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Sample records for evaluate comparative healthcare

  1. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitative study using cognitive interviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  2. How do healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information? A qualitive study using cognitive interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; Hendriks, M.; Rademakers, J.; Delnoij, D.M.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date, online public healthcare reports have not been effectively used by consumers. Therefore, we qualitatively examined how healthcare consumers process and evaluate comparative healthcare information on the Internet. Methods: Using semi-structured cognitive interviews, interviewees

  3. A 6-year comparative economic evaluation of healthcare costs and mortality rates of Dutch patients from conventional and CAM GPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Erik W; Kooreman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare healthcare costs and mortality rates of Dutch patients with a conventional (CON) general practitioner (GP) and patients with a GP who has additionally completed training in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design Comparative economic evaluation. Setting Database from the Dutch insurance company Agis. Participants 1 521 773 patients (98.8%) from a CON practice and 18 862 patients (1.2%) from a CAM practice. Main outcome measures Annual information on five types of healthcare costs for the years 2006–2011: care by GP, hospital care, pharmaceutical care, paramedic care and care covered by supplementary insurance. Healthcare costs in the last year of life. Mortality rates. Results The mean annual compulsory and supplementary healthcare costs of CON patients are respectively €1821 (95% CI 1813 to 1828) and €75.3 (95% CI 75.1 to 75.5). Compulsory healthcare costs of CAM patients are €225 (95% CI 169 to 281; pcompulsory and supplementary healthcare costs and do not live longer or shorter than CON patients. PMID:25164536

  4. Evaluating in a Healthcare Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janne Jul

    2007-01-01

    The think-aloud protocol, also known as concurrent verbalisation protocol, is widely used in the field of HCI today, but as the technology and applications have evolved the protocol has had to cope with this. Therefore new variations of the protocol have seen the light of day. One example...... is retrospective verbalisation. To compare concurrent and retrospective verbalisation an experiment was conducted. A home healthcare application was evaluated with 15 participants using both protocols. The results of the experiment show that the two protocols have each their strengths and weaknesses...

  5. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1(st) Jan 2014 to 1(st) July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  6. A comparative evaluation of public health centers with private health training centers on primary healthcare parameters in India: a study by data envelopment analysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Davey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government; for 6 months duration from 1 st Jan 2014 to 1 st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30% and presence of health staff (100 vs 92% were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001. Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future.

  7. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context...

  8. Emerging hybridity: comparing UK healthcare regulatory arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnival, Joy; Walshe, Kieran; Boaden, Ruth

    2017-06-19

    Purpose Healthcare regulation is one means to address quality challenges in healthcare systems and is carried out using compliance, deterrence and/or improvement approaches. The four countries of the UK provide an opportunity to explore and compare different regulatory architecture and models. The purpose of this paper is to understand emerging regulatory models and associated tensions. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses qualitative methods to compare the regulatory architecture and models. Data were collected from documents, including board papers, inspection guidelines and from 48 interviewees representing a cross-section of roles from six organisational regulatory agencies. The data were analysed thematically using an a priori coding framework developed from the literature. Findings The findings show that regulatory agencies in the four countries of the UK have different approaches and methods of delivering their missions. This study finds that new hybrid regulatory models are developing which use improvement support interventions in parallel with deterrence and compliance approaches. The analysis highlights that effective regulatory oversight of quality is contingent on the ability of regulatory agencies to balance their requirements to assure and improve care. Nevertheless, they face common tensions in sustaining the balance in their requirements connected to their roles, relationships and resources. Originality/value The paper shows through its comparison of UK regulatory agencies that the development and implementation of hybrid models is complex. The paper contributes to research by identifying three tensions related to hybrid regulatory models; roles, resources and relationships which need to be managed to sustain hybrid regulatory models.

  9. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Davey; Santosh Kumar Raghav; Jai Vir Singh; Anuradha Davey; Nirankar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and...

  10. Grief among Healthcare Workers: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerea, L. Eliezer; LiMauro, Barbara F.

    1982-01-01

    Examined the prevalence and nature of grief in response to patient suffering, loss, or death among healthcare workers. Skilled nursing facility personnel remembered experiencing bereavement in response to crises of their geriatric patients. Mourning occurred among virtually all general hospital personnel who usually serve younger patients. (Author)

  11. Comparing Relational and Ontological Triple Stores in Healthcare Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgu Can

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s technological improvements have made ubiquitous healthcare systems that converge into smart healthcare applications in order to solve patients’ problems, to communicate effectively with patients, and to improve healthcare service quality. The first step of building a smart healthcare information system is representing the healthcare data as connected, reachable, and sharable. In order to achieve this representation, ontologies are used to describe the healthcare data. Combining ontological healthcare data with the used and obtained data can be maintained by storing the entire health domain data inside big data stores that support both relational and graph-based ontological data. There are several big data stores and different types of big data sets in the healthcare domain. The goal of this paper is to determine the most applicable ontology data store for storing the big healthcare data. For this purpose, AllegroGraph and Oracle 12c data stores are compared based on their infrastructural capacity, loading time, and query response times. Hence, healthcare ontologies (GENE Ontology, Gene Expression Ontology (GEXO, Regulation of Transcription Ontology (RETO, Regulation of Gene Expression Ontology (REXO are used to measure the ontology loading time. Thereafter, various queries are constructed and executed for GENE ontology in order to measure the capacity and query response times for the performance comparison between AllegroGraph and Oracle 12c triple stores.

  12. Evidence-based healthcare management competency evaluation: alumni perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kenneth R; Clement, Dolores G; Nayar, Preethy

    2006-01-01

    An ongoing concern of healthcare educators is how well students are prepared for practice after they are graduated. Curriculum design and pedagogical methods are central components for developing healthcare management and leadership competencies. Various stakeholders have identified competency domains and typologies that outline the requisite skills and expertise to manage and lead healthcare organizations. This study analyzes survey data over a ten-year period from alumni one-year post graduation to compare self-reported assessment of competency development. Trends across two graduate professional programs tailored to different students of healthcare administration are compared. A total of 302 alumni responded to the survey. A factor analysis is performed to evaluate how the skills, knowledge, and abilities of graduates fit into identified competency domains. Fourteen competencies on the survey load into four factor domains: leadership, communication, business skills, and technology.

  13. Comparability and biosimilarity: considerations for the healthcare provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaymi F; Litten, Jason B; Grampp, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Healthcare providers use recombinant biologics such as monoclonal antibodies to treat a variety of serious illnesses. Manufacturing of approved biotechnology products is complex, and the quality of the resulting biologic is dependent on careful control of process inputs and operating conditions. Biosimilars, which are similar but not identical to innovator biologics, are entering regulatory evaluation, approval, and marketing in regions with biosimilar approval pathways. This article describes the evaluation and potential impact of manufacturing process changes and biosimilar product development, and explores the similarities and distinctions between the two. Regulatory agencies generally require a comparability exercise following a manufacturing process change. This comparability is focused primarily on analytical characterization of the approved product before and after the manufacturing process change, with non-clinical and clinical confirmation required when determined necessary. When developing a biosimilar, the manufacturer does not have access to key information including the innovator manufacturer's cell line, cell culture conditions, purification procedures, and fill and finish processes. Further, the biosimilar manufacturer does not have access to information about the innovator manufacturer's product development history, including knowledge about the quality attributes of lots used in non-clinical and clinical development. We define the biosimilar manufacturer's lack of information as the knowledge gap. As a result, a biosimilarity exercise to compare a biosimilar to an approved innovator biologic requires a rigorous evaluation to ensure the safety and efficacy of the biosimilar. Given the knowledge gap under which biosimilars are developed, data to establish biosimilarity should go beyond a simple comparability exercise.

  14. Mechanisms that Trigger a Good Health-Care Response to Intimate Partner Violence in Spain. Combining Realist Evaluation and Qualitative Comparative Analysis Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Marchal, Bruno; Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Otero-García, Laura; García-Quinto, Marta; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals, especially those working in primary health-care services, can play a key role in preventing and responding to intimate partner violence. However, there are huge variations in the way health care professionals and primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence. In this study we tested a previously developed programme theory on 15 primary health care center teams located in four different Spanish regions: Murcia, C Valenciana, Castilla-León and Cantabria. The aim was to identify the key combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that trigger a good primary health care center team response to intimate partner violence. A multiple case-study design was used. Qualitative and quantitative information was collected from each of the 15 centers (cases). In order to handle the large amount of information without losing familiarity with each case, qualitative comparative analysis was undertaken. Conditions (context and mechanisms) and outcomes, were identified and assessed for each of the 15 cases, and solution formulae were calculated using qualitative comparative analysis software. The emerging programme theory highlighted the importance of the combination of each team's self-efficacy, perceived preparation and women-centredness in generating a good team response to intimate partner violence. The use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care were the most relevant contextual/intervention conditions to trigger a good response. However in order to achieve this, they must be combined with other conditions, such as an enabling team climate, having a champion social worker and having staff with training in intimate partner violence. Interventions to improve primary health care teams' response to intimate partner violence should focus on strengthening team's self-efficacy, perceived preparation and the implementation of a woman-centred approach. The use of the protocol combined with a large working

  15. Evaluating Burnout among Administrative and Healthcare Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khorshidian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Burnout is an occupational hazard which is known as one of the major factors affecting employees’ psychological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate occupational burnout among administrative and healthcare staffs of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional study, 300 employees (150 administrative staff and 150 health care staff were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean of burnout was 2.33±0.60. The results showed no significant difference between men and women employees in terms of occupational burnout and its three dimensions. Moreover, a significant difference between administrative and medical staffs  were found only in the dimension of emotional exhaustion. The mean score of emotional exhaustion in the administrative staff was significantly lower than that of their peers in the healthcare sector (2.03±0.84vs. 2.36±1.00 (p=0.03. Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of employees reported an average level of burnout .Such finding was in agreement with the results reported in previous studies. The obtained results can pave the way for further study on the identifying determinants of burnout.

  16. Direct healthcare costs and cost-effectiveness of acute coronary syndrome secondary prevention with ticagrelor compared to clopidogrel: economic evaluation from the public payer's perspective in Poland based on the PLATO trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawęska, Justyna; Macioch, Tomasz; Perkowski, Piotr; Budaj, Andrzej; Niewada, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ticagrelor is the first reversibly binding oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist designed to reduce clinical thrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Compared to clopidogrel, ticagrelor has been proven to significantly reduce the rate of death from vascular causes, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke without an increase in the rate of overall major bleeding in patients who have an ACS with or without ST-segment elevation (STEMI and NSTEMI) or unstable angina (UA). To evaluate the cost-effectiveness and healthcare costs associated with secondary prevention of ACS using ticagrelor or clopidogrel in patients after STEMI, NSTEMI and UA. An economic model based on results from the PLATO trial was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of one-year therapy with ticagrelor or clopidogrel. The structure of the model consisted of two parts, i.e. the decision tree with one-year PLATO results and the Markov model with lifelong estimations, which exceeded PLATO follow-up data. The model was adjusted to Polish settings with country-specific data on death rates in the general population and direct medical costs calculated from the public payer's perspective. Costs were derived from the National Health Fund (NHF) and the Ministry of Health and presented in PLN 2013 values. Annual mean costs of second and subsequent years after stroke or MI were obtained from the literature. Uncertainty of assumed parameters was tested in scenarios and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. The adopted model allowed the estimation of an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for life years gained (LYG) and an incremental cost-utility ratio for quality adjusted life years (QALY). Total direct medical costs to the public payer at a one year horizon were 2,905 PLN higher with ticagrelor than with clopidogrel. However, mean healthcare costs at a one year horizon (excluding drug costs and concomitant drugs) were 690 PLN higher for patients treated with clopidogrel. In a lifetime horizon

  17. The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. O'Donnell (Owen); E.K.A. van Doorslaer (Eddy); R.P. Rannan-Eliya (Ravi)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe article compares the incidence of public healthcare across 11 Asian countries and provinces, testing the dominance of healthcare concentration curves against an equal distribution and Lorenz curves and across countries. The analysis reveals that the distribution of public healthcare

  18. Toolkit for healthcare facility design evaluation - some case studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available "? This is notoriously difficult to evaluate but, this paper argues, there would be much to be gained from a systematic, reliable and replicable framework for doing so. Internationally, some design evaluation toolkits specifically for healthcare facilities have been...

  19. Toolkit for healthcare facility design evaluation - some case studies.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Jager, Peta

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available "? This is notoriously difficult to evaluate but, this paper argues, there would be much to be gained from a systematic, reliable and replicable framework for doing so. Internationally, some design evaluation toolkits specifically for healthcare facilities have been...

  20. Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  1. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined. PMID:20482843

  2. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Shannon L; Gibson, Jennifer L; Singer, Peter A; Upshur, Ross; Martin, Douglas K

    2010-05-19

    In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy) there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework). The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined.

  3. Evaluating priority setting success in healthcare: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In healthcare today, decisions are made in the face of serious resource constraints. Healthcare managers are struggling to provide high quality care, manage resources effectively, and meet changing patient needs. Healthcare managers who are constantly making difficult resource decisions desire a way to improve their priority setting processes. Despite the wealth of existing priority setting literature (for example, program budgeting and marginal analysis, accountability for reasonableness, the 'describe-evaluate-improve' strategy there are still no tools to evaluate how healthcare resources are prioritised. This paper describes the development and piloting of a process to evaluate priority setting in health institutions. The evaluation process was designed to examine the procedural and substantive dimensions of priority setting using a multi-methods approach, including a staff survey, decision-maker interviews, and document analysis. Methods The evaluation process was piloted in a mid-size community hospital in Ontario, Canada while its leaders worked through their annual budgeting process. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to analyze the data. Results The evaluation process was both applicable to the context and it captured the budgeting process. In general, the pilot test provided support for our evaluation process and our definition of success, (i.e., our conceptual framework. Conclusions The purpose of the evaluation process is to provide a simple, practical way for an organization to better understand what it means to achieve success in its priority setting activities and identify areas for improvement. In order for the process to be used by healthcare managers today, modification and contextualization of the process are anticipated. As the evaluation process is applied in more health care organizations or applied repeatedly in an organization, it may become more streamlined.

  4. An evaluation of the feasibility and validity of a patient-administered malnutrition universal screening tool ('MUST') compared to healthcare professional screening in an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keetarut, K; Zacharopoulou-Otapasidou, S; Bloom, S; Majumdar, A; Patel, P S

    2017-12-01

    Malnutrition is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is associated with poor health outcomes. Despite this, screening for malnutrition in the outpatient-setting is not routine and research in the area is limited. The present study aimed to evaluate whether agreement between malnutrition screening completed by patients and healthcare professionals (HCPs) could be achieved by comparing patient self-administered 'MUST' ('MUST'-P) with HCP administered 'MUST' ('MUST'-HCP) in a single tertiary IBD outpatient clinic. We conducted a feasibility and validity study on adult outpatients with IBD. We collected anthropometric, nutritional and clinical data from patients. All patients completed 'MUST'-P using a self-administered questionnaire, followed by 'MUST'-HCP. 'MUST'-P was timed and feedback on ease-of-use was obtained. The risk of malnutrition was classified as low (score = 0), medium (score = 1) and high (score ≥ 2) and agreement was tested using kappa statistics (κ). Eighty patients were recruited (Crohn's disease: n = 49, ulcerative colitis: n = 29, unclassified: n = 2), with a mean (SD) age of 39.9 (15.1) years (51.2% were males). Seventy-one (92%) of patients found 'MUST'-P either easy or very easy. The mean (SD) time to complete 'MUST'-P was 3.1  (1.8) min (range 1-10 min). Sixty-eight (85%) of patients were at low risk of malnutrition when screened by the HCP. There was moderate agreement (κ = 0.486, P MUST'-P and 'MUST'-HCP, with 100% agreement in scoring for medium- and high-risk categories. The results of the present study suggests that self-screening using 'MUST' could be effectively used in an IBD outpatient clinic to identify those at medium and high risk of malnutrition. The patient friendly version of 'MUST' ('MUST'-P) was considered quick and easy to use by patients. Implementation of self-screening with 'MUST' could improve the nutritional management of IBD patients. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Development and psychometric testing of an instrument to compare career choice influences and perceptions of nursing among healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Sok Ying; Wu, Ling Ting; Lopez, Violeta; Chow, Yeow Leng; Lim, Siriwan; Holroyd, Eleanor; Tan, Khoon Kiat; Wang, Wenru

    2017-04-27

    With the availability of more healthcare courses and an increased intake of nursing students, education institutions are facing challenges to attract school leavers to enter nursing courses. The comparison of career choice influences and perception of nursing among healthcare students can provide information for recruitment strategies. An instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice is lacking. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of an instrument to compare the influences of healthcare career choice with perceptions of nursing as a career choice. The study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, two sets of scales with parallel items that measure the influences of healthcare career choice and perceptions of nursing as a career choice were developed through an earlier qualitative study, literature review, and expert validation. Phase two involved testing the construct validity, concurrent validity and reliability with a convenience sample of 283 first year healthcare students who were recruited at two education institutions in Singapore. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 35-parallel items in a six-factor solution (personal interest, prior healthcare exposure, self-efficacy, perceived nature of work, job prospects, and social influences) that explained 59 and 64% of the variance for healthcare career choice and nursing as a career choice respectively. A high correlation (r = 0.76, p nursing as a career choice. The test-retest reliability was acceptable with an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.63 for healthcare career choice and 0.60 for nursing as a career choice. The instrument provides opportunities for understanding the differences between influences of healthcare career choice and perceptions of nursing as a career choice. This comparative understanding of career choice influences can guide educator and policy-makers on nursing recruitment.

  6. Evaluating a healthcare data warehouse for cancer diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Dr. Osama E.; Eldeen, Ahmed Nour

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the architecture of healthcare data warehouse specific to cancer diseases. This data warehouse containing relevant cancer medical information and patient data. The data warehouse provides the source for all current and historical health data to help executive manager and doctors to improve the decision making process for cancer patients. The evaluation model based on Bill Inmon's definition of data warehouse is proposed to evaluate the Cancer data warehouse.

  7. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  8. Comparative study of the primary healthcare systems in China and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most satisfied people in both countries were those living in the poorest socioeconomic conditions, the elderly, and those who attended the healthcare meetings. Chinese households were more satisfied with the quality of the CHC services than those in Mali. The Chinese management boards proposed standardisation ...

  9. Requirements for an evaluation infrastructure for reliable pervasive healthcare research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Stefan Rahr; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Bertelsen, Olav W.

    2012-01-01

    The need for a non-intrusive evaluation infrastructure platform to support research on reliable pervasive healthcare in the unsupervised setting is analyzed and challenges and possibilities are identified. A list of requirements is presented and a solution is suggested that would allow researchers...

  10. Systematic review of methods for evaluating healthcare research economic impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdzadeh Reza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic benefits of healthcare research require study so that appropriate resources can be allocated to this research, particularly in developing countries. As a first step, we performed a systematic review to identify the methods used to assess the economic impact of healthcare research, and the outcomes. Method An electronic search was conducted in relevant databases using a combination of specific keywords. In addition, 21 relevant Web sites were identified. Results The initial search yielded 8,416 articles. After studying titles, abstracts, and full texts, 18 articles were included in the analysis. Eleven other reports were found on Web sites. We found that the outcomes assessed as healthcare research payback included direct cost-savings, cost reductions in healthcare delivery systems, benefits from commercial advancement, and outcomes associated with improved health status. Two methods were used to study healthcare research payback: macro-economic studies, which examine the relationship between research studies and economic outcome at the aggregated level, and case studies, which examine specific research projects to assess economic impact. Conclusions Our study shows that different methods and outcomes can be used to assess the economic impacts of healthcare research. There is no unique methodological approach for the economic evaluation of such research. In our systematic search we found no research that had evaluated the economic return of research in low and middle income countries. We therefore recommend a consensus on practical guidelines at international level on the basis of more comprehensive methodologies (such as Canadian Academic of Health Science and payback frameworks in order to build capacity, arrange for necessary informative infrastructures and promote necessary skills for economic evaluation studies.

  11. Evaluating Complex Healthcare Systems: A Critique of Four Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Boon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to bring clarity to the emerging conceptual and methodological literature that focuses on understanding and evaluating complex or ‘whole’ systems of healthcare. An international working group reviewed literature from interdisciplinary or interprofessional groups describing approaches to the evaluation of complex systems of healthcare. The following four key approaches were identified: a framework from the MRC (UK, whole systems research, whole medical systems research described by NCCAM (USA and a model from NAFKAM (Norway. Main areas of congruence include acknowledgment of the inherent complexity of many healthcare interventions and the need to find new ways to evaluate these; the need to describe and understand the components of complex interventions in context (as they are actually practiced; the necessity of using mixed methods including randomized clinical trials (RCTs (explanatory and pragmatic and qualitative approaches; the perceived benefits of a multidisciplinary team approach to research; and the understanding that methodological developments in this field can be applied to both complementary and alternative medicine (CAM as well as conventional therapies. In contrast, the approaches differ in the following ways: terminology used, the extent to which the approach attempts to be applicable to both CAM and conventional medical interventions; the prioritization of research questions (in order of what should be done first especially with respect to how the ‘definitive’ RCT fits into the process of assessing complex healthcare systems; and the need for a staged approach. There appears to be a growing international understanding of the need for a new perspective on assessing complex healthcare systems.

  12. An overview of methods and applications to value informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmanschap, M.A.; van Exel, J.N.; van den Berg, B.; Brouwer, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares several applied valuation methods for including informal care in economic evaluations of healthcare programmes: the proxy good method; the opportunity cost method; the contingent valuation method (CVM); conjoint measurement (CM); and valuation of health effects in terms of

  13. Designing questionnaires: healthcare survey to compare two different response scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A widely discussed design issue in patient satisfaction questionnaires is the optimal length and labelling of the answering scale. The aim of the present study was to compare intra-individually the answers on two response scales to five general questions evaluating patients’ perception of hospital care. Methods Between November 2011 and January 2012, all in-hospital patients at a Swiss University Hospital received a patient satisfaction questionnaire on an adjectival scale with three to four labelled categories (LS) and five redundant questions displayed on an 11-point end-anchored numeric scale (NS). The scales were compared concerning ceiling effect, internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha), individual item answers (Spearman’s rank correlation), and concerning overall satisfaction by calculating an overall percentage score (sum of all answers related to the maximum possible sum). Results The response rate was 41% (2957/7158), of which 2400 (81%) completely filled out all questions. Baseline characteristics of the responders and non-responders were similar. Floor and ceiling effect were high on both response scales, but more pronounced on the LS than on the NS. Cronbach’s alpha was higher on the NS than on the LS. There was a strong individual item correlation between both answering scales in questions regarding the intent to return, quality of treatment and the judgement whether the patient was treated with respect and dignity, but a lower correlation concerning satisfactory information transfer by physicians or nurses, where only three categories were available in the LS. The overall percentage score showed a comparable distribution, but with a wider spread of lower satisfaction in the NS. Conclusions Since the longer scale did not substantially reduce the ceiling effect, the type of questions rather than the type of answering scale could be addressed with a focus on specific questions about concrete situations instead of general questions

  14. Development and Evaluation of an Evaluation Tool for Healthcare Smartphone Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meiling; Kim, Jeongeun

    2015-10-01

    Various types of healthcare smartphone applications (apps) have been released in recent years, making it possible for people to manage their health anytime and anywhere. As a healthcare provider, who has the responsibility to provide guidance as to which apps can be used? The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an evaluation tool for the various aspects of healthcare smartphone apps. In the first phase, a provisional version of an evaluation tool for healthcare smartphone apps was developed from a review of previous studies. In the second phase, the provisional tool was modified and edited after verification by five experts with regard to its content validity. In the third phase, from September 25 to October 4, 2013, 200 responses were collected to verify the construct validity and reliability of the tool. The edited tool had 23 evaluating items with three evaluating factors along with seven subevaluating factors as a result of confirmatory factor analysis. The reliability was found to be high (0.905). This study is meaningful because it demonstrates a healthcare smartphone app evaluation tool that is proven in terms of its validity and reliability. The evaluation tool developed and tested in this study is an appropriate and widely applicable tool with which to evaluate healthcare smartphone apps to determine if they are reliable and useful. However, this evaluation tool represents the beginning of the research in this area.

  15. Program evaluation of remote heart failure monitoring: healthcare utilization analysis in a rural regional medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Keberlein, Pamela; Sorenson, Gigi; Mohler, Sailor; Tye, Blake; Ramirez, A Susana; Carroll, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Remote monitoring for heart failure (HF) has had mixed and heterogeneous effects across studies, necessitating further evaluation of remote monitoring systems within specific healthcare systems and their patient populations. "Care Beyond Walls and Wires," a wireless remote monitoring program to facilitate patient and care team co-management of HF patients, served by a rural regional medical center, provided the opportunity to evaluate the effects of this program on healthcare utilization. Fifty HF patients admitted to Flagstaff Medical Center (Flagstaff, AZ) participated in the project. Many of these patients lived in underserved and rural communities, including Native American reservations. Enrolled patients received mobile, broadband-enabled remote monitoring devices. A matched cohort was identified for comparison. HF patients enrolled in this program showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in healthcare utilization during the 6 months following enrollment, and these reductions were significantly greater compared with those who declined to participate but not when compared with a matched cohort. The findings from this project indicate that a remote HF monitoring program can be successfully implemented in a rural, underserved area. Reductions in healthcare utilization were observed among program participants, but reductions were also observed among a matched cohort, illustrating the need for rigorous assessment of the effects of HF remote monitoring programs in healthcare systems.

  16. Benchmarking healthcare logistics processes: a comparative case study of Danish and US hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feibert, Diana Cordes; Andersen, Bjørn; Jacobsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Logistics processes in hospitals are vital in the provision of patient care. Improving healthcare logistics processes provides an opportunity for reduced healthcare costs and better support of clinical processes. Hospitals are faced with increasing healthcare costs around the world and improvement...... initiatives prevalent in manufacturing industries such as lean, business process reengineering and benchmarking have seen an increase in use in healthcare. This study investigates how logistics processes in a hospital can be benchmarked to improve process performance. A comparative case study of the bed...... logistics process and the pharmaceutical distribution process was conducted at a Danish and a US hospital. The case study results identified decision criteria for designing efficient and effective healthcare logistics processes. The most important decision criteria were related to quality, security...

  17. Decision-analytical modelling in health-care economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Faunce, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Decision-analytical modelling is widely used in health-care economic evaluations, especially in situations where evaluators lack clinical trial data, and in circumstances where such evaluations factor into reimbursement pricing decisions. This paper aims to improve the understanding and use of modelling techniques in this context, with particular emphasis on Markov modelling. We provide an overview, in this paper, of the principles and methodological details of decision-analytical modelling. We propose a common route for practicing modelling that accommodates any type of decision-analytical modelling techniques. We use the treatment of chronic hepatitis B as an example to indicate the process of development, presentation and analysis of the Markov model, and discuss the strengths, weaknesses and pitfalls of different approaches. Good practice of modelling requires careful planning, conduct and analysis of the model, and needs input from modellers and users.

  18. [Today's jobs in the healthcare sector are comparable to other professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, H-J

    2014-08-01

    By applying current standards of job descriptions and performance profiles in the healthcare sector, this article focuses on the issue whether there are fundamental differences between physicians and other healthcare professionals compared to other professions. There are special requirements for physicians, such as a university degree, but the same also holds true for other professions. The increasing economization of the healthcare sector in recent years has led to a situation where differences in the standards for healthcare professionals when compared to other occupations are no longer apparent. Medical directors at university hospitals also have to conform to standards that are applied to executive managers in other businesses. Besides the obvious professional skills, communication with patients and collaborators, knowledge of economics and leadership competence are also mandatory. This does not exclude the impression that physicians and nurses subjectively see in their profession more than just a job but truly a vocation.

  19. Evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrenti, Eloá; Mira, Vera Lúcia; Bucchi, Sarah Marília; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the scientific literature on the evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals. Integrative literature review in which were reviewed the following databases: VHL, Pubmed and Cochrane. The final sample was composed of 19 articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish published from 2000 to July 2010. The subject of study was the evaluation of formal educational processes for health professionals, which had at least the abstract available online. There is no use of a systematic methodology to evaluate the formal educational processes in this study group. The evaluation focus mainly on the learning of participants, with little attention to the teaching process. There are no evaluations on the impact caused by this type of training in institutions and users of the health system, which can incur the risk of reducing the value of formal education processes. A full evaluation of the formal educational processes for professionals during a longer time is important to assess the impact of these processes and provide information about the necessities of continuing education of this population.

  20. Aviation and healthcare: a comparative review with implications for patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parand, Anam; Soukup, Tayana; Reader, Tom; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Safety in aviation has often been compared with safety in healthcare. Following a recent article in this journal, the UK government set up an Independent Patient Safety Investigation Service, to emulate a similar well-established body in aviation. On the basis of a detailed review of relevant publications that examine patient safety in the context of aviation practice, we have drawn up a table of comparative features and a conceptual framework for patient safety. Convergence and divergence of safety-related behaviours across aviation and healthcare were derived and documented. Key safety-related domains that emerged included Checklists, Training, Crew Resource Management, Sterile Cockpit, Investigation and Reporting of Incidents and Organisational Culture. We conclude that whilst healthcare has much to learn from aviation in certain key domains, the transfer of lessons from aviation to healthcare needs to be nuanced, with the specific characteristics and needs of healthcare borne in mind. On the basis of this review, it is recommended that healthcare should emulate aviation in its resourcing of staff who specialise in human factors and related psychological aspects of patient safety and staff wellbeing. Professional and post-qualification staff training could specifically include Cognitive Bias Avoidance Training, as this appears to play a key part in many errors relating to patient safety and staff wellbeing. PMID:26770817

  1. Study protocol: an evaluation of the effectiveness, experiences and costs of a patient-directed strategy compared with a multi-faceted strategy to implement physical cancer rehabilitation programmes for cancer survivors in a European healthcare system; a controlled before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJsbrandy, Charlotte; Ottevanger, Petronella B; Groen, Wim G; Gerritsen, Winald R; van Harten, Wim H; Hermens, Rosella P M G

    2015-09-07

    implementing PCRPs. Step 3: Test and compare both strategies with a clustered CBA (effectiveness, process evaluation and costs), by data extraction from existing registration systems, questionnaires and interviews. For the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, n = 500 patients, 50 per hospital. For the process evaluation, n = 50 patients, 5 per hospital, and n = 40 healthcare professionals, 4 per hospital. % screened patients, % referrals to PCRPs, incremental costs and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). NCT02205853 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  2. Comparative health-care cost advantage of ipratropium over tiotropium in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormuth, Colin R; Yamaguchi, Jesse; Wilmer, Brett; Hosick, David; Stürmer, Til; Carney, Greg

    2012-01-01

    To compare the total direct health-care costs of patients treated with tiotropium and ipratropium. We conducted a cohort study of health-care costs in British Columbia, Canada, by comparing new patients on tiotropium with new patients on ipratropium. Direct health-care costs for study patients were measured in the first 2 years after initiating inhaled anticholinergic treatment. Differences in direct health-care costs between tiotropium and ipratropium patients were estimated by using quantile regression. We analyzed cost differences in the 10th percentile, median, and 90th percentile of patients by cost. High-dimensional propensity score analysis was used as a method of adjustment for potential confounding factors. The study population had 3,140 tiotropium patients and 26,182 ipratropium patients. Higher health system costs in patients who started on tiotropium instead of ipratropium were observed in patients in the median and 10th percentile. The magnitude of these increases was comparable to the price difference between the two drugs. Health system costs in the 90th percentile were not significantly different between tiotropium and ipratropium patients. The results of this study did not support the preferential use of tiotropium over ipratropium as a basis for savings in direct health-care costs. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation and Evaluation of Future Demand and Supply of Healthcare Services Based on a Patient Access Area Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Doi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Accessibility to healthcare service providers, the quantity, and the quality of them are important for national health. In this study, we focused on geographic accessibility to estimate and evaluate future demand and supply of healthcare services. We constructed a simulation model called the patient access area model (PAAM, which simulates patients’ access time to healthcare service institutions using a geographic information system (GIS. Using this model, to evaluate the balance of future healthcare services demand and supply in small areas, we estimated the number of inpatients every five years in each area and compared it with the number of hospital beds within a one-hour drive from each area. In an experiment with the Tokyo metropolitan area as a target area, when we assumed hospital bed availability to be 80%, it was predicted that over 78,000 inpatients would not receive inpatient care in 2030. However, this number would decrease if we lowered the rate of inpatient care by 10% and the average length of the hospital stay. Using this model, recommendations can be made regarding what action should be undertaken and by when to prevent a dramatic increase in healthcare demand. This method can help plan the geographical resource allocation in healthcare services for healthcare policy.

  4. Comparing VA and private sector healthcare costs for end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Denise M; Stroupe, Kevin T; Fischer, Michael J; Reda, Domenic J; Manning, Willard; Browning, Margaret M; Huo, Zhiping; Saban, Karen; Kaufman, James S

    2012-02-01

    Healthcare for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is intensive, expensive, and provided in both the public and private sector. Using a societal perspective, we examined healthcare costs and health outcomes for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) ESRD patients comparing those who received hemodialysis care at VA versus private sector facilities. Dialysis patients were recruited from 8 VA medical centers from 2001 through 2003 and followed for 12 months in a prospective cohort study. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, quality of life, healthcare use, and cost data were collected. Healthcare data included utilization (VA), claims (Medicare), and patient self-report. Costs included VA calculated costs, Medicare dialysis facility reports and reimbursement rates, and patient self-report. Multivariable regression was used to compare costs between patients receiving dialysis at VA versus private sector facilities. The cohort comprised 334 patients: 170 patients in the VA dialysis group and 164 patients in the private sector group. The VA dialysis group had more comorbidities at baseline, outpatient and emergency visits, prescriptions, and longer hospital stays; they also had more conservative anemia management and lower baseline urea reduction ratio (67% vs. 72%; Pprivate sector dialysis group (Pprivate sector settings is critical in informing health policy options for patients with complex chronic illnesses such as ESRD.

  5. Comparing interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration in healthcare: A systematic review of the qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Marlène; Brault, Isabelle; Van Durme, Thérèse; Macq, Jean

    2017-11-11

    Interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration have become important components of a well-functioning healthcare system, all the more so given limited financial resources, aging populations, and comorbid chronic diseases. The nursing role in working alongside other healthcare professionals is critical. By their leadership, nurses can create a culture that encourages values and role models that favour collaborative work within a team context. To clarify the specific features of conceptual frameworks of interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration in the healthcare field. This review, accordingly, offers insights into the key challenges facing policymakers, managers, healthcare professionals, and nurse leaders in planning, implementing, or evaluating interprofessional collaboration. This systematic review of qualitative research is based on the Joanna Briggs Institute's methodology for conducting synthesis. Cochrane, JBI, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Sociological Abstract, PsycInfo, and ProQuest were searched, using terms such as professionals, organizations, collaboration, and frameworks. Qualitative studies of all research design types describing a conceptual framework of interprofessional or interorganizational collaboration in the healthcare field were included. They had to be written in French or English and published in the ten years between 2004 and 2014. Sixteen qualitative articles were included in the synthesis. Several concepts were found to be common to interprofessional and interorganizational collaboration, such as communication, trust, respect, mutual acquaintanceship, power, patient-centredness, task characteristics, and environment. Other concepts are of particular importance either to interorganizational collaboration, such as the need for formalization and the need for professional role clarification, or to interprofessional collaboration, such as the role of individuals and team identity. Promoting

  6. Emerging technologies in healthcare: navigating risks, evaluating rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Elizabeth; Conger, Sue; Blanke, Sandra; Landry, Brett J L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this prescriptive research is to help decision makers become better informed about three technologies emerging in the healthcare arena by providing a basic description of the technology and describing their current applications, future healthcare deployment, potential risks, and related managerial issues. Two of the technologies, radio frequency identification (RFID) and global positioning systems (GPS), are currently available to healthcare organizations and appear capable of decreasing cost but may require significant initial investment and have disruptive potential. The third technology, nanotechnology, has limited current use but may revolutionize both the delivery of medicine and hospital infrastructure management. With cautious attention to managerial issues and meticulous attention to implementation details, healthcare organizations that can successfully navigate the coming technologically driven paradigm shifts will emerge more resilient organizations.

  7. Digital Identifier Systems: Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Khedmatgozar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Identifier is one of the main elements in identifying an object in digital environment. Digital identifier systems were developed followed by a lot of problems such as violation of persistency and uniqueness of physical identifiers and URL in digital environment. These identifiers try to guarantee uniqueness and persistency of hostnames by using indirect names for Domain Name System (DNS. The main objective of this research is to identify qualified digital identifier system among other systems. To achieve the research objective, researchers have considered two major steps: first, identifying main criteria for distinguishing digital identifier based on literature review and focus group interview; and second, performing a comparative evaluation on common identifier systems in the world. Findings of first step demonstrated seven main criteria in three domains for distinguishing digital identifier systems: identifier uniqueness and persistency in the identifier features domain, digital identification, digital uniqueness, digital persistency and digital actionability in the digital coverage domain, and globality in the comprehensiveness of scope domain. In the second step, results of the comparative evaluation on common identifier systems indicated that six identifier systems, included, DOI, Handle, UCI, URN, ARK and PURL, are appropriate choices for using as a digital identifier system. Also, according to these results, three identification systems Including NBN, MARIAM and ISNI were identified as suitable choices for digital identification in certain specialized fields. According to many benefits of using these identifiers in important applied fields, such as, digital content chains and networks integration, digital right management, cross referencing, digital libraries and citation analysis, results of this study can help digital environment experts to diagnose digital identifier and their effective use in applied fields.

  8. Innovative use of the integrative review to evaluate evidence of technology transformation in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew B; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2015-12-01

    Healthcare is in a period significant transformational activity through the accelerated adoption of healthcare technologies, new reimbursement systems that emphasize shared savings and care coordination, and the common place use of mobile technologies by patients, providers, and others. The complexity of healthcare creates barriers to transformational activity and has the potential to inhibit the desired paths toward change envisioned by policymakers. Methods for understanding how change is occurring within this complex environment are important to the evaluation of delivery system reform and the role of technology in healthcare transformation. This study examines the use on an integrative review methodology to evaluate the healthcare literature for evidence of technology transformation in healthcare. The methodology integrates the evaluation of a broad set of literature with an established evaluative framework to develop a more complete understanding of a particular topic. We applied this methodology and the framework of punctuated equilibrium (PEq) to the analysis of the healthcare literature from 2004 to 2012 for evidence of technology transformation, a time during which technology was at the forefront of healthcare policy. The analysis demonstrated that the established PEq framework applied to the literature showed considerable potential for evaluating the progress of policies that encourage healthcare transformation. Significant inhibitors to change were identified through the integrative review and categorized into ten themes that describe the resistant structure of healthcare delivery: variations in the environment; market complexity; regulations; flawed risks and rewards; change theories; barriers; ethical considerations; competition and sustainability; environmental elements, and internal elements. We hypothesize that the resistant nature of the healthcare system described by this study creates barriers to the direct consumer involvement and engagement

  9. Building and Evaluating Research Capacity in Healthcare Systems ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    29 juin 2016 ... ... and development programmes in Africa. Eulalia Kokuangisa Kahwa teaches at the UWI School of Nursing, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica. She is a nurse and nutritionist with over 30 years' experience in healthcare and nursing education, particularly in the fields of HIV/AIDS and asthma.

  10. A comparative study of safety climate differences in healthcare and the petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Espen; Aase, Karina

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this article is to compare safety climate in healthcare and the petroleum industry by collecting empirical evidence of differences between the two sectors. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) is used to measure the safety climate in two organisations operating in the two different sectors: (1) a large Norwegian university hospital offering a wide range of hospital services and (2) a large Norwegian petroleum company producing oil and gas worldwide. Statistical analyses supported the expected hypotheses that safety climate is positively related to outcome measures and that the level on safety climate and outcome measures are generally higher in the petroleum sector. Empirical findings indicate that healthcare should learn from the petroleum industry regarding safety improvement efforts, and the implication of this is discussed in the paper.

  11. Comparing the health state preferences of older persons, informal caregivers and healthcare professionals: a vignette study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia S Hofman

    Full Text Available The Older Persons and Informal Caregivers Survey-Minimum Dataset (TOPICS-MDS collects uniform information from research projects funded under the Dutch National Care for the Elderly Programme. To compare the effectiveness of these projects a preference-weighted outcome measure that combined multidimensional TOPICS-MDS outcomes into a composite endpoint (TOPICS-CEP was developed based on the health state preferences of older persons and informal caregivers.To derive preference weights for TOPICS-CEP's components based on health state preferences of healthcare professionals and to investigate whether these weights differ between disciplines and differ from those of older persons and informal caregivers.Vignette studies were conducted. Participants assessed the general wellbeing of older persons described in vignettes on a scale (0-10. Mixed linear analyses were used to obtain and compare the preference weights of the eight TOPICS-CEP components: morbidities, functional limitations, emotional wellbeing, pain experience, cognitive problems, social functioning, self-perceived health, and self-perceived quality of life (QOL.Overall, 330 healthcare professionals, 124 older persons and 76 informal caregivers participated. The preference weights were not significantly different between disciplines. However, the professionals' preference weights differed significantly from those of older persons and informal caregivers. Morbidities and functional limitations were given more weight by older persons and informal caregivers than by healthcare professionals [difference between preference weights: 0.12 and 0.07] while the opposite was true for pain experience, social functioning, and self-perceived QOL [difference between preference weights: 0.13, 0.15 and 0.26].It is important to recognize the discrepancies between the health state preferences of various stakeholders to (1 correctly interpret results when studying the effectiveness of interventions in elderly

  12. Evaluating integrated healthcare for refugees and hosts in an African context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuepker, Anais; Chi, Chunhuei

    2009-04-01

    This paper argues on ethical and practical grounds for more widespread use of an integrated approach to refugee healthcare, and proposes a basic model of assessment for integrated systems. A defining element of an integrated approach is an equal ability by refugee and host nationals to access the same healthcare resources from the same providers. This differs fundamentally from parallel care, currently the predominant practice in Africa. The authors put forward a general model for evaluation of integrated healthcare with four criteria: (1) improved health outcomes for both hosts and refugees, (2) increased social integration, (3) increased equitable use of healthcare resources, and (4) no undermining of protection. Historical examples of integrated care in Ethiopia and Uganda are examined in light of these criteria to illustrate how this evaluative model would generate evidence currently lacking in debates on the merit of integrated healthcare.

  13. Burnout and job satisfaction comparing healthcare staff of a dermatological hospital and a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, C; Tabolli, S; Ianni, A; Di Pietro, C; Puddu, P

    2005-03-01

    Psychological distress among healthcare professionals can have negative effects on the well-being of the professionals and also on the quality of care they provide to patients. To evaluate burnout and job satisfaction of dermatologists and nurses working with dermatological patients compared with physicians and nurses of other specialties. A self-completed anonymous questionnaire was distributed to the personnel of two hospitals in Rome, Italy: a dermatological hospital (IDI) and a general hospital (GH), belonging to the same non-profit organization. Standardized instruments were used to assess burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and job satisfaction. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the association between burnout and working in dermatology vs. other specialties, job satisfaction, years of employment and respondents' sex and age. We distributed 929 questionnaires to clinical and non-clinical staff of IDI and 494 questionnaires to the GH staff (response rates: 53% at IDI and 50% at the GH). Among respondents there were 67 physicians and 59 nurses at IDI and 70 physicians and 148 nurses at the GH. Subsequent analyses refer only to this clinical subsample. Factor analysis showed that among physicians and nurses the two main factors explaining job satisfaction were respondents 'satisfaction with the management of their unit' and 'opportunities for personal growth'. Among nurses the likelihood of burnout decreased significantly with higher levels of job satisfaction [odds ratio (OR) = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.7-0.9] and working in dermatology compared with other specialties (OR = 0.46; 95% CI 0.2-0.9). Among physicians a lower likelihood of burnout was associated with job satisfaction (OR = 0.66; 95% CI 0.5-0.8) and older age (OR = 0.28; 95% CI 0.1-0.8). Among both physicians and nurses, job satisfaction was associated with a lower likelihood of burnout, independently of clinical specialty and other factors. Burnout was similar for

  14. Introduction special issue on IT adoption and evaluation in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; Trimmer, Ken

    2013-01-01

    This special issue’s coverage truly reflects the spectrum of research areas within Ken Trimmer’s domain. The development of these papers from initial submission also reflects Dr. Trimmer’s ability to aptly match submitted paper to a review team that could insightfully mature the work. This web of scientists coming together in this special issue and in other efforts co-collaborated on elaborated into a collegial force in collectively extending knowledge in the healthcare adoption domain. Healt...

  15. Validation of instruments to evaluate primary healthcare from the patient perspective: overview of the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Jeannie L; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Pineault, Raynald; Beaulieu, Christine; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Santor, Darcy A; Gass, David; Lawson, Beverley

    2011-12-01

    Patient evaluations are an important part of monitoring primary healthcare reforms, but there is little comparative information available to guide evaluators in the choice of instruments or to determine their relevance for Canada. To compare values and the psychometric performances of validated instruments thought to be most pertinent to the Canadian context for evaluating core attributes of primary healthcare. AMONG VALIDATED INSTRUMENTS IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN, WE SELECTED SIX: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS); the Primary Care Assessment Tool - Short Form (PCAT-S); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II); and part of the Veterans Affairs National Outpatient Customer Satisfaction Survey (VANOCSS). We mapped subscales to operational definitions of attributes. All were administered to a sample of adult service users balanced by English/French language (in Nova Scotia and Quebec, respectively), urban/rural residency, high/low education and overall care experience. The sample was recruited from previous survey respondents, newspaper advertisements and community posters. We used common factor analysis to compare our factor resolution for each instrument to that of the developers. Our sample of 645 respondents was approximately balanced by design variables, but considerable effort was required to recruit low-education and poor-experience respondents. Subscale scores are statistically different by excellent, average and poor overall experience, but interpersonal communication and respectfulness scores were the most discriminating of overall experience. We found fewer factors than did the developers, but when constrained to the number of expected factors, our item loadings were largely similar to those found by developers. Subscale reliability was equivalent to or higher than that reported by developers. These instruments perform similarly in the

  16. Can Italian healthcare administrative databases be used to compare regions with respect to compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gini, Rosa; Schuemie, Martijn J; Francesconi, Paolo; Lapi, Francesco; Cricelli, Iacopo; Pasqua, Alessandro; Gallina, Pietro; Donato, Daniele; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Donatini, Andrea; Marini, Alessandro; Cricelli, Claudio; Damiani, Gianfranco; Bellentani, Mariadonata; van der Lei, Johan; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Klazinga, Niek S

    2014-01-01

    Italy has a population of 60 million and a universal coverage single-payer healthcare system, which mandates collection of healthcare administrative data in a uniform fashion throughout the country. On the other hand, organization of the health system takes place at the regional level, and local initiatives generate natural experiments. This is happening in particular in primary care, due to the need to face the growing burden of chronic diseases. Health services research can compare and evaluate local initiatives on the basis of the common healthcare administrative data.However reliability of such data in this context needs to be assessed, especially when comparing different regions of the country. In this paper we investigated the validity of healthcare administrative databases to compute indicators of compliance with standards of care for diabetes, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF). We compared indicators estimated from healthcare administrative data collected by Local Health Authorities in five Italian regions with corresponding estimates from clinical data collected by General Practitioners (GPs). Four indicators of diagnostic follow-up (two for diabetes, one for IHD and one for HF) and four indicators of appropriate therapy (two each for IHD and HF) were considered. Agreement between the two data sources was very good, except for indicators of laboratory diagnostic follow-up in one region and for the indicator of bioimaging diagnostic follow-up in all regions, where measurement with administrative data underestimated quality. According to evidence presented in this study, estimating compliance with standards of care for diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and heart failure from healthcare databases is likely to produce reliable results, even though completeness of data on diagnostic procedures should be assessed first. Performing studies comparing regions using such indicators as outcomes is a promising development with potential to improve

  17. A realist evaluation of the role of communities of practice in changing healthcare practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westbrook Johanna I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare organisations seeking to manage knowledge and improve organisational performance are increasingly investing in communities of practice (CoPs. Such investments are being made in the absence of empirical evidence demonstrating the impact of CoPs in improving the delivery of healthcare. A realist evaluation is proposed to address this knowledge gap. Underpinned by the principle that outcomes are determined by the context in which an intervention is implemented, a realist evaluation is well suited to understand the role of CoPs in improving healthcare practice. By applying a realist approach, this study will explore the following questions: What outcomes do CoPs achieve in healthcare? Do these outcomes translate into improved practice in healthcare? What are the contexts and mechanisms by which CoPs improve healthcare? Methods The realist evaluation will be conducted by developing, testing, and refining theories on how, why, and when CoPs improve healthcare practice. When collecting data, context will be defined as the setting in which the CoP operates; mechanisms will be the factors and resources that the community offers to influence a change in behaviour or action; and outcomes will be defined as a change in behaviour or work practice that occurs as a result of accessing resources provided by the CoP. Discussion Realist evaluation is being used increasingly to study social interventions where context plays an important role in determining outcomes. This study further enhances the value of realist evaluations by incorporating a social network analysis component to quantify the structural context associated with CoPs. By identifying key mechanisms and contexts that optimise the effectiveness of CoPs, this study will contribute to creating a framework that will guide future establishment and evaluation of CoPs in healthcare.

  18. How healthcare systems evaluate their advance care planning initiatives: Results from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Patricia D; Lee, Lydia D; Davison, Sara N; Simon, Jessica E

    2016-09-01

    Advance care planning initiatives are being implemented across healthcare systems around the world, but how best to evaluate their implementation is unknown. To identify gaps and/or redundancies in current evaluative strategies to help healthcare systems develop future evaluative frameworks for ACP. Systematic review. Peer-reviewed and gray literature searches were conducted till February 2015 to answer: "What methods have healthcare systems used to evaluate implementation of advance care planning initiatives?" A PICOS framework was developed to identify articles describing the implementation and evaluation of a health system-level advance care planning initiative. Outcome measures were mapped onto a conceptual quality indicator framework based on the Institute of Medicine and Donabedian models of healthcare quality. A total of 46 studies met inclusion criteria for analysis. Most articles reported on single parts of a healthcare system (e.g. continuing care). The most common outcome measures pertained to document completion, followed by healthcare resource use. Patient-, family-, or healthcare provider-reported outcomes were less commonly measured. Concordance measures (e.g. dying in place of choice) were reported by only 26% of studies. The conceptual quality indicator framework identified gaps and redundancies in measurement and is presented as a potential foundation from which to develop a comprehensive advance care planning evaluation framework. Document completion is frequently used to evaluate advance care planning program implementation; capturing the quality of care appears to be more difficult. This systematic review provides health system administrators with a comprehensive summary of measures used to evaluate advance care planning and may identify gaps in evaluation within their local context. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Evaluation of healthcare waste treatment/disposal alternatives by using multi-criteria decision-making techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Aysun

    2013-02-01

    Healthcare waste should be managed carefully because of infected, pathological, etc. content especially in developing countries. Applied management systems must be the most appropriate solution from a technical, environmental, economic and social point of view. The main objective of this study was to analyse the current status of healthcare waste management in Turkey, and to investigate the most appropriate treatment/disposal option by using different decision-making techniques. For this purpose, five different healthcare waste treatment/disposal alternatives including incineration, microwaving, on-site sterilization, off-site sterilization and landfill were evaluated according to two multi-criteria decision-making techniques: analytic network process (ANP) and ELECTRE. In this context, benefits, costs and risks for the alternatives were taken into consideration. Furthermore, the prioritization and ranking of the alternatives were determined and compared for both methods. According to the comparisons, the off-site sterilization technique was found to be the most appropriate solution in both cases.

  20. Post-Occupancy Evaluation of a Mental Healthcare Facility Based on Staff Perceptions of Design Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Saleh; Snell, Robin

    2017-07-01

    This study was a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) to examine the effectiveness of three specific design innovations in a mental healthcare facility. In addition to collecting data about the impact of these specific designs, the study provides a model for the broader implementation of POE approaches in the mental healthcare context. POEs in general healthcare settings have been shown to lead to better work environments and better outcomes for patients. Despite growing evidence of the value provided by POE studies, the industry has been somewhat slow to adopt their regular use, in part due to unfamiliarity with the POE process. This is particularly true in mental healthcare contexts, where POE studies remain virtually nonexistent. In-depth interviews and a widely distributed, anonymous survey were used to collect hospital staff perceptions and feedback regarding the impact of specific design features. The hospital staff were quite enthusiastic about two of the design innovations studied here (a new wayfinding strategy and the use of vibrant colors in specific areas of the facility). The third innovation, open-style communication centers, elicited more mixed evaluations. The results include extensive hypothesis testing about the effects of each innovation as well as narrative discussions of their pros and cons. The study generated new knowledge about three specific mental healthcare design innovations and provides a model for the practical implementation of a POE approach in mental healthcare contexts. The results are particularly relevant for designers who are considering innovative strategies in future mental healthcare facilities.

  1. Evaluating Healthcare Information Technology Outside of Academia: Observations from the National Resource Center for Healthcare Information Technology at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric G.; Cusack, Caitlin M.; McGowan, Julie J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Resource Center for Health Information Technology (NRC) was formed in the fall of 2004 as part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) health IT portfolio to support its grantees. One of the core functions of the NRC was to assist grantees in their evaluation efforts of Health IT. This manuscript highlights some common challenges experienced by health IT project teams at nonacademic institutions, including inappropriately scoped and resourced evaluation efforts, inappropriate choice of metrics, inadequate planning for data collection and analysis, and lack of consideration of qualitative methodologies. Many of these challenges can be avoided or overcome. The strategies adopted by various AHRQ grantees and the lessons learned from their projects should become part of the toolset for current and future implementers of health IT as the nation moves rapidly towards its widespread adoption. PMID:19567800

  2. Thinking beyond Measurement, Description and Judgment: Fourth Generation Evaluation in Family-Centered Pediatric Healthcare Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although pediatric healthcare organizations have widely implemented the philosophy of family-centered care (FCC), evaluators and health professionals have not explored how to preserve the philosophy of FCC in evaluation processes. Purpose: To illustrate how fourth generation evaluation, in theory, could facilitate collaboration between…

  3. Learning Evaluation: blending quality improvement and implementation research methods to study healthcare innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Cohen, Deborah J; Davis, Melinda M; Gunn, Rose; Dickinson, L Miriam; Miller, William L; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Stange, Kurt C

    2015-03-10

    In healthcare change interventions, on-the-ground learning about the implementation process is often lost because of a primary focus on outcome improvements. This paper describes the Learning Evaluation, a methodological approach that blends quality improvement and implementation research methods to study healthcare innovations. Learning Evaluation is an approach to multi-organization assessment. Qualitative and quantitative data are collected to conduct real-time assessment of implementation processes while also assessing changes in context, facilitating quality improvement using run charts and audit and feedback, and generating transportable lessons. Five principles are the foundation of this approach: (1) gather data to describe changes made by healthcare organizations and how changes are implemented; (2) collect process and outcome data relevant to healthcare organizations and to the research team; (3) assess multi-level contextual factors that affect implementation, process, outcome, and transportability; (4) assist healthcare organizations in using data for continuous quality improvement; and (5) operationalize common measurement strategies to generate transportable results. Learning Evaluation principles are applied across organizations by the following: (1) establishing a detailed understanding of the baseline implementation plan; (2) identifying target populations and tracking relevant process measures; (3) collecting and analyzing real-time quantitative and qualitative data on important contextual factors; (4) synthesizing data and emerging findings and sharing with stakeholders on an ongoing basis; and (5) harmonizing and fostering learning from process and outcome data. Application to a multi-site program focused on primary care and behavioral health integration shows the feasibility and utility of Learning Evaluation for generating real-time insights into evolving implementation processes. Learning Evaluation generates systematic and rigorous cross

  4. Technical evaluation of methods for identifying chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in healthcare claims databases

    OpenAIRE

    Weycker, Derek; Sofrygin, Oleg; Seefeld, Kim; Deeter, Robert G; Legg, Jason; Edelsberg, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthcare claims databases have been used in several studies to characterize the risk and burden of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) and effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors against FN. The accuracy of methods previously used to identify FN in such databases has not been formally evaluated. Methods Data comprised linked electronic medical records from Geisinger Health System and healthcare claims data from Geisinger Health Plan. Subjects were classifie...

  5. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients \\'at risk\\' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored.

  6. Healthcare students' evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Salla; Kääriäinen, Maria; Oikarainen, Ashlee; Tuomikoski, Anna-Maria; Elo, Satu; Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Saarikoski, Mikko; Kärsämänoja, Taina; Mikkonen, Kristina

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of clinical placements and supervision is to promote the development of healthcare students´ professional skills. High-quality clinical learning environments and supervision were shown to have significant influence on healthcare students´ professional development. This study aimed to describe healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision, and to identify the factors that affect these. The study was performed as a cross-sectional study. The data (n = 1973) were gathered through an online survey using the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher scale during the academic year 2015-2016 from all healthcare students (N = 2500) who completed their clinical placement at a certain university hospital in Finland. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression analysis. More than half of the healthcare students had a named supervisor and supervision was completed as planned. The students evaluated the clinical learning environment and supervision as 'good'. The students´ readiness to recommend the unit to other students and the frequency of separate private unscheduled sessions with the supervisor were the main factors that affect healthcare students` evaluation of the clinical learning environment and supervision. Individualized and goal-oriented supervision in which the student had a named supervisor and where supervision was completed as planned in a positive environment that supported learning had a significant impact on student's learning. The clinical learning environment and supervision support the development of future healthcare professionals' clinical competence. The supervisory relationship was shown to have a significant effect on the outcomes of students' experiences. We recommend the planning of educational programmes for supervisors of healthcare students for the enhancement of supervisors' pedagogical competencies in supervising students in

  7. Denkbeeldige Wereld: The New Dutch Guidelines for Economic Evaluations in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2016 the Dutch National Health Care Institute (Zorginstituut Nederland published a new guidance for economic evaluations in healthcare to support reimbursement decisions. These Guidelines update and replace three previously published guidelines covering pharmacoeconomic evaluation, outcomes research and costing. The purpose of this commentary is to consider the merits of these new Guidelines from the perspective of modeled claims which meet the standards of normal science: credibility, evaluation and replication in the treatment of target patient populations. In evaluating the merits of the Guidelines the focus will be on the requirement for submissions to follow reference case standards where lifetime-cost-per-QALY claims are the preferred outcome measure. The assessment points out that in adhering to a reference case standard, the Dutch Guidelines, in common with those in the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, fail to address the fundamental question of claims assessment. Rather, in relying upon the reference case imaginary world (denkbeeldige wereld to inform decision makers, the possibility of evaluating claims and generating feedback to decision makers on comparative effectiveness is put to one side. We have no idea as to whether the claims are right or even if they are wrong. Hopefully, future versions of the guidelines will address this issue and focus on a rigorous program of claims assessment.   Type: Commentary

  8. Using realist evaluation to assess primary healthcare teams' responses to intimate partner violence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicolea, Isabel; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastian, Miguel; Marchal, Bruno; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Few evaluations have assessed the factors triggering an adequate health care response to intimate partner violence. This article aimed to: 1) describe a realist evaluation carried out in Spain to ascertain why, how and under what circumstances primary health care teams respond to intimate partner violence, and 2) discuss the strengths and challenges of its application. We carried out a series of case studies in four steps. First, we developed an initial programme theory (PT1), based on interviews with managers. Second, we refined PT1 into PT2 by testing it in a primary healthcare team that was actively responding to violence. Third, we tested the refined PT2 by incorporating three other cases located in the same region. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and thick descriptions were produced and analysed using a retroduction approach. Fourth, we analysed a total of 15 cases, and identified combinations of contextual factors and mechanisms that triggered an adequate response to violence by using qualitative comparative analysis. There were several key mechanisms -the teams' self-efficacy, perceived preparation, women-centred care-, and contextual factors -an enabling team environment and managerial style, the presence of motivated professionals, the use of the protocol and accumulated experience in primary health care- that should be considered to develop adequate primary health-care responses to violence. The full application of this realist evaluation was demanding, but also well suited to explore a complex intervention reflecting the situation in natural settings. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hem, M.H.; Pedersen, R.; Norvoll, R.; Molewijk, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five

  10. Denmark's comparative position regarding health status, healthcare provision, self-management and social support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Jones, Allan; Zander, Mette

    2015-01-01

    the perspective of people with diabetes, family members of people with diabetes and healthcare professionals. METHODS: A total of 502 Danish people with diabetes (PWD), 122 adult family members of people with diabetes (FM) and 283 healthcare professionals (HCPs) participated in the study. Data on healthcare......, there is room for improvement when it comes to self-management behaviours. Special attention is needed to address this issue without compromising the psychological wellbeing of the PWD....

  11. Transmission characteristics of MERS and SARS in the healthcare setting: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowell, Gerardo; Abdirizak, Fatima; Lee, Sunmi; Lee, Jonggul; Jung, Eunok; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Viboud, Cécile

    2015-09-03

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus has caused recurrent outbreaks in the Arabian Peninsula since 2012. Although MERS has low overall human-to-human transmission potential, there is occasional amplification in the healthcare setting, a pattern reminiscent of the dynamics of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreaks in 2003. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of exposure patterns and transmission dynamics of large hospital clusters of MERS and SARS, including the most recent South Korean outbreak of MERS in 2015. To assess the unexpected nature of the recent South Korean nosocomial outbreak of MERS and estimate the probability of future large hospital clusters, we compared exposure and transmission patterns for previously reported hospital clusters of MERS and SARS, based on individual-level data and transmission tree information. We carried out simulations of nosocomial outbreaks of MERS and SARS using branching process models rooted in transmission tree data, and inferred the probability and characteristics of large outbreaks. A significant fraction of MERS cases were linked to the healthcare setting, ranging from 43.5 % for the nosocomial outbreak in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, in 2014 to 100 % for both the outbreak in Al-Hasa, Saudi Arabia, in 2013 and the outbreak in South Korea in 2015. Both MERS and SARS nosocomial outbreaks are characterized by early nosocomial super-spreading events, with the reproduction number dropping below 1 within three to five disease generations. There was a systematic difference in the exposure patterns of MERS and SARS: a majority of MERS cases occurred among patients who sought care in the same facilities as the index case, whereas there was a greater concentration of SARS cases among healthcare workers throughout the outbreak. Exposure patterns differed slightly by disease generation, however, especially for SARS. Moreover, the distributions of secondary cases per single primary case varied

  12. Sarcopenia and cachexia evaluation in different healthcare settings: a questionnaire survey of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Saori; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Maeda, Keisuke; Nishioka, Shinta; Kokura, Yoji

    2018-01-01

    The rates of sarcopenia and cachexia evaluations by different occupational groups at different settings are unclear. The objectives are to evaluate and compare the relative use of sarcopenia and cachexia evaluations among dietitians and associated healthcare professionals in a diverse range of settings. Participants were 4,621 members from the Japanese Association of Rehabilitation Nutrition. Settings included acute general wards, convalescent rehabilitation wards, long-term care wards, homecare service, and other settings. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate assessments for sarcopenia and cachexia among dietitians and other professionals. Multiple comparisons based on Bonferroni method and logistic regression analysis were used. 718 (15.5%) answered the questionnaire. Data from 683 valid questionnaires were analyzed. Muscle strength, muscle mass, physical function, and cachexia were assessed by 53.4%, 51.1%, 53.4%, and 17.4% of dietitians. At convalescent rehabilitation wards, these rates were 81.8%, 62.0%, 82.5%, and 14.0%. The use of muscle strength and physical function evaluations was significantly lower among dietitians than among physical therapists and occupational therapists. The use of muscle mass and cachexia evaluations was not significantly different among the occupations. The use of muscle mass and strength evaluations was significantly higher in convalescent rehabilitation wards than in acute general wards, long-term care wards and facilities, and other settings, but not in homecare services. Cachexia evaluations were not significantly different between all settings. Raising the awareness of cachexia and sarcopenia among dietitians is a key issue, which should be addressed.

  13. Influenza vaccination uptake among Victorian healthcare workers: evaluating the success of a statewide program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sandra A; Bennett, Noleen; Bull, Ann L; Richards, Michael J; Worth, Leon J

    2016-06-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all Australian healthcare workers (HCWs). In 2014, a target vaccination uptake of 75% was set for Victorian healthcare facilities. This study aimed to determine the 2014 uptake, describe trends over time and propose an enhanced reporting framework. Annual data submitted to the Victorian Healthcare Associated Infection Surveillance System (VICNISS) regarding HCW influenza were evaluated for 2005-2014. Faculty uptake - the number of vaccinations administered divided by total number of staff employed - was reported as a statewide aggregate and stratified by facility size (number of staff employed). In 2014, 78,885 HCWs were vaccinated across 93 healthcare facilities, corresponding to an overall uptake of 72.2%. During 2005-2014, small facilities (healthcare facility size categories, the highest uptake was observed in 2014. Influenza vaccination uptake in HCWs has successfully been introduced as a performance indicator in Victorian healthcare facilities and a peak uptake was reported in 2014. Varied trends are evident when uptake is stratified by number of employed HCWs, providing a feasible and meaningful method for benchmarking. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  14. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland: healthcare and health status compared to Portuguese residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luís; Azevedo, Ana; Barros, Henrique; Paccaud, Fred; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Most migrant studies have compared health characteristics between migrants and nationals of the host country. We aimed at comparing health characteristics of migrants with nationals from their home country. Portuguese national health survey (2005-6; 30,173 participants aged 18-75 years) and four national health surveys conducted in Switzerland (2002, 2004, 2007 and 2011, totalling 1,170 Portuguese migrants of the same age range). Self-reported data on length of stay, cardiovascular risk factors, healthcare use and health status were collected. Resident Portuguese were significantly older and more educated than migrants. Resident Portuguese had a higher mean BMI and prevalence of obesity than migrants. Resident Portuguese also reported more frequently being hypertensive and having their blood pressure screened within the last year. On the contrary, migrant Portuguese were more frequently smokers, had a medical visit in the previous year more frequently and self-rated their health higher than resident Portuguese. After adjustment for age, gender, marital status and education, migrants had a higher likelihood of smoking, of having a medical visit the previous year, and of self-rating their current health as good or very good than resident Portuguese. Compared to Portuguese residents, cholesterol screening in the previous year was more common only among migrants living in Switzerland for more than 17 years. Portuguese migrants in Switzerland do not differ substantially from resident Portuguese regarding most cardiovascular risk factors. Migrants consider themselves healthier than Portuguese residents and more often had a recent medical visit.

  15. The search for the criteria in reforming health care: evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peciūra, Rimantas; Jankauskiene, Danguole; Gurevicius, Romualdas

    2006-01-01

    This article analyzes the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services, i.e. the population's possibilities to receive healthcare services within an acceptable period of time in healthcare institutions situated in a certain territorial-administrative unit--the municipality. The aim of the study was to develop the technique for the quantitative evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services in different territories. The object of the study was the network of primary healthcare institutions and their subdivisions in the municipalities of Klaipeda, Taurage, and Vilnius districts. The methods of the study were geometrical modeling and applied graphics used for the quantitative determination of the ratios between the total zone area of the accessible primary healthcare institutions and the area of the respective municipal territory. The result of the study was the developed and proposed technique allowing for the evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare institutions. The proposed technique of the evaluation of the spatial accessibility of primary healthcare services may be valuable in solving the problems of the development of primary healthcare institutions primarily in the rural regions of Lithuania. The quantitative expression of the evaluation could be used in decision-making related to investments into the development of the primary healthcare institution network in different administrational units of the country. The method of geometrical modeling involving the application of digital graphics may create preconditions for the creation of the geographical information system of the primary healthcare institution network in Lithuania.

  16. Evaluating building performance in healthcare facilities: an organizational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Claudia; Webster, Lynn; Fontaine, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Using the environment as a strategic tool is one of the most cost-effective and enduring approaches for improving public health; however, it is one that requires multiple perspectives. The purpose of this article is to highlight an innovative methodology that has been developed for conducting comprehensive performance evaluations in public sector health facilities in Canada. The building performance evaluation methodology described in this paper is a government initiative. The project team developed a comprehensive building evaluation process for all new capital health projects that would respond to the aforementioned need for stakeholders to be more accountable and to better integrate the larger organizational strategy of facilities. The Balanced Scorecard, which is a multiparadigmatic, performance-based business framework, serves as the underlying theoretical framework for this initiative. It was applied in the development of the conceptual model entitled the Building Performance Evaluation Scorecard, which provides the following benefits: (1) It illustrates a process to link facilities more effectively to the overall mission and goals of an organization; (2) It is both a measurement and a management system that has the ability to link regional facilities to measures of success and larger business goals; (3) It provides a standardized methodology that ensures consistency in assessing building performance; and (4) It is more comprehensive than traditional building evaluations. The methodology presented in this paper is both a measurement and management system that integrates the principles of evidence-based design with the practices of pre- and post-occupancy evaluation. It promotes accountability and continues throughout the life cycle of a project. The advantage of applying this framework is that it engages health organizations in clarifying a vision and strategy for their facilities and helps translate those strategies into action and measurable performance

  17. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention.

  18. Evaluation of an Assistive Telepresence Robot for Elderly Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koceski, Saso; Koceska, Natasa

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we described the telepresence robot system designed to improve the well-being of elderly by supporting them to do daily activities independently, to facilitate social interaction in order to overcome a sense of social isolation and loneliness as well as to support the professional caregivers in everyday care. In order to investigate the acceptance of the developed robot system, evaluation study involved elderly people and professional caregivers, as two potential user groups was conducted. The results of this study are also presented and discussed.

  19. Healthcare planning for the Olympics in London: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Black

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass gatherings, such as the Olympic and Paralympic Games, represent an enormous logistical challenge for the host city. Health service planners must deliver routine and emergency services and, in recent Games, health legacy initiatives, for the local and visiting population. However there is little evidence to support their planning decisions. We therefore evaluated the strategic health planning programme for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games to identify generalisable information for future Games. METHODS: We thematically analysed data from stakeholder interviews and documents. The data were prospectively collected in three phases, before, during and after the Games. FINDINGS: We identified five key themes: (1 Systemic Improvement for example in communications, (2 Effective relationships led to efficiencies and permanent gains, such as new relationships with the private sector (3 Difficult relationships led to inefficiencies, for instance, duplication in testing and exercising emergency scenarios, (4 Tendency to over-estimate demand for care, particularly emergency medicine, and (5 Difficulties establishing a health legacy due to its deprioritisation and lack of vision by the programme team. INTERPRETATION: Enduring improvements which are sustained after the Games are possible, such as the establishment of new and productive partnerships. Relationships must be established early on to avoid duplication, delay and unnecessary expense. There should be greater critical evaluation of the likely demand for health services to reduce the wasting of resources. Finally, if a health legacy is planned, then clear definitions and commitment to its measurement is essential.

  20. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  1. Soundscape evaluations in two critical healthcare settings with different designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okcu, Selen; Ryherd, Erica E; Zimring, Craig; Samuels, Owen

    2011-09-01

    Intensive care units (ICUs) have important but challenging sound environments. Alarms and equipment generate high levels of noise and ICUs are typically designed with hard surfaces. A poor sound environment can add to stress and make auditory tasks more difficult for clinicians. However few studies have linked more detailed analyses of the sound environment to nurse wellbeing and performance. This study is aimed at understanding the relationships between objective acoustic measures and self-reported nurse outcomes. Two 20-bed ICUs with similar patient acuity and treatment models were tested: A recently built neurological ICU and a 1980s-era medical-surgical ICU. The medical-surgical ICU was perceived as louder, more annoying, and having a greater negative impact of noise on work performance, health outcomes, and anxiety as compared to the neurological ICU. Surprisingly, there were little differences between two ICU sound environments based on traditional overall noise measures. The objective differences between the occupied sound environments in the two units only emerged through a more comprehensive analysis of the "occurrence rate" of peak and maximum levels, frequency content, and the speech interference level. Furthermore, mid-level transient sound occurrence rates were significantly and positively correlated to perceived annoyance and loudness levels. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. Comparative performance of private and public healthcare systems in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Andrews, Jason; Kishore, Sandeep; Panjabi, Rajesh; Stuckler, David

    2012-01-01

    Private sector healthcare delivery in low- and middle-income countries is sometimes argued to be more efficient, accountable, and sustainable than public sector delivery. Conversely, the public sector is often regarded as providing more equitable and evidence-based care. We performed a systematic review of research studies investigating the performance of private and public sector delivery in low- and middle-income countries. Peer-reviewed studies including case studies, meta-analyses, reviews, and case-control analyses, as well as reports published by non-governmental organizations and international agencies, were systematically collected through large database searches, filtered through methodological inclusion criteria, and organized into six World Health Organization health system themes: accessibility and responsiveness; quality; outcomes; accountability, transparency, and regulation; fairness and equity; and efficiency. Of 1,178 potentially relevant unique citations, data were obtained from 102 articles describing studies conducted in low- and middle-income countries. Comparative cohort and cross-sectional studies suggested that providers in the private sector more frequently violated medical standards of practice and had poorer patient outcomes, but had greater reported timeliness and hospitality to patients. Reported efficiency tended to be lower in the private than in the public sector, resulting in part from perverse incentives for unnecessary testing and treatment. Public sector services experienced more limited availability of equipment, medications, and trained healthcare workers. When the definition of "private sector" included unlicensed and uncertified providers such as drug shop owners, most patients appeared to access care in the private sector; however, when unlicensed healthcare providers were excluded from the analysis, the majority of people accessed public sector care. "Competitive dynamics" for funding appeared between the two sectors, such

  3. Comparative performance of private and public healthcare systems in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Basu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Private sector healthcare delivery in low- and middle-income countries is sometimes argued to be more efficient, accountable, and sustainable than public sector delivery. Conversely, the public sector is often regarded as providing more equitable and evidence-based care. We performed a systematic review of research studies investigating the performance of private and public sector delivery in low- and middle-income countries. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Peer-reviewed studies including case studies, meta-analyses, reviews, and case-control analyses, as well as reports published by non-governmental organizations and international agencies, were systematically collected through large database searches, filtered through methodological inclusion criteria, and organized into six World Health Organization health system themes: accessibility and responsiveness; quality; outcomes; accountability, transparency, and regulation; fairness and equity; and efficiency. Of 1,178 potentially relevant unique citations, data were obtained from 102 articles describing studies conducted in low- and middle-income countries. Comparative cohort and cross-sectional studies suggested that providers in the private sector more frequently violated medical standards of practice and had poorer patient outcomes, but had greater reported timeliness and hospitality to patients. Reported efficiency tended to be lower in the private than in the public sector, resulting in part from perverse incentives for unnecessary testing and treatment. Public sector services experienced more limited availability of equipment, medications, and trained healthcare workers. When the definition of "private sector" included unlicensed and uncertified providers such as drug shop owners, most patients appeared to access care in the private sector; however, when unlicensed healthcare providers were excluded from the analysis, the majority of people accessed public sector care. "Competitive

  4. Service user engagement in healthcare education as a mechanism for value based recruitment: An evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet; Mills, Anne; Spriggs, Ashley; Addis, Andrea; Bond, Mandy; Latchford, Carolyn; Warren, Angela; Borwell, Juliet; Tee, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Within the United Kingdom (UK) there is an increasing focus on Values Based Recruitment (VBR) of staff working in the National Health Service (NHS) in response to public inquiries criticising the lack of person-centred care. All NHS employees are recruited on the basis of a prescribed set of values. This is extended to the recruitment of student healthcare professionals, yet there is little research of how to implement this. Involving Service Users in healthcare educational practice is gaining momentum internationally, yet involvement of service users in VBR of 'would be' healthcare professionals remains at an embryonic phase. Adult nurses represent the largest healthcare workforce in the UK, yet involvement of service users in their recruitment has received scant attention. This paper is an evaluation of the inclusion of service users in a VBR of 640 adult student nurses. This study used a participatory mixed methods approach, with service users as co-researchers in the study. The study consisted of mixed methods design. Quantitative data via an online questionnaire to ascertain candidates' perspectives (n=269 response rate of 42%), and academic/clinical nurses (n=35 response rate 34.65%). Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups and one to one interviews with service users (n=9). Data analysis included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. 4 overarching themes were identified; increasing sense of humanness, substantiating care values; impact of involvement; working together and making it work, a work in progress. The findings from the study highlight that involving service users in VBR of student healthcare professionals has benefits to candidates, service users and local health services. Appreciating the perceptions of healthcare professionals is fundamental in the UK and internationally to implementing service users' engagement in service enhancement and delivery. Findings from this study identify there may be a dissonance between the policy

  5. Health-care decision-making processes in Latin America: problems and prospects for the use of economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Cynthia P; Drummond, Michael F; Rovira, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The use of economic evaluation studies (EE) in the decision-making process within the health-care system of nine Latin American (LA) and three European countries was investigated. The aim was to identify the opportunities, obstacles, and changes needed to facilitate the introduction of EE as a formal tool in health-care decision-making processes in LA. A comparative study was conducted based on existing literature and information provided through a questionnaire applied to decision makers in Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Portugal Spain, United Kingdom, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Systematic electronic searches of HEED, NHS EED, and LILACS were conducted to identify published economic evaluation studies in LA from 1982 onward. There is relatively little evidence of the conduct and use of EE within the health care systems in LA. Electronic searches retrieved 554 records; however, only 93 were EE. In the nine LA participating countries, broad allocation of health-care resources is primarily based on political criteria, historical records, geographical areas, and specific groups of patients and diseases. Public-health provision and inclusion of services in health-insurance package are responsibilities of the Ministry of Health. Decisions regarding the purchase of medicines are primarily made through public tenders, and mainly based on differences in clinical efficacy and the price of health technologies of interest. To expedite the process of incorporating EE as a formal tool to inform decision-making processes within the health-care systems in LA countries, two main conditions need to be fulfilled. First, adequate resources and skills need to be available to conduct EE of good quality. Second, decision-making procedures need to be modified to accommodate "evidence-based" approaches such as EE.

  6. The Development and Evaluation of an Online Healthcare Toolkit for Autistic Adults and their Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidis, Christina; Raymaker, Dora; McDonald, Katherine; Kapp, Steven; Weiner, Michael; Ashkenazy, Elesia; Gerrity, Martha; Kripke, Clarissa; Platt, Laura; Baggs, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    The healthcare system is ill-equipped to meet the needs of adults on the autism spectrum. Our goal was to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop and evaluate tools to facilitate the primary healthcare of autistic adults. Toolkit development included cognitive interviewing and test-retest reliability studies. Evaluation consisted of a mixed-methods, single-arm pre/post-intervention comparison. A total of 259 autistic adults and 51 primary care providers (PCPs) residing in the United States. The AASPIRE Healthcare toolkit includes the Autism Healthcare Accommodations Tool (AHAT)-a tool that allows patients to create a personalized accommodations report for their PCP-and general healthcare- and autism-related information, worksheets, checklists, and resources for patients and healthcare providers. Satisfaction with patient-provider communication, healthcare self-efficacy, barriers to healthcare, and satisfaction with the toolkit's usability and utility; responses to open-ended questions. Preliminary testing of the AHAT demonstrated strong content validity and adequate test-retest stability. Almost all patient participants (>94 %) felt that the AHAT and the toolkit were easy to use, important, and useful. In pre/post-intervention comparisons, the mean number of barriers decreased (from 4.07 to 2.82, p communication improved (from 30.9 to 32.6, p = 0.03). Patients stated that the toolkit helped clarify their needs, enabled them to self-advocate and prepare for visits more effectively, and positively influenced provider behavior. Most of the PCPs surveyed read the AHAT (97 %), rated it as moderately or very useful (82 %), and would recommend it to other patients (87 %). The CBPR process resulted in a reliable healthcare accommodation tool and a highly accessible healthcare toolkit. Patients and providers indicated that the tools positively impacted healthcare interactions. The toolkit has the potential to reduce barriers to

  7. Economic Evaluation in Ethiopian Healthcare Sector Decision Making: Perception, Practice and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, Elias Asfaw; Mbonigaba, Josue; Kaye, Sylvia Blanche; Wilkinson, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Globally, economic evaluation (EE) is increasingly being considered as a critical tool for allocating scarce healthcare resources. However, such considerations are less documented in low-income countries, such as in Ethiopia. In particular, to date there has been no assessment conducted to evaluate the perception and practice of and barriers to health EE. This paper assesses the use and perceptions of EE in healthcare decision-making processes in Ethiopia. In-depth interview sessions with decision makers/healthcare managers and program coordinators across six regional health bureaus were conducted. A qualitative analysis approach was conducted on three thematic areas. A total of 57 decision makers/healthcare managers were interviewed from all tiers of the health sector in Ethiopia, ranging from the Federal Ministry of Health down to the lower levels of the health facility pyramid. At the high-level healthcare decision-making tier, only 56 % of those interviewed showed a good understanding of EE when explaining in terms of cost and consequences of alternative courses of action and value for money. From the specific program perspective, 50 % of the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS program coordinators indicated the relevance of EE to program planning and decision making. These respondents reported a limited application of costing studies on the HIV/AIDS prevention and control program, which were most commonly used during annual planning and budgeting. The study uncovered three important barriers to growth of EE in Ethiopia: a lack of awareness, a lack of expertise and skill, and the traditional decision-making culture.

  8. Design and development of a computer program for the evaluation of the healthcare executive - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Daniel; Bava, Michele; Delendi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    According to the Italian law which regulates executive healthcare contracts, the professional evaluation is mandatory. The goal of the periodic evaluation is to enhance and motivate the professional involved. In addition this process should 1. increase the sense of duty towards the patients, 2. become aware of ones own professional growth and aspirations and 3. enhance the awareness of the healthcare executive regarding the companys strategies. To satisfy these requirements a data sheet has been modeled for every evaluated subject, divided in two sections. In the first part, the chief executive officer (CEO) scores: 1. behavioral characteristics, 2. multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement, 3. organizational skills, 4. professional quality and training, 5. relationships with the citizens. The scores for these fields are decided by the CEO. In the second part the CEO evaluates: 1. quantitative job dimension, 2.technology innovation, 3. scientific and educational activities. The value scores of these fields are decided by the CEO together with the professional under evaluation. A previously established correction coefficient can be used for all the scores. This evaluation system model has been constructed according to the enhancement quality approaches (Deming cycle) and a web-based software has been developed on a Linux platform using LAMP technology and php programming techniques. The program replicates all the evaluation process creating different profiles of authentications and authorizations which can then give to the evaluator the possibility to make lists of the professionals to evaluate, to upload documents regarding their activities and goals, to receive individual documents in automatically generated folders, to change the correction coefficients, to obtain year by year the individual scores. The advantages of using this web-based software include easy data consultation and update, the implementation of IT security issues, the easy portability and

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL EFFICIENCY. CUSTOMIZE ON HEALTHCARE SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    CLAUDIU CICEA

    2011-01-01

    Efficiency in health service sector is very important because the health sector is a major consumer of resources (especially financial). In this paper the author aims to analyze the efficiency in a social sector (healthcare system) based on cost-benefit analysis.

  10. A novel trust evaluation method for Ubiquitous Healthcare based on cloud computational theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Georgia; Fengou, Maria-Anna; Beis, Antonios; Lymberopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    The notion of trust is considered to be the cornerstone on patient-psychiatrist relationship. Thus, a trustfully background is fundamental requirement for provision of effective Ubiquitous Healthcare (UH) service. In this paper, the issue of Trust Evaluation of UH Providers when register UH environment is addressed. For that purpose a novel trust evaluation method is proposed, based on cloud theory, exploiting User Profile attributes. This theory mimics human thinking, regarding trust evaluation and captures fuzziness and randomness of this uncertain reasoning. Two case studies are investigated through simulation in MATLAB software, in order to verify the effectiveness of this novel method.

  11. Extracting Sentiment from Healthcare Survey Data: An Evaluation of Sentiment Analysis Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, D.; MacFarlane, A.; Russell-Rose, T.

    2015-01-01

    Sentiment analysis is an emerging discipline with many analytical tools available. This project aimed to examine a number of tools regarding their suitability for healthcare data. A comparison between commercial and non-commercial tools was made using responses from an online survey which evaluated design changes made to a clinical information service. The commercial tools were Semantria and TheySay and the non-commercial tools were WEKA and Google Prediction API. Different approaches were fo...

  12. Comparative Performance Evaluation of the Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    was postulated and tested in this study using Paired T-test analysis. ... field staff had a multiplying effect and yielded a higher result as more farm ... system. Objectives of the Study. The study was broadly designed to carry out comparative performance evaluation of the extension delivery system of Abia and Enugu States.

  13. Comparative Evaluation and Optimization of Film Coating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Evaluation and Optimization of Film Coating Formulation Variables and Delayed Release Properties of Three Enteric Polymers on Diclofenac ... According to f2 test, the Wangit L30D-55® and Wangit L-100® coated tablets were similar to the two most commonly marketed products of diclofenac sodium 50 mg ...

  14. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, as a part of on-going efforts, therefore, evaluated and compared the effects of Low Protein-energy (LP) and Normal Protein-energy (NP) diets on the sperm morphology and characteristics of adult Wistar rats orally dosed aqueous extracts of C. australis seed (LPSE and NPSE) and stem (LPST and NPST), 300mg ...

  15. Comparative evaluation of the sperm characteristics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    This study, as a part of on-going efforts, therefore, evaluated and compared the effects of Low Protein-energy (LP) and Normal Protein-energy. (NP) diets on the sperm morphology and characteristics of adult Wistar rats orally dosed aqueous extracts of C. australis seed (LPSE and NPSE) and stem (LPST and NPST), 300mg ...

  16. Comparative evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    overcome these limitations, various alternative formulations have been developed. Comparative evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate as apical barrier material in traumatized nonvital, immature teeth: A clinical pilot study. N Tuloglu, S Bayrak. Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, ...

  17. Comparative evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MTA) as an apical barrier material are limited, and no studies have so far examined the clinical performance of BioAggregate as apical barrier material in nonvital immature teeth. Aim: This study was aimed to provide a comparative evaluation of ...

  18. Comparative evaluation of modified pulse width modulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of modified pulse width modulation schemes of Z-source inverter for various applications and demands. ... In this paper, for the common boost factor and modulation index, the output voltage, output current, output line harmonics profile of the inverters with different PWM schemes powered by the ...

  19. comparative evaluation of pressure distribution between horizontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Green and source function were used to evaluate the performance of horizontal well and vertical well, eventually, compared based dimensionless pressures and pressure derivatives computed by varying the reservoir geometry. Results presented as type curves show that the rate of decline of the pressure derivative curve is.

  20. Comparative evaluation of pressure distribution between horizontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green and source function were used to evaluate the performance of horizontal well and vertical well, eventually, compared based dimensionless pressures and pressure derivatives computed by varying the reservoir geometry. Results presented as type curves show that the rate of decline of the pressure derivative curve is ...

  1. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, T [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  2. Comparing treatment persistence, healthcare resource utilization, and costs in adult patients with major depressive disorder treated with escitalopram or citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Greenberg, Paul E; Ben-Hamadi, Rym; Yu, Andrew P; Yang, Elaine H; Erder, M Haim

    2011-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common type of depression, affecting 6.6% of adults in the United States annually. Citalopram and escitalopram are common second-generation antidepressants used for the treatment of patients with this disorder. Because citalopram is available in generic forms that have lower acquisition costs compared with the branded escitalopram, some health plans may provide incentives to encourage the use of the generic option. Decisions based solely on drug acquisition costs may encourage the use of a therapy that is less cost-effective when treatment persistence, healthcare utilization, and overall costs are factored in. To compare, in a real-world setting, the treatment persistence, healthcare utilization, and overall costs of managing adult patients with major depressive disorder who are treated with escitalopram or citalopram. Administrative claims data (from January 1, 2003, to June 30, 2005) were analyzed for patients with major depressive disorder aged ≥18 years. Patients filled ≥1 prescriptions for citalopram or for escitalopram (first-fill time was defined as the index date) and had no second-generation antidepressant use during the 6-month preindex period. Treatment persistence, healthcare utilization, and healthcare costs were measured over the 6-month preindex and 6-month postindex periods and compared between patients treated with citalopram or escitalopram, using unadjusted and multivariate analyses. Patients receiving escitalopram (N = 10,465) were less likely to discontinue the treatment (hazard ratio 0.94; P = .005) and switch to another second-generation antidepressant (hazard ratio 0.83; P escitalopram were also less likely to have a hospital admission (odds ratio 0.88; P = .036) or an emergency department visit and had lower total healthcare costs (-$1174) and major depressive disorder-related costs (-$109; P escitalopram, patients treated with escitalopram had better treatment persistence, lower healthcare

  3. Language-specific skills in intercultural healthcare communication: Comparing perceived preparedness and skills in nurses' first and second languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiorek, Jessica; van de Poel, Kris

    2017-11-22

    Interactions between people from different cultures are becoming increasingly commonplace in contemporary healthcare settings. To date, most research evaluating cross-cultural preparedness has assumed that medical professionals are speaking their first language (L1). However, as healthcare workers are increasingly mobile and patient populations are increasingly diverse, more and more interactions are likely to occur in a professional's non-native language (L2). This study assessed and compared nurses' perceived cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness in their interactions with patients from other cultures when speaking both their L1 and L2. The goal of this project was to inform the creation of a communication skills training program. Nurses reported their perceived cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness (scales adapted from Park et al., 2009) in their L1 and L2 via an online questionnaire. This questionnaire was distributed among nurses working in Vienna, Austria, through the Vienna Hospital Association (VHA). Nurses and nurses-in-training working in VHA hospitals participated. Most participants who provided demographic information were currently nurses (n=179) with an average of 16.88years (SD=11.50) of professional experience (range: 0-40); n=40 were nurses-in-training with an average of 2.13years (SD=0.88) of experience (range: 1-5). Descriptive statistics for each cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness (in each language) are reported; comparisons between L1 and L2 responses were also conducted. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify predictors of preparedness and L1/L2 skillfulness. Nurses reported feeling significantly less confident in their skills when working in an L2, across a range of culture-related issues. Having had previous communication skills training predicted (better) self-reported L2 skillfulness, although it did not predict L1 skillfulness. These results indicate that there is a language-specific component to cross

  4. Managing healthcare waste in Ghana: a comparative study of public and private hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abor, Patience Aseweh

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims to examine the healthcare waste management practices of selected hospitals in Ghana. The study adopted a multiple case approach, using two public and two private hospitals. Findings indicate that both public hospitals and one private hospital have a waste management policy. Public and private hospitals have waste management plans and waste management teams. Public hospitals were found to generate more waste than the private hospitals. One private hospital and the public hospitals segregate their waste into different categories. This is done by first identifying the waste type and then separating non-infectious or general waste from infectious waste. Both public and private hospitals have internal storage facilities for temporarily storing the waste before they are finally disposed off-site. On-site transportation in the public hospitals is done by using wheelbarrows, while covered bins with wheels are used to transport waste on-site in the private hospitals. In public and private hospitals, off-site transportation of the hospital waste is undertaken by Municipal Assemblies with the use of trucks. Both public and private hospitals employ standard methods for disposing of healthcare waste. The article provides insights into healthcare waste management from a Ghanaian perspective.

  5. Informing Healthcare Waiting Area Design Using Transparency Attributes: A Comparative Preference Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Powers, Matthew; Allison, David; Vincent, Ellen

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to explore people's visual preference for waiting areas in general hospital environments designed with transparency attributes that fully integrate nature. Waiting can be a tedious and frustrating experience among people seeking healthcare treatments and negatively affect their perception of the quality of care. Positive distractions and supportive designs have gained increasing attraction to improve people's waiting experience. Nature, which has shown therapeutic effects according to a growing amount of evidence, could be a distinguished positive distraction in waiting areas. Additionally, the theory of transparency was operationalized to indicate a spatial continuity between the external nature and the built interiors in general healthcare waiting area design. A survey method was adopted in the study. Twenty-one images of general healthcare waiting areas depicting three design typologies were preselected following a strict procedure, including designs with (a) no window views, (b) limited window views to nature, and (c) transparent spaces with maximum natural views. Ninety-five student participants rated the images based on their visual preference using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that transparent waiting areas were significantly preferred. A significant positive relationship existed between the level of transparency and people's preference scores. The factor analysis indicated additional supportive features that may affect people's preferences, including daylight, perceived warmth, noninstitutional furniture arrangement, visual orientation, and the use of natural materials for interior design. However, these tentative results need to be furthered tested with the real patient population as the next step of this study.

  6. The Development of a Quality Management Framework for Evaluating Medical Device Reprocessing Practice in Healthcare Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Bailey; Horodyski, Robin; Welton, Cynthia; Vail, John; Simonetto, Luca; Jokanovic, Danilo; Sharma, Richa; Mahoney, Angela Rea; Savoy-Bird, Shay; Bains, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of medical device reprocessing (MDR) for the provision of safe patient care. Although industry service standards are available to guide MDR practices, there remains a lack of published key performance indicators (KPIs) and targets that are necessary to evaluate MDR quality for feedback and improvement. This article outlines the development of an initial framework that builds on established guidelines and includes service standards, KPIs and targets for evaluating MDR operations. This framework can support healthcare facilities in strengthening existing practices and enables a platform for collaboration towards better MDR performance management.

  7. Interpersonal Communication from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A.

    2011-01-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is “the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired.” Objective: To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Results: Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. Conclusion: The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient

  8. Interpersonal communication from the patient perspective: comparison of primary healthcare evaluation instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Haggerty, Jeannie L; Beaulieu, Christine; Bouharaoui, Fatima; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Burge, Frederick; Santor, Darcy A

    2011-12-01

    The operational definition of interpersonal communication is "the ability of the provider to elicit and understand patient concerns, to explain healthcare issues and to engage in shared decision-making if desired." To examine how well interpersonal communication is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective. 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact in the previous 12 months responded to instruments that evaluate primary healthcare. Eight subscales measure interpersonal communication: the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS, two subscales); the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI, one subscale); the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I); and the Interpersonal Processes of Care Survey, version II (IPC-II, four subscales). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation) factor analysis examined fit to operational definition, and item response theory analysis examined item performance. Items not pertaining to interpersonal communication were removed from the EUROPEP-I. Most subscales are skewed positively. Normalized mean scores are similar across subscales except for IPC-II Patient-Centred Decision-Making and IPC-II Hurried Communication. All subscales load reasonably well on a single factor, presumed to be interpersonal communication. The best model has three underlying factors corresponding to eliciting (eigenvalue = 26.56), explaining (eigenvalue = 2.45) and decision-making (eigenvalue = 1.34). Both the PCAS Communication and the EUROPEP-I Clinical Behaviour subscales capture all three dimensions. Individual subscales within IPC-II measure each sub-dimension. The operational definition is well reflected in the available measures, although shared decision-making is poorly represented. These subscales can be used with confidence in the Canadian context to measure this crucial aspect of patient-centred care.

  9. Hierarchy of evidence: a framework for ranking evidence evaluating healthcare interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David

    2003-01-01

    A number of hierarchies of evidence have been developed to enable different research methods to be ranked according to the validity of their findings. However, most have focused on evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions. When the evaluation of healthcare addresses its appropriateness or feasibility, then existing hierarchies are inadequate. This paper reports the development of a hierarchy for ranking of evidence evaluating healthcare interventions. The aims of this hierarchy are twofold. Firstly, it is to provide a means by which the evidence from a range of methodologically different types of research can be graded. Secondly, it is to provide a logical framework that can be used during the development of systematic review protocols to help determine the study designs which can contribute valid evidence when the evaluation extends beyond effectiveness. The proposed hierarchy was developed based on a review of literature, investigation of existing hierarchies and examination of the strengths and limitations of different research methods. The proposed hierarchy of evidence focuses on three dimensions of the evaluation: effectiveness, appropriateness and feasibility. Research that can contribute valid evidence to each is suggested. To address the varying strengths of different research designs, four levels of evidence are proposed: excellent, good, fair and poor. The strength of the proposed hierarchy is that it acknowledges the valid contribution of evidence generated by a range of different types of research. However, hierarchies only provide a guide to the strength of the available evidence and other issues such as the quality of research also have an important influence.

  10. Comparative evaluation of haemoglobin estimation amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-05-30

    May 30, 2006 ... Comparative evaluation of haemoglobin estimation ... fréquentaient le service de consultation prénatale au Centre Hospitalier Universtaire d' Ibadan, Nigéria, entre le le avril et le 30 mai ... rurales promouvant ainsi l´ accès á la qualité de soin dans les pays qui ne disposent pas d´assez de ressources. (Rev.

  11. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Montagna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare facilities (HF represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis®μ and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis®μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4% by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis®μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis®μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  12. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis(®)μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis(®)μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis(®)μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis(®)μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE METERED-DOSE INHALER TECHNIQUE AMONG HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nadi F. Zeraati

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Poor inhaler technique is a common problem both in asthmatic patients and healthcare providers, which contributes to poor asthma control. This study was performed to evaluate the adequacy of metered-dose inhaler (MDI technique in a sample of physicians and nurses practicing in hospitals of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. A total of 173 healthcare providers voluntary participated in this study. After the participants answered a questionnaire aimed at identifying their involvement in MDI prescribing and counseling, a trained observer assessed their MDI technique using a checklist of nine steps. Of the 173 participants, 35 (20.2% were physicians and 138 (79.8% were nurses. Only 12 participants (6.93% performed all steps correctly. Physicians performed essential steps significantly better than nurses (85.7% vs. 63.8%, P < 0.05. The majority of healthcare providers responsible for instructing patients on the correct MDI technique were unable to perform this technique correctly, indicating the need for regular formal training programs on inhaler techniques.

  14. Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Padraig; Davey Smith, George; von Hinke, Stephanie; Davies, Neil M; Hollingworth, William

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the marginal healthcare costs associated with different diseases and health conditions is important, especially for increasingly prevalent conditions such as obesity. However, existing observational study designs cannot identify the causal impact of disease on healthcare costs. This paper explores the possibilities for causal inference offered by Mendelian randomization, a form of instrumental variable analysis that uses genetic variation as a proxy for modifiable risk exposures, to estimate the effect of health conditions on cost. Well-conducted genome-wide association studies provide robust evidence of the associations of genetic variants with health conditions or disease risk factors. The subsequent causal effects of these health conditions on cost can be estimated using genetic variants as instruments for the health conditions. This is because the approximately random allocation of genotypes at conception means that many genetic variants are orthogonal to observable and unobservable confounders. Datasets with linked genotypic and resource use information obtained from electronic medical records or from routinely collected administrative data are now becoming available and will facilitate this form of analysis. We describe some of the methodological issues that arise in this type of analysis, which we illustrate by considering how Mendelian randomization could be used to estimate the causal impact of obesity, a complex trait, on healthcare costs. We describe some of the data sources that could be used for this type of analysis. We conclude by considering the challenges and opportunities offered by Mendelian randomization for economic evaluation.

  15. An evaluation of a community dietetics intervention on the management of malnutrition for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, S; Kennedy, N P; Rughoobur, G F; Slattery, C G; Sugrue, S

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare professionals working in the community setting have limited knowledge of the evidence-based management of malnutrition. The present study aimed to evaluate a community dietetics intervention, which included an education programme for healthcare professionals in conjunction with the introduction of a community dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition. Changes in nutritional knowledge and the reported management of malnourished patients were investigated and the acceptability of the intervention was explored. An education programme, incorporating 'Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST)' training, was implemented in eight of 10 eligible primary care practices (14 general practitioners and nine practice nurses attended), in seven private nursing homes (20 staff nurses attended) and two health centres (53 community nurses attended) in conjunction with a community dietetics service for patients at risk of malnutrition. Nutritional knowledge was assessed before, immediately after, and 6 months after the intervention using self-administered, multiple-choice questionnaires. Reported changes in practice and the acceptability of the education programme were considered using self-administered questionnaires 6 months after the intervention. A significant increase in nutritional knowledge 6 months after the intervention was observed (P dietetics service for patients 'at risk' of malnutrition increased the nutritional knowledge and improved the reported management of malnourished patients in the community by healthcare professionals. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of Collection and Disposal of Hospital Waste in Hospitals and Healthcare Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nazemi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, one of the environmental issues is waste of hospitals and healthcare facilities which due to hazardous, toxic, and disease-causing agents such as pharmaceutical, chemical and infectious disease, is of particular sensitivity. According to a 2002 survey by WHO, it was determined that 22 million people worldwide suffer from infectious diseases annually, because of contacting hospital wastes. Also based on a research conducted in 22 countries, 18 to 64 percent of hospitals wastes are not disposed properly [1]. The purpose f the study is to appraise collection and disposal of hospital wastes in hospitals and healthcare centers of Shahroud.In this sectional study, 3 university hospitals (580 beds and 10 healthcare facilities were investigated for six months (mehr-azar 89 at Shahroud. In order to determine the amount of waste, produced waste of an entire day was weighted in hospitals and health centers. In this research, proposed questionnaires of WHO for developing countries was used to evaluate collection and disposal system of hospitals waste. Collected data was coded and analyzed by SPSS ver.15.

  17. [Comparative profile of the use of filter needles in Quebec and France in healthcare facility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painchart, L; Odou, P; Bussières, J-F

    2017-11-13

    The manipulation of drugs from glass ampules can generate particles when the ampule is broken. Several authors recommend the use of filter needle to withdraw the drug content. The main objective is to establish an inventory of the use of filter needles and the perception of pharmacists in Quebec and in France. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. A questionnaire was sent to all health facilities in Quebec (n=30) and a selection of hospitals in France (n=100). Respondents were asked to answer a questionnaire that included policies and procedures on the use of these medical devices and the conditions of their use at the pharmacy and in healthcare services. In total, 27 respondents from Quebec (response rate: 90%) and 41 respondents from France (response rate: 41%) participated in our survey. In Quebec, all exploitable questionnaires except one (42/43) used five micron filter needles at the pharmacy against 28% of utilisation in healthcare services. In France, this practice is nearly ignored. Action should be taken to decide on the use of filter needles including studies to confirm the consequences of the presence of these particles on an animal model, discussions with regulatory authorities to clarify the situation, incentives for manufacturers to use vials. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Study protocol: an evaluation of the effectiveness, experiences and costs of a patient-directed strategy compared with a multi-faceted strategy to implement physical cancer rehabilitation programmes for cancer survivors in a European healthcare system; a controlled before and after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsbrandy, Charlotte; Ottevanger, Petronella B.; Groen, Wim G.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; van Harten, Willem H.; Hermens, Rosella P.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The need for physical cancer rehabilitation programmes (PCRPs), addressing adverse effects from cancer, is growing. Implementing these programmes into daily practice is still a challenge. Since barriers for successful implementation often arise at different levels in healthcare,

  19. Enhancing research capacity across healthcare and higher education sectors: development and evaluation of an integrated model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitworth Anne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With current policy in healthcare research, in the United Kingdom and internationally, focused on development of research excellence in individuals and teams, building capacity for implementation and translation of research is paramount among the professionals who use that research in daily practice. The judicious use of research outcomes and evaluation of best evidence and practice in healthcare is integrally linked to the research capacity and capabilities of the workforce. In addition to promoting high quality research, mechanisms for actively enhancing research capacity more generally must be in place to address the complexities that both undermine and facilitate this activity. Methods A comprehensive collaborative model for building research capacity in one health professional group, speech and language therapy, was developed in a region within the UK and is presented here. The North East of England and the strong research ethos of this profession in addressing complex interventions offered a fertile context for developing and implementing a model which integrated the healthcare and university sectors. Two key frameworks underpin this model. The first addresses the individual participants’ potential trajectory from research consciousness to research participative to research active. The second embeds a model developed for general practitioners into a broader framework of practice-academic partnership and knowledge and skills exchange, and considers external drivers and impacts on practice and patient outcomes as key elements. Results and discussion The integration of practice and academia has been successful in building a culture of research activity within one healthcare profession in a region in the UK and has resulted, to date, in a series of research related outcomes. Understanding the key components of this partnership and the explicit strategies used has driven the implementation of the model and are discussed

  20. Addressing holistic healthcare needs of oncology patients: Implementation and evaluation of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) course within an elective module designed for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Homberg, Angelika; Glassen, Katharina; Mahler, Cornelia

    2016-12-01

    Patients, and especially oncology patients, increasingly demand information and application of complementary therapies to supplement their conventional medical treatment and follow-up care. Due to the widespread interest in holistic treatment opportunities in oncology populations, healthcare professionals need to be prepared in differentiating evidence-based methods of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) spectrum and how to consult with patients about it. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of a newly designed module "Complementary and Alternative Medicine in oncological healthcare" in the bachelor degree program Interprofessional Health Care (B.Sc.). The study applied a developed evaluation questionnaire to capture students' perspectives on the CAM contents. This assessment instrument was administered pre and post the CAM teaching unit. Interprofessional medical education, University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany. The integration of the CAM elective module was possible and was met by positive response. Students' interest was reflected in an increase of their self-reported knowledge gain and positive CAM attitude. Comparison of pre and post evaluation data demonstrate that, particularly, students' expectations on developing their own opinion about CAM, and getting an overview of the evidence-base of different CAM methods have been met. Evaluation results indicate that the module content was in line with the students' expectations and may have positively impacted on their general CAM attitude. The results support us in continuing to offer this CAM course within the elective module to prepare today's healthcare professionals for patient-oriented healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Setting Healthcare Priorities at the Macro and Meso Levels: A Framework for Evaluation

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    Edwine W. Barasa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Priority setting in healthcare is a key determinant of health system performance. However, there is no widely accepted priority setting evaluation framework. We reviewed literature with the aim of developing and proposing a framework for the evaluation of macro and meso level healthcare priority setting practices. Methods We systematically searched Econlit, PubMed, CINAHL, and EBSCOhost databases and supplemented this with searches in Google Scholar, relevant websites and reference lists of relevant papers. A total of 31 papers on evaluation of priority setting were identified. These were supplemented by broader theoretical literature related to evaluation of priority setting. A conceptual review of selected papers was undertaken. Results Based on a synthesis of the selected literature, we propose an evaluative framework that requires that priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels of the health system meet the following conditions: (1 Priority setting decisions should incorporate both efficiency and equity considerations as well as the following outcomes; (a Stakeholder satisfaction, (b Stakeholder understanding, (c Shifted priorities (reallocation of resources, and (d Implementation of decisions. (2 Priority setting processes should also meet the procedural conditions of (a Stakeholder engagement, (b Stakeholder empowerment, (c Transparency, (d Use of evidence, (e Revisions, (f Enforcement, and (g Being grounded on community values. Conclusion Available frameworks for the evaluation of priority setting are mostly grounded on procedural requirements, while few have included outcome requirements. There is, however, increasing recognition of the need to incorporate both consequential and procedural considerations in priority setting practices. In this review, we adapt an integrative approach to develop and propose a framework for the evaluation of priority setting practices at the macro and meso levels that draws from

  2. Panel 1 - comparative evaluation of deposition technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Benson, D.K.; Pitts, R.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bhat, D.G. [GTE Valenite Corp., Troy, MI (United States); Yulin Chen [Allison Gas Turbine Division, GM, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gat, R.; Sunkara, M.K. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kelly, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lawler, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Nagle, D.C. [Martin Marietta Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Outka, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Revankar, G.S. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Subramaniam, V.V. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Wilbur, P.J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States); Mingshow Wong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Woolam, W.E. [Southwest Research Inst., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This working group attempted to evaluate/compare the different types of deposition techniques currently under investigation for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. A table lists the broad types of techniques that were considered for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. After some discussion, it was agreed that any evaluation of the various techniques would be dependent on the end application. Thus the next action was to list the different areas where diamond and DLC films could find applications in transportation. These application areas are listed in a table. The table intentionally does not go into great detail on applications because that subject is dealt with specifically by Panel No. 4 - Applications To Transportation. The next action concentrated on identifying critical issues or limitations that need to be considered in evaluating the different processes. An attempt was then made to rank different broad categories of deposition techniques currently available or under development based on the four application areas and the limitations. These rankings/evaluations are given for diamond and DLC techniques. Finally, the working group tried to identify critical development and research issues that need to be incorporated into developing a long-term program that focuses on diamond/DLC coatings for transportation needs. 5 tabs.

  3. Methods for the comparative evaluation of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busse, Reinhard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Political background: As a German novelty, the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen; IGWiG was established in 2004 to, among other tasks, evaluate the benefit of pharmaceuticals. In this context it is of importance that patented pharmaceuticals are only excluded from the reference pricing system if they offer a therapeutic improvement. The institute is commissioned by the Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss, G-BA or by the Ministry of Health and Social Security. The German policy objective expressed by the latest health care reform (Gesetz zur Modernisierung der Gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung, GMG is to base decisions on a scientific assessment of pharmaceuticals in comparison to already available treatments. However, procedures and methods are still to be established. Research questions and methods: This health technology assessment (HTA report was commissioned by the German Agency for HTA at the Institute for Medical Documentation and Information (DAHTA@DIMDI. It analysed criteria, procedures, and methods of comparative drug assessment in other EU-/OECD-countries. The research question was the following: How do national public institutions compare medicines in connection with pharmaceutical regulation, i.e. licensing, reimbursement and pricing of drugs? Institutions as well as documents concerning comparative drug evaluation (e.g. regulations, guidelines were identified through internet, systematic literature, and hand searches. Publications were selected according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Documents were analysed in a qualitative matter following an analytic framework that had been developed in advance. Results were summarised narratively and presented in evidence tables. Results and discussion: Currently licensing agencies do not systematically assess a new drug's added value for patients and society. This is why many

  4. Methods for the comparative evaluation of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentner, Annette; Velasco-Garrido, Marcial; Busse, Reinhard

    2005-11-15

    POLITICAL BACKGROUND: As a German novelty, the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (Institut für Qualität und Wirtschaftlichkeit im Gesundheitswesen; IGWiG) was established in 2004 to, among other tasks, evaluate the benefit of pharmaceuticals. In this context it is of importance that patented pharmaceuticals are only excluded from the reference pricing system if they offer a therapeutic improvement. The institute is commissioned by the Federal Joint Committee (Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss, G-BA) or by the Ministry of Health and Social Security. The German policy objective expressed by the latest health care reform (Gesetz zur Modernisierung der Gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung, GMG) is to base decisions on a scientific assessment of pharmaceuticals in comparison to already available treatments. However, procedures and methods are still to be established. This health technology assessment (HTA) report was commissioned by the German Agency for HTA at the Institute for Medical Documentation and Information (DAHTA@DIMDI). It analysed criteria, procedures, and methods of comparative drug assessment in other EU-/OECD-countries. The research question was the following: How do national public institutions compare medicines in connection with pharmaceutical regulation, i.e. licensing, reimbursement and pricing of drugs? Institutions as well as documents concerning comparative drug evaluation (e.g. regulations, guidelines) were identified through internet, systematic literature, and hand searches. Publications were selected according to pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Documents were analysed in a qualitative matter following an analytic framework that had been developed in advance. Results were summarised narratively and presented in evidence tables. Currently licensing agencies do not systematically assess a new drug's added value for patients and society. This is why many countries made post-licensing evaluation of pharmaceuticals a

  5. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  6. Technical evaluation of methods for identifying chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in healthcare claims databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weycker Derek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare claims databases have been used in several studies to characterize the risk and burden of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN and effectiveness of colony-stimulating factors against FN. The accuracy of methods previously used to identify FN in such databases has not been formally evaluated. Methods Data comprised linked electronic medical records from Geisinger Health System and healthcare claims data from Geisinger Health Plan. Subjects were classified into subgroups based on whether or not they were hospitalized for FN per the presumptive “gold standard” (ANC 9/L, and body temperature ≥38.3°C or receipt of antibiotics and claims-based definition (diagnosis codes for neutropenia, fever, and/or infection. Accuracy was evaluated principally based on positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity. Results Among 357 study subjects, 82 (23% met the gold standard for hospitalized FN. For the claims-based definition including diagnosis codes for neutropenia plus fever in any position (n=28, PPV was 100% and sensitivity was 34% (95% CI: 24–45. For the definition including neutropenia in the primary position (n=54, PPV was 87% (78–95 and sensitivity was 57% (46–68. For the definition including neutropenia in any position (n=71, PPV was 77% (68–87 and sensitivity was 67% (56–77. Conclusions Patients hospitalized for chemotherapy-induced FN can be identified in healthcare claims databases--with an acceptable level of mis-classification--using diagnosis codes for neutropenia, or neutropenia plus fever.

  7. Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Firth, Kimberly; Smeeding, Sandra; Wolever, Ruth; Kaufman, Joanna; Delgado, Roxana; Bellanti, Dawn; Xenakis, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the development of mind-body skills can improve individual and family resilience, particularly related to the stresses of illness, trauma, and caregiving. To operationalize the research evidence that mind-body skills help with health and recovery, Samueli Institute, in partnership with experts in mind-body programming, created a set of guidelines for developing and evaluating mind-body programs for service members, veterans, and their families. The Guidelines for Creating, Implementing, and Evaluating Mind-Body Programs in a Military Healthcare Setting outline key strategies and issues to consider when developing, implementing, and evaluating a mind-body focused family empowerment approach in a military healthcare setting. Although these guidelines were developed specifically for a military setting, most of the same principles can be applied to the development of programs in the civilian setting as well. The guidelines particularly address issues unique to mind-body programs, such as choosing evidence-based modalities, licensure and credentialing, safety and contraindications, and choosing evaluation measures that capture the holistic nature of these types of programs. The guidelines are practical, practice-based guidelines, developed by experts in the fields of program development and evaluation, mind-body therapies, patient- and family-centered care, as well as, experts in military and veteran's health systems. They provide a flexible framework to create mind-body family empowerment programs and describe important issues that program developers and evaluators are encouraged to address to ensure the development of the most impactful, successful, evidence-supported programs possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Value for money of changing healthcare services? Economic evaluation of quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severens, J

    2003-01-01

    

 There are many instances of perceived or real inefficiencies in health service delivery. Both healthcare providers and policy makers need to know the impact and cost of applying strategies to change the behaviour of individuals or organisations. Quality improvement or implementation research is concerned with evaluating the methods of behavioural change. Addressing inefficiencies in healthcare services raises a series of issues, beginning with how inefficiency itself should be defined. The basic concepts of cost analysis and economic evaluations are explained and a model for working through the economic issues of quality improvement is discussed. This model combines the costs and benefits of corrected inefficiency with the costs and degree of behavioural change achieved by a quality improvement method in the policy maker's locality. It shows why it may not always be cost effective for policy makers to address suboptimal behaviour. Both the interpretation of quality improvement research findings and their local application need careful consideration. The limited availability of applicable quality improvement research may make it difficult to provide robust advice on the value for money of many behavioural quality improvement strategies. PMID:14532369

  9. Impact of a quality improvement program on primary healthcare in Canada: a mixed-method evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael E; Brown, Judith Belle; Roberts, Sharon; Russell, Grant; Fournie, Meghan; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Kotecha, Jyoti; Han, Han; Thind, Amardeep; Stewart, Moira; Reichert, Sonja; Tompkins, Jordan W; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous comprehensive evaluations of primary healthcare (PHC) quality improvement (QI) initiatives are lacking. This article describes the evaluation of the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership Learning Collaborative (QIIP-LC), an Ontario-wide PHC QI program targeting type 2 diabetes management, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, access to care, and team functioning. This article highlights the primary outcome results of an external retrospective, multi-measure, mixed-method evaluation of the QIIP-LC, including: (1) matched-control pre-post chart audit of diabetes management (A1c/foot exams) and rate of CRC screening; (2) post-only advanced access survey (third-next available appointment); and (3) post-only semi-structured interviews (team functioning). Chart audit data was collected from 34 consenting physicians per group (of which 88% provided access data). Between-group differences were not statistically significant (A1c [p=0.10]; foot exams [p=0.45]; CRC screening [p=0.77]; advanced access [p=0.22]). Qualitative interview (n=42) themes highlighted the success of the program in helping build interdisciplinary team functioning and capacity. The rigorous design and methodology of the QIIP-LC evaluation utilizing a control group is one of the most significant efforts thus far to demonstrate the impact of a QI program in PHC, with improvements over time in both QIIP and control groups offering a likely explanation for the lack of statistically significant primary outcomes. Team functioning was a key success, with team-based chronic care highlighted as pivotal for improved health outcomes. Policy makers should strive to endorse QI programs with proven success through rigorous evaluation to ensure evidence-based healthcare policy and funding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Development and evaluation of a common data model enabling active drug safety surveillance using disparate healthcare databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Stephanie J; Ryan, Patrick B; O'Hara, Donald J; Powell, Gregory E; Painter, Jeffery L; Pattishall, Edward N; Morris, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    Active drug safety surveillance may be enhanced by analysis of multiple observational healthcare databases, including administrative claims and electronic health records. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a common data model (CDM) enabling rapid, comparable, systematic analyses across disparate observational data sources to identify and evaluate the effects of medicines. The CDM uses a person-centric design, with attributes for demographics, drug exposures, and condition occurrence. Drug eras, constructed to represent periods of persistent drug use, are derived from available elements from pharmacy dispensings, prescriptions written, and other medication history. Condition eras aggregate diagnoses that occur within a single episode of care. Drugs and conditions from source data are mapped to biomedical ontologies to standardize terminologies and enable analyses of higher-order effects. The CDM was applied to two source types: an administrative claims and an electronic medical record database. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate transformation rules. Two case studies demonstrate the ability of the CDM to enable standard analyses across disparate sources: analyses of persons exposed to rofecoxib and persons with an acute myocardial infarction. Over 43 million persons, with nearly 1 billion drug exposures and 3.7 billion condition occurrences from both databases were successfully transformed into the CDM. An analysis routine applied to transformed data from each database produced consistent, comparable results. A CDM can normalize the structure and content of disparate observational data, enabling standardized analyses that are meaningfully comparable when assessing the effects of medicines.

  11. Evaluating clinical ethics support in mental healthcare: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Pedersen, Reidar; Norvoll, Reidun; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-06-01

    A systematic literature review on evaluation of clinical ethics support services in mental healthcare is presented and discussed. The focus was on (a) forms of clinical ethics support services, (b) evaluation of clinical ethics support services, (c) contexts and participants and (d) results. Five studies were included. The ethics support activities described were moral case deliberations and ethics rounds. Different qualitative and quantitative research methods were utilized. The results show that (a) participants felt that they gained an increased insight into moral issues through systematic reflection; (b) there was improved cooperation among multidisciplinary team members; (c) it was uncertain whether clinical ethics support services led to better patient care; (d) the issue of patient and client participation is complex; and (e) the implementation process is challenging. Clinical ethics support services have mainly been studied through the experiences of the participating facilitators and healthcare professionals. Hence, there is limited knowledge of whether and how various types of clinical ethics support services influence the quality of care and how patients and relatives may evaluate clinical ethics support services. Based on the six excluded 'grey zone articles', in which there was an implicit focus on ethics reflection, other ways of working with ethical reflection in practice are discussed. Implementing and evaluating clinical ethics support services as approaches to clinical ethics support that are more integrated into the development of good practice are in focus. In order to meet some of the shortcomings of the field of clinical ethics support services, a research project that aims to strengthen ethics support in the mental health services, including patients' and caregivers' views on ethical challenges, is presented. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. A systematic comparative evaluation of biclustering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Victor A; Campello, Ricardo J G B

    2017-01-23

    Biclustering techniques are capable of simultaneously clustering rows and columns of a data matrix. These techniques became very popular for the analysis of gene expression data, since a gene can take part of multiple biological pathways which in turn can be active only under specific experimental conditions. Several biclustering algorithms have been developed in the past recent years. In order to provide guidance regarding their choice, a few comparative studies were conducted and reported in the literature. In these studies, however, the performances of the methods were evaluated through external measures that have more recently been shown to have undesirable properties. Furthermore, they considered a limited number of algorithms and datasets. We conducted a broader comparative study involving seventeen algorithms, which were run on three synthetic data collections and two real data collections with a more representative number of datasets. For the experiments with synthetic data, five different experimental scenarios were studied: different levels of noise, different numbers of implanted biclusters, different levels of symmetric bicluster overlap, different levels of asymmetric bicluster overlap and different bicluster sizes, for which the results were assessed with more suitable external measures. For the experiments with real datasets, the results were assessed by gene set enrichment and clustering accuracy. We observed that each algorithm achieved satisfactory results in part of the biclustering tasks in which they were investigated. The choice of the best algorithm for some application thus depends on the task at hand and the types of patterns that one wants to detect.

  13. Measuring, evaluating and improving hospital quality parameters/dimensions--an integrated healthcare quality approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zineldin, Mosad; Camgöz-Akdağ, Hatice; Vasicheva, Valiantsina

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the major factors affecting cumulative summation, to empirically examine the major factors affecting satisfaction and to address the question whether patients in Kazakhstan evaluate healthcare similarly or differently from patients in Egypt and Jordan. A questionnaire, adapted from previous research, was distributed to Kazakhstan inpatients. The questionnaire contained 39 attributes about five newly-developed quality dimensions (5Qs), which were identified to be the most relevant attributes for hospitals. The questionnaire was translated into Russian to increase the response rate and improve data quality. Almost 200 usable questionnaires were returned. Frequency distribution, factor analysis and reliability checks were used to analyze the data. The three biggest concerns for Kazakhstan patients are: infrastructure; atmosphere; and interaction. Hospital staffs concern for patients' needs, parking facilities for visitors, waiting time and food temperature were all common specific attributes, which were perceived as concerns. These were shortcomings in all three countries. Improving health service quality by applying total relationship management and the 5Qs model together with a customer-orientation strategy is recommended. Results can be used by hospital staff to reengineer and redesign creatively their quality management processes and help move towards more effective healthcare quality strategies. Patients in three countries have similar concerns and quality perceptions. The paper describes a new instrument and method. The study assures relevance, validity and reliability, while being explicitly change-oriented. The authors argue that patient satisfaction is a cumulative construct, summing satisfaction as five different qualities (5Qs): object; processes; infrastructure; interaction and atmosphere.

  14. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Workplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the

  15. An evaluation of an aggression management training program to cope with workplace violence in the healthcare sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Oostrom (Janneke); H. van Mierlo (Heleen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWorkplace violence is a major occupational hazard for healthcare workers, generating a need for effective intervention programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an aggression management training program. The evaluation design was based on the internal

  16. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobials for textile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windler, Lena; Height, Murray; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-03-01

    Many antimicrobial technologies are available for textiles. They may be used in many different textile applications to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Due to the biological activity of the antimicrobial compounds, the assessment of the safety of these substances is an ongoing subject of research and regulatory scrutiny. This review aims to give an overview on the main compounds used today for antimicrobial textile functionalization. Based on an evaluation of scientific publications, market data as well as regulatory documents, the potential effects of antimicrobials on the environment and on human health were considered and also life cycle perspectives were taken into account. The characteristics of each compound were summarized according to technical, environmental and human health criteria. Triclosan, silane quaternary ammonium compounds, zinc pyrithione and silver-based compounds are the main antimicrobials used in textiles. The synthetic organic compounds dominate the antimicrobials market on a weight basis. On the technical side the application rates of the antimicrobials used to functionalize a textile product are an important parameter with treatments requiring lower dosage rates offering clear benefits in terms of less active substance required to achieve the functionality. The durability of the antimicrobial treatment has a strong influence on the potential for release and subsequent environmental effects. In terms of environmental criteria, all compounds were rated similarly in effective removal in wastewater treatment processes. The extent of published information about environmental behavior for each compound varies, limiting the possibility for an in-depth comparison of all textile-relevant parameters across the antimicrobials. Nevertheless the comparative evaluation showed that each antimicrobial technology has specific risks and benefits that should be taken into account in evaluating the suitability of different antimicrobial products. The

  17. Evaluating a community-based program to improve healthcare quality: research design for the Aligning Forces for Quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Beich, Jeff; Christianson, Jon B; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; McHugh, Megan C; Mittler, Jessica N; Shi, Yunfeng; Bodenschatz, Laura J

    2012-09-01

    The Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) initiative is the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's (RWJF's) signature effort to increase the overall quality of healthcare in targeted communities throughout the country. In addition to sponsoring this 16-site, complex program, the RWJF funds an independent scientific evaluation to support objective research on the initiative's effectiveness and contributions to basic knowledge in 5 core programmatic areas. The research design, data, and challenges faced in the evaluation of this 10-year initiative are discussed. A descriptive overview of the evaluation research design for a multi-site, community based, healthcare quality improvement initiative is provided. The multiphase research design employed by the evaluation team is discussed. Evaluation provides formative feedback to the RWJF, participants, and other interested audiences in real time; develops approaches to assess innovative and under-studied interventions; furthers the analysis and understanding of effective community-based collaborative work in healthcare; and helps to differentiate the various facilitators, barriers, and contextual dimensions that affect the implementation and outcomes of community-based health interventions. The AF4Q initiative is arguably the largest community-level healthcare improvement demonstration in the United States to date; it is being implemented at a time of rapid change in national healthcare policy. The implementation of large-scale, multi-site initiatives is becoming an increasingly common approach for addressing problems in healthcare. The evaluation research design for the AF4Q initiative, and the lessons learned from its approach, may be valuable to others tasked with evaluating similar community-based initiatives.

  18. Evaluation of a collaborative project to develop sustainable healthcare education in eight UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S C; Mortimer, F

    2017-09-01

    Environmental change poses pressing challenges to public health and calls for profound and far-reaching changes to policy and practice across communities and health systems. Medical schools can act as a seedbed where knowledge, skills and innovation to address environmental challenges can be developed through innovative and collaborative approaches. The objectives of this study were to (1) explore drivers and challenges of collaboration for educational development between and within medical schools; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of a range of pedagogies for sustainable healthcare education; and (3) identify effective strategies to facilitate the renewal of medical curricula to address evolving health challenges. Participatory action research. Medical school teams participated in a nine-month collaborative project, including a one-day seminar to learn about sustainable healthcare education and develop a project plan. After the seminar, teams were supported to develop, deliver and evaluate new teaching at their medical school. New teaching was introduced at seven medical schools. A variety of pedagogies were represented. Collaboration between schools motivated and informed participants. The main challenges faced related to time pressures. Educators and students commented that new teaching was enjoyable and effective at improving knowledge and skills. Collaborative working supported educators to develop and implement new teaching sessions rapidly and effectively. Collaboration can help to build educators' confidence and capacity in a new area of education development. Different forms of collaboration may be appropriate for different circumstances and at different stages of education development. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparing Sexual Function in Females of Reproductive Age Referred to Rural and Urban Healthcare Centers in Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javadifar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Healthy sexual function can be considered as an important element to improve personal and public hygiene. The sexual desire plays an important role in mental health and improving the quality of life. Objectives The current study aimed to compare sexual function of females in urban and rural areas. Methods The current descriptive study adopted 800 females of reproductive age (range 15 - 45 years referred to rural and urban healthcare centers in Ahvaz, Iran, in 2015. Samples were randomly selected. Applied instruments in the study were demographic information and female sexual dysfunction questionnaires (FSFI. Independent T-test, Chi-square and logistic regression were employed to analyze data by SPSS ver. 22. Results The result showed a significant statistical difference between females in urban and rural areas in terms of sexual desire, vaginal lubrication, intercourse pain and sexual function (P 0.05. Frequency of sexual dysfunction was 59.9% in females in rural and36.5% in urban areas and the difference between the groups was statistically significant (0.000. In both groups, the highest sexual disorder frequency was related to intercourse pain. Conclusions According to the obtained results, females in the rural areas had lower sexual function than the ones in the urban areas. It is suggested to establish female sexual health units in healthcare centers to give female sexual function consultation adjusted with awareness and culture of females and consider the existing problems.

  20. Healthcare plans and consumer perceptions of healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda-Arango, Ana M

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of healthcare insurance plans on consumer perception of trust in a healthcare institution, and the mediating effect of trust on consumer loyalty towards an institution. The study was conducted at a healthcare institution in Colombia where a total of 841 patients responded to a questionnaire. A structural equation model shows that individuals who have a pre-paid healthcare plan have a stronger evaluation of trust compared to those who hold a regulated healthcare plan (i.e., subsidized and contributory plans). In turn, trust positively predicts consumers' loyalty towards an institution. The relationship between the patients' healthcare plans and their degree of loyalty towards healthcare institutions is completely mediated by their perception of trust towards the institution. A greater perception of trust is explained by having a medical plan that provides consumers with more flexibility, allowing them to select their health provider at a premium price. Although health institutions do not control healthcare regimes, these affect consumers' trust in their service. Institutions cannot modify characteristics of the regime, but they can promote a trustworthy environment to strengthen consumers' loyalty to the institution.

  1. Respectfulness from the Patient Perspective: Comparison of Primary Healthcare Evaluation Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Pineault, Raynald; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Burge, Frederick; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Gass, David; Santor, Darcy A.; Beaulieu, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Respectfulness is one measurable and core element of healthcare responsiveness. The operational definition of respectfulness is “the extent to which health professionals and support staff meet users' expectations about interpersonal treatment, demonstrate respect for the dignity of patients and provide adequate privacy.” Objective: To examine how well respectfulness is captured in validated instruments that evaluate primary healthcare from the patient's perspective, whether or not their developers had envisaged these as representing respectfulness. Method: 645 adults with at least one healthcare contact with their own regular doctor or clinic in the previous 12 months responded to six instruments, two subscales that mapped to respectfulness: the Interpersonal Processes of Care, version II (IPC-II, two subscales) and the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS). Additionally, there were individual respectfulness items in subscales measuring other attributes in the Components of Primary Care Index (CPCI) and the first version of the EUROPEP (EUROPEP-I). Scores were normalized for descriptive comparison. Exploratory and confirmatory (structural equation modelling) factor analyses examined fit to operational definition. Results: Respectfulness scales correlate highly with one another and with interpersonal communication. All items load adequately on a single factor, presumed to be respectfulness, but the best model has three underlying factors corresponding to (1) physician's interpersonal treatment (eigenvalue=13.99), (2) interpersonal treatment by office staff (eigenvalue=2.13) and (3) respect for the dignity of the person (eigenvalue=1.16). Most items capture physician's interpersonal treatment (IPC-II Compassionate, Respectful Interpersonal Style, IPC-II Hurried Communication and PCAS Interpersonal Treatment). The IPC-II Interpersonal Style (Disrespectful Office Staff) captures treatment by staff, but only three items capture dignity. Conclusion: Various items or

  2. Burden of disease and economic evaluation of healthcare interventions: are we investigating what really matters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gènova-Maleras Ricard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of limited available healthcare resources demands an agreed rational allocation principle and the consequent priority setting. We assessed the association between economic evaluations of healthcare interventions published in Spain (1983-2008 and the disease burden in the population. Methods Electronic databases (e.g., PubMed/MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Knowledge, CRD, IME, IBECS and reports from health technology assessment agencies were systematically reviewed. For each article, multiple variables were recorded such as: year and journal of publication, type of study, health intervention targetted, perspective of analysis, type of costs and sources of information, first author's affiliation, explicit recommendations aimed at decision-making, and the main disease cause to which the intervention was addressed. The following disease burden measures were calculated: years of life lost (YLLs, years lived with disability (YLDs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and mortality by cause. Correlation and linear regression models were fitted. Results Four hundred and seventy-seven economic evaluations were identified. Cardiovascular diseases (15.7%, infectious diseases (15.3%, malignant neoplasms (13.2%, and neuropsychiatric diseases (9.6% were the conditions most commonly addressed. Accidents and injuries, congenital anomalies, oral conditions, nutritional deficiencies and other neoplasms were the categories with a lowest number of studies (0.6% for each of them. For the main disease categories (n = 20, a correlation was seen with: mortality 0.67 (p = 0.001, DALYs 0.63 (p = 0.003, YLLs 0.54 (p = 0.014, and YLDs 0.51 (p = 0.018. By disease sub-categories (n = 51, the correlations were generally low and non statistically significant. Conclusions Examining discrepancies between economic evaluations in particular diseases and the overall burden of disease helps shed light on whether there are potentially over- and under

  3. National Initiatives to Improve Healthcare Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Health Delivery Systems in Slovakia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Robert; Caplanova, Anetta; Novak, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    While the United States and Slovakia offer different healthcare delivery systems, each country faces the same challenges of improving the health status of their populations. The authors explore the impact of their respective systems on the health of their populations and compare the health outcomes of both nations. They point out that socioeconomic factors play a far more important role in determining population health outcomes than do the structures of the systems surrounding the care delivery. The authors illustrate this finding through a comparison of the poverty and education levels of a selected minority group from each country in relation to the health outcomes for each population group. The comparison reveals that education is a more influential determinant in a population's health outcomes, than the improved access to care offered by a universal system.

  4. Evaluation of shared EHR services in primary healthcare centers and their rural community offices: the twister story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronaki, Ce; Kontoyiannis, V; Mytaras, M; Aggourakis, N; Kostomanolakis, S; Roumeliotaki, T; Kavlentakis, G; Chiarugi, F; Tsiknakis, M

    2007-01-01

    Ten years after primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare facilities in Crete were connected in HYGEIAnet, one of the first regional health information networks worldwide, the Twister project addressed the practical challenge of delivering integrated eHealth services to remote healthcare facilities in Crete and the south Aegean. A hybrid network infrastructure comprising terrestrial broadband, wireless, and satellite segments provided connectivity among distributed healthcare organizations. A fast-track methodology of continuous training and evaluation was used to encourage the wide adoption of EHR services in primary healthcare centers and their remote community offices, eTraining in prehospital emergency management, and medical collaboration. For the evaluation of Twister, health professionals using EHRs and citizens visiting the healthcare facilities provided their attitudes and perceptions on eHealth. Although eHealth is viewed differently by citizens and health professionals, both groups consider the EHR as an important part of the daily medical practice. However, continuous training, practical incentives, and awareness initiatives are necessary to increase the use of EHRs and the social embedding of eHealth in rural areas.

  5. The challenges of evaluating and comparing projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Hedegaard, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Project Half Double is an industry-driven initiative with the purpose to develop a new and radical project paradigm to increase the competitiveness of the Danish industry. The research part of Project Half Double will assess the degree to which the new project paradigm is more successful than...... traditional approaches, which calls for an evaluation and comparison framework. This paper describes the design of such a comparison framework consisting of the five elements context, project, mechanism/practices, output and impact based on the open systems view. We illustrate the use of the comparison...... framework for front-loading projects in Grundfos and the specific evaluation criteria used here. The design and use of comparison frameworks have some implications such as it being challenging to define relevant and meaningful evaluation criteria, it is difficult to collect complex evaluation data, and some...

  6. Evaluation of factors affecting plate waste of inpatients in different healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero Díaz, Antonio; Caracuel García, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Satisfaction of inpatients with served food within a hospital care system still constitutes one of the main attempts to modernize food services. The impact of type of menu, food category, hospital centre and timetable on the meals wastage produced in different Spanish healthcare settings, was evaluated. Meal wastage was measured through a semiquantitative 5-point scale ("nothing on plate"; "¼ on plate"; "half on plate"; "¾ on plate" and "all on plate"). The study was carried out in two periods of three months each in 2010 and 2011. A trained person took charge of measuring plate waste classified into 726 servings belonging to 11 menus. In total 31,392 plates were served to 7,868 inpatients. A Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test (p food categories, 26.78% of the plates corresponded to soups and purées, while pasta and rice, and prepared foods were only distributed in 4-5% of the servings. Desserts were mostly consumed, while cooked vegetables were less accepted by the inpatients evaluated. Other factors such as hospital centre influenced plate waste (p 0.05). Visual inspections of plate waste might be useful to optimize type and quality of menus served. The type of menu served and the food category could have a great influence on food acceptability by the inpatients studied. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Process and outcome evaluation of a diabetes prevention education program for community healthcare workers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sranacharoenpong, Kitti; Hanning, Rhona M; Sirichakwal, Prapaisri P; Chittchang, Uraiporn

    2009-12-01

    To describe the development, process and outcome evaluation of a culturally tailored diabetes prevention education program for community healthcare workers (CHCWs) in Thailand. A tailored diabetes prevention education program was designed based on formative research and implemented with 35 CHCWs in semi-urban areas in Chiang Mai province, Thailand. Modules were delivered over eight group classes and eight self-directed E-learning sessions (www.FitThai.org). The program incorporated problem-based learning, discussion, reflection, community-based application, self-evaluation and on-line support. The frequency that students accessed on-line materials, including videotaped lectures, readings, monthly newsletters and community resources, was documented. Participant satisfaction was assessed through three questionnaires. Knowledge was assessed through pre-post testing. Three-quarters of participants attended all eight classes and no participant attended fewer than six. On-line support and materials were accessed 3 to 38 times (median 13). Participants reported that program information and activities were fun, useful, culturally-relevant and applicable to diabetes prevention in their specific communities. Participants also appreciated the innovative technology support for their work. Comfort with E-learning varied among participants. Scores on pre-post knowledge test increased from a mean (sd) of 56.5% (6.26) to 75.5% (6.01) (p E-learning were generally well-received and supported better knowledge scores. Ongoing access to web-based materials and expert support may help sustain learning.

  8. Case study evaluation of health-care solid waste and pollution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... recommendations ranging from daily monitoring of generated wastes to its environmental-friendly disposal, in order to guarantee safe management of health-care wastes in the city. Keywords: health-care waste, characterization, quantification, Ibadan, Nigeria Journal of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology Vol.

  9. Healthcare professionals' and mothers' perceptions of factors that influence decisions to breastfeed or formula feed infants: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amy; Raynor, Peter; Lee, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    This article is a report of a study comparing healthcare professionals' and mothers' perceptions of factors that influence the decision to breastfeed or formula feed an infant. The World Health Organisation recommends that mothers should breastfeed exclusively for the first 6 months of age and then continue to do so alongside complementary foods for the first 2 years and beyond. However, levels of breastfeeding in the United Kingdom are below the recommended targets. Low levels of actual or perceived professional support and understanding are associated with formula use. Twenty professionals working closely with mothers of young infants completed a semi-structured interview exploring the reasons they believed mothers chose to use formula milk. Twenty-three mothers with an infant aged 6-12 months also reflected on their experiences of milk feeding. The data were collected during 2007-2008. Professionals described a range of influences on maternal decisions to breastfeed or formula feed including lack of knowledge, support and help with difficulties. These were strongly echoed in the reasons mothers gave for formula use, suggesting clear professional understanding of the challenges relating to breastfeeding. Although keen to give further support, professionals raised issues of lack of time and resources to support mothers. Contrary to maternal beliefs of poor professional understanding, professionals had a clear perception of influences affecting early milk feeding choice. Further resources and recognition are needed for healthcare professionals working with new mothers to enable them to offer increased support, with the aim of increasing breastfeeding duration. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Control and mitigation of healthcare-acquired infections: designing clinical trials to evaluate new materials and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Peter A; Schmidt, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals clean environmental surfaces to lower microbial contamination and reduce the likelihood of transmitting infections. Despite current cleaning and hand hygiene protocols, hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) continue to result in a significant loss of life and cost the U.S. healthcare system an estimated $45 billion annually. Stainless steel and chrome are often selected for hospital touch surfaces for their "clean appearance," comparatively smooth finish, resistance to standard cleaners, and relative effectiveness for removing visible dirt during normal cleaning. Designers use wood surfaces for aesthetics; plastic surfaces have become increasingly endemic for their relative lower initial cost; and "antimicrobial agents" are being incorporated into a variety of surface finishes.This paper concentrates on environmental surface materials with a history of bactericidal control of infectious agents and focuses on the methods necessary to validate their effectiveness in healthcare situations. Research shows copper-based metals to have innate abilities to kill bacteria in laboratory settings, but their effectiveness in patient care environments has not been adequately investigated. This article presents a research methodology to expand the evidence base from the laboratory to the built environment. For such research to have a meaningful impact on the design/specifying community, it should assess typical levels of environmental pathogens (i.e., surface "cleanliness") as measured by microbial burden (MB); evaluate the extent to which an intervention with copper-based materials in a randomized clinical trial affects the level of contamination; and correlate how the levels of MB affect the incidence of infections acquired during hospital stays.

  11. Applying the Analytic Hierarchy Process in healthcare research: A systematic literature review and evaluation of reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katharina; Aumann, Ines; Hollander, Ines; Damm, Kathrin; von der Schulenburg, J-Matthias Graf

    2015-12-24

    The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), developed by Saaty in the late 1970s, is one of the methods for multi-criteria decision making. The AHP disaggregates a complex decision problem into different hierarchical levels. The weight for each criterion and alternative are judged in pairwise comparisons and priorities are calculated by the Eigenvector method. The slowly increasing application of the AHP was the motivation for this study to explore the current state of its methodology in the healthcare context. A systematic literature review was conducted by searching the Pubmed and Web of Science databases for articles with the following keywords in their titles or abstracts: "Analytic Hierarchy Process," "Analytical Hierarchy Process," "multi-criteria decision analysis," "multiple criteria decision," "stated preference," and "pairwise comparison." In addition, we developed reporting criteria to indicate whether the authors reported important aspects and evaluated the resulting studies' reporting. The systematic review resulted in 121 articles. The number of studies applying AHP has increased since 2005. Most studies were from Asia (almost 30%), followed by the US (25.6%). On average, the studies used 19.64 criteria throughout their hierarchical levels. Furthermore, we restricted a detailed analysis to those articles published within the last 5 years (n = 69). The mean of participants in these studies were 109, whereas we identified major differences in how the surveys were conducted. The evaluation of reporting showed that the mean of reported elements was about 6.75 out of 10. Thus, 12 out of 69 studies reported less than half of the criteria. The AHP has been applied inconsistently in healthcare research. A minority of studies described all the relevant aspects. Thus, the statements in this review may be biased, as they are restricted to the information available in the papers. Hence, further research is required to discover who should be interviewed and how, how

  12. Comparative evaluation of the biopharmaceutical and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The biopharmaceutical and chemical equivalence of ten brands of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride tablets were assessed through the evaluation of the uniformity of weight, friability test, hardness, disintegration test, dissolution rate, thin layer chromatography and non-aqueous titration procedure with the use of crystal ...

  13. Comparative evaluation of the physicochemical composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleazu Chinedum

    2012-09-24

    Sep 24, 2012 ... determined using the titrimetric method, the total hydrogen, nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen were determined using standard techniques (Chikezie et al., 2008). Physical/organoleptic analysis. This was determined by physical and sensory evaluation of the water samples for taste, appearance and ...

  14. Comparative evaluation of bioactive compounds in Hibiscus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is growing interest in the chemical composition of plants towards discovery of more effective biotherapeutic agents. Six bioactive compounds were evaluated from Hibiscus sabdariffa and Syzygium samarangense juice extracts. Both juices had high amounts of saponins, with Syzygium samarangense having higher ...

  15. Healthcare access: A sequence-sensitive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco J. Haenssgen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that healthcare-seeking behaviour is neither limited to nor terminated by access to one single healthcare provider. Yet the sequential conceptualisation of healthcare-seeking processes has not diffused into quantitative research, which continues to analyse healthcare access as a “one-off” event. The ensuing lack of understanding healthcare behaviour is problematic in light of the immense burden of premature death especially in low- and middle-income countries. This paper presents an alternative approach. Based on a novel survey instrument, we analyse original survey data from rural India and China that contain 119 unique healthcare pathways among 637 respondents. We offer three applications of how such sequential data can be analysed to enhance our understanding of people's health behaviour. First, descriptive analysis of sequential data enables more a comprehensive representation of people's health behaviours, for example the time spent in various healthcare activities, common healthcare pathways across different groups, or shifts in healthcare provider access during a typical illness. Second, by analysing the effect of mobile technology on healthcare-seeking process characteristics, we demonstrate that conventional, sequence-insensitive indicators are potentially inconsistent and misleading approximations when compared to a more precise, sequence-sensitive measure. Third, we describe how sequential data enable transparent and flexible evaluations of people's healthcare behaviour. The example of a sequence-insensitive evaluation suggests that household wealth has no statistical link to an illustrative “ideal” form of public healthcare utilisation. In contrast, sequence-sensitive evaluations demonstrate that household wealth is associated with an increased likelihood of bypassing referral processes and approaching unregulated and costly informal and private practitioners before accessing a public clinic. Sequential

  16. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Comparative evaluation of aqueous humor viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyshia; Carter, Renee; Tully, Thomas; Negulescu, Ioan; Storey, Eric

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate aqueous humor viscosity in the raptor, dog, cat, and horse, with a primary focus on the barred owl (Strix varia). Twenty-six raptors, ten dogs, three cats, and one horse. Animals were euthanized for reasons unrelated to this study. Immediately, after horizontal and vertical corneal dimensions were measured, and anterior chamber paracentesis was performed to quantify anterior chamber volume and obtain aqueous humor samples for viscosity analysis. Dynamic aqueous humor viscosity was measured using a dynamic shear rheometer (AR 1000 TA Instruments, New Castle, DE, USA) at 20 °C. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, unpaired t-tests, and Tukey's test to evaluate the mean ± standard deviation for corneal diameter, anterior chamber volume, and aqueous humor viscosity amongst groups and calculation of Spearman's coefficient for correlation analyses. The mean aqueous humor viscosity in the barred owl was 14.1 centipoise (cP) ± 9, cat 4.4 cP ± 0.2, and dog 2.9 cP ± 1.3. The aqueous humor viscosity for the horse was 1 cP. Of the animals evaluated in this study, the raptor aqueous humor was the most viscous. The aqueous humor of the barred owl is significantly more viscous than the dog (P humor viscosity of the raptor, dog, cat, and horse can be successfully determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    chemical weathering and evaporation, i.e. about 50% of diesel fuel decomposes without the action of hydrocarbon oxidizing microorganisms. This trend was also observed in all the variants of the experiment, i.e., by comparing the residual petroleum hydrocarbon content at the 1st week of the experiment to the total.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Ultrasonography and Intravenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Renal ultrasonography an easily available procedure was compared to intravenous urogram (IVU) to determine its suitability as an alternative to the latter, which is a relatively invasive test for demonstrating hydronephrosis/ or ureteric obstruction in cervical cancer staging. Study design: Thirty five histologically ...

  20. Comparative sonographic evaluation of the anteroposterior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-21

    Sep 21, 2015 ... Longer duration of illness was associated with smaller pancreas body and tail dimensions, while pancreas head dimension was not significantly affected by the duration of illness. Conclusion: Diabetics have smaller pancreas AP dimensions compared to the normal population. Key words: Diabetes mellitus, ...

  1. An evaluation of healthcare information on the Internet: the case of colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ching; Yamada, Tetsuji; Smith, John

    2014-01-14

    Health information, provided through the Internet, has recently received attention from consumers and healthcare providers as an efficient method of motivating people to get screened for colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, the primary purpose was to investigate the extent to which consumers were better educated about CRC screening information because of the information available on the Internet. Another purpose was to identify how better-informed consumers, with reliable and trustworthy health information, were enabled to make sound decisions regarding CRC screening. The data used in this study was taken from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. People aged 55 and older were classified based on their compliance with recommended CRC screening. The study applied the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to evaluate the effects of health information taken from the Internet regarding CRC screening. The credibility and reliance of cancer related information on the Internet was significantly associated with patient compliance to be screened for CRC. Experience and knowledge of Internet use had a significant impact on the utilization of CRC screening. This analysis suggests that the design and publishing websites concerning CRC should emphasize credibility and reliance. Websites providing information about CRC must also contain the most current information so that people are able to make educated decisions about CRC screening.

  2. An Evaluation of Healthcare Information on the Internet: The Case of Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ching Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Health information, provided through the Internet, has recently received attention from consumers and healthcare providers as an efficient method of motivating people to get screened for colorectal cancer (CRC. In this study, the primary purpose was to investigate the extent to which consumers were better educated about CRC screening information because of the information available on the Internet. Another purpose was to identify how better-informed consumers, with reliable and trustworthy health information, were enabled to make sound decisions regarding CRC screening. The data used in this study was taken from the 2003 Health Information National Trends Survey. People aged 55 and older were classified based on their compliance with recommended CRC screening. The study applied the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to evaluate the effects of health information taken from the Internet regarding CRC screening. The credibility and reliance of cancer related information on the Internet was significantly associated with patient compliance to be screened for CRC. Experience and knowledge of Internet use had a significant impact on the utilization of CRC screening. This analysis suggests that the design and publishing websites concerning CRC should emphasize credibility and reliance. Websites providing information about CRC must also contain the most current information so that people are able to make educated decisions about CRC screening.

  3. Evaluating a community-based participatory research project for elderly mental healthcare in rural America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Blevins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Dean Blevins1,2,3, Bridget Morton4, Rene McGovern5,61South Central Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (SC-MIRECC, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System; 2University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; 3University of Phoenix, Little Rock Campus, Little Rock, AR; 4Northeast Missouri Health Network, Kirksville, MO; 5A.T. Still University/Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kirksville, MO; 6Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OHAbstract: The purpose of this evaluation was to explore the collaborative nature of partners in a rural mental health program for the elderly, and to test an adapted method of assessing the collaborative process. Sixteen collaborative partners were interviewed to explore ratings of collaboration across 6 domains identified as critical to participatory research. Results indicate that the context of rural Missouri and uniqueness of the program necessitated an approach to collaboration that began with a top-down approach, but greater community responsibility developed over time. Partners recognized the efforts of the program’s directors to seek input. Most were satisfied with their roles and the degree of success achieved by the program, although several wanted to have more input in the future in some domains, but not in others. Interviews revealed numerous barriers to achieving sustainability. Methods to improve the assessment of collaboration are discussed and areas for improvement are offered.Keywords: community-based participatory research, elderly, mental health, older adults, rural

  4. Comparative Healthcare: Child Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr C Jayakumar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike India Australia boasts many community services forchildren from families with complex health problems.Practitioners from India report that their private healthsystem is among the best in the world and that thetraining, experience and quality of Indian doctors attractprivate patients from across the globe. On the other handfor many Indians their local health system is not wellresourced as is illustrated in the response to these casescenarios. The coverage of organized immunisationprogram can be limited in some areas; thereforeinfectious disease is a far greater problem than it is inAustralia. In India liberal controls over the sale of manydrugs has resulted in widespread abuse of antibiotics andNSAIDs. The lack of electricity in rural areas precludes thestorage of insulin and sterile injecting equipment whichundermines the quality of diabetic care. On the otherhand most Australians benefit from greater governmentexpenditure on health. The welfare system is much moreequipped to support parents from underpriviledge areas.Many schools will accept children with intellectual orphysical challenges into mainstream classes and cansometimes be financially supported to have a teacher’sassistant for the child. Two groups of Australians needextra support: migrants who may not speak English orknow how to access statutory services and Aboriginalpeople for whom language, lack of social supports orremoteness from health care underscores inequity.

  5. Comparative Healthcare: Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drs Gilbert Shia

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the body anddermatological problems are among the more commonailments to aflict mankind. The care of patients with skincompalints are an excellent backdrop in which to comparemedicine as practiced in China with what is available toAustralias. The approach to most conditions is very similarwhether you live in Beijing or Hobart. However there arealso marked differences, in China acupuncture, herbalmedicine and therapeutic massage are integral parts ofeveryday medical practice, and are promoted by thegovernment. Dermatology is an area where a traditionalherbalist would attract as many patients as an orthodoxdermatologist. For me there are some marked differencesin the way care is organised as is demonstrated in themanagement of the patient with chronic leg ulcers. Theauthors state that such patients are more likely to bereferred to a dermatologist in China because generalpractice has yet to establish itself fully as a specialty. Onthe other hand in Australia such patients are much morelikely to be managed almost exclusively in primary carewith the support of the community nursing services.Indeed as the Australian author states the wait for aroutine appointment with a dermatologist may be severalmonths. It is also intriguing to read about Formula A101an herbal lotion being promoted in China as a treatmentfor a variety of dermatological and other ailments. As withprevious articles in this series the views expressed arethose of the authors and do not necessarily represent theviews of the AMJ or any other official body.

  6. Paediatric palliative care improves patient outcomes and reduces healthcare costs: evaluation of a home-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, P H; De Castro Molina, J A; Teo, K; Tan, W S

    2018-01-03

    Around the world, different models of paediatric palliative care have responded to the unique needs of children with life shortening conditions. However, research confirming their utility and impact is still lacking. This study compared patient-related outcomes and healthcare expenditures between those who received home-based paediatric palliative care and standard care. The quality of life and caregiver burden for patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care were also tracked over the first year of enrolment to evaluate the service's longitudinal impact. A structured impact and cost evaluation of Singapore-based HCA Hospice Care's Star PALS (Paediatric Advance Life Support) programme was conducted over a three-year period, employing both retrospective and prospective designs with two patient groups. Compared to the control group (n = 67), patients receiving home-based paediatric palliative care (n = 71) spent more time at home than in hospital in the last year of life by 52 days (OR = 52.30, 95% CI: 25.44-79.17) with at least two fewer hospital admissions (OR = 2.46, 95% CI: 0.43-4.48); and were five times more likely to have an advance care plan formulated (OR = 5.51, 95% CI: 1.55-19.67). Medical costs incurred by this group were also considerably lower (by up to 87%). Moreover, both patients' quality of life (in terms of pain and emotion), and caregiver burden showed improvement within the first year of enrolment into the programme. Our findings suggest that home-based paediatric palliative care brings improved resource utilization and cost-savings for both patients and healthcare providers. More importantly, the lives of patients and their caregivers have improved, with terminally ill children and their caregivers being able to spend more quality time at home at the final stretch of the disease. The benefits of a community paediatric palliative care programme have been validated. Study findings can become key drivers when

  7. Self-management support to people with type 2 diabetes - a comparative study of Kaiser Permanente and the Danish Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Michaela; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin; Frølich, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Self-management support is considered to be an essential part of diabetes care. However, the implementation of self-management support within healthcare settings has appeared to be challenging and there is increased interest in "real world" best practice examples to guide policy efforts. In order...... to explore how different approaches to diabetes care and differences in management structure influence the provision of SMS we selected two healthcare systems that have shown to be comparable in terms of budget, benefits and entitlements. We compared the extent of SMS provided and the self-management...

  8. Evaluating the organisational climate in Italian public healthcare institutions by means of a questionnaire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wienand, Ulrich; Cinotti, Renata; Nicoli, Augusta; Bisagni, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    ...) to assess the differences among employees with different contractual positions. The anonymous questionnaire containing 50 items, each with a scale from 1 to 10, was offered to the healthcare organisations, to be compiled during ad hoc meetings...

  9. Spacesuit and Space Vehicle Comparative Ergonomic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott; Benson, Elizabeth; Cowley, Matthew; Harvill, Lauren; Blackledge, Christopher; Perez, Esau; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the latest manned spaceflight objectives, a series of prototype launch and reentry spacesuit architectures were evaluated for eventual down selection by NASA based on the performance of a set of designated tasks. A consolidated approach was taken to testing, concurrently collecting suit mobility data, seat-suit-vehicle interface clearances and movement strategies within the volume of a Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle mockup. To achieve the objectives of the test, a requirement was set forth to maintain high mockup fidelity while using advanced motion capture technologies. These seemingly mutually exclusive goals were accommodated with the construction of an optically transparent and fully adjustable frame mockup. The mockup was constructed such that it could be dimensionally validated rapidly with the motion capture system. This paper will describe the method used to create a motion capture compatible space vehicle mockup, the consolidated approach for evaluating spacesuits in action, as well as the various methods for generating hardware requirements for an entire population from the resulting complex data set using a limited number of test subjects. Kinematics, hardware clearance, suited anthropometry, and subjective feedback data were recorded on fifteen unsuited and five suited subjects. Unsuited subjects were selected chiefly by anthropometry, in an attempt to find subjects who fell within predefined criteria for medium male, large male and small female subjects. The suited subjects were selected as a subset of the unsuited subjects and tested in both unpressurized and pressurized conditions. Since the prototype spacesuits were fabricated in a single size to accommodate an approximately average sized male, the findings from the suit testing were systematically extrapolated to the extremes of the population to anticipate likely problem areas. This extrapolation was achieved by first performing population analysis through a comparison of suited

  10. The State of Healthcare Disaster Plans in New Zealand and the Sultanate of Oman: An International Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Al-Shaqsi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to carry out an audit of healthcare plans in New Zealand and Oman. Methods. The study utilizes a deductive content analysis method. Written plans from New Zealand District Health Boards (DHBs and the Omani secondary and tertiary hospitals were analyzed. A checklist was used to score the plans against twelve elements which are command and control, hazard analysis, surge capability, communication, standard operating procedures (SOPs, life-line backups, public and media, training, welfare, coordination, and recovery. Results. There were 14 plans from New Zealand and 7 plans from Oman analysed. The overall coverage of New Zealand plans was 67.5% compared to 53.3% in Oman. Plans from both countries scored similarly in “command and control,” “hazard analysis,” “surge,” and “communication” elements. Omani plans scored lower than those of New Zealand in “media and the publicv” “training,” “coordination,” and “recovery.” Both countries scored very low in addressing the welfare of responders. Conclusion. This study highlighted the value of health emergency plans in New Zealand as reflected by the high score of DHBs’ coordination. Therefore, a similar approach in Oman will enhance emergency preparedness. Responders’ welfare is an issue that needs to be addressed by emergency preparedness plans in both countries.

  11. [Questionnaire evaluation of hand hygiene by the healthcare staff of Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdani, Mabrouka; Ennigrou, Samir; Soltani, Hend; Ben Redjeb, Saïda

    2010-10-01

    Known to be reservoir of bacteria, hands are implicated in bacteria cross-transmission which enhances nosocomial-acquired infection rates (NI) and outbreaks. Hand washing is then considered the first mean with authentic efficiency to prevent NI. To describe the situation of the hand hygiene at Charles Nicolle hospital of Tunis in order to identify problems that can oppose to the good execution of this practice. A descriptive transverse study performed in October 2006 where 600 questionnaires were distributed to healthcare staff of the hospital. Only 434 questionnaires were responded (158 doctors and 276 nurses). Analysis of data obtained showed that hand washing was essentially practiced after each contact presumed to be contaminant for the healthcare person himself (80%) and was principally done with water and soap (82%). Hydro-alcoholic solutions were rarely mentioned (17.1%). The main reasons evoked for the non observance were unavailability of the necessary means (84.8%) and default of awareness (61.3%). So, these results show a poor perception of the healthcare staff on the importance of hand hygiene which they share the responsibility with healthcare managers. Thus, implication of all healthcare actors is necessary to ensure the good practice and mainly the observance of hand hygiene.

  12. Evaluation of national health-care related infection criteria for epidemiological surveillance in neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janita Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the use of the Brazilian criteria for reporting of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs in the neonatal unit and compare them with the criteria proposed by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN. METHODS: this was a cross-sectional study conducted from 2009 to 2011. It included neonates with HAI reporting by at least one of the criteria. Statistical analysis included calculation of incidence density of HAIs, distribution by weight, and by reporting criterion. Analysis of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV for the national criteria was performed considering the NHSN as the gold standard, with agreement assessed by kappa. RESULTS: a total of 882 newborns were followed, and 330 had at least one infection notified by at least one of the criteria. A total of 522 HAIs were reported, regardless of the criteria. An incidence density of 27.28 infections per 1,000 patient-days was observed, and the main topographies were sepsis (58.3%, candidiasis (15.1%, and conjunctivitis (6.5%. A total of 489 (93.7% were notified by both criteria, eight infections were notified only by the national criteria (six cases of necrotizing enterocolitis and two cases of conjunctivitis, and 25 cases of clinical sepsis were reported by NHSN criteria only. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 95.1%, 98.6%, 98.4%, and 95.7%, respectively, for all topographies, and were 91.8%, 100%, 100%, and 96.3% for the analysis of sepsis. Kappa analysis showed an agreement of 96.9%. CONCLUSION: there was a high rate of agreement between the criteria. The use of the national criteria facilitates the reporting of sepsis in newborns, and can help to improve the specificity and PPV.

  13. Refugee children have fewer contacts to psychiatric healthcare services: an analysis of a subset of refugee children compared to Danish-born peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghadouch, Amina; Kristiansen, Maria; Jervelund, Signe Smith; Hjern, Anders; Montgomery, Edith; Norredam, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Studies show a high level of mental health problems among refugee children. This study examined whether a subset of refugee children living in Denmark accessed psychiatric healthcare services more than those born in the country. This study compared 24,427 refugee children from Asia, The Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa and former Yugoslavia, who obtained residency in Denmark between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2010 with 146,562 Danish-born children, matched 1:6 on age and sex. The study looked at contacts with psychiatric hospitals as well as psychologists and psychiatrists in private practice. Between 1 January 1996 and 30 June 2012, 3.5 % of the refugee children accessed psychiatric healthcare services compared to 7.7 % of the Danish-born children. The rate ratio of having any first-time psychiatric contact was 0.42 (95 % CI 0.40-0.45) among refugee boys and 0.35 (95 % CI 0.33-0.37) among refugee girls, compared to Danish-born children. Figures were similar for those accessing private psychologists or psychiatrists, emergency room, inpatient and outpatient services. Refugee children used fewer psychiatric healthcare services than Danish-born children. This may indicate that refugee children experience barriers in accessing psychiatric healthcare systems and do not receive adequate assessment of their mental health and subsequent referral to specialist services.

  14. Integrated decision-making in response to weapons of mass destruction incidents: development and initial evaluation of a course for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Erica; Heck, Emily; Norman, Linda; Weiner, Betsy; Mathews, Rick; Black, James; Terndrup, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Standardized, validated training programs for teaching administrative decision-making to healthcare professionals responding to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) incidents have not been available. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team designed, developed, and offered a four-day, functional exercise, competency-based course at a national training center. This report provides a description of the development and initial evaluation of the course in changing participants' perceptions of their capabilities to respond to WMD events. Course participants were healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, emergency medical services administrators, hospital administrators, and public health officials. Each course included three modified tabletop and/or real-time functional exercises. A total of 441 participants attended one of the eight course offerings between March and August 2003. An intervention group only, pre-post design was used to evaluate change in perceived capabilities related to administrative decision-making for WMD incidents. Paired evaluation data were available on 339 participants (81.9%). Self-ratings for each of 21 capability statements were compared before and after the course. A 19-item total scale score for each participant was calculated from the pre-course and post-course evaluations. Paired t-tests on pre- and post-course total scores were conducted separately for each course. There was consistent improvement in self-rated capabilities after course completion for all 21 capability statements. Paired t-tests of pre- and post-course total scale scores indicated a significant increase in mean ratings for each course (all p < 0.001). The tabletop/real-time-exercise format was effective in increasing healthcare administrators' self-rated capabilities related to WMD disaster management and response. Integrating the competencies into training interventions designed for a specific target audience and deploying them into an interactive learning

  15. Back to the future of IT adoption and evaluation in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spil, Antonius A.M.; LeRouge, Cynthia; Trimmer, Ken; Wiggins, Carla

    2011-01-01

    This is a time of expansion, hope and change in the area of Health Information Technology (HIT). In this study, we provide an in-depth perspective into the adoption and diffusion of IT in healthcare based on a review of the current literature and upon expert panel assessments of adoption and

  16. Training healthcare professionals as moral case deliberation facilitators: evaluation of a Dutch training programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, M.; Molewijk, A.C.; de Bree, M.; Moraal, M.; Verkerk, M.; Widdershoven, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, moral case deliberation (MCD) sessions have mostly been facilitated by external experts, mainly professional ethicists. We have developed a train the facilitator programme for healthcare professionals aimed at providing them with the competences needed for being an MCD facilitator.

  17. Improving Women's Sexual Health: A Quantitative Evaluation of an Educational Intervention for Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Britney; Arnow, B. A.; Haas, Amie; Millheiser, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three per cent of women in the USA report some type of sexual complaint and these complaints have been shown to negatively impact quality of life and overall well-being. With proper training and experience, healthcare professionals are in a unique position to help their patients improve their sexual health. The present study was designed to…

  18. Design and implementation of monitoring and evaluation of healthcare organization management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampos, Platis; Emmanouil, Zoulias; Dimitrios, Iracleous; Lappa, Evaggelia

    2017-09-01

    The management of a healthcare organization is monitored using a suitably designed questionnaire to 271 nurses operating in Greek hospital. The data are fed to an automatic data mining system to obtain a suitable series of models to analyse, visualise and study the obtained information. Hidden patterns, correlations and interdependencies are investigated and the results are analytically presented.

  19. Potential pros and cons of external healthcare performance evaluation systems: real-life perspectives on Iranian hospital evaluation and accreditation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafaripooyan, Ebrahim

    2014-09-01

    Performance evaluation is essential to quality improvement in healthcare. The current study has identified the potential pros and cons of external healthcare evaluation programs, utilizing them subsequently to look into the merits of a similar case in a developing country. A mixed method study employing both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques was adopted to achieve the study end. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) and professionals were approached for two-stage process of data collection. Potential advantages included greater attractiveness of high accreditation rank healthcare organizations to their customers/purchasers and boosted morale of their personnel. Downsides, as such, comprised the programs' over-reliance on value judgment of surveyors, routinization and incurring undue cost on the organizations. In addition, the improved, standardized care processes as well as the judgmental nature of program survey were associated, as pros and cons, to the program investigated by the professionals. Besides rendering a tentative assessment of Iranian hospital evaluation program, the study provides those running external performance evaluations with a lens to scrutinize the virtues of their own evaluation systems through identifying the potential advantages and drawbacks of such programs. Moreover, the approach followed could be utilized for performance assessment of similar evaluation programs.

  20. Potential Benefits and Downsides of External Healthcare Performance Evaluation Systems: Real-Life Perspectives on Iranian Hospital Evaluation and Accreditation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Jaafaripooyan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Performance evaluation is essential to quality improvement in healthcare. The current study has identified the potential pros and cons of external healthcare evaluation programs, utilizing them subsequently to look into the merits of a similar case in a developing country. Methods A mixed method study employing both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis techniques was adopted to achieve the study end. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs and professionals were approached for two-stage process of data collection. Results Potential advantages included greater attractiveness of high accreditation rank healthcare organizations to their customers/purchasers and boosted morale of their personnel. Downsides, as such, comprised the programs’ over-reliance on value judgment of surveyors, routinization and incurring undue cost on the organizations. In addition, the improved, standardized care processes as well as the judgmental nature of program survey were associated, as pros and cons, to the program investigated by the professionals. Conclusion Besides rendering a tentative assessment of Iranian hospital evaluation program, the study provides those running external performance evaluations with a lens to scrutinize the virtues of their own evaluation systems through identifying the potential advantages and drawbacks of such programs. Moreover, the approach followed could be utilized for performance assessment of similar evaluation programs.

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease in Nigeria: An Evaluation of the Spatial Accessibility to Healthcare for Diagnosed Cases in Edo State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviasu, Osaretin; Rigby, Janette E; Ballas, Dimitris

    2015-03-31

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation's health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate.

  2. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: an evaluation of the spatial accessibility to healthcare for diagnosed cases in Edo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osaretin Oviasu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation’s health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate.

  3. Barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use among Arabic-speaking and Caucasian English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a qualitative comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubaidi, H; Mc Namara, K; Browning, Colette; Marriott, J

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the decision-making processes and associated barriers and enablers that determine access and use of healthcare services in Arabic-speaking and English-speaking Caucasian patients with diabetes in Australia. Study setting and design Face-to-face semistructured individual interviews and group interviews were conducted at various healthcare settings—diabetes outpatient clinics in 2 tertiary referral hospitals, 6 primary care practices and 10 community centres in Melbourne, Australia. Participants A total of 100 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited into 2 groups: 60 Arabic-speaking and 40 English-speaking Caucasian. Data collection Interviews were audio-taped, translated into English when necessary, transcribed and coded thematically. Sociodemographic and clinical information was gathered using a self-completed questionnaire and medical records. Principal findings Only Arabic-speaking migrants intentionally delayed access to healthcare services when obvious signs of diabetes were experienced, missing opportunities to detect diabetes at an early stage. Four major barriers and enablers to healthcare access and use were identified: influence of significant other(s), unique sociocultural and religious beliefs, experiences with healthcare providers and lack of knowledge about healthcare services. Compared with Arabic-speaking migrants, English-speaking participants had no reluctance to access and use medical services when signs of ill-health appeared; their treatment-seeking behaviours were straightforward. Conclusions Arabic-speaking migrants appear to intentionally delay access to medical services even when symptomatic. Four barriers to health services access have been identified. Tailored interventions must be developed for Arabic-speaking migrants to improve access to available health services, facilitate timely diagnosis of diabetes and ultimately to improve glycaemic control. PMID:26576809

  4. Robustness of the healthcare utilization results from the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST evaluating the human-bovine (WC3 reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Damme Pierre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial was a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of a three-dose pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5 including its effect on healthcare utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE. The per-protocol (PP analyses, which counted events occurring 14 days after dose 3 among infants without protocol violations, have already been published. This paper evaluates the consistency of the healthcare utilization results based on the modified intention to treat (MITT analyses with the PP analyses. The MITT analyses include all infants receiving at least one dose of vaccine or placebo and follow-up begins after dose 1. The paper also explores the consistency of the results for different subgroups of the study population with different types of surveillance. Methods Data on healthcare utilization for acute gastroenteritis were collected via telephone interviews after administration of the first dose. Parents were either contacted every 6 weeks or every 2 weeks depending on the substudy in which they were enrolled. Those contacted every 2 weeks were also asked to complete symptom diaries. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of RV5 on the rates of RVGE-associated healthcare encounters in all of the analyses. Results In the first 2 years after vaccination, RV5 reduced the combined rate of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED visits 88.9% (95% CI: 84.9, 91.9 for all RVGE regardless of serotype in the MITT analysis compared with a 94.5% (95% CI: 91.2, 96.6 reduction based on the G1-G4 PP analysis. By type of surveillance, the rate reductions for the G1-G4 PP analysis were 91.0% (95% CI: 81.7, 95.5 and 95.9% (95% CI: 92.2, 97.8 among parents contacted every 2 weeks (number evaluable = 4,451 and every 6 weeks (number evaluable = 52,683 respectively. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrated that the effect of RV5 on reducing the rate of hospitalizations

  5. Self-Management Support to People with Type 2 Diabetes - A comparative study of Kaiser Permanente and the Danish Healthcare System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiøtz Michaela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-management support is considered to be an essential part of diabetes care. However, the implementation of self-management support within healthcare settings has appeared to be challenging and there is increased interest in “real world” best practice examples to guide policy efforts. In order to explore how different approaches to diabetes care and differences in management structure influence the provision of SMS we selected two healthcare systems that have shown to be comparable in terms of budget, benefits and entitlements. We compared the extent of SMS provided and the self-management behaviors of people living with diabetes in Kaiser Permanente (KP and the Danish Healthcare System (DHS. Methods Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data from a random sample of 2,536 individuals with DM from KP and the DHS in 2006–2007 to compare the level of SMS provided in the two systems and identify disparities associated with educational attainment. The response rates were 75 % in the DHS and 56 % in KP. After adjusting for gender, age, educational level, and HbA1c level, multiple linear regression analyses determined the level of SMS provided and identified disparities associated with educational attainment. Results Receipt of SMS varied substantially between the two systems. More people with diabetes in KP reported receiving all types of SMS and use of SMS tools compared to the DHS (p  Conclusions Despite better SMS support in KP compared to the DHS, self-management remains an under-supported area of care for people receiving care for diabetes in the two health systems. Our study thereby suggests opportunity for improvements especially within the Danish healthcare system and systems adopting similar SMS support strategies.

  6. Clinically led performance management in secondary healthcare: evaluating the attitudes of medical and non-clinical managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebble, Timothy M; Paul, Maureen; Hockey, Peter M; Heyworth, Nicola; Humphrey, Rachael; Powell, Timothy; Clarke, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Improving the quality and activity of clinicians' practice improves patient care. Performance-related human resource management (HRM) is an established approach to improving individual practice but with limited use among clinicians. A framework for performance-related HRM was developed from successful practice in non-healthcare organisations centred on distributive leadership and locally provided, validated and interpreted performance measurement. This study evaluated the response of medical and non-clinical managers to its implementation into a large secondary healthcare organisation. A semistructured qualitative questionnaire was developed from themes identified during framework implementation and included attitudes to previous approaches to measuring doctors' performance, and the structure and response to implementation of the performance-related HRM framework. Responses were analysed through a process of data summarising and categorising. A total of 29, from an invited cohort of 31, medical and non-clinical managers from departmental to executive level were interviewed. Three themes were identified: (1) previous systems of managing clinical performance were considered to be ineffective due to insufficient empowerment of medical managers and poor quality of available performance data; (2) the implemented framework was considered to address these needs and was positively received by medical and non-clinical managers; (3) introduction of performance-related HRM required the involvement of the whole organisation to executive level and inclusion within organisational strategy, structure and training. This study suggests that a performance-related HRM framework may facilitate the management of clinical performance in secondary healthcare, but is dependent on the design and methods of application used. Such approaches contrast with those currently proposed for clinicians in secondary healthcare in the UK and suggest that alternative strategies should be considered

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HEAVY METALS IN BOTTOM ASH FROM INCINERATORS AND OPEN PIT FROM HEALTHCARE FACILITIES IN GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Amfo-Otua; Sarah Graham Kyerewaa; Emmanuel Adu Ofori; Adams Sadick

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of healthcare waste either by incinerating or open burning in a pit produces bottom ashes which contains heavy metals and other chemicals which are toxic, persistent and accumulate in the food chain resulting in adverse health effects in human and the environment. The study investigated the level of heavy metals in the ashes of thermally treated medical waste from four health care facilities in Ghana. Two batch of the ash samples were collected from two hospital incinerators and the...

  8. Evaluation of a Statewide HIV-HCV-STD Online Clinical Education Program by Healthcare Providers - A Comparison of Nursing and Other Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongwen; Luque, Amneris E

    2016-01-01

    The New York State HIV-HCV-STD Clinical Education Initiative (CEI) has developed a large repository of online resources and disseminated them to a wide range of healthcare providers. To evaluate the CEI online education program and in particular to compare the self-reported measures by clinicians from different disciplines, we analyzed the data from 1,558 course completions in a study period of three months. The results have shown that the overall evaluations by the clinicians were very positive. Meanwhile, there were significant differences across the clinical disciplines. In particular, physicians and nurse practitioners were the most satisfied. In contrast, pharmacists and case/care managers recorded lower than average responses. Nurses and counselors had mixed results. Nurse practitioners' responses were very similar to physicians on most measures, but significantly different from nurses in many aspects. For more effective knowledge dissemination, online education programs should consider the unique needs by clinicians from specific disciplines.

  9. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Stephanie; Kareemi, Hashim; Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Heitman, Steven J; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2016-01-01

    At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis, particularly among perforated appendicitis. Therefore, studies utilizing administrative data to analyze

  10. An evaluation of approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lorraine; Shepherd, Ashley; Harris, Fiona

    2017-08-01

    Improving the quality of healthcare remains central to UK and international policy, practice and research. In 2003, The Institute of Medicine's 'Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality', advocated quality improvement as a core competency for all healthcare professionals. As a result, developing capacity and capability of those applying improvement methodologies in the pre-registration population has risen, yet, little is known about the teaching approaches employed for this purpose. To describe and analyse educational approaches used to teach quality improvement to pre-registration healthcare professionals and identify enabling and impeding factors. Integrative review. CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC, ASSIA, SCOPUS and Google Scholar were accessed for papers published between 2000 and 2016. Publications where quality improvement education was delivered to pre-registration healthcare professionals were eligible. One author independently screened papers, extracted data using a modified version of the Reporting of Primary Studies in Education Guideline and evaluated methodological quality using the Weight of Evidence Framework. The Kirkpatrick Education Evaluation Model was used to explore the impact of teaching approaches. Enabling and impeding factors were thematically analysed. A narrative synthesis of findings is presented. Ten papers were included, representing nursing, pharmacy and medicine from UK, Norway and USA. Studies comprised four quantitative, four mixed method, one qualitative and one cluster randomised trial, all allocated medium Weight of Evidence. Teaching approaches included experiential learning cited in all studies, didactics in seven, group work in four, seminars in three, self-directed learning in three and simulation in one. Most studies measured Level 1 of the Kirkpatrick Model (reaction), all but one measured Level 2 (skills, knowledge or attitudes), none measured Level 3 (behaviour) and one measured Level 4 (patient outcomes

  11. Patented Drug Extension Strategies on Healthcare Spending: A Cost-Evaluation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaz, Nathalie; Haller, Guy; Girardin, François; Huttner, Benedikt; Combescure, Christophe; Dayer, Pierre; Muscionico, Daniel; Salomon, Jean-Luc; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug manufacturers have developed “evergreening” strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs) on the healthcare system as a whole (“spillover effect”). Methods and Findings We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. “Extra costs” were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1) all brand (i.e., initially patented) drugs, (2) all follow-on drugs, or (3) brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated “extra costs” over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2) million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7) million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8) million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover “extra cost” of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800), whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100). Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in “extra costs” of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100). Conclusions Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to

  12. IMPLEMENTATION OF BIG DATA TECHNOLOGIES IN THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEM: EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGICAL AND COMMERCIAL PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Tsvetkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the trajectory of scientific-technological development and commercial perspectives of Big Data technologies in healthcare inRussiaand the world and a patent-conjuncture analysis of areas of Big Data in medicine. There has been shown a high potential of new markets and market niches for services in this field. There are identified the main trends in the evolution of technological solutions in Big Data in in the field of health care. There has been an assessment done of the global competitiveness of Russian Big Data inventions in the field of medicine. 

  13. Patented drug extension strategies on healthcare spending: a cost-evaluation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vernaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug manufacturers have developed "evergreening" strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs on the healthcare system as a whole ("spillover effect". METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. "Extra costs" were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1 all brand (i.e., initially patented drugs, (2 all follow-on drugs, or (3 brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated "extra costs" over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2 million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7 million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8 million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover "extra cost" of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800, whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100. Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in "extra costs" of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100. CONCLUSIONS: Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to increased

  14. Migrants' access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norredam, Marie

    2011-10-01

    . Additionally, more migrants had irrelevant ER visits as evaluated by caregivers. Substudy IV addressed formal and informal barriers to access and screening. According to the law asylum seekers are entitled to emergency care only in 10 out of 24 countries. Medical screening was carried out in all but one of the 24 EU countries; however, the content and extent of screening programmes vary. The thesis aimed to explore if there are differences in migrants' access to healthcare compared to that of non-migrants. Differences in utilisation and clinical outcome were identified between migrants and non-migrants. Reasons why disparities exist were also identified in relation to communication with primary care and on policy level. The thesis shows that various perspectives and scientific problems are important to get a full understanding of the process of access to healthcare for different migrant groups. Moreover, various complementary methodological approaches are needed when studying problems of migrants' access to healthcare.

  15. Comparative evaluation of organic and conventional farming on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of organic and conventional farming on chemical quality parameters and antioxidant activity in fruits. Danielle dos Santos Bonfim de Castro, Lana de Souza Rosa, Ellen Mayra da Silva Menezes, Anderson Junger Teodoro ...

  16. Development of multilateral comparative evaluation method for fuel cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hitoshi; Ikushima, Takeshi; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Nakajima, Kiyoshi

    1998-03-01

    In the near future, Japanese nuclear fuel cycle system will be promoted by national nuclear energy policy, and it`s options i.e. once through, thermal cycle and fast breeder cycle must be selected by multilateral comparative evaluation method from various aspects of safety, society, economy, and e.t.c. Therefore such a problem can be recognized as a social problem of decision making and applied for AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) that can multilaterally and comparatively evaluate the problem. On comparative evaluation, much information are needed for decision making, therefore two kinds of databases having these information have been constructed. And then, the multilateral comparative evaluation method consisting of two kinds of databases and AHP for optimum selection of fuel cycle system option have been developed. (author)

  17. Implementation of a disability management policy in a large healthcare employer: a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, Cameron A; Skivington, Kathryn; Lay, Morgan; Lifshen, Marni; Etches, Jacob; Chambers, Andrea

    2017-06-17

    This study describes the process and outcomes of the implementation of a strengthened disability management policy in a large Canadian healthcare employer. Key elements of the strengthened policy included an emphasis on early contact, the training of supervisors and the integration of union representatives in return-to-work (RTW) planning. The study applied mixed methods, combining a process evaluation within the employer and a quasi-experimental outcome evaluation between employers for a 3-year period prior to and following policy implementation in January 2012. Staff in the implementation organisation (n=4000) and staff in a peer group of 29 large hospitals (n=1 19 000). Work disability episode incidence and duration. Both qualitative and quantitative measures of the implementation process were predominantly positive. Over the 6-year observation period, there were 624 work disability episodes in the organisation and 8604 in the comparison group of 29 large hospitals. The annual per cent change in episode incidence in the organisation was -5.6 (95% CI -9.9 to -1.1) comparable to the annual per cent change in the comparison group: -6.2 (-7.2 to -5.3). Disability episode durations also declined in the organisation, from a mean of 19.4 days (16.5, 22.3) in the preintervention period to 10.9 days (8.7, 13.2) in the postintervention period. Reductions in disability durations were also observed in the comparison group: from a mean of 13.5 days (12.9, 14.1) in the 2009-2011 period to 10.5 days (9.9, 11.1) in the 2012-2014 period. The incidence of work disability episodes and the durations of work disability declined strongly in this hospital sector over the 6-year observation period. The implementation of the organisation's RTW policy was associated with larger reductions in disability durations than observed in the comparison group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial

  18. Cluster randomized trials in comparative effectiveness research: randomizing hospitals to test methods for prevention of healthcare-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Richard; Takvorian, Samuel U; Septimus, Edward; Hickok, Jason; Moody, Julia; Perlin, Jonathan; Jernigan, John A; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S

    2010-06-01

    The need for evidence about the effectiveness of therapeutics and other medical practices has triggered new interest in methods for comparative effectiveness research. Describe an approach to comparative effectiveness research involving cluster randomized trials in networks of hospitals, health plans, or medical practices with centralized administrative and informatics capabilities. We discuss the example of an ongoing cluster randomized trial to prevent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in intensive care units (ICUs). The trial randomizes 45 hospitals to: (a) screening cultures of ICU admissions, followed by Contact Precautions if MRSA-positive, (b) screening cultures of ICU admissions followed by decolonization if MRSA-positive, or (c) universal decolonization of ICU admissions without screening. All admissions to adult ICUs. The primary outcome is MRSA-positive clinical cultures occurring >or=2 days following ICU admission. Secondary outcomes include blood and urine infection caused by MRSA (and, separately, all pathogens), as well as the development of resistance to decolonizing agents. Recruitment of hospitals is complete. Data collection will end in Summer 2011. This trial takes advantage of existing personnel, procedures, infrastructure, and information systems in a large integrated hospital network to conduct a low-cost evaluation of prevention strategies under usual practice conditions. This approach is applicable to many comparative effectiveness topics in both inpatient and ambulatory settings.

  19. Take the Money and Run: The Challenges of Designing and Evaluating Financial Incentives in Healthcare; Comment on “Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Mannion

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  20. Take the money and run: the challenges of designing and evaluating financial incentives in healthcare; Comment on "Paying for performance in healthcare organisations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, Russell

    2014-02-01

    Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  1. Take the Money and Run: The Challenges of Designing and Evaluating Financial Incentives in Healthcare; Comment on “Paying for Performance in Healthcare Organisations”

    OpenAIRE

    Russell Mannion

    2014-01-01

    Many countries are turning their attention to the use of explicit financial incentives to drive desired improvements in healthcare performance. However, we have only a weak evidence-base to inform policy in this area. The research challenge is to generate robust evidence on what financial incentives work, under what circumstances, for whom and with what intended and unintended consequences.

  2. Comparative evaluation of genetic diversity using RAPD, SSR and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Panwar P., Nath M., Yadav V. K. and Kumar A. 2010 Comparative evaluation of genetic diversity using RAPD, SSR and cytochome P450 gene based markers ... sity analysis, the present study aimed to evaluate the relative usefulness of RAPD .... primer ranged from 3 to 15, and size of the products ranged from 300 bp to ...

  3. [Healthcare-associated infection rates: measuring and comparing. Experiences from the German National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KISS) and from other surveillance systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastmeier, P; Behnke, M; Breier, A-C; Piening, B; Schwab, F; Dettenkofer, M; Geffers, C

    2012-11-01

    Surveillance of nosocomial infections is meanwhile a cornerstone of infection prevention activities in hospitals. The objective of this article is to compare healthcare-associated infection rates in intensive care patients, neonatal intensive care patients and operated patients (ICU-KISS, OP-KISS, NEO-KISS) of the German nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS) with the corresponding data of the US American National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). In general, the methodological differences among the three surveillance systems are minor but there are some exceptions. Therefore, differences between countries have to be interpreted very carefully as they may be due to differences in diagnostics, patient mix, types of interventions, length of stay, selection of participating hospitals, post-discharge surveillance activities and interpretation of case definitions. Organizational aspects, such as mandatory participation with public disclosure on infection rates may also have an impact.

  4. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G.; Heitman, Steven J.; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Importance At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. Objectives We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Setting & Participants Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). Intervention & Main Outcome The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. Results The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). Conclusion & Relevance The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Animal with Plant Protein Intake in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Evaluation of Animal with Plant Protein Intake in Northern Adamawa State of Nigeria. HI Kubkomawa, R Midiga, UO Helen, B Williams, F Timon. Abstract. The study was conducted to compare the preference, acceptability and consumption of animal and plant protein intakes in Adamawa State, northern eastern, ...

  6. Evaluating Comparative Judgment as an Approach to Essay Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedle, Jeffrey T.; Ferrara, Steve

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to rubric scoring, comparative judgment generates essay scores by aggregating decisions about the relative quality of the essays. Comparative judgment eliminates certain scorer biases and potentially reduces training requirements, thereby allowing a large number of judges, including teachers, to participate in essay evaluation.…

  7. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Bernhard

    Full Text Available Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1 identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2 to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3 to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument.The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP, were derived from an expert survey (n = 23, interviews with HCPs (n = 12, and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP.Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups.The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has

  8. CDC guidance for evaluating health-care personnel for hepatitis B virus protection and for administering postexposure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillie, Sarah; Murphy, Trudy V; Sawyer, Mark; Ly, Kathleen; Hughes, Elizabeth; Jiles, Ruth; de Perio, Marie A; Reilly, Meredith; Byrd, Kathy; Ward, John W

    2013-12-20

    This report contains CDC guidance that augments the 2011 recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for evaluating hepatitis B protection among health-care personnel (HCP) and administering post-exposure prophylaxis. Explicit guidance is provided for persons working, training, or volunteering in health-care settings who have documented hepatitis B (HepB) vaccination years before hire or matriculation (e.g., when HepB vaccination was received as part of routine infant [recommended since 1991] or catch-up adolescent [recommended since 1995] vaccination). In the United States, 2,890 cases of acute hepatitis B were reported to CDC in 2011, and an estimated 18,800 new cases of hepatitis B occurred after accounting for underreporting of cases and asymptomatic infection. Although the rate of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections have declined approximately 89% during 1990-2011, from 8.5 to 0.9 cases per 100,000 population in the United States, the risk for occupationally acquired HBV among HCP persists, largely from exposures to patients with chronic HBV infection. ACIP recommends HepB vaccination for unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated HCP with reasonably anticipated risk for blood or body fluid exposure. ACIP also recommends that vaccinated HCP receive postvaccination serologic testing (antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen [anti-HBs]) 1-2 months after the final dose of vaccine is administered (CDC. Immunization of health-care personnel: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2011;60 [No. RR-7]). Increasing numbers of HCP have received routine HepB vaccination either as infants (recommended since 1991) or as catch-up vaccination (recommended since 1995) in adolescence. HepB vaccination results in protective anti-HBs responses among approximately 95% of healthy-term infants. Certain institutions test vaccinated HCP by measuring anti-HBs upon hire or matriculation, even when anti

  9. Numerical and experimental evaluation of a compact sensor antenna for healthcare devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomainy, A; Yang Hao; Pasveer, F

    2007-12-01

    The paper presents a compact planar antenna designed for wireless sensors intended for healthcare applications. Antenna performance is investigated with regards to various parameters governing the overall sensor operation. The study illustrates the importance of including full sensor details in determining and analysing the antenna performance. A globally optimized sensor antenna shows an increase in antenna gain by 2.8 dB and 29% higher radiation efficiency in comparison to a conventional printed strip antenna. The wearable sensor performance is demonstrated and effects on antenna radiated power, efficiency and front to back ratio of radiated energy are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Propagation characteristics of the body-worn sensor to on-body and off-body base units are also studied. It is demonstrated that the improved sensor antenna has an increase in transmitted and received power, consequently sensor coverage range is extended by approximately 25%.

  10. Evaluating Evidence-Based Nutrition Support Practice Among Healthcare Professionals With and Without the Certified Nutrition Support Clinician Credential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca; Hise, Mary; Marcus, Andrea Fleisch; Harvey-Banchik, Lillian; Matarese, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    The National Board of Nutrition Support Certification credentials healthcare professionals and certifies that holders of the Certified Nutrition Support Clinician (CNSC) credential have specialized knowledge of safe and effective nutrition support therapy. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey healthcare professionals affiliated with the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) regarding their approaches to nutrition support practice using a complex patient case scenario in accordance with established clinical guidelines. An electronic survey was emailed to individuals affiliated with A.S.P.E.N. Eight multiple-choice knowledge questions addressed evidence-based nutrition support practice issues for a patient with progressing pancreatitis. Demographic and clinical characteristic data were collected. Of 48,093 email invitations sent, 4455 (9.1%) responded and met inclusion criteria. Most respondents were dietitians (70.8%) and in nutrition support practice for 10.3 years, and 29.3% held the CNSC credential. Respondents with the CNSC credential answered 6.18 questions correctly compared with 4.56 for non-CNSC respondents (P case-based knowledge assessment of guideline recommendations for the nutrition support treatment of pancreatitis compared with those without a credential. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Improving healthcare empowerment through breast cancer patient navigation: a mixed methods evaluation in a safety-net setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitova, Guzyal; Burke, Nancy J

    2014-09-19

    Breast cancer mortality rates in the U.S. remain relatively high, particularly among ethnic minorities and low-income populations. Unequal access to quality care, lower follow up rates, and poor treatment adherence contribute to rising disparities among these groups. Healthcare empowerment (HCE) is theorized to improve patient outcomes through collaboration with providers and improving understanding of and compliance with treatment. Patient navigation is a health care organizational intervention that essentially improves healthcare empowerment by providing informational, emotional, and psychosocial support. Patient navigators address barriers to care through multilingual coordination of treatment and incorporation of access to community services, support, and education into the continuum of cancer care. Utilizing survey and qualitative methods, we evaluated the patient navigation program in a Northern California safety-net hospital Breast Clinic by assessing its impact on patients' experiences with cancer care and providers' perspectives on the program. We conducted qualitative interviews with 16 patients and 4 service providers, conducted approximately 66 hours of clinic observations, and received feedback through the self-administered survey from 66 patients. The role of the patient navigator at the Breast Clinic included providing administrative assistance, psychosocial support, improved knowledge, better understanding of treatment process, and ensuring better communication between patients and providers. As such, patient navigators facilitated improved collaboration between patients and providers and understanding of interdisciplinary care processes. The survey results suggested that the majority of patients across all ethnic backgrounds and age groups were highly satisfied with the program and had a positive perception of their navigator. Interviews with patients and providers highlighted the roles of a navigator in ensuring continuity of care, improving

  12. Short- and long-term effects of gestational diabetes mellitus on healthcare cost: a cross-sectional comparative study in the ATLANTIC DIP cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyliv, A; Gillespie, P; O'Neill, C; Noctor, E; O'Dea, A; Tierney, M; McGuire, B; Glynn, L G; Dunne, F

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines the association between gestational diabetes mellitus and costs of care during pregnancy and 2-5 years post pregnancy. Healthcare utilization during pregnancy was measured for a sample of 658 women drawn from the Atlantic Diabetes in Pregnancy (ATLANTIC DIP) network. Healthcare utilization 2-5 years post pregnancy was assessed for a subsample of 348 women via a postal questionnaire. A vector of unit costs was applied to healthcare activity to calculate the costs of care at both time points. Differences in cost for women with gestational diabetes mellitus compared with those with normal glucose tolerance during the pregnancy were examined using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Gestational diabetes mellitus was independently associated with an additional €817.60 during pregnancy (€1192.1 in the gestational diabetes mellitus group, €511.6 in the normal glucose tolerance group), in the form of additional delivery and neonatal care costs, and an additional €680.50 in annual healthcare costs 2-5 years after the index pregnancy (€6252.4 in the gestational diabetes mellitus group, €5434.8 in the normal glucose tolerance group). These results suggest that gestational diabetes mellitus is associated with increased costs of care during and post pregnancy. They provide indication of the associated cost that can be avoided or reduced by the screening, prevention and management of gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnancy. These estimates are useful for further studies that examine the cost and cost-effectiveness of such programmes. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  13. Comparing impact on the family and insurance coverage in children with cerebral palsy and children with another special healthcare need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, B; Colquitt, G; Caciula, M C; Carnes, A; Li, L; Moreau, N

    2018-01-12

    Families and caregivers of children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN) often experience financial difficulties, have unmet physical and mental health needs, and are at increased risk of marital problems due to the stress caused by carrying for their child. Within the larger population of CHSCN, young people with cerebral palsy (CP) have more unmet needs due to the complexity and potential severity of the disability. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with differences in insurance coverage and impact on the family of children with CP and other CHSCN. The data were taken from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, which was designed to examine state- and national-level estimates of CSHCN. Three variables examined differences in insurance coverage between those children diagnosed with CP versus all other CSHCN: insurance coverage for the previous year, current insurance coverage, and adequacy of insurance coverage. Four variables representing different indicators of family impact were used to assess differences between children with CP versus all other CSHCN: out-of-pocket expenses for healthcare, family financial burden, hours per week that family members spent caring for the child, and impact on family work life. The results of this study showed significant differences between households with a child with CP and a child with another health special need in terms of insurance coverage, indicating a tendency of children with CP to be insured the entire year. As for the impact on the family in households with children with CP versus other CSHCN, there were significant differences in all four variables that were analysed. There is limited evidence highlighting differences between the impact of caring for a child with CP and caring for other CSHCN. Caring for a child with CP has a significant impact on the family, despite insurance coverage. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Substance abuse patterns and psychiatric symptomatology among three healthcare provider groups evaluated in an out-patient program for impaired healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Julio I; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Brand, Michael; Koos, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Three impaired health care provider groups (N = 84) (nurses, pharmacists, and providers with prescriptive authority) referred for a substance abuse evaluation at an outpatient-based program were compared on demographic and family factors, substance abuse patterns, and psychiatric symptomology as assessed by the Personality Assessment Inventory. Nurses had the highest rates of family history of addiction, problems with benzodiazepines, and psychiatric comorbidity. Overall, health care professionals endorsed opioids twice as often as alcohol as a preferred substance. Family history of addiction, sex, and psychiatric comorbidity emerged as salient factors among these health care professionals. Clinical implications are examined in light of the current findings.

  15. Development and evaluation of a web-based breast cancer cultural competency course for primary healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantis Maria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop and evaluate a continuing medical education (CME course aimed at improving healthcare provider knowledge about breast cancer health disparities and the importance of cross-cultural communication in provider-patient interactions about breast cancer screening. Methods An interactive web-based CME course was developed and contained information about breast cancer disparities, the role of culture in healthcare decision making, and demonstrated a model of cross-cultural communication. A single group pre-/post-test design was used to assess knowledge changes. Data on user satisfaction was also collected. Results In all, 132 participants registered for the CME with 103 completing both assessments. Differences between pre-/post-test show a significant increase in knowledge (70% vs. 94%; p Conclusion There was an overall high level of satisfaction among all users. Users felt that learning objectives were met and the web-based format was appropriate and easy to use and suggests that web-based CME formats are an appropriate tool to teach cultural competency skills. However, more information is needed to understand how the CME impacted practice behaviors.

  16. Pediatric Dentistry in Primary Healthcare: Creation, Development, and Evaluation of a Distance Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavaresco, Caren Serra; Bragança, Silvana Gonçalves; D'Avila, Otávio Pereira; Umpierre, Roberto; Harzheim, Erno; Rodrigues, Jonas Almeida

    2018-01-02

    Oral health in childhood is a major problem for global public health. In Brazil, the prevalence of childhood tooth decay varies from 12% to 46%. Dental care treatment in Brazil is almost the exclusive responsibility of primary healthcare (PHC). Therefore, it is essential these professionals are prepared to conduct restorative, endodontic, and exodontic treatments and preventive care in children. Children make up a large proportion of the population in territories requiring advanced dental care provided by PHC in Brazil. To care for these patients, it is necessary to have both manual dexterity and technical knowledge of pediatric dentistry. Accordingly, this study aimed to develop a distance course on pediatric dentistry. A pretest questionnaire consisting of 15 questions was used to assess initial dental knowledge of participants. After completion of a five-module course, participants retook the same initial dental knowledge questionnaire (post-test). Descriptive statistic and paired t test, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson and Spearman correlation were used, and a significance level of 5% was set. The majority of participants completing the five-module course were women who earned specialty degrees beyond undergraduate studies and currently worked in PHC (>5 years). Participant performance on the dental knowledge questionnaire after completion of the five-module course improved pre- to post-test. These data suggest that completion of a distance course on pediatric dentistry can be an effective tool for improving knowledge of pediatric dentistry in PHC professionals.

  17. Performance Evaluation of an Enhanced Uplink 3.5G System for Mobile Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnakos, Dimitris; Vouyioukas, Demosthenes; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Constantinou, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The present paper studies the prospective and the performance of a forthcoming high-speed third generation (3.5G) networking technology, called enhanced uplink, for delivering mobile health (m-health) applications. The performance of 3.5G networks is a critical factor for successful development of m-health services perceived by end users. In this paper, we propose a methodology for performance assessment based on the joint uplink transmission of voice, real-time video, biological data (such as electrocardiogram, vital signals, and heart sounds), and healthcare records file transfer. Various scenarios were concerned in terms of real-time, nonreal-time, and emergency applications in random locations, where no other system but 3.5G is available. The accomplishment of quality of service (QoS) was explored through a step-by-step improvement of enhanced uplink system's parameters, attributing the network system for the best performance in the context of the desired m-health services.

  18. Evaluation and implementation of QR Code Identity Tag system for Healthcare in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Vassilya; Bilgin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we designed a QR Code Identity Tag system to integrate into the Turkish healthcare system. This system provides QR code-based medical identification alerts and an in-hospital patient identification system. Every member of the medical system is assigned a unique QR Code Tag; to facilitate medical identification alerts, the QR Code Identity Tag can be worn as a bracelet or necklace or carried as an ID card. Patients must always possess the QR Code Identity bracelets within hospital grounds. These QR code bracelets link to the QR Code Identity website, where detailed information is stored; a smartphone or standalone QR code scanner can be used to scan the code. The design of this system allows authorized personnel (e.g., paramedics, firefighters, or police) to access more detailed patient information than the average smartphone user: emergency service professionals are authorized to access patient medical histories to improve the accuracy of medical treatment. In Istanbul, we tested the self-designed system with 174 participants. To analyze the QR Code Identity Tag system's usability, the participants completed the System Usability Scale questionnaire after using the system.

  19. Performance Evaluation of an Enhanced Uplink 3.5G System for Mobile Healthcare Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Komnakos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studies the prospective and the performance of a forthcoming high-speed third generation (3.5G networking technology, called enhanced uplink, for delivering mobile health (m-health applications. The performance of 3.5G networks is a critical factor for successful development of m-health services perceived by end users. In this paper, we propose a methodology for performance assessment based on the joint uplink transmission of voice, real-time video, biological data (such as electrocardiogram, vital signals, and heart sounds, and healthcare records file transfer. Various scenarios were concerned in terms of real-time, nonreal-time, and emergency applications in random locations, where no other system but 3.5G is available. The accomplishment of quality of service (QoS was explored through a step-by-step improvement of enhanced uplink system's parameters, attributing the network system for the best performance in the context of the desired m-health services.

  20. Sustaining and Improving Study Abroad Experiences Through Comparative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Linda S

    Researchers have related participation in study abroad experiences to many positive outcomes for nursing students; however, educators are faced with the task of not only developing meaningful study abroad opportunities but sustaining and improving them as well. Educators can evaluate repeat study abroad programs by comparing experiences, looking for trends, and conjecturing rationales. To illustrate this process, an example of a study abroad opportunity that has been repeated over 11 years is presented. The first six years have been compared to the most recent five years, revealing three categories of change for evaluation and the resulting course improvements.

  1. Evaluating the effectiveness of care integration strategies in different healthcare systems in Latin America: the EQUITY-LA II quasi-experimental study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, María-Luisa; Vargas, Ingrid; Unger, Jean-Pierre; De Paepe, Pierre; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Samico, Isabella; Albuquerque, Paulette; Eguiguren, Pamela; Cisneros, Angelica Ivonne; Rovere, Mario; Bertolotto, Fernando

    2015-07-31

    Although fragmentation in the provision of healthcare is considered an important obstacle to effective care, there is scant evidence on best practices in care coordination in Latin America. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a participatory shared care strategy in improving coordination across care levels and related care quality, in health services networks in six different healthcare systems of Latin America. A controlled before and after quasi-experimental study taking a participatory action research approach. In each country, two comparable healthcare networks were selected--intervention and control. The study contains four phases: (1) A baseline study to establish network performance in care coordination and continuity across care levels, using (A) qualitative methods: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with a criterion sample of health managers, professionals and users; and (B) quantitative methods: two questionnaire surveys with samples of 174 primary and secondary care physicians and 392 users with chronic conditions per network. Sample size was calculated to detect a proportion difference of 15% and 10%, before and after intervention (α=0.05; β=0.2 in a two-sided test); (2) a bottom-up participatory design and implementation of shared care strategies involving micro-level care coordination interventions to improve the adequacy of patient referral and information transfer. Strategies are selected through a participatory process by the local steering committee (local policymakers, health care network professionals, managers, users and researchers), supported by appropriate training; (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions by measuring changes in levels of care coordination and continuity 18 months after implementation, applying the same design as in the baseline study; (4) Cross-country comparative analysis. This study complies with international and national legal stipulations on ethics. Conditions of the study procedure

  2. Does the use of atypical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy in depression result in cost savings? Comparing healthcare costs and utilization between second-line treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Amany K; Farmer, Kevin C; Brahm, Nancy C; Keast, Shellie; Nesser, Nancy; Neas, Barbara R

    2016-12-01

    Several atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are used as second-line agents for treatment resistant depression. AAPs can be expensive compared to other treatment options and can cause several side effects. To estimate healthcare costs and utilization of AAPs compared to other second-line agents. Observational study using Medicaid claims data (2006-2011). Subjects were depression-diagnosed adult members with at least two prescriptions of antidepressant medications followed by a second-line agent. Gamma generalized linear models (GLM) produced estimates of the difference in mean expenditures among treatment groups after adjusting for individual baseline characteristics using propensity scores. Negative binomial models produced estimates of the difference in number of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits. A total of 3910 members received second-line treatment. Treatment groups were AAPs (n = 2211), augmentation agents other than AAPs (n = 1008), and antidepressant switching (n = 691). AAPs resulted in higher mean adjusted pharmacy costs and higher mean adjusted total mental health-related costs. Mean adjusted total healthcare costs and number of inpatient and ED visits were not different among treatments. The results show no evidence that AAPs used as second-line treatment for depression results in overall cost savings or lower inpatient and ED visits compared to other treatment strategies.

  3. Evaluating the quality of colorectal cancer care across the interface of healthcare sectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ludt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC has a high prevalence in western countries. Diagnosis and treatment of CRC is complex and requires multidisciplinary collaboration across the interface of health care sectors. In Germany, a new nationwide established program aims to provide quality information of healthcare delivery across different sectors. Within this context, this study describes the development of a set of quality indicators charting the whole pathway of CRC-care including data specifications that are necessary to operationalize these indicators before practice testing. METHODS: Indicators were developed following a systematic 10 step modified 'RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method' which involved a multidisciplinary panel of thirteen participants. For each indicator in the final set, data specifications relating to sources of quality information, data collection procedures, analysis and feedback were described. RESULTS: The final indicator set included 52 indicators covering diagnostic procedures (11 indicators, therapeutic management (28 indicators and follow-up (6 indicators. In addition, 7 indicators represented patient perspectives. Primary surgical tumor resection and pre-operative radiation (rectum carcinoma only were perceived as most useful tracer procedures initiating quality data collection. To assess the quality of CRC care across sectors, various data sources were identified: medical records, administrative inpatient and outpatient data, sickness-funds billing code systems and patient survey. CONCLUSION: In Germany, a set of 52 quality indicators, covering necessary aspects across the interfaces and pathways relevant to CRC-care has been developed. Combining different sectors and sources of health care in quality assessment is an innovative and challenging approach but reflects better the reality of the patient pathway and experience of CRC-care.

  4. Sleep, health and memory: comparing parents of typically developing children and parents of children with special health-care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcbean, Amanda L; Schlosnagle, Leo

    2016-02-01

    Parents of children with special healthcare needs (CSHCNs) report poorer sleep than parents of typically developing (TD) children, which has been associated with poorer mental health. The relations between sleep disturbances and general health and memory among this population are unknown. The current study aimed to replicate the findings that parents of CSHCNs report poorer sleep quality than parents of TD children, and further examine how sleep is related to general health and memory. Participants (75 parents of TD children; 97 parents of CSHCNs) completed an online questionnaire consisting of: demographics, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Prospective Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ) and the Healthy Days Measure. Parents of CSHCNs reported worse global sleep than parents of TD children. Parents of CSHCNs took longer to fall asleep at night, had shorter sleep duration and worse subjective sleep quality than parents of TD children. Parents of CSHCNs also had worse prospective memory and were more likely to report poor general health than parents of TD children. Poorer sleep quality was associated with worse memory and health among both parents of TD children and parents of CSHCNs. Results from this study highlight the importance of addressing the sleep of parents of CSHCNs and support the need for more research in this area. By recognizing factors associated with parent's health and functioning, service providers may be better able to implement support programs for parents of CSHCNs. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  5. Comparing Health-Care Providers' Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Childhood Cancer Between Netherlands and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Stefanus; Arnoldussen, Marijn; Gordijn, Maartje S; Sitaresmi, Mei N; van de Ven, Peter M; Ten Broeke, Chloé A M; Veerman, Anjo J P; Mantik, Max; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Mostert, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients with childhood cancer. Health-care providers (HCP) should address this need properly. Geographical and cultural differences seem likely. This study explores perspectives on CAM of HCP involved in the care of children with cancer in Netherlands and Indonesia. Health beliefs, components of CAM, encouraging or discouraging CAM, and knowledge about CAM were assessed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaires at a Dutch and Indonesian academic hospital. A total of 342 HCP participated: 119 Dutch (response rate 80%) and 223 Indonesian (response rate 87%). Chemotherapy can cure cancer according to more Dutch than Indonesian HCP (87% vs. 53% respectively, P cancer according to more Indonesian than Dutch HCP (45% vs. 25%, P < 0.001). Dutch and Indonesian HCP recommend and discourage CAM use differently. Most Dutch (77%) and Indonesian HCP (84%) consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate (P = ns). Fewer Dutch doctors than other HCP want to learn more about CAM (51% vs. 76%, P = 0.007), whereas there is no significant difference in eagerness to learn about CAM between Indonesian doctors (64%) and other HCP (72%). Indonesian HCP have more positive views about CAM than their Dutch colleagues. Both Dutch and Indonesian HCP consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate. Therefore, education programs about CAM tailored to the needs of HCP are recommended, knowing that CAM is used frequently. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Problematisations of Complexity: On the Notion and Production of Diverse Complexities in Healthcare Interventions and Evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Broer (Tineke); R.A. Bal (Roland); Pickersgill, M. (Martyn)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWithin the literature on the evaluation of health (policy) interventions, complexity is a much-debated issue. In particular, many claim that so-called ‘complex interventions’ pose different challenges to evaluation studies than apparently ‘simple interventions’ do. Distinct ways of doing

  7. Comparative evaluation of pin-in-fiberglass cast and Kirschner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four adult (two males and two females) dogs were used to comparatively evaluate the effectiveness of pin-in-fiberglass cast with Kirschner-Ehmer type I external skeletal fixative in the management of surgically created radius-ulna fractures in dogs. These dogs were assigned to two groups (A and B) with each group made ...

  8. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    The characteristics of clays from Abakaliki Formation, Southeastern Nigeria was evaluated to establish its suitability as drilling mud when compared with commercial bentonite such as Wyoming bentonite. The chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical properties were employed in assessing the suitability of. Abakaliki clay ...

  9. Comparative performance evaluation of an existing and modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative performance evaluation of an existing and modified acha dehuller was carried out. The modifications undertaken on the existing dehuller were for the cylinder type, cylinder-concave clearance, cylinder speed and hopper opening. The modified acha dehuller was run at a higher cylinder and fan speeds of ...

  10. Comparative neutron cross sections evaluation for N+ 56 Fe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative neutron cross sections evaluation for N+ 56Fe reaction around incident energies of 13.5-14.5 MeV using the Optical Model (OM) code scat 2. EF Oyidi, MY Onimisi. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Physics Vol. 20 (1) 2008: pp.38-43. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  11. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of clays from Abakaliki Formation, Southeastern Nigeria was evaluated to establish its suitability as drilling mud when compared with commercial bentonite such as Wyoming bentonite. The chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical properties were employed in assessing the suitability of Abakaliki clay as ...

  12. Accounting for Heterogeneity in Hedging Behavior: Comparing & Evaluating Grouping Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.M.E.; Garcia, P.; Irwin, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity, i.e., the notion that individuals respond differently to economic stimuli, can have profound consequences for the interpretation of behavior and the formulation of agricultural policy. This paper compares and evaluates three grouping techniques that can be used to account for

  13. A comparative performance evaluation of micro-Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A comparative performance evaluation of micro-Raman spectrograph using holographic notch filter and dielectric filter. R P Shukla ... Keywords. Raman spectroscopy; holographic notch filter; dielectric filter; diode-pumped solid-state laser. ... The origin of these peculiar spectral lines has been briefly discussed in the paper.

  14. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF FILTERS USED IN TRACKING AIR TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Strekalovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an imitation model for a flow of heterogeneous air targets the comparative assessment of the αβ, αβγ and the Kalman filters efficiency is evaluated. In the case of slightly maneuvering target the difference in filters’ efficiency is statistically insignificant; in the case of sharp maneuvering the Kalman filter is significantly more precise.

  15. Multi-criteria comparative evaluation of spallation reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Andrey; Andrianova, Olga; Konobeev, Alexandr; Korovin, Yury; Kuptsov, Ilya

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an approach to a comparative evaluation of the predictive ability of spallation reaction models based on widely used, well-proven multiple-criteria decision analysis methods (MAVT/MAUT, AHP, TOPSIS, PROMETHEE) and the results of such a comparison for 17 spallation reaction models in the presence of the interaction of high-energy protons with natPb.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Nutritional Composition of African Locust ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (29.85 mg/kg). Locust bean fruit collected from rain forest had the highest proximate and mineral value, while fruit collected from derived savannah had the highest proportion of vitamins. The study has shown that location significantly affects the nutritional composition of locust beans fruit. Keywords: Comparative evaluation ...

  17. A comparative evaluation of Losartan/Hydrochlorothiazide (fixed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this prospective randomized study is to comparatively evaluate the antihypertensive efficacy of combination therapy (losartan/hydrochlorothiazide) with monotherapy (amlodipine). This prospective randomized clinical study was carried out for twelve months (July 2012 – June 2013) and enrolled 250 newly ...

  18. Comparative Evaluation of the Effectiveness of sortie local Fabrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Evaluation of the Effectiveness of sortie local Fabrics for Zooplankton. Harvest. "0v1ts,s 1; Utztowu ... consideration not only in zooplankton field research but also in mass ..... potential of enhancing zooplankton field research/mass ...

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Productivity and Cost Effectiveness of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative Evaluation of Productivity and Cost Effectiveness of Catfish Fingerling Production in Earthen Pond and Recirculation System in Ibadan, Nigeria. ... and quality of feed throughout the period. The survival rate of the frys in the recirculation system was 79% as against 17% in the earthen pond. However, bigger ...

  20. A multifaceted quality improvement intervention for CVD risk management in Australian primary healthcare: a protocol for a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bindu; Patel, Anushka; Jan, Stephen; Usherwood, Tim; Harris, Mark; Panaretto, Katie; Zwar, Nicholas; Redfern, Julie; Jansen, Jesse; Doust, Jenny; Peiris, David

    2014-12-17

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Despite the widespread availability of evidence-based clinical guidelines and validated risk predication equations for prevention and management of CVD, their translation into routine practice is limited. We developed a multifaceted quality improvement intervention for CVD risk management which incorporates electronic decision support, patient risk communication tools, computerised audit and feedback tools, and monthly, peer-ranked performance feedback via a web portal. The intervention was implemented in a cluster randomised controlled trial in 60 primary healthcare services in Australia. Overall, there were improvements in risk factor recording and in prescribing of recommended treatments among under-treated individuals, but it is unclear how this intervention was used in practice and what factors promoted or hindered its use. This information is necessary to optimise intervention impact and maximally implement it in a post-trial context. In this study protocol, we outline our methods to conduct a theory-based, process evaluation of the intervention. Our aims are to understand how, why, and for whom the intervention produced the observed outcomes and to develop effective strategies for translation and dissemination. We will conduct four discrete but inter-related studies taking a mixed methods approach. Our quantitative studies will examine (1) the longer term effectiveness of the intervention post-trial, (2) patient and health service level correlates with trial outcomes, and (3) the health economic impact of implementing the intervention at scale. The qualitative studies will (1) identify healthcare provider perspectives on implementation barriers and enablers and (2) use video ethnography and patient semi-structured interviews to understand how cardiovascular risk is communicated in the doctor/patient interaction both with and without the use of intervention. We will also

  1. Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH): A Streamlined, Systematic, Phased Approach for Determining "What Works" in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Wayne B; Crawford, Cindy; Hilton, Lara; Elfenbaum, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Answering the question of "what works" in healthcare can be complex and requires the careful design and sequential application of systematic methodologies. Over the last decade, the Samueli Institute has, along with multiple partners, developed a streamlined, systematic, phased approach to this process called the Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH™). The SEaRCH process provides an approach for rigorously, efficiently, and transparently making evidence-based decisions about healthcare claims in research and practice with minimal bias. SEaRCH uses three methods combined in a coordinated fashion to help determine what works in healthcare. The first, the Claims Assessment Profile (CAP), seeks to clarify the healthcare claim and question, and its ability to be evaluated in the context of its delivery. The second method, the Rapid Evidence Assessment of the Literature (REAL(©)), is a streamlined, systematic review process conducted to determine the quantity, quality, and strength of evidence and risk/benefit for the treatment. The third method involves the structured use of expert panels (EPs). There are several types of EPs, depending on the purpose and need. Together, these three methods-CAP, REAL, and EP-can be integrated into a strategic approach to help answer the question "what works in healthcare?" and what it means in a comprehensive way. SEaRCH is a systematic, rigorous approach for evaluating healthcare claims of therapies, practices, programs, or products in an efficient and stepwise fashion. It provides an iterative, protocol-driven process that is customized to the intervention, consumer, and context. Multiple communities, including those involved in health service and policy, can benefit from this organized framework, assuring that evidence-based principles determine which healthcare practices with the greatest promise are used for improving the public's health and wellness.

  2. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith? Robert J

    2008-04-01

    vaccination coverage required is modest and may be achieved simply by removing the cost burden to vaccination. Conclusion We recommend that provincial healthcare programs should pay for voluntary adult vaccination for women aged 14–26. However, it should be noted that our model results are preliminary, in that we have made a number of simplifying assumptions, including a lack of age-dependency in sexual partner rates, a lack of sexual activity outside of the vaccine age-range among females and a uniform age of sexual debut; thus, further work is desired to enhance the external generalisability of our results.

  3. Isolation of Legionella species/serogroups from water cooling systems compared with potable water systems in Spanish healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, J-M; Aguilar, L; Granizo, J J; Vos-Arenilla, A; Giménez, M-J; Aguiar, J-M; Prieto, J

    2007-12-01

    Surveillance of Legionella spp. in hospital water systems was performed in forty-four inpatient healthcare facilities in Spain during 2005-2006. A total of 2,341 samples were collected: 470 from cooling systems (cooling towers) and 1,871 from potable water systems. The latter included 211 from cold-water tanks and 260 from hot-water tanks, totalling 471 from central water reservoirs 136 from showers, 1,172 from unfiltered taps and 92 from filtered taps, totalling 1,400 from peripheral points. Temperature, chlorine levels and the presence of Legionella spp. were determined. In all, 373 (15.9%) samples yielded Legionella spp. Significantly higher isolation rates were obtained from cooling towers (23.8%) versus cold- and hot-water tanks (approximately 4.7%), due to the significantly higher number of samples positive for serogroup 1 (19.4 vs 0.9-3.5%). In potable water systems, no differences were found between central water tanks and showers, but significant differences in isolation rates between central water tanks and unfiltered taps were observed (4.7 vs 19.6%) due to differences in non-serogroup 1 L. pneumophila. Filters significantly decreased isolation rates of these serotypes (11 vs 0%). Some seasonal differences were noted, with higher isolation rates in summer for legionella serogroup 1 in cooling systems and for L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 in potable water systems. In regression models, higher temperatures were associated with colonisation in cooling systems, while lower chlorine levels were associated with colonisation in potable water systems.

  4. Contextualisation of patient-centred care: A comparative qualitative study of healthcare professionals' approaches to communicating with seriously ill patients about their dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, A; Kristiansen, M; Rix, B A; Bøge, P; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T

    2017-11-07

    Patients' family relations play an important part in the provision of patient-centred cancer care, not least when healthcare professionals encounter seriously ill patients with dependent children. Little is known about how children are perceived and dealt with in clinical encounters. In this qualitative comparative study, we explore the influence of medical contexts in three Danish hospital wards, haematology, oncological gynaecology and neuro-intensive care, on communication with patients about their children. In exploring the degree to which the inclusion of children in clinical encounters is dependent on context, we took a comparative approach based on fieldwork in wards either exclusively focusing on cancer treatment or partially involved in critical phases of cancer treatment. We conducted 49 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with doctors and nurses, and 27 days of participant observation. The thematic analysis was based on Bateson's conceptualisation of communication. We found that healthcare professionals' approach to children in clinical encounters and the ways in which children were positioned on each ward were influenced by aspects specific to the ward, including the diagnosis and treatments that related specifically to the patient. Our findings suggest the need to explore further the influence of medical contexts on the inclusion of children in patient communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Healthcare costs of ICU survivors are higher before and after ICU admission compared to a population based control group: A descriptive study combining healthcare insurance data and data from a Dutch national quality registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beusekom, Ilse; Bakhshi-Raiez, Ferishta; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; van der Schaaf, Marike; Busschers, Wim B.; Dongelmans, Dave A.

    2017-01-01

    To identify subgroups of ICU patients with high healthcare utilization for healthcare expenditure management purposes such as prevention and targeted care. We conducted a descriptive cohort study, combining a national health insurance claims database and a national quality registry database for

  6. Evaluation systems for clinical governance development: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Elaheh; Tourani, Sogand; Ravaghi, Hamid; Ebrahimipour, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Lack of scientific and confirmed researches and expert knowledge about evaluation systems for clinical governance development in Iran have made studies on different evaluation systems for clinical governance development a necessity. These studies must provide applied strategies to design criteria of implementing clinical governance for hospital's accreditation. This is a descriptive and comparative study on development of clinical governance models all over the world. Data have been gathered by reviewing related articles. Models have been studied in comprehensive review method. The evaluated models of clinical governance development were Australian, NHS, SPOCK and OPTIGOV. The final aspects extracted from these models were Responsiveness, Policies and Strategies, Organizational Structure, Allocating Resources, Education and Occupational Development, Performance Evaluation, External Evaluation, Patient Oriented Approach, Risk Management, Personnel's Participation, Information Technology, Human Resources, Research and Development, Evidence Based Medicine, Clinical Audit, Health Technology Assessment and Quality. These results are applicable for completing the present criteria which evaluating clinical governance application and provide practical framework to evaluate country's hospital on the basis of clinical governance elements.

  7. Evaluation systems for clinical governance development: a comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Hooshmand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lack of scientific and confirmed researches and expert knowledge about evaluation systems for clinical governance development in Iran have made studies on different evaluation systems for clinical governance development a necessity. These studies must provide applied strategies to design criteria of implementing clinical governance for hospital's accreditation. This is a descriptive and comparative study on development of clinical governance models all over the world. Data have been gathered by reviewing related articles. Models have been studied in comprehensive review method. The evaluated models of clinical governance development were Australian, NHS, SPOCK and OPTIGOV. The final aspects extracted from these models were Responsiveness, Policies and Strategies, Organizational Structure, Allocating Resources, Education and Occupational Development, Performance Evaluation, External Evaluation, Patient Oriented Approach, Risk Management, Personnel's Participation, Information Technology, Human Resources, Research and Development, Evidence Based Medicine, Clinical Audit, Health Technology Assessment and Quality. These results are applicable for completing the present criteria which evaluating clinical governance application and provide practical framework to evaluate country's hospital on the basis of clinical governance elements.

  8. [Comparing audiological evaluation and screening: a study on presbycusis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; Negretti, Camila Aparecida; Ueda, Kerli Saori; Moreira, Renata Rodrigues; Schochat, Eliane

    2011-01-01

    Given the high prevalence of presbycusis and the damage it brings about, a screening test can be useful in the identification of hearing loss in primary care. To estimate the prevalence of hearing loss in a representative sample of elderly people living at Butantan using an audiological screening method (questionnaire) and a basic audiological evaluation; to compare the results of the two kinds of evaluations, checking the validity of this tool for hearing loss screening. Cross sectional descriptive study. 200 individuals (above 60 years old, both genders) were randomly selected to undergo audiological screening (questionnaire). Another randomly selected group encompassed 100 individuals who were submitted to a set of audiological tests. Then, we compared the results from the two methods. There were no statistically significant associations between the questionnaire and the degree of hearing loss of the patients. The prevalence of hearing loss in our sample was of 56% in the screening and of 95% when checked by the audiological evaluation. Therefore, screening was not proven valid to assess hearing when compared to audiological evaluation.

  9. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  10. Beyond Effectiveness: A Pragmatic Evaluation Framework for Learning and Continuous Quality Improvement of e-Learning Interventions in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafalla, Tarig Dafalla Mohamed; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatic evaluation framework for evaluating the usability and usefulness of an e-learning intervention for a patient clinical information scheduling system is presented in this paper. The framework was conceptualized based on two different but related concepts (usability and usefulness) and selection of appropriate and valid methods of data collection and analysis that included: (1) Low-Cost Rapid Usability Engineering (LCRUE), (2) Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA), (3) Heuristic Evaluation (HE) criteria for web-based learning, and (4) Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). The results of the analysis showed some areas where usability that were related to General Interface Usability (GIU), instructional design and content was problematic; some of which might account for the poorly rated aspects of usability when subjectively measured. This paper shows that using a pragmatic framework can be a useful way, not only for measuring the usability and usefulness, but also for providing a practical objective evidences for learning and continuous quality improvement of e-learning systems. The findings should be of interest to educators, developers, designers, researchers, and usability practitioners involved in the development of e-learning systems in healthcare. This framework could be an appropriate method for assessing the usability, usefulness and safety of health information systems both in the laboratory and in the clinical context.

  11. Bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health: a qualitative study among decision-makers in the healthcare sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Continued improvements in occupational health can only be ensured if decisions regarding the implementation and continuation of occupational health and safety interventions (OHS interventions) are based on the best available evidence. To ensure that this is the case, scientific evidence should meet the needs of decision-makers. As a first step in bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health, this study aimed to provide insight into the occupational health decision-making process and information needs of decision-makers. Methods An exploratory qualitative study was conducted with a purposeful sample of occupational health decision-makers in the Ontario healthcare sector. Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore the process by which occupational health decisions are made and the importance given to the financial implications of OHS interventions. Twenty-five structured telephone interviews were conducted to explore the sources of information used during the decision-making process, and decision-makers’ knowledge on economic evaluation methods. In-depth interview data were analyzed according to the constant comparative method. For the structured telephone interviews, summary statistics were prepared. Results The occupational health decision-making process generally consists of three stages: initiation stage, establishing the need for an intervention; pre-implementation stage, developing an intervention and its business case in order to receive senior management approval; and implementation and evaluation stage, implementing and evaluating an intervention. During this process, information on the financial implications of OHS interventions was found to be of great importance, especially the employer’s costs and benefits. However, scientific evidence was rarely consulted, sound ex-post program evaluations were hardly ever performed, and there seemed to be a need to advance the economic

  12. Bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health: a qualitative study among decision-makers in the healthcare sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Johanna M; Tompa, Emile; Clune, Laurie; Sarnocinska-Hart, Anna; Bongers, Paulien M; van Tulder, Maurits W; van der Beek, Allard J; van Wier, Marieke F

    2013-06-03

    Continued improvements in occupational health can only be ensured if decisions regarding the implementation and continuation of occupational health and safety interventions (OHS interventions) are based on the best available evidence. To ensure that this is the case, scientific evidence should meet the needs of decision-makers. As a first step in bridging the gap between the economic evaluation literature and daily practice in occupational health, this study aimed to provide insight into the occupational health decision-making process and information needs of decision-makers. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted with a purposeful sample of occupational health decision-makers in the Ontario healthcare sector. Eighteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore the process by which occupational health decisions are made and the importance given to the financial implications of OHS interventions. Twenty-five structured telephone interviews were conducted to explore the sources of information used during the decision-making process, and decision-makers' knowledge on economic evaluation methods. In-depth interview data were analyzed according to the constant comparative method. For the structured telephone interviews, summary statistics were prepared. The occupational health decision-making process generally consists of three stages: initiation stage, establishing the need for an intervention; pre-implementation stage, developing an intervention and its business case in order to receive senior management approval; and implementation and evaluation stage, implementing and evaluating an intervention. During this process, information on the financial implications of OHS interventions was found to be of great importance, especially the employer's costs and benefits. However, scientific evidence was rarely consulted, sound ex-post program evaluations were hardly ever performed, and there seemed to be a need to advance the economic evaluation skill set of

  13. A comparative evaluation of genome assembly reconciliation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhakami, Hind; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Lonardi, Stefano

    2017-05-18

    The majority of eukaryotic genomes are unfinished due to the algorithmic challenges of assembling them. A variety of assembly and scaffolding tools are available, but it is not always obvious which tool or parameters to use for a specific genome size and complexity. It is, therefore, common practice to produce multiple assemblies using different assemblers and parameters, then select the best one for public release. A more compelling approach would allow one to merge multiple assemblies with the intent of producing a higher quality consensus assembly, which is the objective of assembly reconciliation. Several assembly reconciliation tools have been proposed in the literature, but their strengths and weaknesses have never been compared on a common dataset. We fill this need with this work, in which we report on an extensive comparative evaluation of several tools. Specifically, we evaluate contiguity, correctness, coverage, and the duplication ratio of the merged assembly compared to the individual assemblies provided as input. None of the tools we tested consistently improved the quality of the input GAGE and synthetic assemblies. Our experiments show an increase in contiguity in the consensus assembly when the original assemblies already have high quality. In terms of correctness, the quality of the results depends on the specific tool, as well as on the quality and the ranking of the input assemblies. In general, the number of misassemblies ranges from being comparable to the best of the input assembly to being comparable to the worst of the input assembly.

  14. Evaluation of ICT investment in healthcare : Insights and agenda for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arviansyah, A.; Berghout, Egon; Tan, Chee-Wee; Castelnovo, W; Ferrari, E

    2011-01-01

    The recent downturn in global economy exerts mounting pressure on the justification of ICT budgets within organizations. Effective evaluation of ICT investments is therefore deterministic of organizations' ability to maximize the business value to be extracted from such investments. The same can be

  15. A comparative evaluation of microleakage in class v composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraparaju, Sujatha Gopal; Kanumuru, Pavan Kumar; Nujella, Surya Kumari; Konda, Karthik Roy; Reddy, K Bala Kasi; Penigalapati, Sivaram

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To compare and evaluate the microleakage in class V lesions restored with composite resin with and without liner and injectable nanohybrid composite resin. Materials and Methodology. 60 class V cavities were prepared in 30 freshly extracted teeth. After etching and application of bonding agents these cavities were divided into three groups: Group A (n = 20)-restored with composite resin, Group B (n = 20)-flowable composite resin liner + composite resin, and Group C (n = 20)-restored with injectable composite resin. After curing all the specimens were subjected to thermocycling and cyclic loading. Specimens were stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin and evaluated for dye penetration. Results. Results are subjected to Kruskal Wallis and Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, none of the three materials were free from microleakage. All the three materials showed more microleakage at gingival margins compared to occlusal margins. Among all the groups G-ænial Flo showed the least microleakage at the gingival wall.

  16. Systematic comparative evaluation of methods for investigating the TCRβ repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    advantages and disadvantages; however, a systematic evaluation and direct comparison of them would benefit researchers in the selection of the most suitable method. In this study, we used both pooled control plasmids and spiked-in cells to benchmark the MPCR bias. RNA from three healthy donors...... variability was smaller compared with the biological variability. Through direct comparison, these findings provide novel insights into the two experimental methods, which will prove to be valuable in immune repertoire research and its interpretation....

  17. Application of interval 2-tuple linguistic MULTIMOORA method for health-care waste treatment technology evaluation and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; You, Jian-Xin; Lu, Chao; Shan, Meng-Meng

    2014-11-01

    The management of health-care waste (HCW) is a major challenge for municipalities, particularly in the cities of developing countries. Selection of the best treatment technology for HCW can be viewed as a complicated multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem which requires consideration of a number of alternatives and conflicting evaluation criteria. Additionally, decision makers often use different linguistic term sets to express their assessments because of their different backgrounds and preferences, some of which may be imprecise, uncertain and incomplete. In response, this paper proposes a modified MULTIMOORA method based on interval 2-tuple linguistic variables (named ITL-MULTIMOORA) for evaluating and selecting HCW treatment technologies. In particular, both subjective and objective importance coefficients of criteria are taken into consideration in the developed approach in order to conduct a more effective analysis. Finally, an empirical case study in Shanghai, the most crowded metropolis of China, is presented to demonstrate the proposed method, and results show that the proposed ITL-MULTIMOORA can solve the HCW treatment technology selection problem effectively under uncertain and incomplete information environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of computer usage in healthcare among private practitioners of NCT Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshkumar, P; Arun Kumar, Sharma; Rajoura, O P

    2011-01-01

    1. To evaluate the usage and the knowledge of computers and Information and Communication Technology in health care delivery by private practitioners. 2. To understand the determinants of computer usage by them. A cross sectional study was conducted among the private practitioners practising in three districts of NCT of Delhi between November 2007 and December 2008 by stratified random sampling method, where knowledge and usage of computers in health care and determinants of usage of computer was evaluated in them by a pre-coded semi open ended questionnaire. About 77% of the practitioners reported to have a computer and had the accessibility to internet. Computer availability and internet accessibility was highest among super speciality practitioners. Practitioners who attended a computer course were 13.8 times [OR: 13.8 (7.3 - 25.8)] more likely to have installed an EHR in the clinic. Technical related issues were the major perceived barrier in installing a computer in the clinic. Practice speciality, previous attendance of a computer course, age of started using a computer influenced the knowledge about computers. Speciality of the practice, presence of a computer professional and gender were the determinants of usage of computer.

  19. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, E.W. van der; Dongen, J.M. van; Boot, C.R.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  20. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, J.M.; Boot, C.R.; van der Gulden, J.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Anema, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the

  1. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating a community-based participatory research project for elderly mental healthcare in rural America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Dean; Morton, Bridget; McGovern, Rene

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to explore the collaborative nature of partners in a rural mental health program for the elderly, and to test an adapted method of assessing the collaborative process. Sixteen collaborative partners were interviewed to explore ratings of collaboration across 6 domains identified as critical to participatory research. Results indicate that the context of rural Missouri and uniqueness of the program necessitated an approach to collaboration that began with a top-down approach, but greater community responsibility developed over time. Partners recognized the efforts of the program's directors to seek input. Most were satisfied with their roles and the degree of success achieved by the program, although several wanted to have more input in the future in some domains, but not in others. Interviews revealed numerous barriers to achieving sustainability. Methods to improve the assessment of collaboration are discussed and areas for improvement are offered.

  3. Evaluating the risks of clinical research: direct comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rid, Annette; Abdoler, Emily; Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Pine, Daniel S; Wendler, David

    2014-09-01

    Many guidelines and regulations allow children and adolescents to be enrolled in research without the prospect of clinical benefit when it poses minimal risk. However, few systematic methods exist to determine when research risks are minimal. This situation has led to significant variation in minimal risk judgments, raising concern that some children are not being adequately protected. To address this concern, we describe a new method for implementing the widely endorsed "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. This standard defines research risks as minimal when they do not exceed the risks posed by daily life activities or routine examinations. This study employed a conceptual and normative analysis, and use of an illustrative example. Different risks are composed of the same basic elements: Type, likelihood, and magnitude of harm. Hence, one can compare the risks of research and the risks of daily life by comparing the respective basic elements with each other. We use this insight to develop a systematic method, direct comparative analysis, for implementing the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk. The method offers a way of evaluating research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities, such as the risk of experiencing anxiety, stress, or other psychological harm. We thus illustrate how direct comparative analysis can be applied in practice by using it to evaluate whether the anxiety induced by a respiratory CO2 challenge poses minimal or greater than minimal risks in children and adolescents. Direct comparative analysis is a systematic method for applying the "risks of daily life" standard for minimal risk to research procedures that pose the same types of risk as daily life activities. It thereby offers a method to protect children and adolescents in research, while ensuring that important studies are not blocked because of unwarranted concerns about research risks.

  4. ISOS: A job evaluation system to implement comparable worth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Corominas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A fair pay structure is an essential element of the personnel policy of a firm. If the pay structure is perceived as arbitrary by the members of the staff, it becomes a cause of disturbance of the labor relations. Particularly, a pay structure is unfair if it discriminates against women. Job evaluation is a traditional tool used by companies to assist in the process of determining pay structures that can be also useful to detect and combat wage discrimination, since allow determining whether two jobs are of comparable worth or not. Although there are many kinds of systems, authors agree when defining point factor methods as the most appropriate and fair job evaluation systems. However, even being well defined from a technical point of view, most existing systems give discriminatory results regarding to gender. ISOS, a new job evaluation system which is described in this paper, has been designed, with the aim to define a neutral system with regard to gender, based on present jobs characteristics, existing job evaluation systems and job description questionnaires, international experts’ knowledge and a wide body of literature on gender discrimination and its relation with job evaluation. Using ISOS can contribute to detect, combat and eliminate part of the existing wage discrimination in general and, in particular, against women. ISOS includes all aspects of the work so no characteristics are omitted. The system can be applied in any company and to evaluate any job, and offers flexibility to be adapted to the specific characteristics of an organization. ISOS can also be used to detect and combat wage discrimination. Furthermore, characteristics of present jobs, such as cross-training or flexible working time, are also included so the system can be considered innovative in a very traditional field of industrial engineering.

  5. Comparative analysis of quantitative efficiency evaluation methods for transportation networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuxin; Qin, Jin; Hong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    An effective evaluation of transportation network efficiency could offer guidance for the optimal control of urban traffic. Based on the introduction and related mathematical analysis of three quantitative evaluation methods for transportation network efficiency, this paper compares the information measured by them, including network structure, traffic demand, travel choice behavior and other factors which affect network efficiency. Accordingly, the applicability of various evaluation methods is discussed. Through analyzing different transportation network examples it is obtained that Q-H method could reflect the influence of network structure, traffic demand and user route choice behavior on transportation network efficiency well. In addition, the transportation network efficiency measured by this method and Braess's Paradox can be explained with each other, which indicates a better evaluation of the real operation condition of transportation network. Through the analysis of the network efficiency calculated by Q-H method, it can also be drawn that a specific appropriate demand is existed to a given transportation network. Meanwhile, under the fixed demand, both the critical network structure that guarantees the stability and the basic operation of the network and a specific network structure contributing to the largest value of the transportation network efficiency can be identified.

  6. Successful partnerships with third sector organisations to enhance the healthcare student experience: a partnership evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katie; Tanner, Judith; Rutty, Jane; Astley-Pepper, Maxine; Hall, Richard

    2015-03-01

    There is limited research surrounding academic partnerships and more research is needed to educate universities, and the private, public and third sectors about the benefits and limitations of such partnerships. The aim of this study was to outline the unique partnership between Macmillan Cancer Support and De Montfort University and to evaluate the progress of this partnership. A qualitative approach was employed which involved interviews with nine members of the partnership's steering group. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that a partnership between a university and a third sector charity can have mutual benefits for all those involved, particularly for students and those affected by cancer. Furthermore, the module to develop volunteering among families affected cancer, created through this partnership is now being considered by other universities as a way of providing holistic and non-traditional lecture based learning experiences. Recommendations are made for future partnerships between third sector charities and universities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An evaluation of attitude toward vaccines among healthcare workers of a University Hospital in Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeri, R; Genovese, C; Trimarchi, G; Palamara, M A R; La Fauci, V

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is an effective and safe health technology. Despite this vaccine coverage falls short of national and international targets. Study design. The aim of the study was to evaluate the views of medical staff at Messina University Hospital regarding vaccinations, their current and future vaccination status and whether they recommend it to their patients. The study was conducted from April 2016 to March 2017 by an anonymous face-to-face questionnaire submitted to HCWs. A general lack of confidence and insecurity about vaccination was shown by a substantial proportion of physicians analyzed while pediatricians showed a positive attitude to vaccines. However, many physicians had not been immunized with the recommended vaccines for HCWs and therefore represent a potential source of infection for both patients and the general population. Despite the evidence of the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, compliance by HCWs remains very low for a variety of reasons. A range of measures are therefore needed to ensure their use, not only by the general population, but also by doctors who should be their major promoters.

  8. Registry data for cross-country comparisons of migrants' healthcare utilization in the EU: a survey study of availability and content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe Smith; Krasnik, Allan; Rosano, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Background Cross-national comparable data on migrants’ use of healthcare services are important to address problems in access to healthcare; to identify high risk groups for prevention efforts; and to evaluate healthcare systems comparatively. Some of the main obstacles limiting analyses of healt...

  9. A comparative evaluation of a new automated assay for von Willebrand factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, A S; Stufano, F; Canciani, M T; Mackie, I J; Machin, S J; Peyvandi, F

    2013-03-01

    The ristocetin cofactor assay (VWF:RCo) is the reference method for assessing von Willebrand factor (VWF) activity in the diagnosis of von Willebrand's Disease (VWD). However, the assay suffers from poor reproducibility and sensitivity at low levels of VWF and is labour intensive. We have undertaken an evaluation of a new immunoturbidimetric VWF activity (VWF:Ac) assay (INNOVANCE(®) VWF Ac. Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Marburg, Germany) relative to an established platelet-based VWF:RCo method. Samples from 50 healthy normal subjects, 80 patients with VWD and 50 samples that exhibited 'HIL' (i.e. Haemolysis, Icterus or Lipaemia) were studied. VWF:Ac, VWF:RCo and VWF:Ag were performed on a CS-analyser (Sysmex UK Ltd, Milton Keynes, UK), all reagents were from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics. The VWF:Ac assay, gave low intra- and inter-assay imprecision (over a 31-day period, n = 200 replicate readings) using commercial normal (Mean 96.2 IU dL(-1), CV < 3.0%) and pathological (Mean 36.1 IU dL(-1), CV < 3.5%) control plasmas. The normal and clinical samples exhibited good correlation between VWF:RCo (range 3-753 IU dL(-1)) and VWF:Ac (rs = 0.97, P < 0.0001), with a mean bias of 5.6 IU dL(-1). Ratios of VWF:Ac and VWF:RCo to VWF:Ag in the VWD samples were comparable, although VWF:Ac had a superior lower level of detection to that of VWF:RCo (3% and 5% respectively). A subset (n = 97) of VWD and HIL samples were analysed for VWF:Ac at two different dilutions to assess the effect on relative potency, no significant difference was observed (P = 0.111). The INNOVANCE(®) VWF Ac assay was shown to be reliable and precise. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Assessing healthcare quality using routine data: evaluating the performance of the national tuberculosis programme in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Zoë M; Sharp, Alana R; Zhou, Jifang; Wasserman, Sean; Nanoo, Ananta

    2017-02-01

    To assess the performance of healthcare facilities by means of indicators based on guidelines for clinical care of TB, which is likely a good measure of overall facility quality. We assessed quality of care in all public health facilities in South Africa using graphical, correlation and locally weighted kernel regression analysis of routine TB test data. Facility performance falls short of national standards of care. Only 74% of patients with TB provided a second specimen for testing, 18% received follow-up testing and 14% received drug resistance testing. Only resistance testing rates improved over time, tripling between 2004 and 2011. National awareness campaigns and changes in clinical guidelines had only a transient impact on testing rates. The poorest performing facilities remained at the bottom of the rankings over the period of study. The optimal policy strategy requires both broad-based policies and targeted resources to poor performers. This approach to assessing facility quality of care can be adapted to other contexts and also provides a low-cost method for evaluating the effectiveness of proposed interventions. Devising targeted policies based on routine data is a cost-effective way to improve the quality of public health care provided. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF INDIGENOUS MODEL-ASSISTED INNOVATIVE AND CONVENTIONAL SURGICAL TEACHING IN A TERTIARY HEALTHCARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Kumar Jain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical teaching and learning needs lots of practical exposure and hands on training. It often becomes difficult to demonstrate practically hundreds of medical student’s steps of surgical examination, various surgical minor or major procedures on living patients. Three-dimensional demonstration of theoretical topics helps in easy understanding of the subject. On many occasions, theory classes using lectures and slide projection techniques become cumbersome and monotonous for both teachers and students leading to failure to achieve fruitful results. Computer and 3D simulator-assisted teaching may help in some cases, but yet to become available in many developing countries. Without proper practical knowledge when a surgical action is attempted on a living patient, there is always a chance of error. Keeping all these facts in view and the limited teaching resources available, over hundred self-made inexpensive teaching models are developed out of scrap materials and are used to teach medical students in medical colleges of Assam and the results compared with conventional teaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this study, the efficacy and effectiveness of the model-assisted teaching is compared with that of conventional teaching over a span of two years. RESULTS Some of the shortcomings of conventional teaching can be overcome by model-assisted teaching in terms of overall student attendance in the classes and the acceptance and understanding of the topic concerned. CONCLUSION These models help in filling the voids in surgical learning and can be used as an effective adjunct to conventional surgical teaching.

  12. Aesthetic Evaluation of the Nasolabial Region in Children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Comparing Expert versus Nonexperience Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Saito Paiva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic evaluation of cleft lip and palate rehabilitation outcomes may assist in the determination of new surgical interventions and aid in reevaluation of treatment protocols. Our objective was to compare esthetics assessments of the nasolabial region in children with a unilateral cleft lip and palate between healthcare professionals who were experienced in the treatment of cleft lip and palate and those who were inexperienced. The study group included 55 patients between 6 and 12 years of age who had already undergone primary reconstructive surgery for unilateral cleft lip. Standardized digital photographs were obtained, and the esthetic features of the nose, lip, and nasolabial region were evaluated. We used only cropped photographic images in the assessments of healthcare professionals with and without experience in cleft lip and palate. Interrater analysis revealed highly reliable assessments made by both the experienced and inexperienced professionals. There was no statistically significant difference in the esthetic attractiveness of the lip and nose between the experienced and inexperienced professionals. Compared with the inexperienced professionals, the experienced professional evaluators showed higher satisfaction with the esthetic appearance of the nasolabial region; however, no difference was observed in the analysis of the lip or nose alone.

  13. Aesthetic Evaluation of the Nasolabial Region in Children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Comparing Expert versus Nonexperience Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Mattos, Beatriz Silva Camara

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic evaluation of cleft lip and palate rehabilitation outcomes may assist in the determination of new surgical interventions and aid in reevaluation of treatment protocols. Our objective was to compare esthetics assessments of the nasolabial region in children with a unilateral cleft lip and palate between healthcare professionals who were experienced in the treatment of cleft lip and palate and those who were inexperienced. The study group included 55 patients between 6 and 12 years of age who had already undergone primary reconstructive surgery for unilateral cleft lip. Standardized digital photographs were obtained, and the esthetic features of the nose, lip, and nasolabial region were evaluated. We used only cropped photographic images in the assessments of healthcare professionals with and without experience in cleft lip and palate. Interrater analysis revealed highly reliable assessments made by both the experienced and inexperienced professionals. There was no statistically significant difference in the esthetic attractiveness of the lip and nose between the experienced and inexperienced professionals. Compared with the inexperienced professionals, the experienced professional evaluators showed higher satisfaction with the esthetic appearance of the nasolabial region; however, no difference was observed in the analysis of the lip or nose alone. PMID:25126560

  14. Comparing Food Provided and Wasted before and after Implementing Measures against Food Waste in Three Healthcare Food Service Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Strotmann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to reduce food waste in a hospital, a hospital cafeteria, and a residential home by applying a participatory approach in which the employees were integrated into the process of developing and implementing measures. Initially, a process analysis was undertaken to identify the processes and structures existing in each institution. This included a 2-week measurement of the quantities of food produced and wasted. After implementing the measures, a second measurement was conducted and the results of the two measurements were compared. The average waste rate in the residential home was significantly reduced from 21.4% to 13.4% and from 19.8% to 12.8% in the cafeteria. In the hospital, the average waste rate remained constant (25.6% and 26.3% during the reference and control measurements. However, quantities of average daily food provided and wasted per person in the hospital declined. Minimizing overproduction, i.e., aligning the quantity of meals produced to that required, is essential to reducing serving losses. Compliance of meal quality and quantity with customer expectations, needs, and preferences, i.e., the individualization of food supply, reduces plate waste. Moreover, establishing an efficient communication structure involving all actors along the food supply chain contributes to decreasing food waste.

  15. Work-family conflict and enrichment from the perspective of psychosocial resources: comparing Finnish healthcare workers by working schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauno, Saija; Ruokolainen, Mervi; Kinnunen, Ulla

    2015-05-01

    We examined work-family conflict (WFC) and work-family enrichment (WFE) by comparing Finnish nurses, working dayshifts (non-shiftworkers, n = 874) and non-dayshifts. The non-dayshift employees worked either two different dayshifts (2-shiftworkers, n = 490) or three different shifts including nightshifts (3-shiftworkers, n = 270). Specifically, we investigated whether different resources, i.e. job control, managers' work-family support, co-workers' work-family support, control at home, personal coping strategies, and schedule satisfaction, predicted differently WFC and WFE in these three groups. Results showed that lower managers' work-family support predicted higher WFC only among 3-shiftworkers, whereas lower co-workers' support associated with increased WFC only in non-shiftworkers. In addition, shiftworkers reported higher WFC than non-shiftworkers. However, the level of WFE did not vary by schedule types. Moreover, the predictors of WFE varied only very little across schedule types. Shiftwork organizations should pay more attention to family-friendly management in order to reduce WFC among shiftworkers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  16. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Eccles, Martin P; Shepperd, Sasha; Scott, Anthony; Parmelli, Elena; Beyer, Fiona R

    2014-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals’ behaviour and patient outcomes. Objectives To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each

  17. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Eccles, Martin P; Shepperd, Sasha; Scott, Anthony; Parmelli, Elena; Beyer, Fiona R

    2011-07-06

    There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals' behaviour and patient outcomes. To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each review according to the AMSTAR

  18. A "matter of communication": A new classification to compare and evaluate telehealth and telemedicine interventions and understand their effectiveness as a communication process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Massimiliano; Baldo, Vincenzo; Baldovin, Tatjana; Bertoncello, Chiara

    2017-12-01

    This article attempts to define functions and applications of telemedicine and telehealth in order to achieve a simplified and comprehensive taxonomy. This may be used as a tool to evaluate their efficacy and to address health policies from the perspective of the centrality of information in the healthcare. Starting from a lexical frame, telemedicine or telehealth is conceived as a communication means and their action as a communication process. As a performance, the communication is related to the health outcome. Three functions ( telemetry, telephasis, and telepraxis) and nine applications are identified. Understanding the mechanisms of telemedicine and telehealth effectiveness is crucial for a value-driven healthcare system. This new classification-focusing on the end effect of telemedicine and telehealth and on the type of interactions between involved actors-moves toward a new and simplified methodology to compare different studies and practices, design future researches, classify new technologies and guide their development, and finally address health policies and the healthcare provision.

  19. Practical evaluation of comparative modelling and threading methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonman, M J; Knegtel, R M; Grootenhuis, P D

    1998-09-30

    Six protein pairs, all with known 3D-structures, were used to evaluate different protein structure prediction tools. Firstly, alignments between a target sequence and a template sequence or structure were obtained by sequence alignment with QUANTA or by threading with THREADER, 123D and PHD Topits. Secondly, protein structure models were generated using MODELLER. The two protein structure assessment tools used were the root mean square deviation (RMSD) compared with the experimental target structure and the total 3D profile score. Also the accuracy of the active sites of models built in the absence and presence of ligands was investigated. Our study confirms that threading methods are able to yield more accurate models than comparative modelling in cases of low sequence identity (model and the models obtained by threading methods. For high sequence identities (> 30%) comparative modelling using MODELLER resulted in accurate models. Furthermore, the total 3D profile score was not always able to distinguish correct from incorrect folds when different alignment methods were used. Finally, we found it to be important to include possible ligands in the model-building process in order to prevent unrealistic filling of active site areas.

  20. The effectiveness of tools used to evaluate successful critical decision making skills for applicants to healthcare graduate educational programs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Brian; Hawley, Diane

    2015-05-15

    Students leave healthcare academic programs for a variety of reasons. When they attrite, it is disappointing for the student as well as their faculty. Advanced practice nursing and other healthcare professions require not only extensive academic preparation, but also the ability to critically evaluate patient care situations. The ability to critically evaluate a situation is not innate. Critical decision making skills are high level skills that are difficult to assess. For the purpose of this review, critical decision making and critical thinking skills refer to the same constructs and will be referred to globally as critical decision making skills. The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of tools used to evaluate critical decision making skills for applicants to healthcare graduate educational programs. Adult (18 years of age or older) applicants, students enrolled and/or recent graduates (within one year from completion) of healthcare graduate educational programs. Types of interventions: This review considered studies that evaluated the utilization of unique tools as well as standard tools, such as the Graduate Record Exam or grade point average, to evaluate critical decision making skills in graduate healthcare program applicants. Types of studies: Experimental and non-experimental studies were considered for inclusion. Types of outcomes: Successful quantitative evaluations based on specific field of study standards. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. Studies published in English after 1969 were considered for inclusion in this review. Databases that included both published and unpublished (grey) literature were searched. Additionally, reference lists from all articles retrieved were examined for articles for inclusion. Selected papers were assessed by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from Joanna Briggs Institute. Any disagreement between reviewers was

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Three Commercially Available Glass Ionomer Cements in Primary Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S Srinivasa; Murthy, Gargi S

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to comparatively evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of three commercially available glass ionomer cements - Miracle Mix (MM) (GC America Inc., Alsip, USA), Ketac Molar (KM) (3M Corp., Minnesota, USA) and amalgomer CR (AM) (Advanced Healthcare Ltd., Kent, England) in primary teeth and later examine the mode of the adhesive failure at the interface. Materials and Methods: Totally, 90 extracted sound primary molars were selected, and dentin on the buccal surface of crowns was exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned into three groups according to the restorative materials being tested. SBS tests were performed, and the obtained values were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). SBS mean values on were recorded in megapascals (MPa) and the mode of failure was assessed using a scanning electron microscope. Results: SBS (in MPa) was - MM-5.39, KM-4.84, AM-6.38. The predominant failure mode was cohesive. Conclusion: Amalgomer CR exhibited statistically significant higher SBS of 6.38 MPa to primary teeth and has better adhesion to the primary teeth compared to the other test materials and can be considered as a restorative material in pediatric dentistry. However, the results of this study should be corroborated with further investigation to reach a definitive conclusion. PMID:26464550

  2. Can italian healthcare administrative databases be used to compare regions with respect to compliance with standards of care for chronic diseases?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gini (Rosa); M.J. Schuemie (Martijn); P. Francesconi (Paolo); F. Lapi (Francesco); C. Cricelli (Claudio); A. Pasqua (Alessandro); P. Gallina (Pietro); D. Donato (Daniele); S. Brugaletta (Salvatore); A. Donatini (Andrea); A. Marini (Alessandro); C. Cricelli (Claudio); L. Damiani; M. Bellentani (Mariadonata); J. van der Lei (Johan); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam); N.S. Klazinga (Niek)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Italy has a population of 60 million and a universal coverage single-payer healthcare system, which mandates collection of healthcare administrative data in a uniform fashion throughout the country. On the other hand, organization of the health system takes place at the

  3. Comparative analysis of used car price evaluation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuancan; Hao, Lulu; Xu, Cong

    2017-05-01

    An accurate used car price evaluation is a catalyst for the healthy development of used car market. Data mining has been applied to predict used car price in several articles. However, little is studied on the comparison of using different algorithms in used car price estimation. This paper collects more than 100,000 used car dealing records throughout China to do empirical analysis on a thorough comparison of two algorithms: linear regression and random forest. These two algorithms are used to predict used car price in three different models: model for a certain car make, model for a certain car series and universal model. Results show that random forest has a stable but not ideal effect in price evaluation model for a certain car make, but it shows great advantage in the universal model compared with linear regression. This indicates that random forest is an optimal algorithm when handling complex models with a large number of variables and samples, yet it shows no obvious advantage when coping with simple models with less variables.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Biofunctional Compounds Content from Different Herbal Infusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca C. Fărcaş

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tea is the most important non-alcoholic beverage in the world being appreciated for its stimulant properties and health benefits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the content in caffeine, phenolic compounds, flavonoids, as well as the antioxidant activity of five different herbal infusion samples in oder to compare the amount of these bioactive compounds from traditional Romanian medicinal plants and Chinese tea plants. Green tea, black tea, linden (lime tea, mint, and St. John's wort were chosen as materials for the preparation of infusion and laboratory analyses. The caffeine was extracted with dichloromethane and then was quantified by measuring the absorbance of the extract at 260 nm. The quantification of total phenolic compounds was achieved by Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoid content was determined using a chromogenic system of NaNO2-(Al(NO33-NaOH based on spectrophotometric method. The antioxidant capacity of each tea sample was assessed by evaluating their radical scavenging  activity on DPPH radical. The largest content in antioxidant compounds was found in green, but also in the mint infusion sample, while black tea has registered the highest caffeine content. Following the results obtained it can be stated that all the analysed samples contain remarkable amounts of biologically active compounds essential for the human body healt.

  5. Comparative evaluation of midazolam and clonidine as pediatric oral premedication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sangeeta; Kaur, Manpreet; Tripathy, Hemant Kumar; Kumar, Ajeet; Kohli, Santavana; Nanda, Samridhi

    2013-01-01

    Clonidine provides many desirable effects like sedation, analgesia, anxiolysis, and hemodynamic stability and these properties make it a potentially useful anesthetic premedication in the pediatric settings. The aim of this study was to compare oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg), which is considered gold standard with oral clonidine (5 mcg/kg) as a premedication in pediatric patients. Sixty children classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I, aged between 2 and 12, who were scheduled to undergo an elective surgery, were enrolled for a prospective, randomized, and double blind controlled trial. They received either oral midazolam (Group M) or oral clonidine (Group C) 60 minutes before induction of anesthesia and were submitted to an evaluation of anxiety and sedation scores. We also evaluated secondary outcomes such as palatability, parental separation, effect on hemodynamic status, co-operation during venipuncture and facemask application, postoperative analgesic requirement, and recovery profile. Oral midazolam had better efficacy in the preoperative period as sedative and anxiolytic (P 0.05). We conclude that under the conditions of this study, oral midazolam is a better medication than clonidine in children in preoperative period while clonidine is a better medication postoperatively with added advantage of palatability, hemodynamic stability, and no significant side effects.

  6. Comparative evaluation of oculometric variables in graves' ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Amante Miot

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate oculometric parameters of Graves' ophthalmopathy in comparison to healthy eyes using digital photography and digital image analysis. INTRODUCTION: Graves' ophthalmopathy is the main cause of eye proptosis. Because these protrusions cause clinically perceived distortions in orbital architecture, digital photographs can be used to detect and quantify these changes. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study comprising 12 healthy volunteers and 15 Graves' ophthalmopathy patients with the purpose of evaluating the use of simple, non-invasive digital photography to estimate oculometric parameters of Graves' ophthalmopathy and compare them with the parameters of unaffected eyes. Facial photographs of cases and controls were taken in a standardized manner. Oculometric parameters were compared between the groups and then correlated to proptometer measures. RESULTS: All estimated oculometric variables showed significant differences between the groups, in particular with regard to mediopupilar aperture, lateral height, distance from the iris edge to the lateral boundary of the palpebral fissure, and distance from the higher point of the iris to the lateral limit of the palpebral fissure. The product of medial aperture and horizontal palpebral fissure also revealed greater discrepancy between the groups. Proptometer measures showed significant linear correlation between the distance from the iris edge to the lateral boundary of the palpebral fissure and between the distance from the higher point of the iris to the lateral limit of palpebral fissure (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Comparative analysis of oculometric parameters in Graves' ophthalmopathy suggests that eye proptosis is related to an asymmetric increase in lateral oculometric measures. Standardized digital photographs can be used in clinical practice to objectively estimate oculometric parameters of Graves' ophthalmopathy patients.

  7. The CRADLE vital signs alert: qualitative evaluation of a novel device designed for use in pregnancy by healthcare workers in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Hannah L; Boene, Helena; Munguambe, Khatia; Sevene, Esperança; Akeju, David; Adetoro, Olalekan O; Charanthimath, Umesh; Bellad, Mrutyunjaya B; de Greeff, Annemarie; Anthony, John; Hall, David R; Steyn, Wilhelm; Vidler, Marianne; von Dadelszen, Peter; Chappell, Lucy C; Sandall, Jane; Shennan, Andrew H

    2018-01-05

    Vital signs measurement can identify pregnant and postpartum women who require urgent treatment or referral. In low-resource settings, healthcare workers have limited access to accurate vital signs measuring devices suitable for their environment and training. The CRADLE Vital Signs Alert (VSA) is a novel device measuring blood pressure and pulse that is accurate in pregnancy and designed for low-resource settings. Its traffic light early warning system alerts healthcare workers to the need for escalation of care for women with hypertension, haemorrhage or sepsis. This study evaluated the usability and acceptability of the CRADLE VSA device. Evaluation was conducted in community and primary care settings in India, Mozambique and Nigeria and tertiary hospitals in South Africa. Purposeful sampling was used to convene 155 interviews and six focus groups with healthcare workers using the device (n = 205) and pregnant women and their family members (n = 41). Interviews and focus groups were conducted in the local language and audio-recorded, transcribed and translated into English for analysis. Thematic analysis was undertaken using an a priori thematic framework, as well as an inductive approach. Most healthcare workers perceived the CRADLE device to be easy to use and accurate. The traffic lights early warning system was unanimously reported positively, giving healthcare workers confidence with decision-making and a sense of professionalism. However, a minority in South Africa described manual inflation as tiring, particularly when measuring vital signs in obese and hypertensive women (n = 4) and a few South African healthcare workers distrusted the device's accuracy (n = 7). Unanimously, pregnant women liked the CRADLE device. The traffic light early warning system gave women and their families a better understanding of the importance of vital signs in pregnancy and during the postpartum period. The CRADLE device was well accepted by healthcare workers

  8. Comparing the cost-effectiveness of linezolid to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: a healthcare system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dach, E; Morel, C M; Murthy, A; Pagani, L; Macedo-Vinas, M; Olearo, F; Harbarth, S

    2017-09-01

    Few industry-independent studies have been conducted to compare the relative costs and benefits of drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. We performed a stochastic cost-effectiveness analysis comparing two treatment strategies-linezolid versus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin-for the treatment of MRSA infection. We used cost and effectiveness data from a previously conducted clinical trial, complementing with other data from published literature, to compare the two regimens from a healthcare system perspective. Effectiveness was expressed in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Several sensitivity analyses were performed using Monte Carlo simulation, to measure the effect of potential parameter changes on the base-case model results, including potential differences related to type of infection and drug toxicity. Treatment of MRSA infection with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin and linezolid were found to cost on average €146 and €2536, and lead to a gain of 0.916 and 0.881 QALYs, respectively. Treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin was found to be more cost-effective than linezolid in the base case and remained dominant over linezolid in most alternative scenarios, including different types of MRSA infection and potential disadvantages in terms of toxicity. With a willingness-to-pay threshold of €0, €50 000 and €200 000 per QALY gained, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin was dominant in 100%, 96% and 85% of model iterations. A 95% discount on the current purchasing price of linezolid would be needed when it goes off-patent for it to represent better value for money compared with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin. Combined treatment of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole plus rifampicin is more cost-effective than linezolid in the treatment of MRSA infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of phenol-soluble modulin production and Galleria mellonella killing by community-associated and healthcare-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcusaureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakes, Eve; Marbach, Helene; Lynham, Steven; Ward, Malcolm; Edgeworth, Jonathan D; Otter, Jonathan A

    2016-12-01

    Community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) have emerged globally and have been associated with more severe disease than healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA). The purpose of this study was to determine whether laboratory measures of virulence can distinguish dominant CA-MRSA clones from HA-MRSA clones. We compared the production of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) and ability to kill Galleria mellonella caterpillars for a range of CA- and HA-MRSA strains. Twenty-two HA-MRSA strains [ST22-IV (EMRSA-15), ST36-II (EMRSA-16) and ST239-III] and 26 CA-MRSA strains [ST1-IV (PVL+ USA400), ST1-IV (PVL-), ST8-IV (USA300), ST22-IV (PVL+), ST30-IV, ST59-IV and ST80-IV] were analysed. PSM production was measured using and compared using t-tests and ANOVA. A G mellonella (caterpillar) pathogenicity model was performed, and differences were compared using survival analysis and the log-rank test. There was no significant difference in overall PSM production between HA and CA strains (P=0.090), but there was significant variation between clones (P=0.003). G. mellonella caterpillar killing varied significantly by clone (P<0.001), and overall killing was greater for HA compared with CA clones (P=0.007). The increased acute virulence phenotype of CA-MRSA clones in humans is not associated with increased PSM production in vitro or increased killing in an in vivo caterpillar pathogenicity model.

  10. Evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare for ansatte i Odense Kommune, der sygemeldes med lidelser i bevægeapparatet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Didde Cramer; Sørensen, Jan

    CAST har afsluttet en evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare for ansatte i Odense Kommune, der sygemeldes med lidelser i bevægeapparatet. Målet med projektet var at belyse om der blev opnået en hurtigere udredning af kommunens ansatte gennem køb af en 'diagnostisk pakke' ved det...... private firma Falck Healtcare end ved standardforløbet i offentligt regi ved langtidssygemeldinger.   Evalueringen var oprindelig planlagt som et åbent, randomiseret kontrolleret interventionsstudie, hvor ca. 100 deltagere, som pr. lodtrækning skulle fordeles i henholdsvis en kontrol- eller...... projektet skulle udarbejdes en evalueringsrapport. Rapporten: Evaluering af tilbud om henvisning til Falck Healthcare , beskriver forløbet, og målsætningerne bag projektet samt om mulige årsager og barrierer for rekruttering af deltagere....

  11. Improving correctional healthcare providers' ability to care for transgender patients: Development and evaluation of a theory-driven cultural and clinical competence intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Clark, Kirsty A; Altice, Frederick L; Reisner, Sari L; Kershaw, Trace S; Pachankis, John E

    2017-12-01

    Correctional healthcare providers' limited cultural and clinical competence to care for transgender patients represents a barrier to care for incarcerated transgender individuals. The present study aimed to adapt, deliver, and evaluate a transgender cultural and clinical competence intervention for correctional healthcare providers. In the summer of 2016, a theoretically-informed, group-based intervention to improve transgender cultural and clinical competence was delivered to 34 correctional healthcare providers in New England. A confidential survey assessed providers' cultural and clinical competence to care for transgender patients, self-efficacy to provide hormone therapy, subjective norms related to transgender care, and willingness to provide gender-affirming care to transgender patients before and after (immediately and 3-months) the intervention. Linear mixed effects regression models were fit to assess change in study outcomes over time. Qualitative exit interviews assessed feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. Providers' willingness to provide gender-affirming care improved immediately post-intervention (β = 0.38; SE = 0.41, p cultural competence (χ2 = 22.49; p cultural and clinical competence, self-efficacy, subjective norms, and willingness to provide gender-affirming care to transgender patients. Continued efforts should be made to train correctional healthcare providers in culturally and clinically competent gender-affirming care in order to improve the health of incarcerated transgender people. Future efficacy testing of this intervention is warranted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-gamma release assay for TB screening in French healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodi, Dominique; Brunet-Courtois, Benedicte; Nael, Virginie; Audrain, Marie; Chailleux, Edmond; Germaud, Patrick; Naudin, Frederique; Muller, Jean-Yves; Bourrut-Lacouture, Martine; Durand-Perdriel, Marie-Henriette; Gordeeff, Claire; Guillaumin, Guyonne; Houdebine, Marietherese; Raffi, Francois; Boutoille, David; Biron, Charlotte; Potel, Gilles; Roedlich, Claude; Geraut, Christian; Schablon, Anja; Nienhaus, Albert

    2009-11-30

    Using French cut-offs for the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST), results of the TST were compared with the results of an Interferon-gamma Release Assay (IGRA) in Healthcare Workers (HCW) after contact to AFB-positive TB patients. Between May 2006 and May 2007, a total of 148 HCWs of the University Hospital in Nantes, France were tested simultaneously with IGRA und TST. A TST was considered to indicate recent latent TB infection (LTBI) if an increase of >10 mm or if TST >/= 15 mm for those with no previous TST result was observed. For those with a positive TST, chest X-ray was performed and preventive chemotherapy was offered. All HCWs were BCG-vaccinated. The IGRA was positive in 18.9% and TST >/= 10 mm was observed in 65.5%. A recent LTBI was believed to be highly probable in 30.4% following TST. Agreement between IGRA and TST was low (kappa 0.041). In 10 (16.7%) out of 60 HCWs who needed chest X-ray following TST the IGRA was positive. In 9 (20%) out of 45 HCWs to whom preventive chemotherapy was offered following TST the IGRA was positive. Of those considered TST-negative following the French guidelines, 20.5% were IGRA-positive. In a two-step strategy - positive TST verified by IGRA - 18 out of 28 (64.3%) IGRA-positive HCWs would not have been detected using French guidelines for TST interpretation. The introduction of IGRA in contact tracings of BCG-vaccinated HCWs reduces X-rays and preventive chemotherapies. Increasing the cut-off for a positive TST does not seem to be helpful to overcome the effect of BCG vaccination on TST.

  13. Evaluation of the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-γ release assay for TB screening in French healthcare workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Francois

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Using French cut-offs for the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST, results of the TST were compared with the results of an Interferon-γ Release Assay (IGRA in Healthcare Workers (HCW after contact to AFB-positive TB patients. Methods Between May 2006 and May 2007, a total of 148 HCWs of the University Hospital in Nantes, France were tested simultaneously with IGRA und TST. A TST was considered to indicate recent latent TB infection (LTBI if an increase of >10 mm or if TST ≥ 15 mm for those with no previous TST result was observed. For those with a positive TST, chest X-ray was performed and preventive chemotherapy was offered. Results All HCWs were BCG-vaccinated. The IGRA was positive in 18.9% and TST ≥ 10 mm was observed in 65.5%. A recent LTBI was believed to be highly probable in 30.4% following TST. Agreement between IGRA and TST was low (kappa 0.041. In 10 (16.7% out of 60 HCWs who needed chest X-ray following TST the IGRA was positive. In 9 (20% out of 45 HCWs to whom preventive chemotherapy was offered following TST the IGRA was positive. Of those considered TST-negative following the French guidelines, 20.5% were IGRA-positive. In a two-step strategy - positive TST verified by IGRA - 18 out of 28 (64.3% IGRA-positive HCWs would not have been detected using French guidelines for TST interpretation. Conclusion The introduction of IGRA in contact tracings of BCG-vaccinated HCWs reduces X-rays and preventive chemotherapies. Increasing the cut-off for a positive TST does not seem to be helpful to overcome the effect of BCG vaccination on TST.

  14. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Kevin G; McDonald, Eisin; Smith-Palmer, Alison; Johnston, Fiona; Ahmed, Syed

    2017-08-01

    In an attempt to explore healthcare worker acquisition of tuberculosis infection, we conducted population-based surveillance of all cases recorded as healthcare workers reported to Enhanced Surveillance of Mycobacterial Infection from 2000 to 2015. Over the study period, the mean incidence rate of tuberculosis among all healthcare workers was 15.4 per 100,000 healthcare workers. However, the incidence rate of tuberculosis amongst those healthcare workers born outside the UK was 164.8 per 100,000 compared with 5.0 per 100,000 UK-born healthcare workers. Fifty-seven per cent of all non-UK-born healthcare workers were diagnosed within five years of their arrival in the UK and would have been new entrants to the NHS. An effective new entrant occupational health screening programme for latent tuberculosis infection may have prevented some of these active cases of infection.

  15. Making comparative performance information more comprehensible: an experimental evaluation of the impact of formats on consumer understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; De Jong, Anco; Hibbard, Judith H; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to investigate how different presentation formats influence comprehension and use of comparative performance information (CPI) among consumers. An experimental between-subjects and within-subjects design with manipulations of CPI presentation formats. We enrolled both consumers with lower socioeconomic status (SES)/cognitive skills and consumers with higher SES/cognitive skills, recruited through an online access panel. Respondents received fictitious CPI and completed questions about interpretation and information use. Between subjects, we tested (1) displaying an overall performance score (yes/no); (2) displaying a small number of quality indicators (5 vs 9); and (3) displaying different types of evaluative symbols (star ratings, coloured dots and word icons vs numbers and bar graphs). Within subjects, we tested the effect of a reduced number of healthcare providers (5 vs 20). Data were analysed using descriptive analysis, analyses of variance and paired-sampled t tests. A total of 902 (43%) respondents participated. Displaying an overall performance score and the use of coloured dots and word icons particularly enhanced consumer understanding. Importantly, respondents provided with coloured dots most often correctly selected the top three healthcare providers (84.3%), compared with word icons (76.6% correct), star ratings (70.6% correct), numbers (62.0%) and bars (54.2%) when viewing performance scores of 20 providers. Furthermore, a reduced number of healthcare providers appeared to support consumers, for example, when provided with 20 providers, 69.5% correctly selected the top three, compared with 80.2% with five providers. Particular presentation formats enhanced consumer understanding of CPI, most importantly the use of overall performance scores, word icons and coloured dots, and a reduced number of providers displayed. Public report efforts should use these formats to maximise impact on consumers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  16. The neurobehavioural evaluation in schizophrenics: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilamkar, Kamini Ramdas

    2013-01-01

    The simple reaction time task assesses the ability of the subject to respond to an external cue and to retrieve a reward. The reaction time provides an indirect index of the processing capability of the central nervous system and a simple means to the determined sensory and the motor performances, which is a neurobehavioural evaluation. A general slowness in the latency in the reaction time tasks and a disengagement deficit in the visual and the hearing oriented tasks were seen in schizophrenics. In order to clarify the feature of the attention disorders in schizophrenia, a simple reaction time task was given to schizophrenics. Schizophrenics (34 males and 20 females, n=54) and healthy controls (40 males and 21 females, n=61) with a mean age of 35±7, who were individually matched for gender and age, were included in the study, by using a response analyser to evaluate the reaction time. The performances were expressed in mean ± standard deviation of the reaction time by using the unpaired 't' test. The schizophrenic patients performed poorer than the healthy controls, which indicated a difficulty in sustaining attention and this was statistically very highly significant (pdisturbance in interpersonal situations. The increased reaction time as compared to that in healthy controls, might be due to the impairment of the psychomotor poverty, disorganization and reality distortion which were associated with the deficits in the cortical neurological functions, such as planning, coordination and sequencing of the motor acts, which showed a greater involvement of the frontal lobe and temporal lobe dysfunction.

  17. Evaluation of mammographic image quality: pilot study comparing five methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, C B; Fishell, E K; Jong, R A; Weiser, W J; Yaffe, M J

    1992-08-01

    A radiograph is considered of high quality when it allows a radiologist to identify abnormalities with high sensitivity and specificity. Although many methods for assessing image quality have been devised, it is not clear which is most meaningful or how well these methods correlate with one another. A pilot study was undertaken to compare five methods of evaluating mammographic image quality. Each of the methods was used to form separate rankings of 11 mammographic system configurations. In two of the methods, observers (three radiologists and three physicists) subjectively ranked the "image quality" of radiographs of phantoms obtained with each configuration. The third method ranked the systems according to contrast as measured densitometrically with an aluminum step wedge, and the fourth, in terms of lowest to highest mean glandular radiation doses to the breast. In the final method, observers based their rankings on mammograms of patients. The intra- and interobserver variabilities of each ranking method were assessed, as well as the correlations between methods, by using standard nonparametric statistical tests. Intraobserver consistency was high with any of the image quality ranking methods; however, image quality rankings based on either of the two phantoms provided better agreement among observers than did rankings based on images of patients. Surprisingly, no significant degree of correlation was found between any two image quality evaluation methods. Our work may have two implications for the American College of Radiology Mammography Accreditation Program: (1) small variations in phantom scores do not necessarily correlate with subjective variation in image quality in radiographs of patients, and (2) when small numbers of radiographs are used, the assessment of the quality of mammograms of patients may vary considerably among radiologists.

  18. Perspectives on a US-Mexico Border Community's Diabetes and "Health-Care" Access Mobilization Efforts and Comparative Analysis of Community Health Needs over 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Cecilia Ballesteros; de Zapien, Jill Eileen Guernsey; Chang, Jean; Ingram, Maia; Fernandez, Maria L; Carvajal, Scott C; Staten, Lisa K

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a community coalition-university partnership to address health needs in an underserved US-Mexico border, community. For approximately 15 years, this coalition engaged in community-based participatory research with community organizations, state/local health departments, and the state's only accredited college of public health. Notable efforts include the systematic collection of health-relevant data 12 years apart and data that spawned numerous health promotion activities. The latter includes specific evidence-based chronic disease-preventive interventions, including one that is now disseminated and replicated in Latino communities in the US and Mexico, and policy-level changes. Survey data to evaluate changes in a range of health problems and needs, with a specific focus on those related to diabetes and access to health-care issues-identified early on in the coalition as critical health problems affecting the community-are presented. Next steps for this community and lessons learned that may be applicable to other communities are discussed.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Total Antioxidant Capacities of Plant Polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csepregi, Kristóf; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Hideg, Éva

    2016-02-09

    Thirty-seven samples of naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated using three common in vitro assays for total antioxidant activity (TAC) testing: the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Potential (FRAP) and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, in addition to the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent reactivity (FCR). We found that antioxidant hierarchies depended on the choice of assay and applied ANOVA analyses to explore underlying structure-TAC dependencies. In addition to statistically confirming the empirically established connection between flavonoid ring-B catechol and high TEAC or FRAP, new correlations were also found. In flavonoids, (i) hydroxyl groups on ring-B had a positive effect on all four TAC assays; (ii) the presence of a 3-hydroxyl group on ring-C increased TEAC and FRAP, but had no effect on DPPH or FCR; (iii) Phenolic acids lacking a 3-hydroxyl group had significantly lower FRAP or DPPH than compounds having this structure, while TEAC or FCR were not affected. Results demonstrated that any TAC-based ranking of phenolic rich samples would very much depend on the choice of assay, and argue for use of more than one technique. As an illustration, we compared results of the above four assays using either grapevine leaf extracts or synthetic mixtures of compounds prepared according to major polyphenols identified in the leaves.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Total Antioxidant Capacities of Plant Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristóf Csepregi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-seven samples of naturally occurring phenolic compounds were evaluated using three common in vitro assays for total antioxidant activity (TAC testing: the Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC, the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Potential (FRAP and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging assay, in addition to the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent reactivity (FCR. We found that antioxidant hierarchies depended on the choice of assay and applied ANOVA analyses to explore underlying structure-TAC dependencies. In addition to statistically confirming the empirically established connection between flavonoid ring-B catechol and high TEAC or FRAP, new correlations were also found. In flavonoids, (i hydroxyl groups on ring-B had a positive effect on all four TAC assays; (ii the presence of a 3-hydroxyl group on ring-C increased TEAC and FRAP, but had no effect on DPPH or FCR; (iii Phenolic acids lacking a 3-hydroxyl group had significantly lower FRAP or DPPH than compounds having this structure, while TEAC or FCR were not affected. Results demonstrated that any TAC-based ranking of phenolic rich samples would very much depend on the choice of assay, and argue for use of more than one technique. As an illustration, we compared results of the above four assays using either grapevine leaf extracts or synthetic mixtures of compounds prepared according to major polyphenols identified in the leaves.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the microhardness of 4 dental sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, L; Sossi, A; Cadenaro, M; Di Lenarda, R

    2007-12-01

    Aim of this study was the evaluation of the microhardness of 4 dental sealants polymerised with two different curing units. Twenty samples (5 x 5x 2 mm) were prepared with 4 different sealants; 10 samples for each group were polymerised with a plasma curing unit (Apollo 95 E DMD) and 10 with a halogen curing light (Heliolux DLX Vivadent ETS, Schaan, Liechtenstein). For each section 6 Vickers microhardness measurements were performed (VMHT 30A, Leica Wien, Austria), 3 on the surface exposed to the light and 3 on the opposite surface. After the baseline assessment all samples were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 30, 60, 90, 180 and 360 days, and then analysed again with the microhardness indenter and observed under steromicroscope 10X (Leica DM2500 Wien, Austria). Data were then statistically analysed. The hybrid composite Tetric flow (group IV) showed the higher microhardness values compared to the other tested materials (group I, II, III); surfaces exposed to curing light showed higher microhardness values than opposite surfaces. Moreover, a significant microhardness reduction was observed after 30 days; values remained unmodified after 60, 90, 180 and 360 days. Data were then statistically analysed with Anova test for repeated measures, with a global significance level of 0.05. Because of the good mechanical properties of dental sealants they represent the first choice materials in pits and fissures sealing.

  2. Comparative evaluation of pulpal blood flow during incisor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncuoglu, Fidan Alakus; Ersahan, Seyda

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare changes in pulpal blood flow (PBF) as a result of maxillary incisor intrusion achieved by one of two methods (utility arches or mini-implants). Thirty subjects were divided into three groups, the first of which underwent maxillary incisor intrusion using utility arches (UA) and a second group, intrusion via mini-implants (MI). The third group acted as a control. An intrusive force of 100 g was applied to the upper incisors in the treatment groups, whereas no force was applied to the anterior teeth in the control group. A laser Doppler flowmeter (LDF) was used to measure PBF at baseline (T0) and during incisor intrusion at 24 hours (T1), three days (T2), seven days (T3) and three weeks (T4). Statistical changes in PBF were assessed by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank and Mann-Whitney U tests, with significance set at p intrusion at T4. No significant changes in PBF were observed in the control group over the course of the study. The only statistically significant difference between the UA and MI groups were at T1 and T2, at which time the MI group had lower PBF values (p intrusion methods are reversible. Although the changes in PBF could not be directly related to the method of intrusion employed, in general, a more severe drop in PBF was observed in the MI group during the first three days of intrusion.

  3. Translation Evaluation: A Comparative Study of an Oblique Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    / Esmail Zare Behtash

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Translation is of an absolute necessity in today’s world. Robinson (1997 states that the study of translation is an integral part of intercultural relations and of conveying scientific and technological knowledge. He further mentions that “translators need to be able to process linguistic materials quickly and efficiently; but they also need to be able to recognize problem areas and to slow down to solve them in complex analytical ways” (p. 2. This study is an attempt to explore and evaluate an oblique translation of a text from English into Persian to find the most frequent translation strategy. To reach the goal of the study, the researchers selected one hundred and ten sentences of an original English text which had been translated freely at random and compared them with their Persian counterparts. The findings of the study indicated that Persian translator used equivalent strategy with the highest percentage (45% in the translated corpus. After that, modulation, and transposition had the highest percentages respectively.

  4. Evaluation of service quality by using fuzzy MCDM: A case study in Iranian health-care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Afkham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Service quality plays an important role in health care systems since hospitals are responsible for people's lives. This study presents an effective approach for evaluating and comparing service qualities of four hospitals. Service quality consists of different attributes and many of them are intangible and difficult to measure. Therefore, we propose a fuzzy method to resolve the ambiguity of the concepts, which are associated with human judgments. SERVQUAL model is used to evaluate the respondents' judgments of service quality and multi attribute decision making approach is implemented for the comparison among hospitals. The paper use analytical hierarchy process (AHP for obtaining criteria weight and TOPSIS for ranking the cases.

  5. Development of a novel regulatory pharmacovigilance prioritisation system: an evaluation of its performance at the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabroke, Suzie; Wise, Lesley; Waller, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    The prioritisation of drug safety issues for further evaluation or regulatory action is critical to ensure that acceptable timelines and appropriate resource allocation are defined to meet public health and regulatory obligations. Our objective was to develop, pilot and implement a novel tool for prioritising pharmacovigilance issues within the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). An initial system was developed empirically and then piloted over a 10-month period in the pharmacovigilance signal management meeting at the MHRA that discusses potential pharmacovigilance issues, and determines, through consensus, their priority and a timescale for action. The priority assigned by the tool was compared with the priority decided by collective judgement at the meeting. Once an acceptable level of concordance between the tool and the meeting had been achieved, the finalised tool was implemented into routine use at the MHRA, with an evaluation of its performance conducted after the first year. The Regulatory Pharmacovigilance Prioritisation System (RPPS) tool prioritises pharmacovigilance issues according to the following four broad categories, each with four inputs: strength of evidence, public health implications, agency regulatory obligations and public perceptions. A weighted scoring system links the inputs to a pre-defined number of points where if a threshold is reached then the points are awarded. The overall priority is determined by the sum of all points obtained from each of the inputs. The pilot study included a total of 73 pharmacovigilance issues during the 10-month study period, with an overall exact agreement between the RPPS priority and the collective judgement of the meeting of 60.3 %. Where exact agreement was not obtained, the RPPS generally prioritised the issues slightly higher than the meeting. Over the first year following implementation, the RPPS achieved an overall exact agreement of 82.2 %. Following the pilot study and

  6. Approach for conducting the longitudinal program evaluation of the US Department of Health and Human Services National Action Plan to prevent healthcare-associated infections: roadmap to elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Katherine L; Mendel, Peter; Weinberg, Daniel A; Leuschner, Kristin J; Gall, Elizabeth M; Siegel, Sari

    2014-02-01

    In response to mounting evidence about skyrocketing morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), in 2009, the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued the HHS HAI Action Plan to enhance collaboration and coordination and to strengthen the impact of national efforts to address HAIs. To optimize timely understanding of the Action Plan's approach and outcomes, as well as improve the likely success of this effort, HHS requested an independent longitudinal and formative program evaluation. This article describes the evaluation approach to assessing HHS's progress and the challenges encountered as HHS attempted to transform the national strategy to HAI elimination. The Context-Input-Process-Product (CIPP) model, a structured-yet-flexible formative and summative evaluation tool, supported the assessment of: (1) the Context in which the Action Plan developed, (2) the Inputs and decisions made about selecting activities for implementation, (3) Processes or implementation of selected activities, and (4) Products and outcomes. A system framework consisting of 4 system functions and 5 system properties. The CIPP evaluation model provides a structure for tracking the components of the program, the relationship between components, and the way in which components change with time. The system framework allows the evaluation team to understand what the Action Plan is doing and how it aims to facilitate change in the healthcare system to address the problem of HAIs. With coordination and alignment becoming increasingly important among large programs within healthcare and other fields, program evaluations like this can inform the policy community about what works and why, and how future complex large-scale programs should be evaluated.

  7. Measuring healthcare quality: the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Jaap; Niemeijer, Gerard C; Does, Ronald J M M

    2013-01-01

    Current health care quality performance indicators appear to be inadequate to inform the public to make the right choices. The aim of this paper is to define a framework and an organizational setting in which valid and reliable healthcare information can be produced to inform the general public about healthcare quality. To improve health care quality information, the paper explores the analogy between financial accounting, which aims to produce valid and reliable information to support companies informing their shareholders and stakeholders, and healthcare aiming to inform future patients about healthcare quality. Based on this analogy, the authors suggest a measurement framework and an organizational setting to produce healthcare information. The authors suggest a five-quality element framework to structure quality reporting. The authors also indicate the best way to report each type of quality, comparing performance indicators with certification/accreditation. Health gain is the most relevant quality indicator to inform the public, but this information is the most difficult to obtain. Finally, the organizational setting, comparable to financial accounting, required to provide valid, reliable and objective information on healthcare quality is described. Framework elements should be tested in quantitative studies or case studies, such as a performance indicator's relative value compared to accreditation/certification. There are, however, elements that can be implemented right away such as third party validation of healthcare information produced by healthcare institutions. Given the money spent on healthcare worldwide, valid and reliable healthcare quality information's value can never be overestimated. It can justify delivering "expensive healthcare, but also points the way to savings by stopping useless healthcare. Valid and reliable information puts the patient in the driver's seat and enables him or her to make the right decision when choosing their healthcare

  8. TU-FG-201-11: Evaluating the Validity of Prospective Risk Analysis Methods: A Comparison of Traditional FMEA and Modified Healthcare FMEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lah, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Manger, R; Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the ability of traditional Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and a light version of Healthcare FMEA (HFMEA), called Scenario analysis of FMEA (SAFER) by comparing their outputs in terms of the risks identified and their severity rankings. Methods: We applied two prospective methods of the quality management to surface image guided, linac-based radiosurgery (SIG-RS). For the traditional FMEA, decisions on how to improve an operation are based on risk priority number (RPN). RPN is a product of three indices: occurrence, severity and detectability. The SAFER approach; utilized two indices-frequency and severity-which were defined by a multidisciplinary team. A criticality matrix was divided into 4 categories; very low, low, high and very high. For high risk events, an additional evaluation was performed. Based upon the criticality of the process, it was decided if additional safety measures were needed and what they comprise. Results: Two methods were independently compared to determine if the results and rated risks were matching or not. Our results showed an agreement of 67% between FMEA and SAFER approaches for the 15 riskiest SIG-specific failure modes. The main differences between the two approaches were the distribution of the values and the failure modes (No.52, 54, 154) that have high SAFER scores do not necessarily have high FMEA RPN scores. In our results, there were additional risks identified by both methods with little correspondence. In the SAFER, when the risk score is determined, the basis of the established decision tree or the failure mode should be more investigated. Conclusion: The FMEA method takes into account the probability that an error passes without being detected. SAFER is inductive because it requires the identification of the consequences from causes, and semi-quantitative since it allow the prioritization of risks and mitigation measures, and thus is perfectly applicable to clinical parts of radiotherapy.

  9. Better antiretroviral therapy outcomes at primary healthcare facilities: an evaluation of three tiers of ART services in four South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Grimwood, Ashraf; Bock, Peter

    2010-09-21

    There are conflicting reports of antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectiveness comparisons between primary healthcare (PHC) facilities and hospitals in low-income settings. This comparison has not been evaluated on a broad scale in South Africa. A retrospective cohort study was conducted including ART-naïve adults from 59 facilities in four provinces in South Africa, enrolled between 2004 and 2007. Kaplan-Meier estimates, competing-risks Cox regression, generalised estimating equation population-averaged models and logistic regression were used to compare death, loss to follow-up (LTFU) and virological suppression (VS) between PHC, district and regional hospitals. 29 203 adults from 47 PHC facilities, nine district hospitals and three regional hospitals were included. Patients at PHC facilities had more advanced WHO stage disease when starting ART. Retention in care was 80.1% (95% CI: 79.3%-80.8%), 71.5% (95% CI: 69.1%-73.8%) and 68.7% (95% CI: 67.0%-69.7%) at PHC, district and regional hospitals respectively, after 24 months of treatment (PART. District and regional hospital patients had independently reduced probabilities of VS, aOR 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59-0.97) and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.56-0.75) respectively compared to PHC facilities over 24 months of treatment. ART outcomes were superior at PHC facilities, despite PHC patients having more advanced clinical stage disease when starting ART, suggesting that ART can be adequately provided at this level and supporting the South African government's call for rapid up-scaling of ART at the primary level of care. Further prospective research is required to determine the degree to which outcome differences are attributable to either facility level characteristics or patient co-morbidity at hospital level.

  10. Evaluation of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals : Effects on mental health consumer outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilrycx, G.K.M.L.; Croon, M.A.; van den Broek, A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effects of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals on mental health consumer outcomes. Methods: The Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) and the Recovery-Promoting Relationship Scale (RPRS) were administered to a sample of 142

  11. Comparative evaluation of soft tissue characteristics around implant and tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paknejad M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Soft tissue condition around dental implant is an essential part for long term healthy and esthetic outcome. The aim of this study was to compare soft tissue dimensions between implant supported single  tooth replacement and the contra-lateral natural tooth. "nMaterials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed on dentate patients treated with anterior single  tooth implant at least 1 year ago. Of twenty eight, fourteen patients had been treated with one stasge method and others with two stage method. Biologic width (BW, papilla index (PI, and mucosal thickness (MT were evaluated around implants and contra-lateral teeth clinically and compared with each other. The Wilcoxon test, Mann-Whitney test, and Student pair t-test were used to assess the differences between one stasge and two stage implants, and implant and tooth groups. "nResults: The mean BW around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 1.42±0.48 mm, 1.67±0.48 mm, and 1.47±0.60 mm, respectively. The mean PI adjacent to one stasge implants, Two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 2.50±0.52, 2.53±0.55, and 2.72±0.47, correspondingly. The mean MT around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth were 3.10±0.48, 3.09±0.75, and 2.57±0.88, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference among one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth with regard to measured variables. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this investigation, in standard condition, it seems that there is no noticeable difference in indicators of; biologic width, papilla index, and mucosal thickness around one stasge implants, two stage implants, and contra-lateral teeth.

  12. Comparative Ergonomic Evaluation of Spacesuit and Space Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott; Cowley, Matthew; Benson, Elizabeth; Harvill, Lauren; Blackledge, Christopher; Perez, Esau; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of the latest human spaceflight objectives, a series of prototype architectures for a new launch and reentry spacesuit that would be suited to the new mission goals. Four prototype suits were evaluated to compare their performance and enable the selection of the preferred suit components and designs. A consolidated approach to testing was taken: concurrently collecting suit mobility data, seat-suit-vehicle interface clearances, and qualitative assessments of suit performance within the volume of a Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle mockup. It was necessary to maintain high fidelity in a mockup and use advanced motion-capture technologies in order to achieve the objectives of the study. These seemingly mutually exclusive goals were accommodated with the construction of an optically transparent and fully adjustable frame mockup. The construction of the mockup was such that it could be dimensionally validated rapidly with the motioncapture system. This paper describes the method used to create a space vehicle mockup compatible with use of an optical motion-capture system, the consolidated approach for evaluating spacesuits in action, and a way to use the complex data set resulting from a limited number of test subjects to generate hardware requirements for an entire population. Kinematics, hardware clearance, anthropometry (suited and unsuited), and subjective feedback data were recorded on 15 unsuited and 5 suited subjects. Unsuited subjects were selected chiefly based on their anthropometry in an attempt to find subjects who fell within predefined criteria for medium male, large male, and small female subjects. The suited subjects were selected as a subset of the unsuited medium male subjects and were tested in both unpressurized and pressurized conditions. The prototype spacesuits were each fabricated in a single size to accommodate an approximately average-sized male, so select findings from the suit testing were systematically extrapolated to the extremes

  13. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of different obturation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Irena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Root canal filling materials are intended to prevent microleakage and passing of microorganisms and their toxins along the root canal space and into the periradicular tissues. Objective Objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare apical leakage of root canals obturated using a modified warm vertical condensation technique and different materials. Methods Sixty-five extracted single-root teeth were prepared according to the crown-down/ step-back technique. Each canal was rinsed with 3% NaOCl during and after the preparation. The teeth were divided into 3 groups. Every group was obturated by the same technique, but with different materials: RealSeal system (SybronEndo, gutta-percha with AH Plus (Dentsply Maillefer and gutta-percha with Acroseal sealer (Septodont. The remaining 20 teeth were in the control group. The teeth were immersed in 1% methylene blue for 72 hours. After that period, the roots were split longitudinally, and dye penetration was measured using a stereomicroscope. Results Dye penetration occurred in all groups. The least dye penetration occurred in the RealSeal group (0.33}0.29 mm, while the highest dye penetration occurred in the Acroseal group (1.11}0.52 mm. According to the Student's t-test, Acroseal showed significantly more leakage (p<0.001 than RealSeal and AH Plus materials. The microleakage of RealSeal system was not significantly different (p>0.05 from that of AH Plus sealer with gutta-percha. Conclusion The results suggested that new material Resilon (RealSeal and conventional combination AH Plus with gutta-percha had the least apical dye penetration and provided the best sealing.

  14. Comparative evaluation of Asian and white ocular topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson-Curran, Sheila; Brennan, Noel A; Igarashi, Yoshi; Young, Graeme

    2014-12-01

    To provide comparative ocular topography data from a substantial population of East Asian and white eyes. This study evaluated 675 subjects from three ethnic groups: white (n = 255), Chinese (n = 299), and Japanese (n = 121) at investigational sites in four locations: Wenzhou, China; Melbourne, Australia; Tokyo, Japan; and Jacksonville, USA. Subjects underwent the same measurements of ocular topography using identical equipment and protocols. A videokeratoscope (Medmont E300) was used to measure apical corneal radius, simulated K-reading (K), corneal shape factor (CSF), and corneal sagittal height at 10 mm in the two principal meridians. Digital photography was also used to measure ocular parameters including horizontal visible iris diameter (HVID), vertical palpebral aperture (PA), the intercanthal angle (ICA), and upper and lower lid angles. Mean HVID measurements were significantly smaller for the Chinese and Japanese groups than whites: 11.26, 11.10, and 11.75 mm, respectively. Horizontal K was significantly steeper for the white than the Chinese and Japanese groups: 7.79, 7.86, and 7.92 mm, respectively. The Chinese eyes showed significantly higher mean vertical CSF (i.e., more prolate) than the other two groups. The Chinese group had significantly narrower PA and steeper ICA than the other two groups: the mean PA and ICA values were 9.71, 10.31, and 10.58 mm and 7.56, 6.32, and 6.27 degrees, for the Chinese, Japanese, and white groups, respectively. One-third of the Chinese (32%) and 31% of the Japanese subjects showed no apparent supratarsal fold ("single eyelid"). There were also significant differences between groups for corneal sagittal height at 10 mm and upper and lower lid angles, but no significant differences for vertical K and horizontal CSF. This study has highlighted some differences in ocular topography between Chinese, Japanese, and white ethnic groups that may be relevant to soft contact lens fit.

  15. [Management of malaria in Benin: evaluation of the practices of healthcare professionals following the introduction of artemisinin derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogouyemi-Hounto, A; Kinde-Gazard, D; Nahum, A; Abdillahi, A; Massougbodji, A

    2009-12-01

    In 2004 the policy for malaria management in Benin changed when the National Malaria Coordination Program (NMCP) introduced artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Up to that time, chloroquine had been used for first-line therapy against uncomplicated malaria and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine had been used in case of failure. Artemisinin derivatives have been used for monotherapy in Benin since 2002. The purpose of this transverse study carried out among public and private centers in Cotonou from March 16 to May 17, 2005 was to determine the impact of the switch to ACT on the practices of healthcare professionals. Medical centers were randomly selected from each stratum after identification and stratification of all facilities in the healthcare pyramid. A survey questionnaire was sent to healthcare workers. A total of 690 health workers responded to the questionnaire. Most responders (95.5%) were familiar with artemisinin but a lower percentage (89.6%) prescribed them. Responders were less knowledgable about ACT drugs and Coartem was the best known combination in the minds of prescribers. Biological diagnosis was available for 50% of patients. Artemisinine (derivates) were mainly prescribed as a second choice treatment and as monotherapy whether for severe or uncomplicated malaria. They were prescribed to pregnant women in 34.6% of the cases. Dosage was incorrect in 26.1% of cases in adults and 20.9% of cases in children. These findings indicate that more effort is needed to inform healthcare workers. This is especially urgent since the country is now considering revising its malaria management policy to make ACT available at all levels of the healthcare system. An effective information campaign must be set up to ensure that health workers and drug retailers throughout the country are duly informed of the new malaria treatment policy.

  16. Race to the Top: evaluation of a novel performance-based financing initiative to promote healthcare delivery in rural Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrard Nahimana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performance-based financing (PBF has demonstrated a range of successes and failures in improving health outcomes across low- and middle-income countries. Evidence indicates that the success of PBF depends, in large part, on the model selected, in relation to a variety of contextual factors. Objective: Partners In Health∣Inshuti Mu Buzima aimed to evaluate health outcomes associated with a novel capacity-building model of PBF at health centers throughout Kirehe district, Rwanda. Design: Thirteen health centers in Kirehe district, which provide healthcare to a population of over 300,000 people, agreed to participate in a PBF initiative scheme that integrated data feedback, quality improvement coaching, peer-to-peer learning, and district-level priority setting. Health centers’ progress toward collectively agreed upon site-specific health targets was assessed every 6 months for 18 months. Incentives were awarded only when health centers met goals on all three priorities health centers had collectively agreed upon: 90% coverage of community-based health insurance, 70% contraceptive prevalence rate, and zero acute severe malnutrition cases. Improvement across all four time points and facilities was measured using mixed-effects linear regression. Findings: At 6-month follow-up, 4 of 13 health centers had met 1 target. At 12-month follow-up, 7 centers had met 1 target, and by 18-month follow-up, 6 centers had met 2 targets and 2 centers had met all 3. Average health center performance had improved significantly across the district for all three targets: mean insurance coverage increased from 68% at baseline to 93% (p<0.001; mean number of acute malnutrition cases in the previous 6 months declined from 24 to 5 per facility (p<0.001; and contraceptive prevalence increased from 42 to 59% (p<0.001. A number of innovative improvement initiatives were identified. Conclusion: The combining of PBF, district engagement/support, and peer

  17. Comparative analysis of existing food safety culture evaluation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jespersen, Lone; Griffiths, Mansel; Wallace, Carol Anne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the research was firstly, to analyze existing culture evaluation systems for commonalities and differences in research quality, applied validation strategies, and content. Secondly, to suggest a simple structure of food safety cultural dimensions to help unify the culture evaluation field. To achieve these goals, a comparison of eight culture evaluation models applied to varing degrees in the food industry was conducted. The systems were found to vary significantly in applied v...

  18. Protocole of a controlled before-after evaluation of a national health information technology-based program to improve healthcare coordination and access to information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour-Glénisson, Florence; Duhamel, Sylvie; Fourneyron, Emmanuelle; Huiart, Laetitia; Joseph, Jean Philippe; Langlois, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Stephane; Ramel, Viviane; Renaud, Thomas; Roberts, Tamara; Sibé, Matthieu; Thiessard, Frantz; Wittwer, Jerome; Salmi, Louis Rachid

    2017-04-21

    Improvement of coordination of all health and social care actors in the patient pathways is an important issue in many countries. Health Information (HI) technology has been considered as a potentially effective answer to this issue. The French Health Ministry first funded the development of five TSN ("Territoire de Soins Numérique"/Digital health territories) projects, aiming at improving healthcare coordination and access to information for healthcare providers, patients and the population, and at improving healthcare professionals work organization. The French Health Ministry then launched a call for grant to fund one research project consisting in evaluating the TSN projects implementation and impact and in developing a model for HI technology evaluation. EvaTSN is mainly based on a controlled before-after study design. Data collection covers three periods: before TSN program implementation, during early TSN program implementation and at late TSN program implementation, in the five TSN projects' territories and in five comparison territories. Three populations will be considered: "TSN-targeted people" (healthcare system users and people having characteristics targeted by the TSN projects), "TSN patient users" (people included in TSN experimentations or using particular services) and "TSN professional users" (healthcare professionals involved in TSN projects). Several samples will be made in each population depending on the objective, axis and stage of the study. Four types of data sources are considered: 1) extractions from the French National Heath Insurance Database (SNIIRAM) and the French Autonomy Personalized Allowance database, 2) Ad hoc surveys collecting information on knowledge of TSN projects, TSN program use, ease of use, satisfaction and understanding, TSN pathway experience and appropriateness of hospital admissions, 3) qualitative analyses using semi-directive interviews and focus groups and document analyses and 4) extractions of TSN

  19. Comparative evaluation of maintenance performance using subsurvival functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, J.L.; Cooke, R.; Nyman, R.

    1997-01-01

    Subsurvival functions are applied to operational data for the control rod drive systems of Nordic nuclear reactors to evaluate maintenance performance. Competing failure modes are preventive and corrective maintenance. Maintenance indicators are defined and evaluated for 8 plants. (C) 1997 Elsevier...

  20. Evaluating Effectiveness of evidence Based Decision-making Educational Course on Healthcare Domain Managers based Krick-Patrick Model

    OpenAIRE

    Behrouz soltany; Abol Hassan afkar; Seyedeh Hoda Mousavi; Tahereh Khazaei; Somaieh Roohani_Majd; Mohsen Nouri; Mohsen Mohammadi; Nasim Hatefi Moadab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:Now a day, Increasing growth of information and increase in complexity of jobs has lead to an increasing importance of educating employees. Toffler believes that education is the most important action and way to face great changes in future life and accepting changes.present study aims to study the effect of evidence based decision making workshop on healthcare managers by means of Krick-Patrick model. Methods and Material:present study was executed among 60 of health...

  1. Parent-taught driver education in Texas : a comparative evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    An evaluation of the Parent-Taught Driver Education (PTDE) program in Texas was conducted using three different research techniques: (1) focus groups with driver education instructors, teen drivers, and their parents; (2) statewide mail survey of you...

  2. Association between antidepressant drug use during pregnancy and child healthcare utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ververs, T. F.; van Wensen, K.; Freund, M. W.; van der Heide, M.; Visser, G. H. A.; Schobben, A. F. A. M.; de Jong-van den Berg, L. T. W.; Egberts, A. C. G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate healthcare utilisation by children who were exposed to antidepressant drug use during pregnancy and those whose mothers stopped using antidepressants before pregnancy compared with a control group. Design Cohort study. Setting Health insurance records in the Netherlands.

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Online Machine Translation Systems with Legal Texts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chunyu Kit; Tak Ming Wong

    2008-01-01

    ... answer. In this article, we will examine a number of the most commonly used online MT services and compare their translation performance on legal texts, a text genus of particular importance to law...

  4. Comparative evaluation of the susceptibility pattern of commonly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The agar disc diffusion method was used to evaluate the susceptibility pattern of commonly used standard antibiotics with the aim of identifying the most effective to address the problem of resistance. A total of two hundred and twenty (220) urine samples collected from 44 Army Reference Hospital and Yusuf Dantsoho ...

  5. Comparative evaluation of ankaferd blood stopper, ferric sulfate, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to the pulpotomy agents (ABS, FC, FS). Following treatment, for 24 months, teeth were clinically and radiographically evaluated once every 3 and 6 months respectively. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 15 software was used in data analysis. Kaplan– Meier ...

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Cheese samples treated with Honey and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of honey and thyme solutions in extending the shelf life and enhancing the nutritional and sensory qualities of Wara, the West African soft cheese. The control treatment (A) was cheese kept in the whey, while Treatments B and C were cheese samples kept in Thyme and Honey ...

  7. In vitro comparative evaluation of co-trimoxazole tablet products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial resistance to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole is a rapidly increasing problem and is exacerbated by use of substandard products. In this work, it is aimed to evaluate the physical properties and the dissolution profiles of trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole tablets which were obtained from drug retail outlets in Addis ...

  8. A comparative performance evaluation of micro-Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An indigenously designed and developed micro-Raman spectrograph, con- sisting of a diode-pumped solid-state green laser for the excitation of Raman scattering, a Raman imaging microscope, CCD as a detector and a notch filter, has been extensively studied to evaluate its performance. A dielectric edge filter ...

  9. Comparative physico-chemical evaluation of soymilk and soya cake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soymilk and soyacake were produced by three methods: illinois, (A), cornel (B), and traditional oriental (C). Physiochemical, microbiological, and sensory properties were evaluated. Method C had the highest soymilk yield of 57.76% followed by B with 55.17% and A 52.85%. The protein contents of soymilk were 2.8, 3.5, ...

  10. A Comparative Evaluation of the Flow and Compaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick Erah

    paper, in comparison with Avicel PH 101, using the Kawakita and Heckel models were evaluated. Result: The results indicate that the flow properties of these materials could not be predicted accurately using the Kawakita model. A comparison of compression behaviour and compactibility of the two powders showed Avicel ...

  11. Comparative morphophysiological evaluation of the testis of adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: Cuscuta australis (C. australis) seed and stem are historically used by the local population as dietary supplement for the management of infertility. This study, therefore, evaluated the effect of orally administered aqueous extracts of C. australis seed and stem, 300mg/kg body weight/day for seven days, on the ...

  12. A comparative evaluation of pentazocine and dipyrone on diazepam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work reports on the evaluation of pentazocine and dipyrone analgesics on diazepam-induced sleep in mice. Diazepam (10 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (ip) was used to determine the onset and duration of sleep in mice and the mean of both set values were calculated and recorded. Pentazocine 20, 30 and 50 ...

  13. Comparative physicochemical and microbial evaluation of six herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The herbal bitters were subjected to physicochemical and phytochemical evaluation; organoleptic test, phytochemical screening, thin layer chromatography (TLC), heavy metal content, total phenolic acid and antioxidant activities as well as microbiological assessment to determine microbial load and ...

  14. comparative performance evaluation of an existing and modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    It is necessary to evaluate mechanical systems in order to obtain the optimal performance parameters for the systems. In the last few decades, considerable effort has been expended by many ... performance parameters for the acha dehullers. Plate 3: Open cylinder type. A. Shaft; B. Rod (5.6mm); C. Spiral conveyor ...

  15. A Comparative Evaluation of the Flow and Compaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Alpha-cellulose obtained as pulp from fibrous plant materials has found use in the pharmaceutical industry as a disintegrant and direct compression diluent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of α-cellulose obtained from waste paper as a direct compression excipient. Method: The flow and ...

  16. Conization and healthcare use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria E; Vázquez-Prada Baillet, Miguel; Jensen, Pernille T

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether negative psychological consequences of conization reported in questionnaire studies translated into increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve such symptoms. This was a population-based register study comparing women undergoing conization......, healthcare use increased significantly from the 'before' to the 'after' period. For contacts with GPs and hospitals, the increase was significantly larger for the conization group than for the control group, but this could be attributed to the standard postconization follow-up process. In the 'before' period......, women who later had a conization used fewer drugs than the control-group women, but their drug use increased similarly over time. The conization event did not result in an increased use of the healthcare services that could relieve potential negative side effects. However, women who underwent...

  17. [Requirements for the provision of healthcare to socially disadvantaged population groups: evaluation of 10 years of medical care provided to the homeless in Hanover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidl, Jana; Wenzlaff, Paul; Sens, Brigitte; Goesmann, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the German Federal Government introduced a general health insurance obligation, but there are still vulnerable groups such as poor and homeless people without access to medical care. Especially for social fringe groups, a visit to the doctor involves many obstacles. Ten years ago the project "Outreach medical care for homeless people and people threatened by homelessness in Hanover" was established in order to reduce those gaps in healthcare provision. A continuously conducted evaluation of the project shows that low-threshold consulting hours are accepted and the transition to medical specialists is becoming increasingly easy. So the evaluation plays an important part in the development of the project. Since the healthcare reform in 2004, however, the number of cases has increased by 30 % while the actual homeless target group has remained the same. In order to guarantee access to the healthcare system for patients who cannot afford additional payments, the abolition of the quarterly practice fee and other additional payments for people on a low income is an important step. The growing requirements, resulting from a changing clientele and changes in the general conditions, are raising questions as to the nature of such projects and its future funding. In the long run it isn't the aim of this non-profit project to take on central tasks of a mutually supportive community. Therefore the data and results collected on the evaluation not only serve to improve the projects management, but also provide important information to other initiatives outside Hanover whether and how to support the respective groups of patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Healthcare seeking behaviour of students living on their own compared to those living in the parental home: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, Samuel N.; Messoussi, Ilyes; Schuijt, Michiel T. U.; de Goeij, Moniek C. M.; Kunst, Anton E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate differences in healthcare seeking behaviour and barriers between students living in the parental home and those living on their own. Participants Five hundred and six second year students of the University of Amsterdam (UvA), interviewed in March and April

  19. Plants used during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum healthcare in Lao PDR: A comparative study of the Brou, Saek and Kry ethnic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Boer Hugo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many Southeast Asian cultures the activities and diet during the postpartum period are culturally dictated and a period of confinement is observed. Plants play an important role in recovery during the postpartum period in diet, traditional medicine, steam bath and mother roasting (where mother and child placed on a bed above a brazier with charcoal embers on which aromatic plants are laid. This research focuses on the use of plants during pregnancy, parturition, postpartum recovery and infant healthcare among three ethnic groups, the Brou, Saek and Kry. It aims to identify culturally important traditions that may facilitate implementation of culturally appropriate healthcare. Methods Data were collected in 10 different villages in Khammouane province, Lao PDR, through group and individual interviews with women by female interviewers. Results A total of 55 different plant species are used in women's healthcare, of which over 90% are used in postpartum recovery. Consensus Analysis rejects the hypothesis that the three ethnic groups belong to a single culture for postpartum plant use, and multidimensional scaling reveals non-overlapping clusters per ethnic group. Conclusion Medicinal plant use is common among the Brou, Saek and Kry to facilitate childbirth, alleviate menstruation problems, assist recovery after miscarriage, mitigate postpartum haemorrhage, aid postpartum recovery, and for use in infant care. The wealth of novel insights into plant use and preparation will help to understand culturally important practices such as confinement, dietary restrictions, mother roasting and herbal steam baths and their incorporation into modern healthcare.

  20. Anxiety associations with cardiac symptoms, angiographic disease severity, and healthcare utilization: the NHLBI-sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Kenkre, Tanya S; Bittner, Vera; Krantz, David S; Thompson, Diane V; Linke, Sarah E; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Cornell, Carol E; Vaccarino, Viola; Pepine, Carl J; Johnson, B Delia; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2013-10-03

    Anxiety is common among patients presenting with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). In a sample of women with signs and symptoms of ischemia, we examined three anxiety markers as predictors of CAD endpoints including: 1) cardiac symptom indicators; 2) angiographic CAD severity; and 3) healthcare utilization (cardiac hospitalizations and 5-year cardiovascular [CVD] healthcare costs). Participants completed a baseline protocol including coronary angiogram, cardiac symptoms, psychosocial measures and a median 5.9-year follow-up to track hospitalizations. We calculated CVD costs based on cardiac hospitalizations, treatment visits, and CVD medications. Anxiety measures included anxiolytic medication use, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores, and anxiety disorder treatment history. The sample numbered 514 women with anxiety measure data and covariates (mean age=57.5 [11.1]). One in five (20.4%) women reported using anxiolytic agents. Anxiety correlated with cardiac symptom indicators (anxiolytic use with nighttime angina and nitroglycerine use; STAI scores and anxiety disorder treatment history with nighttime angina, shortness of breath, and angina frequency). Anxiety disorder treatment history (but not STAI scores or anxiolytics) predicted less severe CAD. Anxiolytic use (but not STAI scores or anxiety disorder treatment history) predicted hospitalizations for chest pain and coronary catheterization (HRs=2.0, 95% CIs=1.1-4.7). Anxiety measures predicted higher 5-year CVD costs (+9.0-42.7%) irrespective of CAD severity. Among women with signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia, anxiety measures predict cardiac endpoints ranging from cardiac symptom severity to healthcare utilization. Based on these findings, anxiety may warrant greater consideration among women with suspected CAD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Anxiety Associations with Cardiac Symptoms, Angiographic Disease Severity, & Healthcare Utilization: The NHLBI-Sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Kenkre, Tanya S.; Bittner, Vera; Krantz, David S.; Thompson, Diane V.; Linke, Sarah E.; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Cornell, Carol E.; Vaccarino, Viola; Pepine, Carl J.; Johnson, B. Delia; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety is common among patients presenting with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). In a sample of women with signs and symptoms of ischemia, we examined three anxiety markers as predictors of CAD endpoints including: 1) cardiac symptom indicators; 2) angiographic CAD severity; and 3) healthcare utilization (cardiac hospitalizations & 5-year cardiovascular [CVD] healthcare costs). Methods Participants completed a baseline protocol including coronary angiogram, cardiac symptoms, psychosocial measures and a median 5.9-year follow-up to track hospitalizations. We calculated CVD costs based on cardiac hospitalizations, treatment visits, and CVD medications. Anxiety measures included anxiolytic medication use, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores, and anxiety disorder treatment history. Results The sample numbered 514 women with anxiety measure data and covariates (mean age=57.5[11.1]). One in five (20.4%) women reported using anxiolytic agents. Anxiety correlated with cardiac symptom indicators (anxiolytic use with nighttime angina & nitroglycerine use; STAI scores & anxiety disorder treatment history with nighttime angina, shortness of breath, & angina frequency). Anxiety disorder treatment history (but not STAI scores or anxiolytics) predicted less severe CAD. Anxiolytic use (but not STAI scores or anxiety disorder treatment history) predicted hospitalizations for chest pain and coronary catheterization (HR’s=2.0, 95% CI’s=1.1–4.7). Anxiety measures predicted higher 5-year CVD costs (+9.0–42.7%) irrespective of CAD severity. Conclusions Among women with signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia, anxiety measures predict cardiac endpoints ranging from cardiac symptom severity to healthcare utilization. Based on these findings, anxiety may warrant greater consideration among women with suspected CAD. PMID:23410495

  2. Comparative Analysis of Bracket Slot Dimensions Evaluating Different Manufacturing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics ; 2012: Volume 73: 454-466. 23. Roth RH. Five Year Clinical Evaluation of the Andrews Straight-Wire Appliance ... appliance by Edward Angle in 1928 (21, 23, 24, 26). The Edgewise appliance was greatly accepted by the orthodontic community with the bracket itself...horizontally the Edgewise appliance allowed for both the crown and root movement to be controlled with a greater degree of precision than had been able to

  3. Comparative Evaluation Of Four Formulated Weaning Foods And A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X 103 cfu/g, sample C was from no growth to 2.8 x 103 cfu/g, sample D was from no growth to 2.5 x 103, while the commercial product(E) from no growth to 2.0 x 103 cfu/g. Sensory evaluation showed that the product were significantly different (P>0.05) in taste, flavour, and texture. Sample D was judged best in all sensory ...

  4. The Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS): A comparative evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith, Mark S.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This theses is an evaluation of the Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS) to determine whether it is likely to solve a host of long-standing problems with use of automatic test equipment (ATE) for support of Naval aircraft. CASS is a new ATE program nearing the end of full scale development which will replace all current ATE systems and many smaller manual testers to form a single, general purpose test system for all intermediate ...

  5. Comparative evaluation of the fracture resistances of endodontically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-30

    Mar 30, 2014 ... Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistances of teeth filled using different root canal sealers and rials. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty single rooted mandibular human incisor teeth with single canals were divided into 5 experimental groups of 20 teeth with 2 control ...

  6. Comparative evaluation of the fracture resistances of endodontically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistances of teeth filled using different root canal sealers band rials. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty single rooted mandibular human incisor teeth with single canals were divided into 5 experimental groups of 20 teeth with 2 control groups of 10 teeth ...

  7. Comparative Evaluation of the Cognitive Theories of Piaget and Ausubel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Loretta A.

    Jean Piaget's theory of cognitive development and David Ausubel's assimilation theory of learning are explicated and selected research involving both theories is reviewed in this paper. The two theories are compared on selected dimensions to demonstrate that they are compatible and that, in conjunction with one another, they form a strong…

  8. comparative evaluation of the flexural strength of concrete and colcrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Colcrete is a construction material resulting from grouting of prep laced coarse aggregates with colgrout. Colcrete is more economical to use than concrete. If the performance of colcrete in service is favourably comparable to that of concrete, some construction costs could be saved in the use of colcrete in place ...

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Gari Samples Produced from Fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gari was produced from fresh cassava roots and dried cassava chips from four cassava cultivars; (TMS 98/2101, TMS 97/4779, TMS 91/02324 and NR87184). The gari samples were analyzed for chemical properties and sensory qualities. Results showed that gari obtained from the chips compared favourably with gari ...

  10. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of Pseudomonas putida in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to compare the efficacy of Рseudomonas putida, contained in the biopreparation «Pseudomin» in the bioremediation of diesel fuel contaminated derno-podzoluivisolic soil of two different horizons. By analyzing the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) content using IR-spectrometry method under ...

  11. evaluation of the efficacy of separate oral supplements compared

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daniel Owu

    had no treatment and served as control, block C rats were served daily dose of 15mg vitamin E only while block D rats were served daily ... the separate oral supplements of vitamins C and E as compared with the combined supplements. Key words: .... lead), radiation, dioxin, alcohol and infectious disease will adversely ...

  12. Comparative evaluation of the academic performance of single sex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study compared the performance levels of students of single-sex schools against coeducational schools at the end of the third year of senior secondary education in Ibadan, South West Nigeria. Three hypotheses were tested using primary data gathered from Multilevel analysis which was carried out on a sample of ...

  13. Comparative evaluation of photovoltaic MPP trackers: A simulated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnam Jyoti Saharia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes a comparative assessment of three popular maximum power point tracking (MPPT algorithms used in photovoltaic power generation. A 120 Wp PV module is taken as reference for the study that is connected to a suitable resistive load by a boost converter. Two profiles of variation of solar insolation at fixed temperature and varying temperature at fixed solar insolation are taken to test the tracking efficiency of three MPPT algorithms based on the perturb and observe (P&O, Fuzzy logic, and Neural Network techniques. MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation software is used for assessment, and the results indicate that the fuzzy logic-based tracker presents better tracking effectiveness to variations in both solar insolation and temperature profiles when compared to P&O technique and Neural Network-based technique.

  14. OCT evaluation of directional atherectomy compared to balloon angioplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos [Citizens Memorial Hospital Heart and Vascular Institute, Bolivar, MO (United States); Lendel, Vasili [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Cilingiroglu, Mehmet, E-mail: mcilingiroglu@yahoo.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Koc University, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    Directional atherectomy (DA) is one of the most commonly used modalities for the treatment of obstructive femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease (PAD), especially in patients with large and calcified atherosclerotic plaques. The effect of directional atherectomy to the vascular wall compared to balloon angioplasty by optical coherence tomography (OCT) has not been previously described. We present the first case of OCT after directional atherectomy with SilverHawk followed by angiosculpt balloon angioplasty. - Highlights: • Directional atherectomy avoids the vascular mechanical damage caused by angioplasty balloons and the exposure of stent struts or the potential of stent fracture with stents. • OCT can accurately assess the effect of endovacular interventions to the vessel wall. • Although angiographic results after directional atherectomy are acceptable, OCT use demonstrated suboptimal improvement of the MLA requiring additional balloon angioplasty. • Longer studies are needed to define whether the improved OCT results with angioplasty compared to DA may offer better clinical outcomes.

  15. A comparative evaluation of nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dheer; Chopra, Anju; Patel, Mitra Bhanu; Sarpal, Amarjit Singh [Indian Oil Corporation Limited, Faridabad (India). Research and Development Centre

    2011-07-15

    Although the concentration of nitrogen compounds in crude oil is relatively low, they can become more concentrated in petroleum distillates and poison the catalysts used in refining processes. They cause undesirable deposits, color formation and odor in products; they also contribute to air pollution and some are highly carcinogenic. The poisoned catalyst becomes deactivated for hydrodesulfurization and unable to remove sulfur from middle distillates. In order to understand the effect on catalytic processes, it is desirable to identify the nitrogen compounds in various petroleum distillates. This paper compares the nitrogen species profiles in different petroleum distillates using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector. In addition, four different petroleum distillate samples from different refineries were analyzed to find the variation in their nitrogen profiles. The nitrogen compounds in petroleum distillate samples were identified as anilines, quinolines, indoles, and carbazoles and their alkyl derivatives. Quantitation was carried out against known reference standards. The quantitative data were compared to the total nitrogen content determined by elemental analysis. (orig.)

  16. Comparative evaluation of inhibitory activity of Epiphgram from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result showed that epiphgram from both albino and normal skinned snails had higher microbial activity for both Eschericia coli and Salmonella species as shown by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC: 0.050 and 0.098 vs 0.098 and 0.049) compared to streptomycin (MIC: 78 and 1.95 vs 15.63 and 1.95) which is the ...

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Community Detection Algorithms: A Topological Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Orman, Günce,; Labatut, Vincent; Cherifi, Hocine

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Community detection is one of the most active fields in complex networks analysis, due to its potential value in practical applications. Many works inspired by different paradigms are devoted to the development of algorithmic solutions allowing to reveal the network structure in such cohesive subgroups. Comparative studies reported in the literature usually rely on a performance measure considering the community structure as a partition (Rand Index, Normalized Mutual i...

  18. 78 FR 59729 - Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... off-normal conditions, environmental justice, geology and minerals, land use, socioeconomics, and... COMMISSION Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive... the Final Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive...

  19. EmERGE project: Evaluating mHealth technology in HIV to improve Empowerment and healthcare utilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chausa, P.; Gomez, A.J.; Apers, L.; Henwood, F.; Mandalia, S.; Wallitt, E.; Leon, A.; Begovac, J.; Borges, M.; Brown, A.; Block, K.; Glaysher, B.; Whetham, J.

    2016-07-01

    The EmERGE project (http://www.emergeproject.eu/) will develop a mHealth platform to enable self-management of HIV in patients with stable disease. The platform will build upon and integrate the existing mHealth solutions operated by pioneering healthcare providers in the UK and Spain and apply a rigorous co-design approach to ensure patient and clinician input to the solution. The platform will provide users with web based (clinicians) and mobile device applications (patients) which interface securely with relevant medical data and facilitate remote access to key healthcare providers. EATG, the leading European HIV patient organisation, will provide a direct and deep interaction with representative patients and clinicians from 5 EU countries. The platform and interfaces will be validated in a large study of 3900 patients using a tailored Health Technology Assessment process: the Model for Assessment of Telemedicine applications, specifically developed for the assessment of mHealth solutions including translatability as a key factor. (Author)

  20. Comparative evaluation of flow for pharmaceutical powders and granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rakhi B; Tawakkul, Mobin A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to carry out a systematic evaluation of flow of pharmaceutical powders and granules using compendial and non-compendial methods. Angle of repose, bulk density, tapped density, Carr's compressibility index, and Hausner ratios were evaluated. Additionally, flow was characterized using a powder rheometer in which a sensitive force transducer monitors the forces generated as a result of the sample displacement. The critical attributes such as cohesivity index, caking strength, and flow stability were determined for samples. The samples consisted of different grades of magnesium stearate powder including bovine, vegetable, and food grade, physical mixture powder blend consisting of a model formulation, granules prepared by various methods including slugging, high shear granulator, and fluid bed dryer. Lubricant efficiency was also determined for granules lubricated with various concentrations of magnesium stearate. It was observed that the compendial methods were often non-discriminating for minor variations in powder flow. The additional characterization such as cohesivity, and caking strength were helpful in understanding the flow characteristics of pharmaceutical systems. The flow stability test determined that the powders were not affected by the test conditions on the rheometer. The non-compendial tests were discriminating to even minor variations in powder flow.

  1. Evidence-Based and Value-Based Decision Making About Healthcare Design: An Economic Evaluation of the Safety and Quality Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Rana; Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Xue, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a vision and framework that can facilitate the implementation of evidence-based design (EBD), scientific knowledge base into the process of the design, construction, and operation of healthcare facilities and clarify the related safety and quality outcomes for the stakeholders. The proposed framework pairs EBD with value-driven decision making and aims to improve communication among stakeholders by providing a common analytical language. Recent EBD research indicates that the design and operation of healthcare facilities contribute to an organization's operational success by improving safety, quality, and efficiency. However, because little information is available about the financial returns of evidence-based investments, such investments are readily eliminated during the capital-investment decision-making process. To model the proposed framework, we used engineering economy tools to evaluate the return on investments in six successful cases, identified by a literature review, in which facility design and operation interventions resulted in reductions in hospital-acquired infections, patient falls, staff injuries, and patient anxiety. In the evidence-based cases, calculated net present values, internal rates of return, and payback periods indicated that the long-term benefits of interventions substantially outweighed the intervention costs. This article explained a framework to develop a research-based and value-based communication language on specific interventions along the planning, design and construction, operation, and evaluation stages. Evidence-based and value-based design frameworks can be applied to communicate the life-cycle costs and savings of EBD interventions to stakeholders, thereby contributing to more informed decision makings and the optimization of healthcare infrastructures. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) 7: supporting staff in evidence-based decision-making, implementation and evaluation in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Allen, Kelly; Waller, Cara; Dyer, Tim; Brooke, Vanessa; Garrubba, Marie; Melder, Angela; Voutier, Catherine; Gust, Anthony; Farjou, Dina

    2017-06-21

    This is the seventh in a series of papers reporting Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) in a local healthcare setting. The SHARE Program was a systematic, integrated, evidence-based program for resource allocation within a large Australian health service. It aimed to facilitate proactive use of evidence from research and local data; evidence-based decision-making for resource allocation including disinvestment; and development, implementation and evaluation of disinvestment projects. From the literature and responses of local stakeholders it was clear that provision of expertise and education, training and support of health service staff would be required to achieve these aims. Four support services were proposed. This paper is a detailed case report of the development, implementation and evaluation of a Data Service, Capacity Building Service and Project Support Service. An Evidence Service is reported separately. Literature reviews, surveys, interviews, consultation and workshops were used to capture and process the relevant information. Existing theoretical frameworks were adapted for evaluation and explication of processes and outcomes. Surveys and interviews identified current practice in use of evidence in decision-making, implementation and evaluation; staff needs for evidence-based practice; nature, type and availability of local health service data; and preferred formats for education and training. The Capacity Building and Project Support Services were successful in achieving short term objectives; but long term outcomes were not evaluated due to reduced funding. The Data Service was not implemented at all. Factors influencing the processes and outcomes are discussed. Health service staff need access to education, training, expertise and support to enable evidence-based decision-making and to implement and evaluate the changes arising from those decisions. Three support services were proposed based on research

  3. Droplet Nucleation: Physically-Based Parameterizations and Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Ghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in simulations of climate and climate change is the influence of aerosols on the optical properties of clouds. The root of this influence is the droplet nucleation process, which involves the spontaneous growth of aerosol into cloud droplets at cloud edges, during the early stages of cloud formation, and in some cases within the interior of mature clouds. Numerical models of droplet nucleation represent much of the complexity of the process, but at a computational cost that limits their application to simulations of hours or days. Physically-based parameterizations of droplet nucleation are designed to quickly estimate the number nucleated as a function of the primary controlling parameters: the aerosol number size distribution, hygroscopicity and cooling rate. Here we compare and contrast the key assumptions used in developing each of the most popular parameterizations and compare their performances under a variety of conditions. We find that the more complex parameterizations perform well under a wider variety of nucleation conditions, but all parameterizations perform well under the most common conditions. We then discuss the various applications of the parameterizations to cloud-resolving, regional and global models to study aerosol effects on clouds at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. We compare estimates of anthropogenic aerosol indirect effects using two different parameterizations applied to the same global climate model, and find that the estimates of indirect effects differ by only 10%. We conclude with a summary of the outstanding challenges remaining for further development and application.

  4. Comparative evaluation of methods to quantify dissolution of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna B.; Kruse, Susanne; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Effects and behaviour of nanomaterials in the environment depends on the materials' specific physical and chemical properties and for certain nanomaterials (e.g., Ag, ZnO and CuO) aqueous solubility is of outmost importance. The solubility of metals salts is normally described as a maximum...... dissolved concentration or by the solubility constant (Ksp). For nanomaterials it is essential to also assess solubility kinetics as nanomaterials will often not dissolve instantaneously upon contact with artificial aqueous media or natural waters. Dissolution kinetics will thereby influence their short...... and long-term environmental fate as well as laboratory test results. This highlights the need to evaluate and improve the reliability of methods applied to assess the solubility kinetics of nanomaterials. Based on existing OECD guidelines and guidance documents on aqueous dissolution of metals and metal...

  5. Comparative evaluation of remote maintenance schemes for fusion DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utoh, Hiroyasu, E-mail: uto.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp; Tobita, Kenji; Someya, Youji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. • The banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme. • The key engineering issues are in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability. - Abstract: Maintenance schemes are one of the critical issues in DEMO design, significantly affecting the configuration of in-vessel components, the size of toroidal field (TF) coil, the arrangement of poloidal field (PF) coils, reactor building, hot cell and so forth. Therefore, the maintenance schemes should satisfy many design requirements and criteria to assure reliable and safe plant operation and to attain reasonable plant availability. The plant availability depends on reliability of remote maintenance scheme, inspection of pipe connection and plasma operation. In this paper, various remote maintenance schemes for DEMO were comparatively assessed based on requirements for DEMO remote maintenance. From the view points of the reliability of inspection on hot cell, TF coil size, stored energy of PF coil and portability of segment, the banana shape segment transport using all vertical maintenance ports would be more probable DEMO reactor maintenance scheme, and it has key engineering issues such as in-vessel transferring mechanism of segment, pipe connection and conducting shell design for plasma vertical stability.

  6. COMPARATIVE STUDY TO EVALUATE LIPID-LOWERING EFFECT OF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niteesh Shanbag

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dyslipidaemia is a widely established risk factor for coronary artery disease. As Asians differ in pattern of various lipid abnormalities than non-Asians, this study was undertaken to compare efficacy of commonly administrated drugs, atorvastatin and fenofibrate. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was carried out in 100 diagnosed cases of hypertriglyceridaemia divided into two groups, A and B. The mean, standard deviation, standard error of mean and t value were calculated following 12 weeks of therapy of atorvastatin 10 mg in group A and micronized fenofibrate in group B. RESULTS Our study showed that fenofibrate is more efficacious in reducing the levels of triglycerides and rising level of HDL cholesterol, while atorvastatin is more efficacious in reducing LDL cholesterol. CONCLUSION Micronized fenofibrate has more efficiency in reducing triglycerides and raising HDL. Atorvastatin is more efficacious in reducing LDL levels.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Tactile Sensation by Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yem, Vibol; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    An electrotactile display is a tactile interface that provides tactile perception by passing electrical current through the surface of the skin. It is actively used instead of mechanical tactile displays for tactile feedback because of several advantages such as its small and thin size, light weight, and high responsiveness. However, the similarities and differences between these sensations is still not clear. This study directly compares the intensity sensation of electrotactile stimulation to that of mechanical stimulation, and investigates the characteristic sensation of anodic and cathodic stimulation. In the experiment, participants underwent a 30 pps electrotactile stimulus every one second to their middle finger, and were asked to match this intensity by adjusting the intensity of a mechanical tactile stimulus to an index finger. The results showed that anodic stimulation mainly produced vibration sensation, whereas cathodic sensation produced both vibration and pressure sensations. Relatively low pressure sensation was also observed for anodic stimulation but it remains low, regardless of the increasing of electrical intensity.

  8. Development and comparative evaluation of new shapes of pillows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her, Jin-Gang; Ko, Do-Heung; Woo, Ji-Hae; Choi, Young-Eun

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pillow designs suitable for supine and side-lying positions. [Subjects] Twenty female and twenty male subjects with a mean age of 22.7 years (SD = 1.3) participated in the study. [Methods] First, a three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to analyze the movements of the head and the shoulder joints during changes from supine positions to side-lying positions. Second, the height from the face to the shoulder and the height from the floor to the middle of the neck in a side-lying position were measured. Third, the weight distribution ratios of the head and the trunk were compared using general pillows (polyester sponge), memory foam, and prototype pillows. [Results] During position changes from supine positions to side-lying positions, the head moved in a fan shape, and the shoulder joint moved an average of 4.4 cm upward. The height from the face to the shoulder was 9 cm on average. The height from the floor to the middle of the neck was 11 cm on average. The weight distribution ratios between the head and the trunk were compared among general pillows (polyester sponge), memory foam, and prototype pillows. The results showed significant differences in the side-lying position. [Conclusion] Pillows with uniform heights are not suitable for a supine or side-lying position. In the case of both positions, users should be allowed to select pillows in shapes that can support the neck.

  9. Comparative evaluation of DNase-seq footprint identification strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iros eBarozzi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available DNase I is an enzyme preferentially cleaving DNA in highly accessible regions. Recently, Next-Generation Sequencing has been applied to DNase I assays (DNase-seq to obtain genome-wide maps of these accessible chromatin regions.With high-depth sequencing, DNase I cleavage sites can be identified with base-pair resolution, revealing the presence of protected regions (footprints, corresponding to bound molecules on the DNA. Integrating footprint positions close to transcription start sites with motif analysis can reveal the presence of regulatory interactions between specific transcription factors (TFs and genes. However, this inference heavily relies on the accuracy of the footprint call and on the sequencing depth of the DNase-seq experiment.Using ENCODE data, we comprehensively evaluate the performances of two recent footprint callers (Wellington and DNaseR and one metric (the Footprint Occupancy Score, or FOS, and assess the consequences of different footprint calls on the reconstruction of TF-TF regulatory networks. We rate Wellington as the method of choice among those tested: not only its predictions are the best in terms of accuracy, but also the properties of the inferred networks are robust against sequencing depth

  10. Impact of a primary healthcare quality improvement program on diabetes in Canada: evaluation of the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Sonja M; Harris, Stewart B; Tompkins, Jordan W; Belle-Brown, Judith; Fournie, Meghan; Green, Michael; Han, Han; Kotecha, Jyoti; Mequanint, Selam; Paquette-Warren, Jann; Roberts, Sharon; Russell, Grant; Stewart, Moira; Thind, Amardeep; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Primary healthcare (PHC) quality improvement (QI) initiatives are designed to improve patient care and health outcomes. We evaluated the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP), an Ontario-wide PHC QI program on access to care, diabetes management and colorectal cancer screening. This manuscript highlights the impact of QIIP on diabetes outcomes and associated vascular risk factors. A cluster matched-control, retrospective prechart and postchart audit was conducted. One physician per QIIP-PHC team (N=34) and control (N=34) were recruited for the audit. Eligible charts were reviewed for prespecified type 2 diabetes mellitus clinical process and outcome data at baseline, during (intervention range: 15-17.5 months) and post. Primary outcome measures were the A1c of patients above study target and proportion of patients with an annual foot exam. Secondary outcome measures included glycemic, hypertension and lipid outcomes and management, screening for diabetes-related complications, healthcare utilization, and diabetes counseling, education and self-management goal setting. More patients in the QIIP group achieved statistically improved lipid testing, eye examinations, peripheral neuropathy exams, and documented body mass index. No statistical differences in A1c, low-density lipoprotein or systolic/diastolic blood pressure values were noted, with no significant differences in medication prescription, specialist referrals, or chart-reported diabetes counseling, education or self-management goals. Patients of QIIP physicians had significantly more PHC visits. The QIIP-learning collaborative program evaluation using stratified random selection of participants and the inclusion of a control group makes this one of the most rigorous and promising efforts to date evaluating the impact of a QI program in PHC. The chart audit component of this evaluation highlighted that while QIIP improved some secondary diabetes measures, no improvements in clinical outcomes

  11. Esthetic factors of smile in vertical dimensions: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyaroop Rai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The variations in aesthetic perception among the professionals and the laypersons were compared, to understand the association of various skeletal and dental factors in vertical dimension, which alter the soft-tissue characteristics during posed/social smile, among young adults. Methods: Images of the posed smile were captured with a digital camera from the 60 nonorthodontic treated young adults (30 girls, 30 boys. Determinants of the "pleasing smile" were identified from the results of a Visual Analog Scale. Quantitative measurements of the soft- and hard-tissue were made by using the smile images and cephalometric radiographs. The esthetics of the smile was correlated with specific skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue structures in the anteroposterior and vertical dimensions. Results: Three factors formed significant components of a pleasant smile, for orthodontists (incisogingival display, upper lip, and buccal corridor and three for laypersons (upper lip, lower lip, and smile arc. A strong positive correlation was seen among skeletal and dental vertical dimensions and incisor show. The vertical thickness of the upper lip had a significant positive correlation with the position of the maxillary incisor. Conclusion: Incisogingival display, upper lip, lower lip and buccal corridor proved to be the most influential variables in smile esthetics. The significant relationship of incisor protrusion with the vertical thickness of the vermilion border of the upper lip shows that skeletal and dental vertical dimensions for incisal display must be considered when planning orthodontic treatment.

  12. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities

  13. Healthcare professionals' self-reported experiences and preferences related to direct healthcare professional communications: a survey conducted in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piening, Sigrid; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; de Graeff, Pieter A; Straus, Sabine M J M; Mol, Peter G M

    2012-11-01

    In Europe, Direct Healthcare Professional Communications (DHPCs) are important tools to inform healthcare professionals of serious, new drug safety issues. However, this tool has not always been successful in effectively communicating the desired actions to healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare providers' experiences and their preferences for improvement of risk communication, comparing views of general practitioners (GPs), internists, community pharmacists and hospital pharmacists. A questionnaire was developed and pilot tested to assess experiences and preferences of Dutch healthcare professionals with DHPCs. The questionnaire and two reminders were sent to a random sample of 3488 GPs, internists and community and hospital pharmacists in the Netherlands. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic characteristics of the respondents. Chi squares, ANOVAs and the Wilcoxon signed rank test were used, when appropriate, to compare healthcare professional groups. The overall response rate was 34% (N = 1141, ranging from 24% for internists to 46% for community pharmacists). Healthcare providers trusted safety information more when provided by the Dutch Medicines Evaluation Board (MEB) than by the pharmaceutical industry. This was more the case for GPs than for the other healthcare professionals. Respondents preferred safety information to be issued by the MEB, the Dutch Pharmacovigilance Center or their own professional associations. The preferred alternative channels of drug safety information were e-mail, medical journals and electronic prescribing systems. Safety information of drugs does not always reach healthcare professionals through DHPCs. To improve current risk communication of drug safety issues, alternative and/or additional methods of risk communication should be developed using electronic methods and medical journals. Moreover, (additional) risk communication coming from an independent source such as the

  14. Identifying barriers and facilitators to participation in pressure ulcer prevention in allied healthcare professionals: a mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Peter R; Clarkson, Paul; Bader, Dan L; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the barriers and facilitators for allied health professional's participation in pressure ulcer prevention. Mixed method cohort study. Single centre study in an acute university hospital trust. Five physiotherapists and four occupational therapists were recruited from the hospital trust. Therapists had been working in the National Health Service (NHS) for a minimum of one year. Therapist views and experiences were collated using an audio recorded focus group. This recording was analysed using constant comparison analysis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of attitudes and knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention using questionnaires. Key themes surrounding barriers to participation in pressure ulcer prevention included resources (staffing and equipment), education and professional boundaries. Fewer facilitators were described, with new training opportunities and communication being highlighted. Results from the questionnaires showed the therapists had a positive attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention with a median score of 81% (range 50 to 83%). However, there were gaps in knowledge with a median score of 69% (range 50 to 77%). The therapist reported several barriers to pressure ulcer prevention and few facilitators. The primary barriers were resources, equipment and education. Attitudes and knowledge in AHPs were comparable to data previously reported from experienced nursing staff. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The cost-effectiveness of contemporary home haemodialysis modalities compared with facility haemodialysis: a systematic review of full economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachael; Marshall, Mark R; Morton, Rachael L; McFarlane, Philip; Howard, Kirsten

    2014-08-01

    The financial burden of the increasing dialysis population challenges healthcare resources internationally. Home haemodialysis offers many benefits over conventional facility dialysis including superior clinical, patient-centred outcomes and reduced cost. This review updates a previous review, conducted a decade prior, incorporating contemporary home dialysis techniques of frequent and nocturnal dialysis. We sought comparative cost-effectiveness studies of home versus facility haemodialysis (HD) for people with end-stage kidney failure (ESKF). We conducted a systematic review of literature from January 2000-March 2014. Studies were included if they provided comparative information on the costs, health outcomes and cost-effectiveness ratios of home HD and facility HD. We searched medical and health economic databases using MeSH headings and text words for economic evaluation and haemodialysis. Six studies of economic evaluations that compared home to facility HD were identified. Two studies compared home nocturnal HD, one home nocturnal and daily home HD, and three compared contemporary home HD to facility HD. Overall these studies suggest that contemporary home HD modalities are less costly and more effective than facility HD. Home HD start-up costs tend to be higher in the short term, but these are offset by cost savings over the longer term. Contemporaneous dialysis modalities including nocturnal and daily home haemodialysis are cost-effective or cost-saving compared with facility-based haemodialysis. This result is largely driven by lower staff costs, and better health outcomes for survival and quality of life. Expanding the proportion of haemodialysis patients managed at home is likely to produce cost savings. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Design of an impact evaluation using a mixed methods model – an explanatory assessment of the effects of results-based financing mechanisms on maternal healthcare services in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In this article we present a study design to evaluate the causal impact of providing supply-side performance-based financing incentives in combination with a demand-side cash transfer component on equitable access to and quality of maternal and neonatal healthcare services. This intervention is introduced to selected emergency obstetric care facilities and catchment area populations in four districts in Malawi. We here describe and discuss our study protocol with regard to the research aims, the local implementation context, and our rationale for selecting a mixed methods explanatory design with a quasi-experimental quantitative component. Design The quantitative research component consists of a controlled pre- and post-test design with multiple post-test measurements. This allows us to quantitatively measure ‘equitable access to healthcare services’ at the community level and ‘healthcare quality’ at the health facility level. Guided by a theoretical framework of causal relationships, we determined a number of input, process, and output indicators to evaluate both intended and unintended effects of the intervention. Overall causal impact estimates will result from a difference-in-difference analysis comparing selected indicators across intervention and control facilities/catchment populations over time. To further explain heterogeneity of quantitatively observed effects and to understand the experiential dimensions of financial incentives on clients and providers, we designed a qualitative component in line with the overall explanatory mixed methods approach. This component consists of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with providers, service user, non-users, and policy stakeholders. In this explanatory design comprehensive understanding of expected and unexpected effects of the intervention on both access and quality will emerge through careful triangulation at two levels: across multiple quantitative elements and across

  17. Design of an impact evaluation using a mixed methods model--an explanatory assessment of the effects of results-based financing mechanisms on maternal healthcare services in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Stephan; Muula, Adamson S; Robyn, Paul Jacob; Bärnighausen, Till; Sarker, Malabika; Mathanga, Don P; Bossert, Thomas; De Allegri, Manuela

    2014-04-22

    In this article we present a study design to evaluate the causal impact of providing supply-side performance-based financing incentives in combination with a demand-side cash transfer component on equitable access to and quality of maternal and neonatal healthcare services. This intervention is introduced to selected emergency obstetric care facilities and catchment area populations in four districts in Malawi. We here describe and discuss our study protocol with regard to the research aims, the local implementation context, and our rationale for selecting a mixed methods explanatory design with a quasi-experimental quantitative component. The quantitative research component consists of a controlled pre- and post-test design with multiple post-test measurements. This allows us to quantitatively measure 'equitable access to healthcare services' at the community level and 'healthcare quality' at the health facility level. Guided by a theoretical framework of causal relationships, we determined a number of input, process, and output indicators to evaluate both intended and unintended effects of the intervention. Overall causal impact estimates will result from a difference-in-difference analysis comparing selected indicators across intervention and control facilities/catchment populations over time.To further explain heterogeneity of quantitatively observed effects and to understand the experiential dimensions of financial incentives on clients and providers, we designed a qualitative component in line with the overall explanatory mixed methods approach. This component consists of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with providers, service user, non-users, and policy stakeholders. In this explanatory design comprehensive understanding of expected and unexpected effects of the intervention on both access and quality will emerge through careful triangulation at two levels: across multiple quantitative elements and across quantitative and qualitative elements

  18. The Design of the IGE Evaluation Project Phase IV Comparative Studies. Comparative Study of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    This paper outlines the design of two Comparative Studies of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IGE) Evaluation Project. More than 2,000 elementary schools in 25 states use the IGE system. The Evaluation Project was designed to gain a comprehensive view of the system's operation and effectiveness. Phase IV investigated pupil outcomes,…

  19. Contribution of the spanish agency for medicines and healthcare products to the European committee for the evaluation of medicinal products for human use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Gutiérrez, A; Díaz-Ramos, P; Sulleiro-Avendaño, E; de Miguel-Marañón, M; Padilla-Gallego, M E; Sancho-López, A; Ruiz-Antúnez, S; Prieto-Yerro, C

    2015-05-01

    The centralized procedure for registering medicinal products involves a joint assessment by all regulatory agencies of European Union member states, which are coordinated by the European Medicines Agency. Since its implementation in 1995, the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Healthcare Products (AEMPS) has actively contributed to the committee on medicinal products for human use. The therapeutic areas in which AEMPS has the greatest presence are cardiovascular, sensory organs (mainly ophthalmology) and genitourinary/sexual hormones. The technical staff of AEMPS contributes their expertise and extensive experience to this task, as do the practitioners of the Spanish healthcare system who act as external experts, providing their clinical vision and bringing the daily clinical practice to the evaluation of medicinal products. As with other European decision spaces, the joint participation of the member states is not homogeneous, with a minority of countries still heading the majority of assessments for the committee on medicinal products for human use, although all member countries take part in the final decision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. 77 FR 58416 - Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... COMMISSION Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste... Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent Ion Exchange Resins from... Comparative Environmental Evaluation of Alternatives for Handling Low-Level Radioactive Waste Spent Ion...

  1. Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) 6: investigating methods to identify, prioritise, implement and evaluate disinvestment projects in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Allen, Kelly; Brooke, Vanessa; Dyer, Tim; Waller, Cara; King, Richard; Ramsey, Wayne; Mortimer, Duncan

    2017-05-25

    This is the sixth in a series of papers reporting Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) in a local healthcare setting. The SHARE program was established to investigate a systematic, integrated, evidence-based approach to disinvestment within a large Australian health service. This paper describes the methods employed in undertaking pilot disinvestment projects. It draws a number of lessons regarding the strengths and weaknesses of these methods; particularly regarding the crucial first step of identifying targets for disinvestment. Literature reviews, survey, interviews, consultation and workshops were used to capture and process the relevant information. A theoretical framework was adapted for evaluation and explication of disinvestment projects, including a taxonomy for the determinants of effectiveness, process of change and outcome measures. Implementation, evaluation and costing plans were developed. Four literature reviews were completed, surveys were received from 15 external experts, 65 interviews were conducted, 18 senior decision-makers attended a data gathering workshop, 22 experts and local informants were consulted, and four decision-making workshops were undertaken. Mechanisms to identify disinvestment targets and criteria for prioritisation and decision-making were investigated. A catalogue containing 184 evidence-based opportunities for disinvestment and an algorithm to identify disinvestment projects were developed. An Expression of Interest process identified two potential disinvestment projects. Seventeen additional projects were proposed through a non-systematic nomination process. Four of the 19 proposals were selected as pilot projects but only one reached the implementation stage. Factors with potential influence on the outcomes of disinvestment projects are discussed and barriers and enablers in the pilot projects are summarised. This study provides an in-depth insight into the experience of disinvestment

  2. The Mais Médicos (More Doctors) Program in Northeast: evaluation of hospitalizations for Primary Healthcare-sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rogério Fabiano; Sousa, Islândia Maria Carvalho de; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi; Santos, Carlos Renato Dos; Brito-Silva, Keila; Santos, Lara Ximenes; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    This paper analyzes the increase in professionals in Brazil's Northeastern Region resulting from the Mais Médicos (More Doctors) Program. The scale of the increase was analyzed through the indicator Hospitalizations for Primary-Care Sensitive Conditions (HPSCs). The method used was a quantitative approach, based on data on distribution of doctors and service they provided in these states, and on hospitalizations for diarrhea and gastroenteritis in the period September 2012 to August 2015. The choice of this condition took into account the aspects of: its high frequency in the period; the simplicity of intervention; and its historic occurrence in the Northeast. The results show that the Mais Médicos Program had an influence on the reduction of hospitalizations for this type of condition - they fell by 35% in the period investigated, with important differences between the states. In spite of the significant scale of the entry of medical professionals into the health system, it is known that in isolation simply increasing the number of professionals of a particular type has a limited effect in improving primary healthcare.

  3. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttinger, Alexandra; Dreibelbis, Robert; Roha, Kristin; Ngabo, Fidel; Kayigamba, Felix; Mfura, Leodomir; Moe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF) in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS) that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8%) and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%). When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda. PMID:26516883

  4. Evaluation of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals: effects on mental health consumer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilrycx, Greet; Croon, Marcel; Van den Broek, Anneloes; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs

    2015-03-01

    To examine the effects of a recovery-oriented care training program for mental healthcare professionals on mental health consumer outcomes. The Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) and the Recovery-Promoting Relationship Scale (RPRS) were administered to a sample of 142 consumers with severe mental illness. A repeated measurement design with six measurement occasions was used. Separate analyses were performed for the MHRM and RPRS subscales. Data were analyzed by means of the software package AMOS for structural equation modeling. First, the means of the five scales were computed at each measurement occasion. Next, two series of regression analyses were conducted: the first series aimed to ascertain whether gender and age have a significant effect on the MHRM and RPRS scores, and the second series aimed to detect a systematic trend in the average scale response of the MHRM and RPRS. Scores showed a significant change over time for the subscale 'Learning & new potentials' of the MHRM. Significant effects were also found for gender, with men scoring higher than women on the subscales 'Self-empowerment' and 'Learning & new potentials'. Age had no effect on the MHRM and RPRS. The scores on the RPRS showed no significant change over time. One year after completion of the recovery-oriented training program for professionals, positive results were found for two subscales of the MHRM, that is, 'Self- empowerment' and 'Learning & new potentials'. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Huttinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8% and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%. When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda.

  6. Design and evaluation of a ubiquitous chest-worn cardiopulmonary monitoring system for healthcare application: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiewen; Ha, Congying; Zhang, Zhengbo

    2017-02-01

    Ambulatory recording of physiological data will provide us deep insight into the physical condition of patients and athletes, and assessing treatment effects and training performances. This study presents a miniature wearable cardiopulmonary monitoring system called "Smart Chest Strap," which consists of an elastic band worn around the user's chest with integrated sensors, a physiological signals acquisition unit, and a mobile phone. The physiological signals including electrocardiogram, respiratory inductance plethysmograph, and accelerations (ACC) are sampled, digitalized, stored, and simultaneously transmitted to a mobile phone via Bluetooth. A medical validation test with participants performing discontinuous incremental treadmill (0-12 km/h) exercise was conducted. The results indicate nearly perfect correlations (0.999, 0.996, 0.994), small mean bias (0.60 BPM, 0.51 BPM, 0.05 g), and narrow limits of agreement (±2.90 BPM, ±1.81 BPM, ±0.09 g) for heart rate (HR), breathing rate (BR), and ACC represented as vector magnitude units (VMUs). There is a general trend of decrease in accuracy, precision, and correlation for HR, BR, and VMU as velocity increases, but these validity statistics are all within acceptable error limits and clinically accepted. The findings demonstrate that the Smart Chest Strap is valid and will have wider applications in healthcare, sports, and scientific research areas.

  7. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttinger, Alexandra; Dreibelbis, Robert; Roha, Kristin; Ngabo, Fidel; Kayigamba, Felix; Mfura, Leodomir; Moe, Christine

    2015-10-27

    There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF) in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS) that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8%) and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%). When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda.

  8. Healthcare in the New Vietnam: comparing patients' satisfaction with outpatient care in a traditional neighborhood clinic and a new, western-style clinic in Ho Chi Minh City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat, Sonny; Barr, Donald

    2006-03-01

    As Vietnam opens its economy to privatization, its system of healthcare will face a series of crucial tests. Vietnam's system of private healthcare--once comprised only of individual physicians holding clinic hours in their homes--has come to also include larger customer-oriented clinics based on an American business model. As the two models compete in the expanding private market, it becomes increasingly important to understand patients' perceptions of the alternative models of care. This study reports on interviews with 194 patients in two different types of private-sector clinics in Vietnam: a western-style clinic and a traditional style, after-hours clinic. In bivariate and multivariate analyses, we found that patients at the western style clinic reported both higher expectations of the facility and higher satisfaction with many aspects of care than patients at the after-hours clinic. These different perceptions appear to be based on the interpersonal manner of the physician seen and the clinic's delivery methods rather than perceptions of the physician's technical skill and method of treatment. These findings were unaffected by the ethnicity of physician seen. These findings suggest that patients in Vietnam recognize and prefer more customer-oriented care and amenities, regardless of physician ethnicity and perceive no significant differences in technical skill between the private delivery models.

  9. Complexity leadership: a healthcare imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberg, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The healthcare system is plagued with increasing cost and poor quality outcomes. A major contributing factor for these issues is that outdated leadership practices, such as leader-centricity, linear thinking, and poor readiness for innovation, are being used in healthcare organizations. Complexity leadership theory provides a new framework with which healthcare leaders may practice leadership. Complexity leadership theory conceptualizes leadership as a continual process that stems from collaboration, complex systems thinking, and innovation mindsets. Compared to transactional and transformational leadership concepts, complexity leadership practices hold promise to improve cost and quality in health care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Towards an equitable healthcare in China: evaluating the productive efficiency of community health centers in Jiangsu Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lulin; Xu, Xinglong; Antwi, Henry Asante; Wang, Linna

    2017-05-25

    While the demand for the health service keeps escalating at the grass root or rural areas of China, a substantial portion of healthcare resources remains stagnant in the more developed cities and this has entrenched health inequity in many parts of China. At its conception, the Deepening Health Care Reform in 2012 China was intended to flush out these discrepancies and promote a more equitable and efficient distribution of health resources. Nearly half a decade of this reform, there are uncertainties as to whether the attainment of the objectives of the reform is in sight. We divided Jiangsu Province into 3 zones according to the level of economic and social development i.e. developed, developing, and undeveloped areas. Using a hybrid of Panel data analysis and an augmented Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), we model human resources, capital inputs of Community Health Centers to comprehensively determine the technical and scale efficiency of community health resources in 3 zones in Jiangsu Province. We sampled data and analysed efficiency and productivity growth of 75 Community Health Centers in 13 cities of Jiangsu Province from 2011 to 2015, which shows that a significant productive growth among Community Health Centers between 2011 and 2015. Mirroring the behavior of Community Health Centers, technological progress was the underlying force for the growth and the deterioration in efficiency change was found. This can be credited partly to the Deepening Health Care Reform measures aimed at improving technology availability in health centers in sub-urban areas. The regional summary of the DEA result shows that the stage of economic development and the efficiency performance of hospital did not necessarily go hand in hand among the 3 zones of Jiangsu. The government of China in general and Jiangsu province in particular could improve the efficiency of health resources allocation by improving the community health service system, rationalizing the allocation of health

  11. Economic Evaluation of a Multifaceted Implementation Strategy for the Prevention of Hand Eczema Among Healthcare Workers in Comparison with a Control Group: The Hands4U Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Esther W C; van Dongen, Johanna M; Boot, Cécile R L; van der Gulden, Joost W J; Bosmans, Judith E; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy for the prevention of hand eczema in comparison with a control group among healthcare workers. A total of 48 departments (n=1,649) were randomly allocated to the implementation strategy or the control group. Data on hand eczema and costs were collected at baseline and every 3 months. Cost-effectiveness analyses were performed using linear multilevel analyses. The probability of the implementation strategy being cost-effective gradually increased with an increasing willingness-to-pay, to 0.84 at a ceiling ratio of €590,000 per person with hand eczema prevented (societal perspective). The implementation strategy appeared to be not cost-effective in comparison with the control group (societal perspective), nor was it cost-beneficial to the employer. However, this study had some methodological problems which should be taken into account when interpreting the results.

  12. Strategies in primary healthcare to implement early identification of risky alcohol consumption: why do they work or not? A qualitative evaluation of the ODHIN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keurhorst, M; Heinen, M; Colom, J; Linderoth, C; Müssener, U; Okulicz-Kozaryn, K; Palacio-Vieira, J; Segura, L; Silfversparre, F; Słodownik, L; Sorribes, E; Laurant, M; Wensing, M

    2016-06-07

    Screening and brief interventions (SBI) in primary healthcare are cost-effective in risky drinkers, yet they are not offered to all eligible patients. This qualitative study aimed to provide more insight into the factors and mechanisms of why, how, for whom and under what circumstances implementation strategies work or do not work in increasing SBI. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between February and July 2014 with 40 GPs and 28 nurses in Catalonia, the Netherlands, Poland, and Sweden. Participants were purposefully selected from the European Optimising Delivery of Healthcare Interventions (ODHIN) trial. This randomised controlled trial evaluated the influence of training and support, financial reimbursement and an internet-based method of delivering advice on SBI. Amongst them were 38 providers with a high screening performance and 30 with a low screening performance from different allocation groups. Realist evaluation was combined with the Tailored Implementation for Chronic Diseases framework for identification of implementation determinants to guide the interviews and analysis. Transcripts were analysed thematically with the diagram affinity method. Training and support motivated SBI by improved knowledge, skills and prioritisation. Continuous provision, sufficient time to learn intervention techniques and to tailor to individual experienced barriers, seemed important T&S conditions. Catalan and Polish professionals perceived financial reimbursement to be an additional stimulating factor as well, as effects on SBI were smoothened by personnel levels and salary levels. Structural payment for preventive services rather than a temporary project based payment, might have increased the effects of financial reimbursement. Implementing e-BI seem to require more guidance than was delivered in ODHIN. Despite the allocation, important preconditions for SBI routine seemed frequent exposure of this topic in media and guidelines, SBI facilitating information

  13. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  14. Comparing patient and healthcare worker experiences during a dengue outbreak in Singapore: understanding the patient journey and the introduction of a point-of-care test (POCT) toward better care delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qinghui; Hildon, Zoe J-L; Singh, Shweta; Jing, Jin; Thein, Tun Linn; Coker, Richard; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M; Leo, Yee Sin

    2017-07-19

    In the aftermath of an upsurge in the number of dengue cases in 2013 and 2014, the SD BIOLINE Dengue Duo rapid diagnostic Point-of-Care Test (POCT) kit was introduced in Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore in June 2013. It is known that the success of POCT usage is contingent on its implementation within the health system. We evaluated health services delivery and the Dengue Duo rapid diagnostic test kit application in Singapore from healthcare workers' perspectives and patient experiences of dengue at surge times. Focus group discussions were conducted with dengue patients, from before and after the POCT implementation period. In-depth interviews with semi-structured components with healthcare workers were carried out. A patient centred process mapping technique was used for evaluation, which mapped the patient's journey and was mirrored from the healthcare worker's perspective. Patients and healthcare workers confirmed a wide range of symptoms in adults, making it challenging to determine diagnosis. There were multiple routes to help seeking, and no 'typical patient journey', with patients either presenting directly to the hospital emergency department, or being referred there by a primary care provider. Patients groups diagnosed before and after POCT implementation expressed some differences between speed of diagnoses and attitudes of doctors, yet shared negative feelings about waiting times and a lack of communication and poor information delivery. However, the POCT did not in its current implementation do much to help waiting times. Healthcare workers expressed that public perceptions of dengue in recent years was a major factor in changing patient management, and that the POCT kit was helpful in improving the speed and accuracy of diagnoses. Health service delivery for dengue patients in Singapore was overall perceived to be of an acceptable clinical standard, which was enhanced by the introduction of the POCT. However, improvements can be focused on Adapting

  15. Comparative Evaluation for Assessing Oratest as a Diagnostic Tool for Evaluation of Plaque Levels & Gingivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahasweta Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims & Objectives: Periodontal disease comprises a group of inflammatory conditions of the supporting tissues of the teeth that are caused by bacteria. The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether Oratest could be used as a sensitive indicator of plaque levels and gingivitis. Material and Methods: Hundred caries free patients visiting the out-patient department of A.E.C.S. Maaruti College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Banglore were selected according to predetermined selection criteria. The study consisted of two clinical stages: Stage 1. Recording of Plaque Index (Loe, 1967 and Gingival Index (Loe & Silness 1963 in the subjects. Stage 2. Performance of the Oratest and recording the scores in the same subjects. The Oratest was performed by rinsing the mouth with sterilized UHT (Ultra high temperature milk. About 3 ml of expectorated milk was added to a test tube containing the 0.12 ml of 0.1% methylene blue. The time required for colour change from blue to white attained at the bottom of the tube was recorded. Plaque Index, Gingival Index and Oratest scores were compared using Student t test. Pearson correlation test was applied to assess correlation between the indices and Oratest scores. Results:The results of the study showed that as age increased plaque and Gingival Indexes also increased whereas Oratest scores decreased. No significant difference between males and females was found in mean values of Plaque Index, Gingival Index and Oratest scores. Negative correlation was seen between Plaque Index and Oratest scores (r = 0.724 and also between Gingival Index and Oratest scores (r = 0.728. Conclusions: The study showed high correlation between the plaque and gingival indices and Oratest scores. This study validates Oratest as a predictable & sensitive test to assess periodontal disease.

  16. The impact of HIV-associated lipodystrophy on healthcare utilization and costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV disease itself is associated with increased healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditures. HIV-infected persons with lipodystrophy have been shown to have poor self-perceptions of health. We evaluated whether lipodystrophy in the HIV-infected population was associated with increased utilization of healthcare services and increased healthcare costs. Objective To examine utilization of healthcare services and associated costs with respect to presence of lipodystrophy among HIV-infected patients. Methods Healthcare utilization and cost of healthcare services were collected from computerized accounting records for participants in a body image study among HIV-infected patients treated at a tertiary care medical center. Lipodystrophy was assessed by physical examination, and effects of lipodystrophy were assessed via body image surveys. Demographic and clinical characteristics were also ascertained. Analysis of healthcare utilization and cost outcomes was performed via between-group analyses. Multivariate modeling was used to determine predictors of healthcare utilization and associated costs. Results Of the 181 HIV-infected participants evaluated in the study, 92 (51% had clinical evidence of HIV-associated lipodystrophy according to physician examination. Total healthcare utilization, as measured by the number of medical center visits over the study period, was notably increased among HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy as compared to HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Similarly, total healthcare expenditures over the study period were $1,718 more for HIV-infected subjects with lipodystrophy than for HIV-infected subjects without lipodystrophy. Multivariate modeling demonstrated strong associations between healthcare utilization and associated costs, and lipodystrophy score as assessed by a clinician. Healthcare utilization and associated costs were not related to body image survey scores among HIV

  17. LEAN thinking in Finnish healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorma, Tapani; Tiirinki, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Turkki, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes. Design/methodology/approach - A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used. Findings - LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN. Originality/value - This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare.

  18. Attitudes and reactions to a healthcare robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Elizabeth; Kuo, I Han; Lee, Yong In; Rabindran, Joel; Kerse, Ngaire; Stafford, Rebecca; MacDonald, Bruce A

    2010-06-01

    The use of robots in healthcare is a new concept. The public's perception and acceptance is not well understood. The objective was to investigate the perceptions and emotions toward the utilization of healthcare robots among individuals over 40 years of age, investigate factors contributing to acceptance, and evaluate differences in blood pressure checks taken by a robot and a medical student. Fifty-seven (n = 57) adults aged over 40 years and recruited from local general practitioner or gerontology group lists participated in two cross-sectional studies. The first was an open-ended questionnaire assessing perceptions of robots. In the second study, participants had their blood pressure taken by a medical student and by a robot. Patient comfort with each encounter, perceived accuracy of each measurement, and the quality of the patient interaction were studied in each case. Readings were compared by independent t-tests and regression analyses were conducted to predict quality ratings. Participants' perceptions about robots were influenced by their prior exposure to robots in literature or entertainment media. Participants saw many benefits and applications for healthcare robots, including simple medical procedures and physical assistance, but had some concerns about reliability, safety, and the loss of personal care. Blood pressure readings did not differ between the medical student and robot, but participants felt more comfortable with the medical student and saw the robot as less accurate. Although age and sex were not significant predictors, individuals who held more positive initial attitudes and emotions toward robots rated the robot interaction more favorably. Many people see robots as having benefits and applications in healthcare but some have concerns. Individual attitudes and emotions regarding robots in general are likely to influence future acceptance of their introduction into healthcare processes.

  19. The USE IT-adoption-model to predict and evaluate adoption of information and communication technology in healthcare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel-Verkerke, M.B.; Spil, Antonius A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The USE IT-model integrates theories about adoption and diffusion of innovations and is suitable to predict and evaluate the success of an information system from a user’s perspective. The USE IT-model consists of four determinants: relevance, requirements, resources and

  20. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  1. Economic evaluation of home-based telebehavioural health care compared to in-person treatment delivery for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounthavong, Mark; Pruitt, Larry D; Smolenski, Derek J; Gahm, Gregory A; Bansal, Aasthaa; Hansen, Ryan N

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Home-based telebehavioural healthcare improves access to mental health care for patients restricted by travel burden. However, there is limited evidence assessing the economic value of home-based telebehavioural health care compared to in-person care. We sought to compare the economic impact of home-based telebehavioural health care and in-person care for depression among current and former US service members. Methods We performed trial-based cost-minimisation and cost-utility analyses to assess the economic impact of home-based telebehavioural health care versus in-person behavioural care for depression. Our analyses focused on the payer perspective (Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs) at three months. We also performed a scenario analysis where all patients possessed video-conferencing technology that was approved by these agencies. The cost-utility analysis evaluated the impact of different depression categories on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the model assumptions. Results In the base case analysis the total direct cost of home-based telebehavioural health care was higher than in-person care (US$71,974 versus US$20,322). Assuming that patients possessed government-approved video-conferencing technology, home-based telebehavioural health care was less costly compared to in-person care (US$19,177 versus US$20,322). In one-way sensitivity analyses, the proportion of patients possessing personal computers was a major driver of direct costs. In the cost-utility analysis, home-based telebehavioural health care was dominant when patients possessed video-conferencing technology. Results from probabilistic sensitivity analyses did not differ substantially from base case results. Discussion Home-based telebehavioural health care is dependent on the cost of supplying video-conferencing technology to patients but offers the opportunity to

  2. Evaluating quality management systems for HIV rapid testing services in primary healthcare clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaya, Ziningi; Drain, Paul K; Mashamba-Thompson, Tivani P

    2017-01-01

    Rapid HIV tests have improved access to HIV diagnosis and treatment by providing quick and convenient testing in rural clinics and resource-limited settings. In this study, we evaluated the quality management system for voluntary and provider-initiated point-of-care HIV testing in primary healthcare (PHC) clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa. We conducted a quality assessment audit in eleven PHC clinics that offer voluntary HIV testing and counselling in rural KZN, South Africa from August 2015 to October 2016. All the participating clinics were purposively selected from the province-wide survey of diagnostic services. We completed an on-site monitoring checklist, adopted from the WHO guidelines for assuring accuracy and reliability of HIV rapid tests, to assess the quality management system for HIV rapid testing at each clinic. To determine clinic's compliance to WHO quality standards for HIV rapid testing the following quality measure was used, a 3-point scale (high, moderate and poor). A high score was defined as a percentage rating of 90 to 100%, moderate was defined as a percentage rating of 70 to 90%, and poor was defined as a percentage rating of less than 70%. Clinic audit scores were summarized and compared. We employed Pearson pair wise correlation coefficient to determine correlations between clinics audit scores and clinic and clinics characteristics. Linear regression model was computed to estimate statistical significance of the correlates. Correlations were reported as significant at p ≤0.05. Nine out of 11 audited rural PHC clinics are located outside 20Km of the nearest town and hospital. Majority (18.2%) of the audited rural PHC clinics reported that HIV rapid test was performed by HIV lay counsellors. Overall, ten clinics were rated moderate, in terms of their compliance to the stipulated WHO guidelines. Audit results showed that rural PHC clinics' average rating score for compliance to the WHO guidelines ranged between 64.4% (CI

  3. Suicide assessment and management initiative (SAM): evaluating the implementation and uptake of suicide prevention activities in a healthcare setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishmael, Kiera Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among Canadian men and women from adolescence to middle age and is strongly associated with mental illness. BC Mental Health and Addiction Services has developed Suicide Assessment and Management (SAM) Guidelines to identify safety risks within its client populations. Rigourous evaluation of the SAM Guidelines Initiative is essential to determine the impact of the intervention. This paper describes the literature review and logic model for the SA...

  4. Eye Tracking: A Novel Approach for Evaluating and Improving the Safety of Healthcare Processes in the Simulated Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Elizabeth A; Marquard, Jenna L; Fisher, Donald L; Gawlinski, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Eye tracking, used to evaluate a clinician's eye movements, is an example of an existing technology being used in novel ways by patient safety researchers in the simulated setting. The use of eye-tracking technology has the potential to augment current teaching, evaluation, and research methods in simulated settings by using this quantitative, objective data to better understand why an individual performed as he or she did on a simulated or naturalistic task. Selected literature was reviewed with the purpose of explicating how eye tracking can be used by researchers and educators to evaluate error-prone processes. The literature reviewed was obtained by querying the databases PubMed, CINHAL, and Google Scholar using the key words eye tracking, patient safety, and medical errors from 2005 through 2015.An introduction to the use of eye tracking, including both theoretical underpinnings and technological considerations, is presented. In addition, examples of how eye tracking has been used in research studies conducted in both simulated and naturalistic settings are provided. The use of eye-tracking technology to capture the eye movements of novice and expert clinicians has provided new insight into behaviors associated with the identification of medical errors. The study of novices' and experts' eye movements provides data about clinician performance not possible with existing evaluation methods such as direct observation, verbal reports, and thinking out loud. The use of eye tracking to capture the behaviors of experts can lead to the development of training protocols to guide the education of students and novice practitioners. Eye-tracking technology clearly has the potential to transform the way clinical simulation is used to improve patient safety practices.

  5. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasu, Rafia S; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Suminski, Richard; Snella, Kathleen; Warady, Bradley

    2015-08-17

    Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL) on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs) were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL). HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL) and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER) visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI). A P value of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA® 11.0 statistical software. The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%). Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83%) and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P healthcare utilization and expenditure. Individuals with below basic or basic HLL have greater healthcare

  6. Health Literacy Impact on National Healthcare Utilization and Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafia Rasu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Health literacy presents an enormous challenge in the delivery of effective healthcare and quality outcomes. We evaluated the impact of low health literacy (LHL on healthcare utilization and healthcare expenditure. Methods Database analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS from 2005-2008 which provides nationally representative estimates of healthcare utilization and expenditure. Health literacy scores (HLSs were calculated based on a validated, predictive model and were scored according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL. HLS ranged from 0-500. Health literacy level (HLL and categorized in 2 groups: Below basic or basic (HLS <226 and above basic (HLS ≥226. Healthcare utilization expressed as a physician, nonphysician, or emergency room (ER visits and healthcare spending. Expenditures were adjusted to 2010 rates using the Consumer Price Index (CPI. A Pvalue of 0.05 or less was the criterion for statistical significance in all analyses. Multivariate regression models assessed the impact of the predicted HLLs on outpatient healthcare utilization and expenditures. All analyses were performed with SAS and STATA®11.0 statistical software. Results The study evaluated 22 599 samples representing 503 374 648 weighted individuals nationally from 2005-2008. The cohort had an average age of 49 years and included more females (57%. Caucasian were the predominant racial ethnic group (83% and 37% of the cohort were from the South region of the United States of America. The proportion of the cohort with basic or below basic health literacy was 22.4%. Annual predicted values of physician visits, nonphysician visits, and ER visits were 6.6, 4.8, and 0.2, respectively, for basic or below basic compared to 4.4, 2.6, and 0.1 for above basic. Predicted values of office and ER visits expenditures were $1284 and $151, respectively, for basic or below basic and $719 and $100 for above basic (P < .05. The extrapolated national

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of a Personal Healthcare System Prototype for Cognitive eRehabilitation in a Living Assistance Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pastorino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The integration of rehabilitation systems in an ambient assisted living environment can provide a powerful and versatile tool for long-term stroke rehabilitation goals. This paper introduces a novel concept of a personalized cognitive rehabilitation system in a naturalistic setting. The proposed platform was developed within the CogWatch project, with the intent of fostering independence in activities of daily living in patients with apraxia and action disorganization syndrome. Technical usability was evaluated in a series of pilot experiments, which illustrate how this approach may help to retrain patients in activities of daily living. The first system prototype has been tested with 36 participants divided into three groups, providing an exploratory evaluation of the usability of this solution and its acceptability. The technical solutions used within the CogWatch project are targeted to meet both the end users’ needs from the interaction and usability point of views and the clinical requirements associated with the use of such systems. The challenges behind the development of ambient assisted living systems for cognitive rehabilitation are discussed.

  8. An Examination of Perceived Quality, Satisfaction, and Loyalty Relationship: Applicability of Comparative and Noncomparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licen Indahwati Darsono

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates alternative measurement approaches to investigating the relationship amongst perceived quality, customer satisfaction, and loyalty. The authors define and measure the constructs within a relative attitudinal framework and compare these results to a noncomparative or individual evaluation of brands. In addition, loyalty is measured by and defined as a behavioral and attitudinal loyalty. The object of this research is teh botol whilst the subjects are undergraduate students in Surabaya and Yogyakarta. The proposed model, with satisfaction as a mediator between quality and loyalty, is found to be an acceptable representation of data across three brands of teh botol and for both comparative and noncomparative evaluation. The use of relative attitude, however, indicates a much stronger relationship amongst perceived quality, satisfaction, and loyalty than the attitude towards a brand when they are performed in individual evaluation. With respect to predictive ability, this study’s findings suggest that comparative evaluation has higher degree of applicability than does noncomparative evaluation.

  9. Socioeconomic status and catastrophic health expenditure evaluation in IR Iran: A comparative study in 2004 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health equity is a main principle of all healthcare systems in the world. Family Physician (FP program, as a health sector reform (HSR in Iran, was executed to reduce households’ health care cost and to achieve health equity in 2004. Meanwhile, catastrophic health expenditure is known as an accepted indicator in HSR evaluation. In this context, after determining and comparing socioeconomic status (SES among different periods, we made an attempt to evaluate households’ health financial protection in different quintiles after implementation of FP program.  Methods: The current cross-sectional study was based on the data obtained from Household Income and Expenditure Survey in 2004 and 2011. The health expenditures, catastrophic health expenditure (CHE, and SES were determined by this data during these years. Descriptive analyses and comparisons using Chi-squared test were carried out via SPSS, version 20.  Results: A total of 1716 households were included in the survey during 2004 and 2011. The highest proportion of households was related to quintiles very poor and poor with respect to each year. Moreover, it was observed that SES in 2011 had the worse situation compared to that in 2004; this situation was worse in urban areas. In the present study, CHE is related to poorer quintiles, and in rural areas no household was faced with CHE in 2011.  Conclusions: Implementation of FP program in rural areas with more primary care has prevented hospitalization. This was considerable for poorer quintiles and has led to financial protection for rural households.

  10. The Management of Long-Term Sickness Absence in Large Public Sector Healthcare Organisations: A Realist Evaluation Using Mixed Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Angela; O'Halloran, Peter; Porter, Sam

    2015-09-01

    The success of measures to reduce long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in public sector organisations is contingent on organisational context. This realist evaluation investigates how interventions interact with context to influence successful management of LTSA. Multi-method case study in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland comprising realist literature review, semi-structured interviews (61 participants), Process-Mapping and feedback meetings (59 participants), observation of training, analysis of documents. Important activities included early intervention; workplace-based occupational rehabilitation; robust sickness absence policies with clear trigger points for action. Used appropriately, in a context of good interpersonal and interdepartmental communication and shared goals, these are able to increase the motivation of staff to return to work. Line managers are encouraged to take a proactive approach when senior managers provide support and accountability. Hindering factors: delayed intervention; inconsistent implementation of policy and procedure; lack of resources; organisational complexity; stakeholders misunderstanding each other's goals and motives. Different mechanisms have the potential to encourage common motivations for earlier return from LTSA, such as employees feeling that they have the support of their line manager to return to work and having the confidence to do so. Line managers' proactively engage when they have confidence in the support of seniors and in their own ability to address LTSA. Fostering these motivations calls for a thoughtful, diagnostic process, taking into account the contextual factors (and whether they can be modified) and considering how a given intervention can be used to trigger the appropriate mechanisms.

  11. Email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Yannis; Atherton, Helen; Sawmynaden, Prescilla; Car, Josip

    2012-09-12

    159 healthcare providers at baseline. It compared an email to physicians containing patient-specific osteoporosis risk information and guidelines for evaluation and treatment with usual care (no email). This study was at high risk of bias for the allocation concealment and blinding domains. The email reminder changed health professional actions significantly, with professionals more likely to provide guideline-recommended osteoporosis treatment (bone density measurement and/or osteoporosis medication) when compared with usual care. The evidence for its impact on patient behaviours/actions was inconclusive. One measure found that the electronic medical reminder message impacted patient behaviour positively: patients had a higher calcium intake, and two found no difference between the two groups. The study did not assess primary health service outcomes or harms. As only one study was identified for inclusion, the results are inadequate to inform clinical practice in regard to the use of email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals. Future research needs to use high-quality study designs that take advantage of the most recent developments in information technology, with consideration of the complexity of email as an intervention, and costs.

  12. Email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyder, Clare; Atherton, Helen; Car, Mate; Heneghan, Carl J; Car, Josip

    2015-02-20

    trial involving 327 patients and 159 healthcare providers at baseline. It compared an email to physicians containing patient-specific osteoporosis risk information and guidelines for evaluation and treatment versus usual care (no email). This study was at high risk of bias for the allocation concealment and blinding domains. The email reminder changed health professional actions significantly, with professionals more likely to provide guideline-recommended osteoporosis treatment (bone density measurement or osteoporosis medication, or both) when compared with usual care. The evidence for its impact on patient behaviours or actions was inconclusive. One measure found that the electronic medical reminder message impacted patient behaviour positively (patients had a higher calcium intake), and two found no difference between the two groups. The study did not assess health service outcomes or harms.No new studies were identified for this update. Only one study was identified for inclusion, providing insufficient evidence for guiding clinical practice in regard to the use of email for clinical communication between healthcare professionals. Future research should aim to utilise high-quality study designs that use the most recent developments in information technology, with consideration of the complexity of email as an intervention.

  13. Assessing the applicability of qualitative comparative analysis for the evaluation of complex projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Verweij (Stefan); L.M. Gerrits (Lasse)

    2012-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper introduces and assesses Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) as a complexity-informed framework for evaluating complex infrastructure projects coupled with area development. This is done in four steps. First, the properties of infrastructure and area

  14. Online Database for the Assessment and Comparative Evaluation of Rehabilitation Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ward, T

    2001-01-01

    .... In this paper we report on efforts by the authors to address these issues through the establishment of an online database available over a variety of web devices for the comparative evaluation...

  15. Supporting home care for the dying: an evaluation of healthcare professionals' perspectives of an individually tailored hospice at home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Barbara A; Baldry, Catherine R; Groves, Karen E; Whelan, Alison; Sephton, Janice; Gaunt, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    To explore health care professionals' perspective of hospice at home service that has different components, individually tailored to meet the needs of patients. Over 50% of adults diagnosed with a terminal illness and the majority of people who have cancer, prefer to be cared for and to die in their own home. Despite this, most deaths occur in hospital. Increasing the options available for patients, including their place of care and death is central to current UK policy initiatives. Hospice at home services aim to support patients to remain at home, yet there are wide variations in the design of services and delivery. A hospice at home service was developed to provide various components (accompanied transfer home, crisis intervention and hospice aides) that could be tailored to meet the individual needs of patients. An evaluation study. Data were collected from 75 health care professionals. District nurses participated in one focus group (13) and 31 completed an electronic survey. Palliative care specialist nurses participated in a focus group (9). One hospital discharge co-ordinator and two general practitioners participated in semi-structured interviews and a further 19 general practitioners completed the electronic survey. Health care professionals reported the impact and value of each of the components of the service, as helping to support patients to remain at home, by individually tailoring care. They also positively reported that support for family carers appeared to enable them to continue coping, rapid access to the service was suggested to contribute to faster hospital discharges and the crisis intervention service was identified as helping patients remain in their own home, where they wanted to be. Health care professionals perceived that the additional individualised support provided by this service contributed to enabling patients to continue be cared for and to die at home in their place of choice. This service offers various components of a hospice

  16. Mobile phone-based interactive voice response as a tool for improving access to healthcare in remote areas in Ghana - an evaluation of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; May, J; Krumkamp, R; Lamshöft, M; Kreuels, B; Owusu-Dabo, E; Mohammed, A; Bonacic Marinovic, A; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; Fobil, J N

    2017-05-01

    To investigate and determine the factors that enhanced or constituted barriers to the acceptance of an mHealth system which was piloted in Asante-Akim North District of Ghana to support healthcare of children. Four semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 37 mothers. Participants were selected from a study population of mothers who subscribed to a pilot mHealth system which used an interactive voice response (IVR) for its operations. Data were evaluated using qualitative content analysis methods. In addition, a short quantitative questionnaire assessed system's usability (SUS). Results revealed 10 categories of factors that facilitated user acceptance of the IVR system including quality-of-care experience, health education and empowerment of women. The eight categories of factors identified as barriers to user acceptance included the lack of human interaction, lack of update and training on the electronic advices provided and lack of social integration of the system into the community. The usability (SUS median: 79.3; range: 65-97.5) of the system was rated acceptable. The principles of the tested mHealth system could be of interest during infectious disease outbreaks, such as Ebola or Lassa fever, when there might be a special need for disease-specific health information within populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Applicability of the comet assay in evaluation of DNA damage in healthcare providers' working with antineoplastic drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Hajaghazadeh, Mohammad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Zare Sakhvidi, Fariba; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Unintended occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ANDs) may occur in medical personnel. Some ANDs are known human carcinogens and exposure can be monitored by genotoxic biomarkers. To evaluate the obstacles to obtaining conclusive results from a comet assay test to determine DNA damage among AND exposed healthcare workers. We systematically reviewed studies that used alkaline comet assay to determine the magnitude and significance of DNA damage among health care workers with potential AND exposure. Fifteen studies were eligible for review and 14 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Under random effect assumption, the estimated standardized mean difference (SMD) in the DNA damage of health care workers was 1.93 (95% CI: 1.15-2.71, p comet moment, I2 test results, as a measure of heterogeneity, dropped to zero. Heterogeneity analysis showed that date of study publication was a possible source of heterogeneity (B = -0.14; p comet assay methodological variables, and exposure characteristics may be responsible for heterogenic data from comet assay studies and interfere with obtaining conclusive results. Lack of quantitative environmental exposure measures and variation in comet assay protocols across studies are important obstacles in generalization of results.

  18. Applicability of the comet assay in evaluation of DNA damage in healthcare providers’ working with antineoplastic drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Sakhvidi, Mohammad Javad; Hajaghazadeh, Mohammad; Mostaghaci, Mehrdad; Mehrparvar, Amir houshang; Zare Sakhvidi, Fariba; Naghshineh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Unintended occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ANDs) may occur in medical personnel. Some ANDs are known human carcinogens and exposure can be monitored by genotoxic biomarkers. Objective To evaluate the obstacles to obtaining conclusive results from a comet assay test to determine DNA damage among AND exposed healthcare workers. Methods We systematically reviewed studies that used alkaline comet assay to determine the magnitude and significance of DNA damage among health care workers with potential AND exposure. Fifteen studies were eligible for review and 14 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Results Under random effect assumption, the estimated standardized mean difference (SMD) in the DNA damage of health care workers was 1.93 (95% CI: 1.15–2.71, p comet moment, I2 test results, as a measure of heterogeneity, dropped to zero. Heterogeneity analysis showed that date of study publication was a possible source of heterogeneity (B = −0.14; p comet assay methodological variables, and exposure characteristics may be responsible for heterogenic data from comet assay studies and interfere with obtaining conclusive results. Lack of quantitative environmental exposure measures and variation in comet assay protocols across studies are important obstacles in generalization of results. PMID:27110842

  19. Romanian healthcare system at a glance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Balan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian healthcare system is facing constant challenges to produce high quality care with low costs. Objectives The paper aims to analyze the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system in terms of resources allocation. The evaluation and the dimension of healthcare system efficiency are important for identifying a balance between the resources required and the health outcomes. Prior Work Previous studies describe the Romanian healthcare system as a system in transition. This study focuses on the relationship between the inputs and outputs of the system. Approach In order to assess the efficiency of the Romanian healthcare system we use Data Envelopment Analysis approach. Both input and output healthcare indicators are observed for the period 1999-2010 and the years when healthcare inputs have been used efficiently are identified. Results The results show that human, financial, and technological resources have been used at maximum capacity in 1999, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010. Implications Though efficiency is defined differently by diverse stakeholders, healthcare policies should focus on rising the responsibility of communities and individuals for better treatments and services and better access to information on healthcare providers. Value The paper is an empirically based study of the healthcare resources allocation in Romania.

  20. Effect on maternal and child health services in Rwanda of payment to primary health-care providers for performance: an impact evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinga, Paulin; Gertler, Paul J; Binagwaho, Agnes; Soucat, Agnes L B; Sturdy, Jennifer; Vermeersch, Christel M J

    2011-04-23

    Evidence about the best methods with which to accelerate progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals is urgently needed. We assessed the effect of performance-based payment of health-care providers (payment for performance; P4P) on use and quality of child and maternal care services in health-care facilities in Rwanda. 166 facilities were randomly assigned at the district level either to begin P4P funding between June, 2006, and October, 2006 (intervention group; n=80), or to continue with the traditional input-based funding until 23 months after study baseline (control group; n=86). Randomisation was done by coin toss. We surveyed facilities and 2158 households at baseline and after 23 months. The main outcome measures were prenatal care visits and institutional deliveries, quality of prenatal care, and child preventive care visits and immunisation. We isolated the incentive effect from the resource effect by increasing comparison facilities' input-based budgets by the average P4P payments made to the treatment facilities. We estimated a multivariate regression specification of the difference-in-difference model in which an individual's outcome is regressed against a dummy variable, indicating whether the facility received P4P that year, a facility-fixed effect, a year indicator, and a series of individual and household characteristics. Our model estimated that facilities in the intervention group had a 23% increase in the number of institutional deliveries and increases in the number of preventive care visits by children aged 23 months or younger (56%) and aged between 24 months and 59 months (132%). No improvements were seen in the number of women completing four prenatal care visits or of children receiving full immunisation schedules. We also estimate an increase of 0·157 standard deviations (95% CI 0·026-0·289) in prenatal quality as measured by compliance with Rwandan prenatal care clinical practice guidelines. The P4P scheme in Rwanda had

  1. The Development and User Satisfaction Evaluation of Internet-Based N-Screen Healthcare Walking Content to Increase Continuous Usage Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youm, Sekyoung

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the current study is (1) to apply Internet-based N-Screen (this is used like the term "emultiscreen"; as the technology that provides services of shared content or application via N devices, it includes all screens such as personal computers [PCs], TV, and mobile devices) services to healthcare services by developing games for improving one's health and (2) to present ways to activate the use of health promotion contents in the future by investigating user satisfaction and whether there is any intention to accept the contents and/or use the services continuously. In order to evaluate the customized health maintenance content provided by the healthcare walking system developed in the current study, 98 adult men and women residing in Seoul, Korea, were instructed to use 10 minutes' worth of the walking content. Perceived quality, level of trust in the results, effectiveness of the exercise, and overall satisfaction were measured in regard to the N-Screen-based walking content, including those for the cell phone, PC, and Internet protocol TV (IPTV). Walking contents using N-Screen services were perceived with high levels of trust in the results of the exercise, the effectiveness of the exercise, and overall satisfaction. In terms of the usability of N-Screen services, the younger the participants, the more usable they found the mobile or PC programs. The older the participants, the more usable they found the IPTV screens, although they still struggled with using the content given; operating IPTVs proved to be difficult for them. Furthermore, participants who were engaged in exercise on a regular basis were less satisfied with the program, in general. The present study has developed a walking system using N-Screen programs to make the most common and effective forms of exercise-walking and running-accessible indoors. This may increase motivation to exercise by offering services that boost one's interest in exercising, such as personal monitoring and real

  2. Healthcare priority setting in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukachi, Salome A.; Onyango-Ouma, Washington; Siso, Jared Maaka

    2014-01-01

    improves the priority setting decisions. This paper describes the healthcare priority setting processes in Malindi district, Kenya, prior to the implementation of A4R in 2008 and evaluates the process for its conformance with the conditions for A4R. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions with key...

  3. 'Reframing Healthcare Services through the Lens of Co-Production' (RheLaunCh): a study protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of mechanisms by which healthcare and social services impact the health and well-being of patients with COPD and CHF in the USA and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Gijs; Johnson, Julie; Batalden, Paul; Carlson, Michelle; Geense, Wytske; Groenewoud, Stef; Jones, Sylvester; Roy, Brita; Sansone, Christina; Wolf, Judith R L M; Bart, Bradley; Wollersheim, Hub

    2017-09-07

    The USA lags behind other high-income countries in many health indicators. Outcome differences are associated with differences in the relative spending between healthcare and social services at the national level. The impact of the ratio and delivery of social and healthcare services on the individual patient's health is however unknown. ' Reframing Healthcare Services through the Lens of Co-Production ' (RheLaunCh) will be a cross-Atlantic comparative study of the mechanisms by which healthcare and social service delivery may impact patient health with chronic conditions. Insight into these mechanisms is needed to better and cost-effectively organise healthcare and social services. We designed a mixed methods study to compare the socioeconomic background, needs of and service delivery to patients with congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA and the Netherlands. We will conduct: (1) a literature scan to compare national and regional healthcare and social service systems; (2) a retrospective database study to compare patient's socioeconomic and clinical characteristics and the service use and spending at the national, regional and hospital level; (3) a survey to compare patient perceived quality of life, receipt and experience of service delivery and ability of these services to meet patient needs; and (4) multiple case studies to understand what patients need to better govern their quality of life and how needs are met by services. Ethics approval was granted by the ethics committee of the Radboud University Medical Center (2016-2423) in the Netherlands and by the Human Subjects Research Committee of the Hennepin Health Care System, Inc. (HSR #16-4230) in the USA. Multiple approaches will be used for dissemination of results, including (inter)national research presentations and peer-reviewed publications. A website will be established to support the development of a community of practice. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  4. A Comparative Evaluation of Procedural Level Generators in the Mario AI Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Britton; Dahlskog, Steve; Shaker, Noor

    dierent from another in terms of its output. To remedy this, we have conducted a large-scale comparative evaluation of level generators for the Mario AI Benchmark, a research-friendly clone of the classic platform game Super Mario Bros. In all, we compare the output of seven dierent level generators from...

  5. Programmatic correlates of maternal healthcare seeking behaviors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Considerable improvement in maternal healthcare use has been observed since the inception of the health extension program (HEP) in Ethiopia in 2003. Objective: This paper evaluates the influence of HEP outreach strategies on maternal healthcare use. Method: Cross-sectional survey of 2,916 women with ...

  6. Evaluating application of the National Healthcare Safety Network central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance definition: a survey of pediatric intensive care and hematology/oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Aditya H; Miller, Marlene R; Gao, Cuilan; Rosenberg, Carol; Morrell, Gloria C; Coffin, Susan E; Huskins, W Charles

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the application of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definition in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) and pediatric hematology/oncology units (PHOUs) participating in a multicenter quality improvement collaborative to reduce CLABSIs; to identify sources of variability in the application of the definition. Online survey using 18 standardized case scenarios. Each described a positive blood culture in a patient and required a yes- or-no answer to the question "Is this a CLABSI?" NHSN staff responses were the reference standard. Sixty-five US PICUs and PHOUs. Staff who routinely adjudicate CLABSIs using NHSN definitions. Sixty responses were received from 58 (89%) of 65 institutions; 78% of respondents were infection preventionists, infection control officers, or infectious disease physicians. Responses matched those of NHSN staff for 78% of questions. The mean (SE) percentage of concurring answers did not differ for scenarios evaluating application of 1 of the 3 criteria ("known pathogen," 78% [1.7%]; "skin contaminant, >1 year of age," 76% [SE, 2.5%]; "skin contaminant, ≤1 year of age," 81% [3.8%]; [Formula: see text]). The mean percentage of concurring answers was lower for scenarios requiring respondents to determine whether a CLABSI was present or incubating on admission (64% [4.6%]; [Formula: see text]) or to distinguish between primary and secondary bacteremia (65% [2.5%]; [Formula: see text]). The accuracy of application of the CLABSI definition was suboptimal. Efforts to reduce variability in identifying CLABSIs that are present or incubating on admission and in distinguishing primary from secondary bloodstream infection are needed.

  7. Improving opioid safety practices in primary care: protocol for the development and evaluation of a multifaceted, theory-informed pilot intervention for healthcare providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leece, Pamela; Buchman, Daniel Z; Hamilton, Michael; Timmings, Caitlyn; Shantharam, Yalnee; Moore, Julia; Furlan, Andrea D

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In North America, drug overdose deaths are reaching unprecedented levels, largely driven by increasing prescription opioid-related deaths. Despite the development of several opioid guidelines, prescribing behaviours still contribute to poor patient outcomes and societal harm. Factors at the provider and system level may hinder or facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines; interventions designed to address such factors are needed. Methods and analysis Using implementation science and behaviour change theory, we have planned the development and evaluation of a comprehensive Opioid Self-Assessment Package, designed to increase adherence to the Canadian Opioid Guideline among family physicians. The intervention uses practical educational and self-assessment tools to provide prescribers with feedback on their current knowledge and practices, and resources to improve their practice. The evaluation approach uses a pretest and post-test design and includes both quantitative and qualitative methods at baseline and 6 months. We will recruit a purposive sample of approximately 10 family physicians in Ontario from diverse practice settings, who currently treat patients with long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain. Quantitative data will be analysed using basic descriptive statistics, and qualitative data will be analysed using the Framework Method. Ethics and dissemination The University Health Network Research Ethics Board approved this study. Dissemination plan includes publications, conference presentations and brief stakeholder reports. This evidence-informed, theory-driven intervention has implications for national application of opioid quality improvement tools in primary care settings. We are engaging experts and end users in advisory and stakeholder roles throughout our project to increase its national relevance, application and sustainability. The performance measures could be used as the basis for health system quality improvement

  8. Healthcare system intervention for prevention of birth injuries - process evaluation of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and agreement for change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nyström, Monica E; Westerlund, Anna; Höög, Elisabet; Millde-Luthander, Charlotte; Högberg, Ulf; Grunewald, Charlotta

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is fundamental in high quality healthcare systems but despite an excellent record of perinatal care in Sweden some children still suffer from substandard care and unnecessary birth injuries...

  9. Public perceptions of healthcare in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy Fy; Joshi, Veena Dhanajay

    2008-02-01

    Understanding public perceptions of healthcare delivery is important to guide policy formulation and practice as well as to identify areas where public health communication needs to be strengthened to overcome misconceptions and allay unfounded concerns. We conducted a survey of Singapore residents to determine perceptions of the affordability and quality of healthcare in Singapore. A sampling frame was drawn from the 2005/2006 edition of the telephone directory. One thousand seven hundred and eighty-three respondents were interviewed via telephone and asked to rank their agreement with statements pertaining to healthcare cost and quality on a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents were representative of the general population in ethnicity and housing type but lower income households were over-represented. 79.6% of respondents agreed that Singapore had a good healthcare system and 57.5% agreed that the government provided good and affordable healthcare to Singaporeans. The majority agreed that healthcare was generally affordable, especially at polyclinics (78%) and restructured hospitals (50%) and that the quality of healthcare in Singapore was high. Comparing primary and tertiary care, there was uniformity in the perception of quality at both levels but respondents assessed tertiary healthcare to be less affordable (P Singapore healthcare is generally regarded to be high although there are growing concerns regarding the affordability of healthcare.

  10. Healthcare. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This executive summary highlights several findings about healthcare. These are: (1) Healthcare is 18 percent of the U.S. economy, twice as high as in other countries; (2) There are two labor markets in healthcare: high-skill, high-wage professional and technical jobs and low-skill, low-wage support jobs; (3) Demand for postsecondary education in…

  11. The quality of healthcare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of healthcare provided by a healthcare system is not always easily assessed. How can one assess the smile of reassurance from a nursing sister or the feeling of satisfaction of a patient when visiting a doctor in a resource-limited setting? There are, however, some objective measures of healthcare activity.

  12. Physician Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Physician Compare, which meets Affordable Care Act of 2010 requirements, helps you search for and select physicians and other healthcare professionals enrolled in...

  13. Developing and evaluating the implementation of a complex intervention: using mixed methods to inform the design of a randomised controlled trial of an oral healthcare intervention after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Marian C; Stott, David J; Norrie, John; Chalmers, Campbell; St George, Bridget; Sweeney, Petrina M; Langhorne, Peter

    2011-07-05

    Many interventions delivered within the stroke rehabilitation setting could be considered complex, though some are more complex than others. The degree of complexity might be based on the number of and interactions between levels, components and actions targeted within the intervention. The number of (and variation within) participant groups and the contexts in which it is delivered might also reflect the extent of complexity. Similarly, designing the evaluation of a complex intervention can be challenging. Considerations include the necessity for intervention standardisation, the multiplicity of outcome measures employed to capture the impact of a multifaceted intervention and the delivery of the intervention across different clinical settings operating within varying healthcare contexts. Our aim was to develop and evaluate the implementation of a complex, multidimensional oral health care (OHC) intervention for people in stroke rehabilitation settings which would inform the development of a randomised controlled trial. After reviewing the evidence for the provision of OHC following stroke, multi-disciplinary experts informed the development of our intervention. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods we evaluated the implementation of the complex OHC intervention across patients, staff and service levels of care. We also adopted a pragmatic approach to patient recruitment, the completion of assessment tools and delivery of OHC, alongside an attention to the context in which it was delivered. We demonstrated the feasibility of implementing a complex OHC intervention across three levels of care. The complementary nature of the mixed methods approach to data gathering provided a complete picture of the implementation of the intervention and a detailed understanding of the variations within and interactions between the components of the intervention. Information on the feasibility of the outcome measures used to capture impact across a range of components was

  14. On mining latent topics from healthcare chat logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Huang, Zhengxing; Gan, Chenxi

    2016-06-01

    Public and internet-based social media such as online healthcare-oriented chat groups provide a convenient channel for patients and people concerned about health to communicate and share information with each other. The chat logs of an online healthcare-oriented chat group can potentially be used to extract latent topics, to encourage participation, and to recommend relevant healthcare information to users. This paper addresses the use of online healthcare chat logs to automatically discover both underlying topics and user interests. We present a new probabilistic model that exploits healthcare chat logs to find hidden topics and changes in these topics over time. The proposed model uses separate but associated hidden variables to explore both topics and individual interests such that it can provide useful insights to the participants of online healthcare chat groups about their interests in terms of weighted topics or vice versa. We evaluate the proposed model on a real-world chat log by comparing its performance to benchmark topic models, i.e., latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) and Author Topic Model (ATM), on the topic extraction task. The chat log is obtained from an online chat group of pregnant women, which consists of 233,452 chat word tokens contributed by 118 users. Both detected individual interests and underlying topics with their progressive information over time are demonstrated. The results show that the performance of the proposed model exceeds that of the benchmark models. The experimental results illustrate that the proposed model is a promising method for extracting healthcare knowledge from social media data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sustainable healthcare: how to assess and improve healthcare structures' sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoli, M; Capolongo, S; Bottero, M; Cavagliato, E; Speranza, S; Volpatti, L

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is a broad and debated subject, often difficult to be defined and applied into real projects, especially when dealing with a complex scenario as the one of healthcare. Many research studies and evaluation systems have handled this topic from different perspectives, but many limits and criticalities still have to be overcome to properly cope with actual needs. The Sustainable Healthcare project has been developed through three main phases: a deep study of the state of the art, unraveling pros and cons of available sustainability scoring systems; an accurate analysis of the stakeholders network and their needs; the realization of an objective evaluation framework, through scientific methods, as the ANP. The newly developed evaluation system takes into consideration all the three pillars of sustainability, analyzing social, environmental and economic sustainability through a set of criteria, specified by measurable indicators. So the system identifies both global sustainability and specific critical areas, pointing out possible strategic solutions to improve sustainability. The evaluation is achieved through technical analyses and qualitative surveys, which eventually allow to quantitatively assess sustainability, through a sound scoring method. This study proposes an innovative evaluation method to determine the sustainability of a hospital, already existing or in the design phase, within the European context. The Sustainable Healthcare system overcomes some of the current evaluation systems' limits by establishing a multidisciplinary approach and being an easy-to-use tool. This protocol is intended to be of support in the identification of the main hospital's weaknesses and in setting priorities for implementation of the solutions.

  16. Sensing behaviour in healthcare design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Hysse Forchhammer, Birgitte; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    specifically on activity and location data that can easily be obtained from smartphones or wearables. We further demonstrate how these are applied in healthcare design using an example from dementia care. Comparing a current and proposed scenario exemplifies how integrating sensor-derived information about...

  17. Safety Profile and Costs of Related Adverse Events of Trastuzumab Emtansine for the Treatment of HER2-Positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer Compared to Capecitabine Plus Lapatinib from the Perspective of the Canadian Health-Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwko, Charles; Prady, Catherine; Yunger, Simon; Pollex, Erika; Moser, Aurelie

    2015-08-01

    Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, KADCYLA(®)) is an antibody-drug conjugate comprised of the cytotoxic agent DM1 and trastuzumab (HERCEPTIN(®)). The safety profile of T-DM1 in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer previously treated with trastuzumab and a taxane was investigated in the phase III EMILIA trial. The trial demonstrated clinically and statistically meaningful differences in the safety profile between T-DM1 and capecitabine plus lapatinib (CAP + LAP). The objective of this study was to estimate the costs of managing treatment-related grade ≥ 3 adverse events (AEs) that occurred in ≥ 2% of patients and grade 2 AEs that occurred in ≥ 5% of patients taking T-DM1 compared with patients taking CAP + LAP based on the EMILIA trial, from the perspective of Canadian public payers. An Excel-based model was utilized to estimate the relevant costs. Clinical data were obtained from the EMILIA trial. Cost information was obtained from the literature, clinical experts, and standard cost sources. The analysis was conducted from the Canadian public-payer perspective and reported in 2014 Canadian dollars (CAD). The management of included treatment-related AEs resulted in higher estimated per-patient costs of CAD6901 for CAP + LAP versus CAD3380 for T-DM1, resulting in savings of CAD3521. From a Canadian perspective, this analysis demonstrated that utilizing T-DM1 for the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer results in substantial savings to the public health-care system when considering the costs of treatment-related AEs, due to fewer amount of toxicities compared with CAP + LAP. Results of various sensitivity analyses investigating changes in number and costs of AEs confirmed the findings; however, the magnitude of cost savings varied. Further analyses are necessary to determine whether these cost savings would occur in other countries and health-care systems.

  18. A Comparative Study of Evaluations of Language Learning Potential by Aptitude Battery, Two Teacher Evaluations, and Student Self-Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockman, John F.

    In an effort to support Carroll's premise that there might be a relationship between foreign language aptitude and the degree to which the learner is capable of coping with the pace of language instruction, this study describes the comparative effectiveness of predicting student language learning potential through the Pimsleur Aptitude Battery,…

  19. High Rate of Implementation of Proposed Actions for Improvement With the Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis Method: Evaluation of 117 Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhrn, Annica; Ericsson, Carin; Andersson, Christer; Elfström, Johan

    2015-02-24

    The aims of this study were to investigate what kind of impact the Healthcare Failure Mode Effect Analysis (HFMEA) had on the organization in 1 county council in Sweden and to evaluate the method of working for multidisciplinary teams performing HFMEA. Three main outcome measures were used: the quality of the documentation from the HFMEAs, fulfillment of the primary goal of the HFMEA, and, finally, whether proposed actions for improvement were implemented. The study involved retrospective analysis of the documentation from 117 performed HFMEAs from 3 hospitals in the county council of Östergötland, Sweden, and interviews or questionnaires with team leaders and managers between 2006 and 2010. A proposed change in the organizational structure was the most common issue in the analyses. Eighty-nine percent of the written reports were of high quality. A median of 10 serious risks were detected, and 10 proposed actions (median) were made. In 78% of the HFMEAs, all or a large part of these had been implemented a few years afterward. We were unable to find factors that promoted the rate of implementation of proposed actions. Seventy-eight percent of the managers were completely satisfied with the results of the HFMEA. The mean cost per risk analysis was &OV0556;1909. Most of the proposed actions were implemented. The use of HFMEA can be improved using fewer team leaders but with more experience. The work involved in writing a report can be reduced without loss of impact on the organization.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

  20. Application of Student t-test for evaluation of interlaboratory comparative tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Shatalov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of interlaboratory comparative tests typically represent a small sample size. Therefore, to evaluate the quality of test results of laboratories participating in interlaboratory comparative tests, it is proposed to use Student t-test, which connects three main characteristics of small sample: the width of the confidence interval, the corresponding confidence probability and sample size. The examples of interlaboratory comparative tests of diesel show, that the use Student test allows to more objectively evaluate the quality of tests results of laboratories, in particular to identify and assess the results outside the confidence interval of the certified value of the sample for inspection. The calculation of average values of Student statistic for the aggregate test results allows to evaluate the quality of the laboratory, to range them, to form a ranking of laboratories on an objective basis.

  1. Evaluation of Serum Cystatin C compared with Creatinine: A study in patients with Pre-eclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Salma Malik Mmordas; Omer Fadol Edris

    2015-01-01

    This is cross sectional study aim to evaluate of serum Cystatin C and Creatinine level among pre-clampsia patients. Hundred subjects were evaluate in this study, 50 preclampsia patients as cases and 50 healthy apparently as control groups. Serum Cystatin C and Creatinine were measuring using MISP-i2, Mindray respectively. In assessment of renal function and compare with creatin in women which diagnostic   preeclampsia.  Result showed there was significant increase in mean concentration of Cys...

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Spectral Transmittance of Some Welding Glasses with ANSI Z87.1

    OpenAIRE

    saeed Rahmani; Alireza Akbarzadeh Baghban; Mohammadreza Nazari; Mohammad Ghassemi-Broumand

    2016-01-01

    Background: Welding emits harmful rays to the eyes. We evaluate and compare the UV, blue light and IR transmittance characteristics of some currently available welding safety protectors with ANSI Z87.1 criteria.Materials and Methods: Three type of welding safety protectors (three of each type) have been evaluated for spectral transmittance. One-sample T-test was performed to establish is there a statistically significant difference between the standard criteria and UV, blue and IR regions for...

  3. Capillary compared to venous blood sampling in clozapine treatment: patients׳ and healthcare practitioners׳ experiences with a point-of-care device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogers, Jan P A M; Bui, Hong; Herruer, Martien; Cohen, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Underuse of the antipsychotic clozapine for schizophrenia is an impediment to improving outcomes for patients. Because of its possible severe side effects, including granulocytopenia or even agranulocytosis, clozapine treatment entails regular WBC monitoring, which can be a major drawback for patients and practitioners. The HemoCue WBC DIFF system is a point-of-care device using capillary blood sampling which provides WBC counts with differentials, including granulocytes. We investigated if capillary sampling instead of conventional venous sampling might diminish the burden for patients and practitioners and motivate them to continue clozapine treatment. A randomized cross-over trial design was used to compare the two sampling methods. Patients׳ subjective experiences of various aspects of blood sampling were rated on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Patients and practitioners were also asked if they had any preference for venous or capillary sampling and patients were asked if the sampling method influenced their motivation to continue clozapine treatment. Seventy-three patients were included in this study. Three dropped out before completion. The VAS ratings on all five aspects and the total burden experienced showed a consistent pattern favouring capillary blood sampling (psampling at a laboratory and practitioners also preferred it. Using this method might therefore boost clozapine prescription rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. A retrospective review comparing two-year patient-reported outcomes, costs, and healthcare resource utilization for TLIF vs. PLF for single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Elliott; Chotai, Silky; Stonko, David; Wick, Joseph; Sielatycki, Alex; Devin, Clinton J

    2017-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs), morbidity, and costs of TLIF vs PLF to determine whether one treatment was superior in the setting of single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients undergoing TLIF or PLF for single-level spondylolisthesis were included for retrospective analysis. EQ-5D, ODI, SF-12 MCS/PCS, NRS-BP/LP scores were collected at baseline and 24 months after surgery. 90-day post-operative complications, revision surgery rates, and satisfaction scores were also collected. Two-year resource use was multiplied by unit costs based on Medicare payment amounts (direct cost). Patient and caregiver workday losses were multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate (indirect cost). Total cost was used to assess mean total 2-year cost per QALYs gained after surgery. 62 and 37 patients underwent TLIF and PLF, respectively. Patients in the PLF group were older (p surgery (p surgery, satisfaction, and similar gain in QALYs and cost per QALYs gained. There was no significant difference in 24-month direct, indirect, and total cost. Overall costs and health care utilization were similar in both the groups. Both TLIF and PLF for single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis provide improvement in disability, pain, quality of life, and general health.

  5. Improving opioid safety practices in primary care: protocol for the development and evaluation of a multifaceted, theory-informed pilot intervention for healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leece, Pamela; Buchman, Daniel Z; Hamilton, Michael; Timmings, Caitlyn; Shantharam, Yalnee; Moore, Julia; Furlan, Andrea D

    2017-04-26

    In North America, drug overdose deaths are reaching unprecedented levels, largely driven by increasing prescription opioid-related deaths. Despite the development of several opioid guidelines, prescribing behaviours still contribute to poor patient outcomes and societal harm. Factors at the provider and system level may hinder or facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines; interventions designed to address such factors are needed. Using implementation science and behaviour change theory, we have planned the development and evaluation of a comprehensive Opioid Self-Assessment Package, designed to increase adherence to the Canadian Opioid Guideline among family physicians. The intervention uses practical educational and self-assessment tools to provide prescribers with feedback on their current knowledge and practices, and resources to improve their practice. The evaluation approach uses a pretest and post-test design and includes both quantitative and qualitative methods at baseline and 6 months. We will recruit a purposive sample of approximately 10 family physicians in Ontario from diverse practice settings, who currently treat patients with long-term opioid therapy for chronic pain. Quantitative data will be analysed using basic descriptive statistics, and qualitative data will be analysed using the Framework Method. The University Health Network Research Ethics Board approved this study. Dissemination plan includes publications, conference presentations and brief stakeholder reports. This evidence-informed, theory-driven intervention has implications for national application of opioid quality improvement tools in primary care settings. We are engaging experts and end users in advisory and stakeholder roles throughout our project to increase its national relevance, application and sustainability. The performance measures could be used as the basis for health system quality improvement indicators to monitor opioid prescribing. Additionally, the

  6. Sustainability in health care by allocating resources effectively (SHARE) 3: examining how resource allocation decisions are made, implemented and evaluated in a local healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Claire; Allen, Kelly; Waller, Cara; Brooke, Vanessa

    2017-05-09

    This is the third in a series of papers reporting a program of Sustainability in Health care by Allocating Resources Effectively (SHARE) in a local healthcare setting. Leaders in a large Australian health service planned to establish an organisation-wide, systematic, integrated, evidence-based approach to disinvestment. In order to introduce new systems and processes for disinvestment into existing decision-making infrastructure, we aimed to understand where, how and by whom resource allocation decisions were made, implemented and evaluated. We also sought the knowledge and experience of staff regarding previous disinvestment activities. Structured interviews, workshops and document analysis were used to collect information from multiple sources in an environmental scan of decision-making systems and processes. Findings were synthesised using a theoretical framework. Sixty-eight respondents participated in interviews and workshops. Eight components in the process of resource allocation were identified: Governance, Administration, Stakeholder engagement, Resources, Decision-making, Implementation, Evaluation and, where appropriate, Reinvestment of savings. Elements of structure and practice for each component are described and a new framework was developed to capture the relationships between them. A range of decision-makers, decision-making settings, type and scope of decisions, criteria used, and strengths, weaknesses, barriers and enablers are outlined. The term 'disinvestment' was not used in health service decision-making. Previous projects that involved removal, reduction or restriction of current practices were driven by quality and safety issues, evidence-based practice or a need to find resource savings and not by initiatives where the primary aim was to disinvest. Measuring resource savings is difficult, in some situations impossible. Savings are often only theoretical as resources released may be utilised immediately by patients waiting for beds, clinic

  7. Knowledge and Attitude of Healthcare Workers towards Kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The knowledge and attitude of healthcare workers towards kidney transplantation are fundamental in the development and sustainability of transplant programs. Healthcare workers caninfluence the willingness to donate kidneys. Objectives: To evaluate the knowledge and attitude of Nigerian healthcare ...

  8. WOODSTOVE EMISSION SAMPLING METHODS COMPARABILITY ANALYSIS AND IN-SITU EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY WOODSTOVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report compares simultaneous results from three woodstove sampling methods and evaluates particulate emission rates of conventional and Oregon-certified catalytic and noncatalytic woodstoves in six Portland, OR, houses. EPA Methods 5G and 5H and the field emission sampler (A...

  9. A Comparative Study of Monte Carlo Methods for Efficient Evaluation of Marginal Likelihoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. David (David); N. Basturk (Nalan); L.F. Hoogerheide (Lennart); H.K. van Dijk (Herman)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractStrategic choices for efficient and accurate evaluation of marginal likelihoods by means of Monte Carlo simulation methods are studied for the case of highly non-elliptical posterior distributions. A comparative analysis is presented of possible advantages and limitations of different

  10. Comparing the Level of Positive Tendency in a Life Satisfaction Evaluation between Chinese and Western People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shih-jung; Wu, Chia-huei

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that people from Chinese cultural backgrounds have a smaller positive tendency in life evaluation compared to people in typical Western cultures. Participants first described their imagined best and worst life and then rated their current life on scale anchored by those imaginings (Mellor et al. "International Journal of Social…

  11. Evaluating Intangible Outcomes: Using Multiattribute Utility Analysis to Compare the Benefits and Costs of Social Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selameab, Tehout; Yeh, Stuart S.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, program managers are required to evaluate programs with multiple outcomes against costs. This is difficult when program outcomes are not easily translated into a common metric. This article compares cost benefit analysis with Multiple Attribute Utility Technology and discusses the application of judgment in both analytical…

  12. Poem Generator: A Comparative Quantitative Evaluation of a Microworlds-Based Learning Approach for Teaching English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a comparative quantitative evaluation of an approach to teaching poetry in the subject domain of English that employs a "guided discovery" pedagogy using computer-based microworlds. It uses a quasi-experimental design in order to measure performance gains in computational thinking and poetic thinking following a…

  13. Cost Effectiveness Ratio: Evaluation Tool for Comparing the Effectiveness of Similar Extension Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2015-01-01

    Extension educators have been challenged to be cost effective in their educational programming. The cost effectiveness ratio is a versatile evaluation indicator for Extension educators to compare the cost of achieving a unit of outcomes or educating a client in similar educational programs. This article describes the cost effectiveness ratio and…

  14. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  15. Improving Healthcare Logistics Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feibert, Diana Cordes

    provision whilst providing high quality care. Logistics activities in hospitals provide a significant opportunity for cost containment in healthcare through the implementation of best practices. Literature provides little guidance on how to improve healthcare logistics processes. This study investigates...... at hospitals in Denmark and the US investigating three different types of processes: bed logistics, hospital cleaning, and pharmaceutical distribution. Based on an analysis and comparison of the case studies, a set of factors were identified influencing the decision on how to improve healthcare logistics......Healthcare costs are increasing due to an ageing population and more sophisticated technologies and treatments. At the same time, patients expect high quality care at an affordable cost. The healthcare industry has therefore experienced increasing pressures to reduce the cost of healthcare...

  16. Healthcare financing in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananatu, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Malaysian healthcare system and its method of financing. The development of the healthcare delivery system in Malaysia is commendable. However, the strength and weaknesses of the public healthcare system and the financing problems encountered are also discussed. Cost of healthcare and funding of both the public and private sectors were also revealed. One must optimise the advantages of operating a health financing scheme which is affordable and controllable which contribute towards cost-containment and quality assurance. Thus, there is a need for the establishment of a National Healthcare Financing, a mechanism to sustain the healthcare delivery network and operate it as a viable option. A model of the National Health Financing Scheme (NHFS) was proposed.

  17. A conditional nonparametric analysis for measuring the efficiency of regional public healthcare delivery: an application to Greek prefectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkos, George E; Tzeremes, Nickolaos G

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the Greek public healthcare delivery efficiency from a regional perspective by applying conditional nonparametric models. The study reviews the existing literature on performance measurement and proposes models on these grounds. By using data envelopment analysis (DEA) and free disposal hull (FDH) models, the performance of public health delivery services of the Greek prefectures is evaluated. The efficiency levels of the Greek prefectures are compared and analyzed in a regional context. By using convex and non-convex models alongside with bootstrap techniques and conditional full frontier applications the paper develops models for regional public health delivery policy evaluation. The paper shows that higher levels of GDP per capita (GDPc) have a negative influence on the efficiency of regional healthcare delivery, indicating that regional economic growth does not ensure better healthcare delivery service. Furthermore the results reveal that population density increases the prefectures' efficiency of public health provision, indicating the over-supply of health services by urban hospitals. Finally, several healthcare delivery inefficiencies have been reported among the Greek prefectures emphasizing a poor state of healthcare delivery. The results indicate that after the reform of the Greek national healthcare system in 2000-2002, the absence of a unified healthcare policy was accompanied with misallocation of healthcare resources among the Greek prefectures creating socioeconomic health inequalities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating the Safety Profile of Non-Active Implantable Medical Devices Compared with Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Josep; Coloma, Preciosa M; Verhamme, Katia M C; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Rebollo, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Recent safety issues involving non-active implantable medical devices (NAIMDs) have highlighted the need for better pre-market and post-market evaluation. Some stakeholders have argued that certain features of medicine safety evaluation should also be applied to medical devices. Our objectives were to compare the current processes and methodologies for the assessment of NAIMD safety profiles with those for medicines, identify potential gaps, and make recommendations for the adoption of new methodologies for the ongoing benefit-risk monitoring of these devices throughout their entire life cycle. A literature review served to examine the current tools for the safety evaluation of NAIMDs and those for medicines. We searched MEDLINE using these two categories. We supplemented this search with Google searches using the same key terms used in the MEDLINE search. Using a comparative approach, we summarized the new product design, development cycle (preclinical and clinical phases), and post-market phases for NAIMDs and drugs. We also evaluated and compared the respective processes to integrate and assess safety data during the life cycle of the products, including signal detection, signal management, and subsequent potential regulatory actions. The search identified a gap in NAIMD safety signal generation: no global program exists that collects and analyzes adverse events and product quality issues. Data sources in real-world settings, such as electronic health records, need to be effectively identified and explored as additional sources of safety information, particularly in some areas such as the EU and USA where there are plans to implement the unique device identifier (UDI). The UDI and other initiatives will enable more robust follow-up and assessment of long-term patient outcomes. The safety evaluation system for NAIMDs differs in many ways from those for drugs, but both systems face analogous challenges with respect to monitoring real-world usage. Certain features

  19. [Evaluating healthcare workers' infection control practice in a Lima metropolitan hospital during the influenza A(H1N1) epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagui-Moscoso, Martín J; Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina B; Sanabria-Rojas, Hernán A; Encarnación-Gallardo, Edith E

    2012-01-01

    Determining healthcare workers' level of compliance with infection control practices in a Lima hospital during the influenza A(H1N1) epidemic. A cross-sectional observational study was made of 165 healthcare workers who provided inpatient care in risk areas like emergency services, emergency, intensive care and hospitalisation. The sample size was calculated using EpiInfo software (version 2000) and was based on simple systematic sampling. An ad hoc format validated by experts' judgement was used. 23.6 % (39/165) of the respondents washed their hands before and after contact with patients, 72.7 % (96/132) wore gloves for healthcare when so indicated, 61.0 % (64/105) washed their hands after removing gloves, while 58.0 % (76/131) of those who had contact with contaminated material did so after such contact. Only 14.5 % (24/165) of workers engaged in good practice. The percentage of healthcare workers' engaging in infection control practice in the study hospital during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) epidemic was low.

  20. Evaluating workforce developments to support children of mentally ill parents: implementing new interventions in the adult mental healthcare in Northern Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reedtz, C.; Lauritzen, C.; Doesum, K.T.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Background According to new Norwegian laws, mental healthcare for adults are obligated to assess all patients who are parents and to act on their children's needs. This article describes the study protocol of implementing the interventions Family Assessment and Child Talks for children of patients

  1. Knowledge management in Portuguese healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Sofia Gaspar; Ferreira, Maria Manuela Frederico

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge management imposes itself as a pressing need for the organizations of several sectors of the economy, including healthcare. to evaluate the perception of healthcare institution collaborators in relation to knowledge management in the institution where they operate and analyze the existence of differences in this perception, based on the institution's management model. a study conducted in a sample consisting of 671 collaborators from 10 Portuguese healthcare institutions with different models of management. In order to assess the knowledge management perception, we used a score designed from and based on items from the scores available in the literature. the perception of moderate knowledge management on the healthcare institutions and the statistically significant differences in knowledge management perception were evidenced in each management model. management knowledge takes place in healthcare institutions, and the current management model determines the way staff at these institutions manage their knowledge.

  2. Healthcare Data Analytics on the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajit Bhattacharya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meaningful analysis of voluminous health information has always been a challenge in most healthcare organizations. Accurate and timely information required by the management to lead a healthcare organization through the challenges found in the industry can be obtained using business intelligence (BI or business analytics tools. However, these require large capital investments to implement and support the large volumes of data that needs to be analyzed to identify trends. They also require enormous processing power which places pressure on the business resources in addition to the dynamic changes in the digital technology. This paper evaluates the various nuances of business analytics of healthcare hosted on the cloud computing environment. The paper explores BI being offered as Software as a Service (SaaS solution towards offering meaningful use of information for improving functions in healthcare enterprise. It also attempts to identify the challenges that healthcare enterprises face when making use of a BI SaaS solution.

  3. Marketing in Healthcare Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana BIRSA

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare marketing is a part of public services marketing. In developed countries, healthcare marketing can be applied to a microeconomic as well as to a macroeconomic level. The main feature of healthcare marketing is that there are products, markets, but there is no cash equivalent. For both traditional marketing and public healthcare marketing, the user of a product or service is called “consumer” and a group of consumers is mentioned as a “market”. Acceptance of marketing by USA heath s...

  4. Healthcare financing in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevenka Kovač

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare financing system is of crucial importance for the functioning of any healthcare system, especially because there is no country in the world that is able to provide all its residents with access to all the benefits afforded by modern medicine. Lack of resources in general and rising healthcare expenditures are considered a difficult issue to solve in Croatia as well. Since Croatia gained its independence, its healthcare system has undergone a number of reforms, the primary objective of which was to optimize healthcare services to the actual monetary capacity of the Croatian economy. The objectives of the mentioned re - forms were partially achieved. The solutions that have been offered until now, i.e. consolidation measures undertaken in the last 10 years were necessary; however, they have not improved the operating conditions. There is still the issue of the deficit from the previous years, i.e. outstanding payments, the largest in the last decade. Analysis of the performance of healthcare institutions in 2011 shows that the decision makers will have to take up a major challenge of finding a solution to the difficulties the Croatian healthcare system has been struggling with for decades, causing a debt of 7 billion kuna. At the same time, they will need to uphold the basic principles of the Healthcare Act, i.e. to provide access to healthcare and ensure its continuity, comprehensiveness and solidarity, keeping in mind that the National Budget Act and Fiscal Responsibility Act have been adopted.

  5. Healthcare Firms and the ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garefalakis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the continuous and drastic changes due to the economic crisis, along with the increasing market demands, major reforms are initiated in the healthcare sector in order to improve the quality of healthcare and operational efficiency, while reducing costs and optimizing back-end operations. ERP systems have been the basic technological infrastructure to many sectors as well as healthcare. The main objective of this study is to discuss how the adoption of ERP systems in healthcare organizations improves their functionality, simplifies their business processes, assure the quality of care services and helps their management accounting and controlling. This study presents also the stages required for the implementation of ERP system in healthcare organizations. This study utilizes a literature review in order to reach the research conclusions. Specifically, through related case studies and research, it examines how ERP systems are used to evaluate the better functionality of the healthcare organizations, addressing in parallel important problems, and possible malfunctions. The implementation of ERP systems in healthcare organizations promises to evolve and align strictly to the organizations’ corporate objectives and high-levels of healthcare quality. In order to accomplish this goal, the right decisions should be made by the managers of the healthcare organization regarding the choice of the appropriate ERP system following its installation and its application. Limited research exists on the significance ERP systems implementation in healthcare organizations, while possible dysfunctions and challenges during its installation and implementation are recorded. Therefore, new evidence in the significance of ERP systems in healthcare organization is provided.

  6. Public versus Private Healthcare Systems following Discharge from the ICU: A Propensity Score-Matched Comparison of Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe Leopoldo Dexheimer Neto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The long-term outcomes of patients after discharge from tertiary ICUs as they relate to the public versus private healthcare systems in Brazil have not yet been evaluated. Materials and Methods. A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted to compare the all-cause mortality and the physical functional status (PFS 24 months after discharge from the ICU between adult patients treated in the public and private healthcare systems. A propensity score- (PS- matched comparison of all causes of mortality and PFS 24 months after discharge from the ICU was performed. Results. In total, 928 patients were discharged from the ICU including 172 (18.6% patients in the public and 756 (81.4% patients in the private healthcare system. The results of the PS-matched comparison of all-cause mortality revealed higher mortality rates among the patients of the public healthcare system compared to those of the private healthcare system (47.3% versus 27.6%, P=0.003. The comparison of the PS-matched Karnofsky performance and Lawton activities of daily living scores between the ICU survivors of the public and private healthcare systems revealed no significant differences. Conclusions. The patients of private healthcare system exhibited significantly greater survival rates than the patients of the public healthcare system with similar PFS following ICU discharge.

  7. Public versus Private Healthcare Systems following Discharge from the ICU: A Propensity Score-Matched Comparison of Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Rosa, Regis Goulart; Duso, Bruno Achutti; Haas, Jaqueline Sanguiogo; Savi, Augusto; Cabral, Cláudia da Rocha; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; de Oliveira, Roselaine Pinheiro; Antônio, Ana Carolina Peçanha; Castro, Priscylla de Souza; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The long-term outcomes of patients after discharge from tertiary ICUs as they relate to the public versus private healthcare systems in Brazil have not yet been evaluated. Materials and Methods. A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted to compare the all-cause mortality and the physical functional status (PFS) 24 months after discharge from the ICU between adult patients treated in the public and private healthcare systems. A propensity score- (PS-) matched comparison of all causes of mortality and PFS 24 months after discharge from the ICU was performed. Results. In total, 928 patients were discharged from the ICU including 172 (18.6%) patients in the public and 756 (81.4%) patients in the private healthcare system. The results of the PS-matched comparison of all-cause mortality revealed higher mortality rates among the patients of the public healthcare system compared to those of the private healthcare system (47.3% versus 27.6%, P = 0.003). The comparison of the PS-matched Karnofsky performance and Lawton activities of daily living scores between the ICU survivors of the public and private healthcare systems revealed no significant differences. Conclusions. The patients of private healthcare system exhibited significantly greater survival rates than the patients of the public healthcare system with similar PFS following ICU discharge. PMID:27123450

  8. Public versus Private Healthcare Systems following Discharge from the ICU: A Propensity Score-Matched Comparison of Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Rosa, Regis Goulart; Duso, Bruno Achutti; Haas, Jaqueline Sanguiogo; Savi, Augusto; Cabral, Cláudia da Rocha; Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; de Oliveira, Roselaine Pinheiro; Antônio, Ana Carolina Peçanha; Castro, Priscylla de Souza; Teixeira, Cassiano

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The long-term outcomes of patients after discharge from tertiary ICUs as they relate to the public versus private healthcare systems in Brazil have not yet been evaluated. Materials and Methods. A multicenter prospective cohort study was conducted to compare the all-cause mortality and the physical functional status (PFS) 24 months after discharge from the ICU between adult patients treated in the public and private healthcare systems. A propensity score- (PS-) matched comparison of all causes of mortality and PFS 24 months after discharge from the ICU was performed. Results. In total, 928 patients were discharged from the ICU including 172 (18.6%) patients in the public and 756 (81.4%) patients in the private healthcare system. The results of the PS-matched comparison of all-cause mortality revealed higher mortality rates among the patients of the public healthcare system compared to those of the private healthcare system (47.3% versus 27.6%, P = 0.003). The comparison of the PS-matched Karnofsky performance and Lawton activities of daily living scores between the ICU survivors of the public and private healthcare systems revealed no significant differences. Conclusions. The patients of private healthcare system exhibited significantly greater survival rates than the patients of the public healthcare system with similar PFS following ICU discharge.

  9. Healthcare system information at language schools for newly arrived immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tynell, Lena Lyngholt; Wimmelmann, Camilla Lawaetz; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In most European countries, immigrants do not systematically learn about the host countries’ healthcare system when arriving. This study investigated how newly arrived immigrants perceived the information they received about the Danish healthcare system. Method: Immigrants attending...... a language school in Copenhagen in 2012 received either a course or written information on the Danish healthcare system and subsequently evaluated this quantitatively. Results: The evaluation revealed a positive appraisal of the course/information provided. Conclusion: In times of austerity, incorporating...... healthcare information into an already existing language programme may be pertinent for providing immigrants with knowledge on the healthcare system....

  10. Healthcare system intervention for prevention of birth injuries – process evaluation of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and agreement for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyström Monica E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is fundamental in high quality healthcare systems but despite an excellent record of perinatal care in Sweden some children still suffer from substandard care and unnecessary birth injuries. Sustainable patient safety improvements assume changes in key actors’ mental models, norms and culture as well as in the tools, design and organisation of work. Interventions positively affecting team mental models on safety issues are a first step to enhancing change. Our purpose was to study a national intervention programme for the prevention of birth injuries with the aim to elucidate how the main interventions of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and written agreement for change affected the teams and their mental model of patient safety, and thereby their readiness for change. Knowledge of relevant considerations before implementing this type of patient safety intervention series could thereby be increased. Methods Eighty participants in twenty-seven maternity units were interviewed after the first intervention sequence of the programme. A content analysis using a priori coding was performed in order to relate results to the anticipated outcomes of three basic interventions: self-assessment, peer review and written feedback, and agreement for change. Results The self-assessment procedure was valuable and served as a useful tool for elucidating strengths and weaknesses and identifying areas for improvement for a safer delivery in maternity units. The peer-review intervention was appreciated, despite it being of less value when considering the contribution to explicit outcome effects (i.e. new input to team mental models and new suggestions for actions. The feedback report and the mutual agreement on measures for improvements reached when signing the contract seemed exert positive pressures for change. Conclusions Our findings are in line with several studies stressing the importance of self-evaluation by

  11. Healthcare system intervention for prevention of birth injuries - process evaluation of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and agreement for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Monica E; Westerlund, Anna; Höög, Elisabet; Millde-Luthander, Charlotte; Högberg, Ulf; Grunewald, Charlotta

    2012-08-24

    Patient safety is fundamental in high quality healthcare systems but despite an excellent record of perinatal care in Sweden some children still suffer from substandard care and unnecessary birth injuries. Sustainable patient safety improvements assume changes in key actors' mental models, norms and culture as well as in the tools, design and organisation of work. Interventions positively affecting team mental models on safety issues are a first step to enhancing change. Our purpose was to study a national intervention programme for the prevention of birth injuries with the aim to elucidate how the main interventions of self-assessment, peer review, feedback and written agreement for change affected the teams and their mental model of patient safety, and thereby their readiness for change. Knowledge of relevant considerations before implementing this type of patient safety intervention series could thereby be increased. Eighty participants in twenty-seven maternity units were interviewed after the first intervention sequence of the programme. A content analysis using a priori coding was performed in order to relate results to the anticipated outcomes of three basic interventions: self-assessment, peer review and written feedback, and agreement for change. The self-assessment procedure was valuable and served as a useful tool for elucidating strengths and weaknesses and identifying areas for improvement for a safer delivery in maternity units. The peer-review intervention was appreciated, despite it being of less value when considering the contribution to explicit outcome effects (i.e. new input to team mental models and new suggestions for actions). The feedback report and the mutual agreement on measures for improvements reached when signing the contract seemed exert positive pressures for change. Our findings are in line with several studies stressing the importance of self-evaluation by encouraging a thorough review of objectives, practices and outcomes for the

  12. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture.

  13. Patients' satisfaction with healthcare: comparing general practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daprim ogaji

    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva. 2003;95(12):851-62. 14. Gasquet I, Dehé S, Gaudebout P, Falissard B. Regular visitors are not good substitutes for assessment of elderly patient satisfaction with nursing home care and services. The Journals of ...

  14. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassens, Mareli M; van Schalkwyk, Cari; du Toit, Elizabeth; Roest, Eline; Lombard, Carl J; Enarson, Donald A; Beyers, Nulda; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2013-01-01

    Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02) as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08). In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08). The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  15. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation — 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  16. Evaluation of Serum Cystatin C compared with Creatinine: A study in patients with Pre-eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Malik Mmordas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is cross sectional study aim to evaluate of serum Cystatin C and Creatinine level among pre-clampsia patients. Hundred subjects were evaluate in this study, 50 preclampsia patients as cases and 50 healthy apparently as control groups. Serum Cystatin C and Creatinine were measuring using MISP-i2, Mindray respectively. In assessment of renal function and compare with creatin in women which diagnostic   preeclampsia.  Result showed there was significant increase in mean concentration of Cystatin C in case versus control groups with P-value 0.000, insignificant different in Creatinine level when compare case group with control group with P-value 0.706. The study conclude that serum Cystatin C is higher in preclampsia patients while Creatinine show insignificant different as serum Cystatin C as marker for glomerular filtration, may be useful as marker for renal disease in preclampsia.  

  17. Economic Evaluation of a Soft Ankle Brace Compared to Tape in Acute Lateral Ankle Ligamentous Sprains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; Krist, MR; van de Port, Ingrid; van de Port, Ingrid G. L.; Hoes, Arno W.; de Wit, GA; Backx, FJG

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ankle sprains are common injuries, associated with high healthcare and societal costs. After sustaining an acute ankle sprain, ankle taping is the standard treatment in the Netherlands. Ankle braces are sometimes used as an alternative. The aim of the present study was to assess the

  18. The intersection of disability and healthcare disparities: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Michelle A; Mahmoudi, Elham; Lee, Shoou-Yih

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a conceptual framework for understanding healthcare disparities experienced by individuals with disabilities. While health disparities are the result of factors deeply rooted in culture, life style, socioeconomic status, and accessibility of resources, healthcare disparities are a subset of health disparities that reflect differences in access to and quality of healthcare and can be viewed as the inability of the healthcare system to adequately address the needs of specific population groups. This article uses a narrative method to identify and critique the main conceptual frameworks that have been used in analyzing disparities in healthcare access and quality, and evaluating those frameworks in the context of healthcare for individuals with disabilities. Specific models that are examined include the Aday and Anderson Model, the Grossman Utility Model, the Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s models of Access to Healthcare Services and Healthcare Disparities, and the Cultural Competency model. While existing frameworks advance understandings of disparities in healthcare access and quality, they fall short when applied to individuals with disabilities. Specific deficits include a lack of attention to cultural and contextual factors (Aday and Andersen framework), unrealistic assumptions regarding equal access to resources (Grossman's utility model), lack of recognition or inclusion of concepts of structural accessibility (IOM model of Healthcare Disparities) and exclusive emphasis on supply side of the healthcare equation to improve healthcare disparities (Cultural Competency model). In response to identified gaps in the literature and short-comings of current conceptualizations, an integrated model of disability and healthcare disparities is put forth. We analyzed models of access to care and disparities in healthcare to be able to have an integrated and cohesive conceptual framework that could potentially address issues related to access to

  19. Healthcare. State Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report projects education requirements linked to forecasted job growth in healthcare by state and the District of Columbia from 2010 through 2020. It complements a larger national report which projects educational demand for healthcare for the same time period. The national report shows that with or without Obamacare, the United States will…

  20. Economic evaluation of interventions for malignant neoplasms in Spain: systematic review and comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-López, F; García-Altés, A; Álvarez-Martín, E; Gènova-Maleras, R; Morant-Ginestar, C; Arana, E

    2012-01-01

    To review standard methods used to evaluate the efficiency of oncology interventions, comparing their main characteristics with those of the studies aimed for other conditions. We performed a systematic review and comparative analysis calculating odds ratios (OR). We searched the biomedical literature to assess economic evaluation studies on malignant neoplasms in Spain published between 1983 and 2008. Their characteristics were reviewed and summarised, including the following variables: journal and year of publication, intervention, type and design of study, perspective, type of costs, financing source, and decision-making recommendations. Sixty-three studies were included. Main characteristics of the reports were: cost-effectiveness analysis and therapeutic interventions (60.3%; n=38). Seventeen studies (27.0%) used an observational design. Economic evaluations of malignant neoplasms showed the following associations (compared to those studies addressing other causes [n=411]): cost minimisation analysis (OR: 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-3.27), diagnostic interventions (OR: 2.18; 95% CI: 1.07-4.43), decision analysis design (OR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.24-0.87), societal perspective (OR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.05-0.86) and for-profit source of financing (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.30-0.93). Economic evaluations of interventions for malignant neoplasms are not common despite the gradual increase produced during recent years in Spain. Reports presented heterogeneity in the quality of the information regarding the methods and the data sources used. Further efficiency evaluations of oncology interventions are needed and methodological quality should be warranted. Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the polyphenol composition and antioxidant capacity of propolis and Echinacea purpurea

    OpenAIRE

    Silviya S. Georgieva; Valentina L. Christova-Bagdassarian; Maria S. Atanassova

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate and compare total phenolics and total flavonoides, and antioxidant capacity of propolis and Echinacea purpurea ethanol extracts. Methods: Propolis and dried Echinacea purpurea extracts were obtained by extraction methods. The extracts were tested for total phenol and total flavonoid contents and antioxidant capacity was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Results: The content of total phenolics and total flavon...

  2. Evaluating collaborations in comparative effectiveness research: opportunities and challenges for social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Kimmey, Laura D; Tomas, Amber; Esposito, Dominick; Rich, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Multidisciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration has become a key feature of comparative effectiveness research (CER), and CER funders have made promotion of these types of collaboration an implicit, and sometimes explicit, goal of funding. An important challenge in evaluating CER programs is understanding if and how different forms of collaboration are associated with successful CER projects. This article explores the potential use of social network analysis to address research questions about the associations between collaboration and the success of CER projects.

  3. Comparative evaluation of retention of prefabricated and conventional cast post: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Suchismita; Begum, Zubeda; Choudhary, Prashant; Tripathi, Siddhi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the retention of various prefabricated posts and to compare them with that of the conventional cast post. Materials and Methods: A sample of 60 freshly extracted single-rooted human mandibular first premolars were sectioned horizontally, 1 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into four groups consisting of carbon fiber posts, glass fiber posts, stainless steel posts and cast metal posts. Cast metal post ...

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Quantitative Test Methods for Gases on a Hard Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    XX-02-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Apr 2008 – Dec 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Comparative Evaluation of...determining the efficacy of chlorine dioxide (CD) gas and vaporous hydrogen peroxide (VHP) against spores of Bacillus subtilis. The tests were...SUBJECT TERMS Three Step Method (TSM) Quantitative Carrier Disk Test (QCT) Chlorine dioxide (CD) Bacillus subtilis Vaporous hydrogen peroxide

  5. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO QUALITY EVALUATION OF SOME PARACETAMOL TABLETS, COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE IN BANGLADESH DRUG MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Jannatul Farhana, Md. Najem Uddin*, Md. Robiul Islam

    2018-01-01

    Paracetamol is a widely used non-prescription analgesic and antipyretic medicine. It is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide with non-prescription sales exceeding 25 thousand million doses per year in the United States of America. The study was conducted to assess the comparative in-vitro quality control parameters through the evaluation of weight variation, hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution profile among the commercially available tablet brands of paracetamol...

  6. Comparative instrumental evaluation of efficacy and safety between a binary and a ternary system in chemexfoliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameli, Norma; Mariano, Maria; Ardigò, Marco; Corato, Cristina; De Paoli, Gianfranco; Berardesca, Enzo

    2017-09-20

    To instrumentally evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a new ternary system chemo exfoliating formulation (water-dimethyl isosorbide-acid) vs traditional binary systems (water and acid) where the acid is maintained in both the systems at the same concentration. Different peelings (binary system pyruvic acid and trichloroacetic acid-TCA, and ternary system pyruvic acid and TCA) were tested on the volar forearm of 20 volunteers of both sexes between 28 and 50 years old. The outcomes were evaluated at the baseline, 10 minutes, 24 hours, and 1 week after the peeling by means of noninvasive skin diagnosis techniques. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy was used for stratum corneum evaluation, transepidermal waterloss, and Corneometry for skin barrier and hydration, Laser Doppler velocimetry in association with colorimetry for irritation and erythema analysis. The instrumental data obtained showed that the efficacy and safety of the new ternary system peel compounds were significantly higher compared with the binary system formulations tested. The new formulation peels improved chemexfoliation and reduced complications such as irritation, redness, and postinflammatory pigmentation compared to the traditional aqueous solutions. The study showed that ternary system chemexfoliation, using a controlled delivery technology, was able to provide the same clinical effects in term of stratum corneum reduction with a significantly reduced barrier alteration, water loss, and irritation/erythema compared to traditional binary system peels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Desenvolvimento de indicadores para avaliação de serviço público de odontologia Development of indicators for evaluating public dental healthcare services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Ribeiro de Carvalho Bueno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente artigo é descrever e analisar o desenvolvimento dos indicadores utilizados para se identificar fortalezas e deficiências de serviço público de odontologia no município de Cambé, Paraná. A metodologia usada foi o estudo de caso histórico-organizacional. Para o planejamento da avaliação foi desenvolvido o modelo-lógico do serviço. Para tanto, foram coletadas informações a partir da triangulação de métodos (entrevistas, análise documental e observação. Na sequência, foi desenvolvida uma matriz que apresenta dimensões de análise, critérios, indicadores, pontuações, parâmetros e fontes de informações. Três oficinas de trabalho foram realizadas com profissionais do serviço local visando melhor adequação do modelo-lógico e da matriz à realidade do serviço. O período de coleta de dados foi novembro de 2006 a julho de 2007. Como resultado, obteve-se um fluxograma da organização do serviço de odontologia e uma matriz com duas dimensões de análise, doze critérios e vinte e quatro indicadores. O desenvolvimento dos indicadores, privilegiando a participação dos sujeitos envolvidos com a prática, proporcionou o planejamento de uma avaliação abrangente e realista.The objective of this article is to describe and analyze the development of indicators used to identify strengths and deficiencies in public dental healthcare services in the municipality of Cambé, Paraná. The methodology employed was a historical-organizational case study. A theoretical model of the service was developed for evaluation planning. To achieve this, information was collected from triangulation of methods (interviews, document analysis and observation. A matrix was then developed which presents analysis dimensions, criteria, indicators, punctuation, parameters and sources of information. Three workshops were staged during the process with local service professionals in order to verify whether both the logical model

  8. Comparative ex vivo evaluation of two electronic percussive testing devices measuring the stability of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckili, Onur; Bilhan, Hakan; Cilingir, Altug; Bilmenoglu, Caglar; Ates, Gokcen; Urgun, Aliye Ceren; Bural, Canan

    2014-12-01

    A comparative ex vivo study was performed to determine electronic percussive test values (PTVs) measured by cabled and wireless electronic percussive testing (EPT) devices and to evaluate the intra- and interobserver reliability of the wireless EPT device. Forty implants were inserted into the vertebrae and forty into the pelvis of a steer, a safe distance apart. The implants were all 4.3 mm wide and 13 mm long, from the same manufacturer. PTV of each implant was measured by four different examiners, using both EPT devices, and compared. Additionally, the intra- and interobserver reliability of the wireless EPT device was evaluated. Statistically significant differences (P devices. PTVs measured by the wireless EPT device were significantly higher than the cabled EPT device (P device was evaluated as excellent for the measurements in type II bone and good-to-excellent in type IV bone; interobserver reliability was evaluated as fair-to-good in both bone types. The wireless EPT device gives PTVs higher than the cabled EPT device, indicating lower implant stability, and its inter- and intraobserver reliability is good and acceptable.

  9. Retrenchment strategies and tactics for healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, H J; Smith, H L

    1985-01-01

    Retrenchment is a problem confronting many public, private, and voluntary healthcare organizations. With budgetary restrictions in the public sector and the shift toward prospective payment systems and diagnosis-related reimbursement by third-party payors, healthcare executives must address several dilemmas and choices. Yet, retrenchment should not necessarily be viewed as a problem with limited alternatives. It may represent a time for capitalizing on opportunities and for creating innovation within healthcare institutions. Indeed, innovation may represent the only means for survival. This article evaluates the management strategies that transform retrenchment from a problem into an opportunity.

  10. Classical and recent free-volume models for polymer solutions: A comparative evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radfarnia, H.R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ghotbi, C.

    2007-01-01

    for aqueous and alcohol solutions, based on the physical values of the van der Waals volume and surface areas for both FV-combinatorial and residual contributions. The prediction results of both "recent" and "classical" FV models using the new regressed energy parameters are significantly better, compared......In this work, two "classical" (UNIFAC-FV, Entropic-FV) and two "recent" free-volume (FV) models (Kannan-FV, Freed-FV) are comparatively evaluated for polymer-solvent vapor-liquid equilibria including both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Moreover, some further developments are presented here...... by the modified Freed-FV model for athermal and non-athermal polymer systems are compared to other "recent" and "classical" FV models, indicating an improvement for the modified Freed-FV model for aqueous polymer solutions. Second, for the original Freed-FV model, new UNIFAC group energy parameters are regressed...

  11. Evaluation concepts to compare observed and simulated deposition areas of mass movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Micha; Scheidl, Christian; Kaitna, Roland

    2017-04-01

    A delineation of potentially endangered areas by geophysical mass flows, like debris flows, rock and snow avalanches, is an important for regional and urban planning. For this numerical simulation programs have become an important tool in engineering hazard assessment. However, when being confronted with the evaluation of model performance and sensitivity there are no standard, objective approaches. In this contribution we present a new approach to quantitatively compare 2D simulations of observed and simulated deposition patterns - a concept derived from a literature review of 75 peer reviewed articles which inverse modelled real events of different types of mass flows. It seems that existing evaluation concepts with respect to the deposition distribution does only account for one or a combination of two possible evaluation errors based on overestimation, underestimation and/or overlap of the simulation outcome with the observed reference. The proposed evaluation concept integrates all three possible errors and yields a single metric between -1 (no fit) and 1 (perfect fit). Combined with a ternary plot we further show that the proposed evaluation concept might act as a simple decision support tool to i) identify weaknesses and strengths of the simulation model, ii) to find the best simulation setup and iii) to test whether higher complexity of simulation models are balanced by higher accuracies. This method shall help developers and end-users of simulation models to better understand model behavior and provide a possibility for comparison of model results, independent of simulation platform and type of mass flow.

  12. Healthcare technology management competency and its impacts on IT-healthcare partnerships development.

    Sc