mortality of people living with HIV infection (PLWH), we set out to determine which of a number of previously investigated personal, socioeconomic, treatment-related and disease-related factors were independently associated with self-reported difficulty taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an Australian sample of PLWH. Using data from a national cross-sectional survey of 1106 PLWH, we conducted bivariate and multivariable analyses to assess the association of over 70 previously investigated factors with self-reported difficulty taking ART. Factors that maintained an association with reported difficulty taking ART at the level of α=0.05 in the multivariable logistic regression analysis were considered to be independently associated with reported difficulty taking ART. A total of 867 (78.4%) survey respondents were taking antiretroviral medication at the time of completing the HIV Futures 6 survey. Overall, 39.1% of these respondents reported difficulty taking ART. Factors found to be independently associated with reported difficulty taking ART included younger age, alcohol and party drug use, poor or fair self-reported health, diagnosis of a mental health condition, living in a regional centre, taking more than one ART dose per day, experiencing physical adverse events or health service discrimination, certain types of ART regimen and specific attitudes towards ART and HIV. Thirteen previously investigated factors were found to be independently associated with reported difficulty taking ART, reaffirming the dynamic nature of adherence behaviour and the ongoing importance of addressing adherence behaviour in the clinical management of PLWH. © 2011 British HIV Association.

  19. A feasibility study of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy in children with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubolyam Sasiwimol

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a large immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy (ART study in children. Methods We conducted an open-label pilot randomized clinical trial study in 43 Thai children with CD4 15 to 24% of starting generic AZT/3TC/NVP immediately (Arm 1 or deferring until CD4 Results Recruitment took 15 months. Twenty-six of 69 (37.7% were not eligible due mainly to low CD4%. Twenty four and 19 were randomized to arms 1 and 2 respectively. All accepted the randomized arm; however, 3 in arm 1 stopped ART and 1 in arm 2 refused to start ART. Ten/19 (53% in arm 2 started ART. At baseline, median age was 4.8 yrs, CDC A:B were 36:7, median CD4 was 19% and viral load was 4.8 log. All in arm 1 and 17/19 in arm 2 completed the study (median of 134 weeks. No one had AIDS or death. Four in immediate arm had tuberculosis. Once started on ART, deferred arm children achieved similar CD4 and viral load response as the immediate arm. Adverse events were similar between arms. The deferred arm had a 26% ART saving. Conclusion Almost 40% of children were not eligible due mainly to low CD4% but adherence to randomized treatment and retention in trial were excellent. A larger study to evaluate when to start ART is feasible.

  20. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in urban Cameroon, 2003?2005

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Cecile Zoung-Kanyi; Lucienne Assumpta Bella; Carno Tchuani; Helene Epee; Louis Menyeng; Regis Pouillot; Jembia Mosoko; Claudine Essomba; Yacouba Njankouo Mapoure; Madeleine Mbangue; Therese Abong; Mathurin Tejiokem; Charles Kouanfack; Alain Kenfak; Koulla, Sinata S

    2008-01-01

    Background:Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought by ART programs. Methods:Based on existing patient records, we assessed determinants of retention in HIV care among HIV patients enrolled in an urban ART at two urban hospitals in Cameroon...

  1. Genital HSV Shedding among Kenyan Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffins O Manguro

    Full Text Available Genital ulcer disease (GUD prevalence increases in the first month of antiretroviral treatment (ART, followed by a return to baseline prevalence by month 3. Since most GUD is caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, we hypothesized that genital HSV detection would follow a similar pattern after treatment initiation.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 122 HSV-2 and HIV-1 co-infected women with advanced HIV disease who initiated ART and were followed closely with collection of genital swab specimens for the first three months of treatment.At baseline, the HSV detection rate was 32%, without significant increase in genital HSV detection noted during the first month or the third month of ART. HIV-1 shedding declined during this period; no association was also noted between HSV and HIV-1 shedding during this period.Because other studies have reported increased HSV detection in women initiating ART and we have previously reported an increase in GUD during early ART, it may be prudent to counsel HIV-1 infected women initiating ART that HSV shedding in the genital tract may continue after ART initiation.

  2. Registered nurses' perceptions regarding nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation in Hhohho region, Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavhandu-Mudzusi, A H; Sandy, P T; Hettema, A

    2017-12-01

    Swaziland has the highest HIV prevalence globally. It faces a critical shortage of health workers for addressing the HIV pandemic. To curb this human resource challenge, Swaziland adopted a nurse-driven model for antiretroviral therapy delivery in line with the recommendations of the World Health Organization on task shifting. The study explored the perceptions of registered nurses on the nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme in the Hhohho region of Swaziland (NARTIS). The study utilized a phenomenological design, specifically a phenomenographic design. The study was conducted in ten health facilities in the Hhohho region of Swaziland. These facilities comprised eight clinics, a hospital and a health centre. These were registered nurses, trained and certified in the nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme. The nurses also had experience of working in a nurse-led antiretroviral therapy initiation programme. Eighteen (18) nurses were purposively selected and recruited to participate in the study. Data were collected through open and deep individual interviews guided by a semi-structured interview schedule. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically using Sjöström and Dahlgren's approach to data analysis. Three major themes emerged from the study data: nurses' emotional reactions to the implementation of the NARTIS programme, and influences and overcoming barriers to the programme. The study findings have generated insights into this program which is useful for the provision of care to people living with HIV/AIDS in Swaziland. But nurses need support to ensure effective implementation. The study findings have implications for both the practice of the NARTIS programme and health policy development. The development of a health policy that alleviates the barriers to the NARTIS programme can enhance nurses' role and make care provision to people living with HIV/AIDS more effective. © 2017 International Council

  3. [Causes of death among 91 HIV-infected adults in the era of potent antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodqi, Mustapha; Marih, Latifa; Lahsen, Ahd Oulad; Bensghir, Rajae; Chakib, Abdelfatah; Himmich, Hakima; El Filali, Kamal Marhoum

    2012-07-01

    To describe the causes of death occurring during the antiretroviral therapy in Casablanca. Retrospective study of a cohort of HIV positive patients attending the infectious diseases unit of Casablanca receiving antiretroviral therapy. Files of 91 patients who died were analyzed. Since June 1999, 1243 patients were treated and 91 deaths occurred (7, 3%). The mean age at time of death was 36 years. Forty-six patients were male (50, 5%) and 86 were stage C (94, 5%). At the initiation of treatment, mean CD4 count was 96 cells/mL (1-626) and mean plasma HIV- RNA was 5, 65 log10. They have received antiretroviral therapy for a mean of 9 months (1-48 months). At time of death, 37 patients (52, 8%) had a CD4 count greater than 200 cells/mL and 16 patients (23%) had undetectable plasma viral load. In 57 cases (63%), the death occurred within the first year after start of antiretroviral therapy. The main causes of death were: tuberculosis (35%), cryptosporidiosis (19%), cryptococcosis (13%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (9%), Kaposi sarcoma (6%), non Hodgkin's lymphoma (2%), atypical mycobacteriosis (2%), cerebral lymphoma (1%), aspergillosis (1%), HIV wasting syndrome (1%) and cancer of cervix (1%). Non AIDS related deaths were noticed in three cases (3%) and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in six cases (7%). In Casablanca, the main cause of death among HIV-infected patients is tuberculosis. Collaboration between the national tuberculosis and AIDS programs has been established to improve the prevention, detection, diagnosis and management of HIV/tuberculosis co infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [risk Factors For Non-compliance To Treatment With Highly Effective Antiretroviral Therapy].

    OpenAIRE

    Colombrini, Maria Rosa Ceccato; Coleta, Marília Ferreira Dela; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was: to measure the prevalence of non-compliance to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) by AIDS patients; to identify whether some of the factors listed in health literature were associated with non-compliance; to establish the predictive values of non-compliance to HAART-related factors. An analytic prevalence study (N = 60) was performed, in which the three days prior to the interview were considered. Those classified as compliant were the patients who inge...

  5. Adult Antiretroviral Therapy and Child Health: Evidence from Scale-Up in Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne M. Lucas; Nicholas L. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    One in five Zambian children lives with an HIV/AIDS-infected adult. We estimate the effect that the availability of adult antiretroviral therapy (ART) has on the health of such children. Using a triple difference specification, we find that adult access to ART resulted in increased weight-for-age and decreased incidence of stunting among children younger than 60 months who resided with an infected father or other infected adult in an intact household. Because the increased availability of adu...

  6. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte R; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...... with the disfiguring body-alterations known as HALS. More recently, however, regimens containing nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have attracted attention. Reviewing switch studies regarding metabolic parameters and body shape changes, certain trends emerge. Switching from PI, the metabolic...

  7. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the era of antiretroviral therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez, Jorge N.; Bibiana A Ledesma; Nigro, Monica G; Natalia Vittar; Nestor Rueda; Luis De Carolis; Olga Figueiras; Silvana Carnevale; Marcelo Corti

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a severe opportunistic infection in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lung is a major site of infection after the central nervous system. In this report we described two cases of pneumonia due to Toxoplasma gondii infection in HIV patients with antiretroviral therapy. Clinical and radiological abnormalities are not specific. Pulmonary toxoplasmosis should be considered in HIV-infected patients with late stage of HIV, CD4 count less than 100 c...

  8. Health service delivery models for the provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Nicholson, Joey

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In response to the lack of evidence-based guidance for how to continue scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) in ways that make optimal use of limited resources, to assess comparative studies of ART service delivery models implemented in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: A systematic...... of service delivery models, making it difficult to draw conclusions about some models. The strongest evidence was related to the feasibility of decentralisation and task-shifting, both of which appear to be effective strategies....

  9. Antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy and early neonatal life: consequences for HIV-exposed, uninfected children

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia El Beitune; Geraldo Duarte; Silvana Maria Quintana; Figueiró-Filho,Ernesto A.; Alessandra Cristina Marcolin; Renata Abduch

    2004-01-01

    Women have emerged as the fastest growing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected population worldwide, mainly because of the increasing occurrence of heterosexual transmission. Most infected women are of reproductive age and one of the greatest concerns for both women and their physicians is that more than 1,600 infants become infected with HIV each day. Almost all infections are a result of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. With the advent of combination antiretroviral therapies, tra...

  10. Incidence of cervical disease associated to HPV in human immunodeficiency infected women under highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogtomo Martin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV may be at higher risk of developing cervical cancer than non infected women. In a pilot study, we assessed the relationships among cervical cytology abnormalities associated to Human Papillomavirus (HPV, HIV infection and Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART on the development of Squamous Intraepithelial lesions (SILs. Out of the 70 HIV infected women from Douala -Cameroon (Central Africa that we included in the study, half (35 were under HAART. After obtaining information related to their lifestyle and sexual behaviour, cervicovaginal samples for Pap smears and venous blood for CD4 count were collected and further divided into two groups based upon the presence or absence of cervical cytology abnormalities i.e. those with normal cervical cytology and those with low and high Squamous Intraepithelial lesions (LSIL, HSIL. Results Assessment was done according to current antiretroviral regimens available nationwide and CD4 count. It was revealed that 44.3% of HIV-infected women had normal cytology. The overall prevalence of LSIL and HSIL associated to HPV in the studied groups was 24.3% (17/70 and 31.4% (22/70 respectively. Among the 22 HSIL-positive women, 63.6% (14/22 were not on antiretroviral therapy, while 36.4% (8/22 were under HAART. HIV infected women under HAART with positive HSIL, showed a median CD4+ T cell count of 253.7 +/- 31.7 higher than those without therapy (164.7 +/- 26.1. The incidence of HSIL related to HPV infection within the study group independently of HAART initiation was high. Conclusion These results suggest the need for extension and expansion of the current study in order to evaluate the incidence of HPV infection and cervical cancer among HIV-infected and non HIV- infected women in Cameroon.

  11. Risk for opportunistic disease and death after reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV previously receiving episodic therapy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sadr, W M; Grund, B; Neuhaus, J; Babiker, A; Cohen, C J; Darbyshire, J; Emery, S; Lundgren, J D; Phillips, A; Neaton, J D

    2008-09-02

    Episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4+ cell counts is inferior to continuous antiretroviral therapy. To determine whether reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients who received episodic treatment reduces excess risk for opportunistic disease or death. Randomized, controlled trial. Sites in 33 countries. 5472 HIV-infected individuals with CD4(+) cell counts greater than 0.350 x 10(9) cells/L enrolled from January 2002 to January 2006. Episodic or continuous antiretroviral therapy initially, followed by continuous therapy in participants previously assigned to episodic treatment. Opportunistic disease or death was the primary outcome. Eighteen months after the recommendation to reinitiate continuous therapy, mean CD4+ cell counts were 0.152 x 10(9) cells/L (95% CI, 0.136 to 0.167 x 10(9) cells/L) less in participants previously assigned to episodic treatment (P HIV RNA levels of 400 copies/mL or less was 29% for participants initially assigned to episodic therapy and 66% for those assigned to continuous therapy. Participants who reinitiated continuous therapy experienced rapid suppression of HIV RNA levels (89.7% with HIV RNA levels disease or death decreased after the recommendation to reinitiate continuous therapy (from 2.5 [CI, 1.8 to 3.5] to 1.4 [CI, 1.0 to 2.0]; P = 0.033 for difference). The residual excess risk was attributable to failure to reinitiate therapy by some participants and slow recovery of CD4+ cell counts for those who reinitiated therapy. Follow-up was too short to assess the full effect of switching from episodic to continuous antiretroviral therapy. Reinitiating continuous antiretroviral therapy in patients previously assigned to episodic treatment reduced excess risk for opportunistic disease or death, but excess risk remained. Episodic antiretroviral therapy, as used in the SMART study, should be avoided.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy for Multidrug-Resistant HIV: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early years of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era, HIV with resistance to two or more agents in different antiretroviral classes posed a significant clinical challenge. Multidrug-resistant (MDR HIV was an important cause of treatment failure, morbidity, and mortality. Treatment options at the time were limited; multiple drug regimens with or without enfuvirtide were used with some success but proved to be difficult to sustain for reasons of tolerability, toxicity, and cost. Starting in 2006, data began to emerge supporting the use of new drugs from the original antiretroviral classes (tipranavir, darunavir, and etravirine and drugs from new classes (raltegravir and maraviroc for the treatment of MDR HIV. Their availability has enabled patients with MDR HIV to achieve full and durable viral suppression with more compact and cost-effective regimens including at least two and often three fully active agents. The emergence of drug-resistant HIV is expected to continue to become less frequent in the future, driven by improvements in the convenience, tolerability, efficacy, and durability of first-line HAART regimens. To continue this trend, the optimal rollout of HAART in both rich and resource-limited settings will require careful planning and strategic use of antiretroviral drugs and monitoring technologies.

  13. Healthcare Worker Perceived Barriers to Early Initiation of Antiretroviral and Tuberculosis Therapy among Tanzanian Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajanga, Bahati M. K.; Peck, Robert N.; Kalluvya, Samuel; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Smart, Luke R.; Downs, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Setting Clinical trials have shown that early initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis saves lives, but models for implementation of this new strategy have been under-studied in real-world settings. Objective To identify the barriers and possible solutions for implementing concurrent early treatment with antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis therapy in a large East African referral hospital where the prevalence of both infections is high. Design In-depth interviews among hospital administrators, laboratory technicians, nurses, pharmacists, and physicians. Results Twenty-six hospital staff identified six key barriers and corresponding solutions to promote rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected inpatients with tuberculosis. These include revising systems of medication delivery, integrating care between inpatient and outpatient systems, training hospital nurses to counsel and initiate medications in inpatients, and cultivating a team approach to consistent guideline implementation. Conclusion Most barriers identified by hospital staff were easily surmountable with reorganization, training, and policy changes at minimal cost. Efforts to reduce mortality for HIV and tuberculosis co-infected patients in accordance with new World Health Organization guidelines are currently hampered by implementation barriers in real-world settings. Our findings suggest that these can be overcome with strategic enactment of simple, realistic interventions to promote early dual treatment for HIV/tuberculosis co-infected patients. PMID:24551061

  14. Service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage, retention and adherence to antiretroviral therapy and HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Peter; Munthali, Chigomezgo; Ferguson, Jane; Armstrong, Alice; Kranzer, Katharina; Ferrand, Rashida A; Ross, David A

    2015-08-01

    Adolescents living with HIV face substantial difficulties in accessing HIV care services and have worse treatment outcomes than other age groups. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, retention in HIV care and adherence to ART. We systematically searched the Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Sciences databases and conference abstracts from the International AIDS Conference and International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA). Studies published in English between 1st January 2001 and 9th June 2014 were included. Two authors independently evaluated reports for eligibility, extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Eleven studies from nine countries were eligible for review. Three studies were randomised controlled trials. Interventions assessed included individual and group counselling and education; peer support; directly observed therapy; financial incentives; and interventions to improve the adolescent-friendliness of clinics. Most studies were of low to moderate methodological quality. This review identified limited evidence on the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to support adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to ART initiation, retention on ART and adherence to ART. Although recommendations are qualified because of the small numbers of studies and limited methodological quality, offering individual and group education and counselling, financial incentives, increasing clinic accessibility and provision of specific adolescent-tailored services appear promising interventions and warrant further investigation. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Incidence of Severe Neutropenia in HIV-Infected People Starting Antiretroviral Therapy in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroi, Charline; Balestre, Eric; Messou, Eugene; Minga, Albert; Sawadogo, Adrien; Drabo, Joseph; Maiga, Moussa; Zannou, Marcel; Seydi, Moussa; Dabis, Francois; Jaquet, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, antiretroviral therapy (ART) including drugs with potential toxicity such as Zidovudine (ZDV) are routinely prescribed. This study aimed at estimating the incidence of severe neutropenia and associated factors after ART initiation in five West African countries. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted within the international epidemiologic database to evaluate AIDS (IeDEA) collaboration in West Africa. All HIV-infected adults, initiating ART between 2002 and 2014, with a baseline and at least one follow-up absolute neutrophil count (ANC) measurement were eligible. Incidence of severe neutropenia (ANC neutropenia, expressed with their adjusted hazard ratios (aHR). Between 2002 and 2014, 9,426 HIV-infected adults were enrolled. The crude incidence rate of a first severe neutropenia was 9.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 8.6-9.8). Factors associated with severe neutropenia were exposure to ZDV neutropenia after ART initiation in West Africa is high and associated with ZDV exposure and advanced HIV disease. In this context, efforts are needed to scale-up access to less toxic first-line ART drugs and to promote early ART initiation.

  16. Incidence of Cytomegalovirus Retinitis in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Ahuja, Alka; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Danis, Ronald P.; Meinert, Curtis L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and to characterize the factors associated with increased risk of CMV retinitis. Design Prospective cohort study Methods 1600 participants with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) but without CMV retinitis at enrollment who completed at least one follow-up visit in the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA) were seen every 6 months to obtain disease and treatment history, ophthalmic examination, and laboratory testing. Incidence of CMV retinitis and risk factors for incident CMV retinitis were assessed. Results The incidence rate of CMV retinitis in individuals with AIDS was 0.36/100 person years (PY) based upon 29 incident cases during 8,134 person-years of follow-up. The rate was higher for those with a CD4+ T cell count at the immediately prior visit below 50 cells/μL (3.89/100 PY, p 100 cells/μL developed CMV retinitis. Having a CD4+ T cell count below 50 cells/μL at the clinical visit prior to CMV retinitis evaluation was the single most important risk factor (HR: 136, 95% CI: 30 to 605, p AIDS, especially those with severely compromised immune systems, remain at risk for developing CMV retinitis in the HAART era, although the incidence rate is reduced from that observed in the pre-HAART era. PMID:22310076

  17. Selection of HIV resistance associated with antiretroviral therapy initiated due to pregnancy and suspended postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Giovanina M; Huang, Sharon; Hitti, Jane; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2011-11-01

    Compare the risk of HIV drug resistance in women stopping suppressive nelfinavir (NFV)-based or Nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) after pregnancy. Specimens collected after stopping ART were tested for drug resistance by an oligonucleotide ligation assay and consensus sequencing. When postpartum drug resistance was detected, specimens obtained at study entry and during ART were evaluated. Sixteen of 38 women with ART-induced suppression of viral replication suspended ART postpartum. Resistance mutations were detected in 75% who stopped NFV-ART and in 50% who stopped NVP-ART. M184V, associated with Lamivudine resistance, was more frequent among those randomized to NFV-ART compared with NVP-ART (6 of 8 versus 1 of 8; P = 0.04), and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance was detected in 4 of 8 stopping NVP-ART. HIV drug resistance was frequently observed among women who stopped suppressive NVP-ART or NFV-ART postpartum. This suggests that NFV-ART may have suboptimal potency, that staggering discontinuation of NVP-ART may be warranted, and/or ART adherence may be lax in women who choose to stop ART postpartum.

  18. Antiretroviral therapy in prevention of HIV and TB: update on current research efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granich, Reuben; Gupta, Somya; Suthar, Amitabh B; Smyth, Caoimhe; Hoos, David; Vitoria, Marco; Simao, Mariangela; Hankins, Catherine; Schwartlander, Bernard; Ridzon, Renee; Bazin, Brigitte; Williams, Brian; Lo, Ying-Ru; McClure, Craig; Montaner, Julio; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-09-01

    There is considerable scientific evidence supporting the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) infections. The complex nature of the HIV and TB prevention responses, resource constraints, remaining questions about cost and feasibility, and the need to use a solid evidence base to make policy decisions, and the implementation challenges to translating trial data to operational settings require a well-organised and coordinated response to research in this area. To this end, we aimed to catalogue the ongoing and planned research activities that evaluate the impact of ART plus other interventions on HIV- and/or TB-related morbidity, mortality, risk behaviour, HIV incidence and transmission. Using a limited search methodology, 50 projects were identified examining ART as prevention, representing 5 regions and 52 countries with a global distribution. There are 24 randomised controlled clinical trials with at least 12 large randomised individual or community cluster trials in resource-constrained settings that are in the planning or early implementation stages. There is considerable heterogeneity between studies in terms of methodology, interventions and geographical location. While the identified studies will undoubtedly advance our understanding of the efficacy and effectiveness of ART for prevention, some key questions may remain unanswered or only partially answered. The large number and wide variety of research projects emphasise the importance of this research issue and clearly demonstrate the potential for synergies, partnerships and coordination across funding agencies.

  19. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojeh VB

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs, and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV- infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH. Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3% patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10 years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%, unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1% and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%. Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%, rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%, change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%, and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%. A total of 389 (93% out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212 of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89 were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49. However, 7.5% (30 prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21 were not dispensed, and 3% (12 were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors.

  20. Factors related to antiretroviral therapy adherence in children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marta; González, Ida; Pérez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, global initiatives to address the AIDS epidemic have produced promising advances through access to effective treatment programs. However, lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a problem for pediatric patients. Explore antiretroviral therapy adherence in children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in Cuba and examine its relationship with psychosocial, individual and treatment factors. A qualitative study was carried out of 21 caregivers of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS. Demographics and information on treatment regimen were collected by chart review. In-depth interviews were conducted to assess adherence and examine its relationship with psychosocial, individual and treatment factors. Interviews were transcribed and the information was grouped by factor category. Adherence was analyzed in relation to these three sets of factors. Caregivers interviewed reported adequate adherence in 17 of the 21 children. Lack of adherence was linked primarily to psychosocial factors such as additional responsibility taken on by the caregiver while grappling with his or her own illness, the presence of untreated psychological symptoms in the caregiver, perceived difficulties with family support, the child's age, and assigning treatment responsibilities to the child without taking into account his/her psychological maturity. The study revealed a high level of antiretroviral therapy adherence. It reconfirmed the fundamental importance of the caregiver and family support for therapeutic success in children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS. These results, as well as the factors identified in cases of nonadherence, can contribute to a framework for assessment and specialized interventions to optimize pediatric antiretroviral adherence.

  1. Fixed-dose combination for adults accessing antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA HIV Clinicians Society

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This document serves to guide clinicians and programme managers on how to switch from 3 separate antiretroviral (ARV drugs to the new, single, fixed-dose combination (FDC tablet containing tenofovir (TDF, emtricitabine (FTC and efavirenz (EFV. Summary Transitioning from individual drugs to an FDC tablet needs to be managed carefully, particularly regarding stock management, ordering processes, supply-chain integrity and comprehensive patient counselling. Priority groups • Initially, FDC supply will be insufficient to provide for all FDC-suitable patients • Therefore, the National Department of Health (NDoH has recommended that the following patient groups be prioritized for FDC initiation/switch: • Priority group 1: All HIV-positive patients newly initiating ART – adults, adolescents and pregnant women (regardless of CD4 count (amendment to the guidelines for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT anticipated in April 2013 – and who do not have contra-indications to the FDC component drugs • Priority group 2: HIV-positive pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers currently stable on lamivudine (3TC, TDF and EFV • Priority group 3: Virologically suppressed patients on a stavudine (d4T-based regimen and who have normal renal function • Priority group 4: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have tuberculosis (TB co-infection • Priority group 5: Stable patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who have other co-morbidites (e.g. hypertension, diabetes • Priority group 6: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who request to switch to the FDC treatment • Priority group 7: Patients receiving individual TDF, 3TC and EFV and who, after counselling, agree to switch to the FDC treatment. Important: Clinic staff must co-ordinate this process and only switch as many patients to the FDC tablet as stock allows. This should avoid patients being switched back and forth

  2. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Grubb

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART, and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Discussion: Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Conclusions: Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including

  3. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Ian R; Beckham, Sarah W; Kazatchkine, Michel; Thomas, Ruth M; Albers, Eliot R; Cabral, Mauro; Lange, Joep; Vella, Stefano; Kurian, Manoj; Beyrer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including comprehensive harm reduction and other prevention

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis in an HIV-infected patient undergoing antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, MR; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Røder, ME

    2006-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a number of metabolic and morphologic alterations, known as HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), have been increasingly common in HIV-infected patients being treated with this therapy. The use of protease...... inhibitors (PI), in particular, has been associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia, but only infrequently with diabetic ketoacidosis. We report a case of diabetic ketoacidosis in an HIV-infected woman after 1(1/2) years of a PI-containing regimen, demonstrating reduced beta cell function...

  5. metabolic disturbances associated with antiretroviral therapy and hn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    growth hormone anabolic steroids dietary supplements. L-carnitine. • Hypoglycaemic agents metformin. • Surgery liposuction plastic surgery. • Switching ART. Studies have been performed to investigate the merits of switching therapies, but reports generally show some biochemical improvement but very little morphological.

  6. Antiplasmodial Activity of 'Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-plasmodial effect of 'Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) was investigated. A hundred and twenty healthy Swiss albino mice (20-24 g) were passaged with Chloroquine sensitive P.berghei and randomly assigned into three study groups: prophylactic, suppressive and curative study group. The animals ...

  7. Self-perception of knowledge and adherence reflecting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli-Hernandez, Carolina; Lucchetta, Rosa Camila; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandez; Mastroianni, Patricia de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate which indirect method for assessing adherence best reflects highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) effectiveness and the factors related to adherence. Method This descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed in 2012 at a reference center of the state of São Paulo. Self-report (simplified medication adherence questionnaire [SMAQ]) and drug refill parameters were compared to the viral load (clinical parameter of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy [EP]) to evaluate the EP. The “Cuestionario para la Evaluación de la Adhesión al Tratamiento Antiretroviral” (CEAT-VIH) was used to evaluate factors related to adherence and the EP and, complementarily, patient self-perception of adherence was compared to the clinical parameter of the EP. Results Seventy-five patients were interviewed, 60 of whom were considered as adherent from the clinical parameter of the EP and ten were considered as adherent from all parameters. Patient self-perception about adherence was the instrument that best reflected the EP when compared to the standardized self-report questionnaire (SMAQ) and drug refill parameter. The level of education and the level of knowledge on HAART were positively correlated to the EP. Forgetfulness, alcohol use, and lack of knowledge about the medications were the factors most frequently reported as a cause of nonadherence. Conclusion A new parameter of patient self-perception of adherence, which is a noninvasive, inexpensive instrument, could be applied and assessed as easily as self-report (SMAQ) during monthly drug refill, since it allows monitoring adherence through pharmaceutical assistance. Therefore, patient adherence to HAART could be evaluated using self-perception (CEAT-VIH) and the viral load test. PMID:27695297

  8. Cell-to-cell spread of HIV permits ongoing replication despite antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Alex; Kim, Jocelyn T; Balazs, Alejandro B; Dekel, Erez; Mayo, Avi; Milo, Ron; Baltimore, David

    2011-08-17

    Latency and ongoing replication have both been proposed to explain the drug-insensitive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reservoir maintained during antiretroviral therapy. Here we explore a novel mechanism for ongoing HIV replication in the face of antiretroviral drugs. We propose a model whereby multiple infections per cell lead to reduced sensitivity to drugs without requiring drug-resistant mutations, and experimentally validate the model using multiple infections per cell by cell-free HIV in the presence of the drug tenofovir. We then examine the drug sensitivity of cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a mode of HIV transmission that can lead to multiple infection events per target cell. Infections originating from cell-free virus decrease strongly in the presence of antiretrovirals tenofovir and efavirenz whereas infections involving cell-to-cell spread are markedly less sensitive to the drugs. The reduction in sensitivity is sufficient to keep multiple rounds of infection from terminating in the presence of drugs. We examine replication from cell-to-cell spread in the presence of clinical drug concentrations using a stochastic infection model and find that replication is intermittent, without substantial accumulation of mutations. If cell-to-cell spread has the same properties in vivo, it may have adverse consequences for the immune system, lead to therapy failure in individuals with risk factors, and potentially contribute to viral persistence and hence be a barrier to curing HIV infection.

  9. The cost of a combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (cART optimization pathway as maintenance therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ravasio

    2017-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS: From the Italian NHS’s perspective, the adoption of a specific cART optimization pathway represents a cost-saving option as maintenance antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients.

  10. Pulmonary effects of immediate versus deferred antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunisaki, Ken M; Niewoehner, Dennis E; Collins, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Institute, US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Division of AIDS, Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hipatites Virales (France), Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, Danish National Research Foundation, European AIDS Treatment Network, German Ministry......BACKGROUND: Observational data have been conflicted regarding the potential role of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) as a causative factor for, or protective factor against, COPD. We therefore aimed to investigate the effect of immediate versus deferred ART on decline in lung function in HIV......-positive individuals. METHODS: We did a nested substudy within the randomised, controlled Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial at 80 sites in multiple settings in 20 high-income and low-to-middle-income countries. Participants were HIV-1 infected individuals aged at least 25 years, naive to ART...

  11. HIV-1 subtypes and response to combination antiretroviral therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, WP; Ruiz, L; Loveday, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may vary in ability to suppress viral load and increase CD4+ T-cell count in people infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, possibly due to differences in resistance development. Antiretroviral drugs have predominantly been developed in Western...... Europe/North America on the basis of the most prevalent subtype, B. However, non-B subtypes are increasingly spreading worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To compare virological and immunological response to cART between patients infected with B and non-B subtypes across Europe. DESIGN: EuroSIDA prospective......, observational cohort with 11,928 HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Response to cART was analysed in patients with subtypes determined pre-cART, via multivariable logistic regression on the first measurements 6–12 months after starting cART. A virological response was defined as a viral load

  12. HIV-1 subtypes and response to combination antiretroviral therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, WP; Ruiz, L; Loveday, C

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may vary in ability to suppress viral load and increase CD4+ T-cell count in people infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, possibly due to differences in resistance development. Antiretroviral drugs have predominantly been developed in Western......, observational cohort with 11,928 HIV-1-infected patients. METHODS: Response to cART was analysed in patients with subtypes determined pre-cART, via multivariable logistic regression on the first measurements 6–12 months after starting cART. A virological response was defined as a viral load ...-B-infected patients (P=0.334). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in odds of an immunological response (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.73–1.87, P=0.524). CONCLUSIONS: There was no evidence of significant differences in virological or immunological response to cART between patients infected with HIV-1 B...

  13. Impact on adherence of a telephone follow up strategy in HIV-naïve patients who start antiretroviral therapy: cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    M. Bullo; Toibaro, J.; Losso, M.

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy changed the prognosis of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, lack of adherence jeopardizes the success of antiretroviral therapy and enhances the development of treatment-resistant strains, treatment failure, and therefore it stands as a public health problem. The main goal of this study was to measure the impact on treatment discontinuations and lost to follow up, of a telephone follow-up strategy in naïve patients who start antiretroviral therapy. We conducte...

  14. Antiretroviral therapy provided to HIV-infected Malawian women in a randomized trial diminishes the posiitive effect of lipid-based nutrient supplements on breast milk B-vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is little information on B-vitamin concentrations in human milk or how they are affected by maternal B-vitamin deficiencies, antiretroviral (ARV) therapy or maternal supplementation. Objective: To evaluate effects of ARV therapy and/or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) on B-v...

  15. Tuberculosis incidence among people living with HIV/AIDS with virological failure of antiretroviral therapy in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaliza Cardozo Rebouças

    Full Text Available Abstract Antiretroviral therapy for HIV has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients. However, tuberculosis remains the leading opportunistic infection and cause of death among people living with HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis has been shown to be a good predictor of virological failure in this group. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of tuberculosis and its consequences among individuals diagnosed with virological failure of HIV. This was a retrospective cohort study involving people living with HIV/AIDS being followed-up in an AIDS reference center in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Individuals older than 18 years with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy for at least six months, diagnosed with virological failure (HIV-RNA greater than or equal to 1000 copies/mL, from January to December 2013 were included. Tuberculosis was diagnosed according to the criteria of the Brazilian Society of Pneumology. Fourteen out of 165 (8.5% patients developed tuberculosis within two years of follow-up (incidence density = 4.1 patient-years. Death was directly related to tuberculosis in 6/14 (42.9%. A high incidence and tuberculosis-related mortality was observed among patients with virological failure. Diagnosis of and prophylaxis for tuberculosis in high-incidence countries such as Brazil is critical to decrease morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  16. Tuberculosis incidence among people living with HIV/AIDS with virological failure of antiretroviral therapy in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaliza Cardozo Rebouças

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy for HIV has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients. However, tuberculosis remains the leading opportunistic infection and cause of death among people living with HIV/AIDS. Tuberculosis has been shown to be a good predictor of virological failure in this group. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of tuberculosis and its consequences among individuals diagnosed with virological failure of HIV. This was a retrospective cohort study involving people living with HIV/AIDS being followed-up in an AIDS reference center in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Individuals older than 18 years with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy for at least six months, diagnosed with virological failure (HIV-RNA greater than or equal to 1000 copies/mL, from January to December 2013 were included. Tuberculosis was diagnosed according to the criteria of the Brazilian Society of Pneumology. Fourteen out of 165 (8.5% patients developed tuberculosis within two years of follow-up (incidence density = 4.1 patient-years. Death was directly related to tuberculosis in 6/14 (42.9%. A high incidence and tuberculosis-related mortality was observed among patients with virological failure. Diagnosis of and prophylaxis for tuberculosis in high-incidence countries such as Brazil is critical to decrease morbidity and mortality in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  17. Lipodystrophy induced by combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients: A Belgrade cohort study

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    Dragović Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has led to dramatic reductions in mortality and morbidity of HIV/AIDS-patients. Lipodystrophy, a syndrome including peripheral fat wasting and central obesity, is well-documented side effect of HAART. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of lipodystrophy, and to determine its risk ratios in a HIV/AIDS cohort. Methods. This cross-sectional study included all antiretroviral-naive HIV/AIDS patients commencing HAART from October 1, 2001 to October 1, 2010, in the HIV/AIDS Center, Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Belgrade, Serbia. Univariate and stepwise multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the odds ratios (OR with the confidence interval (CI of 95%, in order to establish the relative risk for lipodystrophy. The Kaplan-Meier-method was used to determine the probability of development lipodystrophy over time. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS software version using 0.05 as a p-treshold for the significance. Results. This study included 840 HIV/AIDS patients, 608 women and 232 men, followed for 5.6 ± 2.8 years. The prevalence of lipodystrophy was 69.2%. Univariate and stepwise multivariate regression analysis identified that the female gender, hepatitis C coinfection, AIDS diagnosis prior to HAART initiation, nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitors and proteaseinhibitors based regimens had a high risk for developing lipodystrophy in HIV/AIDS-patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-3.49, p = 0.04; OR = 3.31, 95% CI = 1.4 - 3.8, p < 0.01; OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.7 - 6.1, p < 0.01; OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.7 - 3.3, p < 0.01; OR = 6.1, 95% CI = 4.1 - 9.7, p < 0.01, respectively. Conclusion. Despite much greater life expectancy of HIV/AIDSpatients, treatment-related toxicities still remain a major concern. Monitoring of lipodystrophy, as side effect of HAART, is particularly important. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br

  18. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Janne; Obel, Niels; Gill, Michael John; Crane, Heidi; Boesecke, Christoph; Samji, Hasina; Grabar, Sophie; Cazanave, Charles; Cavassini, Matthias; Shepherd, Leah; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smit, Colette; Saag, Michael; Lampe, Fiona; Hernando, Vicky; Montero, Marta; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy; Miro, Jose; Ingle, Suzanne; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996–1999 and survived for more than ten years. Methods We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA. Results During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5%) patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified) were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years. Conclusions Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes. PMID:27525413

  19. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Trickey

    Full Text Available To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996-1999 and survived for more than ten years.We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA.During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5% patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years.Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes.

  20. A national survey of teachers on antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: access, retention in therapy and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Makombe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV/AIDS is having a devastating effect on the education sector in sub-Saharan Africa. A national survey was conducted in all public sector and private sector facilities in Malawi providing antiretroviral therapy (ART to determine the uptake of ART by teachers and their outcomes while on treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort study was carried out based on patient follow-up records from ART Registers and treatment master cards in all 138 ART clinics in Malawi; observations were censored on September 30(th 2006. By this date, Malawi's 102 public sector and 36 private sector ART clinics had registered a total of 72,328 patients for treatment. Of these, 2,643 (3.7% were teachers. Adjusting for double-registration caused by clinic transfers, it is estimated that 2,380 individual teachers had ever accessed ART. There were 15% of teachers starting ART in WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 with a CD4-lymphocyte count of

  1. An investigation into frequency and reasons why patients switch antiretroviral therapy and which antiretrovirals are commonly implicated in toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study Previous investigation into antiretroviral (ARV therapy switches in our HIV cohort suggested an annual switch rate of 20% in 2006 with 60% of switches being secondary to toxicity [1]. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this switch rate has changed in recent years, determine reasons why patients change regimens, and identify which ARVs are most likely to be switched for toxicity concerns. Methods The electronic patient database was reviewed to identify all patients within our HIV cohort who switched ARV therapy between 1st December 2009 and 31st May 2011. Details of which ARVs were switched and the reasons why were recorded. Any switches due to toxicity were investigated further to identify the actual or perceived adverse effect. Summary of results Nine hundred and twenty-three regimens were switched over 18 months affecting 12% (n = 722 of patients on treatment during this time. The most common reason for switching medication was due to toxicity, occurring in 452 (49% cases. Other reasons included simplification (15%, clinical trials (8%, virological failure (8% and drug interactions (4%. The remaining 16% switched for various reasons including pregnancy and co-morbidities. Of 452 switches for toxicity (or perceived toxicity, 122 (27% were due to CNS side effects (89 out of a total of 122 were related to efavirenz, 64 (14% gastrointestinal disturbances (38/64 related to protease inhibitors, 54 (12% actual/perceived cardiovascular risk (21/54 related to abacavir and 21/54 related to saquinavir, 54 (12% hepatotoxicity (21/54 related to atazanavir and 14/54 related to efavirenz, 42 (9% metabolic concerns (24/42 related to protease inhibitors and 38 (8% renal toxicity (28/38 related to tenofovir. Other toxicities accounted for 78 (18% switches. An observed toxicity switch rate (OTSR per 1000 patient years (95% CI was calculated for each ARV. Conclusions 12% of patients switched therapy in 18 months, predicting

  2. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  3. Incidence of Opportunistic Infections and the impact of Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Adults in Low and Middle Income Countries: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Low, A.; Gavriilidis, G; Larke, N; Lajoie, MR; Drouin, O; Stover, J; Muhe, L; Easterbrook, P

    2016-01-01

    Background. ?To understand regional burdens and inform delivery of health services, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on incidence of key opportunistic infections (OIs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)?infected adults in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods. ?Eligible studies describing the cumulative incidence of OIs and proportion on ART from 1990 to November 2013 were identified using multiple databas...

  4. Dynamics of the HIV infection under antiretroviral therapy: A cellular automata approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Coutinho, Sérgio; Zorzenon dos Santos, Rita Maria; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus infection under antiretroviral therapy is investigated using a cellular automata model where the effectiveness of each drug is self-adjusted by the concentration of CD4+ T infected cells present at each time step. The effectiveness of the drugs and the infected cell concentration at the beginning of treatment are the control parameters of the cell population’s dynamics during therapy. The model allows describing processes of mono and combined therapies. The dynamics that emerges from this model when considering combined antiretroviral therapies reproduces with fair qualitative agreement the phases and different time scales of the process. As observed in clinical data, the results reproduce the significant decrease in the population of infected cells and a concomitant increase of the population of healthy cells in a short timescale (weeks) after the initiation of treatment. Over long time scales, early treatment with potent drugs may lead to undetectable levels of infection. For late treatment or treatments starting with a low density of CD4+ T healthy cells it was observed that the treatment may lead to a steady state in which the T cell counts are above the threshold associated with the onset of AIDS. The results obtained are validated through comparison to available clinical trial data.

  5. Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART): A Sel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lamivudine/ Stavudine (Triomune); Efavirenz/Lamivudine/ Zidovudine and Indinavir/ Lamivudine /Stavudine. The correlation of factors like income, educational level, age, gender, medication type and adherence was evaluated. The effect of ...

  6. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on HIV response to antiretroviral therapy in a Chinese antiretroviral therapy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: HBV co-infection can affect late immunological and virological responses to ART and increase the risk of hepatotoxicity. Mortality due to liver disease was high among HIV/HBV co-infected individuals in this study, despite HBV-active ART. As long as HIV/HBV co-infected persons need anti-HBV therapy, they should be recommended ART that includes agents with activity against both HIV and HBV, regardless of the CD4 cell count level.

  7. Highly active antiretroviral therapy adherence and its determinants in selected regions in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix F. Widjaja

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART can reduce morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients. However, it depends upon adherence to medication. The objective of this study was to examine the adherence to HAART and to evaluate individual patient characteristics i.e. self-efficacy, depression level, and social support and to finally determine HAART adherence in selected regions in Indonesia.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Jakarta, Malang, Bandung, Makasar and Banda Aceh. The subject of the study was HIV-infected patients who were older than 13 years old and had taken HAART for at least a month. They were recruited consecutively then asked how many pills they had missed during the previous month. Poor adherence can be stated if the percentage of adherence rate is below 95%. HIV treatment adherence self-efficacy scale  (HIVASES, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL was adapted to assess self-efficacy, depression level and social support, respectively.Results: We found that 96% (n=53 of the subjects adhered to HAART. There were no associations between adherence with self-efficacy, depression level, and social support. The main cause of non-adherence in this study was ‘simply  forget’.Conclusion: Adherence to HAART was found to be high and not associated with self-efficacy, depression level and social support in some central regions in Indonesia. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:50-5Keywords: adherence, depression, HAART, HIV, self-efficacy, social support

  8. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Increases the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in South African HIV-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel A Dave

    Full Text Available Data on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients from sub-Saharan Africa is sparse. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of HIV-infected South African adults.We studied HIV-infected patients who were either antiretroviral therapy (ART-naive or receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based or protease inhibitor (PI-based ART. Evaluation included fasting lipograms, oral glucose tolerance tests and clinical anthropometry. Dyslipidemia was defined using the NCEP ATPIII guidelines.The median age of the participants was 34 years (range 19-68 years and 78% were women. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in 406 ART-naive and 551 participants on ART was 90.0% and 85%, respectively. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDLC was the most common abnormality [290/406 (71% ART-naïve and 237/551 (43% ART- participants]. Participants on ART had higher triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC, LDL-cholesterol (LDLC and HDLC than the ART-naïve group. Severe dyslipidaemia, (LDLC> 4.9 mmol/L or TG >5.0 mmol/L was present in <5% of participants. In multivariate analyses there were complex associations between age, gender, type and duration of ART and body composition and LDLC, HDLC and TG, which differed between ART-naïve and ART-participants.Participants on ART had higher TG, TC, LDLC and HDLC than those who were ART-naïve but severe lipid abnormalities requiring evaluation and treatment were uncommon.

  9. Tuberculosis after one year of combination antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanbi, Maxwell O; Achenbach, Chad J; Feinglass, Joe; Taiwo, Babafemi; Onu, Adamu; Pho, Mai T; Agbaji, Oche; Kanki, Phyllis; Murphy, Robert L

    2013-06-01

    Our objective was to determine tuberculosis (TB) incidence and evaluate TB risk in adults after one or more years of use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) through a retrospective cohort study in Jos, Nigeria. We studied a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with ART for at least 1 year. Based on immunologic and virologic responses to ART, patients were categorized into four groups: CD4 T cell count ≥350 cells/mm(3) and HIV-1 RNA level ≤400 copies/ml (group 1), CD4 T cell count ≥350 cells/mm(3) and HIV-1 RNA level >400 copies/ml (group 2), CD4 T cell count 400 copies/ml (group 4). Time to incident TB for the four groups was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression models were used to evaluate predictors of incident TB. In this cohort of 5,093 HIV-infected adults, of which 68.4% were female, with a mean age 35.1 years (standard deviation 9.1 years), we observed 98 cases of incident TB during 4 years and 3 months of follow-up. The overall TB incidence rate was 8.7 cases/1,000 patient-years of follow-up. Adjusted hazards for incident TB were 2.11 (95% CI 0.97-4.61), 2.05 (95% CI 1.10-3.79), and 3.65 (95% CI 1.15-5.06) in group 2, 3, and 4 patients, respectively, compared to group 1. Tuberculosis incidence in patients on ART is driven by poor immunologic and/or virologic response. Optimization of HIV treatment should be prioritized to reduce the burden of TB in this high-risk population.

  10. Metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Alvarez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of and the associated factors for metabolic syndrome (MS among Latin American HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART using baseline data from the RAPID II study. METHODS: A longitudinal study to evaluate the metabolic profile, cardiovascular disease (CVD risk and associated treatment practices to reduce this risk has been conducted in seven Latin American countries (the RAPID II study. Adult HIV patients with at least six months of RT were enrolled. MS was defined following ATP-III criteria. Demographic and anthropometric data, serum biochemical and clinical parameters were compared in patients with and without MS using bivariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: A total of 4,010 patients were enrolled, 2,963 (74% were males. Mean age (SD was 41.9 (10.0 years. The prevalence of MS was 20.2%. Females had higher prevalence of MS than males (22.7% vs. 19.4%, p = 0.02. MS was driven by high triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol and high blood pressure (HBP. Patients with MS had higher 10year CVD risk: 22.2% vs. 7.4%, p < 0.001. Age (OR: 1.05 per year, female gender (OR: 1.29, family history of CVD (OR: 1.28, CD4 cell count (OR: 1.09 per 100 cell increase, and protease inhibitor based-ART (OR: 1.33 correlated with MS in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of MS in this setting was similar to that reported from developed countries. MS was driven by high triglycerides, low-HDL and HBP, and it was associated with higher risk of CVD. Traditional risk factors, female gender, immune reconstitution, and protease inhibitor based-ART correlated with MS.

  11. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangona, Lucília; Daca, Timóteo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, António

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5±8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hour duration with a frequency of 3 times a week. The FEG performed a protocol that included 20 minutes of exercise, cycling at 60 % of V̇O2peak, increasing to 75 % and 85 % in the 4th and 8th weeks, respectively, and a muscular endurance circuit consisted of 6 exercises at 15 repetitions per minute (RM). The PEG followed a program consisting of active games. Before and after the intervention the participants were submitted to a clinical evaluation including immunological parameters (CD4+), cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and anthropometry. Comparison of somatic variables before and after the program showed no exercise effect. Immunological and cardiovascular variables were also independent of the exercise group. The main effect was found in cardiorespiratory fitness: exercise groups increased significantly in V̇O2peak (FEG=14.7 %; PEG=11.1 %) with no significant differences in CG. The percentage of high attendance was identical between the two groups. It was concluded that there is no contraindication for exercise in this type of population and the beneficial effect was mainly in cardiorespiratory fitness, regardless of the type of exercise performed.

  12. Effects of adherence to antiretroviral therapy on body mass index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. Olowookere

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ure, development of drug resistance and subsequent virological and immunological failure.4,5. Although .... adherence during counseling sessions, although 95% adher- ence is sufficient to suppress viral load to .... evaluation and adherence measurement by self report. In conclusion, P95% adherence to ...

  13. Accessibility of antiretroviral therapy in Ghana: Convenience of access

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to explore the participants' perceived convenience of accessing ART by PLWHA in Ghana. The convenience of accessing ART was evaluated from the reported travel and waiting times to receive care, the availability, or otherwise, of special considerations, with respect to the waiting time to ...

  14. Gender differences in retention and survival on antiretroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background. There is currently a dearth of knowledge on gender differences in mortality among patients on ART in Africa. Methods. Using data from the national ART monitoring and evaluation system, a survival analysis of all healthcare workers, teachers, and police/army personnel who accessed ART in Malawi ...

  15. The costs of providing antiretroviral therapy services to HIV-infected individuals presenting with advanced HIV disease at public health centres in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: Findings from a randomised trial evaluating different health care strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfather Dickson Kimaro

    Full Text Available Understanding the costs associated with health care delivery strategies is essential for planning. There are few data on health service resources used by patients and their associated costs within antiretroviral (ART programmes in Africa.The study was nested within a large trial, which evaluated screening for cryptococcal meningitis and tuberculosis and a short initial period of home-based adherence support for patients initiating ART with advanced HIV disease in Tanzania and Zambia. The economic evaluation was done in Tanzania alone. We estimated costs of providing routine ART services from the health service provider's perspective using a micro-costing approach. Incremental costs for the different novel components of service delivery were also estimated. All costs were converted into US dollars (US$ and based on 2012 prices.Of 870 individuals enrolled in Tanzania, 434 were enrolled in the intervention arm and 436 in the standard care/control arm. Overall, the median (IQR age and CD4 cell count at enrolment were 38 [31, 44] years and 52 [20, 89] cells/mm3, respectively. The mean per patient costs over the first three months and over a one year period of follow up following ART initiation in the standard care arm were US$ 107 (95%CI 101-112 and US$ 265 (95%CI 254-275 respectively. ART drugs, clinic visits and hospital admission constituted 50%, 19%, and 19% of the total cost per patient year, while diagnostic tests and non-ART drugs (co-trimoxazole accounted for 10% and 2% of total per patient year costs. The incremental costs of the intervention to the health service over the first three months was US$ 59 (p<0.001; 95%CI 52-67 and over a one year period was US$ 67(p<0.001; 95%CI 50-83. This is equivalent to an increase of 55% (95%CI 51%-59% in the mean cost of care over the first three months, and 25% (95%CI 20%-30% increase over one year of follow up.

  16. The impact of herbal remedies on adverse effects and quality of life in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepe, Nyasha; Madanhi, Nathan; Mudzviti, Tinashe; Gavi, Samuel; Maponga, Charles Chiedza; Morse, Gene D

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Use of herbal remedies among HIV-infected individuals in Africa increased in the past decade, mainly due to traditional beliefs and at times inconsistent access to antiretroviral drugs. In Zimbabwe, accessibility and availability of antiretroviral drugs has increased in recent years; however, the use of herbal remedies remains high. This study was conducted to determine the impact of concomitant use of herbal remedies with antiretroviral drugs on adverse events and on quality of life. Methodology A convenient sample of HIV positive patients at Parirenyatwa group of hospitals' Family Care Clinic (Harare, Zimbabwe) was enrolled. A questionnaire was used to collect data on the adverse event experiences of the patients using herbal remedies for their HIV, as well as the types of herbal remedy used. Quality of life index was measured using an HIV/AIDS targeted quality of life (HAT-QOL) tool developed by the World Health Organization. Results Abdominal pain (odds ratio = 2.7, p-value = 0.01) and rash (odds ratio = 2.5, p-value = 0.02) had significant associations with using herbal remedies during antiretroviral therapy. Improved quality of life index was not significantly associated with herbal remedy use during antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions There is evidence to suggest that some traditional herbal remedies used in Zimbabwe may increase incidence of certain types of adverse events when used in combination with antiretroviral drugs. Use of herbal drugs in combination with antiretroviral therapy does not significantly improve quality of life index in comparison to antiretroviral drug use only. PMID:21330740

  17. [Pulmonary hypertension in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: the role of antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olalla, Julián; Urdiales, Daniel; Pombo, Marta; del Arco, Alfonso; de la Torre, Javier; Prada, José Luis

    2014-03-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious disorder, more prevalent in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is not entirely clear what role is played by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in PAH development or course. Our aim was to describe PAH prevalence in a series of HIV-infected patients and identify possible links with cumulative and current use of different antiretrovirals. Cross-sectional study of a cohort of HIV-infected patients attending a hospital in southern Spain. Demographic data, data on HIV infection status and on cumulative and recent antiretroviral treatment were recorded. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in all study participants. PAH was defined as pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 36mmHg or more. A total of 400 patients participated in the study; 178 presented with tricuspid regurgitation and 22 of these presented with PAH (5.5%). No differences were encountered in age, sex, CD4 lymphocytes, proportion of naive patients or patients with AIDS. No differences were encountered in cumulative use of antiretrovirals. However, recent use of lamivudine was associated with a greater presence of PAH, whereas recent use of tenofovir and emtricitabine was associated with a lower presence of PAH. Logistic regression analysis was performed including the use of lamivudine, emtricitabine and tenofovir. Only recent use of tenofovir was associated with a lower presence of PAH (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.17-0.84). PAH prevalence in our study was similar to others series. Current use of tenofovir may be associated with lower PAH prevalence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Are routine tuberculosis programme data suitable to report on antiretroviral therapy use of HIV-infected tuberculosis patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Miranda; Gudo, Paula Samo; Simbe, Chalice Mage; Perdigão, Paula; van Leth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is lifesaving for HIV-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients. ART-use by these patients lag behind compared to HIV-testing and co-trimoxazole preventive therapy. TB programmes provide the data on ART-use by HIV-infected TB patients, however often the HIV services provide

  19. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...... identified: 162 for CMV disease, 103 for MAC infection, 75 for toxoplasmosis, and 39 for cryptococcosis. During 781 person-years of follow-up, five patients had relapse. Two relapses (one of CMV disease and one of MAC infection) were diagnosed after maintenance therapy was interrupted when the CD4 lymphocyte....... One relapse (toxoplasmosis) was diagnosed after maintenance therapy interruption at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 200 x 10(6) cells/L for 15 months. The overall incidences of recurrent CMV disease, MAC infection, toxoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis were 0.54 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 0.07 to 1...

  20. Iatrogenic osteoporosis, bilateral HIP osteonecrosis, and secondary adrenal suppression in an HIV-infected man receiving inhaled corticosteroids and ritonavir-boosted highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Nargess; Bukberg, Phillip; Manessis, Anastasios; Yen, Vincent; Young, Iven

    2011-01-01

    To report the first case of severe osteoporosis associated with a vertebral pathologic fracture and osteonecrosis of femoral heads in an HIV-infected man receiving inhaled corticosteroids and ritonavir-boosted antiretroviral therapy. We describe an HIV-infected man with severe osteoporosis, bilateral hip osteonecrosis, and secondary adrenal suppression, including detailed clinical, laboratory, and radiographic data, and review the related literature. A 60-year-old man with a 15-year history of HIV infection and a medical history of long-standing bronchiectasis treated with inhaled corticosteroids and hypogonadism treated with testosterone was referred to the endocrinology clinic after experiencing an osteoporotic vertebral fracture. He was taking ritonavir-boosted antiretroviral therapy. Osteonecrosis of both hips was also diagnosed, which required total hip replacement therapy. Laboratory evaluation revealed adrenal insufficiency due to increased effect of exogenous inhaled steroids and no other secondary causes of osteoporosis. A bone densitometry study showed osteoporosis of both hips and the lumbar spine. He was treated with intravenous pamidronate. During treatment, he developed bilateral femoral fractures after minor trauma. Given the potential for increased serum levels of inhaled corticosteroids in patients taking ritonavir-boosted highly active antiretroviral therapy, attention must be paid to the risk of bone loss in HIV-infected patients taking inhaled corticosteroids. Prescribing calcium and vitamin D supplementation and considering early osteoporosis screening are reasonable measures for this patient population. Interaction between inhaled corticosteroids and ritonavir may increase risk of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression.

  1. Opportunistic disease and mortality in patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C virus in the strategic management of antiretroviral therapy (SMART) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, Lars; Neuhaus, Jacquie

    2008-01-01

    with the viral suppression (continued use of antiretroviral therapy) group. We assessed whether participants with concurrent hepatitis had an increased risk of the end points evaluated in the SMART study. METHODS: Participants were classified as being positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV) if they had positive...... the coinfected participants (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.3-5.6), whereas the risk of OD was comparable (HR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.7-1.8). The 3 leading causes of non-OD death in coinfected participants were unknown cause, substance abuse, and non-acquired immunodeficiency disease cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Interruption...... of antiretroviral therapy is particularly unsafe in persons with hepatitis virus coinfection. Although HCV- and/or HBV-coinfected participants constituted 17% of participants in the SMART study, almost one-half of all non-OD deaths occurred in this population. Viral hepatitis was an unlikely cause of this excess...

  2. Polyacrylamide Gel Treatment of Antiretroviral Therapy-induced Facial Lipoatrophy in HIV Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansor, Samreen; Breiting, Vibeke Bro; Dahlstrøm, Karin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Today, highly active antiretroviral therapy is lifesaving for most HIV-infected patients, but the treatment can result in facial lipoatrophy, which changes the face so radically that patients may develop severe psychological and social problems. Since 2001 polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) has...... been used successfully in HIV patients abroad. This article describes the results of a Danish study. METHODS: Forty HIV patients recruited from two major referral hospitals in the capitol area of Copenhagen, Denmark, each received a series of PAAG gel injections (small deposits in several sessions...

  3. Does antiretroviral therapy change partnership dynamics and HIV risk behaviours among HIV-infected adults

    OpenAIRE

    McGrath, Nuala; Grapsa, Erofili

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We explore the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on partnership acquisition and dissolution rates and changes in sexual behaviours among HIV-infected adults. Design: Using detailed longitudinal data from a prospective cohort of HIV-infected adults with CD4+ cell count below 200?cells/?l (ART-eligible) or CD4+ cell count above 500?cells/?l (pre-ART) conducted in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, from 2009 to 2012. Methods: Partnership acquisition and dissolution are explored t...

  4. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  5. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Sony, Peter; Salahuddin, Mohammed; Kumalo, Abera; Geneto, Mathewos; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Moscovitch, Adam; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression) and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  6. Immediate access to antiretroviral therapy is important in children living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Das Bhattacharya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews a case of a child with perinatal HIV followed for 30 months during a prospective cohort study on pneumonia prevention in HIV-infected children. The point of this case report is to illustrate how delayed access to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected children impacts immunization response and growth. Given the WHO's early release guideline changes on ART recommendations and the expected full revised guidelines coming out this year, this article is a timely discussion on the need for access to ART for HIV infected Indian children regardless of CD4 count.

  7. PENTA 2009 guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy in paediatric HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Welch, Steve; Sharland, Mike

    2009-01-01

    PENTA Guidelines aim to provide practical recommendations for treating children with HIV infection in Europe. Changes to guidance since 2004 have been informed by new evidence and by expectations of better outcomes following the ongoing success of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participation......) with either a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a boosted protease inhibitor (PI) remains the first choice combination. Lamivudine and abacavir are the NRTI backbone of choice for most children, based on long-term follow-up in the PENTA 5 trial. Stavudine is no longer recommended...

  8. Prevalence and Correlates of Persistent HIV-1 RNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid During Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, AM; Munoz-Moreno, JA; McClernon, DR; Ellis, RJ; Cookson, D; Clifford, DB; Collier, AC.; Gelman, BB; Marra, CM; McArthur, JC; McCutchan, JA; Morgello, S.; Sacktor, N.; Simpson, DM; Franklin, DR

    2017-01-01

     Neurocognitive disorders remain common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adults, perhaps owing to persistent HIV-1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using a single-copy assay, we measured HIV-1 RNA levels in CSF and plasma specimens from 220 HIV-positive adults who were taking suppressive ART. Fifty-five participants were tested twice. HIV-1 RNA was detected in 42.3% of CSF and 65.2% of plasma samples. Correlates of higher CSF HIV-1 RNA lev...

  9. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cell–cell spread of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanji, Boghuma Kabisen; Pillay, Deenan

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) disseminates between T cells either by cell-free infection or by highly efficient direct cell–cell spread. The high local multiplicity that characterizes cell–cell infection causes variability in the effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs applied as single agents. Whereas protease inhibitors (PIs) are effective inhibitors of HIV-1 cell–cell and cell-free infection, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) show reduced potency; however, antiretrovirals are not administered as single agents and are used clinically as combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Here we explored the efficacy of PI- and RTI-based cART against cell–cell spread of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Using a quantitative assay to measure cell–cell spread of HIV-1 between T cells, we evaluated the efficacy of different clinically relevant drug combinations. We show that combining PIs and RTIs improves the potency of inhibition of HIV-1 and effectively blocks both cell-free and cell–cell spread. Combining drugs that alone are poor inhibitors of cell–cell spread markedly improves HIV-1 inhibition, demonstrating that clinically relevant combinations of ART can inhibit this mode of HIV-1 spread. Furthermore, comparison of wild-type and drug-resistant viruses reveals that PI- and RTI-resistant viruses have a replicative advantage over wild-type virus when spreading by cell–cell means in the presence of cART, suggesting that in the context of inadequate drug combinations or drug resistance, cell–cell spread could potentially allow for ongoing viral replication. PMID:28141491

  10. Combination antiretroviral therapy and cell-cell spread of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanji, Boghuma Kabisen; Pillay, Deenan; Jolly, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) disseminates between T cells either by cell-free infection or by highly efficient direct cell-cell spread. The high local multiplicity that characterizes cell-cell infection causes variability in the effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs applied as single agents. Whereas protease inhibitors (PIs) are effective inhibitors of HIV-1 cell-cell and cell-free infection, some reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) show reduced potency; however, antiretrovirals are not administered as single agents and are used clinically as combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Here we explored the efficacy of PI- and RTI-based cART against cell-cell spread of wild-type and drug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Using a quantitative assay to measure cell-cell spread of HIV-1 between T cells, we evaluated the efficacy of different clinically relevant drug combinations. We show that combining PIs and RTIs improves the potency of inhibition of HIV-1 and effectively blocks both cell-free and cell-cell spread. Combining drugs that alone are poor inhibitors of cell-cell spread markedly improves HIV-1 inhibition, demonstrating that clinically relevant combinations of ART can inhibit this mode of HIV-1 spread. Furthermore, comparison of wild-type and drug-resistant viruses reveals that PI- and RTI-resistant viruses have a replicative advantage over wild-type virus when spreading by cell-cell means in the presence of cART, suggesting that in the context of inadequate drug combinations or drug resistance, cell-cell spread could potentially allow for ongoing viral replication.

  11. Lymphocyte-Dominant Encephalitis and Meningitis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, Lisa M; Beck, Sarah E; Queen, Suzanne E; Brill, Samuel A; Shirk, Erin N; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Muth, Dillon C; Adams, Robert J; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2018-01-01

    A retrospective neuropathologic review of 30 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was conducted. Seventeen animals with lymphocyte-dominant inflammation in the brain and/or meninges that clearly was morphologically distinct from prototypic SIV encephalitis and human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis were identified. Central nervous system (CNS) infiltrates in cART-treated macaques primarily comprised CD20+ B cells and CD3+ T cells with fewer CD68+ macrophages. Inflammation was associated with low levels of SIV RNA in the brain as shown by in situ hybridization, and generally was observed in animals with episodes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) viral rebound or sustained plasma and CSF viremia during treatment. Although the lymphocytic CNS inflammation in these macaques shared morphologic characteristics with uncommon immune-mediated neurologic disorders reported in treated HIV patients, including CNS immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and neurosymptomatic CSF escape, the high prevalence of CNS lesions in macaques suggests that persistent adaptive immune responses in the CNS also may develop in neuroasymptomatic or mildly impaired HIV patients yet remain unrecognized given the lack of access to CNS tissue for histopathologic evaluation. Continued investigation into the mechanisms and outcomes of CNS inflammation in cART-treated, SIV-infected macaques will advance our understanding of the consequences of residual CNS HIV replication in patients on cART, including the possible contribution of adaptive immune responses to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incident pregnancy and time to death or AIDS among HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Westreich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the impact of pregnancy on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined the effect of incident pregnancy after HAART initiation on clinical response to HAART. METHODS: We evaluated a prospective clinical cohort of adult women initiating HAART in Johannesburg, South Africa between 1 April 2004 and 31 March 2011, and followed up until an event, transfer, drop-out, or administrative end of follow-up on 30 September 2011. Women over age 45 and women who were pregnant at HAART initiation were excluded from the study. Main exposure was having experienced pregnancy after HAART initiation; main outcome was death and (separately death or new AIDS event. We calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence limits (CL using marginal structural Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: The study included 7,534 women, and 20,813 person-years of follow-up; 918 women had at least one recognized pregnancy during follow-up. For death alone, the weighted (adjusted HR was 0.84 (95% CL 0.44, 1.60. Sensitivity analyses confirmed main results, and results were similar for analysis of death or new AIDS event. Incident pregnancy was associated with a substantially reduced hazard of drop-out (HR = 0.62, 95% CL 0.51, 0.75. CONCLUSIONS: Recognized incident pregnancy after HAART initiation was not associated with increases in hazard of clinical events, but was associated with a decreased hazard of drop-out. High rates of pregnancy after initiation of HAART may point to a need to better integrate family planning services into clinical care for HIV-infected women.

  13. HIV viremia and incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients successfully treated with antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Chad J; Buchanan, Ashley L; Cole, Stephen R; Hou, Lifang; Mugavero, Michael J; Crane, Heidi M; Moore, Richard D; Haubrich, Richard H; Gopal, Satish; Eron, Joseph J; Hunt, Peter W; Rodriguez, Benigno; Mayer, Kenneth; Saag, Michael S; Kitahata, Mari M

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients remains high despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART). We evaluated NHL incidence in HIV-infected patients followed in the Centers for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems who started combination ART and achieved suppression of HIV. We estimated the hazard ratio for NHL by time-varying HIV viremia categories, accounting for time-varying CD4 cell count using marginal structural models. We observed 37 incident NHL diagnoses during 21 607 person-years of follow-up in 6036 patients (incidence rate, 171 per 100 000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 124-236). NHL incidence was high even among patients with nadir CD4 cell count >200 cells/µL (140 per 100 000 person-years [95% CI, 80-247]). Compared with ≤50 copies/mL, hazard ratios (HRs) for NHL were higher among those with HIV viremia of 51-500 copies/mL (HR current = 1.66 [95% CI, .70-3.94]; HR 3-month lagged = 2.10 [95% CI, .84-5.22]; and HR 6-month lagged = 1.46 [95% CI, .60-3.60]) and >500 copies/mL (HR current = 2.39 [95% CI, .92-6.21]; HR 3-month lagged = 3.56 [95% CI, 1.21-10.49]; and HR 6-month lagged = 2.50 [95% CI, .91-6.84]). Current HIV RNA as a continuous variable was also associated with NHL (HR = 1.42 per log10 copies/mL [95% CI, 1.05-1.92]). Our findings demonstrate a high incidence of NHL among HIV-infected patients on ART and suggest a role of HIV viremia in the pathogenesis of NHL. Earlier initiation of potent ART and maximal continuous suppression of HIV viremia may further reduce NHL risk.

  14. Commonly Prescribed Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens and Incidence of AIDS-Defining Neurological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniglia, Ellen C; Phillips, Andrew; Porter, Kholoud; Sabin, Caroline A; Winston, Alan; Logan, Roger; Gill, John; Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Barger, Diana; Lodi, Sara; Moreno, Santiago; Arribas, José Ramón; Pacheco, Antonio; Cardoso, Sandra W; Chrysos, George; Gogos, Charalabos; Abgrall, Sophie; Costagliola, Dominique; Meyer, Laurence; Seng, Remonie; van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Muga, Roberto; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; Braun, Dominique; Hauser, Christoph; Barrufet, Pilar; Leyes, Maria; Tate, Janet; Justice, Amy; Hernán, Miguel A

    2018-01-01

    The differential effects of commonly prescribed combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens on AIDS-defining neurological conditions (neuroAIDS) remain unknown. Prospective cohort studies of HIV-positive individuals from Europe and the Americas included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration. Individuals who initiated a first-line cART regimen in 2004 or later containing a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone and either atazanavir, lopinavir, darunavir, or efavirenz were followed from cART initiation until death, lost to follow-up, pregnancy, the cohort-specific administrative end of follow-up, or the event of interest, whichever occurred earliest. We evaluated 4 neuroAIDS conditions: HIV dementia and the opportunistic infections toxoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningitis, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. For each outcome, we estimated hazard ratios for atazanavir, lopinavir, and darunavir compared with efavirenz via a pooled logistic model. Our models were adjusted for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Twenty six thousand one hundred seventy-two individuals initiated efavirenz, 5858 initiated atazanavir, 8479 initiated lopinavir, and 4799 initiated darunavir. Compared with efavirenz, the adjusted HIV dementia hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.72 (1.00 to 2.96) for atazanavir, 2.21 (1.38 to 3.54) for lopinavir, and 1.41 (0.61 to 3.24) for darunavir. The respective hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the combined end point were 1.18 (0.74 to 1.88) for atazanavir, 1.61 (1.14 to 2.27) for lopinavir, and 1.36 (0.74 to 2.48) for darunavir. The results varied in subsets defined by calendar year, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor backbone, and age. Our results are consistent with an increased risk of neuroAIDS after initiating lopinavir compared with efavirenz, but temporal changes in prescribing trends and confounding by indication could explain our findings.

  15. Prevalence of depressive symptoms amongst highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART patients in AIDSRelief Uganda

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    Constance Shumba

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is limited data on the prevalence of depression in HIV and AIDS patients in Sub- Saharan Africa and little resources have been allocated to address this issue. Depression affects patient adherence to treatment and predisposes patients to resistance which poses a public health threat. It also affects quality of life and productivity of patients. From August 2008 to March 2009, 731 patient adherence surveys were administered to assess disease, treatment knowledge and services received. The primary variable of interest was patients’ level of depressive symptoms score, constructed using factor analysis from five survey questions relating to: sadness, need to be alone, hopelessness and confusion and was categorized as no depressive symptoms (score 0, low depressive symptoms (score 1-2, moderate depressive symptoms (score 3-4 and high depressive symptoms (score 5-10. Majority of the patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART (59% were found to have depressive symptoms and this was more among women than men (66% vs 43%. There was some association of depressive symptoms with non-disclosure (70% of those who had not disclosed had depressive symptoms compared to 53% among those who had disclosed. There is a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among adult patients on HAART. There is need for in-depth evaluation to find out the root causes of depressive symptoms among HAART patients in AIDSRelief clinics. There is need to integrate mental health management in HIV care and treatment as well as training the existing health workers on mental health management.

  16. The factors that influence adherence of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS to anti-retroviral therapy

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    Valéria Lima de Barros

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To learn the experiences of pregnant women with HIV/AIDS in relation to adherence to antiretroviral therapy in two public hospitals of reference for HIV/AIDS in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study conducted with 24 pregnant women who were in prenatal care and use of antiretroviral therapy. Sociodemographic and obstetric data and information regarding the experience with antiretroviral therapy adherence were collected from July to September 2009, through a semi-structured interview. Results: Womenhad a mean age of 29, low income, low education and a stable partner. It was found that some factors affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Among these, stand out not accepting the diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS. However,the fear of transmitting the virus to the baby acted as a stimulus for pregnant women adhere to treatment. Conclusion: The non-acceptance of diagnosis and the absence of signs and symptoms of AIDS negatively affect pregnant women adherence to antiretroviral treatment. On the other hand, the fear that the child be born with the virus and the desire to continue to live are stimuli to adherence.

  17. Pharmacogenetics of the lipodystrophy syndrome associated with HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Francesc; Domingo, Pere; Viladés, Consuelo; Peraire, Joaquim; Arnedo, Mireia; Alcamí, José; Leal, Manuel; Villarroya, Francesc; Gatell, Josep Ma

    2011-11-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have been associated with several toxicities that limit their success. Of the chronic toxicities, the lipodystrophy syndrome is of special concern due to the metabolic alterations that can accompany it. Why some patients treated with a particular antiretroviral regimen develop lipodystrophy, while others do not, is a medical mystery, but it has been suggested that individuals may (or may not) have a genetically conditioned predisposition. Pharmacogenetics is the science that studies how the genetic composition of individuals can give rise to interindividual variations in response to drugs and drug toxicity. This article reviews the published investigations on the association between host genetic determinants in treated HIV-infected patients and the presence of lipodystrophy. Studies were identified through a PubMed database search. Case-control and longitudinal studies into pharmacogenetic association were selected. Areas covered include the data on the genetic variants of mitochondrial parameters, cytokines, adipokines, proteins involved in adipocyte biology and proteins involved in stavudine metabolism. Most studies provide inconsistent data due to partial genetic evaluation, different assessment of lipodystrophy and low number of patients evaluated. The pharmacogenetics of lipodystrophy in HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral drugs still belongs in the research laboratory.

  18. Safety and efficacy of a raltegravir-based dual antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice

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    G Cenderello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HAART has revolutionized HIV disease management and increased life expectancy for most HIV-infected individuals on treatment. A nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase (NRTI inhibitor backbone is a recommended component of standard first-line HAART. Nevertheless, NRTI-sparing alternatives are warranted in order to reduce long-term toxicities in many patients (pts. Aim of the study was to evaluate safety of raltegravir-based dual antiretroviral therapy (DUAL in a clinical practice setting. Methods: All pts on DUAL regimen followed at our outpatient HIV service on May 31st 2012 were recruited. Their clinical files were retrospectively studied. Collected data included: demographics, CDC staging, reason to DUAL switching, cholesterol (total and HDL, creatinine, CK, CD4+ count and HIV RNA were recorded at switch and every six months after for the first year. Change in CD4 count after the switch was evaluated by Student t-test. Results: The cohort included 55 pts (27 M; mean age was 54 years (38–72. HIV infection was acquired through: injective drug abuse (25, unprotected homosexual (24 and heterosexual (16 intercourse. CDC staging was: A=16, B=26, C=13. Mean previous treatment regimens were 4. At time of study pts had been on DUAL regimen for 23 months. They had been switched to DUAL therapy for: drug resistance (14; 25.5% (DRR or drug toxicity (41; 74.5%. The most frequently associated drug was darunavir/rtv (19; 34.5%, followed by atazanavir (13; 23.6%; 5 were unboosted; lopinavir/rtv (12; 21.8%, and NVP (11; 20%. DRR pts presented at baseline a mean viral load of 40,153 copies of HIV-RNA/ml; after at 12 months all but 3 showed undetectable (<40 copies viral load and a mean CD4 gain of 142 cells/ml. Pts switched to DUAL for toxicity presented persistent undetectable viral load and a mean CD4+gain of 94 cells/ml. The observed CD4+ increase in both groups (DRR and toxicity presented a statistical significance (p<0.01. Total and HDL

  19. Supporting adherence to antiretroviral therapy with mobile phone reminders: results from a cohort in South India.

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    Rashmi Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence is central to the success of antiretroviral therapy. Supporting adherence has gained importance in HIV care in many national treatment programs. The ubiquity of mobile phones, even in resource-constrained settings, has provided an opportunity to utilize an inexpensive, contextually feasible technology for adherence support in HIV in these settings. We aimed to assess the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in South India. Participant experiences with the intervention were also studied. This is the first report of such an intervention for antiretroviral adherence from India, a country with over 800 million mobile connections. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Quasi-experimental cohort study involving 150 HIV-infected individuals from Bangalore, India, who were on antiretroviral therapy between April and July 2010. The intervention: All participants received two types of adherence reminders on their mobile phones, (i an automated interactive voice response (IVR call and (ii A non-interactive neutral picture short messaging service (SMS, once a week for 6 months. Adherence measured by pill count, was assessed at study recruitment and at months one, three, six, nine and twelve. Participant experiences were assessed at the end of the intervention period. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 38 years, 27% were female and 90% urban. Overall, 3,895 IVRs and 3,073 SMSs were sent to the participants over 6 months. Complete case analysis revealed that the proportion of participants with optimal adherence increased from 85% to 91% patients during the intervention period, an effect that was maintained 6 months after the intervention was discontinued (p = 0.016. Both, IVR calls and SMS reminders were considered non-intrusive and not a threat to privacy. A significantly higher proportion agreed that the IVR was helpful compared to the SMS (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Mobile phone reminders may improve

  20. Improving antiretroviral therapy scale-up and effectiveness through service integration and decentralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Rutherford, George W; Horvath, Tara; Doherty, Meg C; Negussie, Eyerusalem K

    2014-03-01

    Current service delivery systems do not reach all people in need of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In order to inform the operational and service delivery section of the WHO 2013 consolidated antiretroviral guidelines, our objective was to summarize systematic reviews on integrating ART delivery into maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) care settings in countries with generalized epidemics, tuberculosis (TB) treatment settings in which the burden of HIV and TB is high, and settings providing opiate substitution therapy (OST); and decentralizing ART into primary health facilities and communities. A summary of systematic reviews. The reviewers searched PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CENTRAL, and the WHO Index Medicus databases. Randomized controlled trials and observational cohort studies were included if they compared ART coverage, retention in HIV care, and/or mortality in MNCH, TB, or OST facilities providing ART with MNCH, TB, or OST facilities providing ART services separately; or primary health facilities or communities providing ART with hospitals providing ART. The reviewers identified 28 studies on integration and decentralization. Antiretroviral therapy integration into MNCH facilities improved ART coverage (relative risk [RR] 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.79) and led to comparable retention in care. ART integration into TB treatment settings improved ART coverage (RR 1.83, 95% CI 1.48-2.23) and led to a nonsignificant reduction in mortality (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.29-1.05). The limited data on ART integration into OST services indicated comparable rates of ART coverage, retention, and mortality. Partial decentralization into primary health facilities improved retention (RR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01-1.09) and reduced mortality (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.87). Full decentralization improved retention (RR 1.12, 95% CI 1.08-1.17) and led to comparable mortality. Community-based ART led to comparable rates of retention and mortality. Integrating ART

  1. Persistent humoral immune defect in highly active antiretroviral therapy-treated children with HIV-1 infection: loss of specific antibodies against attenuated vaccine strains and natural viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Vincent; Scherpbier, Henriëtte; Pajkrt, Dasja; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Zaaijer, Hans; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the pre-highly active antiretroviral therapy era, a loss of specific antibodies was seen. Our objective with this study was to describe the loss of specific antibodies during treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: In a prospective, single-center, cohort study of

  2. Long-term use of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohui Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy currently used in China is not associated with carotid artery stiffness in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with good highly active antiretroviral therapy compliance. Human immunodeficiency virus may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis.

  3. Incidence and risk factors of HIV-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy: a European multicohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlius, Julia; Schmidlin, Kurt; Costagliola, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Incidence and risk factors of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are not well defined in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART).......Incidence and risk factors of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are not well defined in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)....

  4. Abnormalities in body composition and nutritional status in HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, L C de Barros; Gonçalves, E M; de Carvalho, W R G; Guerra-Junior, G; Centeville, M; Aoki, F H; Morcillo, A M; dos Santos Vilela, M M; da Silva, M T N

    2011-08-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to compare growth, nutritional status and body composition outcomes between a group of 94 HIV-infected children and adolescents on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 364 healthy controls, and to evaluate their association with clinical and lifestyle variables within the HIV-infected group. When compared with the control group, HIV patients had higher risk of stunting (odds ratio [OR] 5.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.83-10.04) and thinness (OR 4.7, 95% CI: 2.44-9.06), higher waist-to-hip ratios (medians 0.89 versus 0.82 for boys and 0.90 versus 0.77 for girls, P HIV-infected children on ART showed significant nutritional status and body composition abnormalities, consistent with the severity of vertical HIV infection and the consequences of prolonged ART.

  5. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for women and children in the WHO European Region 2002-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stengaard, Annemarie Rinder; Lazarus, Jeff; Donoghoe, Martin C

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To assess the level of access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for women and children in the WHO European Region. Methods. Analysis of data from three national surveys of 53 WHO European Member States. The comparative level of access to HAART for women and children...... was assessed by comparing the percentage of reported HIV cases with the percentage of HAART recipients in women at the end of 2002 and 2006 and in children at the end of 2004 and 2006. Findings. Overall, the data suggest that there is equivalence of access to antiretroviral therapy by gender and age in Europe...

  6. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is a marker of dysmetabolism in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Kofoed, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects the immune and pro-inflammatory status of the HIV-infected patient. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses suPAR. Independent of the immune response to HAART, suPAR remains elevated in some HIV-infected......Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) reflects the immune and pro-inflammatory status of the HIV-infected patient. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses suPAR. Independent of the immune response to HAART, suPAR remains elevated in some HIV......-HDL-cholesterol and inversely with Rd, NOGM and limb fat (P

  7. Adesão à terapia antiretroviral para HIV/AIDS Adhesión a la terapia anti-retroviral para el vih/sida Adherence to the antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosa Ceccato Colombrini

    2006-12-01

    que contribuyen a la construcción y ejercicio de la ciudadanía.The non-adherence to the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is considered one of the most threatening risks for the effectiveness of the treatment of the person with HIV/AIDS on the individual plan and for the resistance-virus dissemination on the collective plan. The objective of this study was to analyze, through a literature review, the predicting factors of non-adherence to the HAART, as well as to assemble and relate them to the person in treatment, the disease, the treatment and the health and social support service. The literature points to the need for studies that evaluate social-cultural aspects, beliefs, quality of the service and the relationship of the patient with the multi-professional team, as well as others related to race and to the side effects of the antiretroviral agents. These studies aim at favoring the creation of strategies that im-prove the adherence of patients to the HAART, contributing at the same time for the development and the exercise of citizenship.

  8. Astrocyte Senescence and Metabolic Changes in Response to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Drugs

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    Justin Cohen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART survival rates among patients infected by HIV have increased. However, even though survival has increased HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND still persist, suggesting that HAART-drugs may play a role in the neurocognitive impairment observed in HIV-infected patients. Given previous data demonstrating that astrocyte senescence plays a role in neurocognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, we examined the role of HAART on markers of senescence in primary cultures of human astrocytes (HAs. Our results indicate HAART treatment induces cell cycle arrest, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, and the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment is also associated with the induction of reactive oxygen species and upregulation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. These changes in mitochondria correlate with increased glycolysis in HAART drug treated astrocytes. Taken together these results indicate that HAART drugs induce the senescence program in HAs, which is associated with oxidative and metabolic changes that could play a role in the development of HAND.

  9. Technological methods to measure adherence to antiretroviral therapy and preexposure prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Lindsey E; Haberer, Jessica E

    2017-09-01

    The WHO's Consolidated Guidelines (2016) call for research on improved methods to proactively monitor adherence and identify those individuals who have the greatest needs for adherence support. This review aims to elucidate the latest technologies available to measure adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy and preexposure prophylaxis against HIV infection and present their utility in various settings and populations. Within the last few years, advances have been made in the features of existing technology to measure adherence (real-time electronic adherence measurements), additional approaches have been developed (digital medicine systems) and improved (short message service surveys), and point of care testing for pharmacokinetic measures are under development. Technology advances in adherence measurement are promising for improved accuracy and, in some cases, the ability to intervene with adherence challenges in real time. This progress will greatly further our understanding of adherence behavior, as well as the ability to effectively link interventions with individuals who need them, thus maximizing the clinical and public health benefits of both antiretroviral therapy and preexposure prophylaxis.

  10. Hepatic adverse events during highly active antiretroviral therapy containing nevirapine: a case report

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    Yamazhan Tansu

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatotoxicity is one of the most serious complications of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The aim of this report is to analyse an HIV infected patient on HAART including nevirapine and taking antidepressive agents, with acute toxic hepatitis. Case presentation A 39 year old patient diagnosed as HIV positive one month ago administered to the clinical ward of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology in Ege University Medical School with high fever, malaise, nausea, diarrheae and elevated liver enzymes (ALT 1558 U/L, AST 4288 U/L. He has been using HAART including zidovudine+lamivudine (2 × 1/day and nevirapine (2 × 200 mg/day, following dose escalation for 22 days, sertralin and diazepam for 12 days and lithium for 10 days. The patient was hospitalized. Antiretroviral and antidepressant treatments were stopped. The day after admission, his fever dropped and his symptoms improved. Clinical improvement continued on the following days. The patient was discharged upon his request on the 14th day of hospitalization. The liver function tests returned to normal levels in two weeks following discharge. Conclusion Close monitoring of liver enzymes during the first 12 weeks of nevirapine therapy is critical to prevent life threatening events.

  11. Predictors of Mortality among Adult Antiretroviral Therapy Users in Southeastern Ethiopia: Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Setegn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although efforts have been made to reduce AIDS-related mortality by providing antiretroviral therapy (ART services, still people are dying while they are on treatment due to several factors. This study aimed to investigate the predictors of mortality among adult antiretroviral therapy (ART users in Goba Hospital, Southeast Ethiopia. Methods. The medical records of 2036 ART users who enrolled at Goba Hospital between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed and sociodemographic, clinical, and ART-related data were collected. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure risk of death and identify the independent predictors of mortality. Results. The overall mortality incidence rate was 20.3 deaths per 1000 person-years. Male, bedridden, overweight/obese, and HIV clients infected with TB and other infectious diseases had higher odds of death compared with their respective counterparts. On the other hand, ART clients with primary and secondary educational level and early and less advanced WHO clinical stage had lower odds of death compared to their counterparts. Conclusion. The overall mortality incidence rate was high and majority of the death had occurred in the first year of ART initiation. Intensifying and strengthening early ART initiation, improving nutritional status, prevention and control of TB, and other opportunistic infections are recommended interventions.

  12. Alveolar bone in human immunodeficiency virus infection: is it changed by long-term antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittayananta, Wipawee; Kanjanaprapas, Aree; Arirachakaran, Pratanporn; Pangsomboon, Kanokporn; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reported that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) can lead to osteoporosis in HIV-infected individuals. However, their effects on alveolar bone are not well established. The objective of this study was to measure the alveolar bone mineral density (BMD) of HIV-infected patients, with and without antiretroviral therapy (ART), in comparison with that of HIV-free individuals, and to determine factors associated with the BMD of alveolar bone. A cross-sectional study was performed in non-HIV-infected individuals and HIV-infected individuals, with and without ART. Medical status and clinical data were recorded. Periapical radiographs of maxillary and mandibular right premolars were analysed for changes of alveolar BMD based on HIV/ART status. Other factors associated with the changes of alveolar BMD were explored using a parametric multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). One-hundred and one HIV-infected individuals receiving ART (age range: 23-57 years; median age 39 years), 58 receiving no ART (age range: 20-59 years; median age 34 years) and 50 HIV-negative individuals (age range: 19-59 years; median age 36 years) were enrolled. Neither HIV status nor use of ART was significantly associated with the changes of alveolar BMD. Although osteoporosis has been reported in HIV-infected individuals treated with ART, alveolar BMD does not appear to be changed as a result of the infection, or use of ART. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  13. Comparing Absolute Lymphocyte Count to Total Lymphocyte Count, as a CD4 T Cell Surrogate, to Initiate Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Srirangaraj; Dasegowda, Venkatesha

    2011-01-01

    Background: The high cost of CD4 count estimation in resource-limited settings is a major obstacle in initiating patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Thus, there is a need to evaluate other less expensive surrogate markers like total lymphocyte count (TLC) and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Objectives To evaluate the correlation of TLC and ALC to CD4 count. To determine a range of TLC and ALC cut-offs for initiating HAART in HIV-infected patients in resource-limited settings. Materials and Methods: In a prospective observational cohort study of 108 ART-naive HIV-positive patients, Spearman correlation between ALC and CD4 cell count, and TLC and CD4 cell count were assessed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of various ALC and TLC cut-offs were computed for CD4 count <200 cells/cu.mm. Results: Good correlation was noted between ALC and CD4 (r=0.5604) and TLC and CD4 (r=0.3497). ALC of 1400 cells/cu.mm had a sensitivity of 71.08% and specificity of 78.26% for predicting CD4 cell counts less than 200 cells/cu.mm. Similarly, TLC of 1200 cells/cu.mm had a sensitivity of 63.41% and specificity of 69.57%. Conclusion: Either ALC or TLC may be helpful in deciding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor settings, though ALC is better than TLC as a surrogate for CD4 counts. PMID:21887059

  14. Antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Nguyen Thi Thu; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Mogensen, Hanne Overgaard

    2011-01-01

    -sectional study using structured questionnaires and CD4 cell count was conducted with 353 HIV-positive women recruited from groups of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), by snowball technique through member of PLWHA groups and the local AIDS management system (Provincial AIDS Center (PAC)). The percentage of HIV......-positive women having an unmet ARV need was estimated to be 40%, particularly high among women who were not registered at PAC. Having an unmet ARV need was associated with not participating in PLWHA groups (OR 6.5; 2.4-17.2) and being younger than 30 years old (OR 2.9; 1.1-7.3)....

  15. Immunological profile in persons under antiretroviral therapy in a rural Nigerian hospital

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    Baba Maiyaki Musa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, with Nigeria having the third highest burden of HIV infection globally; efforts are made to increases access to HIV/AIDS care and treatment. This has currently reached rural areas with limited manpower and laboratory evaluation capacity. This review is necessitated by the paucity of interim report on treatment profile in Nigerian rural areas. We report on the immunological profile of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Otukpo General Hospital, a rural Nigerian hospital. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients receiving ART treatment and care, on April 2009, when 2347 patients were under ART therapy. Out of these, 96 patients were selected by simple random sampling from hospital register, with their data abstracted from standardized Ministry of Health registers and facility documents kept at the hospital, and analyzed for descriptive and biometric measures. Ninty-six patients (29% males with a median age of 35 years, median baseline CD4 lymphocyte count 221 cells/mL, median one year CD4 lymphocyte count of 356 cells/mL and median one year CD4 lymphocyte increment of 124 cells/mL were studied. There is no statistically significant difference in baseline CD4 lymphocyte count when data is disaggregated by type of drug regimen (AZT, D4T and TDF. Fourty-four percent, 23% and 33% of patients were on TDF, D4T & AZT based regimen, respectively (P=0.66. Increment of >100 cells/mL was seen in 64.58% of the reviewed patients. There was a higher CD4 lymphocyte count increment in patients on TDF & D4T compared with those in AZT based regimens (ANOVA; P<0.0003. Multivariate linear regression model showed one year CD4 lymphocyte count, one year increment in CD4 lymphocyte count, WBC count, and absolute neutrophil count to be significant correlates of baseline CD4 lymphocyte count (P<0.0001. Equally, multivariate logistic regression found

  16. Occupational therapy evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  17. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttkammer, Nancy H.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Baseman, Janet G.; Destiné, Rodney; Domerçant, Jean Wysler; Coq, Nancy Rachel Labbé; Raphael, Nernst Atwood; Sherr, Kenneth; Tegger, Mary; Yuhas, Krista; Barnhart, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005–2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. Methods This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR) system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. Results Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.8–18.3). In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54–2.33; P Haiti. PMID:25563149

  18. Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

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    Scanlon ML

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael L Scanlon,1,2 Rachel C Vreeman1,21Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2USAID, Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH Partnership, Eldoret, KenyaAbstract: The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world’s HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a

  19. Antiretroviral therapy optimisation without genotype resistance testing: a perspective on treatment history based models.

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    Mattia C F Prosperi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although genotypic resistance testing (GRT is recommended to guide combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, funding and/or facilities to perform GRT may not be available in low to middle income countries. Since treatment history (TH impacts response to subsequent therapy, we investigated a set of statistical learning models to optimise cART in the absence of GRT information. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The EuResist database was used to extract 8-week and 24-week treatment change episodes (TCE with GRT and additional clinical, demographic and TH information. Random Forest (RF classification was used to predict 8- and 24-week success, defined as undetectable HIV-1 RNA, comparing nested models including (i GRT+TH and (ii TH without GRT, using multiple cross-validation and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. Virological success was achieved in 68.2% and 68.0% of TCE at 8- and 24-weeks (n = 2,831 and 2,579, respectively. RF (i and (ii showed comparable performances, with an average (st.dev. AUC 0.77 (0.031 vs. 0.757 (0.035 at 8-weeks, 0.834 (0.027 vs. 0.821 (0.025 at 24-weeks. Sensitivity analyses, carried out on a data subset that included antiretroviral regimens commonly used in low to middle income countries, confirmed our findings. Training on subtype B and validation on non-B isolates resulted in a decline of performance for models (i and (ii. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment history-based RF prediction models are comparable to GRT-based for classification of virological outcome. These results may be relevant for therapy optimisation in areas where availability of GRT is limited. Further investigations are required in order to account for different demographics, subtypes and different therapy switching strategies.

  20. CD4:CD8 Ratio and CD8 Count as Prognostic Markers for Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T.; Schommers, Philipp; Tate, Jan; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Guest, Jodie L.; Gill, M. John; Zangerle, Robert; Saag, Mike; Reiss, Peter; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Johnson, Margaret; Lima, Viviane D.; Sterling, Tim R.; Cavassini, Matthias; Wittkop, Linda; Costagliola, Dominique; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Boulle, Andrew; Stephan, Christoph; Miro, Jose M.; Chêne, Geneviève; Dabis, François; Monforte, Antonella D.'Arminio; del Amo, Julia; van Sighem, Ard; Vehreschild, Jorg Janne; Gill, John; Guest, Jodie; Haerry, David Hans-Ulrich; Hogg, Robert; Justice, Amy; Shepherd, Leah; Obel, Niels; Crane, Heidi M.; Smith, Colette; Saag, Michael; Sterling, Tim; Teira, Ramon; Williams, Matthew; Sterne, Jonathan; May, Margaret; Ingle, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether CD4:CD8 ratio and CD8 count were prognostic for all-cause, AIDS, and non-AIDS mortality in virologically suppressed patients with high CD4 count. We used data from 13 European and North American cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy

  1. Outcomes of acutely HIV-1-infected individuals following rapid antiretroviral therapy initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girometti, Nicolò; Nwokolo, Nneka; McOwan, Alan; Whitlock, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Few data exist on the benefits and acceptability of rapid initiation of antiretroviral treatment in acute HIV infection (AHI). We analysed a large cohort of acutely infected HIV patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) to determine uptake, linkage into care and time to achieve viral suppression. Case notes of all individuals diagnosed with AHI between May 2014 and October 2015 at 56 Dean Street, a sexual health clinic in London, UK were reviewed. AHI was defined through documentation of plasma HIV RNA positivity only, plasma HIV RNA and p24 antigen positivity with a negative HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test or HIV EIA test switching from negative to positive within 6 weeks. Between-group comparisons of time to viral suppression according to ART chosen were performed using the log-rank test. We identified 113 individuals with AHI. Linkage to care was 95%. 77% of patients started ART at first medical appointment: all men who have sex with men, median age 35 years, median viral load (VL) log10 6.45, median CD4+ T-cell count 483 cells/mm3. Median time from diagnosis to ART initiation was 20 days. At 24 weeks, no patients had discontinued ART; 99% of patients achieved viral suppression by 24 weeks, with a median time to documented VL suppression of 74 days. Viral suppression was more rapid with integrase inhibitors compared with other regimens (median 41 versus 88.5 days, PHIV infection, individuals demonstrated high ART uptake and rapid VL suppression suggesting that early treatment with antiretrovirals is acceptable and efficacious.

  2. Social, Cultural, and Environmental Challenges Faced by Children on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe: a Mixed Method Study

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    Margaret Macherera, MSc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART, many children, particularly in the rural communities of Zimbabwe, remain vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors and challenges facing children on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Brunapeg area of Mangwe District, Zimbabwe.Methods:A mixed-method approach involving interviewer-guided focus group discussions and piloted semi-structured questionnaires was utilized to collect data from different key population groups. The data obtained were analyzed through content coding procedures based on a set of predetermined themes of interest.Results:A number of challenges emerged as barriers to the success of antiretroviral therapy for children. Primary care givers were less informed about HIV and AIDS issues for people having direct impact on the success of antiretroviral therapy in children whilst some were found to be taking the antiretroviral drugs meant for the children. It also emerged that some primary care givers were either too young or too old to care for the children while others had failed to disclose to the children why they frequently visited the Opportunistic Infections (OI clinic. Most primary care givers were not the biological parents of the affected children. Other challenges included inadequate access to health services, inadequate food and nutrition and lack of access to clean water, good hygiene and sanitation. The lack of community support and stigma and discrimination affected their school attendance and hospital visits. All these factors contributed to non-adherence to antiretroviral drugs.Conclusions and Public Health Implications:Children on ART in rural communities in Zimbabwe remain severely compromised and have unique problems that need multi-intervention strategies both at policy and programmatic levels. Effective mitigating measures must be fully established and implemented in rural communities of developing countries in the fight for

  3. Predicting the Need for Third-Line Antiretroviral Therapy by Identifying Patients at High Risk for Failing Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa.

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    Onoya, Dorina; Nattey, Cornelius; Budgell, Eric; van den Berg, Liudmyla; Maskew, Mhairi; Evans, Denise; Hirasen, Kamban; Long, Lawrence C; Fox, Matthew P

    2017-05-01

    Although third-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is available in South Africa's public sector, its cost is substantially higher than first and second line. Identifying risk factors for failure on second-line treatment remains crucial to reduce the need for third-line drugs. We conducted a case-control study including 194 adult patients (≥18 years; 70 cases and 124 controls) who initiated second-line ART in Johannesburg, South Africa. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess predictors of virologic failure (defined as 2 consecutive viral load measures ≥1000 copies/mL, ≥3 months after switching to second line). Variables included a social instability index, ART adherence, self-reported as well as diagnosed adverse drug reactions (ADRs), HIV disclosure, depression, and factors affecting access to HIV clinics. Overall 60.0% of cases and 54.0% of controls were female. Mean ages of cases and controls were 41.8 ± 9.6 and 43.3 ± 8.0, respectively. Virologic failure was predicted by ART adherence third-line regimens.

  4. Virtual intervention to support self-management of antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, José; Godin, Gaston; Ramirez-Garcia, Pilar; Rouleau, Geneviève; Bourbonnais, Anne; Guéhéneuc, Yann-Gaël; Tremblay, Cécile; Otis, Joanne

    2015-01-06

    Living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) necessitates long-term health care follow-up, particularly with respect to antiretroviral therapy (ART) management. Taking advantage of the enormous possibilities afforded by information and communication technologies (ICT), we developed a virtual nursing intervention (VIH-TAVIE) intended to empower HIV patients to manage their ART and their symptoms optimally. ICT interventions hold great promise across the entire continuum of HIV patient care but further research is needed to properly evaluate their effectiveness. The objective of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two types of follow-up--traditional and virtual--in terms of promoting ART adherence among HIV patients. A quasi-experimental study was conducted. Participants were 179 HIV patients on ART for at least 6 months, of which 99 were recruited at a site offering virtual follow-up and 80 at another site offering only traditional follow-up. The primary outcome was medication adherence and the secondary outcomes were the following cognitive and affective variables: self-efficacy, attitude toward medication intake, symptom-related discomfort, stress, and social support. These were evaluated by self-administered questionnaire at baseline (T0), and 3 (T3) and 6 months (T6) later. On average, participants had been living with HIV for 14 years and had been on ART for 11 years. The groups were highly heterogeneous, differing on a number of sociodemographic dimensions: education, income, marital status, employment status, and living arrangements. Adherence at baseline was high, reaching 80% (59/74) in the traditional follow-up group and 84% (81/97) in the virtual follow-up group. A generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis was run, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics at baseline. A time effect was detected indicating that both groups improved in adherence over time but did not differ in this regard. Improvement at 6 months was significantly

  5. Adverse drug reactions to antiretroviral therapy: Results from spontaneous reporting system in Nigeria

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    Kenneth A Agu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study evaluated the suspected adverse drug reactions (ADR reported from a spontaneous reporting program in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in Nigeria Materials and Methods: This descriptive study analyzed individual case safety reports (ICSRs in HIV-positive patients receiving ART between January 2011 and December 2011 in 38 secondary hospitals. All ICSRs during this period were included. Chi-square was used to test the association between variables at 95% confidence interval. Results: From 1237 ICSRs collated, only 1119 (90.5% were valid for analysis. Mean age of patients was 35.3 (95%CI, 35.1-35.5 years; and 67.1% were females. A total of 1679 ADR cases were reported, a mean (± Standard Deviation, SD of 1.5 (± 0.8 ADR cases per patient. Of reported ADRs, 63.2%, 8.2% and 19.3% occurred in patients on Zidovudine-based, Stavudine-based and Tenofovir-based regimens, respectively. The commonest ADRs included (12.0% peripheral neuropathy, (11.4% skin rash, (10.1% pruritus and (6.5% dizziness. ADR occurrence was associated with ART regimens, concomitant medicines and age (P < 0.05 unlike gender. Anaemia was associated with Zidovudine (AZT/ Lamivudine (3TC /Nevirapine (NEV regimen [Odds ratio, OR = 6.4 (3.0-13.8; P < 0.0001], and peripheral neuropathy with Stavudine (d4T/3TC/NEV regimen [OR = 8.7 (5.8-30.0, P < 0.0001] and Tenofovir (TDF/Emtricitabine (FTC/Efavirenz (EFV regimen [OR = 2.1 (1.0-4.1, P = 0.0446]. Skin rash and peripheral neuropathy were associated with patients aged < 15years [OR = 3.0 (1.3-6.6, P = 0.0056] and 45-59years [OR = 1.9 (1.3-2.7, P = 0.0006] respectively. Palpitation and polyuria were associated with Salbutamol [OR = 55.7 (4.9-349.6, P = 0.0000] and Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS [OR = 50.2 (0.9-562.1, P = 0.0040] respectively. Conclusion: ADRs were less likely to occur in patients on stavudine-based and tenofovir-based regimens compared to

  6. Adherence and retention on antiretroviral therapy in a public-private partnership program in Nigeria

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    K Torpey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART in Nigeria was restricted to secondary and tertiary level hospitals due to weak health systems in primary health centres (PHCs. Shell Petroleum Development Company (SDPC Nigeria and FHI 360 using a systems strengthening approach, piloted ART enrolment in a PHC in south-eastern Nigeria. This study sought to evaluate patients’ adherence and mortality on ART, and associated risk factors. We reviewed clinic records of adult patients initiating ART between January 2007 and December 2009. Adherence was calculated as the number of days of medication dispensed as a percentage of total number of days evaluated. Outcome measures were probability of being alive and retained in care at 12 and 24 months on ART. Competing risks regression models were used to assess potential predictors associated with mortality. Total of 196 patients (64.8% males were initiated on ART. Patients’ median age was 35 years (IQR 30–44; median CD4 at initiation was 132 cells/mm3 (IQR 82–212, Patients in WHO stage III and IV constituted 73 (37.6% and 83 (42.8% respectively. Majority (108 [55.1%] of patients had adherence rates >95%. Adherence levels ranged: 70–85%, 50–65% and <50% in 29 (14.8%, 30 (15.3% and 29 (14.8% of patients respectively. Nucleoside backbone use were AZT/3TC (69.4% d4T/3TC (28.6% and TDF/FTC (2%. At 12 months of follow up, 80.6% (158 were alive and on ART, mortality accounted for 12.8% (25, 11 (5.6% were LTFU and 2 (1.1% transferred out. At 24 months on ART survival decreased to 64.3% (126, 20.4% (40 died, 9.2% (18 were LTFU and 12 (6.1% transferred out. Competing risks regression models revealed that patients’ factors significantly associated with mortality include: bedridden patients (HR=3.6 [95% CI: 1.11–11.45], p=0.03, referent: working, <50% adherence levels (HR=27.7 [95% CI: 8.55–89.47], p<0.0001, referent: >95% adherence level. In conclusion, majority of attrition was

  7. Factors influencing medication adherence beliefs and self-efficacy in persons naive to antiretroviral therapy: a multicenter, cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nancy R; Testa, Marcia A; Marc, Linda G; Chesney, Margaret A; Neidig, Judith L; Smith, Scott R; Vella, Stefano; Robbins, Gregory K

    2004-06-01

    It is widely recognized that adherence to antiretroviral therapy is critical to long-term treatment success, yet rates of adherence to antiretroviral medications are frequently subtherapeutic. Beliefs about antiretroviral therapy and psychosocial characteristics of HIV-positive persons naive to therapy may influence early experience with antiretroviral medication adherence and therefore could be important when designing programs to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy. As part of a multicenter AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG 384) study, 980 antiretroviral-naive subjects (82% male, 47% White, median age 36 years, and median CD4 cell count 278 cells/mm3) completed a self-administered questionnaire prior to random treatment assignment of initial antiretroviral medications. Measures of symptom distress, general health and well-being, and personal and situational factors including demographic characteristics, social support, self-efficacy, depression, stress, and current adherence to (nonantiretroviral) medications were recorded. Associations among variables were explored using correlation and regression analyses. Beliefs about the importance of antiretroviral adherence and ability to take antiretroviral medications as directed (adherence self-efficacy) were generally positive. Fifty-six percent of the participants were "extremely sure" of their ability to take all medications as directed and 48% were "extremely sure" that antiretroviral nonadherence would cause resistance, but only 37% were as sure that antiretroviral therapy would benefit their health. Less-positive beliefs about antiretroviral therapy adherence were associated with greater stress, depression, and symptom distress. More-positive beliefs about antiretroviral therapy adherence were associated with better scores on health perception, functional health, social-emotional-cognitive function, social support, role function, younger age, and higher education (r values = 0.09-0.24, all p < .001). Among

  8. Sleep Quality and Its Correlates in HIV Positive Patients Who Are Candidates for Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy.

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    Fatemeh Dabaghzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, it has been reported that most human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients suffer from various degrees of sleep problems. Sleep disorders can affect quality of life, physical and social functioning and can also cause chronic fatigue. Some psychological and physiological factors are related to sleep quality. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality and its related psychological and physiological factors in Iranian human immunodeficiency virus positive patients who were candidates for initiation of antiretroviral therapy.This was a cross- sectional study of 59 HIV positive out-patients in stages 2 or 3 of HIV disease who were candidates for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS and Somatization Subscale of Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90 were used to assess the patients' sleep quality, depression, anxiety and physiological factors, respectively. SPSS software version 12 was used for data analysis. The Pearson correlation coefficient was utilized to analyze the correlation between PSQI and other quantitative variables.Based on the sleep quality assessment, 47.5 % of the patients had PSQI > 5 that was defined as sleep disturbances. A significant correlation was found between sleep quality and HDRS (r = 0.531, p = 0.0001, HARS (r = 0.627, p = 0.0001 and somatization subscale of SCL-90 (r = 0.36, p = 0.05.This study showed that human immunodeficiency virus positive individuals suffer from sleep disorders at least as same as the general population, and that psychological variables including depression and anxiety and physiological variables including physical morbidities in different systems of the body lead to sleep disturbance in this population.

  9. Diminished physical function in older HIV-infected adults in the Southeastern U.S. despite successful antiretroviral therapy.

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    Audrey L Khoury

    Full Text Available As antiretroviral therapy efficacy improves, HIV is gradually being recognized more as a chronic disease within the aging HIV-infected population. While these individuals are surviving into old age, they may, however, be experiencing "accelerated aging" with greater declines in physical function than that observed among comparably matched individuals free of HIV. This decline is not well understood and it remains unclear if physical decline correlates with the degree of immunosuppression based on CD4 lymphocyte nadir.In a cross-sectional study of accelerated aging in the older HIV-infected population on antiretroviral therapy (ART, physical performance evaluations were completed on a cohort of 107 HIV-infected subjects, age 50 years or older (with no HIV-1 RNA >200 copies/mL in the prior 12 months, and compared to reference ranges for age- and gender-matched HIV-uninfected persons. Physical performance testing consisted of four validated assessments: the 2.4-meter walk, 30-second chair stand, grip strength and 6-minute walk test.When compared to age- and gender-matched HIV-uninfected reference controls, older HIV-infected persons had diminished physical function. No correlation was found between physical function and degree of immunosuppression as determined by pre-ART CD4 nadir.Despite improved survival, HIV-infected adults on suppressive ART have diminished physical function compared to HIV-uninfected persons. The degree of HIV-associated immunosuppression does not correlate with the observed degree of physical function decline in older HIV-infected persons, suggesting the decline is mediated by other mechanisms.

  10. Optimizing Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for Maternal and Child Health (MCH): Rationale and Design of the MCH-ART Study.

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    Myer, Landon; Phillips, Tamsin K; Zerbe, Allison; Ronan, Agnes; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Le Roux, Stanzi M; Brittain, Kirsty; Ciaranello, Andrea; Petro, Greg; McIntyre, James A; Abrams, Elaine J

    2016-08-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV implementation faces significant challenges globally, particularly in the context of universal lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-infected pregnant women. We describe the rationale and methods of the Maternal and Child Health-Antiretroviral Therapy (MCH-ART) study, an implementation science project examining strategies for providing HIV care and treatment to HIV-infected women who initiate ART during pregnancy and their HIV-exposed infants. MCH-ART is composed of 3 interrelated study designs across the antenatal and postnatal periods. Phase 1 is a cross-sectional evaluation of consecutive HIV-infected pregnant women seeking antenatal care; phase 2 is an observational cohort of all women from phase 1 who are eligible for initiation of ART following local guidelines; and phase 3 is a randomized trial of strategies for delivering ART to breastfeeding women from phase 2 during the postpartum period. During each phase, a set of study measurement visits is carried out separately from antenatal care and ART services; a maximum of 9 visits takes place from the beginning of antenatal care through 12 months postpartum. In parallel, in-depth interviews are used to examine issues of ART adherence and retention qualitatively, and costs and cost-effectiveness of models of care are examined. Separate substudies examine health outcomes in HIV-uninfected women and their HIV-unexposed infants, and the role of the adherence club model for long-term adherence and retention. Combining observational and experimental components, the MCH-ART study presents a novel approach to understand and optimize ART delivery for MCH.

  11. Structured intermittent interruption of chronic HIV infection treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy: effects on leptin and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, M Montes de Oca; Pérez-Cano, R; Garcia-Juárez, R; Martín-Aspas, A; del Alamo, C Fernández Gutiérrez; Girón-González, J A

    2006-04-01

    The changes in nutritional parameters and adipocytokines after structured intermittent interruption of highly active antiretroviral treatment of patients with chronic HIV infection are analyzed. Twenty-seven patients with chronic HIV infection (median CD4+ T cell count/microl: nadir, 394; at the beginning of structured interruptions, 1041; HIV viral load: nadir, 41,521 copies/ml; at the beginning of structured interruptions <50 copies/ml; median time of previous treatment: 60 months) were evaluated during three cycles of intermittent interruptions of therapy (8 weeks on/4 weeks off). CD4+ T cell count, HIV viral load, anthropometric measures, and serum concentrations of triglycerides, cholesterol, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor and its soluble receptors I and II were determined. After the three cycles of intermittent interruptions of therapy, no significant differences in CD4+ T cell count/microl, viral load, or serum concentrations of cholesterol or triglycerides with reference to baseline values were found. A near-significant higher fatty mass (skinfold thicknesses, at the end, 121 mm, at the beginning, 100 mm, p = 0.100), combined with a significant increase of concentration of leptin (1.5 vs. 4.7 ng/ml, p = 0,044), as well as a decrease in serum concentrations of soluble receptors of tumor necrosis factor (TNFRI, 104 vs. 73 pg/ml, p = 0.022; TNFRII 253 vs. 195 pg/ml, p = 0.098) were detected. Structured intermittent interruption of highly active antiretroviral treatment of patients with chronic HIV infection induces a valuable positive modification in markers of lipid turnover and adipose tissue mass.

  12. Quality of life, anxiety and depression in patients with HIV/AIDS who present poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Narváez Betancur

    Full Text Available Abstract The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy marked a major gain in efficacy of HIV/AIDS treatment and a reduction in morbidity and mortality of the infected patients. However, high levels of adherence are required to obtain virologic suppression. In Brazil, the policy of free and universal access to antiretroviral therapy has been in place since 1996, although there are reports of poor adherence. Objective To define the clinical, demographic and psychological characteristics, and quality of life of patients with HIV/AIDS who present poor adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. To be included in the study patients had to be 18 through 65 years old, diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, having the two previous viral loads above 500 copies, a surrogate for poor adherence to antiretrovirals. The following instruments were applied to all eligible patients: the sociodemographic questionnaire “Adherence Follow-up Questionnaire”, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the 36-Item Short Form Survey. Results 47 patients were evaluated, 70.2% were female, mean age of 41.9 years (±10.5, 46.8% were single, 51.1% self-reported adherence ≥95%, 46.8% mentioned depression as the main reason for not taking the medication, 59.5% presented symptoms of moderate to severe depression, and 44.7% presented symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety. Finally, regarding health-related quality of life these patients obtained low scores in all dimensions, physical component summary of 43.96 (±9.64 and mental component summary of 33.19 (±13.35. Conclusion The psychological component is considered to be fundamental in the management of HIV/AIDS patients. Psychoeducation should be conducted at the initial evaluation to reduce negative beliefs regarding antiretroviral therapy Assessment of anxiety and depression symptoms should be done throughout therapy as both psycological

  13. Quality of life, anxiety and depression in patients with HIV/AIDS who present poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a cross-sectional study in Salvador, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Mónica Narváez; Lins, Liliane; Oliveira, Irismar Reis de; Brites, Carlos

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy marked a major gain in efficacy of HIV/AIDS treatment and a reduction in morbidity and mortality of the infected patients. However, high levels of adherence are required to obtain virologic suppression. In Brazil, the policy of free and universal access to antiretroviral therapy has been in place since 1996, although there are reports of poor adherence. To define the clinical, demographic and psychological characteristics, and quality of life of patients with HIV/AIDS who present poor adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This was a cross-sectional study. To be included in the study patients had to be 18 through 65 years old, diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, having the two previous viral loads above 500 copies, a surrogate for poor adherence to antiretrovirals. The following instruments were applied to all eligible patients: the sociodemographic questionnaire "Adherence Follow-up Questionnaire", the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the 36-Item Short Form Survey. 47 patients were evaluated, 70.2% were female, mean age of 41.9 years (±10.5), 46.8% were single, 51.1% self-reported adherence ≥95%, 46.8% mentioned depression as the main reason for not taking the medication, 59.5% presented symptoms of moderate to severe depression, and 44.7% presented symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety. Finally, regarding health-related quality of life these patients obtained low scores in all dimensions, physical component summary of 43.96 (±9.64) and mental component summary of 33.19 (±13.35). The psychological component is considered to be fundamental in the management of HIV/AIDS patients. Psychoeducation should be conducted at the initial evaluation to reduce negative beliefs regarding antiretroviral therapy Assessment of anxiety and depression symptoms should be done throughout therapy as both psycological conditions are associated with patient adherence, success of

  14. AIDS-related malignancies: emerging challenges in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Matthew C; Pantanowitz, Liron; Dezube, Bruce J

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at increased risk of developing cancer, particularly in the later stages of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Despite the advent of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), malignancy in this population is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (ARL) are the most common AIDS-defining malignancies. AIDS-related KS varies from minimal to fulminant disease. Treatment decisions for AIDS-related KS are guided largely by the presence and extent of symptomatic disease. In addition to HAART, excellent treatments exist for both localized disease (topical gel, radiotherapy, and intralesional therapy) and advanced disease (liposomal anthracyclines, paclitaxel). Novel therapies that have become available to treat AIDS-related KS include angiogenesis inhibitors and antiviral agents. ARL comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies. With the immune restoration afforded by HAART, standard-dose chemotherapies now can be safely administered to treat ARL with curative intent. The role of analogous treatments used in HIV-negative patients, including monoclonal antibodies and autologous stem cell transplantation, requires further clarification in HIV-positive patients. HIV-infected patients also appear to be at increased risk for developing certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Although the optimal treatment of these neoplasms is at present uncertain, recent advances in chemotherapy, antiretroviral drugs, and supportive care protocols are allowing for more aggressive management of many of the AIDS-related cancers. This article provides an up-to-date review of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of various AIDS-related malignancies that are likely to be encountered by an oncologist practicing in the current HAART era.

  15. Efavirenz Conceptions and Regimen Management in a Prospective Cohort of Women on Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheree Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of the antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV is not recommended by the WHO or South African HIV treatment guidelines during the first trimester of pregnancy due to potential fetal teratogenicity; there is little evidence of how clinicians manage EFV-related fertility concerns. Women on antiretroviral therapy (ART were enrolled into a prospective cohort in four public clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa. Fertility intentions, ART regimens, and pregnancy testing were routinely assessed during visits. Women reporting that they were trying to conceive while on EFV were referred for regimen changes. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to assess incidence across ART regimens. From the 822 women with followup visits between August 2009–March 2011, 170 pregnancies were detected during study followup, including 56 EFV conceptions. Pregnancy incidence rates were comparable across EFV, nevirapine, and lopinavir/ritonavir person-years (95% 100/users (P=0.25; incidence rates on EFV were 18.6 Confidence Interval: 14.2–24.2. Treatment substitution from EFV was made for 57 women, due to pregnancy intentions or actual pregnancy; however, regimen changes were not systematically applied across women. High rates of pregnancy on EFV and inconsistencies in treatment management suggest that clearer guidelines are needed regarding how to manage fertility-related issues in. women on EFV-based regimens.

  16. When to start antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: a human rights analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmy Alexandra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence from developed and developing countries shows clear clinical and public health benefit to starting antiretroviral therapy (ART earlier. While discussions about when to start ART have often focused on the clinical risks and benefits, the main issue is one of fair limit-setting. We applied a human rights framework to assess a policy of early treatment initiation according to the following criteria: public-health purpose; likely effectiveness; specificity; human rights burdens and benefits; potential for less restrictive approaches; and fair administration. Discussion According to our analysis, a policy of earlier ART initiation would better serve both public health and human rights objectives. We highlight a number of policy approaches that could be taken to help meet this aim, including increased international financial support, alternative models of care, and policies to secure the most affordable sources of appropriate antiretroviral drugs. Summary Widespread implementation of earlier ART initiation is challenging in resource-limited settings. Nevertheless, rationing of essential medicines is a restriction of human rights, and the principle of least restriction serves to focus attention on alternative measures such as adapting health service models to increase capacity, decreasing costs, and seeking additional international funding. Progressive realisation using well-defined steps will be necessary to allow for a phased implementation as part of a framework of short-term targets towards nationwide policy adoption, and will require international technical and financial support.

  17. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahov David

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  18. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  19. Self-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection and virologic treatment response - A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Oort, Frans J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV-1 infection is essential for plasma HIV-1 RNA suppression. Self-report is the most frequently used measure of adherence to HAART, but its validity is controversial. Studies on the relation between self-reported adherence

  20. Higher rates of AIDS during the first year of antiretroviral therapy among migrants: the importance of tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shepherd, Bryan Shepherd; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Parrish, Deidra D.; Glass, Tracy R.; Cescon, Angela; Masabeu, Angels; Chene, Genevieve; de Wolf, Frank; Crane, Heidi M.; Jarrin, Inma; Gill, John; del Amo, Julia; Abgrall, Sophie; Khaykin, Pavel; Lehmann, Clara; Ingle, Suzanne M.; May, Margaret T.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Casabona, Jordi; Cavassini, Matthias; Chêne, Geneviève; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, François; Monforte, Antonella D.'Arminio; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Guest, Jodie; Haerry, David Hans-Ulrich; Hogg, Robert; Justice, Amy; Mocroft, Amanda; Kitahata, Mari; Lampe, Fiona; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael; Sterling, Tim; Williams, Matthew; Zangerle, Robert; Sterne, Jonathan; May, Margaret; Ingle, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    In lower-income countries rates of AIDS-defining events (ADEs) and death are high during the first year of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). We investigated differences between foreign-born (migrant) and native-born (nonmigrant) patients initiating ART in Europe, the US and Canada, and

  1. Comparative effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy regimens: ACTG 5095 and 5142 clinical trials relative to ART-CC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Gulick, Roy M.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Abgrall, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Harris, Ross; Gill, M. John; de Wolf, Frank; Hogg, Robert; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Chêne, Geneviève; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Guest, Jodie L.; Smith, Colette; Murillas, Javier; Berenguer, Juan; Wyen, Christoph; Domingo, Pere; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Saag, Michael S.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Ribaudo, Heather; Lalama, Christina; Klingman, Karin K.; Bastow, Barbara; Kmack, Anne; Meyer, William A.; Kutitzkes, Daniel R.; Acosta, Edward P.; Hughes, Valery; Squires, Kathleen E.; Shackman, Bruce R.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Parrillo, Vincent; Martinez, Ana I.; Fallis, Richard; Storfer, Stephen P.; Giordano, Michael; McDonough, Marita; Rooney, James; Rugh, Lynn; Ryan, Kirk; Tolson, Jerry; van Kempen, Amy S.; Schnizlein Bick, Carol; Webb, Nancy; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Peeples, Lynne; Powderly, William G.; Klingman, Karin L.; Garren, Kevin W.; George, Tania; Rooney, James F.; Brizz, Barbara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Murphy, Robert L.; Swindells, Susan; Havlir, Diane; Mellors, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The generalizability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinical trial efficacy findings to routine care settings is not well studied. We compared the relative effectiveness of initial ART regimens estimated in AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) randomized controlled trials with that among patients

  2. Determinants of reduced cognitive performance in HIV-1-infected middle-aged men on combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.; Su, T.; Wit, F.W.; Kootstra, N.A.; Caan, M.W.A.; Geurtsen, G.J.; Schmand, B.A.; Stolte, I.G.; Prins, M.; Majoie, C.B.; Portegies, P.; Reiss, P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The spectrum of risk factors for HIV-associated cognitive impairment is likely very broad and includes not only HIV/antiretroviral therapy-specific factors but also other comorbid conditions. The purpose of this current study was to explore possible determinants for decreased cognitive

  3. The clinical impact of immunodeficiency and viraemia in the era of combined antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite treatment with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), patients may experience viraemia at different levels and for varying periods of time, and CD4 count recovery, even in patients with sustained virus suppression, frequently remains suboptimal. We studied the characteristics of episodes of

  4. A clinically prognostic scoring system for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: results from the EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda; Gatell, Jose M

    2002-01-01

    The risk of clinical progression for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons receiving treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is poorly defined. From an inception cohort of 8457 HIV-infected persons, 2027 patients who started HAART during prospective follow-up wer...

  5. High level of virological suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, Legese A.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Yalew, Alemayehu W.; Sprangers, Mirjam Ag; Prins, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Plasma viral load (pVL) is a key indicator of therapeutic response in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but is often unavailable in routine clinical care in resource-limited settings. Previous model-based simulation studies have suggested that the

  6. The role of targeted viral load testing in diagnosing virological failure in children on antiretroviral therapy with immunological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mary-Ann; Boulle, Andrew; Technau, Karl; Eley, Brian; Moultrie, Harry; Rabie, Helena; Garone, Daniela; Giddy, Janet; Wood, Robin; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2012-11-01

    To determine the improvement in positive predictive value of immunological failure criteria for identifying virological failure in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) when a single targeted viral load measurement is performed in children identified as having immunological failure. Analysis of data from children (5000 copies/ml on two consecutive occasions treatment in virologically suppressed children. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Delayed HIV diagnosis and initiation of antiretroviral therapy: inequalities by educational level, COHERE in EuroCoord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodi, Sara; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Touloumi, Giota; Braun, Dominique; Teira, Ramon; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Gallois, Anne; Zangerle, Robert; Spire, Bruno; Dabis, Francois; Stähelin, Cornelia; Termote, Monique; Kirk, Ole; Chêne, Genevieve; Egger, Matthias; del Amo, Julia; Warszawski, Josiane; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Reiss, Peter; Wit, Ferdinand; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Sabin, Caroline; Gibb, Diana; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Obel, Niels; Thorne, Claire; Mocroft, Amanda; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Ramos, José; Conejo, Pablo Rojo; Soriano, Toni; Battegay, Manuel; Rauch, Andri; Mussini, Cristina; Tookey, Pat; Casabona, Jordi; Miró, Jose M.; Castagna, Antonella; Konopnick, Deborah; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Torti, Carlo; Garrido, Myriam; Haerry, David; de Wit, Stéphane; Costagliola, Dominique; D'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Grarup, Jesper; Judd, Ali; Barger, Diana; Colin, Céline; Schwimmer, Christine; Wittkop, Linda; Campbell, Maria; Friis-Møller, Nina; Kjaer, Jesper; Raben, Dorthe; Brandt, Rikke Salbøl; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Dorrucci, Maria; Engsig, Frederik; Furrer, Hansjakob; Lambotte, Olivier; Matheron, Sophie; Miro, Jose; Monge, Susana; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; van der Valk, Marc; Wyss, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:In Europe and elsewhere, health inequalities among HIV-positive individuals are of concern. We investigated late HIV diagnosis and late initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) by educational level, a proxy of socioeconomic position.Design and methods:We used data from nine

  8. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trickey, Adam; May, Margaret T; Vehreschild, Jorg-Janne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996-1999 and survived for more than ten years. METHODS: We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretro...

  9. Incidence and predictors of severe anemia in Asian HIV-infected children using first-line antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunupuradah, Torsak; Kariminia, Azar; Chan, Kwai-Cheng; Ramautarsing, Reshmie; Huy, Bui Vu; Han, Ning; Nallusamy, Revathy; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sirisanthana, Virat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Kurniati, Nia; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yusoff, Nik Khairulddin Nik; Razali, Kamarul; Fong, Siew Moy; Sohn, Annette H.; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong

    2013-01-01

    There are limited data on treatment-related anemia in Asian HIV-infected children. Data from Asian HIV-infected children aged <18 years on first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were used. Children who had pre-existing severe anemia at baseline were excluded. Anemia was graded using

  10. Modest Nonadherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Promotes Residual HIV-1 Replication in the Absence of Virological Rebound in Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, Alexander O.; de Bruin, Marijn; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Bakker, Margreet; Berkhout, Ben; Prins, Jan M.; Lukashov, Vladimir V.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are widely assumed to forgive modest nonadherence, because virological suppression in plasma is common at adherence levels of >70%. Yet, it is unknown whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication is completely suppressed at

  11. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Are Present in Six Percent of Persons Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in Lusaka, Zambia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Siwale, Margaret; Wallis, Carole L.; Labib, Moheb; van Hasselt, Robbert; Stevens, Wendy S.; Schuurman, Rob; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; van Vugt, Michèle; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the mutational patterns and factors associated with baseline drug-resistant HIV-1 present at initiation of first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) at 3 sites in Lusaka, Zambia, in 2007-2008. Methods: Population sequencing of the HIV-1 pol gene was performed in the PharmAccess

  12. Regional differences in the risk of triple class failure in European patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy after 1 January 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, A; Horban, A; Clotet, B

    2008-01-01

    Regional differences across Europe in triple class failure (TCF; the failure of each of the three separate main classes of antiretrovirals (ARVs) with a viral load >1000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL for >4 months) have not been described. A total of 1956 patients started combination ARV therapy after 1...

  13. Increasing cerebrospinal fluid chemokine concentrations despite undetectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV RNA in HIV-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gisolf, E. H.; van Praag, R. M.; Jurriaans, S.; Portegies, P.; Goudsmit, J.; Danner, S. A.; Lange, J. M.; Prins, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Only limited data on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-1 RNA responses and markers of local inflammation in CSF during antiretroviral therapy are available. HIV-RNA, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor (sTNFr)-II, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and interferon-gamma-inducible protein

  14. High level of virological suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekuria, Legese A.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Yalew, Alemayehu W.; Sprangers, Mirjam Ag; Prins, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma viral load (pVL) is a key indicator of therapeutic response in HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but is often unavailable in routine clinical care in resource-limited settings. Previous model-based simulation studies have suggested that the benefits of

  15. Bone mineral density increases in HIV-infected children treated with long-term combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunders, Madeleine J.; Frinking, Olivier; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; van Arnhem, Lotus A.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Reiss, Peter; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2013-01-01

    The long-term treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) requires assessment of potential adverse effects, such as osteoporosis. Longitudinal data on bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected children showed that cumulative

  16. Uptake of tenofovir-based antiretroviral therapy among HIV-HBV-coinfected patients in the EuroSIDA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Mocroft, Amanda; Grint, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to guidelines all HIV/HBV co-infected patients should receive tenofovir-based combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate uptake and outcomes of tenofovir-based cART among HIV/HBV patients in the EuroSIDA study. METHODS: All HBsAg+ patients followed up...

  17. A coronary heart disease risk model for predicting the effect of potent antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Shipley, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experience metabolic complications including dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, which may increase their coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. We developed a prognostic model for CHD tailored to the changes in risk factors...

  18. HIV drug resistance and hepatitis co-infections in HIV-infected adults and children initiating antiretroviral therapy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusine-Bahunde, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the roll-out of antiretroviral therapy (ART), few data have been generated on outcomes and outcome predictors of ART in adults and children in Rwanda. Equally, the extent of chronic hepatitis virus infections and their impact on the ART outcomes in the country are not known. This information

  19. Measuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy in northern Tanzania: feasibility and acceptability of the Medication Event Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyimo, R.A.; Boogaard, van den J.; Msoka, E.; Hospers, H.J.; Ven, van der A.A.; Mushi, D.; Bruin, de M.

    2011-01-01

    An often-used tool to measure adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), an electronic pill-cap that registers date and time of pill-bottle openings. Despite its strengths, MEMS-data can be compromised by inaccurate use and acceptability problems due

  20. Soluble urokinase receptor levels in plasma during 5 years of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Katzenstein, Terese L; Piironen, Timo

    2004-01-01

    active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Plasma suPAR decreased after introducing HAART, most pronounced during the first treatment year. The change in plasma suPAR was independent of changes in viral replication and CD4+ cells but it was strongly correlated with plasma levels of the soluble TNF receptor...

  1. Combination Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV in Rwandan Adults: Clinical Outcomes and Impact on Reproductive Health up to 24 Months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asiimwe-Kateera, Brenda; Veldhuijzen, Nienke; Balinda, Jean Paul; Rusine, John; Eagle, Sally; Vyankandondera, Joseph; Mugabekazi, Julie; Ondoa, Pascale; Boer, Kimberly; Asiimwe, Anita; Lange, Joep; Reiss, Peter; van de Wijgert, Janneke

    2015-01-01

    Adult women (n = 113) and men (n = 100) initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and women not yet eligible for cART (n = 199) in Kigali, Rwanda, were followed for 6-24 months between 2007 and 2010. In the cART groups, 21% of patients required a drug change due to side effects and 11% of

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia: a comparative analysis of two regional cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Rimke; Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kityo, Cissy; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Siwale, Margaret; Phanuphak, Praphan; Akanmu, Sulaimon; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Sim, Benedict Lh; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Ditangco, Rossana; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Sohn, Annette H.; Hamers, Raph L.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of how to achieve optimal long-term adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in settings where the burden of HIV disease is highest remains limited. We compared levels and determinants of adherence over time between HIV-positive persons receiving ART who were enrolled in a

  3. A Subset of CD4/CD8 Double-Negative T Cells Expresses HIV Proteins in Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeMaster, Laura K.; Liu, Xiaohe; VanBelzen, D. Jake; Trinité, Benjamin; Zheng, Lingjie; Agosto, Luis M.; Migueles, Stephen A.; Connors, Mark; Sambucetti, Lidia; Levy, David N.; Pasternak, Alexander O.; O'Doherty, Una

    2016-01-01

    A major goal in HIV eradication research is characterizing the reservoir cells that harbor HIV in the presence of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which reseed viremia after treatment is stopped. In general, it is assumed that the reservoir consists of CD4(+) T cells that express no viral proteins.

  4. Association between diarrhea and quality of life in HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tramarin, A; Parise, N; Campostrini, S; Yin, DD; Postma, MJ; Lyu, R; Grisetti, R; Capetti, A; Cattelan, AM; Di Toro, MT; Mastroianni, A; Pignattari, E; Mondardini, [No Value; Calleri, G; Raise, E; Starace, F

    Diarrhea is a common symptom that many HIV patients experience either as a consequence of HIV infection or of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A multicenter, prospective observational study was conducted in 11 AIDS clinics in Italy to determine the effect of diarrhea on health-related

  5. Immune recovery of middle-aged HIV patients following antiretroviral therapy: An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ngai Sze; Chan, Kenny Chi Wai; Cheung, Edward Ka Hin; Wong, Ka Hing; Lee, Shui Shan

    2017-07-01

    In HIV-infected persons, age is negatively associated with optimal CD4 recovery following antiretroviral therapy. Our understanding of the situation in older adults, especially the middle-aged is, however, limited. We undertook to examine the latter's pattern of CD4/CD8 recovery following antiretroviral therapy.Retrospective clinical cohort data of HIV patients diagnosed between 1985 and 2014 in Hong Kong were collected. They were categorized by age at treatment initiation, viz., young adults (age 18-49), middle-aged (age 50-64), and elderly (≥65 years' old). Predictors of immune recovery (CD4 count, CD8 count, CD4/CD8 ratio) over time were examined using multivariable linear generalized estimating equations.A total of 2754 patients (aged ≥18) have been on antiretroviral therapy, with baseline characteristics similar between middle-aged and the elderly. Late diagnosis, defined as progression to AIDS within 3 months of HIV diagnosis, was less common in middle-aged (odds ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.37-0.91). Among Chinese patients who have been on treatment for ≥4 years (n = 913), 80.6%, 14.6%, and 4.8% were young adults, middle-aged, and elderly respectively. Late treatment initiation, defined as AIDS diagnosis or CD4 count ≤100 cells/μL before treatment, was common in middle-aged and elderly, the former however had faster CD4 recovery (3.95 vs. 3.36 cells/μL/month), but slower CD8 decline (-1.76 vs. -4.34 cells/μL/month) and CD4/CD8 normalization (0.009 vs. 0.0101/month).As a transitional age group, the immune recovery of middle-aged patients lagged behind young adults largely because of late treatment initiation. Following adoption of early and non-CD4-guided treatment initiation, their long-term clinical outcome is expected to improve.

  6. The effects of a lipid-based nutrient supplement and antiretroviral therapy in a randomized controlled trial on iron, copper, and zinc in milk from HIV+ Malawian mothers and associations with maternal and infant biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated effects of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy and lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) on iron, copper and zinc in milk of exclusively breastfeeding HIV-infected Malawian mothers, and their correlations with maternal and infant biomarkers. Breast milk at 2, 6, and 24 weeks (wk) postpartum a...

  7. Antiretroviral therapy for prevention of tuberculosis in adults with HIV: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh B Suthar

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is the strongest risk factor for developing tuberculosis and has fuelled its resurgence, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2010, there were an estimated 1.1 million incident cases of tuberculosis among the 34 million people living with HIV worldwide. Antiretroviral therapy has substantial potential to prevent HIV-associated tuberculosis. We conducted a systematic review of studies that analysed the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the incidence of tuberculosis in adults with HIV infection.PubMed, Embase, African Index Medicus, LILACS, and clinical trial registries were systematically searched. Randomised controlled trials, prospective cohort studies, and retrospective cohort studies were included if they compared tuberculosis incidence by antiretroviral therapy status in HIV-infected adults for a median of over 6 mo in developing countries. For the meta-analyses there were four categories based on CD4 counts at antiretroviral therapy initiation: (1 less than 200 cells/µl, (2 200 to 350 cells/µl, (3 greater than 350 cells/µl, and (4 any CD4 count. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis in all baseline CD4 count categories: (1 less than 200 cells/µl (hazard ratio [HR] 0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07 to 0.36, (2 200 to 350 cells/µl (HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.60, (3 greater than 350 cells/µl (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.63, and (4 any CD4 count (HR 0.35, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.44. There was no evidence of hazard ratio modification with respect to baseline CD4 count category (p = 0.20.Antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with a reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis across all CD4 count strata. Earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy may be a key component of global and national strategies to control the HIV-associated tuberculosis syndemic.International Prospective Register

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Johnson, Warren D.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. Methods and Findings Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS), including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART) and US$979 (standard ART). Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81) but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384). The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS–US$9,979/YLS) including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS–US$5,537/YLS). Conclusions Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita) after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510 Please see

  9. Anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected travelers to Hajj pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Abdulrazaq G; Abdulmumini, Murjanatu; Dalhat, Mahmoud M; Hamza, Muhammad; Iliyasu, Garba

    2010-01-01

    Many countries with high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection also have substantial Muslim populations. HIV-infected patients who travel to Hajj in Saudi-Arabia may encounter challenges regarding their anti-retroviral therapy (ART). In a cohort study in Nigeria, clinically stable patients on ART who were traveling for the 2008 to 2009 Hajj (Hajj-pilgrims [HP]) were selected and compared with consecutively selected Muslim patients who were clinically stable and traveled to and from distances within the country to access ART (non-pilgrims [NP]). Participants were clinically evaluated and interviewed regarding their adherence to ART pre-travel and post-travel, international border passage with medications and reasons for missing ART doses. Post-travel change in CD4 counts and RNA-PCR viral load were measured. Outcomes were proportion who missed >or=1 dose of ART during Hajj compared with pre-travel or post-travel and failure of ART, defined as decline in CD4 cell counts or high viral load or both. Thirty-one HP and 27 NP had similar characteristics and were away for (median [range]) 36 days (28-43 days) and 84 days (28-84 days), respectively (p or= 1 ART doses among HP and NP while away were 16/31 (51.6%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with risk ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) 2.79 (1.18-6.60). Among HP, the proportions who missed >or= 1 ART doses pre-travel and post-travel were lower than those who missed it during Hajj. Those who failed ART among HP compared with NP were 15/31 (48.4%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with odds ratio (95% CI) 4.13 (1.10-17.21). Reasons for missing ART included forgetfulness, exhaustion of supplies, stigma, spiritual alternatives, or disinclination; five patients were unable to cross airports with medications. Patients who went on Hajj were more likely to miss medications and to have ART failure due to several reasons including inability to cross borders with medications.

  10. Measuring adherence to antiretroviral therapy in children and adolescents in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel C Vreeman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High levels of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART are central to HIV management. The objective of this study was to compare multiple measures of adherence and investigate factors associated with adherence among HIV-infected children in western Kenya. Methods: We evaluated ART adherence prospectively for six months among HIV-infected children aged ≤14 years attending a large outpatient HIV clinic in Kenya. Adherence was reported using caregiver report, plasma drug concentrations and Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS®. Kappa statistics were used to compare adherence estimates with MEMS®. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between child, caregiver and household characteristics with dichotomized adherence (MEMS® adherence ≥90% vs. <90% and MEMS® treatment interruptions of ≥48 hours. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated. Results: Among 191 children, mean age at baseline was 8.2 years and 55% were female. Median adherence by MEMS® was 96.3% and improved over the course of follow-up (p<0.01, although 49.5% of children had at least one MEMS® treatment interruption of ≥48 hours. Adherence estimates were highest by caregiver report, and there was poor agreement between MEMS® and other adherence measures (Kappa statistics 0.04–0.37. In multivariable logistic regression, only caregiver-reported missed doses in the past 30 days (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14–1.39, late doses in the past seven days (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.05–1.22 and caregiver-reported problems with getting the child to take ART (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.01–1.20 were significantly associated with dichotomized MEMS® adherence. The caregivers reporting that ART made the child sick (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01–1.25 and reporting difficulties in the community that made giving ART more difficult (e.g. stigma (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02–1.27 were significantly associated with MEMS® treatment interruptions in

  11. Patients’ willingness to take separate component antiretroviral therapy regimens for HIV in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Engelhard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The costs of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART consisting of separate, particularly generic, components are generally much lower than of a single tablet regimen (STR including the same active ingredients. Our aim was to evaluate whether patients in care in the Netherlands would be willing to take separate component regimens (SCR instead of an STR and to examine whether willingness was associated with particular patient characteristics. Materials and Methods: Data from the HIV Monitoring Foundation of all adult HIV-1-infected patients in care taking cART>6 months were used to randomly select 1000 patients. As part of a questionnaire developed for a study assessing patient experience, patients were asked whether they were willing to take an SCR instead of an STR. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between age, gender, region of origin, mode of HIV transmission, socioeconomic status, duration of cART and answering “yes” to the question versus “maybe” or “no.” Variables with p<0.1 in the univariate analysis were entered in a multivariate model. Results: Of the 300 patients who completed the questionnaire, 49% answered “yes,” 24% “maybe” and 27% “no” to the question whether they would be willing to use a SCR. Reasons for answering “no” included difficulties swallowing pills, convenience of STR (especially when travelling/at work, and concerns about side effects. Respondents who answered “maybe” often indicated that they preferred STRs, emphasized the importance of taking the pills once daily, and pointed out that efficacy/safety of an SCR should not be less. Having to pay for medication was reported as a reason to consider switching to an SCR. In the multivariate analysis, respondents who were born outside the Netherlands were less likely; and those with cART use ≥15 yrs were more likely to answer “yes” (Table 1. Conclusions: Half of the respondents were willing to take SCRs

  12. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  13. Total lymphocyte count is a reliable surrogate marker for CD4 cell counts after the first year of antiretroviral therapy: data from an Indonesian cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Marrigje A; Wisaksana, Rudi; Meijerink, Hinta; Indrati, Agnes; van de Ven, Andre J A M; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2012-05-01

    Many studies have evaluated the total lymphocyte count (TLC) as a cheap surrogate marker for CD4 cells in HIV-infected patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We assessed whether TLC can replace CD4 cell counts in evaluating the immunological response to ART. In a cohort of patients in Indonesia TLC, if measured after at least 1-year ART, correctly identified patients with <200 CD4 cells, and reliably excluded immunological failure, obviating the need for CD4 cell measurement in 43% of patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Analysis of virological efficacy in trials of antiretroviral regimens: drawbacks of not including viral load measurements after premature discontinuation of therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Pedersen, Court; Law, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    to ITT/s=f, 22-70% of the patients starting a HAART regimen in a RCT experienced a virological response at week 48. Only two RCTs had complete follow-up data (n=424): between 29 and 62% achieved a virological response at week 48 in the six treatment arms evaluated in the studies according to ITT...... confirmed virological failure: 63 vs 33%), varied largely across regimens and were not associated with the discontinuation rate. CONCLUSIONS: Discontinuation of follow-up at switch from the therapy to be evaluated remains common in antiretroviral treatment trials, but leads to an imprecise and incomplete......SIDA) starting their first HAART regimen. METHODS: Two classifications of defining virological response 48 weeks after starting the therapy to be evaluated were compared: 1) only patients remaining on the therapy and having a plasma viral load (pVL) below a given cut-off level at week 48 were classified...

  15. Fluticasone furoate induced iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in a pediatric patient receiving anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, S A A; van 't Veer, N E; Emmen, J M A; van Beek, R H T

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, induced by treatment with fluticasone furoate (1-2 dd, 27.5 µg in each nostril) in a pediatric patient treated for congenital HIV. The pediatric patient described in this case report is a young girl of African descent, treated for congenital HIV with a combination therapy of Lopinavir/Ritonavir (1 dd 320/80 mg), Lamivudine (1 dd 160 mg) and Abacavir (1 dd 320 mg). Our pediatric patient presented with typical Cushingoid features (i.e. striae of the upper legs, full moon face, increased body and facial hair) within weeks after starting fluticasone furoate therapy, which was exacerbated after increasing the dose to 2 dd because of complaints of unresolved rhinitis. Biochemical analysis fitted iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, with a repeatedly low cortisol (iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome in patients treated for HIV due to the strong inhibition of CYP3 enzymes by Ritonavir. Upon discontinuation of fluticasone treatment, the pediatric patient improved both clinically and biochemically with normalisation of cortisol and ACTH within a couple of weeks. Fluticasone therapy may induce iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome in a patient treated with anti-retroviral therapy.Pharmacogenetic analysis, in particular CYP3A genotyping, provides useful information in patients treated for HIV with respect to possible future steroid treatment.Fluticasone furoate is not detected in the Siemens Immulite cortisol binding assay.

  16. Outcomes among HIV-1 infected individuals first starting antiretroviral therapy with concurrent active TB or other AIDS-defining disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André R S Périssé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB is common among HIV-infected individuals in many resource-limited countries and has been associated with poor survival. We evaluated morbidity and mortality among individuals first starting antiretroviral therapy (ART with concurrent active TB or other AIDS-defining disease using data from the "Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource-Limited Settings" (PEARLS study. METHODS: PARTICIPANTS WERE CATEGORIZED RETROSPECTIVELY INTO THREE GROUPS ACCORDING TO PRESENCE OF ACTIVE CONFIRMED OR PRESUMPTIVE DISEASE AT ART INITIATION: those with pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary TB ("TB" group, those with other non-TB AIDS-defining disease ("other disease", or those without concurrent TB or other AIDS-defining disease ("no disease". Primary outcome was time to the first of virologic failure, HIV disease progression or death. Since the groups differed in characteristics, proportional hazard models were used to compare the hazard of the primary outcome among study groups, adjusting for age, sex, country, screening CD4 count, baseline viral load and ART regimen. RESULTS: 31 of 102 participants (30% in the "TB" group, 11 of 56 (20% in the "other disease" group, and 287 of 1413 (20% in the "no disease" group experienced a primary outcome event (p = 0.042. This difference reflected higher mortality in the TB group: 15 (15%, 0 (0% and 41 (3% participants died, respectively (p<0.001. The adjusted hazard ratio comparing the "TB" and "no disease" groups was 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 0.93-2.10; p = 0.11 for the primary outcome and 3.41 (1.72-6.75; p<0.001 for death. CONCLUSIONS: Active TB at ART initiation was associated with increased risk of mortality in HIV-1 infected patients.

  17. Immunologic, virologic, and clinical consequences of episodes of transient viremia during suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sighem, Ard; Zhang, Shuangjie; Reiss, Peter; Gras, Luuk; van der Ende, Marchina; Kroon, Frank; Prins, Jan; de Wolf, Frank

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate immunologic, virologic, and clinical consequences of episodes of transient viremia in patients with sustained virologic suppression. METHODS: From the AIDS Therapy Evaluation Project, Netherlands cohort, 4447 previously therapy-naive patients were selected who were on

  18. Determinants of non-compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy among adults living with HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeda, Desta Hiko; Gebretsadik, Lakew Abebe; Dejene, Tariku; Wolde, Mirkuzie; Sudhakar, Morankar

    2012-01-01

    Non-compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy is a major public health concern and further challenged by interaction of various social and clinical obstacles. So; near perfect pill taking is desirable in order to maximise its benefits. To systematically search, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence on determinants of non-compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy among adults living with HIV/AIDS and provide direction to future how to increase compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy. The systematic review considered studies with 18 years and above year old adults living with HIV/AIDS.Determinants of non-compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy among adults living with HIV/AIDS.Quantitative study designs were considered for inclusion.Socio-economic, Health service, Psychosocial and behavioural and Clinical related outcomes. English language articles published between January1997 and December 2011 were sought across major databases. Methodological quality was assessed using Joanna Briggs Institute Meta Analysis of Statistical Assessment and Review Instrument critical appraisal tools. Data were extracted from papers included in the review by using a standardized data extraction tool. Meta- analysis was conducted using fixed and random effects model with mantel Haenszel method using Revman5 software. Heterogeneity between the studies was assessed using χ test at a p-value of risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals at a p-value of Risk=1.38; 95%CI=1.21, 1.58, p valueRisk =2.04; 95%CI=1.51, 2.74, p value=non-compliance with Antiretroviral Therapy.Behavioural change via counselling should be encouraged as a way to increase compliance. Reminders to take mediations regularly, on time, offering encouragement to keep going, helping to keep clinic appointments and providing emotional support for adults living with HIV/AIDS is important.Further research utilizing more robust experimental methods would help to further explore the findings of this review.

  19. Antiretroviral Therapy and Nutrition in Southern Africa: Citizenship and the Grammar of Hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    How might we understand and respond to the new forms of hunger that arise with the massive rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV in southern Africa? Rather than 'merely' a technical problem of measurement, medicine or infrastructure, I suggest that a philosophical question arises concerning the relationship between the experience of hunger, the utterances that communicate that experience, and the bodily regimes of well-being and ill-being indexed by such utterances. Taking the gut as a particular kind of mediator of experience, I draw on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa to open up a set of questions on acknowledgment and avoidance. The central question concerns the divergent concepts of 'grammar' that confront the relationship between hunger and ART.

  20. [Family members' concealing and silencing in the care of children under antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antônio Marcos Tosoli; Cabral, Ivone Evangelista

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this paper were unveiling the caregiver's everyday life of caring for children under antiretroviral therapy (ARVT), and analyzing the dimensions of care them. Qualitative research was conducted with a creative-sensitive method including seven family members and data were treated through discourse analysis. These family members' everyday life in the medication implementation was marked by concealing and silencing. The first one was represented by linguistic regularities, as expressions and acronyms do not appear in their enunciation, and also in the way their lives are organized facing stigma and bias related to the ARVT. The last one occurred in the relationship with children, as when family members were questioned about the medication, they answered in an evasive way. Concealing and silencing related to child HIV/AIDS are themes which need to be approached by nurses in their caring and health education interventions.

  1. Reduction in extrapulmonary tuberculosis in context of antiretroviral therapy scale-up in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, J C; Ranoto, L; Muditambi, N; Railton, J; Maswanganyi, M; Struthers, H E; McIntyre, J A; Peters, R P H

    2017-09-01

    Scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has reduced the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in South Africa. Despite the strong association of HIV infection with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), the effect of ART on the epidemiology of EPTB remains undocumented. We conducted a retrospective record review of patients initiated on treatment for EPTB in 2009 (ART coverage EPTB (n = 399 in 2009 vs. 336 in 2013; P EPTB cases, the proportion of miliary TB and disseminated TB decreased significantly (both P EPTB cases that is similar to that of PTB in the context of the ART scale-up. The changing profile of EPTB warrants attention of healthcare workers.

  2. Four-year treatment outcomes of adult patients enrolled in Mozambique's rapidly expanding antiretroviral therapy program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Auld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Mozambique during 2004-2007 numbers of adult patients (≥15 years old enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART increased about 16-fold, from 60 kg, WHO stage IV (AHR 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-2.4, reference group WHO stage I/II, lack of co-trimoxazole prescription (AHR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-1.8, and later calendar year of ART initiation (AHR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8. Rates of immunologic treatment failure and regimen-switch were 14.0 and 0.6 events per 100-patient years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ART initiation at earlier disease stages and scale-up of co-trimoxazole among ART patients could improve outcomes. Research to determine reasons for low regimen-switch rates and increasing rates of attrition during program expansion is needed.

  3. A case of atypical progressive outer retinal necrosis after highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Se Joon; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chung, Hum

    2004-06-01

    This is a report of an atypical case of progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) and the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the clinical course of viral retinitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient. A 22-year-old male patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) presented with unilaterally reduced visual acuity and a dense cataract. After cataract extraction, retinal lesions involving the peripheral and macular areas were found with perivascular sparing and the mud-cracked, characteristic appearance of PORN. He was diagnosed as having PORN based on clinical features and was given combined antiviral treatment. With concurrent HAART, the retinal lesions regressed, with the regression being accelerated by further treatment with intravenous acyclovir and ganciclovir. This case suggests that HAART may change the clinical course of PORN in AIDS patients by improving host immunity. PORN should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute unilateral cataract in AIDS patients.

  4. Work-related barriers and facilitators to antiretroviral therapy adherence in persons living with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Madriz, Gilberto; Lerner, Debra; Ruthazer, Robin; Rogers, William H; Wilson, Ira B

    2011-10-01

    Little is known about how the structure of work affects adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy. We surveyed participants in an adherence intervention study to learn more about job characteristics, including measures of psychological demand and control, and job accommodations. Adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System. Of 156 trial subjects, 69 were employed, and these 69 made 229 study visits. Psychological demands and control were unrelated to adherence, but the presence of workplace accommodations was significantly associated with adherence (P side effects affecting work performance. Having the ability to institute job accommodations was more important to adherence than the psychosocial structure of the work. These potential benefits of requesting modifications need to be weighed against the possible risks of workplace disclosure.

  5. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, Karthik; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Thomas, Maya Mary; Alexander, Mathew; Verghese, Valsan Philip

    2015-01-01

    Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE) in HIV-infected children is a scarcely reported entity with previous reports describing fulminant course. The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in altering its course remains unknown. We describe a child with HIV infection, who developed measles at 5 months of age and later developed SSPE at 14 years of age, remaining stable at 7 month follow-up, while on HAART for WHO (World Health Organisation) stage IV disease. The dynamics of HIV-related immunosuppression has an impact on the clinical course of SSPE. Contrary to reported cases of fulminant progression, a classic presentation with slow progression can be expected in children on HAART. We reemphasize the recommendation of “early measles vaccination” to prevent measles infection and subsequent SSPE in these children with an increasingly good life expectancy in the era of HAART. PMID:25745323

  6. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis (SSPE in HIV-infected children is a scarcely reported entity with previous reports describing fulminant course. The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in altering its course remains unknown. We describe a child with HIV infection, who developed measles at 5 months of age and later developed SSPE at 14 years of age, remaining stable at 7 month follow-up, while on HAART for WHO (World Health Organisation stage IV disease. The dynamics of HIV-related immunosuppression has an impact on the clinical course of SSPE. Contrary to reported cases of fulminant progression, a classic presentation with slow progression can be expected in children on HAART. We reemphasize the recommendation of “early measles vaccination” to prevent measles infection and subsequent SSPE in these children with an increasingly good life expectancy in the era of HAART.

  7. Risk factors for mortality among malnourished HIV-infected adults eligible for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodd, Susannah L; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa are malnourished. We aimed to increase understanding of the factors affecting their high mortality, particularly in the high-risk period before ART initiation. METHODS: We...... analysed potential risk factors for mortality of Zambian and Tanzanian participants enrolled in the NUSTART clinical trial. Malnourished adults (n = 1815; body mass index [BMI] ART and randomised to receive different nutritional supplements. Demographics......, measures of body composition, blood electrolytes and clinical conditions were investigated as potential risk factors using Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The mortality rate was higher in the period from referral to starting ART (121 deaths/100 person-years; 95 % CI 103, 142) than during the first 12...

  8. Carotid intima-media thickness in HIV patients treated with antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Anne-Mette; Wiinberg, Niels; Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Increased cardiovascular risk in HIV patients in antiretroviral therapy (ART) may be due to HIV infection, direct effect of ART or dyslipidaemia induced by ART. Our aim was to study the relative importance of HIV, ART and dyslipidaemia on atherosclerosis, assessed by the comparison...... of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in non-smoking HIV patients with high or low serum cholesterol levels as well as in healthy volunteers. METHODS: HIV patients in ART with normal cholesterol (or=6 x 5 mmol l(-1); n=12) as well as healthy controls (n=14) were included. All were non...... no correlation was found with total cholesterol or LDL cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: In non-smoking HIV patients receiving ART no sign of accelerated atherosclerosis was found as assessed by IMT even not in hypercholesterolaemic HIV patients. IMT correlated with HDL cholesterol but not with LDL cholesterol. Based...

  9. Prognosis of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohlius, Julia; Schmidlin, Kurt; Costagliola, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined survival and prognostic factors of patients who developed HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN AND SETTING: Multicohort collaboration of 33 European cohorts. METHODS: We included all cART-naive patients...... enrolled in cohorts participating in the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) who were aged 16 years or older, started cART at some point after 1 January 1998 and developed NHL after 1 January 1998. Patients had to have a CD4 cell count after 1 January 1998 and one....... Patients developing NHL on cART had an increased risk of death compared with patients who were cART naive at diagnosis. CONCLUSION: In the era of cART two-thirds of patients diagnosed with HIV-related systemic NHL survive for longer than 1 year after diagnosis. Survival is poorer in patients diagnosed...

  10. Impact of switching antiretroviral therapy on lipodystrophy and other metabolic complications: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgitte Rønde; Haugaard, Steen B; Iversen, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), metabolic and morphological complications known as HIV associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) have been increasingly common. The approaches to target these complications span from resistance exercise, diet and use...... complications such as dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance seem to be partly reversible, whereas the morphologic alterations appear to be unchanged. In studies in which NRTI's are switched, dyslipidaemia appears unaffected, but a modest improvement in peripheral lipoatrophy has been reported. However...... with the disfiguring body-alterations known as HALS. More recently, however, regimens containing nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have attracted attention. Reviewing switch studies regarding metabolic parameters and body shape changes, certain trends emerge. Switching from PI, the metabolic...

  11. HIV infection and arterial stiffness among older-adults taking antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedner, Mark J.; Kim, June-Ho; Nakku, Ruth Sentongo; Hemphill, Linda; Triant, Virginia A.; Haberer, Jessica E.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Boum, Yap; Kwon, Douglas S.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Hunt, Peter W.; Okello, Samson; Bangsberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with arterial stiffness, but no studies have assessed this relationship in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled 205 participants over 40 years old in Uganda: 105 on antiretroviral therapy for a median of 7 years, and a random sample of 100 age and gender-matched HIV-uninfected controls from the clinic catchment area. The prevalence of arterial stiffness (ABI>1.2) was 33%, 18%, 19% and 2% in HIV+ men, HIV- men, HIV+ women, and HIV- women. In multivariable models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, HIV+ individuals had over double the prevalence of arterial stiffness (APR 2.86, 95%CI 1.41–5.79, P=0.003). PMID:26636926

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children

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    Kilborn, Tracy [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Zampoli, Marco [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Pulmonology, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-06-15

    The outcome of HIV infection has improved since the widespread availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Some patients, however, develop a clinical and radiological deterioration following initiation of HAART due to either the unmasking of occult subclinical infection or an enhanced inflammatory response to a treated infection. This phenomenon is believed to result from the restored ability to mount an immune response and is termed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) or immune reconstitution disease. IRIS is widely reported in the literature in adult patients, most commonly associated with mycobacterial infections. There is, however, a paucity of data documenting the radiological findings of IRIS in children. Radiologists need to be aware of this entity. As a diagnosis of exclusion it is essential that the radiological findings be assessed in the context of the clinical presentation. This article reviews the common clinical and radiological manifestations of IRIS in HIV-infected children. (orig.)

  13. Disfiguring molluscum contagiosum in a HIV-positive patient responding to antiretroviral therapy

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    Sen Sumit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum (MC is caused by a double stranded DNA virus belonging to the pox virus family. MC lesions are usually pearly, dome shaped, small, discrete lesions with central umbilication. In HIV-positive patients atypical varieties are found. They may be large or nonumbilicated. Individual papules may join to form the agminate variety. This form is rare. Lesions of MC in healthy immunocompetent patients may occur at any part of the body including face, trunk, and limbs. Sexually active adults have lesions usually on the genitalia, pubis, and inner thigh, rarely on the face and scalp. We present a case of agminate MC occurring in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency disease responding to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  14. Progressive Hypertrophic Genital Herpes in an HIV-Infected Woman despite Immune Recovery on Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Mark H. Yudin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Most HIV-infected individuals are coinfected by Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2. HSV-2 reactivates more frequently in HIV-coinfected individuals with advanced immunosuppression, and may have very unusual clinical presentations, including hypertrophic genital lesions. We report the case of a progressive, hypertrophic HSV-2 lesion in an HIV-coinfected woman, despite near-complete immune restoration on antiretroviral therapy for up to three years. In this case, there was prompt response to topical imiquimod. The immunopathogenesis and clinical presentation of HSV-2 disease in HIV-coinfected individuals are reviewed, with a focus on potential mechanisms for persistent disease despite apparent immune reconstitution. HIV-infected individuals and their care providers should be aware that HSV-2 may cause atypical disease even in the context of near-comlpete immune reconstitution on HAART.

  15. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the development and remission of oral plasmablastic lymphoma

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    Vivian Petersen Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL represents a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in this tumor is poorly known due to its small incidence. This study reports a case of a 33-year-old HIV-positive woman who was referred to the Stomatology Department complaining about a painful gingival growth and cervical nodule both with 20 days of evolution. The lesions appeared 7 months after the patient stopped HAART. The final diagnosis was PBL. After resuming HAART for 45 days, the gingival lesion presented complete remission. The patient continued with HAART alongside chemotherapy. At 24 months follow-up, the patient was stable. The dental surgeon plays an essential role in orientation and retention in care of HIV patients once the adherence of HAART seems to play an important role in PBL development and response to treatment.

  16. Depleted skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, hyperlactatemia, and decreased oxidative capacity in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Pedersen, Steen B

    2005-01-01

    hyperlactatemia is associated with depletion of skeletal muscle (sm)-mtDNA and decreased oxidative capacity in HIV-infected patients on NRTI based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and whether HIV infection itself is associated with sm-mtDNA depletion. Sm-mtDNA was determined in 42 HIV...... to all HIV-NRTI (n = 35), in turn displaying decreased sm-mtDNA (P therapy. Further, HIV may deplete sm-mtDNA of NAIVE, which...

  17. Antiretroviral therapy, labor productivity, and sex: a longitudinal cohort study of tea pluckers in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Bruce A; Fox, Matthew P; Bii, Margaret; Rosen, Sydney; Rohr, Julia; Shaffer, Douglas; Sawe, Fredrick; Wasunna, Monique; Simon, Jonathon L

    2013-01-02

    To estimate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on labor productivity and income using detailed employment data from two large tea plantations in western Kenya for HIV-infected tea pluckers who initiated ART. Longitudinal study using primary data on key employment outcomes for a group of HIV-infected workers receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and workers in the general workforce. We used nearest-neighbor matching methods to estimate the impacts of HIV/AIDS and ART among 237 HIV-positive pluckers on ART (index group) over a 4-year period (2 years pre-ART and post-ART) on 4 monthly employment outcomes - days plucking tea, total kilograms (kgs) harvested, total days working, and total labor income. Outcomes for the index group were compared with those for a matched reference group from the general workforce. We observed a rapid deterioration in all four outcomes for HIV-infected individuals in the period before ART initiation and then a rapid improvement after treatment initiation. By 18-24 months after treatment initiation, the index group harvested 8% (men) and 19% (women) less tea than reference individuals. The index group earned 6% (men) and 9% (women) less income from labor than reference individuals. Women's income would have dropped further if they had not been able to offset their decline in tea plucking by spending more time on nonplucking assignments. HIV-infected workers experienced long-term income reductions before and after initiating ART. The implications of such long-term impacts in low-income countries have not been adequately addressed.

  18. Causes of death on antiretroviral therapy: a post-mortem study from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Emily B; Omar, Tanvier; Setlhako, Gosetsemang J; Osih, Regina; Feldman, Charles; Murdoch, David M; Martinson, Neil A; Bangsberg, David R; Venter, W D F

    2012-01-01

    Mortality in the first months of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a significant clinical problem in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, no post-mortem study has investigated the causes of mortality in these patients. HIV-positive adults who died as in-patients at a Johannesburg academic hospital underwent chart-review and ultrasound-guided needle autopsy for histological and microbiological examination of lung, liver, spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lymph node, skin and cerebrospinal fluid. A clinico-pathologic committee considered all available data and adjudicated immediate and contributing causes of death. Thirty-nine adults were enrolled: 14 pre-ART, 15 early-ART (7-90 days), and 10 late-ART (>90 days). Needle sampling yielded adequate specimen in 100% of kidney, skin, heart and cerebrospinal fluid samples, 97% of livers and lungs, 92% of bone marrows, 87% of spleens and 68% of lymph nodes. Mycobacterial infections were implicated in 69% of deaths (26 of 27 of these due to M. tuberculosis), bacterial infections in 33%, fungal infections in 21%, neoplasm in 26%, and non-infectious organ failure in 26%. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) was implicated in 73% of early-ART deaths. Post-mortem investigations revealed previously undiagnosed causes of death in 49% of cases. Multiple pathologies were common with 62% of subjects with mycobacterial infection also having at least one other infectious or neoplastic cause of death. Needle biopsy was efficient and yielded excellent pathology. The large majority of deaths in all three groups were caused by M. tuberculosis suggesting an urgent need for improved diagnosis and expedited treatment prior to and throughout the course of antiretroviral therapy. Complex, unrecognized co-morbidities pose an additional challenge.

  19. Lipodystrophy in HIV/AIDS patients with different levels of physical activity while on antiretroviral therapy

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    Aline Francielle Mota Segatto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Lipodystrophy is related to the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and can cause aesthetic stigma and increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Physical activity may be a valid alternative for the treatment and prevention of lipodystrophy. However, few studies address this issue. The objective of this study was to assess lipodystrophy related to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients with different physical activity habits. METHODS: The sample was composed of 42 HIV/AIDS patients taking HAART medication who were visiting the Counseling and Testing Center (CTC in Presidente Prudente. The level of physical activity was obtained using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ; lipodystrophy was diagnosed using a self-report questionnaire that was administered to the patient and then followed up by medical confirmation. The percentage of trunk fat was estimated by dual X-Ray absorptiometry (DEXA. Information about sex, age, length of HAART treatment, CD4+ T lymphocyte count (CD4 and viral load was also collected. RESULTS: A higher prevalence of lipodystrophy was observed in the sedentary group when compared to the physically active group, which indicates that physical activity may be a protective factor in relation to the occurrence of lipodystrophy. The group that had a higher CD4 had a higher proportion of lipodystrophy and a higher proportion of younger and physically active individuals. The patients with lipodystrophy had a higher percentage of trunk fat and were more sedentary than active individuals. CONCLUSIONS: A physically active lifestyle has a protective effect against the occurrence of lipodystrophy related to HAART.

  20. Estimating health workforce needs for antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings

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    Fullem Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to increase access to life-saving treatment, including antiretroviral therapy (ART, for people living with HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings has been the growing focus of international efforts. One of the greatest challenges to scaling up will be the limited supply of adequately trained human resources for health, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists and other skilled providers. As national treatment programmes are planned, better estimates of human resource needs and improved approaches to assessing the impact of different staffing models are critically needed. However there have been few systematic assessments of staffing patterns in existing programmes or of the estimates being used in planning larger programmes. Methods We reviewed the published literature and selected plans and scaling-up proposals, interviewed experts and collected data on staffing patterns at existing treatment sites through a structured survey and site visits. Results We found a wide range of staffing patterns and patient-provider ratios in existing and planned treatment programmes. Many factors influenced health workforce needs, including task assignments, delivery models, other staff responsibilities and programme size. Overall, the number of health care workers required to provide ART to 1000 patients included 1–2 physicians, 2–7 nurses, Discussion These data are consistent with other estimates of human resource requirements for antiretroviral therapy, but highlight the considerable variability of current staffing models and the importance of a broad range of factors in determining personnel needs. Few outcome or cost data are currently available to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of different staffing models, and it will be important to develop improved methods for gathering this information as treatment programmes are scaled up.

  1. Hormonal contraceptive use in HIV-infected women using antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review

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    Womack JA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Julie A Womack,1,2 Gina Novick,1 Joseph L Goulet2 1Yale School of Nursing, 2Veterans Affairs Connecticut Health Care System, West Haven Veterans Administration Medical Center, West Haven, CT, USA Background: While extensive research has explored pharmacokinetic interactions between antiretroviral therapy (ART and hormonal contraception, few studies have examined whether these interactions affect clinical outcomes. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of the literature that describes hormonal contraceptive use among HIV-infected women who also use ART, focusing on papers that address clinically important outcomes such as pregnancy or ovulation. Methods/design: An electronic literature search was conducted of PubMed and Ovid to identify all articles that addressed hormonal contraception co-administered with ART published in English between January 1, 1990 and October 30, 2014. In addition, manual reference checks of all articles of interest were conducted to identify articles not captured in the electronic search. Our search criteria identified 405 records. The title and abstract of data reports retrieved via the search were reviewed to identify potential articles of interest. Those with any indication of the main outcomes of interest were considered for inclusion (N=162. Abstracts were then reviewed to identify those manuscripts that would merit a review of the full-text version (N=64. Eight articles that addressed the outcomes of interest were identified. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the quality of these articles. Results: The studies reviewed were limited in a number of ways that precluded their providing a rigorous assessment of the efficacy of contraception when co-administered with ART. Discussion: None of the studies were of adequate quality to provide the guidance that providers and HIV-infected women need when considering contraceptive options. High-quality, well-powered studies are required to address

  2. Remission of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following highly active antiretroviral therapy in a man with AIDS

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    Yoganathan K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Katie Yoganathan1, David Brown2, Kathir Yoganathan31Cardiff Medical School, Cardiff, Wales, UK; 2Virus Reference Department, Microbiology Services, Health Protection Agency, London, UK; 3Singleton Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Swansea, UKAbstract: A 43-year-old Caucasian homosexual man with AIDS presented with blurring of vision, change of personality, and memory loss in March 1999. He had first been admitted 2 months previously for treatment of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. A magnetic resonance imaging scan on admission showed multiple white matter lesions involving both subcortical cerebral hemispheres and cerebellar regions, with no mass effect or surrounding edema. JC virus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings were diagnostic of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. His CD4 count was 34 cells/mL, and his HIV ribonucleic acid level was 800,789 copies/mL. He was treated with a combination antiretroviral therapy. He was last reviewed in October 2011. He was fully independent socially and mentally, but he still had some residual neurologic signs with right-sided homonymous hemianopia and visual agnosia. His HIV ribonucleic acid level was undetectable, and his CD4 count was 574 cells/mm3. Although the median survival of patients with PML was poor before the antiretroviral therapy era, our patient, who is now aged 55 years, is still alive 12 years after the diagnosis. The diagnosis of PML and differential diagnosis of focal neurologic signs in HIV-positive patients are discussed in this case report.Keywords: HIV, focal neurologic signs, cerebral toxoplasmosis, primary brain lymphoma, ischaemic stroke

  3. Risk factors for delayed antiretroviral therapy initiation among HIV-seropositive patients.

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    Terra V Fatukasi

    Full Text Available Prompt initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART is important to reduce comorbidity and mortality among people living with HIV, especially for those with a low CD4 cell count. However there is evidence that not everyone receives prompt initiation of ART after enrolling into HIV care. The current study investigated factors associated with failure to initiate ART within two years of entering into care among those with a CD4 count at or below 350 cells/mm3. The sample included 4,907 ART-naive patients with a CD4 count at or below 350 cells/mm3 enrolled between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 at any of eight clinical sites in the Center for AIDS Research Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS. The two-year risk of delayed ART initiation was estimated using a log-binomial regression model with stabilized inverse probability of censoring weights for those lost to follow-up. Adjusting for other factors, an earlier enrollment date was the sole demographic characteristic associated with an increased risk of delayed ART initiation. Higher CD4 count, lower viral load, and a prevalent AIDS diagnosis were clinical characteristics associated with delayed ART initiation. Gender, age, race/ethnicity and HIV risk factors such as reported male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use were not associated with delayed ART initiation. This study identified characteristics of patients for whom treatment was strongly to moderately recommended but who did not initiate ART within two years of entering care. Despite the known benefits of early antiretroviral therapy initiation, a lower viral load measurement may continue to be an important clinical characteristic in the more recent era with current ART initiation guidelines. These findings provide a target for closer monitoring and intervention to reduce disparities in HIV care.

  4. Association of aging and survival in a large HIV-infected cohort on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Mwesigwa, Robert; Ford, Nathan; Cooper, Curtis L; Au-Yeung, Christopher; Chan, Keith; Nachega, Jean B; Wood, Evan; Hogg, Robert S; Dybul, Mark; Mills, Edward J

    2011-03-13

    To examine if there is a significant difference in survival between elderly (>50 years) and nonelderly adult patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Uganda between 2004 and 2010. Prospective observational study. Patients 18-49 years of age (nonelderly) and 50 years of age and older enrolled in the AIDS Support Organization Uganda HIV/AIDS national programme were assessed for time to all-cause mortality. We applied a Weibull multivariable regression. Among the 22 087 patients eligible for analyses, 19 657 (89.0%) were aged between 18 and 49 years and 2430 (11.0%) were aged 50 years or older. These populations differed in terms of the distributions of sex, baseline CD4 cell count and death. The age group 40-44 displayed the lowest crude mortality rate [31.4 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval (CI) 28.1, 34.7) and the age group 60-64 displayed the highest crude mortality rate (58.9 deaths per 1000 person-years; 95% CI 42.2, 75.5). Kaplan-Meier survival estimates indicated that nonelderly patients had better survival than elderly patients (P age status was importantly associated (adjusted hazard ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.08-1.42) with mortality, when controlling for sex, baseline CD4 cell count and year of therapy initiation. As antiretroviral treatment cohorts mature, the proportion of patients who are elderly will inevitably increase. Elderly patients may require focused clinical care that extends beyond HIV treatment.

  5. Fatal Lactic Acidosis in a Kidney Transplant Recipient on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy after Initiation of Tacrolimus Therapy

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    Michael V. Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, kidney transplantation is safe and efficacious in patients receiving treatment for HIV. Although multiple drug interactions between antiviral and immunosuppressive treatments exist, few patients experience serious adverse reactions. We report a case of fatal lactic acidosis in a healthy kidney transplant recipient with stable HIV infection who had previously received treatment for and cleared hepatitis C virus infection. Death occurred less than one month following the initiation of tacrolimus therapy. Based on predicted drug interactions, appropriate tacrolimus dosing was calculated prior to its commencement, yet plasma tacrolimus levels were initially unexpectedly high. The patient subsequently developed lactic acidosis and hepatic steatosis, presumably due to mitochondrial toxicity from the antiretroviral regimen on which he had previously been stable. We suspect CYP2C19*2 (poor metaboliser genotype status and concomitant treatment with lansoprazole, tacrolimus, and antiretroviral (ARV medications resulted in hepatic decompensation. This highlights the importance of careful interaction screening for all new drugs administered to patients with HIV who have complex treatment regimens as well as heightened clinical vigilance for unexpected toxicities.

  6. Long-term costs and health impact of continued global fund support for antiretroviral therapy.

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    John Stover

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: By the end of 2011 Global Fund investments will be supporting 3.5 million people on antiretroviral therapy (ART in 104 low- and middle-income countries. We estimated the cost and health impact of continuing treatment for these patients through 2020. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Survival on first-line and second-line ART regimens is estimated based on annual retention rates reported by national AIDS programs. Costs per patient-year were calculated from country-reported ARV procurement prices, and expenditures on laboratory tests, health care utilization and end-of-life care from in-depth costing studies. Of the 3.5 million ART patients in 2011, 2.3 million will still need treatment in 2020. The annual cost of maintaining ART falls from $1.9 billion in 2011 to $1.7 billion in 2020, as a result of a declining number of surviving patients partially offset by increasing costs as more patients migrate to second-line therapy. The Global Fund is expected to continue being a major contributor to meeting this financial need, alongside other international funders and domestic resources. Costs would be $150 million less in 2020 with an annual 5% decline in first-line ARV prices and $150-370 million less with a 5%-12% annual decline in second-line prices, but $200 million higher in 2020 with phase out of stavudine (d4T, or $200 million higher with increased migration to second-line regimens expected if all countries routinely adopted viral load monitoring. Deaths postponed by ART correspond to 830,000 life-years saved in 2011, increasing to around 2.3 million life-years every year between 2015 and 2020. CONCLUSIONS: Annual patient-level direct costs of supporting a patient cohort remain fairly stable over 2011-2020, if current antiretroviral prices and delivery costs are maintained. Second-line antiretroviral prices are a major cost driver, underscoring the importance of investing in treatment quality to improve retention on first-line regimens.

  7. The development of antiretroviral therapy and its impact on the HIV-1/AIDS pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the last 25 years, HIV-1, the retrovirus responsible for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), has gone from being an "inherently untreatable" infectious agent to one eminently susceptible to a range of approved therapies. During a five-year period, starting in the mid-1980s, my group at the National Cancer Institute played a role in the discovery and development of the first generation of antiretroviral agents, starting in 1985 with Retrovir (zidovudine, AZT) in a collaboration with scientists at the Burroughs-Wellcome Company (now GlaxoSmithKline). We focused on AZT and related congeners in the dideoxynucleoside family of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), taking them from the laboratory to the clinic in response to the pandemic of AIDS, then a terrifying and lethal disease. These drugs proved, above all else, that HIV-1 infection is treatable, and such proof provided momentum for new therapies from many sources, directed at a range of viral targets, at a pace that has rarely if ever been matched in modern drug development. Antiretroviral therapy has brought about a substantial decrease in the death rate due to HIV-1 infection, changing it from a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic manageable condition, compatible with very long survival. This has special implications within the classic boundaries of public health around the world, but at the same time in certain regions may also affect a cycle of economic and civil instability in which HIV-1/AIDS is both cause and consequence. Many challenges remain, including (1) the life-long duration of therapy; (2) the ultimate role of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); (3) the cardiometabolic side-effects or other toxicities of long-term therapy; (4) the emergence of drug-resistance and viral genetic diversity (non-B subtypes); (5) the specter of new cross-species transmissions from established retroviral reservoirs in apes and Old World monkeys; and (6) the continued pace of new HIV-1

  8. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

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    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p ART. Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p ART increased with daily ART pill count but not increased age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy.

  9. Basis of selection of first and second line highly active antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS on genetic barrier to resistance: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusiime, Christine; Ocama, Ponsiano; Kambugu, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) continues to improve as treatment choices expand with the development of new antiretroviral agents and regimens. However, the successful long-term treatment of HIV/AIDS is under threat from the emergence of drug-resistant strains to multiple agents and entire drug classes.

  10. Long-term efficacy of first line antiretroviral therapy in Indian HIV-1 infected patients: a longitudinal cohort study.

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    Ujjwal Neogi

    Full Text Available Short term efficacy of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in resource-constrained settings is comparable to that found in western studies. However, long term data are limited. India has the third largest HIV infected population in the world but the long-term outcome of first line therapy according to the national guidelines has not been evaluated yet. Therefore, we conducted a long-term longitudinal analysis of the efficacy of the national first-line therapy in India from an observational cohort of Indian patients in two different clinical settings.A total 323 patients who had been on ART for a median of 23 months and achieved virological suppression 2000 copies/mL. Adherence and treatment interruptions (>48 h were assessed via self-report. In the studied patients, the median duration of viral suppression was 44 months; 15.8% of patients showed viral rebound, and 2.8% viral failure. Viral rebound or failure was significantly negatively related to perfect adherence (100% adherence and no treatment interruption >48 hrs. Virological re-suppression in the subsequent visit was observed in three patients without any change in therapy despite the presence of key mutations.Our study reports for the first time, a good long-term response to the first line therapy for a median of nearly four years although a less than perfect adherence increases the risk for treatment failure and subsequent drug resistance development. The empirical findings in this study also indicate the overall success of the Indian ART program in two different settings which likely are representative of other clinics that operate under the national guidelines.

  11. Impact of hepatitis C virus coinfection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome in HIV-infected individuals: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Nina Margrethe; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ø.; Kronborg, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients may decrease the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We determined the impact of HCV infection on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy and outcome among...... Danish patients with HIV-1 infection. METHODS: This prospective cohort study included all adult Danish HIV-1-infected patients who started highly active antiretroviral therapy from 1 January 1995 to 1 January 2004. Patients were classified as HCV positive (positive HCV serological test and/or HCV PCR...

  12. Tumor therapy evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A. [Zurich Univ., Zurich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs.

  13. Could low level laser therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy lead to complete eradication of HIV-1 in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2017-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection remains a major health problem despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which has greatly reduced mortality rates. Due to the unavailability of an effective vaccine or a treatment that would completely eradicate the virus, the quest for new and combination therapies continues. In this study we explored the influence of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected and uninfected cells. Literature reports LLLT as widely used to treat different medical conditions such as diabetic wounds, sports injuries and others. The technique involves exposure of cells or tissue to low levels of red and near infrared laser light. Both HIV infected and uninfected cells were laser irradiated at a wavelength of 640 nm with fluencies ranging from 2 to 10 J/cm2 and cellular responses were assessed 24 hours post laser treatment. In our studies, laser therapy had no inhibitory effects in HIV-1 uninfected cells as was indicated by the cell morphology and proliferation results. However, laser irradiation enhanced cell apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells as the laser fluencies increased. This led to further studies in which laser irradiation would be conducted in the presence of HAART to determine whether HAART would minimise the detrimental effects of laser irradiation in infected cells.

  14. The effect of antiretroviral therapy on the prevalence of HIV-associated oral candidiasis in a Spanish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Salobreña, Alejandro; Gaitaín-Cepeda, Luis; Ceballos-García, Laura; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2004-03-01

    To investigate the temporal changes in the prevalence of oral candidiasis in a cohort of Spanish human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, before and after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Retrospective analysis of a clinical database from "Carlos Haya" Hospital, Málaga, Spain, from 1995 to 2000. The prevalence of oral candidiasis was assessed in 807 HIV/AIDS patients and the temporal progression of its major variants evaluated using a linear regression model. Overall oral candidiasis was prevalent in 30.0% to 48.3% of the cohort throughout and no significant variation in its incidence was noted during the study period. Prevalence of erythematous candidiasis increased from 24.5% (1995) to 45.0% (2000) and pseudomembranous candidiasis decreased from 22.4% (1995) to 5.2% (2000) (PHyperplastic candidiasis was not detected in the cohort after the introduction of HAART therapy. Although oral candidiasis in HIV-infected Spanish individuals has not decreased significantly after the introduction of HAART, there appears to be a significant reduction in hyperplastic and pseudomembranous variants of the disease with a compensatory increase in erythematous candidiasis.

  15. Early changes in inflammatory and pro-thrombotic biomarkers in patients initiating antiretroviral therapy with abacavir or tenofovir

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    Tormo Consuelo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abacavir has been associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction, but the pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We evaluated longitudinal changes in pro-atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients initiating abacavir or tenofovir. Methods Consecutive patients initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART with abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine were included. Plasma levels of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 were measured at baseline and at different time points throughout 48 weeks. Comparisons were adjusted for age, sex, ART status at inclusion, viral load, lipodystrophy, Framingham score and hepatitis C virus co-infection status. Results 50 patients were analyzed, 28 initiating abacavir and 22 tenofovir. The endothelial biomarker sVCAM-1 declined significantly in both treatment groups. hsCRP tended to increase soon after starting therapy with abacavir, a trend that was not seen in those initiating tenofovir. IL-6 significantly increased only at week 24 from baseline in patients on abacavir (+225%, p Conclusion Changes in biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial function are not different in viremic patients starting ART with abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir/emtricitabine. These changes occur in the early phases of treatment and include anti- and pro-atherosclerotic effects with both drugs.

  16. Human resources requirements for highly active antiretroviral therapy scale-up in Malawi

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    Rudatsikira Emmanuel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Twelve percent of the adult population in Malawi is estimated to be HIV infected. About 15% to 20% of these are in need of life saving antiretroviral therapy. The country has a public sector-led antiretroviral treatment program both in the private and public health sectors. Estimation of the clinical human resources needs is required to inform the planning and distribution of health professionals. Methods We obtained data on the total number of patients on highly active antiretroviral treatment program from the Malawi National AIDS Commission and Ministry of Health, HIV Unit, and the number of registered health professionals from the relevant regulatory bodies. We also estimated number of health professionals required to deliver highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART using estimates of human resources from the literature. We also obtained data from the Ministry of Health on the actual number of nurses, clinical officers and medical doctors providing services in HAART clinics. We then made comparisons between the human resources situation on the ground and the theoretical estimates based on explicit assumptions. Results There were 610 clinicians (396 clinical officers and 214 physicians, 44 pharmacists and 98 pharmacy technicians and 7264 nurses registered in Malawi. At the end of March 2007 there were 85 clinical officer and physician full-time equivalents (FTEs and 91 nurse FTEs providing HAART to 95,674 patients. The human resources used for the delivery of HAART comprised 13.9% of all clinical officers and physicians and 1.1% of all nurses. Using the estimated numbers of health professionals from the literature required 15.7–31.4% of all physicians and clinical officers, 66.5–199.3% of all pharmacists and pharmacy technicians and 2.6 to 9.2% of all the available nurses. To provide HAART to all the 170,000 HIV infected persons estimated as clinically eligible would require 4.7% to 16.4% of the total number of

  17. DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN METHADONE DOSE AND ADHERENCE TO ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PERSONS WHO USE ILLICIT OPIOIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Leslie; Nolan, Seonaid; Dobrer, Sabina; Puscas, Cathy; Montaner, Julio; Ahamad, Keith; Dong, Huiru; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims For HIV-positive individuals who use illicit opioids, engagement in methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) can contribute to improved HIV treatment outcomes. However, to our knowledge, the role of methadone dosing in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has not yet been investigated. We sought to examine the relationship between methadone dose and ART adherence among a cohort of persons who use illicit opioids. Design and Setting We used data from the ACCESS study, an ongoing prospective observational cohort of HIV-positive persons who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, confidentially linked to comprehensive HIV treatment data in a setting of universal no-cost medical care including medications. We evaluated the longitudinal relationship between methadone dose and the likelihood of ≥ 95% adherence to ART among ART-exposed participants during periods of engagement in MMT. Participants 297 ART-exposed individuals on MMT were recruited between December 2005 and May 2013 and followed for a median of 42.1 months. Measurements We measured methadone dose at ≥ 100 vs methadone maintenance therapy, those receiving higher doses of methadone (≥ 100 mg/day) are more likely to achieve ≥ 95% adherence to antiretroviral therapy than those receiving lower doses. PMID:25940906

  18. WHO antiretroviral therapy guidelines 2010 and impact of tenofovir on chronic kidney disease in Vietnamese HIV-infected patients.

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    Daisuke Mizushima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 2010 WHO antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines have resulted in increased tenofovir use. Little is known about tenofovir-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD in HIV-infected Vietnamese with mean body weight of 55 kg. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in this country. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study was performed. METHODS: Clinical data on HIV-infected Vietnamese cohort were collected twice a year. To evaluate the prevalence of CKD, serum creatinine was measured in 771 patients in October 2011 and April 2012. CKD was defined as creatinine clearance less than 60 ml/min at both time points. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with CKD. RESULTS: Tenofovir use increased in Vietnam from 11.9% in April 2011 to 40.3% in April 2012. CKD was diagnosed in 7.3%, of which 7% was considered moderate and 0.3% was severe. Multivariate analysis of October-2011 data identified age per year-increase (OR: 1.229, 95%CI, 1.170-1.291, body weight per 1 kg-decrement (1.286, 1.193-1.386, and tenofovir use (2.715, 1.028-7.168 as risk factors for CKD. CONCLUSIONS: Older age, low body weight and tenofovir use were independent risk factors for CKD in Vietnam. Further longitudinal study is required to evaluate the impact of TDF on renal function in Vietnam and other countries with small-body weight patients.

  19. Risk of Cancer among Commercially Insured HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy

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    Jeannette Y. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore the cancer incidence rates among HIV-infected persons with commercial insurance who were on antiretroviral therapy and compare them with those rates in the general population. Paid health insurance claims for 63,221 individuals 18 years or older, with at least one claim with a diagnostic code for HIV and at least one filled prescription for an antiretroviral medication between January 1, 2006, and September 30, 2012, were obtained from the LifeLink® Health Plan Claims Database. The expected number of cancer cases in the general population for each gender-age group (60 years was estimated using incidence rates from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER program. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs were estimated using their 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Compared to the general population, incidence rates for HIV-infected adults were elevated (SIR, 95% CI for Kaposi sarcoma (46.08; 38.74–48.94, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (4.22; 3.63–4.45, Hodgkin lymphoma (9.83; 7.45–10.84, and anal cancer (30.54; 25.62–32.46 and lower for colorectal cancer (0.69; 0.52–0.76, lung cancer (0.70; 0.54, 0.77, and prostate cancer (0.54; 0.45–0.58. Commercially insured, treated HIV-infected adults had elevated rates for infection-related cancers, but not for common non-AIDS defining cancers.

  20. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Whetten

    Full Text Available As antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs, understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care.The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+ participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468. Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART.Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence.This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of

  1. Birth outcomes in South African women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy: a retrospective observational study

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    van der Merwe Karin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, a triple-drug combination, in HIV-infected pregnant women markedly reduces mother to child transmission of HIV and decreases maternal morbidity. However, there remains uncertainty about the effects of in utero exposure to HAART on foetal development. Methods Our objectives were to investigate whether in utero exposure to HAART is associated with low birth weight and/or preterm birth in a population of South African women with advanced HIV disease. A retrospective observational study was performed on women with CD4 counts ≤250 cells/mm3 attending antenatal antiretroviral clinics in Johannesburg between October 2004 and March 2007. Low birth weight ( Results Among HAART-unexposed infants, 27% (60/224 were low birth weight compared with 23% (90/388 of early HAART-exposed (exposed 3 increase, 95% CI 0.45-0.71, p 3 increase, 95% CI 0.55-0.85, p = 0.001. HAART exposure was associated with an increased preterm birth rate (15%, or 138 of 946, versus 5%, or seven of 147, in unexposed infants, p = 0.001, with early nevirapine and efavirenz-based regimens having the strongest associations with preterm birth (AOR 5.4, 95% CI 2.1-13.7, p Conclusions In this immunocompromised cohort, in utero HAART exposure was not associated with low birth weight. An association between NNRTI-based HAART and preterm birth was detected, but residual confounding is plausible. More advanced immunosuppression was a risk factor for low birth weight and preterm birth, highlighting the importance of earlier HAART initiation in women to optimize maternal health and improve infant outcomes.

  2. Trauma history and depression predict incomplete adherence to antiretroviral therapies in a low income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetten, Kathryn; Shirey, Kristen; Pence, Brian Wells; Yao, Jia; Thielman, Nathan; Whetten, Rachel; Adams, Julie; Agala, Bernard; Ostermann, Jan; O'Donnell, Karen; Hobbie, Amy; Maro, Venance; Itemba, Dafrosa; Reddy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs), understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care. The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT) study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+) participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468). Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART. Incomplete art adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence. This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence and maximize the potential of expanded

  3. [Budget impact analysis of antiretroviral therapy. A reflection based on the GESIDA guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The latest version of the Spanish clinical practice guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults, developed by the Spanish AIDS Study Group (GESIDA) and the National AIDS Plan, recommends initiating ART early in certain circumstances. The aim of this study was to estimate the budget impact of this recommendation by using the data from the VACH cohort. We considered a scenario in which all naïve asymptomatic patients would initiate ART if they had 500/μL if they were older than 55 years, or had high viral load, liver disease, chronic kidney disease or high cardiovascular risk. The study was designed as a cost analysis in terms of annual pharmaceutical expenditure. The only costs included were those relating to the ART combinations analyzed. To estimate these costs, we assumed that this guideline had a penetration of 80%, an adherence of 95% and 12% dropouts. A total of 12,500 patients were reviewed. Of these, 1,127 (10%) had not initiated ART; CD4 lymphocyte count was 350-500 in 294 (26.1%) and > 500 in 685 (60.8%). If the new clinical practice guideline were applied, 45.2% of naïve patients (95% CI: 42.4%-48.2%) would be advised to start ART. Carrying out this recommendation in hospitals of the VACH cohort would require an additional annual investment of € 3,270,975 and would increase the overall cost of antiretroviral drugs by 3%. In the framework of health economics, incorporating economic impact estimates - such as those performed in this study - into clinical practice guidelines would be advisable to increase their feasibility. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Antiretroviral therapy outcomes in HIV-infected children after adjusting protease inhibitor dosing during tuberculosis treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordula Frohoff

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Modification of ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (LPV/r-based antiretroviral therapy is required for HIV-infected children co-treated for tuberculosis (TB. We aimed to determine virologic and toxicity outcomes among TB/HIV co-treated children with the following modifications to their antiretroviral therapy (ART: (1 super-boosted LPV/r, (2 double-dose LPV/r or (3 ritonavir.A medical record review was conducted at two clinical sites in Johannesburg, South Africa. The records of children 6-24 months of age initiating LPV/r-based therapy were reviewed. Children co-treated for TB were categorized based on the modifications made to their ART regimen and were compared to children of the same age at each site not treated for TB. Included are 526 children, 294 (56% co-treated for TB. All co-treated children had more severe HIV disease, including lower CD4 percents and worse growth indicators, than comparisons. Children in the super-boosted group (n = 156 were as likely to be virally suppressed (<400 copies/ml at 6 months as comparisons (69.2% vs. 74.8%, p = 0.36. Children in the double-dose (n = 47 and ritonavir groups (n = 91 were significantly less likely to be virally suppressed at 6 months (53.1% and 49.3% than comparisons (74.8% and 82.1%; p = 0.02 and p<0.0001, respectively. At 12 months only children in the ritonavir group still had lower rates of virological suppression relative to comparisons (63.9% vs 83.3% p<0.05. Grade 1 or greater ALT elevations were more common in the super-boosted (75% than double-dose (54.6% or ritonavir (33.9% groups (p = 0.09 and p<0.0001 but grade 3/4 elevations were observed in 3 (13.6% of the super-boosted, 7 (15.9% of the double-dose and 5 (8.9% of the ritonavir group (p = 0.81 and p = 0.29.Good short-term virologic outcomes were achieved in children co-treated for TB and HIV who received super-boosted LPV/r. Treatment limiting toxicity was rare. Strategies for increased dosing of LPV

  5. Abordagem metabólica e nutricional da lipodistrofia em uso da terapia anti-retroviral Metabolic and nutritional approach of lipodystrophy in the use of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Daniele Tavares Dutra

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A terapia anti-retroviral altamente ativa, usada contra o Vírus da Imunodeficiência Humana, vem possibilitando a melhora do quadro clínico-laboratorial de portadores da Síndrome da Imunodeficiência Adquirida. Contudo, alterações metabólicas e complicações morfológicas, associadas ao uso da terapia, vêm sendo investigadas. A utilização prolongada desta terapia tem um impacto importante sobre o estado nutricional dos pacientes. Antes da sua utilização, a perda de peso e a desnutrição, conseqüências das infecções oportunistas, eram os maiores problemas nutricionais. Atualmente, o foco principal das discussões têm sido as complicações metabólicas e morfológicas, dentre elas a lipodistrofia, com a dislipidemia, a resistência à insulina, a osteopenia, e a distribuição alterada da gordura corporal, aumentando assim os riscos de doenças cardiovasculares. A nutrição desempenha um papel fundamental no suporte da saúde desses pacientes, integrando as equipes multiprofissionais, promovendo a melhora da adesão à terapia anti-retroviral e do prognóstico da doença. No entanto, para que se tenha mais conhecimento sobre a terapia, as proporções de seus efeitos adversos, e o perfil nutricional desses pacientes, a curto e a longo prazos, é de suma importância que se estude mais sobre este assunto, a fim de permitir perspectivas de um regime terapêutico mais seguro dentro de seus alcances metodológicos, proporcionando uma melhor qualidade de vida aos pacientes.The highly active antiretroviral therapy used against Human Immunodeficiency Virus provides an improvement in laboratory and clinical findings of patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. However, metabolic and morphologic disturbances associated with the therapy are being investigated. The drawn out use of these therapy has an important impact on the nutritional status of the patients. Before the use of this therapy, weight loss and malnutrition caused by

  6. Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: adapting guidance to meet the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoria, Marco; Vella, Stefano; Ford, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the evolution of WHO guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected individuals, considering the key epidemiological, scientific, programmatic, and political changes over the last decade, and highlights the major trends for the management of the HIV disease in future guidelines revisions. In the last few years, new evidence has emerged supporting the potential preventive benefit of ART in reducing HIV transmission. This, together with the potential clinical benefits of earlier initiation of therapy, has led to the consideration of the broader strategic use of ART, taking into account the clinical and public health benefit, and programmatic feasibility. In 2002, WHO established its first guidelines for ART use, primarily focused on a public health approach for resource-limited settings. These recommendations were updated in 2003, 2006, and 2010, incorporating progressive changes reflecting progressive increase in the knowledge of HIV pathogenesis, development of new drugs and diagnostics, and increased experience of HIV treatment and prevention programs. The impact of several international political commitments and scale-up initiatives such as the 3 by 5 Initiative, Universal Access targets, and the Treatment 2.0 Strategy were also important drivers of the global response, increasing the treatment coverage and catalyzing the necessary environment for the establishment of operational and programmatic components for an expanded and sustainable global response to HIV/AIDS.

  7. KIR-HLA genotypes in HIV-infected patients lacking immunological recovery despite effective antiretroviral therapy.

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    Alessandro Soria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In HIV-infected individuals, mechanisms underlying unsatisfactory immune recovery during effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART have yet to be fully understood. We investigated whether polymorphism of genes encoding immune-regulating molecules, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and their ligands class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA, could influence immunological response to cART. METHODS: KIR and HLA frequencies were analyzed in 154 HIV-infected and cART-treated patients with undetectable viral load divided into two groups: 'immunological non responders' (INR, N = 50, CD4(+ T-cell count 350/mm(3. Molecular KIR were typed using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. Comparisons were adjusted for baseline patient characteristics. RESULTS: The frequency of KIR2DL3 allele was significantly higher in FR than in INR (83.7% vs. 62%, P = 0.005. The functional compound genotype HLA-C1(+/KIR2DL3(+, even at multivariable analysis, when adjusted for nadir CD4(+ T-cell count, was associated with reduced risk of INR status: odds ratio (95% Confidence Intervals 0.34 (0.13-0.88, P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced presence of the inhibitory KIR2DL3 genotype detected in INR might provoke an imbalance in NK function, possibly leading to increased immune activation, impaired killing of latently infected cells, and higher proviral burden. These factors would hinder full immune recovery during therapy.

  8. Nutritional status and mortality among HIV-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enju; Spiegelman, Donna; Semu, Helen; Hawkins, Claudia; Chalamilla, Guerino; Aveika, Akum; Nyamsangia, Stella; Mehta, Saurabh; Mtasiwa, Deo; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2011-07-15

    Poor nutritional status is associated with immunologic impairment and adverse health outcomes among adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We investigated body mass index (BMI), middle upper arm circumference (MUAC), and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentrations at initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 18,271 HIV-infected Tanzanian adults and their changes in the first 3 months of ART, in relation to the subsequent risk of death. Lower BMI, MUAC, and Hgb concentrations at ART initiation were strongly associated with a higher risk of death within 3 months. Among patients who survived >3 months after ART initiation, those with a decrease in weight, MUAC, or Hgb concentrations by 3 months had a higher risk of death during the first year. After 1 year, only a decrease in MUAC by 3 months after ART initiation was associated with a higher risk of death. Weight loss was associated with a higher risk of death across all levels of baseline BMI, with the highest risk observed among patients with BMI nutritional status at ART initiation and decreased nutritional status in the first 3 months of ART were strong independent predictors of mortality. The role of nutritional interventions as adjunct therapies to ART merits further investigation.

  9. Tuberculin skin test conversion among HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirenga, B J; Worodria, W; Massinga-Loembe, M; Nalwoga, T; Manabe, Y C; Kestens, L; Colebunders, R; Mayanja-Kizza, H

    2013-03-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinic in a setting of high tuberculosis (TB) and HIV prevalence. To study the incidence of and factors associated with tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion in HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Prospective cohort study of TST-negative, ART-naïve HIV patients (CD4 cell count conversion were calculated, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Of the 142 patients, 105 (75.5%) were females. The mean age was 35.9 years (standard deviation 8.1) and the median CD4 cell count was 119 cells/l (interquartile range 42168). The incidence of TST conversion was 30.2/100 person years (95%CI 19.546.8). Conversion was not associated with clinical, CD4 cell count or chest radiography findings. A high incidence of TST conversion was observed, supporting the World Health Organization recommendation to provide isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) to all HIV patients in high TB prevalence settings. If case-control programmes choose to provide IPT only to TST-positive patients, repeat TST should be considered following initiation of ART.

  10. Impact of gender on response to highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Impact of gender on time to initiation, response to and risk of modification of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-1 infected individuals is still controversial. METHODS: From a nationwide cohort of Danish HIV infected individuals we identified all...... counts (adjusted p=0.21). We observed no delay in time to initiation of HAART in women compared to men (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). There were no gender differences in risk of treatment modification of the original HAART regimen during the first year of therapy for either toxicity (IRR 0.97 95% CI 0.......66-1.44) or other/unknown reasons (IRR 1.18 95% CI 0.76-1.82). Finally, CD4 counts and the risk of having a detectable viral load at 1, 3 and 6 years did not differ between genders. CONCLUSIONS: In a setting with free access to healthcare and HAART, gender does neither affect time from eligibility to HAART...

  11. Clinical differences between younger and older adults with HIV/AIDS starting antiretroviral therapy in Uganda and Zimbabwe: a secondary analysis of the DART trial

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh, S. M.; Obuku, E. A.; Walker, S. A.; Semeere, A. S.; Auerbach, B. J.; Hakim, J. G.; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Mugyenyi, P. N.; Salata, R. A.; Kityo, C M; DART Trial Team, The

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and immunological data about HIV in older adults from low and middle income countries is scarce. We aimed to describe differences between younger and older adults with HIV starting antiretroviral therapy in two low-income African countries.

  12. Accumulation of protease mutations among patients failing second-line antiretroviral therapy and response to salvage therapy in Nigeria.

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    Holly E Rawizza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines and programs in resource-limited settings (RLS have focused on 1(st- and 2(nd-line (2 L therapy. As programs approach a decade of implementation, policy regarding access to 3(rd-line (3 L ART is needed. We aimed to examine the impact of maintaining patients on failing 2 L ART on the accumulation of protease (PR mutations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: From 2004-2011, the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR Program provided ART to >100,000 people in Nigeria. Genotypic resistance testing was performed on a subset of patients experiencing 2 L failure, defined as 2 consecutive viral loads (VL>1000 copies/mL after ≥6 months on 2 L. Of 6714 patients who received protease inhibitor (PI-based ART, 673 (10.0% met virologic failure criteria. Genotypes were performed on 61 samples. Patients on non-suppressive 2 L therapy for 24 months. Patients developed a median of 0.6 (IQR: 0-1.4 IAS PR mutations per 6 months on failing 2 L therapy. In 38% of failing patients no PR mutations were present. For patients failing >24 months, high- or intermediate-level resistance to lopinavir and atazanavir was present in 63%, with 5% to darunavir. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report assessing the impact of duration of non-suppressive 2 L therapy on the accumulation of PR resistance in a RLS. This information provides insight into the resistance cost of failing to switch non-suppressive 2 L regimens and highlights the issue of 3 L access.

  13. Impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV coinfection: relationship between prolonged efficacy of HAART and HBV surface and early antigen seroconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miailhes, Patrick; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Pradat, Pierre; Lebouché, Bertrand; Chevallier, Michèle; Chevallier, Philippe; Zoulim, Fabien; Trepo, Christian

    2007-09-01

    Coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients is common. However, little is known about the natural history of chronic hepatitis B in HIV-infected populations, especially the impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the outcome of HBV early antigen (HBeAg) and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) status. The characteristics of 92 patients coinfected with HIV and HBV were retrospectively assessed before and after HAART and lamivudine treatment to determine the impact of treatment on chronic hepatitis B and factors associated with HBeAg and/or HBsAg seroconversion. During follow-up, 82 patients received antiretroviral therapy, 79 of whom received HAART. Twenty-eight of the 76 patients who were administered lamivudine therapy developed lamivudine resistance mutations. While receiving antiretroviral therapy, 10 of 59 HBeAg-positive patients developed antibody to HBeAg, 3 of 10 cleared HBsAg, and 2 of 3 developed antibody to HBsAg. Two of 23 HBeAg-negative patients cleared HBsAg and developed antibody to HBsAg. HBeAg and/or HBsAg seroconversion combined with an undetectable HBV DNA level (i.e., an HBV response) correlated with a sustained HIV response (P=.001), shorter duration of antiretroviral therapy (P=.058), and more-severe disease, as evaluated by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staging (for stage B vs. stage A, P=.029; for stage C vs. stage A, P=.069). For patients with elevated baseline alanine aminotransferase levels, the HBV response correlated significantly with a greater increase in CD4 cell count while receiving HAART. In HIV-HBV-coinfected patients, HBV response correlated with a sustained HIV response to antiretroviral therapy, usually HAART including lamivudine.

  14. Bone mineral density changes in protease inhibitor-sparing vs. nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy: data from a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Obel, N; Nielsen, H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).......The aim of the study was to compare changes in bone mineral density (BMD) over 144 weeks in HIV-infected patients initiating nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-sparing or protease inhibitor-sparing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)....

  15. A longitudinal study of systemic inflammation and recovery of lean body mass among malnourished HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania and Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PrayGod, George; Blevins, M; Woodd, Susannah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The effects of inflammation on nutritional rehabilitation after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) are not well understood. We assessed the relationship between inflammation and body composition among patients enrolled in the Nutritional Support for African Adults Starting...... Antiretroviral therapy (NUSTART) trial in Tanzania and Zambia from 2011 to 2013. SUBJECTS/METHODS: HIV-infected, ART-eligible adults with body mass index (BMI) of

  16. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load.......Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load....

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated giant conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma: complete remission with antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo-Sánchez, Y W; Fernández-Agrafojo, D

    2017-09-05

    A 35-year-old male patient with a large unilateral haemorrhagic conjunctival tumour lesion and another contralateral haemorrhagic conjunctival flat lesion associated with violaceous cutaneous macules on the extremities and angiomatous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract as initial clinical manifestation of HIV-related immunodeficiency. Cutaneous, gastric mucosal and conjunctival biopsy was consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma with complete remission after highly active antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy. HIV-related conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma, even a large one, can have a good response to antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy without any additional topical eye treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Frequent hepatitis B virus rebound among HIV-hepatitis B virus-coinfected patients following antiretroviral therapy interruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dore, Gregory J; Soriano, Vicente; Rockstroh, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption in HIV-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients was examined in the Strategic Management of AntiRetroviral Therapy (SMART) study. METHODS: Plasma HBV DNA was measured in all hepatitis B surface antigen-positive (HBV.......0002), nondetectable HBV DNA at baseline (P = 0.007), and black race (P = 0.03). Time to ART reinitiation was shorter (7.5, 15.6, and 17.8 months; P hepatitis C virus-positive and non-HBV/hepatitis...... C virus participants in the drug conservation arm. No hepatic decompensation events occurred among HBV-positive participants in either arm. CONCLUSION: HBV DNA rebound following ART interruption is common and may be associated with accelerated immune deficiency in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients....

  19. Cellular automata approach for the dynamics of HIV infection under antiretroviral therapies: The role of the virus diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; de Figueirêdo, Pedro Hugo; Coutinho, Sérgio

    2013-10-01

    We study a cellular automata model to test the timing of antiretroviral therapy strategies for the dynamics of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We focus on the role of virus diffusion when its population is included in previous cellular automata model that describes the dynamics of the lymphocytes cells population during infection. This inclusion allows us to consider the spread of infection by the virus-cell interaction, beyond that which occurs by cell-cell contagion. The results show an acceleration of the infectious process in the absence of treatment, but show better efficiency in reducing the risk of the onset of AIDS when combined antiretroviral therapies are used even with drugs of low effectiveness. Comparison of results with clinical data supports the conclusions of this study.

  20. Plasma levels of intact and cleaved urokinase receptor decrease in HIV-1-infected patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S R; Katzenstein, T L; Pedersen, M

    2006-01-01

    Elevated blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by ELISA decrease in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). As the suPAR ELISA measures both three- and two-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)] an......Elevated blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by ELISA decrease in human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). As the suPAR ELISA measures both three- and two-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), su...... correlation with sTNFrII suggests that the individual plasma suPAR forms are linked to immune activation in HIV-1 infection....