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Sample records for evaluate anti-malarial drug

  1. Poisoning by anti-malarial drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had taken chloroquine: no other anti-malarial drugs were involved [1]. ... and angio-oedema have been described. Itching without a ... 15mg/L the risk of permanent visual damage and cardiac dysrhythmias is ... to use an alternative method.

  2. Mechanochemical Synthesis, In vivo Anti-malarial and Safety Evaluation of Amodiaquine-zinc Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arise Rotimi Olusanya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available So far, some prospective metal-based anti-malarial drugs have been developed. The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of Zn (II complex with amodiaquine and its anti-malarial efficacy on Plasmodium berghei-infected mice and safety evaluation were described in this study.

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  4. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  5. A phase I trial to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of low-dose methotrexate as an anti-malarial drug in Kenyan adult healthy volunteers

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    Oyoo George O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations indicate that methotrexate, an old anticancer drug, could be used at low doses to treat malaria. A phase I evaluation was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of this drug in healthy adult male Kenyan volunteers. Methods Twenty five healthy adult volunteers were recruited and admitted to receive a 5 mg dose of methotrexate/day/5 days. Pharmacokinetics blood sampling was carried out at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours following each dose. Nausea, vomiting, oral ulcers and other adverse events were solicited during follow up of 42 days. Results The mean age of participants was 23.9 ± 3.3 years. Adherence to protocol was 100%. No grade 3 solicited adverse events were observed. However, one case of transiently elevated liver enzymes, and one serious adverse event (not related to the product were reported. The maximum concentration (Cmax was 160-200 nM and after 6 hours, the effective concentration (Ceff was Conclusion Low-dose methotraxate had an acceptable safety profile. However, methotrexate blood levels did not reach the desirable Ceff of 250-400-nM required to clear malaria infection in vivo. Further dose finding and safety studies are necessary to confirm suitability of this drug as an anti-malarial agent.

  6. A qualitative assessment of the challenges of WHO prequalification for anti-malarial drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangmu; Pan, Ke; Peng, Danlu; Stergachis, Andy

    2018-04-03

    While China is a major manufacturer of artemisinin and its derivatives, it lags as a global leader in terms of the total export value of anti-malarial drugs as finished pharmaceutical products ready for marketing and use by patients. This may be due to the limited number of World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified anti-malarial drugs from China. Understanding the reasons for the slow progress of WHO prequalification (PQ) in China can help improve the current situation and may lead to greater efforts in malaria eradication by Chinese manufacturers. In-depth interviews were conducted in China between November 2014 and December 2016. A total of 26 key informants from central government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, universities, and research institutes were interviewed, all of which had current or previous experience overseeing or implementing anti-malarial research and development in China. Chinese anti-malarial drugs that lack WHO PQ are mainly exported for use in the African private market. High upfront costs with unpredictable benefits, as well as limited information and limited technical support on WHO PQ, were reported as the main barriers to obtain WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs by respondents from Chinese pharmaceutical companies. Potential incentives identified by respondents included tax relief, human resource training and consultation, as well as other incentives related to drug approval, such as China's Fast Track Channel. Government support, as well as innovative incentives and collaboration mechanisms are needed for further adoption of WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs in China.

  7. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

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    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  8. Plasmodium falciparum resistance to anti-malarial drugs in Papua New Guinea: evaluation of a community-based approach for the molecular monitoring of resistance

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    Reeder John C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular monitoring of parasite resistance has become an important complementary tool in establishing rational anti-malarial drug policies. Community surveys provide a representative sample of the parasite population and can be carried out more rapidly than accrual of samples from clinical cases, but it is not known whether the frequencies of genetic resistance markers in clinical cases differ from those in the overall population, or whether such community surveys can provide good predictions of treatment failure rates. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, in vivo drug efficacy of amodiaquine or chloroquine plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was determined at three sites in Papua New Guinea. The genetic drug resistance profile (i.e., 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum crt, mdr1, dhfr, dhps, and ATPase6 was concurrently assessed in 639 community samples collected in the catchment areas of the respective health facilities by using a DNA microarray-based method. Mutant allele and haplotype frequencies were determined and their relationship with treatment failure rates at each site in each year was investigated. Results PCR-corrected in vivo treatment failure rates were between 12% and 28% and varied by site and year with variable longitudinal trends. In the community samples, the frequencies of mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1 were high and did not show significant changes over time. Mutant allele frequencies in pfdhfr were moderate and those in pfdhps were low. No mutations were detected in pfATPase6. There was much more variation between sites than temporal, within-site, variation in allele and haplotype frequencies. This variation did not correlate well with treatment failure rates. Allele and haplotype frequencies were very similar in clinical and community samples from the same site. Conclusions The relationship between parasite genetics and in vivo treatment failure rate is not straightforward. The

  9. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: Mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies

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    Dondorp Arjen M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. Methods A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. Results The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with

  10. Assessing the quality of anti-malarial drugs from Gabonese pharmacies using the MiniLab®: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Benjamin J.; Meerveld-Gerrits, Janneke; Kroon, Daniëlle; Mougoula, Judith; Vingerling, Rieke; Bache, Emmanuel; Boersma, Jimmy; van Vugt, Michèle; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Kaur, Harparkash; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies alluded to the alarming scale of poor anti-malarial drug quality in malaria-endemic countries, but also illustrated the major geographical gaps in data on anti-malarial drug quality from endemic countries. Data are particularly scarce from Central Africa, although it carries the

  11. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

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    Chance Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP. Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9. The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum

  12. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubjer, Reem A; Adeel, Ahmed A; Chance, Michael L; Hassan, Amir A

    2011-08-21

    This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from Yemen. Mutant pfcrtT76 is highly prevalent but it

  13. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform...... practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug...

  14. Identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs using a simple and reliable in vitro parasite viability fast assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, María; Viera, Sara; Crespo, Benigno; Franco, Virginia; Gómez-Lorenzo, María G; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Íñigo; Sanz, Laura María; Gamo, Francisco-Javier

    2015-11-05

    The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins threatens to undermine the effectiveness of artemisinin-based combination anti-malarial therapy. Developing suitable drugs to replace artemisinins requires the identification of new compounds that display rapid parasite killing kinetics. However, no current methods fully meet the requirements to screen large compound libraries for candidates with such properties. This study describes the development and validation of an in vitro parasite viability fast assay for identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs. Parasite killing kinetics were determined by first culturing unlabelled erythrocytes with P. falciparum in the presence of anti-malarial drugs for 24 or 48 h. After removing the drug, samples were added to erythrocytes pre-labelled with intracellular dye to allow their subsequent identification. The ability of viable parasites to re-establish infection in labelled erythrocytes could then be detected by two-colour flow cytometry after tagging of parasite DNA. Thus, double-stained erythrocytes (with the pre-labelled intracellular dye and the parasite DNA dye) result only after establishment of new infections by surviving parasites. The capacity of the test anti-malarial drugs to eliminate viable parasites within 24 or 48 h could, therefore, be determined. The parasite viability fast assay could be completed within 48 h following drug treatment and distinguished between rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs versus those acting more slowly. The assay was validated against ten standard anti-malarial agents with known properties and results correlated well with established methods. An abbreviated assay, suitable for adaption to medium-high throughput screening, was validated and applied against a set of 20 compounds retrieved from the publically available Medicines for Malaria Venture 'Malaria Box'. The quantification of new infections to determine parasite viability offers important

  15. The effect of malaria and anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Brotto, Marco

    2016-11-02

    Malaria remains one of the most important infectious diseases in the world, being a significant public health problem associated with poverty and it is one of the main obstacles to the economy of an endemic country. Among the several complications, the effects of malaria seem to target the skeletal muscle system, leading to symptoms, such as muscle aches, muscle contractures, muscle fatigue, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. Malaria cause also parasitic coronary artery occlusion. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the effect of malaria disease and the anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles. Research articles and case report publications that addressed aspects that are important for understanding the involvement of malaria parasites and anti-malarial therapies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscles were analysed and their findings summarized. Sequestration of red blood cells, increased levels of serum creatine kinase and reduced muscle content of essential contractile proteins are some of the potential biomarkers of the damage levels of skeletal and cardiac muscles. These biomarkers might be useful for prevention of complications and determining the effectiveness of interventions designed to protect cardiac and skeletal muscles from malaria-induced damage.

  16. Evaluation of chloroquine as a potent anti-malarial drug: issues of public health policy and healthcare delivery in post-war Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaquoi, Moses B F; Kennedy, Stephen B

    2003-02-01

    Chloroquine-resistant plasmodium falciparum malaria is a serious public health threat that is spreading rapidly across Sub-Saharan Africa. It affects over three quarters (80%) of malarial endemic countries. Of the estimated 300-500 million cases of malaria reported annually, the vast majority of malarial-related morbidities occur among young children in Africa, especially those concentrated in the remote rural areas with inadequate access to appropriate health care services. In Liberia, in vivo studies conducted between 1993 and 2000 observed varying degrees of plasmodium falciparum malaria infections that were resistant to chloroquine, including sulfadiazine-pyrimethamine. As the country emerges from a prolonged civil war, the health care delivery system may not be adequately prepared to implement an effective nation-wide malarial control strategy. As a result, the management of uncomplicated malaria in Liberia poses a significant public health challenge for the government-financed health care delivery system. Therefore, based on extensive literature review, we report the failure of chloroquine as an effective first-line drug for the treatment of uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria in Liberia and recommend that national health efforts be directed at identifying alternative drug(s) to replace it.

  17. Malavefes: A computational voice-enabled malaria fuzzy informatics software for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs

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    Olugbenga O. Oluwagbemi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the infectious diseases consistently inherent in many Sub-Sahara African countries. Among the issues of concern are the consequences of wrong diagnosis and dosage administration of anti-malarial drugs on sick patients; these have resulted into various degrees of complications ranging from severe headaches, stomach and body discomfort, blurred vision, dizziness, hallucinations, and in extreme cases, death. Many expert systems have been developed to support different infectious disease diagnoses, but not sure of any yet, that have been specifically designed as a voice-based application to diagnose and translate malaria patients’ symptomatic data for pre-laboratory screening and correct prescription of proper dosage of the appropriate medication. We developed Malavefes, (a malaria voice-enabled computational fuzzy expert system for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs using Visual Basic.NET., and Java programming languages. Data collation for this research was conducted by survey from existing literature and interview from public health experts. The database for this malaria drug informatics system was implemented using Microsoft Access. The Root Sum Square (RSS was implemented as the inference engine of Malavefes to make inferences from rules, while Centre of Gravity (CoG was implemented as the defuzzification engine. The drug recommendation module was voice-enabled. Additional anti-malaria drug expiration validation software was developed using Java programming language. We conducted a user-evaluation of the performance and user-experience of the Malavefes software. Keywords: Informatics, Bioinformatics, Fuzzy, Anti-malaria, Voice computing, Dosage prescription

  18. In vitro studies on the sensitivity pattern of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs and local herbal extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasehinde, Grace I; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adeyeba, Adegboyega O; Fagade, Obasola E; Valecha, Neena; Ayanda, Isaac O; Ajayi, Adesola A; Egwari, Louis O

    2014-02-20

    The resistance of human malaria parasites to anti-malarial compounds has become considerable concern, particularly in view of the shortage of novel classes of anti-malarial drugs. One way to prevent resistance is by using new compounds that are not based on existing synthetic antimicrobial agents. Sensitivity of 100 Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, artemisinin, Momordica charantia ('Ejirin') Diospyros monbuttensis ('Egun eja') and Morinda lucida ('Oruwo') was determined using the in vitro microtest (Mark III) technique to determine the IC50 of the drugs. All the isolates tested were sensitive to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to chloroquine, 13% to amodiaquine and 5% to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Highest resistance to chloroquine (68.9%) was recorded among isolates from Yewa zone while highest resistance to amodiaquine (30%) was observed in Ijebu zone. Highest resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine was recorded in Yewa and Egba zones, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the responses to artemisinin and mefloquine (P0.05). Highest anti-plasmodial activity was obtained with the ethanolic extract of D. monbuttensis (IC50 = 3.2 nM) while the lowest was obtained from M. lucida (IC50 = 25 nM). Natural products isolated from plants used in traditional medicine, which have potent anti-plasmodial action in vitro, represent potential sources of new anti-malarial drugs.

  19. Development of a TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay for detection of Single Nucleotides Polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Kamau Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-malarial drug resistance poses a threat to current global efforts towards control and elimination of malaria. Several methods are used in monitoring anti-malarial drug resistance. Molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP for example are increasingly being used to identify genetic mutations related to anti-malarial drug resistance. Several methods are currently being used in analysis of SNP associated with anti-malarial drug resistance and although each one of these methods has unique strengths and shortcoming, there is still need to improve and/or develop new methods that will close the gap found in the current methods. Methods TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assays for detection of SNPs associated with anti-malarial drug resistance were designed for analysis on Applied Biosystems PCR platform. These assays were designed by submitting SNP sequences associated with anti-malarial drug resistance to Applied Biosystems website. Eleven SNPs associated with resistance to anti-malarial drugs were selected and tested. The performance of each SNP assay was tested by creating plasmid DNAs carrying codons of interests and analysing them for analysis. To test the sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay, 12 clinical samples were sequenced at codons of interest and used in the analysis. Plasmid DNAs were used to establish the Limit of Detection (LoD for each assay. Results Data from genetic profiles of the Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and sequence data from 12 clinical samples was used as the reference method with which the performance of the SNP assays were compared to. The sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay was establish at 100%. LoD for each assay was established at 2 GE, equivalent to less than 1 parasite/μL. SNP assays performed well in detecting mixed infection and analysis of clinical samples. Conclusion TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assay provides a good alternative tool in

  20. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwafongo Winfred

    2010-10-01

    the potential to alleviate restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas.

  1. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas. PMID:20979633

  2. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

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    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  3. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

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    Bate Roger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug quality have occurred. Since intelligence provided by investigators indicates that some counterfeit producers may be adapting products to pass Minilab tests, the results are compared with those from a Raman spectrometer and discrepancies are discussed. Methods Between mid-2007 and early-2010, samples of anti-malarial drugs were bought covertly from pharmacies in Lagos on three different occasions (October 2007, December 2008, February 2010, and from pharmacies in Accra on two different occasions (October 2007, February 2010. All samples were tested using the Minilab® protocol, which includes disintegration and active ingredient assays as well as visual inspection, and most samples were also tested by Raman spectrometry. Results In Lagos, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 29% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 53% using Raman spectrometry, and 46% using visual inspection. In Accra, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 54% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 72% using Raman spectrometry, and 90% using visual inspection. Conclusions The evidence presented shows that drug quality is probably improving in both cities, especially Lagos, since major reductions of failure rates over time occur with all means of assessment. Many more samples failed when examined by Raman spectrometry than by Minilab® protocol. The discrepancy is most likely caused by the two techniques measuring different aspects of the medication

  4. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Central, West and East African children with severe malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Nguetse, Christian N.; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Ogutu, Bernhards R.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (PfMDR1), P. falciparum Ca(2+)-ATPase (PfATP6) and Kelch-13 propeller domain (PfK13) loci are molecular markers of parasite susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. Their frequency distributions were determined in the isolates collected from children with severe malaria originating from three African countries. METHODS: Samples from 287 children with severe malaria [(Gabon: n = 114); (Ghana: n = 89); (Kenya: n = 84)] were genotyped fo...

  5. CYP450 phenotyping and accurate mass identification of metabolites of the 8-aminoquinoline, anti-malarial drug primaquine

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    Pybus Brandon S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ drug primaquine (PQ is currently the only approved drug effective against the persistent liver stage of the hypnozoite forming strains Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale as well as Stage V gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. To date, several groups have investigated the toxicity observed in the 8AQ class, however, exact mechanisms and/or metabolic species responsible for PQ’s haemotoxic and anti-malarial properties are not fully understood. Methods In the present study, the metabolism of PQ was evaluated using in vitro recombinant metabolic enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP and mono-amine oxidase (MAO families. Based on this information, metabolite identification experiments were performed using nominal and accurate mass measurements. Results Relative activity factor (RAF-weighted intrinsic clearance values show the relative role of each enzyme to be MAO-A, 2C19, 3A4, and 2D6, with 76.1, 17.0, 5.2, and 1.7% contributions to PQ metabolism, respectively. CYP 2D6 was shown to produce at least six different oxidative metabolites along with demethylations, while MAO-A products derived from the PQ aldehyde, a pre-cursor to carboxy PQ. CYPs 2C19 and 3A4 produced only trace levels of hydroxylated species. Conclusions As a result of this work, CYP 2D6 and MAO-A have been implicated as the key enzymes associated with PQ metabolism, and metabolites previously identified as potentially playing a role in efficacy and haemolytic toxicity have been attributed to production via CYP 2D6 mediated pathways.

  6. Major Reduction in Anti-Malarial Drug Consumption in Senegal after Nation-Wide Introduction of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests

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    Thiam, Sylla; Thior, Moussa; Faye, Babacar; Ndiop, Médoune; Diouf, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Mame Birame; Diallo, Ibrahima; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Albertini, Audrey; Lee, Evan; Jorgensen, Pernille; Gaye, Oumar; Bell, David

    2011-01-01

    Background While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. Methods and Findings Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584873 suspect fever cases). An estimated 516576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. Conclusions The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were achieved in ACT

  7. Operational strategies of anti-malarial drug campaigns for malaria elimination in Zambia's southern province: a simulation study.

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    Stuckey, Erin M; Miller, John M; Littrell, Megan; Chitnis, Nakul; Steketee, Rick

    2016-03-09

    Malaria elimination requires reducing both the potential of mosquitoes to transmit parasites to humans and humans to transmit parasites to mosquitoes. To achieve this goal in Southern province, Zambia a mass test and treat (MTAT) campaign was conducted from 2011-2013 to complement high coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN). To identify factors likely to increase campaign effectiveness, a modelling approach was applied to investigate the simulated effect of alternative operational strategies for parasite clearance in southern province. OpenMalaria, a discrete-time, individual-based stochastic model of malaria, was parameterized for the study area to simulate anti-malarial drug administration for interruption of transmission. Simulations were run for scenarios with a range of artemisinin-combination therapies, proportion of the population reached by the campaign, targeted age groups, time between campaign rounds, Plasmodium falciparum test protocols, and the addition of drugs aimed at preventing onward transmission. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess uncertainty of simulation results. Scenarios were evaluated based on the reduction in all-age parasite prevalence during the peak transmission month one year following the campaign, compared to the currently-implemented strategy of MTAT 19 % population coverage at pilot and 40 % coverage during the first year of implementation in the presence of 56 % LLIN use and 18 % indoor residual spray coverage. Simulation results suggest the most important determinant of success in reducing prevalence is the population coverage achieved in the campaign, which would require more than 1 year of campaign implementation for elimination. The inclusion of single low-dose primaquine, which acts as a gametocytocide, or ivermectin, which acts as an endectocide, to the drug regimen did not further reduce parasite prevalence one year following the campaign compared to the currently-implemented strategy

  8. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania: a baseline study in an era of assumed artemisinin combination therapy (ACT

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    Ringsted Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemether-lumefantrine (ALu replaced sulphadoxine-pymimethamine (SP as the official first-line anti-malarial in Tanzania in November 2006. So far, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is contra-indicated during pregnancy by the national malaria treatment guidelines, and pregnant women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods All drug shops selling prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN, and legally amodiaquine (AQ. Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%, QN (11% and ACT (2%. Conclusions In community practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp

  9. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

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    Komal Kalani

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  10. Stability-indicating HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/MS impurity profiling of the anti-malarial drug lumefantrine.

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    Verbeken, Mathieu; Suleman, Sultan; Baert, Bram; Vangheluwe, Elien; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Jansen, Frans H; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2011-02-28

    Lumefantrine (benflumetol) is a fluorene derivative belonging to the aryl amino alcohol class of anti-malarial drugs and is commercially available in fixed combination products with β-artemether. Impurity characterization of such drugs, which are widely consumed in tropical countries for malaria control programmes, is of paramount importance. However, until now, no exhaustive impurity profile of lumefantrine has been established, encompassing process-related and degradation impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished pharmaceutical products (FPPs). Using HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/ion trap/MS, a comprehensive impurity profile was established based upon analysis of market samples as well as stress, accelerated and long-term stability results. In-silico toxicological predictions for these lumefantrine related impurities were made using Toxtree® and Derek®. Several new impurities are identified, of which the desbenzylketo derivative (DBK) is proposed as a new specified degradant. DBK and the remaining unspecified lumefantrine related impurities are predicted, using Toxtree® and Derek®, to have a toxicity risk comparable to the toxicity risk of the API lumefantrine itself. From unstressed, stressed and accelerated stability samples of lumefantrine API and FPPs, nine compounds were detected and characterized to be lumefantrine related impurities. One new lumefantrine related compound, DBK, was identified and characterized as a specified degradation impurity of lumefantrine in real market samples (FPPs). The in-silico toxicological investigation (Toxtree® and Derek®) indicated overall a toxicity risk for lumefantrine related impurities comparable to that of the API lumefantrine itself.

  11. Quality assessment of some selected brands of anti malarial drugs used in Ghana: A case study of Agona West Municipality

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    Asare, Aquisman Ebenezer

    2016-07-01

    The availability of numerous brands of artesunate in our drug market today places clinicians and pharmacists in a difficult situation of choice of a suitable brand or the possibility of alternative use. Fake artesunate could compromise the hope that ACT (artemisinin combination therapy) offers for malaria control in Africa. In this study, quality of some selected brands of anti - malarial drugs used in the communities of Agona west Municipality, Ghana was determined. Blister or packs of anti – malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The Protocols of the International Pharmacopeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab were used to assess the quality of anti – malarial tablets per blister pack manufactured by Bliss Gvs Pharma Ltd. India, Letap Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. Ghana and Guilin Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. China and sold in chemical sales outlets at the farming communities of Agona West Municipality, Ghana. The identification test was used to confirm the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS 1302) reference standards and Gsunate reference standard (ICRS4061). The friability test was used to confirm the hardness of the tablets to determine the drug ability to withstand abrasion in packaging, handling and shipping. The disintegration test was used to confirm the time required for the tablets to disintegrate into particles. Titrimetric analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets.The results of the study are as follows for Artesunate by GPCL, LPL and Gsunate by BGPL; the identification test confirmed the presence of the active ingredient in all the brands. Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 1 to 15 min for genuine artesunate per tablet, 93.75 % of field selected artesunate blister pack tablets manufactured by GPCL passed the disintegration test and 6.25% failed. Also 85.57% of the sampled artesunate blister pack manufactured by

  12. Phytochemical analysis of essential oil of Anthriscus nemorosa and evaluation of antioxidant and anti-malarial activity

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    S. Naeini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: This investigation was performed in order to analyze the composition of the essential oil (EO of Anthriscus nemorosa and evaluation of its anti-oxidant and anti-malarial activity of its extracts and determination of the total phenolics content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC. Methods: One hundred g dried powder of Anthriscus nemorosa was submitted to hydro-distillation and also was extracted (with n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM and methanol (MeOH, by using Clevenger and Soxhlet apparatus, respectively. Moreover, extracted essential oil (EO was analyzed by GC-MS. Furthermore, the anti-oxidant, anti- malaria, Total phenolics content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC of EO and the extracts were investigated by DPPH, cell free -hematin formation, Folin- Ciocalteau and colorimetric methods, respectively. Results: Fifty nine compounds, representing 94% of total oil were identified High content of terpenoids (60.02% were identified in the essential oil with isogeranol (28.86%, crystathenyl acetate  (13.86% and farnesene (10.39% as the most dominant compounds.. Methanol extract demonstrated free radical scavenging activity (RC50 0.192±0.133.Total phenol contents was (325.82±2.72 mg/g. Total flavonoid content was (140.4096±2.4 mg/g. None of the extracts showed anti-malaria effect. Conclusion: Main constituents of A. nemorosa were terpenoids. In comparison with other species of Anthriscus, antioxidant activity of A. nemorosa essential oil was less noticeable.

  13. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  14. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi.

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    Amuasi, John H; Diap, Graciela; Blay-Nguah, Samuel; Boakye, Isaac; Karikari, Patrick E; Dismas, Baza; Karenzo, Jeanne; Nsabiyumva, Lievin; Louie, Karly S; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2011-02-10

    Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was equivalent to 1.5 days worth

  15. Exposure to anti-malarial drugs and monitoring of adverse drug reactions using toll-free mobile phone calls in private retail sector in Sagamu, Nigeria: implications for pharmacovigilance

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    Ogunwande Isiaka A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs contribute to ill-health or life-threatening outcomes of therapy during management of infectious diseases. The exposure to anti-malarial and use of mobile phone technology to report ADRs following drug exposures were investigated in Sagamu - a peri-urban community in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Purchase of medicines was actively monitored for 28 days in three Community Pharmacies (CP and four Patent and Proprietary Medicine Stores (PPMS in the community. Information on experience of ADRs was obtained by telephone from 100 volunteers who purchased anti-malarials during the 28-day period. Results and Discussion A total of 12,093 purchases were recorded during the period. Antibiotics, analgesics, vitamins and anti-malarials were the most frequently purchased medicines. A total of 1,500 complete courses of anti-malarials were purchased (12.4% of total purchases; of this number, purchases of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ were highest (39.3 and 25.2% respectiuvely. Other anti-malarials purchased were artesunate monotherapy (AS - 16.1%, artemether-lumefantrine (AL 10.0%, amodiaquine (AQ - 6.6%, quinine (QNN - 1.9%, halofantrine (HF - 0.2% and proguanil (PR - 0.2%. CQ was the cheapest (USD 0.3 and halofantrine the most expensive (USD 7.7. AL was 15.6 times ($4.68 more expensive than CQ. The response to mobile phone monitoring of ADRs was 57% in the first 24 hours (day 1 after purchase and decreased to 33% by day 4. Participants in this monitoring exercise were mostly with low level of education (54%. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that ineffective anti-malaria medicines including monotherapies remain widely available and are frequently purchased in the study area. Cost may be a factor in the continued use of ineffective monotherapies. Availability of a toll-free telephone line may facilitate pharmacovigilance and follow up of response to medicines in a resource

  16. Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal

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    Brasseur Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing the safety profile of anti-malarial treatments in routine use is essential; millions of patients receive now artemisinin combination therapy (ACT annually, but the return on information through current systems is as yet inadequate. Cohort event monitoring (CEM is a WHO (World Health Organization-recommended practice; testing its performance and feasibility in routine practice in malaria-endemic is important. Methods A nine-year CEM-based study of the safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ at five peripheral health facilities in a rural district of South-western Senegal. Staff (nurses, health workers were trained to collect actively and systematically information on the patient, treatment and events on a purposely designed questionnaire. The occurrence and severity of events was collected before, during and after treatment up to 28 days in order to generate information on all adverse events (AEs as well as treatment-emerging signs/symptoms (TESS. Laboratory tests (haematology, liver and renal was planned for at least 10% of cases. Results During 2001–2009, 3,708 parasitologically-confirmed malaria cases (mean age = 16.0 ± 12.7 years were enrolled (26% and 52% of all and parasitologically-confirmed ASAQ treatments, respectively. Treatment was supervised in 96% of cases. Products changed over time: 49% were a loose combination of individually-packaged products (available 2001–03, 42% co-blistered products (2004–09 and 9% a fixed-dose co-formulation (2006–09; dosing was age-based for 42%, weight-based for 58%. AS and AQ were correctly dosed in 97% and 82% of cases with the loose and 93% and 86% with the fixed combination, but only 50% and 42% with the co-blistered product. Thirty-three per cent (33% of patients had at least one sign/symptom pre-treatment, 12% had at least one AE and 9% a TESS (total events 3,914, 1,144 and 693, respectively. AEs overestimated TESS by 1.2-2 fold (average 1.7. Changes in

  17. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

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    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  18. Access to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) and other anti-malarials: national policy and markets in Sierra Leone.

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    Amuasi, John H; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days' worth of wages in both the public and private sectors.

  19. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

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    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  20. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

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    Swain Bijay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20 and resistant (MRC-pf-303 strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AP (7.2 μg/ml was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml. Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs.

  1. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kirti; Dash, Aditya P; Swain, Bijay K; Dey, Nrisingha

    2009-01-01

    Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP) and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC) are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20) and resistant (MRC-pf-303) strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of AP (7.2 μg/ml) was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml). Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC) and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR) were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs. PMID:19216765

  2. Genotyping of Plasmodium falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Akter Jasmin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past many regions of Bangladesh were hyperendemic for malaria. Malaria control in the 1960s to 1970s eliminated malaria from the plains but in the Chittagong Hill Tracts remained a difficult to control reservoir. The Chittagong Hill Tracts have areas with between 1 and 10% annual malaria rates, predominately 90-95% Plasmodium falciparum. In Southeast Asia, multiplicity of infection for hypo-endemic regions has been approximately 1.5. Few studies on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum have been performed in Bangladesh. Anderson et al. performed a study in Khagrachari, northern Chittagong Hill Tracts in 2002 on 203 patients and found that parasites had a multiplicity of infection of 1.3 by MSP-1, MSP-2 and GLURP genotyping. A total of 94% of the isolates had the K76T Pfcrt chloroquine resistant genotype, and 70% showed the N86Y Pfmdr1 genotype. Antifolate drug resistant genotypes were high with 99% and 73% of parasites having two or more mutations at the dhfr or dhps loci. Methods Nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to genotype P. falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. Results The analysis of polymorphic and drug resistant genotype on 33 paired recrudescent infections after drug treatment in the period 2004 to 2008 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, which is just prior to countrywide provision of artemisinin combination therapy. Overall the multiplicity of infection for MSP-1 was 2.7 with a slightly smaller parasite diversity post-treatment. The 13 monoclonal infections by both GLURP and MSP-1 were evenly divided between pre- and post-treatment. The MSP-1 MAD block was most frequent in 66 of the samples. The prevalence of the K76T PfCRT chloroquine resistant allele was approximately 82% of the samples, while the resistant Pfmdr1 N86Y was present in 33% of the samples. Interestingly, the post

  3. "Every drug goes to treat its own disease…" - a qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of taking anti-retrovirals concomitantly with anti-malarials among those affected by HIV and malaria in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangesho, Peter E; Reynolds, Joanna; Lemnge, Martha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about how people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience malaria and the concomitant use of anti-malarial treatments with anti-retrovirals (ARVs). An understanding of how patients make sense of these experiences is important to consider in planning......, perceptions of drug strength appeared to compel some people not enrolled in the clinical study to take the drugs at separate times to avoid anticipated harm to the body. CONCLUSIONS: Management of HIV and malaria concurrently often requires individuals to cross the domains of different disease programmes...

  4. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

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    Ronn Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma. Methods A monoclonal antibody (MAb that reacts with the N-side chain of the CQ molecule was prepared by use of a CQ analogue. A specific and reliable ELISA for detection of CQ was developed. The developed assay was validated by measuring CQ in tablets sold in Denmark, India and Sudan. Furthermore, kinetics of CQ concentrations in plasma of four volunteers, who ingested two tablets of Malarex® containing, 250 mg CQ base, were measured before drug intake, three hours later and thereafter at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The same plasma samples were simultaneously measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results The ELISA proved an easy-to-handle and very sensitive tool for the detection of CQ with a lower limit of detection at 3.9 ng/ml. ELISA levels of CQ in plasma showed high agreement with the levels obtained by HPLC (r = 0.98. The specificity in the negative control group was 100%. Conclusion The developed ELISA can be used for quality screening of CQ in pharmaceutical formulations and for drug monitoring in malaria and in other infectious diseases, such as HIV, where CQ proved to be an effective therapeutic agent. The methodology has been exploited to develop monoclonal

  5. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Alifrangis, Michael; Recke, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1...... therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite...

  6. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

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    Sow Diarietou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004; and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006. Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013, and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001 were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum in vitro continuous culture conditions: A comparison of parasite susceptibility and tolerance to anti-malarial drugs throughout the asexual intra-erythrocytic life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M

    2017-12-01

    The continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum is often seen as a means to an end, that end being to probe the biology of the parasite in question, and ultimately for many in the malaria drug discovery arena, to identify means of killing the parasite in order to treat malaria. In vitro continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum is a fundamental requirement when undertaking malaria research where the primary objectives utilise viable parasites of a desired lifecycle stage. This investigation, and resulting data, compared the impact culturing Plasmodium falciparum long term (4 months) in different environmental conditions had on experimental outcomes and thus conclusions. The example presented here focused specifically on the effect culture conditions had on the in vitro tolerance of Plasmodium falciparum to standard anti-malarial drugs, including artemisinin and lumefantrine. Historical data from an independent experiment for 3D7-ALB (5% O 2 ) was also compared with that obtained from this study. We concluded that parasites cultured for several months in media supplemented with a serum substitute such as Albumax II ® or within hyperoxic conditions (21% O 2 ), demonstrate highly variable responses to artemisinin and lumefantrine but not all anti-malarial drugs, when compared to those cultured in human serum in combination with Albumax II ® under normoxic conditions (5% O 2 ) for the parasite. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

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    Wells Timothy NC

    2011-03-01

    medicinal products already used by the community. This first step forms a solid basis of observations, before moving to in vivo pharmacological characterization and ultimately identifying the active ingredient. A large part of the population uses herbal medicinal products despite limited numbers of well-controlled clinical studies. Increased awareness by the regulators and public health bodies of the need for safety information on herbal medicinal products also lends support to obtaining more clinical data on such products. Conclusions The relative paucity of new herbal medicinal product scaffolds active against malaria results discovered in recent years suggest it is time to re-evaluate the ‘smash and grab’ approach of randomly testing purified natural products and replace it with a patient-data led approach. This will require a change of perspective form many in the field. It will require an investment in standardisation in several areas, including: the ethnopharmacology and design and reporting of clinical observation studies, systems for characterizing anti-malarial activity of patient plasma samples ex vivo followed by chemical and pharmacological characterisation of extracts from promising sources. Such work falls outside of the core mandate of the product development partnerships, such as MMV, and so will require additional support. This call is timely, given the strong interest from researchers in disease endemic countries to support the research arm of a malaria eradication agenda. Para-national institutions such as the African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation (ANDi will play a major role in facilitating the development of their natural products patrimony and possibly clinical best practice to bring forward new therapeutics. As in the past, with quinine, lapinone and artemisinin, once the activity of herbal medicinal products in humans is characterised, it can be used to identify new molecular scaffolds which will form the basis of the next

  9. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

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    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  10. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewchuk, Tanya; O'Connell, Kathryn A; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Chapman, Steven; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012.ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate findings widely for decision

  11. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

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    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  12. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate

  13. Increased pfmdr1 gene copy number and the decline in pfcrt and pfmdr1 resistance alleles in Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates after the change of anti-malarial drug treatment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duah, Nancy O; Matrevi, Sena A; de Souza, Dziedzom K; Binnah, Daniel D; Tamakloe, Mary M; Opoku, Vera S; Onwona, Christiana O; Narh, Charles A; Quashie, Neils B; Abuaku, Benjamin; Duplessis, Christopher; Kronmann, Karl C; Koram, Kwadwo A

    2013-10-30

    With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005, monitoring of anti-malarial drug efficacy, which includes the use of molecular tools to detect known genetic markers of parasite resistance, is important for first-hand information on the changes in parasite susceptibility to drugs in Ghana. This study investigated the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr1) copy number, mutations and the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) mutations in Ghanaian isolates collected in seven years to detect the trends in prevalence of mutations. Archived filter paper blood blots collected from children aged below five years with uncomplicated malaria in 2003-2010 at sentinel sites were used. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 756 samples were assessed for pfmdr1 gene copy number. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to detect alleles of pfmdr1 86 in 1,102 samples, pfmdr1 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 in 832 samples and pfcrt 76 in 1,063 samples. Merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2) genotyping was done to select monoclonal infections for copy number analysis. The percentage of isolates with increased pfmdr1 copy number were 4, 27, 9, and 18% for 2003-04, 2005-06, 2007-08 and 2010, respectively. Significant increasing trends for prevalence of pfmdr1 N86 (×(2) = 96.31, p resistance has been reported. The decreasing trend in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance markers after change of treatment policy presents the possibility for future introduction of chloroquine as prophylaxis for malaria risk groups such as children and pregnant women in Ghana.

  14. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, William R.; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outs...

  15. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, William R; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-03-03

    The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outset to carefully distinguish those entities that have a therapeutic indication from those entities that have a molecular mechanism of action, we had not previously represented in DrOn any particular therapeutic indication. In this work, we add therapeutic indications for three research use cases: resistant hypertension, malaria, and opioid abuse research. We also added mechanisms of action for opioid analgesics and added 108 classes representing drug products in response to a large term request from the Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM) project. The net result is a new version of DrOn, current to May 2016, that represents three major therapeutic classes of drugs and six new mechanisms of action. A therapeutic indication of a drug product is represented as a therapeutic function in DrOn. Adverse effects of drug products, as well as other therapeutic uses for which the drug product was not designed are dispositions. Our work provides a framework for representing additional therapeutic indications, adverse effects, and uses of drug products beyond their design. Our work also validated our past modeling decisions for specific types of mechanisms of action, namely effects mediated via receptor and/or enzyme binding. DrOn is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron.owl . A smaller version without NDCs is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron/dron-lite.owl.

  16. PfMDR2 and PfMDR5 are dispensable for Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasite multiplication but change in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, M. van der; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Membrane-associated ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins hydrolyze ATP in order to translocate a broad spectrum of substrates, from single ions to macromolecules across membranes. In humans, members from this transport family have been linked to drug resistance phenotypes, e.g.,

  17. Synthesis and exploration of novel curcumin analogues as anti-malarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Satyendra; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-03-15

    Curcumin, a major yellow pigment and active component of turmeric, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Recent studies have indicated that curcumin inhibits chloroquine-sensitive (CQ-S) and chloroquine-resistant (CQ-R) Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture with an IC(50) of approximately 3.25 microM (MIC=13.2 microM) and IC(50) 4.21 microM (MIC=14.4 microM), respectively. In order to expand their potential as anti-malarials a series of novel curcumin derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit P. falciparum growth in culture. Several curcumin analogues examined show more effective inhibition of P. falciparum growth than curcumin. The most potent curcumin compounds 3, 6, and 11 were inhibitory for CQ-S P. falciparum at IC(50) of 0.48, 0.87, 0.92 microM and CQ-R P. falciparum at IC(50) of 0.45 microM, 0.89, 0.75 microM, respectively. Pyrazole analogue of curcumin (3) exhibited sevenfold higher anti-malarial potency against CQ-S and ninefold higher anti-malarial potency against CQ-R. Curcumin analogues described here represent a novel class of highly selective P. falciparum inhibitors and promising candidates for the design of novel anti-malarial agents.

  18. The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border

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    Ladda Kajeechiwa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A targeted malaria elimination project, including mass drug administrations (MDA of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine plus a single low dose primaquine is underway in villages along the Thailand Myanmar border. The intervention has multiple components but the success of the project will depend on the participation of the entire communities. Quantitative surveys were conducted to study reasons for participation or non-participation in the campaign with the aim to identify factors associated with the acceptance and participation in the mass drug administrations. Methods The household heads in four study villages in which MDAs had taken place previously were interviewed between January 2014 and July 2015. Results 174/378 respondents (46 % completed three rounds of three drug doses each, 313/378 (83 % took at least three consecutive doses and 56/378 (15 % did not participate at all in the MDA. The respondents from the two villages (KNH and TPN were much more likely to participate in the MDA than respondents from the other two villages (HKT and TOT. The more compliant villages KNH and TPN had both an appearance of cohesive communities with similar demographic and ethnic backgrounds. By contrast the villages with low participation were unique. One village was fragmented following years of armed conflict and many respondents gave little inclination to cooperate with outsiders. The other village with low MDA coverage was characterised by a high percentage of short-term residents with little interest in community interventions. A universal reason for non-participation in the MDA applicable to all villages was an inadequate understanding of the intervention. Conclusions It is unlikely that community engagement can unite fragmented communities in participating in an intervention, which benefits the community. Understanding the purpose and the reasons underlying the intervention is an important pre-condition for participation. In the

  19. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

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    Newton Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA containing paracetamol (acetaminophen, counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems.

  20. Anti-malarial activity of 6-(8'Z-pentadecenyl-salicylic acid from Viola websteri in mice

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    Park Won-Hwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Petroleum ether extracts of Viola websteri Hemsl (Violaceae were reported to have anti-plasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro, with this activity being largely attributable to 6-(8'Z-pentadecenyl-salicylic acid (6-SA. Methods The schizontocidal activity of 6-SA on early Plasmodium berghei infections was evaluated in a four-day test. The possible 'repository' activity of 6-SA was assessed using the method described by Peters. The median lethal dose (LD50 of 6-SA, when given intraperitoneally, was also determined using uninfected ICR mice and the method of Lorke. Results In the present study, 6-SA was found to have anti-malarial activity in vivo, when tested against P. berghei in mice. 6-SA at 5, 10 and 25 mg/kg·day exhibited a significant blood schizontocidal activity in four-day early infections, repository evaluations and established infections with a significant mean survival time comparable to that of the standard drug, chloroquine (5 mg/kg·day. Conclusion 6-SA possesses a moderate anti-malarial activity that could be exploited for malaria therapy.

  1. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

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    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  2. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2014-06-02

    The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change. Further, responsible stakeholders in

  3. Therapeutic efficacy of artesunate in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and anti-malarial, drug-resistance marker polymorphisms in populations near the China-Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after seven-day artesunate monotherapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yingjiang County along the China-Myanmar border and investigate genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr, dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps and ATPase (pfatp6 genes. Methods Patients ≥ one year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or history of fever and P. falciparum mono-infection were included. Patients received anti-malarial treatment with artesunate (total dose of 16 mg/kg over seven days by directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed based on clinical and parasitological outcomes. Treatment failure was defined as recrudescence of the original parasite and distinguished with new infection confirmed by PCR. Analysis of gene mutation and amplification were performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled; 10 withdrew from the study, and six were lost to follow-up. All but two patients demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitological response; 12 had detectable parasitaemia on day 3. These two patients were confirmed to be new infection by PCR. The efficacy of artesunate was 95.9%. The pfcrt mutation in codon 76 was found in all isolates (100%, and mutations in codons 71 and 72 were found in 4.8% of parasite isolates. No mutation of pfmdr1 (codons 86 or 1246 was found. Among all samples, 5.1% were wild type for pfdhfr, whereas the other samples had mutations in four codons (51, 59, 108 and 164, and mutations in pfdhps (codons 436, 437, 540 and 581 were found in all isolates. No samples had mutations in pfatp6 codons 623 or 769, but two new mutations (N683K and R756K were found in 4.6% and 9.2% of parasite isolates, respectively. Conclusion Plasmodium

  4. QSAR models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Vijay H; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Mahajan, Devidas T

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, predictive quantitative structure - activity relationship (QSAR) models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines have been developed. CORAL, which is freely available on internet (http://www.insilico.eu/coral), has been used as a tool of QSAR analysis to establish statistically robust QSAR model of anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines. Six random splits into the visible sub-system of the training and invisible subsystem of validation were examined. Statistical qualities for these splits vary, but in all these cases, statistical quality of prediction for anti-malarial activity was quite good. The optimal SMILES-based descriptor was used to derive the single descriptor based QSAR model for a data set of 112 aminoquinolones. All the splits had r(2)> 0.85 and r(2)> 0.78 for subtraining and validation sets, respectively. The three parametric multilinear regression (MLR) QSAR model has Q(2) = 0.83, R(2) = 0.84 and F = 190.39. The anti-malarial activity has strong correlation with presence/absence of nitrogen and oxygen at a topological distance of six.

  5. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

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    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  6. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain) and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain), using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain). Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy), Solanum surattense (Burm.f.) and Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml) and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time. PMID:20462416

  7. Differences in anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline enantiomers and investigation of the presumed underlying mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullié Catherine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better anti-malarial efficiency and lower neurotoxicity have been reported for mefloquine (MQ (+- enantiomer. However, the importance of stereoselectivity remains poorly understood as the anti-malarial activity of pure enantiomer MQ analogues has never been described. Building on these observations, a series of enantiopure 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives has previously been synthesized to optimize the efficiency and reduce possible adverse effects. Their in vitro activity on Plasmodium falciparum W2 and 3D7 strains is reported here along with their inhibition of β-haematin formation and peroxidative degradation of haemin, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial drugs. Results The (S-enantiomers of this series of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives were found to be at least as effective as both chloroquine (CQ and MQ. The derivative with a 5-carbon side-chain length was the more efficient on both P. falciparum strains. (R -enantiomers displayed an activity decreased by 2 to 15-fold as compared to their (S counterparts. The inhibition of β-haematin formation was significantly stronger with all tested compounds than with MQ, irrespective of the stereochemistry. Similarly, the inhibition of haemin peroxidation was significantly higher for both (S and (R-enantiomers of derivatives with a side-chain length of five or six carbons than for MQ and CQ. Conclusions The prominence of stereochemistry in the anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives is confirmed. The inhibition of β-haematin formation and haemin peroxidation can be put forward as presumed mechanisms of action but do not account for the stereoselectivity of action witnessed in vitro.

  8. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisuna, Ambrose O; Daumerie, Penny Grewal; Balyeku, Andrew; Egan, Timothy; Piot, Bram; Coghlan, Renia; Lugand, Maud; Bwire, Godfrey; Rwakimari, John Bosco; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Kato, Fred; Byangire, Maria; Kagwa, Paul; Sebisubi, Fred; Nahamya, David; Bonabana, Angela; Mpanga-Mukasa, Susan; Buyungo, Peter; Lukwago, Julius; Batte, Allan; Nakanwagi, Grace; Tibenderana, James; Nayer, Kinny; Reddy, Kishore; Dokwal, Nilesh; Rugumambaju, Sylvester; Kidde, Saul; Banerji, Jaya; Jagoe, George

    2012-10-29

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - "ACT with a leaf", while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention's impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, "ACT with a leaf" accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2%) at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%). The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4) at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, psupply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign significantly increased the uptake and use of ACT in the private sector in Uganda.

  9. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talisuna Ambrose O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2% at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%. The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4 at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p Conclusions These data demonstrate that a supply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign

  10. New molecular settings to support in vivo anti-malarial assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamontes-Rosa, Noemí; Alejandre, Ane Rodriguez; Gomez, Vanesa; Viera, Sara; Gomez-Lorenzo, María G; Sanz-Alonso, Laura María; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso

    2016-03-08

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is now commonly used as a method to confirm diagnosis of malaria and to differentiate recrudescence from re-infection, especially in clinical trials and in reference laboratories where precise quantification is critical. Although anti-malarial drug discovery is based on in vivo murine efficacy models, use of molecular analysis has been limited. The aim of this study was to develop qPCR as a valid methodology to support pre-clinical anti-malarial models by using filter papers to maintain material for qPCR and to compare this with traditional methods. FTA technology (Whatman) is a rapid and safe method for extracting nucleic acids from blood. Peripheral blood samples from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, P. yoelii, or P. falciparum were kept as frozen samples or as spots on FTA cards. The extracted genetic material from both types of samples was assessed for quantification by qPCR using sets of specific primers specifically designed for Plasmodium 18S rRNA, LDH, and CytB genes. The optimal conditions for nucleic acid extraction from FTA cards and qPCR amplification were set up, and were confirmed to be suitable for parasite quantification using DNA as template after storage at room temperature for as long as 26 months in the case of P. berghei samples and 52 months for P. falciparum and P. yoelii. The quality of DNA extracted from the FTA cards for gene sequencing and microsatellite amplification was also assessed. This is the first study to report the suitability of FTA cards and qPCR assay to quantify parasite load in samples from in vivo efficacy models to support the drug discovery process.

  11. Flow cytometry for the evaluation of anti-plasmodial activity of drugs on Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes

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    Pipy Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of promising anti-malarial drugs against Plasmodium gametocytes is hard to evaluate even in vitro. This is because visual examination of stained smears, which is commonly used, is not totally convenient. In the current study, flow cytometry has been used to study the effect of established anti-malarial drugs against sexual stages obtained from W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Gametocytes were treated for 48 h with different drug concentrations and the gametocytaemia was then determined by flow cytometry and compared with visual estimation by microscopy. Results and conclusions Initially gametocytaemia was evaluated either using light microscopy or flow cytometry. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.9986 was obtained. Two distinct peaks were observed on cytometry histograms and were attributed to gametocyte populations. The activities of established anti-malarial compounds were then measured by flow cytometry and the results were equivalent to those obtained using light microscopy. Primaquine and artemisinin had IC50 of 17.6 μM and 1.0 μM, respectively. Gametocyte sex was apparently distinguishable by flow cytometry as evaluated after induction of exflagellation by xanthurenic acid. These data form the basis of further studies for developing new methods in drug discovery to decrease malaria transmission.

  12. Prevalence of molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in two districts of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Schousboe, Mette L; Thomsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) have been used in treatment of falciparum and vivax malaria in Nepal. Recently, resistance to both drugs have necessitated a change towards artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) against Plasmodium falciparum in highly...... endemic areas. However, SP is still used against P. falciparum infections in low endemic areas while CQ is used in suspected cases in areas with lack of diagnostic facilities. This study examines the prevalence of molecular markers of P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax CQ and SP resistance to determine...... and P. vivax for CQ (Pfcrt, Pfmdr1, Pvmdr1) and SP (Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pvdhfr), using various PCR-based methods. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Positive P. vivax and P. falciparum infections were identified by PCR in 92 and 41 samples respectively. However, some of these were negative in subsequent PCRs. Based...

  13. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

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    Hubbard Alan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Results Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66 and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24. Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5. However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03. Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Conclusions Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission

  14. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; Dorsey, Grant; Hubbard, Alan E; Rosenthal, Philip J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2010-01-15

    Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66) and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24). Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5). However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03). Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission, gel electrophoresis appears adequate to estimate comparative

  15. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

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    Vincent-Mark Arlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru. Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents, a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the

  16. Discovery of potent, novel, non-toxic anti-malarial compounds via quantum modelling, virtual screening and in vitro experimental validation

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    Kaludov Nikola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing resistance towards existing anti-malarial therapies emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Additionally, many malaria drugs in use today have high toxicity and low therapeutic indices. Gradient Biomodeling, LLC has developed a quantum-model search technology that uses quantum similarity and does not depend explicitly on chemical structure, as molecules are rigorously described in fundamental quantum attributes related to individual pharmacological properties. Therapeutic activity, as well as toxicity and other essential properties can be analysed and optimized simultaneously, independently of one another. Such methodology is suitable for a search of novel, non-toxic, active anti-malarial compounds. Methods A set of innovative algorithms is used for the fast calculation and interpretation of electron-density attributes of molecular structures at the quantum level for rapid discovery of prospective pharmaceuticals. Potency and efficacy, as well as additional physicochemical, metabolic, pharmacokinetic, safety, permeability and other properties were characterized by the procedure. Once quantum models are developed and experimentally validated, the methodology provides a straightforward implementation for lead discovery, compound optimizzation and de novo molecular design. Results Starting with a diverse training set of 26 well-known anti-malarial agents combined with 1730 moderately active and inactive molecules, novel compounds that have strong anti-malarial activity, low cytotoxicity and structural dissimilarity from the training set were discovered and experimentally validated. Twelve compounds were identified in silico and tested in vitro; eight of them showed anti-malarial activity (IC50 ≤ 10 μM, with six being very effective (IC50 ≤ 1 μM, and four exhibiting low nanomolar potency. The most active compounds were also tested for mammalian cytotoxicity and found to be non-toxic, with a

  17. interventional studies of anti-malarial drugs utilization in public

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study Design. The study was a cross ... Muhammadu Sanusi General Hospital (SMSGH) and ... regimens, guided focus group presentations and one .... to the optimal theoretical value of 17.2% proposed in.

  18. An ethnobotanical study of anti-malarial plants among indigenous people on the upper Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausin, Gina; Hidalgo, Ari de Freitas; Lima, Renata Braga Souza; Kinupp, Valdely Ferreira; Ming, Lin Chau; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Milliken, William

    2015-11-04

    material available, the patient's age (children and adults) and the local expert. The treatment time varies from a single dose to up to several weeks. Most anti-malarial plants are domesticated or grow spontaneously. They are grown in home gardens, open areas near the communities, clearings and secondary forests, and wild species grow in areas of seasonally flooded wetlands and terra firme ('solid ground') forest, in some cases in locations that are hard to access. Traditional knowledge of plants was found to be falling into disuse presumably as a consequence of the local official health services that treat malaria in the communities using commercial drugs. Despite this, some species are used in the prevention of this disease and also in the recovery after using conventional anti-malarial drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The association between price, competition, and demand factors on private sector anti-malarial stocking and sales in western Kenya: considerations for the AMFm subsidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Households in sub-Saharan Africa are highly reliant on the retail sector for obtaining treatment for malaria fevers and other illnesses. As donors and governments seek to promote the use of artemisinin combination therapy in malaria-endemic areas through subsidized anti-malarials offered in the retail sector, understanding the stocking and pricing decisions of retail outlets is vital. Methods A survey of all medicine retailers serving Bungoma East District in western Kenya was conducted three months after the launch of the AMFm subsidy in Kenya. The survey obtained information on each anti-malarial in stock: brand name, price, sales volume, outlet characteristics and GPS co-ordinates. These data were matched to household-level data from the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance System, from which population density and fever prevalence near each shop were determined. Regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with retailers’ likelihood of stocking subsidized artemether lumefantrine (AL) and the association between price and sales for AL, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Results Ninety-seven retail outlets in the study area were surveyed; 11% of outlets stocked subsidized AL. Size of the outlet and having a pharmacist on staff were associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL. In the multivariable model, total volume of anti-malarial sales was associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL and competition was important; likelihood of stocking subsidized AL was considerably higher if the nearest neighbour stocked subsidized AL. Price was a significant predictor of sales volume for all three types of anti-malarials but the relationship varied, with the largest price sensitivity found for SP drugs. Conclusion The results suggest that helping small outlets overcome the constraints to stocking subsidized AL should be a priority. Competition between retailers and prices can play an important

  20. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phitsinee Thipubon

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron cstitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  1. Anti-malarial landscape in Myanmar: results from a nationally representative survey among community health workers and the private sector outlets in 2015/2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Si Thu; Khin, Hnin Su Su; Thi, Aung

    2017-04-25

    In 2015/2016, an ACTwatch outlet survey was implemented to assess the anti-malarial and malaria testing landscape in Myanmar across four domains (Eastern, Central, Coastal, Western regions). Indicators provide an important benchmark to guide Myanmar's new National Strategic Plan to eliminate malaria by 2030. This was a cross-sectional survey, which employed stratified cluster-random sampling across four regions in Myanmar. A census of community health workers (CHWs) and private outlets with potential to distribute malaria testing and/or treatment was conducted. An audit was completed for all anti-malarials, malaria rapid diagnostic tests. A total of 28,664 outlets were approached and 4416 met the screening criteria. The anti-malarial market composition comprised CHWs (41.5%), general retailers (27.9%), itinerant drug vendors (11.8%), pharmacies (10.9%), and private for-profit facilities (7.9%). Availability of different anti-malarials and diagnostic testing among anti-malarial-stocking CHWs was as follows: artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (81.3%), chloroquine (67.0%), confirmatory malaria test (77.7%). Less than half of the anti-malarial-stocking private sector had first-line treatment in stock: ACT (41.7%) chloroquine (41.8%), and malaria diagnostic testing was rare (15.4%). Oral artemisinin monotherapy (AMT) was available in 27.7% of private sector outlets (Western, 54.1%; Central, 31.4%; Eastern; 25.0%, Coastal; 15.4%). The private-sector anti-malarial market share comprised ACT (44.0%), chloroquine (26.6%), and oral AMT (19.6%). Among CHW the market share was ACT (71.6%), chloroquine (22.3%); oral AMT (3.8%). More than half of CHWs could correctly state the national first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria (59.2 and 56.9%, respectively) compared to the private sector (15.8 and 13.2%, respectively). Indicators on support and engagement were as follows for CHWs: reportedly received training on malaria diagnosis (60.7%) or

  2. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J

    2017-05-19

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass anti-malarial administration coverage within a clinical trial in Battambang Province, western Cambodia. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with villagers, in-depth interviews with study staff, trial drop-outs and refusers, and observations in the communities. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated from Khmer to English for qualitative content analysis using QSR NVivo. Malaria was an important health concern and villagers reported a demand for malaria treatment. This was in spite of a fall in incidence over the previous decade and a lack of familiarity with asymptomatic malaria. Participants generally understood the overall study aim and were familiar with study activities. Comprehension of the study rationale was however limited. After the first mass anti-malarial administration, seasonal health complaints that participants attributed to the anti-malarial as "side effects" contributed to a decrease of coverage in round two. Staff therefore adapted the community engagement approach, bringing to prominence local leaders in village meetings. This contributed to a subsequent increase in coverage. Future mass anti-malarial administration must consider seasonal disease patterns and the importance of local leaders taking prominent roles in community engagement. Further research is needed to investigate coverage in scenarios that more closely resemble implementation i.e. without participation incentives, blood sampling and free healthcare.

  3. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard Alan E; Dorsey Grant; Gupta Vinay; Rosenthal Philip J; Greenhouse Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary elec...

  4. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds | Das ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti‑cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. ... Keywords: Anticancer agents, Antimalarials, Antitumor activity, Artemisinins, Novel chemotherapy ...

  5. Availability and quality of anti-malarials among private sector outlets in Myanmar in 2012: results from a large, community-based, cross-sectional survey before a large-scale intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khin, Hnin Su Su; Chen, Ingrid; White, Chris; Sudhinaraset, May; McFarland, Willi; Littrell, Megan; Montagu, Dominic; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-14

    Global malaria control efforts are threatened by the spread and emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. In 2012, the widespread sale of partial courses of artemisinin-based monotherapy was suspected to take place in the highly accessed, weakly regulated private sector in Myanmar, posing potentially major threats to drug resistance. This study investigated the presence of artemisinin-based monotherapies in the Myanmar private sector, particularly as partial courses of therapy, to inform the targeting of future interventions to stop artemisinin resistance. A large cross-sectional survey comprised of a screening questionnaire was conducted across 26 townships in Myanmar between March and May, 2012. For outlets that stocked anti-malarials at the time of survey, a stock audit was conducted, and for outlets that stocked anti-malarials within 3 months of the survey, a provider survey was conducted. A total of 3,658 outlets were screened, 83% were retailers (pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers) and 17% were healthcare providers (private facilities and health workers). Of the 3,658 outlets screened, 1,359 outlets (32%) stocked at least one anti-malarial at the time of study. Oral artemisinin-based monotherapy comprised of 33% of self-reported anti-malarials dispensing volumes found. The vast majority of artemisinin-based monotherapy was sold by retailers, where 63% confirmed that they sold partial courses of therapy by cutting blister packets. Very few retailers (5%) had malaria rapid diagnostic tests available, and quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy was virtually nonexistent among retailers. Informal private pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers should be targeted for interventions to improve malaria treatment practices in Myanmar, particularly those that threaten the emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance.

  6. Effects of the anti-malarial compound cryptolepine and its analogues in human lymphocytes and sperm in the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Rajendran C; Emerce, Esra; Wright, Colin W; Karahalil, Bensu; Karakaya, Ali E; Anderson, Diana

    2011-12-15

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by the genus Plasmodium. It causes one million deaths per year in African children under the age of 5 years. There is an increasing development of resistance of malarial parasites to chloroquine and other currently used anti-malarial drugs. Some plant products such as the indoloquinoline alkaloid cryptolepine have been shown to have potent activity against P. falciparum in vitro. On account of its toxicity, cryptolepine is not suitable for use as an antimalarial drug but a number of analogues of cryptolepine have been synthesised in an attempt to find compounds that have reduced cytotoxicity and these have been investigated in the present study in human sperm and lymphocytes using the Comet assay. The results suggest that cryptolepine and the analogues cause DNA damage in lymphocytes, but appear to have no effect on human sperm at the assessed doses. In the context of antimalarial drug development, the data suggest that all cryptolepine compounds and in particular 2,7-dibromocryptolepine cause DNA damage and therefore may not be suitable for pre clinical development as antimalarial agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  8. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lawrence; Coignez, Veerle; Barojas, Adrian; Bempong, Daniel; Bradby, Sanford; Dijiba, Yanga; James, Makeida; Bretas, Gustavo; Adhin, Malti; Ceron, Nicolas; Hinds-Semple, Alison; Chibwe, Kennedy; Lukulay, Patrick; Pribluda, Victor

    2012-06-15

    Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with the quality of anti-malarial medicines

  9. Identification and reconstitution of the polyketide synthases responsible for biosynthesis of the anti-malarial agent, cladosporin

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Rachel V. K.; Sanichar, Randy; Lambkin, Gareth R.; Reiz, Béla; Xu, Wei; Tang, Yi; Vederas, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial agent cladosporin is a nanomolar inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and exhibits activity against both blood and liver stage infection. Cladosporin can be isolated from the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, where it was believed to be biosynthesized by a highly reducing (HR) and non-reducing (NR) iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS) pair. Genome sequencing of the host organism, and subsequent heterologous expression of these enzymes in Sacchar...

  10. Determinants of price setting decisions on anti-malarial drugs at retail shops in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Patouillard, Edith; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Palafox, Benjamin; Tougher, Sarah; Pok, Sochea; O?Connell, Kate; Goodman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background In many low-income countries, the private commercial sector plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. However, the quality of care it provides is often poor, with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) generally being too costly for consumers. Decreasing ACT prices is critical for improving private sector treatment outcomes and reducing the spread of artemisinin resistance. Yet limited evidence exists on the factors influencing retailers? pricing decisions. This...

  11. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  12. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT ( Conclusions These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials are accessed, with some exceptions. The results confirm that there is substantial room to improve availability and affordability of ACT treatment in the surveyed countries. The data will also be useful for monitoring the impact of interventions such as the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria.

  13. Working towards consensus on methods used to elicit participant-reported safety data in uncomplicated malaria clinical drug studies: a Delphi technique study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandimika, Nyaradzo; Barnes, Karen I; Chandler, Clare I R; Pace, Cheryl; Allen, Elizabeth N

    2017-01-28

    Eliciting adverse event (AE) and non-study medication data reports from clinical research participants is integral to evaluating drug safety. However, using different methods to question participants yields inconsistent results, compromising the interpretation, comparison and pooling of data across studies. This is particularly important given the widespread use of anti-malarials in vulnerable populations, and their increasing use in healthy, but at-risk individuals, as preventive treatment or to reduce malaria transmission. Experienced and knowledgeable anti-malarial drug clinical researchers were invited to participate in a Delphi technique study, to facilitate consensus on what are considered optimal (relevant, important and feasible) methods, tools, and approaches for detecting participant-reported AE and non-study medication data in uncomplicated malaria treatment studies. Of 72 invited, 25, 16 and 10 panellists responded to the first, second and third rounds of the Delphi, respectively. Overall, 68% (68/100) of all questioning items presented for rating achieved consensus. When asking general questions about health, panellists agreed on the utility of a question/concept about any change in health, taking care to ensure that such questions/concepts do not imply causality. Eighty-nine percent (39/44) of specific signs and symptoms questions were rated as optimal. For non-study medications, a general question and most structured questioning items were considered an optimal approach. The use of mobile phones, patient diaries, rating scales as well as openly engaging with participants to discuss concerns were also considered optimal complementary data-elicitation tools. This study succeeded in reaching consensus within a section of the anti-malarial drug clinical research community about using a general question concept, and structured questions for eliciting data about AEs and non-study medication reports. The concepts and items considered in this Delphi to be

  14. Donor support for quality assurance and pharmacovigilance of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Stephanie D; Mills, Brianna M; Stergachis, Andy

    2017-07-11

    Malaria control efforts have been strengthened by funding from donor groups and government agencies. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and the Malaria (Global Fund), the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) account for the majority of donor support for malaria control and prevention efforts. Pharmacovigilance (PV), which encompasses all activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding, and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem, is a necessary part of efforts to reduce drug resistance and improve treatment outcomes. This paper reports on an analysis of PV plans in the Global Fund and PMI and World Bank's grants for malaria prevention and control. All active malaria grants as of September 2015 funded by the Global Fund and World Bank, and fiscal year 2015 and 2016 PMI Malaria Operational Plans (MOP) were identified. The total amount awarded for PV-related activities and drug quality assurance was abstracted. A Key-Word-in-Context (KWIC) analysis was conducted for the content of each grant. Specific search terms consisted of pharmacovigilance, pregn*, registry, safety, adverse drug, mass drug administration, primaquine, counterfeit, sub-standard, and falsified. Grants that mentioned PV activities identified in the KWIC search, listed PV in their budgets, or included the keywords: counterfeit, sub-standard, falsified, mass drug administration, or adverse event were thematically coded using Dedoose software version 7.0. The search identified 159 active malaria grants including 107 Global Fund grants, 39 fiscal year 2015 and 2016 PMI grants and 13 World Bank grants. These grants were primarily awarded to low-income countries (57.2%) and in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (70.4%). Thirty-seven (23.3%) grants included a budget line for PV- or drug quality assurance-related activities, including 21 PMI grants and 16 Global Fund grants. Only 23 (14.5%) grants directly mentioned PV. The primary focus area was improving drug

  15. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kathryn A; Gatakaa, Hellen; Poyer, Stephen; Njogu, Julius; Evance, Illah; Munroe, Erik; Solomon, Tsione; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Zinsou, Cyprien; Akulayi, Louis; Raharinjatovo, Jacky; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Adjibabi, Chérifatou Bello; Agbango, Jean Angbalu; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin Fanomezana; Coker, Babajide; Rubahika, Denis; Hamainza, Busiku; Chapman, Steven; Shewchuk, Tanya; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was available for free in all countries except Benin and the DRC (US$1.29 [Inter Quartile Range (IQR): $1.29-$1.29] and $0.52[IQR: $0.00-$1.29] per adult equivalent dose respectively). In the private sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was 5-24 times more expensive than non-artemisinin therapies. The exception was Madagascar where, due to national social marketing of subsidized ACT, the price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share. Most anti-malarials were distributed through the private sector

  16. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian R; Chehuan, Yonne F; Siqueira, Maria José; das Graças Alecrim, Maria; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Druilhe, Pierre; Brasseur, Philippe; de Fátima Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria; Carvalho, Leonardo J M; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio T

    2013-08-12

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10-20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health policies.

  17. The challenge to avoid anti-malarial medicine stock-outs in an era of funding partners: the case of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen-Lopez, Inez; Shango, Winna; Barrington, Jim; Ziegler, Rene; Smith, Tom; deSavigny, Don

    2014-05-11

    Between 2007 and 2013, the Tanzanian public sector received 93.1 million doses of first-line anti-malarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the form of artemether-lumefantrine entirely supplied by funding partners. The introduction of a health facility ACT stock monitoring system using SMS technology by the National Malaria Control Programme in mid 2011 revealed a high frequency of stock-outs of ACT in primary care public health facilities. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of availability of ACT and possible causes of observed stock-outs across public health facilities in Tanzania since mid-2011. Data were collected weekly by the mobile phone reporting tool SMS for Life on ACT availability from over 5,000 public health facilities in Tanzania starting from September 2011 to December 2012. Stock data for all four age-dose levels of ACT across health facilities were summarized and supply of ACT at the national level was also documented. Over the period of 15 months, on average 29% of health facilities in Tanzania were completely stocked out of all four-age dose levels of the first-line anti-malarial with a median duration of total stock-out of six weeks. Patterns of total stock-out by region ranged from a low of 9% to a high of 52%. The ACT stock-outs were most likely caused by: a) insufficient ACT supplies entering Tanzania (e.g. in 2012 Tanzania received 10.9 million ACT doses compared with a forecast demand of 14.4 million doses); and b) irregular pattern of ACT supply (several months with no ACT stock). The reduced ACT availability and irregular pattern of supply were due to cumbersome bureaucratic processes and delays both within the country and from the main donor, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Tanzania should invest in strengthening both the supply system and the health information system using mHealth solutions such as SMS for Life. This will continue to assist in tracking ACT availability across

  18. Therapeutic and prophylactic effect of intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment in infants (IPTi from Ghana and Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuels Benno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP reduces the incidence of malaria episodes in young children. The exact mechanism by which the protective effect is mediated needs to be defined. This study aimed to investigate therapeutic, prophylactic, and possible exceeding effects of SP-based IPTi in two clinical trials. Methods Protective efficacies from two IPTi trials performed in Kumasi, Ghana, and Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for overlapping time series of 61 days. For six-months periods after each of three IPTi doses a multivariate Poisson regression model with the respective cohort as co-variate was generated and effect modification of protective efficacy with time strata was evaluated by log-likelihood tests. Results Protective efficacies were not significantly different between the two study cohorts. Study-cohort corrected protective efficacy was highest for the first 61 days after each IPTi application and decreased continuously. For the first 61 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2, and IPTi-3 the protective efficacy was 71%, 44%, and 43%, respectively. A reduction of the malaria incidence rate was detectable for the first 60, 30 and 40 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2 and IPTi-3 drug application, respectively. After IPTi-3 a higher risk for malaria could be seen after day 60. This effect was mainly based on the overwhelming influence of the Kumasi cohort. Conclusion The results suggest that SP-based IPTi mainly works through a therapeutic and prophylactic effect over 30 to 60 days after drug application and that a sustained effect beyond post-treatment prophylaxis might be very low. Trial registration Data analysis from clinical trials NCT ID # 00206739 (Kumasi Trial and NCT ID # 00167843 (Lambaréné Trial, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  19. Screening and hit evaluation of a chemical library against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Vicky M; Bashyam, Sridevi; Burrows, Jeremy N; Duffy, Sandra; Papadatos, George; Puthukkuti, Shyni; Sambandan, Yuvaraj; Singh, Shivendra; Spangenberg, Thomas; Waterson, David; Willis, Paul

    2014-05-27

    In view of the need to continuously feed the pipeline with new anti-malarial agents adapted to differentiated and more stringent target product profiles (e.g., new modes of action, transmission-blocking activity or long-duration chemo-protection), a chemical library consisting of more than 250,000 compounds has been evaluated in a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition assay and further assessed for chemical diversity and novelty. The selection cascade used for the triaging of hits from the chemical library started with a robust three-step in vitro assay followed by an in silico analysis of the resulting confirmed hits. Upon reaching the predefined requirements for selectivity and potency, the set of hits was subjected to computational analysis to assess chemical properties and diversity. Furthermore, known marketed anti-malarial drugs were co-clustered acting as 'signposts' in the chemical space defined by the hits. Then, in cerebro evaluation of the chemical structures was performed to identify scaffolds that currently are or have been the focus of anti-malarial medicinal chemistry programmes. Next, prioritization according to relaxed physicochemical parameters took place, along with the search for structural analogues. Ultimately, synthesis of novel chemotypes with desired properties was performed and the resulting compounds were subsequently retested in a P. falciparum growth inhibition assay. This screening campaign led to a 1.25% primary hit rate, which decreased to 0.77% upon confirmatory repeat screening. With the predefined potency (EC₅₀  10) criteria, 178 compounds progressed to the next steps where chemical diversity, physicochemical properties and novelty assessment were taken into account. This resulted in the selection of 15 distinct chemical series. A selection cascade was applied to prioritize hits resulting from the screening of a medium-sized chemical library against blood-stage P. falciparum. Emphasis was placed on chemical

  20. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  1. Mapping the genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the drug-like chemical space reveals novel anti-malarial targets and potential drug leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Plichta, Damian Rafal; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    , in order to uncover the weak links in the proteome of the parasite. We predicted 293 proteins of P. falciparum, including the six out of the seven verified targets for P. falciparum malaria treatment, as targets of 4645 GSK active compounds. Furthermore, we prioritized druggable targets, based on a number...... of factors, such as essentiality for growth, lack of homology with human proteins, and availability of experimental data on ligand activity with a non-human homologue of a parasite protein. We have additionally prioritized predicted ligands based on their polypharmacology profile, with focus on validated...

  2. Within-host selection of drug resistance in a mouse model of repeated interrupted treatment of Plasmodium yoelii infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuralitha, Suci; Siregar, Josephine E; Syafruddin, Din; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study within-host selection of resistant parasites, an important factor in the development of resistance to anti-malarial drugs, a mouse model of repeated interrupted malaria treatment (RIT) has been developed. The characteristics of within host selection of resistance to atovaquone

  3. Specific Stereoisomeric Conformations Determine the Drug Potency of Cladosporin Scaffold against Malarial Parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pronay; Babbar, Palak; Malhotra, Nipun; Sharma, Manmohan; Jachak, Gorakhnath R; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Harlos, Karl; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2018-05-21

    The dependence of drug potency on diastereomeric configurations is a key facet. Using a novel general divergent synthetic route for a three-chiral centre anti-malarial natural product cladosporin, we built its complete library of stereoisomers (cladologs) and assessed their inhibitory potential using parasite-, enzyme- and structure-based assays. We show that potency is manifest via tetrahyropyran ring conformations that are housed in the ribose binding pocket of parasite lysyl tRNA synthetase (KRS). Strikingly, drug potency between top and worst enantiomers varied 500-fold, and structures of KRS-cladolog complexes reveal that alterations at C3 and C10 are detrimental to drug potency where changes at C3 are sensed by rotameric flipping of Glutamate332. Given that scores of anti-malarial and anti-infective drugs contain chiral centers, this work provides a new foundation for focusing on inhibitor stereochemistry as a facet of anti-microbial drug development.

  4. Discovery and Evaluation of Thiazinoquinones as Anti-Protozoal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Kaiser

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pure compound screening has identified the dioxothiazino-quinoline-quinone ascidian metabolite ascidiathiazone A (2 to be a moderate growth inhibitor of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC50 3.1 μM and Plasmodium falciparum (K1 dual drug resistant strain (IC50 3.3 μM while exhibiting low levels of cytotoxicity (L6, IC50 167 μM. A series of C-7 amide and Δ2(3 analogues were prepared that explored the influence of lipophilicity and oxidation state on observed anti-protozoal activity and selectivity. Little variation in anti-malarial potency was observed (IC50 0.62–6.5 μM, and no correlation was apparent between anti-malarial and anti-T. brucei activity. Phenethylamide 7e and Δ2(3-glycine analogue 8k exhibited similar anti-Pf activity to 2 but with slightly enhanced selectivity (SI 72 and 93, respectively, while Δ2(3-phenethylamide 8e (IC50 0.67 μM, SI 78 exhibited improved potency and selectivity towards T. brucei rhodesiense compared to the natural product hit. A second series of analogues were prepared that replaced the quinoline ring of 2 with benzofuran or benzothiophene moieties. While esters 10a/10b and 15 were once again found to exhibit cytotoxicity, carboxylic acid analogues exhibited potent anti-Pf activity (IC50 0.34–0.035 μM combined with excellent selectivity (SI 560–4000. In vivo evaluation of a furan carboxylic acid analogue against P. berghei was undertaken, demonstrating 85.7% and 47% reductions in parasitaemia with ip or oral dosing respectively.

  5. Evaluation of in vivo antimalarial activity of the ethanolic leaf extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Plasmodium berghei berghei in mice was evaluated. ... indicated in the consistent increase in weight and slight increase in the PCV ... Key words: Chromolaena odorata, Cymbopogon citratus, anti-malarial .... This was prepared by determining both the percentage parasitaemia and the ..... Malaria vaccine: Multiple targets.

  6. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ortiz

    Full Text Available Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target.

  7. Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    Quality of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is important for ensuring malaria parasite clearance and protecting the efficacy of artemisinin-based therapies. The extent to which non quality-assured ACT (non-QAACT), or those not granted global regulatory approval, are available and used to treat malaria in endemic countries is poorly documented. This paper uses national and sub-national medicine outlet surveys conducted in eight study countries (Benin, Kinshasa and Kantanga [Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC], Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) between 2009 and 2015 to describe the non-QAACT market and to document trends in availability and distribution of non-QAACT in the public and private sector. In 2014/15, non-QAACT were most commonly available in Kinshasa (83%), followed by Katanga (53%), Nigeria (48%), Kenya (42%), and Uganda (33%). Non-QAACT accounted for 20% of the market share in the private sector in Kenya, followed by Benin and Uganda (19%), Nigeria (12%) and Zambia (8%); this figure was 27% in Katanga and 40% in Kinshasa. Public sector non-QAACT availability and distribution was much lower, with the exception of Zambia (availability, 85%; market share, 32%). Diverse generics and formulations were available, but non-QAACT were most commonly artemether-lumefantrine (AL) or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA PPQ), in tablet formulation, imported, and distributed in urban areas at either pharmacies or drug stores. The number of unique manufacturers supplying non-QAACT to each country ranged from 9 in Uganda to 92 in Nigeria. Addressing the availability and distribution of non-QAACT will require effective private sector engagement and evidence-based strategies to address provider and consumer demand for these products. Given the variation in non-QAACT markets observed across the eight study countries, active efforts to limit registration, importation and distribution of non-QAACT must be tailored to the country context

  8. Population Genetics and Drug Resistance Markers: An Essential for Malaria Surveillance in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Beg, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium (P.) vivax is the prevalent malarial species accounting for 70% of malaria cases in Pakistan. However, baseline epidemiological data on P. vivax population structure and drug resistance are lacking from Pakistan. For population structure studies, molecular genetic markers, circumsporozoite protein (csp) and merozoite surface protein-1 (msp-1) are considered useful as these play an important role in P. vivax survival under immune and environmental pressure. Furthermore, these genes have also been identified as suitable candidates for vaccine development. While efforts for effective vaccine are underway, anti-malarial agents remain the mainstay for control. Evidence of resistance against commonly used anti-malarial agents, particularly Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is threatening to make this form of control defunct. Therefore, studies on drug resistance are necessary so that anti-malarial treatment strategies can be structured and implemented accordingly by the Malaria Control Program, Pakistan. This review aims to provide information on genetic markers of P. vivax population structure and drug resistance and comment on their usefulness in molecular surveillance and control. (author)

  9. Within-host selection of drug resistance in a mouse model of repeated interrupted treatment of Plasmodium yoelii infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nuralitha, Suci; Siregar, Josephine E; Syafruddin, Din; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study within-host selection of resistant parasites, an important factor in the development of resistance to anti-malarial drugs, a mouse model of repeated interrupted malaria treatment (RIT) has been developed. The characteristics of within host selection of resistance to atovaquone and pyrimethamine in Plasmodium yoelii was examined in such a model. METHODS: Treatment of P. yoelii infected mice, with atovaquone or pyrimethamine, was started at parasitaemia level of 3-5%, inter...

  10. Impact of introducing subsidized combination treatment with artemether-lumefantrine on sales of anti-malarial monotherapies: a survey of private sector pharmacies in Huambo, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiana, Cristina; Floridia, Marco; Martinho do Rosário, Joana; Fortes, Filomeno; Allan, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) against malaria are subsidized in many African countries, but the impact of subsidy programs in reducing the sales of concomitantly available antimalarial monotherapies is poorly defined. Data from The MENTOR initiative, that introduced subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (sAL) in the private sector of Huambo province, Angola, were used. The main response variable was represented by sales of sAL and of monotherapies, measured as number of treatment courses. Sales in private pharmacies of sAL and four antimalarial monotherapies between 2009 and 2013 were organized in four time-periods, and analyzed using generalized linear models for repeated measures. A secondary analysis evaluated changes in relative market share. We analyzed data from 34 pharmacies at four time points, taken from a larger survey that involved 165 pharmacies between June 2009 and March 2013. The sAL, following its introduction, became the dominant antimalarial treatment in the private sector, usually exceeding the total sales of all antimalarial monotherapies combined (1480/2800 total treatment courses, 52.8% of all sales in March 2013). Sales of monotherapies decreased significantly, but did not stop, representing 36.7% (1028/2800) of sales at the end of the survey. Subsidized ACTs can attain rapidly a high relative market share. Their introduction reduced, but did not eliminate the demand for less effective monotherapies, that might favor parasite resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. What happened to anti-malarial markets after the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria pilot? Trends in ACT availability, price and market share from five African countries under continuation of the private sector co-payment mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougher, Sarah; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-04-25

    The private sector supplies anti-malarial treatment for large proportions of patients in sub-Saharan Africa. Following the large-scale piloting of the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm) from 2010 to 2011, a private sector co-payment mechanism (CPM) provided continuation of private sector subsidies for quality-assured artemisinin combination therapies (QAACT). This article analyses for the first time the extent to which improvements in private sector QAACT supply and distribution observed during the AMFm were maintained or intensified during continuation of the CPM through 2015 in Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda using repeat cross-sectional outlet survey data. QAACT market share in all five countries increased during the AMFm period (p private sector QAACT availability were maintained or improved. In 2014/15, private sector QAACT availability was greater than 70% in Nigeria (84.3%), Kenya (70.5%), Tanzania (83.0%) and Uganda (77.1%), but only 11.2% in Madagascar. QAACT market share was maintained or improved post-AMFm in Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda, but statistically significant declines were observed in Kenya and Madagascar. In 2014/5, QAACT market share was highest in Kenya and Uganda (48.2 and 47.5%, respectively) followed by Tanzania (39.2%), Nigeria (35.0%), and Madagascar (7.0%). Four of the five countries experienced significant decreases in median QAACT price during the AMFm period. Private sector QAACT prices were maintained or further reduced in Tanzania, Nigeria and Uganda, but prices increased significantly in Kenya and Madagascar. SP prices were consistently lower than those of QAACT in the AMFm period, with the exception of Kenya and Tanzania in 2011, where they were equal. In 2014/5 QAACT remained two to three times more expensive than the most popular non-artemisinin therapy in all countries except Tanzania. Results suggest that a private sector co-payment mechanism for QAACT implemented at national scale for 5 years was

  12. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) necessitating dose adjustments or the avoidance of drug combinations. This study aimed to evaluate DDIs among patients with CKD in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, South-East Nigeria.

  13. Center for Drug Evaluation and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research(CDER) performs an essential public health task by making sure that safe and effective drugs are available to improve the...

  14. Evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, J.A.; Grove, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive new drugs are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States. Before a new drug can be marketed it must have an approved New Drug Application (NDA). Clinical investigations of a radioactive new drug are carried out under a Notice of Claimed Investigational Exemption for a New Drug (IND), submitted to the FDA. In the review of the IND, radiation doses are projected on the basis of experimental data from animal models and from calculations based upon radiation characteristics, predicted biodistribution of the drug in humans, and activity to be administered. FDA physicians review anticipated doses and prevent clinical investigations in humans when the potential risk of the use of a radioactive substance outweighs the prospect of achieving beneficial results from the administration of the drug. In the evaluation of an NDA, FDA staff attempt to assure that the intended diagnostic or therapeutic effect is achievable with the lowest practicable radiation dose. Radiation doses from radioactive new drugs are evaluated by physicians within the FDA. Important radioactive new drugs are also evaluated by the Radiopharmaceuticals Advisory Committee. FDA also supports the Center for Internal Radiation Dosimetry at Oak Ridge, to provide information regarding in vivo distribution and dosimetry to critical organs and the whole body from radioactive new drugs. The process for evaluation of radiation doses from radioactive new drugs for protection against use of unnecessary radiation exposure by patients in nuclear medicine procedures, a

  15. Evaluation of drug interaction microcomputer software: Dambro's Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, T I; Giudici, R A

    1990-01-01

    Dambro's Drug Interactions was evaluated using general and specific criteria. The installation process, ease of learning and use were rated excellent. The user documentation and quality of the technical support were good. The scope of coverage, clinical documentation, frequency of updates, and overall clinical performance were fair. The primary advantages of the program are the quick searching and detection of drug interactions, and the attempt to provide useful interaction data, i.e., significance and reference. The disadvantages are the lack of current drug interaction information, outdated references, lack of evaluative drug interaction information, and the inability to save or print patient profiles. The program is not a good value for the pharmacist but has limited use as a quick screening tool.

  16. A genome wide association study of Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to 22 antimalarial drugs in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Wendler

    Full Text Available Drug resistance remains a chief concern for malaria control. In order to determine the genetic markers of drug resistant parasites, we tested the genome-wide associations (GWA of sequence-based genotypes from 35 Kenyan P. falciparum parasites with the activities of 22 antimalarial drugs.Parasites isolated from children with acute febrile malaria were adapted to culture, and sensitivity was determined by in vitro growth in the presence of anti-malarial drugs. Parasites were genotyped using whole genome sequencing techniques. Associations between 6250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and resistance to individual anti-malarial agents were determined, with false discovery rate adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing. We identified expected associations in the pfcrt region with chloroquine (CQ activity, and other novel loci associated with amodiaquine, quinazoline, and quinine activities. Signals for CQ and primaquine (PQ overlap in and around pfcrt, and interestingly the phenotypes are inversely related for these two drugs. We catalog the variation in dhfr, dhps, mdr1, nhe, and crt, including novel SNPs, and confirm the presence of a dhfr-164L quadruple mutant in coastal Kenya. Mutations implicated in sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance are at or near fixation in this sample set.Sequence-based GWA studies are powerful tools for phenotypic association tests. Using this approach on falciparum parasites from coastal Kenya we identified known and previously unreported genes associated with phenotypic resistance to anti-malarial drugs, and observe in high-resolution haplotype visualizations a possible signature of an inverse selective relationship between CQ and PQ.

  17. Activity of clinically relevant antimalarial drugs on Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes in an ATP bioluminescence "transmission blocking" assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Lelièvre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current anti-malarial drugs have been selected on the basis of their activity against the symptom-causing asexual blood stage of the parasite. Which of these drugs also target gametocytes, in the sexual stage responsible for disease transmission, remains unknown. Blocking transmission is one of the main strategies in the eradication agenda and requires the identification of new molecules that are active against gametocytes. However, to date, the main limitation for measuring the effect of molecules against mature gametocytes on a large scale is the lack of a standardized and reliable method. Here we provide an efficient method to produce and purify mature gametocytes in vitro. Based on this new procedure, we developed a robust, affordable, and sensitive ATP bioluminescence-based assay. We then assessed the activity of 17 gold-standard anti-malarial drugs on Plasmodium late stage gametocytes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Difficulties in producing large amounts of gametocytes have limited progress in the development of malaria transmission blocking assays. We improved the method established by Ifediba and Vanderberg to obtain viable, mature gametocytes en masse, whatever the strain used. We designed an assay to determine the activity of antimalarial drugs based on the intracellular ATP content of purified stage IV-V gametocytes after 48 h of drug exposure in 96/384-well microplates. Measurements of drug activity on asexual stages and cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells were also obtained to estimate the specificity of the active drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The work described here represents another significant step towards determination of the activity of new molecules on mature gametocytes of any strain with an automated assay suitable for medium/high-throughput screening. Considering that the biology of the forms involved in the sexual and asexual stages is very different, a screen of our 2 million-compound library may allow us to discover novel anti-malarial

  18. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  19. Evaluation of the Anti-plasmodial Activity of the Methanolic Root Extracts of Anthocleista nobilis G. Don, Nauclea latifolia Smith and Napoleona imperialis P. Beauv

    OpenAIRE

    Ijeoma H. Ogbuehi; Omotayo O. Ebong; Eme O. Asuquo; Chijioke A. Nwauche

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of resistant strains of the malaria parasite has necessitated the continued search for other effective, safe and cheap plant-based anti-malarial agents. This study was carried out to evaluate in vivo the anti-plasmodial effect of the extract of a combination of three plants as used in traditional medicine in South-east, Nigeria. Dried and ground roots of the three plants: Anthocleista nobilis, Nauclea latifolia and Napoleona imperialis were extracted in 70% methanol as a combina...

  20. Drug use in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi Y; Burri, Christian; Nzolo, Didier B; Engo, Aline B; Lula, Yves N; Mampunza, Samuel M; Nsibu, Célestin N; Mesia, Gauthier K; Kayembe, Jean-Marie N; Likwela, Joris L; Kintaudi, Leon M; Tona, Gaston L

    2018-05-03

    Malaria the first causes of death from parasitic infection worldwide. Interventions to reduce the burden of malaria have produced a tremendous drop in malaria morbidity and mortality. However, progress is slower in DRC, which shares with Nigeria 39% of deaths related to malaria globally. Inappropriate use of drugs may be one of the factors of this below-average performance. The aim of this study was to describe the use of drugs in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in DRC. A drug use study was carried out in DRC from January to March 2014. In each of the former 11 provinces of DRC, one Rural Health Centre, one Urban Health Centre and one General Hospital were selected. In each of them, 100 patient's files containing prescription of anti-malarials from January to December 2013 were randomly selected. Among them, all of the files with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were included in this study. Prescribed anti-malarials, co-prescribed drugs and their indications were collected. Descriptive analyses were performed. A total of 2300 files out of 3300 (69.7%) concerned uncomplicated malaria and were included in analysis. Malaria treatment was initiated after a positive RDT or microscopy in 51.5% of cases, upon suspicion without requesting biological confirmation in 37% and despite negative results in 11%. Twenty-nine (29) different treatment regimens were used. The drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme were used in 54.3% of cases (artesunate-amodiaquine 37.4% or artemether-lumefantrine 16.9%). The second most used anti-malarial was quinine (32.4%). Apart from anti-malarials, an average of 3.1 drugs per patient were prescribed, among which antibiotics (67.9%), analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) (all abbreviations to be explicated on first use) (70.6%), vitamins (29.1%), anaemia drugs, including blood transfusion (9.1%) and corticosteroids (5.7%), In 51.4% of cases there was no indication for

  1. Systematic evaluation of drug-disease relationships to identify leads for novel drug uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, A P; Butte, A J

    2009-11-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the discovery of alternative uses for drugs--uses that are different from that for which the drugs were originally intended. One challenge in this effort lies in choosing the indication for which a drug of interest could be prospectively tested. We systematically evaluated a drug treatment-based view of diseases in order to address this challenge. Suggestions for novel drug uses were generated using a "guilt by association" approach. When compared with a control group of drug uses, the suggested novel drug uses generated by this approach were significantly enriched with respect to previous and ongoing clinical trials.

  2. Evaluation of Drug Quality (III): Determination of Ciprofloxacin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Evaluation of Drug Quality (III): Determination of Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride ... two methods were interpreted in terms of differences in sensitivities of the methods. It was ..... Agency for Food, Drug Administration and. Control ... regulatory standards and specified identity. Therefore drug analysis requires that drugs meet their.

  3. Hospital pharmacists' evaluation of drug wholesaler services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W O; Ryan, M R; Roberts, K B

    1983-10-01

    Services provided by drug wholesalers were evaluated by hospital pharmacists. A survey was mailed to 1500 randomly selected pharmacy directors. Respondents indicated availability and use of 26 customer services. Pharmacists rated the services that they used on the basis of importance of the service and satisfaction with the service. The 644 returned questionnaires indicated that most services were available to a large majority of respondents. Most services used were rated as important or essential. Most respondents were satisfied with wholesaler services; the service with which the most respondents were dissatisfied was stocking of pharmaceuticals in single-unit packaging. Of other services that were widely used and rated important, prompt crediting for delivery errors, few out-of-stock items, frequent pickup of return merchandise, and stocking of injectable pharmaceuticals received low satisfaction ratings. Same-day delivery service and emergency delivery of prescription items were unavailable to more than 40% of respondents. Hospital pharmacists were generally satisfied with services provided by drug wholesalers. Wholesalers should be aware of the particular service needs of hospital pharmacists, and further studies of these needs should be conducted.

  4. 76 FR 45268 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ...] Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Approach to Addressing Drug Shortage; Public Workshop AGENCY... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop regarding the approach of the Center for Drug Evaluation and..., and to gain additional insight from, professional societies, patient advocates, industry, consumer...

  5. Approved Drug Products with Therapuetic Equivalence Evaluations (Orange Book)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The publication Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations (the List, commonly known as the Orange Book) identifies drug products approved on...

  6. Evaluation of Information Contained in Drug Advertisement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Information Contained in Drug Advertisement and Promotion Materials in Nigeria. ... Conclusion: This study reveals that advertising materials used in promoting drugs in Nigeria have incomplete ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development, use and evaluation of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E H; Launsø, Laila

    1987-01-01

    . Drugs offer a standard solution to health problems independent of the individuals' social life. Thus drugs become a tool which function in agreement with the disintegrated and achievement-orientated approach to disease as it is organized today. In general the statements in this article are not limited...

  9. In vivo anti-malarial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    There is, thus, the need to initiate further in-depth investigation by using different experimental ... antiprotozoal compounds, a sapogenin (muzanzagenin) and lignan ((+) .... The microscope had an. Ehrlich's ... 100 red blood cells per field.

  10. Lead Optimization of Anti-Malarial Propafenone Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, David; Pradhan, Anupam; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Parman, Toufan; Gow, Jason; Zhu, Fangyi; Furimsky, Anna; Lemoff, Andrew; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Sigal, Martina; Clark, Julie A.; Wilson, Emily; Tang, Liang; Connelly, Michele C.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Mirsalis, Jon; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported studies identified analogs of propafenone that had potent antimalarial activity, reduced cardiac ion channel activity, and properties that suggested the potential for clinical development for malaria. Careful examination of the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and efficacy of this series of compounds using rodent models revealed orally bioavailable compounds that are non-toxic and suppress parasitemia in vivo. Although these compounds possess potential for further preclinical development, they also carry some significant challenges. PMID:22708838

  11. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemisinin is a naturally occurring antimalarial showing anticancer properties. ..... Artemisinins usually promote apoptosis rather than necrosis in most cases ... artemisinin-mediated inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C).

  12. Ethnobotanical study of some Ghanaian anti-malarial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asase, Alex; Oteng-Yeboah, Alfred A; Odamtten, George T; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2005-06-03

    An ethnobotanical study was conducted in the Wechiau Community Hippopotamus Sanctuary area in Ghana, through interviews and quadrate studies, to investigate the range and abundance of species used in the treatment of malaria. Forty-one species belonging to 17 families were encountered during the study. Of the 17 families studied Leguminosae and Anacardiaceae predominated in terms of number of species used to treat malaria. Eight plant species namely, Afraegle paniculata (Rutaceae), Haematostaphis barteri (Anacardiaceae), Indigo era pulchra (Leguminosae), Monanthotaxis sp. (Annonaceae), Ozoroa insignis (Anacardiaceae), Strychnos innocua (Loganiaceae), Strychnos spinosa (Loganiaceae) and Xeroderris stuhlmannii (Leguminosae) have not previously been documented for the treatment of malaria in Ghana. The results are discussed and recommendations made for future research to support the conservation and sustainable harvesting of the species reported to have medicinal properties.

  13. Development and Evaluation of Chronotherapeutic Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The developed system is capable of releasing the drug after a 4-h lag period. However ... concentration would be at its maximum level, ... spheronizer (Caleva MBS, UK)operating at .... capsules show that the color intensity of the.

  14. The evaluation of the abuse liability of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, C E

    1990-01-01

    In order to place appropriate restrictions upon the availability of certain therapeutic agents to limit their abuse, it is important to assess abuse liability, an important aspect of drug safety evaluation. However, the negative consequences of restriction must also be considered. Drugs most likely to be tested are psychoactive compounds with therapeutic indications similar to known drugs of abuse. Methods include assays of pharmacological profile, drug discrimination procedures, self-administration procedures, and measures of drug-induced toxicity including evaluations of tolerance and physical dependence. Furthermore, the evaluation of toxicity using behavioural end-points is an important component of the assessment, and it is generally believed that the most valid procedure in this evaluation is the measurement of drug self-administration. However, even this method rarely predicts the extent of abuse of a specific drug. Although methods are available which appear to measure relative abuse liability, these procedures are not validated for all drug classes. Thus, additional strategies, including abuse liability studies in humans, modelled after those used with animals, must be used in order to make a more informed prediction. Although there is pressure to place restrictions on new drugs at the time of marketing, in light of the difficulty of predicting relative abuse potential, a better strategy might be to market a drug without restrictions, but require postmarketing surveillance in order to obtain more accurate information on which to base a final decision.

  15. Malaria in South America: a drug discovery perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luiza R; Spangenberg, Thomas; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Wells, Timothy N C

    2013-05-24

    The challenge of controlling and eventually eradicating malaria means that new tools are urgently needed. South America's role in this fight spans both ends of the research and development spectrum: both as a continent capable of discovering and developing new medicines, and also as a continent with significant numbers of malaria patients. This article reviews the contribution of groups in the South American continent to the research and development of new medicines over the last decade. Therefore, the current situation of research targeting malaria control and eradication is discussed, including endemicity, geographical distribution, treatment, drug-resistance and diagnosis. This sets the scene for a review of efforts within South America to discover and optimize compounds with anti-malarial activity.

  16. Cost Evaluation of Commonly Prescribed Antihypertensive Drugs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was also concluded that generic prescription should be encouraged among prescribers to lessen the financial burden of patients because drugs marketed under generic names are usually cheaper than those with brand names. Key words: Brand, Generic,Prescription, Antihypertensives,Cost. [Nig. Jnl Health & Biomedical ...

  17. Using Respondent-Driven Sampling to Recruit Illegal Drug Purchasers to Evaluate a Drug Market Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Allison J; Sussell, Jesse; Kilmer, Beau; Saunders, Jessica; Heckathorn, Douglas D

    2016-04-01

    Violent drug markets are not as prominent as they once were in the United States, but they still exist and are associated with significant crime and lower quality of life. The drug market intervention (DMI) is an innovative strategy that uses focused deterrence, community engagement, and incapacitation to reduce crime and disorder associated with these markets. Although studies show that DMI can reduce crime and overt drug activity, one perspective is prominently missing from these evaluations: those who purchase drugs. This study explores the use of respondent-driven sampling (RDS)-a statistical sampling method-to approximate a representative sample of drug users who purchased drugs in a targeted DMI market to gain insight into the effect of a DMI on market dynamics. Using RDS, we recruited individuals who reported hard drug use (crack or powder cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, or illicit use of prescriptions opioids) in the last month to participate in a survey. The main survey asked about drug use, drug purchasing, and drug market activity before and after DMI; a secondary survey asked about network characteristics and recruitment. Our sample of 212 respondents met key RDS assumptions, suggesting that the characteristics of our weighted sample approximate the characteristics of the drug user network. The weighted estimates for market purchasers are generally valid for inferences about the aggregate population of customers, but a larger sample size is needed to make stronger inferences about the effects of a DMI on drug market activity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Evaluation of Drug Utilization Pattern for Patients of Bronchial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Drug Utilization Pattern for Patients of Bronchial Asthma in a Government Hospital of Saudi Arabia. ... Background: Bronchial asthma is a social and economic healthcare burden. Drug utilization studies are ... Salbutamol and budesonide were the most common from each group, respectively. 89.5% of the ...

  19. Formulation and Evaluation of Rifampicin Liposomes for Buccal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankalapalli, Srinivas; Tenneti, V S Vinai Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery through liposomes offers several advantages, but still challenging to the researchers for the use of liposomes as carriers in drug delivery due to their poor physical stability, unpredictable drug encapsulation and systemic availability of the loaded drug. The present investigation was planned with an objective to prepare Rifampicin loaded liposomes by using response surface methodology of statistical 32 factorial design and further to formulate them into pastilles for deliver through buccal route thereby to enhance systemic absorption. Rifampicin liposomes were prepared by using different ratios of soya lecithin and cholesterol by solvent Injection method. These liposomes were characterized by using optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and evaluated for particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE), in vitro and ex vivo drug release. Main effects and interaction terms of the formulation variables were evaluated quantitatively using a mathematical statistical model approach showing that both independent variables have significant (P value value: 0.0273), percentage entrapment efficiency (P value: 0.0096), percentage drug release through dialysis membrane (P value: 0.0047) and percentage drug release through porcine buccal membrane (P value: 0.0019). The statistical factorial design of liposomal formulations fulfilled all the requirements of the target set and exhibited suitable values for the selected test parameters. Pastilles were prepared for liposomes using glycerol gelatin base and were found to be soft, smooth with uniform drug content and drug release.

  20. Intracranial self-stimulation to evaluate abuse potential of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Miller, Laurence L

    2014-07-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is a behavioral procedure in which operant responding is maintained by pulses of electrical brain stimulation. In research to study abuse-related drug effects, ICSS relies on electrode placements that target the medial forebrain bundle at the level of the lateral hypothalamus, and experimental sessions manipulate frequency or amplitude of stimulation to engender a wide range of baseline response rates or response probabilities. Under these conditions, drug-induced increases in low rates/probabilities of responding maintained by low frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation are interpreted as an abuse-related effect. Conversely, drug-induced decreases in high rates/probabilities of responding maintained by high frequencies/amplitudes of stimulation can be interpreted as an abuse-limiting effect. Overall abuse potential can be inferred from the relative expression of abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects. The sensitivity and selectivity of ICSS to detect abuse potential of many classes of abused drugs is similar to the sensitivity and selectivity of drug self-administration procedures. Moreover, similar to progressive-ratio drug self-administration procedures, ICSS data can be used to rank the relative abuse potential of different drugs. Strengths of ICSS in comparison with drug self-administration include 1) potential for simultaneous evaluation of both abuse-related and abuse-limiting effects, 2) flexibility for use with various routes of drug administration or drug vehicles, 3) utility for studies in drug-naive subjects as well as in subjects with controlled levels of prior drug exposure, and 4) utility for studies of drug time course. Taken together, these considerations suggest that ICSS can make significant contributions to the practice of abuse potential testing. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Role of imaging techniques in the evaluation of cardiovascular drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugishita, Yasuro; Matsuda, Mitsuo; Ajisaka, Ryuichi

    1985-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of imaging in the evaluation of medical treatment in heart diseases, radionuclide angiocardiography, echocardiography and Doppler echocardiography were applied in the cases of various kinds of heart diseases. Acute and chronic effects of antianginal drugs (nitrates, calcium antagonists and beta-blockers) could be evaluated by exercise radionuclide angiocardiography or exercise echocardiography in the cases of effort angina. The effects of the drugs changing myocardial contractility, preload or afterload could be evaluated by echocardiography in various kinds of heart diseases, including valvular heart biseases. The effect of calcium antagonists in improving diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy could be evaluated by echocardiography or Doppler echocardiography. In conclusion, imaging techniqus are valuable and useful methods to evaluate the effects of cardiovascular drugs, by offering various informations. (author)

  2. The impact of cancer drug wastage on economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Judy; Cheung, Matthew C; Mai, Helen; Letargo, Jessa; Chambers, Alexandra; Sabharwal, Mona; Trudeau, Maureen E; Chan, Kelvin K W

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of modeling cancer drug wastage in economic evaluations because wastage can result from single-dose vials on account of body surface area- or weight-based dosing. Intravenous chemotherapy drugs were identified from the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR) program as of January 2015. Economic evaluations performed by drug manufacturers and pCODR were reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses and budget impact analyses were conducted for no-wastage and maximum-wastage scenarios (ie, the entire unused portion of the vial was discarded at each infusion). Sensitivity analyses were performed for a range of body surface areas and weights. Twelve drugs used for 17 indications were analyzed. Wastage was reported (ie, assumptions were explicit) in 71% of the models and was incorporated into 53% by manufacturers; this resulted in a mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio increase of 6.1% (range, 1.3%-14.6%). pCODR reported and incorporated wastage for 59% of the models, and this resulted in a mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio increase of 15.0% (range, 2.6%-48.2%). In the maximum-wastage scenario, there was a mean increase in the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 24.0% (range, 0.0%-97.2%), a mean increase in the 3-year total incremental budget costs of 26.0% (range, 0.0%-83.1%), and an increase in the 3-year total incremental drug budget cost of approximately CaD $102 million nationally. Changing the mean body surface area or body weight caused 45% of the drugs to have a change in the vial size and/or quantity, and this resulted in increased drug costs. Cancer drug wastage can increase drug costs but is not uniformly modeled in economic evaluations. Cancer 2017;123:3583-90. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Cluster-randomized study of intermittent preventive treatment for malaria in infants (IPTi in southern Tanzania: evaluation of impact on survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellenberg Joanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent Preventive Treatment for malaria control in infants (IPTi consists of the administration of a treatment dose of an anti-malarial drug, usually sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, at scheduled intervals, regardless of the presence of Plasmodium falciparum infection. A pooled analysis of individually randomized trials reported that IPTi reduced clinical episodes by 30%. This study evaluated the effect of IPTi on child survival in the context of a five-district implementation project in southern Tanzania. [Trial registration: clinical trials.gov NCT00152204]. Methods After baseline household and health facility surveys in 2004, five districts comprising 24 divisions were randomly assigned either to receive IPTi (n = 12 or not (n = 12. Implementation started in March 2005, led by routine health services with support from the research team. In 2007, a large household survey was undertaken to assess the impact of IPTi on survival in infants aged two-11 months through birth history interviews with all women aged 13-49 years. The analysis is based on an "intention-to-treat" ecological design, with survival outcomes analysed according to the cluster in which the mothers lived. Results Survival in infants aged two-11 months was comparable in IPTi and comparison areas at baseline. In intervention areas in 2007, 48% of children aged 12-23 months had documented evidence of receiving three doses of IPTi, compared to 2% in comparison areas (P P = 0.31. Conclusion The lack of evidence of an effect of IPTi on survival could be a false negative result due to a lack of power or imbalance of unmeasured confounders. Alternatively, there could be no mortality impact of IPTi due to low coverage, late administration, drug resistance, decreased malaria transmission or improvements in vector control and case management. This study raises important questions for programme evaluation design.

  4. Food and Drug Administration Evaluation and Cigarette Smoking Risk Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Annette R.; Waters, Erika A.; Parascandola, Mark; Augustson, Erik M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the relationship between a belief about Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety evaluation of cigarettes and smoking risk perceptions. Methods: A nationally representative, random-digit-dialed telephone survey of 1046 adult current cigarette smokers. Results: Smokers reporting that the FDA does not evaluate cigarettes for…

  5. The relevance of the psychological evaluation in drug dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, G; Negrei, C; B?l?l?u, D; Ciobanu, AM; Baconi, D

    2014-01-01

    Psychological interventions are considered a central part of the individual psychotherapy in the rehabilitation counseling of psychiatrically symptomatic drug-dependent patients during methadone maintenance treatment in community programs. The need for psychological counseling should be evaluated for each individual patient. Medication is an important part of the treatment and individual psychotherapy focuses on the reduction or total cessation of drug use. The Recipient is G.M. 31, sentenced...

  6. Drug Use Evaluation of Three Widely Prescribed Antibiotics in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization studies are helpful in understanding the current practice. We have conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the relevant use of a group of most commonly prescribed antibiotics in a teaching hospital in Iran.  The results of this study may be of help for clinicians to improve the patient care.Methods: Patients who received parenteral ceftazidim, vancomycin and amikacin from December2010 to May 2011 were enrolled in this study. Patient’s data including demographic, length of Hospital stay, drug allergy, first and final diagnosis were recorded in a predesigned data collection form. American Hospital Formulary Services (AHFS book were used as a reference for evaluation of study drug indication and dosing according to diagnosis and microbiological culture. Defined Daily Dose (DDD of each drug extracted from Anatomic and Therapeutic Chemical classification system (ATC/DDD and drug usage data evaluated by calculating the ratio of prescribed drug to its DDD.Results: The ratio of prescribed daily dose to DDD was 0.78, 0.95 and 0.86 for amikacin, ceftazidime and vancomycin respectively. Between amikacin group, 43 patients (86% received drug empirically, the number of empiric treatments for ceftazidim and vancomycin were 45(90% and 44 patients (88%. The renal function tests (Blood Urea Nitrogen, Serum Creatinin were evaluated in 56% of amikacin group, 64% in ceftazidime group and 78% in vancomycin group.Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the need to establish continuing medical education (CME courses for physicians to familiarize them with standards required to use and monitor these agents.

  7. Active site similarity between human and Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterases: considerations for antimalarial drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Brittany L.; Thompson, Philip E.; Manallack, David T.

    2011-08-01

    The similarity between Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterase enzymes ( PfPDEs) and their human counterparts have been examined and human PDE9A was found to be a suitable template for the construction of homology models for each of the four PfPDE isoforms. In contrast, the architecture of the active sites of each model was most similar to human PDE1. Molecular docking was able to model cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) substrate binding in each case but a docking mode supporting cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding could not be found. Anticipating the potential of PfPDE inhibitors as anti-malarial drugs, a range of reported PDE inhibitors including zaprinast and sildenafil were docked into the model of PfPDEα. The results were consistent with their reported biological activities, and the potential of PDE1/9 inhibitor analogues was also supported by docking.

  8. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Byoung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite

  10. Stability and drug dissolution evaluation of Qingkailing soft/hard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To carry out a post-marketing evaluation of the stability and drug dissolution of ... Stability data from long-term studies showed that within 6 months the ... However, fingerprint pattern statistical analysis showed that the soft capsule is ...

  11. New indicators of illegal drug use to compare drug user populations for policy evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Fabi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: New trends in drug consumption show a trend towards higher poly-use. Epidemiological indicators presently used are mostly based on the prevalence of users of the “main” substances and the ranking of harm caused by drug use is based on a single substance analysis.Methods: In this paper new indicators are proposed; the approach consider the segmentation of the population with respect to the frequency of use in the last 30 days and the harm score of the various substances used by a poly-user. Scoring is based on single substance score table reported in recent papers and principal component analysis is applied to reduce dimensionality. Any user ischaracterized by the two new scores: frequency of use score and poly-use score.Results: The method is applied to the drug user populations interviewed in Communities and Low Threshold Services within the Problem Drug Use 2012 survey in four different European countries. The comparison of the poly-use score cumulative distributions gives insight about behavioural trends of drug use and also evaluate the efficacy of the intervention services. Furthermore, the application of this method to School Population Survey 2011 data allows a definition of the expected behaviour of the poly-drug score for the General Population Survey to be representative.Conclusions: In general, the method is simply and intuitive, and could be applied to surveys containing questions about drug use. A possible limitations could be that the median is chosen for calculating the frequency of use score in questionnaires containing the frequency of drug use in classes.

  12. Gamma- scintigraphy in the evaluation of drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahhosseini, S.; Beiki, D.; Eftekhari, M.

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-scintigraphy is applied extensively in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical delivery systems, particularly for monitoring formulations in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. The radiolabelling is generally achieved by the incorporation of an appropriate radionuclide such as technetium-99m or indium-111 into the formulation or by addition of a non- radioactive isotope such as samarium-152 followed by neutron activation of the final product. Drug delivery systems can be tested in vitro using various techniques like dissolution rate. Since in vitro testing methods are not predictive of in vivo results, such systems should be evaluated in vivo using animal models, especially oral dosage forms. Altered gastrointestinal transit due to individual variation, physiologic factors, or the presence of food may influence bioavailability. Distribution or drug release may be premature or delayed in vivo. Similarly, altered deposition or clearance from other routes of administration such as nasal, ocular, or inhalation may explain drug absorption anomalies. Therefore, there is a growing tendency for new drug delivery systems to be tested, whenever possible, in human subjects in a so called phase 1 clinical evaluation. Gamma- scintigraphy combined with knowledge of physiological and dosage from design can help to identify some of these variables. the resulting insight can be used to accelerate the formulation development process and to ensure success in early clinical trials

  13. [Evaluation of administration errors of injectable drugs in neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, A; Sayadi, M; Ben Hmida, H; Ben Ameur, K; Mestiri, K

    2015-11-01

    Use of injectable drugs in newborns represents more than 90% of prescriptions and requires special precautions in order to ensure more safety and efficiency. The aim of this study is to gather errors relating to the administration of injectable drugs and to suggest corrective actions. This descriptive and transversal study has evaluated 300 injectable drug administrations in a neonatology unit. Two hundred and sixty-one administrations have contained an error. Data are collected by direct observations of administrative act. Errors observed are: an inappropriate mixture (2.6% of cases); an incorrect delivery rate (33.7% of cases); incorrect dilutions (26.7% of cases); error in calculation of the dose to be injected (16.7% of cases); error while sampling small volumes (6.3% of cases); error or omission of administration schedule (1% of cases). These data have enabled us to evaluate administration of injectable drugs in neonatology. Different types of errors observed could be a source of therapeutic inefficiency, extended lengths of stay or iatrogenic drug. Following these observations, corrective actions have been undertaken by pharmacists and consist of: organizing training sessions for nursing; developing an explanatory guide for dilution and administration of injectable medicines, which was made available to the clinical service. Collaborative strategies doctor-nurse-pharmacist can help to reduce errors in the medication process especially during his administration. It permits improvement of injectable drugs use, offering more security and better efficiency and contribute to guarantee ideal therapy for patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. BDA-410: a novel synthetic calpain inhibitor active against blood stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuerong; Chen, Huiqing; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Chishti, Athar H

    2007-09-01

    Falcipains, the papain-family cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium falciparum, are potential drug targets for malaria parasite. Pharmacological inhibition of falcipains can block the hydrolysis of hemoglobin, parasite development, and egress, suggesting that falcipains play a key role at the blood stage of parasite life cycle. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-malarial effects of BDA-410, a novel cysteine protease inhibitor as a potential anti-malarial drug. Recombinant falcipain (MBP-FP-2B) and P. falciparum trophozoite extract containing native falcipains were used for enzyme inhibition studies in vitro. The effect of BDA-410 on the malaria parasite development in vitro as well as its anti-malarial activity in vivo was evaluated using the Plasmodium chabaudi infection rodent model. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of BDA-410 were determined to be 628 and 534nM for recombinant falcipain-2B and parasite extract, respectively. BDA-410 inhibited the malaria parasite growth in vitro with an IC(50) value of 173nM causing irreversible damage to the intracellular parasite. In vivo, the BDA-410 delayed the progression of malaria infection significantly using a mouse model of malaria pathogenesis. The characterization of BDA-410 as a potent inhibitor of P. falciparum cysteine proteases, and the demonstration of its efficacy in blocking parasite growth both in vitro and in vivo assays identifies BDA-410 is an important lead compound for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs.

  15. Evaluation of mesotherapy as a transdermal drug delivery tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Kye, J; Lee, M; Park, B

    2016-05-01

    There has been no research about the exact mechanism of transdermal drug delivery during mesotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the commercial mesogun can be an appropriate technique for a transdermal drug delivery. We injected blue ink into the polyurethane foam or pig skin with three types of mesotherapy using a commercial mesogun, or local made intradermal injector, or a manual injection of syringe. To assess the internal pressure of the cylinder and drug delivery time, we designed the evaluation setup using a needle tip pressure transducer. All types of injectors induced adequate penetration of blue ink into the polyurethane foam without backflow. In the pig skin, blue ink leaked out rapidly with the backward movement of the needle in the commercial mesogun in contrast to the local made injector or the manual injection of syringe. When the time for backward movement of the syringe approaches 1000 ms, the cylinder pressure of the syringe is saturated at around 25 mmHg which can be translated into the dermal pressure of the pig skin. There should be sufficient time between the insertion and withdrawal of the needle of injector for the adequate transdermal drug delivery and it must be considered for mesotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Evaluation of the Drug Treatment and Persistence of Onychomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Campbell

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Onychomycosis is a common nail disease responsible for approximately 50% of diseases of the nail. It occurs more in the elderly, though several cases have been reported among children. Several factors influence, such as climate, geography, and migration. The two dermatophytes most commonly implicated in onychomycosis are Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes, accounting for more than 90% of onychomycoses. Nonetheless, several other toxigenic molds have been implicated. For convenience, onychomycosis is divided into four major clinical presentations: distal subungal, which is the most common form of the disease; proximal subungal, which is the most common form found in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection; superficial; and total dystrophic onychomycosis. Epidemiology of onychomycosis in adults and children is evaluated and the most common clinical symptoms addressed. Although the risk factors are discussed, the multifactorial nature of onychomycosis makes this inexhaustible. The diagnosis and treatments are difficult and the choice of appropriate antifungal drugs complex and require the knowledge of the chemical structures of the metabolites of the molds that cause onychomycosis and their interaction with the antifungal drugs. This is true because most of the antifungal drugs are derived from mold/fungal metabolism. Treatment with griseofulvin and amphotericin is displaced by the use of newer drugs from azole compounds, pyrimidines, and allylamines derivatives. Amorolfine, itraconazole, and ciclopirox nail lacquer solution 8 have gained support globally, but the side effects, drug resistance, and persistence of the disease are still a serious concern to the patients, just as economics and quality of life. Hence, the search for safer and more efficacious drug treatments are continuing.

  17. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  18. The relevance of the psychological evaluation in drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, G; Negrei, C; Bălălău, D; Ciobanu, A M; Baconi, D

    2014-01-01

    Psychological interventions are considered a central part of the individual psychotherapy in the rehabilitation counseling of psychiatrically symptomatic drug-dependent patients during methadone maintenance treatment in community programs. The need for psychological counseling should be evaluated for each individual patient. Medication is an important part of the treatment and individual psychotherapy focuses on the reduction or total cessation of drug use. The Recipient is G.M. 31, sentenced to a seven-year term of imprisonment for trafficking and use of and high-risk drugs, diagnosed on admission with opioid and methadone dependence, withdrawal syndrome. Following the observation and psychological evaluation, psychiatric and clinical examination, initiation of methadone substitution treatment was recommended, according to the following regimen: twelve 2.5 mg tablets for the first 2 days, followed by increase with about 5 mg per week until the complete remission of withdrawal symptoms, stabilization of the dose but not exceeding 200 mg methadone hydrochloride per day. Specialist monitoring, specialized counseling and individual and group psychotherapy were provided.

  19. Evaluation of SMS reminder messages for altering treatment adherence and health seeking perceptions among malaria care-seekers in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jenny X; Modrek, Sepideh

    2016-12-01

    In Nigeria, access to malaria diagnostics may be expanded if drug retailers were allowed to administer malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). A 2012 pilot intervention showed that short message service (SMS) reminder messages could boost treatment adherence to RDT results by 10-14% points. This study aimed to replicate the SMS intervention in a different population, and additionally test the effect of an expanded message about anticipated RDT access policy change on customers' acceptability for drug retailers' administration of RDTs. One day after being tested with an RDT, participants who purchased malaria treatment from drug shops were randomized to receive (1) a basic SMS reminder repeating the RDT result and appropriate treatment actions, (2) an expanded SMS reminder additionally saying that the 'government might allow pharmacists/chemists to do RDTs' or (3) no SMS reminders (i.e. control). Using regression analysis, we estimate intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment effects on the treated for 686 study participants. Results corroborate previous findings that a basic SMS reminder increased treatment adherence [odds ratio (OR) = 1.53, 95% CI 0.96-2.44] and decreased use of unnecessary anti-malarials for RDT-negative adults [OR = 0.63, 95% CI 0.39-1.00]. The expanded SMS also increased adherence for adults [OR = 1.42, 95% CI 0.97-2.07], but the effects for sick children differed-the basic SMS did not have any measurable impact on treatment adherence [OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.24-3.09] or use of unnecessary anti-malarials [OR = 1.27, 95% CI 0.32-1.93], and the expanded SMS actually led to poorer treatment adherence [OR = 0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.66] and increased use of unnecessary anti-malarials [OR = 4.67, 95% CI 1.76-12.43]. Further, the targeted but neutral message in the expanded SMS lowered acceptance for drug retailers' administration of RDTs [OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.10-2.93], counter to what we hypothesized. Future SMS interventions should

  20. Engineering and evaluating drug delivery particles in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnmalm, Mattias; Yan, Yan; Caruso, Frank

    2014-09-28

    The development of new and improved particle-based drug delivery is underpinned by an enhanced ability to engineer particles with high fidelity and integrity, as well as increased knowledge of their biological performance. Microfluidics can facilitate these processes through the engineering of spatiotemporally highly controlled environments using designed microstructures in combination with physical phenomena present at the microscale. In this review, we discuss microfluidics in the context of addressing key challenges in particle-based drug delivery. We provide an overview of how microfluidic devices can: (i) be employed to engineer particles, by providing highly controlled interfaces, and (ii) be used to establish dynamic in vitro models that mimic in vivo environments for studying the biological behavior of engineered particles. Finally, we discuss how the flexible and modular nature of microfluidic devices provides opportunities to create increasingly realistic models of the in vivo milieu (including multi-cell, multi-tissue and even multi-organ devices), and how ongoing developments toward commercialization of microfluidic tools are opening up new opportunities for the engineering and evaluation of drug delivery particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum genes related to drug resistance: a survey over four decades under different treatment policies in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Juliana; Lopes, Dinora; do Rosário, Virgílio; Machado, Marta; Hristov, Angélica D; Lima, Giselle Fmc; Costa-Nascimento, Maria J; Segurado, Aluísio C; Di Santi, Silvia M

    2014-09-19

    Anti-malarial resistance in Plasmodium falciparum remains an obstacle for malaria control. Resistance-associated genes were analysed in Brazilian samples over four decades to evaluate the impact of different treatment regimens on the parasite genetic profile. Samples were collected on filter paper from patients infected in the Amazon region from 1984 to 2011. DNA was extracted with Chelex® 100 and monoinfection confirmed by PCR. SNPs in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhfr and pfdhps genes were assessed by PCR-RFLP. The pfmdr1 copy number was estimated using real time quantitative PCR with SYBR® Green. Parasite response was assessed ex vivo with seven concentrations of each anti-malarial. Patients were treated according to Brazilian guidelines: quinine plus tetracycline or mefloquine in period 1 and ACT in period 2. All 96 samples presented the pfcrt 76T mutant throughout the assessed periods. In addition, all isolates showed ex vivo chloroquine resistance. The pfmdr1 86Y was detected in 1.5% of samples in period 1, and in 25% in period 2. All samples presented the pfmdr1 1246Y. The analysis of pfmdr1 copy number showed amplification in 37.3% in period 1 and in 42% in period 2. Mutations in pfdhfr were shown as follows: 51I in all samples in period 1 and in 81.2% in period 2; 59R in 6.4% in period 2. The pfdhfr 108N and the pfdhps 437G were seen in all samples along time; the pfdhps 540E in 93.7% in period 1 and in 75% in period 2. The 76T mutation associated to chloroquine resistance is still present in the parasite population, although this anti-malarial was withdrawn from the chemotherapy of P. falciparum in Brazil in the mid-1980s. All isolates assayed ex vivo for chloroquine showed resistant phenotype and 76T. No association was observed between pfmdr1 mutations and resistance to quinine, mefloquine and artemisinin derivatives. Additionally, the pfdhfr 108N mutation was detected in all samples throughout the evaluated periods, demonstrating fixation of the mutant

  2. Observational Pharmacoepidemiology in the Drug Safety and Effectiveness Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cabrita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Observational epidemiological studies have been used in the medicines context for more than 40 years, contributing to characterize drug use patterns and safety, efficacy and effectiveness profiles. Its use has been increased in recognition of the clinical trials limitations to assess the therapeutic and iatrogenic potential of the medicines after its commercialization. The evolution of the regulatory framework for pharmacovigilance, requiring post-marketing studies, post-authorization safety studies (PASS and the post-authorization efficacy studies (PAES to approve certain drugs, reinforced the importance of observational pharmacoepidemiology for the characterization of the medicines safety and effectiveness profiles. Pharmacoepidemiological research can be carried out from field studies designed to obtain the necessary information or in databases with health records of population samples that already contain the information. This 2nd option is more efficient and more and more frequent. Although, observational research from field studies continues to have its space, the increasing availability of databases allowed a new development to observational pharmacoepidemiology. Indeed, access to automated records databases with up-to-date information on medical prescriptions and global health care to representative population samples with long follow-up periods is a valuable tool for the study of drug use patterns and therapeutic and iatrogenic potential in routine clinical practice. In this context, observational pharmacoepidemiology reinforces its role as a scientific area particularly suitable for evaluating the safety and the effectiveness of the medicines in the “real world”, making a relevant contribution to overcome the gap in translating the evidence from the clinical trials for clinical practice.

  3. In vitro evaluation of dendrimer prodrugs for oral drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najlah, Mohammad; Freeman, Sally; Attwood, David; D'Emanuele, Antony

    2007-05-04

    Dendrimer-based prodrugs were used to enhance the transepithelial permeability of naproxen, a low solubility model drug. The stability of the dendrimer-naproxen link was assessed. Naproxen was conjugated to G0 polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers either by an amide bond or an ester bond. The stability of G0 prodrugs was evaluated in 80% human plasma and 50% rat liver homogenate. The cytotoxicity of conjugates towards Caco-2 cells was determined and the transport of the conjugates across Caco-2 monolayers (37 degrees C) was reported. In addition, one lauroyl chain (L) was attached to the surface group of G0 PAMAM dendrimer of the diethylene glycol ester conjugate (G0-deg-NAP) to enhance permeability. The lactic ester conjugate, G0-lact-NAP, hydrolyzed slowly in 80% human plasma and in 50% rat liver homogenate (t(1/2)=180 min). G0-deg-NAP was hydrolyzed more rapidly in 80% human plasma (t(1/2)=51 min) and was rapidly cleaved in 50% liver homogenate (t(1/2)=4.7 min). The conjugates were non-toxic when exposed to Caco-2 cells for 3h. Permeability studies showed a significant enhancement in the transport of naproxen when conjugated to dendrimers; L-G0-deg-NAP yielding the highest permeability. Dendrimer-based prodrugs with appropriate linkers have potential as carriers for the oral delivery of low solubility drugs such as naproxen.

  4. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  5. [Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Álvarez, Sandra; Porta-Oltra, Begoña; Hernandez-Griso, Marta; Pérez-Labaña, Francisca; Climente-Martí, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    to assess the impact of two closed-system drug transfer device on the local and environmental contamination and preparation times in the process of preparation of parenteral chemotherapy compared to the standard system. prospective observational study. Two different closed- systems providers, Care Fusion® and Icu Medical®, were compared to standard preparation. 15 nurses of Pharmacy Department prepared 5 preparations each one, one with the standard procedure and four using closed-systems. To evaluate the contamination, a fluorescein solution 0.5% was prepared. Two kind of contamination were evaluated, local (three points connection: closed-system connect vial, syringe and final infusion bags) and environmental (gloves and countertop). Percentage of contaminated preparations was obtained in each one. Time taken by each nurse in each preparation was recorded. 75 preparations were prepared. Local contamination was reduced 21% and 75% in closed-system Icu Medical® and Care Fusion® respectively. Care Fusion® closed system, local contamination was significantly lower than the standard system to the vial, syringe and final package, while Icu Medical® closed-systems only was significantly lower in the connection to the vial. Time of preparation was increased significantly with the use of closed-system between 23.4 and 30.5 seconds. both closed-systems drug transfer device have shown an improvement in contamination than the use of the standard system. However, preparation time has been significantly increased with the use of both systems. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeldt, Hans; Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly; Ricci, M. Stacey; McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh

    2010-01-01

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  7. Design and Evaluation of Chitosan-Based Novel pHSensitive Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Evaluation of Chitosan-Based Novel pHSensitive Drug Carrier for Sustained ... Scanning electron microscopy(SEM),Raman spectroscopy for particle size analysis. Swelling ratio, Effect of drug loading on encapsulation efficiency

  8. Stability and drug dissolution evaluation of Qingkailing soft/hard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPLC-DAD) method was developed ... stability and drug dissolution, which may affect the biopharmaceutics and the clinical effects of the drug. ... behavior may also affect the pharmacokinetic ..... of enzymes and intrinsic factors in stomach and.

  9. Evaluating and Valuing Drugs for Rare Conditions: No Easy Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollendorf, Daniel A; Chapman, Richard H; Pearson, Steven D

    2018-05-01

    We find ourselves in an era of unprecedented growth in the development and use of so-called "orphan" drugs to treat rare diseases, which are poised to represent more than one-fifth of pharmaceutical expenditures by 2022. This widespread use has been facilitated by legislative and regulatory incentives in both the United States and abroad, yet US payers and health systems have not yet made a concerted effort to understand whether and how rare diseases require special considerations on their part and how to adapt traditional methods of health technology assessment and economic evaluation to accommodate these situations. In this article, we explore the general ethical dilemmas that rare diseases present, steps taken by health technology assessment bodies worldwide to define the level of rarity that would necessitate special measures and the modifications to their assessment and valuation processes needed, and the contextual components for rare-disease evaluation that lie outside of the assessment framework as a guide to US decision makers on constructing a formal and relevant process stateside. Copyright © 2018 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A regulatory perspective on the abuse potential evaluation of novel stimulant drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Silvia N; Klein, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In the United States of America (USA), the abuse potential assessment of a drug is performed as part of the safety evaluation of a drug under development, and to evaluate if the drug needs to be subject to controls that would minimize the abuse of the drug once on the market. The assessment of the abuse potential of new drugs consists of a scientific and medical evaluation of all data related to abuse of the drug. This paper describes the regulatory framework for evaluating the abuse potential of new drugs, in general, including novel stimulants. The role of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the evaluation of the abuse potential of drugs, and its role in drug control are also discussed. A definition of abuse potential, an overview of the currently accepted approaches to evaluating the abuse potential of a drug, as well as a description of the criteria that applies when recommending a specific level of control (i.e., a Schedule) for a drug under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of case management of uncomplicated malaria in Haiti: a national health facility survey, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Keren Z; Jean, Samuel E; Existe, Alexandre; Akom, Eniko E; Chang, Michelle A; Lemoine, Jean Frantz; Mace, Kimberly E

    2015-10-09

    Malaria is a public health concern in Haiti, although there are limited data on its burden and case management. National malaria guidelines updated in 2012 recommend treatment with chloroquine and primaquine. In December 2012, a nationally-representative cross-sectional survey of health facilities (HFs) was conducted to determine malaria prevalence among febrile outpatients and malaria case management quality at baseline before scale-up of diagnostics and case management training. Among all 833 HFs nationwide, 30 were selected randomly, in proportion to total HFs per region, for 2-day evaluations. Survey teams inventoried HF material and human resources. Outpatients of all ages were screened for temperature >37.5 °C or history of fever; those without severe symptoms were consented and enrolled. Providers evaluated and treated enrolled patients according to HF standards; the survey teams documented provider-ordered diagnostic tests and treatment decisions. Facility-based test results [microscopy and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs)] were collected from HF laboratories. Blood smears for gold-standard microscopy, and dried blood spots for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were obtained. Malaria diagnostic capacity, defined as completing a test for an enrolled patient or having adequate resources for RDTs or microscopy, was present in 11 (37 %) HFs. Among 459 outpatients screened, 257 (56 %) were febrile, of which 193 (75 %) were eligible, and 153 (80 %) were enrolled. Among 39 patients with facility-level malaria test results available on the survey day, 11 (28 %) were positive, of whom 6 (55 %) were treated with an anti-malarial. Twenty-seven (95 %) of the 28 patients testing negative were not treated with an anti-malarial. Of 114 patients without test results available, 35 (31 %) were presumptively treated for malaria. Altogether, 42 patients were treated with an anti-malarial, one (2 %) according to Haiti's 2012 guidelines. Of 140 gold-standard smears, none

  12. Review of regulatory recommendations for orphan drug submissions in the Netherlands and Scotland : focus on the underlying pharmacoeconomic evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Postema, Roelien; Tolley, Keith; Postma, Maarten J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pharmacoeconomic evaluations of new drug therapies are often required for reimbursement or guidance decisions. However, for orphan drugs, country-specific requirements exist. In the Netherlands, orphan drug developers can be exempted from providing a full pharmacoeconomic evaluation,

  13. [Significance of re-evaluation and development of Chinese herbal drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yue; Ma, Zengchun; Zhang, Boli

    2012-01-01

    The research of new herbal drugs involves in new herbal drugs development and renew the old drugs. It is necessary to research new herbal drugs based on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The current development of famous TCM focuses on the manufacture process, quality control standards, material basis and clinical research. But system management of security evaluation is deficient, the relevant system for the safety assessment TCM has not been established. The causes of security problems, security risks, target organ of toxicity, weak link of safety evaluation, and ideas of safety evaluation are discussed in this paper. The toxicology research of chinese herbal drugs is necessary based on standard of good laboratory practices (GLP), the characteristic of Chinese herbal drugs is necessary to be fully integrated into safety evaluation. The safety of new drug research is necessary to be integrated throughout the entire process. Famous Chinese medicine safety research must be paid more attention in the future.

  14. Acanthamoeba: epidimiology, pathogenicity and evaluation of effectiveness of recent drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    To study the epidimiology of Acanthamoeba and to evaluate the effectiveness of some recent drugs against parasite. The study was carried out from March to May 2005 at the ophthalmic clinic of King Fahad Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Samples of rinsing solutions and saline of contact lens, tap water, Swimming pool water and Soil from Hufof city Saudi Arabia were tested. Mice were used to infect them via intranasal inoculation from isolated culture strain for confirming pathogenicity. Rokitamycin, polymixin B, suramin and chloropromazin were used to study their effects on Acanthamoeba growth in vitro. Acanthamoeba were detected in 20% of solution of contact lens, 20% of tap water, 50% of swimming pool samples and 40% of soil samples. All animals died or were sacrificed and had Acanthamoeba isolated from their organs. Higher percentage of growth inhibition of Acanthamoeba cultured was shown by chloropromazine and rokitamycin after 21 days (100%), while Polymyin B and Suramin showed 83% and 64% inhibition respectively. Acanthamoeba isolated in significant percent of environmental sources. Pathogenicity of organism was confirmed in mice. Contact lens wearers should be aware of the risks associated with Acanthamoeba. Rokitamycin and chlorpromazine showed good inhibition in vitro. (author)

  15. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins of the malaria parasite highlight new drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    January Weiner 3rd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date.

  16. 21 CFR 201.200 - Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... labeling and advertising. 201.200 Section 201.200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Efficacy Study § 201.200 Disclosure of drug efficacy study evaluations in labeling and advertising. (a)(1... bringing to the attention of the prescribers of prescription items the conclusions of the expert panels...

  17. 76 FR 72422 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Effectiveness of Anticoccidial Drugs in Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0784] Draft Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Effectiveness of Anticoccidial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and...

  18. 78 FR 8446 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research; Prescription Drug Labeling Improvement and Enhancement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... utility of the prescription drug labeling as a communication tool and to discuss strategies for making it... the Web site after this document publishes in the Federal Register.) All holders of marketing... before June 30, 2001, and for generic drugs. The initiative is anticipated to take place over several...

  19. Selection of drug resistant mutants from random library of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase in Plasmodium berghei model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuthavong Yongyuth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of drug resistance amongst the human malaria Plasmodium species has most commonly been associated with genomic mutation within the parasites. This phenomenon necessitates evolutionary predictive studies of possible resistance mutations, which may occur when a new drug is introduced. Therefore, identification of possible new Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (PfDHFR mutants that confer resistance to antifolate drugs is essential in the process of antifolate anti-malarial drug development. Methods A system to identify mutations in Pfdhfr gene that confer antifolate drug resistance using an animal Plasmodium parasite model was developed. By using error-prone PCR and Plasmodium transfection technologies, libraries of Pfdhfr mutant were generated and then episomally transfected to Plasmodium berghei parasites, from which pyrimethamine-resistant PfDHFR mutants were selected. Results The principal mutation found from this experiment was S108N, coincident with the first pyrimethamine-resistance mutation isolated from the field. A transgenic P. berghei, in which endogenous Pbdhfr allele was replaced with the mutant PfdhfrS108N, was generated and confirmed to have normal growth rate comparing to parental non-transgenic parasite and also confer resistance to pyrimethamine. Conclusion This study demonstrated the power of the transgenic P. berghei system to predict drug-resistant Pfdhfr mutations in an in vivo parasite/host setting. The system could be utilized for identification of possible novel drug-resistant mutants that could arise against new antifolate compounds and for prediction the evolution of resistance mutations.

  20. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdot Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds. A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs to all patients during the three drug rounds on each of six days per ward. Main outcomes were number, type and clinical importance of errors and associated risk factors. Drug administration error rate was calculated with and without wrong time errors. Relationship between the occurrence of errors and potential risk factors were investigated using logistic regression models with random effects. Results Twenty-eight nurses caring for 108 patients were observed. Among 1501 opportunities for error, 415 administrations (430 errors with one or more errors were detected (27.6%. There were 312 wrong time errors, ten simultaneously with another type of error, resulting in an error rate without wrong time error of 7.5% (113/1501. The most frequently administered drugs were the cardiovascular drugs (425/1501, 28.3%. The highest risks of error in a drug administration were for dermatological drugs. No potentially life-threatening errors were witnessed and 6% of errors were classified as having a serious or significant impact on patients (mainly omission. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of errors was associated with drug administration route, drug classification (ATC and the number of patient under the nurse's care. Conclusion Medication administration errors are frequent. The identification of its determinants helps to undertake designed interventions.

  1. Hepatic transporter drug-drug interactions: an evaluation of approaches and methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Beth; Riley, Robert J

    2017-12-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) continue to account for 5% of hospital admissions and therefore remain a major regulatory concern. Effective, quantitative prediction of DDIs will reduce unexpected clinical findings and encourage projects to frontload DDI investigations rather than concentrating on risk management ('manage the baggage') later in drug development. A key challenge in DDI prediction is the discrepancies between reported models. Areas covered: The current synopsis focuses on four recent influential publications on hepatic drug transporter DDIs using static models that tackle interactions with individual transporters and in combination with other drug transporters and metabolising enzymes. These models vary in their assumptions (including input parameters), transparency, reproducibility and complexity. In this review, these facets are compared and contrasted with recommendations made as to their application. Expert opinion: Over the past decade, static models have evolved from simple [I]/k i models to incorporate victim and perpetrator disposition mechanisms including the absorption rate constant, the fraction of the drug metabolised/eliminated and/or clearance concepts. Nonetheless, models that comprise additional parameters and complexity do not necessarily out-perform simpler models with fewer inputs. Further, consideration of the property space to exploit some drug target classes has also highlighted the fine balance required between frontloading and back-loading studies to design out or 'manage the baggage'.

  2. Evaluating drug prices, availability, affordability, and price components: implications for access to drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Zaheer Ud Din; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Singh, Harpal; Bukahri, Nadeem Irfan; Creese, Andrew

    2007-03-27

    Malaysia's stable health care system is facing challenges with increasing medicine costs. To investigate these issues a survey was carried out to evaluate medicine prices, availability, affordability, and the structure of price components. The methodology developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Action International (HAI) was used. Price and availability data for 48 medicines was collected from 20 public sector facilities, 32 private sector retail pharmacies and 20 dispensing doctors in four geographical regions of West Malaysia. Medicine prices were compared with international reference prices (IRPs) to obtain a median price ratio. The daily wage of the lowest paid unskilled government worker was used to gauge the affordability of medicines. Price component data were collected throughout the supply chain, and markups, taxes, and other distribution costs were identified. In private pharmacies, innovator brand (IB) prices were 16 times higher than the IRPs, while generics were 6.6 times higher. In dispensing doctor clinics, the figures were 15 times higher for innovator brands and 7.5 for generics. Dispensing doctors applied high markups of 50%-76% for IBs, and up to 316% for generics. Retail pharmacy markups were also high-25%-38% and 100%-140% for IBs and generics, respectively. In the public sector, where medicines are free, availability was low even for medicines on the National Essential Drugs List. For a month's treatment for peptic ulcer disease and hypertension people have to pay about a week's wages in the private sector. The free market by definition does not control medicine prices, necessitating price monitoring and control mechanisms. Markups for generic products are greater than for IBs. Reducing the base price without controlling markups may increase profits for retailers and dispensing doctors without reducing the price paid by end users. To increase access and affordability, promotion of generic medicines and improved availability

  3. Evaluating drug prices, availability, affordability, and price components: implications for access to drugs in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ud Din Babar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaysia's stable health care system is facing challenges with increasing medicine costs. To investigate these issues a survey was carried out to evaluate medicine prices, availability, affordability, and the structure of price components. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The methodology developed by the World Health Organization (WHO and Health Action International (HAI was used. Price and availability data for 48 medicines was collected from 20 public sector facilities, 32 private sector retail pharmacies and 20 dispensing doctors in four geographical regions of West Malaysia. Medicine prices were compared with international reference prices (IRPs to obtain a median price ratio. The daily wage of the lowest paid unskilled government worker was used to gauge the affordability of medicines. Price component data were collected throughout the supply chain, and markups, taxes, and other distribution costs were identified. In private pharmacies, innovator brand (IB prices were 16 times higher than the IRPs, while generics were 6.6 times higher. In dispensing doctor clinics, the figures were 15 times higher for innovator brands and 7.5 for generics. Dispensing doctors applied high markups of 50%-76% for IBs, and up to 316% for generics. Retail pharmacy markups were also high-25%-38% and 100%-140% for IBs and generics, respectively. In the public sector, where medicines are free, availability was low even for medicines on the National Essential Drugs List. For a month's treatment for peptic ulcer disease and hypertension people have to pay about a week's wages in the private sector. CONCLUSIONS: The free market by definition does not control medicine prices, necessitating price monitoring and control mechanisms. Markups for generic products are greater than for IBs. Reducing the base price without controlling markups may increase profits for retailers and dispensing doctors without reducing the price paid by end users. To increase access and

  4. Evaluating Drug Prices, Availability, Affordability, and Price Components: Implications for Access to Drugs in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Zaheer Ud Din; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed; Singh, Harpal; Bukahri, Nadeem Irfan; Creese, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Background Malaysia's stable health care system is facing challenges with increasing medicine costs. To investigate these issues a survey was carried out to evaluate medicine prices, availability, affordability, and the structure of price components. Methods and Findings The methodology developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Health Action International (HAI) was used. Price and availability data for 48 medicines was collected from 20 public sector facilities, 32 private sector retail pharmacies and 20 dispensing doctors in four geographical regions of West Malaysia. Medicine prices were compared with international reference prices (IRPs) to obtain a median price ratio. The daily wage of the lowest paid unskilled government worker was used to gauge the affordability of medicines. Price component data were collected throughout the supply chain, and markups, taxes, and other distribution costs were identified. In private pharmacies, innovator brand (IB) prices were 16 times higher than the IRPs, while generics were 6.6 times higher. In dispensing doctor clinics, the figures were 15 times higher for innovator brands and 7.5 for generics. Dispensing doctors applied high markups of 50%–76% for IBs, and up to 316% for generics. Retail pharmacy markups were also high—25%–38% and 100%–140% for IBs and generics, respectively. In the public sector, where medicines are free, availability was low even for medicines on the National Essential Drugs List. For a month's treatment for peptic ulcer disease and hypertension people have to pay about a week's wages in the private sector. Conclusions The free market by definition does not control medicine prices, necessitating price monitoring and control mechanisms. Markups for generic products are greater than for IBs. Reducing the base price without controlling markups may increase profits for retailers and dispensing doctors without reducing the price paid by end users. To increase access and affordability

  5. The War on Illegal Drug Production and Trafficking: An Economic Evaluation of Plan Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Mejía; Pascual Restrepo

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a thorough economic evaluation of the anti-drug policies implemented in Colombia between 2000 and 2006 under the so-called Plan Colombia. The paper develops a game theory model of the war against illegal drugs in producer countries. We explicitly model illegal drug markets, which allows us to account for the feedback effects between policies and market outcomes that are potentially important when evaluating large scale policy interventions such as Plan Colombia. We use ava...

  6. Rational drug use--evaluation of a training programme for interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natu, M V; Zachariah, P; Zachariah, A; Chand, S; Singh, T; Choudhry, K

    1995-09-01

    A workshop covering various aspects of rational drug use was conducted for interns of Christian Medical College, Ludhiana. Evaluation of the workshop revealed that it was able to bring about an attitudinal change regarding rational drug use. The methodology and evaluation procedures have been described. It is suggested that similar attempts should be made at all medical colleges so that every graduate enters medical practice with a positive attitude towards rational drug use.

  7. Evaluation of drug therapy problems among renal patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adibe et al. Trop J Pharm Res, March 2017; 16(3): 697 .... suggestions to address medication problems, ..... Preventable drug-related hospital admissions. Ann. Pharmacother. 2002;. 36: .... geriatric hospitalized patients in yogyakarta hospitals,.

  8. Evaluation of Information Contained in Drug Advertisement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a descriptive study based on critical appraisal of drug promotional brochures and leaflets. ..... behavior of doctors in a teaching hospital in Ibadan,. Nigeria. ... Guide. Edinburgh, Churchills Living stone, 1999: 111–116. 12. Buck ML.

  9. Evaluation of drug administration errors in a teaching hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Berdot, Sarah; Sabatier, Brigitte; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Medication errors can occur at any of the three steps of the medication use process: prescribing, dispensing and administration. We aimed to determine the incidence, type and clinical importance of drug administration errors and to identify risk factors. Methods Prospective study based on disguised observation technique in four wards in a teaching hospital in Paris, France (800 beds). A pharmacist accompanied nurses and witnessed the preparation and administration of drugs...

  10. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS patients' knowledge on antiretroviral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Flávia de Castro Almeida

    Full Text Available Lack of information on antiretroviral drugs or the misunderstanding of available information can facilitate incorrect use of such drugs. This can result in non-adherence to the prescribed regimen, leading to a great possibility of a therapeutic failure. The aim of this study was to know which information HIV/AIDS patients, who receive their medicines at the pharmacy of a reference hospital in the northeast Brazil, have on the drugs they use, the source of this information and whether there is a need for additional information. A total of 195 HIV/AIDS patients, who were using either zidovudina + lamivudina 300+150mg (AZT+3TC, efavirenz 600mg (EFZ or lopinavir/ritonavir 133.33/33mg (LPV/r, were interviewed. The mean age was 41 years (SD = 9.55 and 70.8% were males. Of the total, 55.4% didn't know the effect of the drug in the organism; 35.9% were unaware of the necessity of taking antiretroviral drugs for the rest of their lives; only 14.4% knew how to proceed when a dosage was missed; 22.1% said they could die and the same number of individuals believed in aggravation of the disease in case of treatment interruption. The majority, 68.2%, considered it very necessary to receive drug information. The results show that there is an apparent lack of general information among users of antiretroviral drugs, and at the same time a need for it. It is necessary that all professionals involved in the health care of the patients agree that an efficient supply of information on prescribed drugs is an ethical component of the treatment that favors and fosters its adherence.

  11. Evaluation procedures for drug crimes, the Iranian legal system

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Hariri; Saeid Darougari

    2014-01-01

    Today, drug trafficking, transnational organized crime of, comes into account. Distributors and consumers of drugs, distribution and consumption gradually, the traditional process lubricants Battalion (mechanical and chemical), and this would have altered, requires the development of formal and substantial rights.  The law of success in fighting crime, completely dependent on the integrity, transparency and efficiency of criminal procedure, and the amount of punishment that fits the crime app...

  12. Combined Transcriptomics and Metabolomics in a Rhesus Macaque Drug Administration Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Whole blood and bone marrow RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven time-points before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modelling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modelling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the bone marrow with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance following each round of drug exposure is observed. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine’s predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system.

  13. IN-VITRO EVALUATION OF ANTI-TRICHOMONAL ACTIVITIES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infective, has shown anti-malarial and antitrypanocidal activities. Therefore using bioactivity guided fractionation, anti-trichomonal activity of E. uniflora leaf was investigated. Anti-trichomonal activities of leaf methanol extract and its fractions against ...

  14. Automated applications of sandwich-cultured hepatocytes in the evaluation of hepatic drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cassandra H; Smith, William R; St Claire, Robert L; Brouwer, Kenneth R

    2011-04-01

    Predictions of the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity of compounds in pharmaceutical development are essential aspects of the drug discovery process. B-CLEAR is an in vitro system that uses sandwich-cultured hepatocytes to evaluate and predict in vivo hepatobiliary disposition (hepatic uptake, biliary excretion, and biliary clearance), transporter-based hepatic drug-drug interactions, and potential drug-induced hepatotoxicity. Automation of predictive technologies is an advantageous and preferred format in drug discovery. In this study, manual and automated studies are investigated and equivalence is demonstrated. In addition, automated applications using model probe substrates and inhibitors to assess the cholestatic potential of drugs and evaluate hepatic drug transport are examined. The successful automation of this technology provides a more reproducible and less labor-intensive approach, reducing potential operator error in complex studies and facilitating technology transfer.

  15. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  16. Pooling, meta-analysis, and the evaluation of drug safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leizorovicz Alain

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "integrated safety report" of the drug registration files submitted to health authorities usually summarizes the rates of adverse events observed for a new drug, placebo or active control drugs by pooling the safety data across the trials. Pooling consists of adding the numbers of events observed in a given treatment group across the trials and dividing the results by the total number of patients included in this group. Because it considers treatment groups rather than studies, pooling ignores validity of the comparisons and is subject to a particular kind of bias, termed "Simpson's paradox." In contrast, meta-analysis and other stratified analyses are less susceptible to bias. Methods We use a hypothetical, but not atypical, application to demonstrate that the results of a meta-analysis can differ greatly from those obtained by pooling the same data. In our hypothetical model, a new drug is compared to 1 a placebo in 4 relatively small trials in patients at high risk for a certain adverse event and 2 an active reference drug in 2 larger trials of patients at low risk for this event. Results Using meta-analysis, the relative risk of experiencing the adverse event with the new drug was 1.78 (95% confidence interval [1.02; 3.12] compared to placebo and 2.20 [0.76; 6.32] compared to active control. By pooling the data, the results were, respectively, 1.00 [0.59; 1.70] and 5.20 [2.07; 13.08]. Conclusions Because these findings could mislead health authorities and doctors, regulatory agencies should require meta-analyses or stratified analyses of safety data in drug registration files.

  17. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  18. Evaluating the War on Drugs: US and Colombian Interdiction Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    market remained in the hands of Mexican traffickers.3 When, in the early 1970’s, the US tightened drug enforcement along the border with Mexico and the...US Senate, September 12-13, 1989. Tokatlian, J. , Bagley, B., Eds., Economia y Politica del Narcotraffico, CEI, Bogota, 1990. U.S. Congress. Senate

  19. Evaluation of Herbs as Potential Drugs/Medicines | Odhiambo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herbal drugs have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, for both human and livestock. A study conducted in the Lake Victoria Basin Kenya revealed vast knowledge and reliance on traditional medicine as a source of healthcare. The study documented 34 medicinal plant ...

  20. An Impact Evaluation of a Rural Youth Drug Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvela, Paul D.; McClendon, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effects of mixed affective-cognitive drug education program on rural northern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin sixth and seventh graders' (N=265) substance use health beliefs and behaviors. Alcohol use in this population was determined to be much higher than national average for similar age groups while marijuana, cigarette, and…

  1. On illicit drug policies; methods of evaluation and comments on recent practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Giovanni; Vezzani, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    This contribution provides an overview of different approaches used to analyse drug policies within and across countries. Besides the great number of cost of illness studies which have contributed to the assessment of health harms and risks associated to the drug use, most of the recent efforts have focused on the creation of synthetic indices to classify countries around the world or to evaluate particular law enforcement policies in some countries. This is probably due to a general lack of comparable data across countries. The wide variety of budgetary practices in the drugs field in Europe contributes to the problems that exist in estimating drug-related public expenditure. These heterogeneous accounting practices, together with the complexity of the drug phenomenon and the multiplicity of perspectives on the issue, strongly constrains the possibility of economically evaluate and compare drug laws across countries.

  2. [Categories and characteristics of BPH drug evaluation models: a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Yan; Wu, Jian-Hui; Sun, Zu-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a worldwide common disease in men over 50 years old, and the exact cause of BPH remains largely unknown. In order to elucidate its pathogenesis and screen effective drugs for the treatment of BPH, many BPH models have been developed at home and abroad. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the categories and characteristics of BPH drug evaluation models, highlighting the application value of each model, to provide a theoretical basis for the development of BPH drugs.

  3. Drug and Vaccine evaluation in the Human Aotus Plasmodium falciparum Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    and phenyl ring systems is anticipated to yield a valuable new antimalarial drug (33). The antimalarial activity and pharmacology of a series of...remains essentially unchanged since 1976, viz. to ascertain the antimalarial activity of drugs against P. falciparum and P. vivax in Aotus. The...Present data on the evaluation of potential antimalarial activity of drugs in the pre-clinical model of Aotus l. lemurinus (Panamanian night

  4. Drugs' rapid payoffs distort evaluation of their instrumental uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, George

    2011-12-01

    Science has needed a dispassionate valuation of psychoactive drugs, but a motivational analysis should be conducted with respect to long-term reward rather than reproductive fitness. Because of hyperbolic overvaluation of short-term rewards, an individual's valuation depends on the time she forms it and the times she will revisit it, sometimes making her best long-term interest lie in total abstinence.

  5. Pharmacognostic and physicochemical evaluation of homoeopathic drug: Erigeron canadensis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Rao Pogaku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Erigeron canadensis L. is an erect annual herb belonging to the family Asteraceae. Aerial parts are used in Homoeopathy for bruises, cough, dysuria, gonorrhea, haemorrhages, haemorrhoids, spermatorrhea, and wounds. Objective: The pharmacognostic and physicochemical studies have been carried out to facilitate the use of correct species and lay down standards of raw drug materials. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic studies of the leaf and stem of authentic samples of E. canadensis L. have been carried out. Physicochemical parameters of the raw drug include extractive values, ash value, and formulation; besides weight per mL, total solids, and alcohol content, high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC and ultraviolet (UV studies are given. Results: Epidermal cells often possess crystals of calcium oxalate. Stomata are anomocytic, anisocytic, and tetracytic types. Trichomes are uniseriate and conical in structure. The mid vein in transection is flat on adaxial and is ribbed toward abaxial, with a secretory cavity beneath the central vascular bundle. Stem in transection is round. The vascular tissue is made of several vascular bundles in a ring. Crystals of calcium oxalate occur in the epidermis, cortex, and pith of stem. In mature stem, secondary xylem is well developed with a reduced phloem. The determined physicochemical data, namely, extractive values, ash values, and preparation of for raw drug and weight per mL, total solids, and alcohol content besides UV and HPTLC profile for finished product are provided. Conclusions: The presented morphoanatomical features along with powder microscopic and organoleptic characters and physicochemical data are diagnostic to establish the standards for ensuring quality and purity of the drug.

  6. [Drug evaluation in healthy volunteers. Legislative and ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warot, D

    1991-01-01

    Studies in healthy volunteers have been legalized since December 20th 1988 in France. The healthy volunteer is employed for a variety of studies in phases I and IV of drug development. This type of research can equally be called nontherapeutic in nature. Every experiment involving healthy volunteers should be approved by the Ethics Committee. Using volunteers within the department, company or other organisation, while offering advantages for the investigator should be prohibited as freedom of concept might not be safeguarded. As well, financial incentives may over-persuade individuals, including students, who have low incomes and promote the "professional volunteer". To avoid this problem, French law planned a national register. The potential benefits of such a disposition are still unknown. Having been given appropriate information concerning the drug trial, his obligations and rights, the healthy volunteer gives his written consent. Specific recommendations for nontherapeutic assessments of drug effects are given concerning prisoners, the mentally handicapped, women with a risk of frequency, children. Ethical considerations concerning research on a healthy population must go beyond the law recently promulgated in France.

  7. The evaluation of drug regulation - economic approaches into the valuation and evaluation of the drug regulatory framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvy, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The European pharmaceutical market is strictly regulated. Sufficient levels of quality, safety, and efficacy will have to be demonstrated before a pharmaceutical is allowed to enter the market. There is little evidence, however, that the current drug regulatory framework is achieving its goals of

  8. Maternal drug use: evaluation of risks to breast-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirksey, A; Groziak, S M

    1984-01-01

    This paper, based on a review of the literature, evaluates the risks to infants of maternal drug use during lactation. The potential harm of a particular drug to the breastfed infant is related both to the complex mechanism of milk synthesis and secretion and the mode of passage of the drug from plasma into milk. The 1st part of the paper discusses mammary cell and milk synthesis, milk secretion and composition, the mode of passage of drugs into milk, and factors influencing drug concentrations in milk. Drug concentrations in milk are dependent on 6 major factors: drug dosage, proportion bound in plasma, molecular weight, lipid solubility, degree of ionization, and pH difference between plasma and milk. Drugs that are weak acids are ionized to a greater extent and are more protein-bound than weak alkaline drugs. The 2nd part of the paper evaluates the risks to breastfed infants of selected pharmacons. Some categories of drugs that contain pharmacons that should be limited or avoided by nursing mothers are alkylating agents, analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents, anticoagulants, anticonvulsants, anti-infective agents, central nervous system stimulants, hormones, laxatives, minerals, provitamins, psychotherapeutic agents, thyroid affecting agents, and vitamins. The following precautions are suggested to minimize the risks of potentially harmful pharmacons: 1) all unnecessary medications should be avoided by nrusing mothers; 2) if medication is necessary during lactation, drug dosage should be controlled and the infant should be monitored for adverse symptoms; 3) drugs should be administered shortly after breastfeeding and the interval prolonged before the next feeding; and 4) if the infant must be fed soon after a potentially harmful drug has been taken by the mother, bottle feeding is recommended.

  9. Advanced Drug Delivery Systems - a Synthetic and Biological Applied Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lise Nørkjær

    function as the targeting moiety on the surface of the liposomes. Several examples of synthetic procedures known from the literature are presented. The chapter is completed with a study covering the conjugation efficiencies of a variety of chemical functionalities. Large differences are revealed between...... to guide the uptake, in addition to an enzymatically cleavable peptide sequence, whose cleavage would result in removal of the polymer layer as well as uncovering cationic charges on the liposomal surface. These systems were shown to have superior drug efficacy in vitro....

  10. An Evaluation of Immediate Outcomes and Fidelity of a Drug Abuse Prevention Program in Continuation High Schools: Project towards No Drug Abuse (TND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisha, Nadra E.; Sun, Ping; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Unger, Jennifer B.; Sussman, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The present study provides an implementation fidelity, process, and immediate outcomes evaluation of Project Towards No Drug Abuse (TND), a drug prevention program targeting continuation high school youth (n = 1426) at risk for drug abuse. A total of 24 schools participated in three randomized conditions: TND Only, TND and motivational…

  11. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoguang [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Medical Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Qian, Hua [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Miyamoto, Fusako [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Naito, Takeshi [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawaji, Kumi [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kazumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); JST Innovation Plaza Kyoto, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8245 (Japan); Hattori, Toshio [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Matsuoka, Masao [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  12. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. NK-cell activity in immunotoxicity drug evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederbrant, Karin; Marcusson-Staaahl, Maritha; Condevaux, Fabienne; Descotes, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    NK-cell activity as a tool for detection of immunotoxic effects of new human drugs has gained further attention when the recent European note for guidance CPMP/SWP/1042/99 was adopted. The inclusion of NK-cell activity plus distribution of lymphocyte subsets were suggested as an alternative to the primary antibody response to a T-cell dependent antigen. Either of the two test alternatives should be included as a routine parameter in at least one repeated dose-toxicity study, rats or mice being the species of choice. The standard procedure for measuring NK-cell activity is the 51 Cr-release assay. However, a new flow-cytometric assay, adapted for rat peripheral blood, does not require dedicated groups of animals, offers the possibility of repeated testing, and shows at least as sensitive as the conventional 51 Cr-release assay

  14. Evaluation of Biosourced Alkyd Nanoemulsions as Drug Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Yong Teo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel oil-in-water (O/W nanoemulsions were formulated using short, medium, and long oil length alkyds synthesized from palm kernel oil by a two-stage alcoholysis-polyesterification reaction. Alkyd/surfactant/water ternary phase diagrams identified a composition of 1% alkyd, 9% Tween 80, and 90% water where spontaneous production of nanoemulsions occurred. The pH, droplet size, and zeta potential of all formulations were in the range of 6.4–6.6, 11–14 nm, and −6 mV to −8 mV, respectively. Rheological studies showed that the nanoemulsions displayed non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior at low shear rates up to 20 s−1 with conversion to Newtonian behavior above this shear rate. All nanoemulsions were found to be stable against phase separation on storage at 4°C and 25°C for three months. Short oil length alkyd nanoemulsions exhibited significantly higher stability compared with medium and long oil length alkyd nanoemulsions, as demonstrated by an absence of phase separation and only minor changes of droplet size on storage at an elevated temperature of 45°C for 3 months. The drug carrying capacity and storage stability of the nanoemulsions were assessed using phenytoin. The entrapment efficiency of alkyd nanoemulsions was in excess of 90% and loss of phenytoin content was restricted to less than 4% during storage of the nanoemulsions for three months at 4°C, 25°C, and 45°C. Taken together, these findings indicate that nanoemulsions prepared from palm kernel oil-based alkyds offer potential as nanocarriers for drug delivery applications.

  15. Gynecomastia and drugs: a critical evaluation of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Frank Q; Warrier, Rohit S; Gannon, Mary C

    2015-05-01

    A large number of medications have been implicated in the genesis of gynecomastia. However, gynecomastia is common in men, asymptomatic, increases with age, and is considered to be due to an increased estradiol/testosterone ratio. This complicates the interpretation of medication-related gynecomastia. Therefore, we have reviewed the literature in order to assess the data relating gynecomastia onset with utilization of specific medications. The literature was searched in PubMed and the Ovid/Medline databases from the 1946 to January 2015 with the search terminology of "gynecomastia, drugs/medications." A few other articles were found and included. One hundred ten publications were reviewed. Sixty-three were single case reports. There were 24 population-based studies of which 8 were HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral agents. Among the case reports, 49 were for individual medications, and 2 were reports of antineoplastic or antiretroviral drug regimens. In the great majority, mastodynia with or without breast enlargement was present and referred to as gynecomastia. Generally, hormonal profiles could not explain the breast enlargement. The pain/tenderness and breast enlargement resolved spontaneously over time. Many different medications have been associated with the presence of "gynecomastia." Generally, it presents as a syndrome characterized by a single painful/tender breast (mastodynia) associated with breast enlargement and is transient. We suggest that these cases be referred to as an acute gynecomastia syndrome. This syndrome also occurs independent of medication use. Thus, in an individual patient, whether it is medication induced often remains uncertain. The pathogenesis remains unknown.

  16. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Miyamoto, Fusako; Naito, Takeshi; Kawaji, Kumi; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Hattori, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masao; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. ► The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. ► In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 BaL as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1 IIIB activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1 IIIB and anti-HIV-1 BaL activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, “phenotypic drug evaluation”, may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  17. Simulated Evaluation of Drug-Impaired Psychomotor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this placebo-controlled, randomized-crossover study was to evaluate a computer-based divided-attention task as a method for measure impaired human psychomotor performance. The ability of the divided-attention task to detect and differentiate was evaluated using single oral doses of placebo, caffeine and diphenhydramine. Ten healthy men were the subjects of the study. Subject performance on divided-attention was compared with tests of short-term memory and a set of visual analog...

  18. Injections, cocktails and diviners: therapeutic flexibility in the context of malaria elimination and drug resistance in Northeast Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia's elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia, their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling "cocktails" and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. METHODS: The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey. RESULTS: Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i the public sector; ii the private sector; iii traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination.

  19. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous blood and masturbation specimens of semen were obtained from the subjects before treatment, immediately post-treatment and by the 65th day from commencement of treatment. Blood levels of follicle stimulating hormones, leutinizing hormone and testosterone were determined by Enzyme Linked Imuno Assay.

  20. In vivo anti-malarial potentials of some plants extracts on ICR-mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five medicinal plants, Acacia nilotica (Fabaceae), Citrus aurantifolia (Rutaceae), Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae) Carica papaya (Caricaceae), and Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) used for the treatment of malaria/ fever by the Hausa people of Kano-Nigeria were selected based on their traditional claims. These were ...

  1. Avidity of anti-malarial antibodies inversely related to transmission intensity at three sites in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewanyana, Isaac; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Nankabirwa, Joaniter I; Yeka, Adoke; Sullivan, Richard; Kamya, Moses R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Drakeley, Chris; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tetteh, Kevin K A

    2017-02-10

    People living in malaria endemic areas acquire protection from severe malaria quickly, but protection from clinical disease and control of parasitaemia is acquired only after many years of repeated infections. Antibodies play a central role in protection from clinical disease; however, protective antibodies are slow to develop. This study sought to investigate the influence of Plasmodium falciparum exposure on the acquisition of high-avidity antibodies to P. falciparum antigens, which may be associated with protection. Cross-sectional surveys were performed in children and adults at three sites in Uganda with varied P. falciparum transmission intensity (entomological inoculation rates; 3.8, 26.6, and 125 infectious bites per person per year). Sandwich ELISA was used to measure antibody responses to two P. falciparum merozoite surface antigens: merozoite surface protein 1-19 (MSP1-19) and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1). In individuals with detectable antibody levels, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) was added to measure the relative avidity of antibody responses by ELISA. Within a site, there were no significant differences in median antibody levels between the three age groups. Between sites, median antibody levels were generally higher in the higher transmission sites, with differences more apparent for AMA-1 and in ≥5 year group. Similarly, median avidity index (proportion of high avidity antibodies) showed no significant increase with increasing age but was significantly lower at sites of higher transmission amongst participants ≥5 years of age. Using 5 M GuHCl, the median avidity indices in the ≥5 year group at the highest and lowest transmission sites were 19.9 and 26.8, respectively (p = 0.0002) for MSP1-19 and 12.2 and 17.2 (p = 0.0007) for AMA1. Avidity to two different P. falciparum antigens was lower in areas of high transmission intensity compared to areas with lower transmission. Appreciation of the mechanisms behind these findings as well as their clinical consequences will require additional investigation, ideally utilizing longitudinal data and investigation of a broader array of responses.

  2. Anti-malarial activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Piliostigma thonningii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... Key words: Piliostigma thonningii, anti plasmodial, Plasmodium berghei berghei NK65. ... predicted that a reliable malaria vaccine is several years away. The global ... nature and its petals are white to pinkish colour produced between ... randomized into three groups of three mice each and were given.

  3. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... 2Department of Physiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria. ... sperm count, percentage sperm forward motility and blood levels of testosterone were ... be associated with fertility changes as a result of their inherent ...

  4. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... Malaria is caused by any of the four protozoan species of the genus plasmodium. ... intervention for malaria therapy in patients living in areas of high level of resistance. ..... need for assisted conception. The observation that ...

  5. Dried blood spots as a source of anti-malarial antibodies for epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corran, Patrick H; Cook, Jackie; Lynch, Caroline; Leendertse, Heleen; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Griffin, Jamie; Cox, Jonathan; Abeku, Tarekegn; Bousema, Teun; Ghani, Azra C; Drakeley, Chris; Riley, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Background Blood spots collected onto filter paper are an established and convenient source of antibodies for serological diagnosis and epidemiological surveys. Although recommendations for the storage and analysis of small molecule analytes in blood spots exist, there are no published systematic studies of the stability of antibodies under different storage conditions. Methods Blood spots, on filter paper or glass fibre mats and containing malaria-endemic plasma, were desiccated and stored at various temperatures for different times. Eluates of these spots were assayed for antibodies against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, MSP-119 and MSP2, and calculated titres used to fit an exponential (first order kinetic) decay model. The first order rate constants (k) for each spot storage temperature were used to fit an Arrhenius equation, in order to estimate the thermal and temporal stability of antibodies in dried blood spots. The utility of blood spots for serological assays was confirmed by comparing antibodies eluted from blood spots with the equivalent plasma values in a series of samples from North Eastern Tanzania and by using blood spot-derived antibodies to estimate malaria transmission intensity in this site and for two localities in Uganda. Results Antibodies in spots on filter paper and glass fibre paper had similar stabilities but blood was more easily absorbed onto filter papers than glass fibre, spots were more regular and spot size was more closely correlated with blood volume for filter paper spots. Desiccated spots could be stored at or below 4°C for extended periods, but were stable for only very limited periods at ambient temperature. When desiccated, recoveries of antibodies that are predominantly of IgG1 or IgG3 subclasses were similar. Recoveries of antibodies from paired samples of serum and of blood spots from Tanzania which had been suitably stored showed similar recoveries of antibodies, but spots which had been stored for extended periods at ambient humidity and temperature showed severe loss of recoveries. Estimates of malaria transmission intensity obtained from serum and from blood spots were similar, and values obtained using blood spots agreed well with entomologically determined values. Conclusion This study has demonstrated the suitability of filter paper blood spots paper for collection of serum antibodies, and provided clear guidelines for the treatment and storage of filter papers which emphasize the importance of desiccation and minimisation of time spent at ambient temperatures. A recommended protocol for collecting, storing and assaying blood spots is provided. PMID:18826573

  6. Evaluation of a Peer-Led Drug Abuse Risk Reduction Project for Runaway/Homeless Youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Stuart W.; Jarvis, Sara

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates the Drug Prevention in Youth risk reduction program that was implemented in shelters for runaway/homeless youths in the southeastern United States. An evaluation strategy was developed allowing for comparisons between peer-led, adult-led and nonintervention groups. Well-trained and motivated peer/near-peer leaders made particularly…

  7. Malaria diagnostic testing and treatment practices in three different Plasmodium falciparum transmission settings in Tanzania: before and after a government policy change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousema Teun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patterns of decreasing malaria transmission intensity make presumptive treatment of malaria an unjustifiable approach in many African settings. The controlled use of anti-malarials after laboratory confirmed diagnosis is preferable in low endemic areas. Diagnosis may be facilitated by malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. In this study, the impact of a government policy change, comprising the provision of RDTs and advice to restrict anti-malarial treatment to RDT-positive individuals, was assessed by describing diagnostic behaviour and treatment decision-making in febrile outpatients Methods Prospective data from Biharamulo and Rubya Designated District Hospital (DDH were collected before and after policy change, in Sumve DDH no new policy was implemented. Diagnosis of malaria was confirmed by RDT; transmission intensity was evaluated by a serological marker of malaria exposure in hospital attendees. Results Prior to policy change, there was no evident association between the actual level of transmission intensity and drug-prescribing behaviour. After policy change, there was a substantial decrease in anti-malarial prescription and an increase in prescription of antibiotics. The proportion of parasite-negative individuals who received anti-malarials decreased from 89.1% (244/274 to 38.7% (46/119 in Biharamulo and from 76.9% (190/247 to 10.0% (48/479 in Rubya after policy change. Conclusion This study shows that an official policy change, where RDTs were provided and healthcare providers were advised to adhere to RDT results in prescribing drugs can be followed by more rational drug-prescribing behaviour. The current findings are promising for improving treatment policy in Tanzanian hospitals.

  8. Blood pressure reduction, persistence and costs in the evaluation of antihypertensive drug treatment – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasford Joerg

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood pressure lowering drugs are usually evaluated in short term trials determining the absolute blood pressure reduction during trough and the duration of the antihypertensive effect after single or multiple dosing. A lack of persistence with treatment has however been shown to be linked to a worse cardiovascular prognosis. This review explores the blood pressure reduction and persistence with treatment of antihypertensive drugs and the cost consequences of poor persistence with pharmaceutical interventions in arterial hypertension. Methods We have searched the literature for data on blood pressure lowering effects of different antihypertensive drug classes and agents, on persistence with treatment, and on related costs. Persistence was measured as patients' medication possession rate. Results are presented in the form of a systematic review. Results Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARBs have a competitive blood pressure lowering efficacy compared with ACE-inhibitors (ACEi and calcium channel blockers (CCBs, beta-blockers (BBs and diuretics. 8 studies describing the persistence with treatment were identified. Patients were more persistent on ARBs than on ACEi and CCBs, BBs and diuretics. Thus the product of blood pressure lowering and persistence was higher on ARBs than on any other drug class. Although the price per tablet of more recently developed drugs (ACEi, ARBs is higher than that of older ones (diuretics and BBs, the newer drugs result in a more favourable cost to effect ratio when direct drug costs and indirect costs are also considered. Conclusion To evaluate drugs for the treatment of hypertension several key variables including the blood pressure lowering effect, side effects, compliance/persistence with treatment, as well as drug costs and direct and indirect costs of medical care have to be considered. ARBs, while nominally more expensive when drug costs are considered only, provide substantial cost savings

  9. Evaluation of the microscopic observational drug susceptibility assay for rapid and efficient diagnosis of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Lazarus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Tuberculosis (TB is endemic in India and the burden of multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is high. Early detection of MDR-TB is of primary importance in controlling the spread of TB. The microscopic observational drug susceptibility (MODS assay has been described as a cost-effective and rapid method by which mycobacterial culture and the drug susceptibility test (DST can be done at the same time. Materials and Methods: A total of 302 consecutive sputum samples that were received in an accredited mycobacteriology laboratory for conventional culture and DST were evaluated by the MODS assay. Results: In comparison with conventional culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ media, the MODS assay showed a sensitivity of 94.12% and a specificity of 89.39% and its concordance with the DST by the proportion method on LJ media to isoniazid and rifampicin was 90.8% and 91.5%, respectively. The turnaround time for results by MODS was 9 days compared to 21 days by culture on LJ media and an additional 42 days for DST by the 1% proportion method. The cost of performing a single MODS assay was Rs. 250/-, compared to Rs. 950/- for culture and 1st line DST on LJ. Conclusion: MODS was found to be a sensitive and rapid alternative method for performing culture and DST to identify MDR-TB in resource poor settings.

  10. Treatment of imported malaria in adults: a multicentre study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranque, S; Marchou, B; Malvy, D; Adehossi, E; Laganier, R; Tissot-Dupont, H; Lotte, A; Dydymsky, S; Durant, J; Stahl, J-P; Bosseray, A; Gaillat, J; Sotto, A; Cazorla, C; Ragneau, J-M; Brouqui, P; Delmont, J

    2005-10-01

    Data about anti-malarial drugs prescription practices in Europe and the safety of imported malaria treatments are scanty. In 1999, a French consensus development conference published guidelines for the prevention and treatment of imported P. falciparum malaria. The impact of these guidelines has not been evaluated. To investigate the impact of these guidelines on the prescription of anti-malarials, and to evaluate the incidence of acute drug events (ADEs) leading to discontinuation of treatment. Cross-sectional survey. Members of the medical staff in 14 French infectious and tropical disease wards completed a standardized form for each patient treated for imported malaria in 2001. A propensity score matching technique was used to estimate the risk of ADEs leading to discontinuation of the regimen. In the 474 patients studied, quinine was the first-line anti-malarial most often prescribed. Only 3% of patients received halofantrine. Mefloquine was associated with a RR of 4.9 (95%CI 3.2-7.4, p guidelines have been taken into account. Mefloquine was associated with a substantial risk of discontinuing the treatment because of ADEs. This is a serious limitation for the use of mefloquine in the treatment of out-patients with imported malaria.

  11. Evaluation and modeling of the eutectic composition of various drug-polyethylene glycol solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Jared A; Taylor, Lynne S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of which factors contribute to the eutectic composition of drug-polyethylene glycol (PEG) blends and to compare experimental values with predictions from the semi-empirical model developed by Lacoulonche et al. Eutectic compositions of various drug-PEG 3350 solid dispersions were predicted, assuming athermal mixing, and compared to experimentally determined eutectic points. The presence or absence of specific interactions between the drug and PEG 3350 were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The eutectic composition for haloperidol-PEG and loratadine-PEG solid dispersions was accurately predicted using the model, while predictions for aceclofenac-PEG and chlorpropamide-PEG were very different from those experimentally observed. Deviations in the model prediction from ideal behavior for the systems evaluated were confirmed to be due to the presence of specific interactions between the drug and polymer, as demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Detailed analysis showed that the eutectic composition prediction from the model is interdependent on the crystal lattice energy of the drug compound (evaluated from the melting temperature and the heat of fusion) as well as the nature of the drug-polymer interactions. In conclusion, for compounds with melting points less than 200°C, the model is ideally suited for predicting the eutectic composition of systems where there is an absence of drug-polymer interactions.

  12. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF FLOATING DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF AMOXYCILLIN TRIHYDRATE

    OpenAIRE

    Marella Radhakrishna; K.G.Parthiban; Nelluri Ramarao; Nagapuri Santhoshi Deepika; Perumulla Abhishek

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to formulate and evaluate balanced Floating Drug Delivery Systems as controlled release modules, which prolongs the release rate of the drugs. Amoxycillin is an anti- bacterial acts by inhibiting the synthesis of bacterial cell walls. It inhibits cross-linkage between the linear peptidoglycan polymer chains that make up a major component of the cell walls of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Helicobacter pylori exists in the gastric mucous layer or ...

  13. Development and Evaluation of Cefadroxil Drug Loaded Biopolymeric Films Based on Chitosan-Furfural Schiff Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ritu B.; Uplana, Rahul A.; Patel, Vishnu A.; Dixit, Bharat C.; Patel, Tarosh S.

    2010-01-01

    Cefadroxil drug loaded biopolymeric films of chitosan-furfural schiff base were prepared by reacting chitosan with furfural in presence of acetic acid and perchloric acid respectively for the external use. Prepared films were evaluated for their strength, swelling index, thickness, drug content, uniformity, tensile strength, percent elongation, FTIR spectral analysis and SEM. The results of in vitro diffusion studies revealed that the films exhibited enhanced drug diffusion as compared to the films prepared using untreated chitosan. The films also demonstrated good to moderate antibacterial activities against selective gram positive and gram negative bacteria. PMID:21179325

  14. Sustained Release and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Carbon Nanotube-Mediated Drug Delivery System for Betulinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely utilized as a novel drug carrier with promising future applications in biomedical therapies due to their distinct characteristics. In the present work, carboxylic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f-SWCNTs were used as the starting material to react with anticancer drug, BA to produce f-SWCNTs-BA conjugate via π-π stacking interaction. The conjugate was extensively characterized for drug loading capacity, physicochemical properties, surface morphology, drug releasing characteristics, and cytotoxicity evaluation. The results indicated that the drug loading capacity was determined to be around 20 wt% and this value has been verified by thermogravimetric analysis. The binding of BA onto the surface of f-SWCNTs was confirmed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies. Powder XRD analysis showed that the structure of the conjugate was unaffected by the loading of BA. The developed conjugate was found to release the drug in a controlled manner with a prolonged release property. According to the preliminary in vitro cytotoxicity studies, the conjugate was not toxic in a standard fibroblast cell line, and anticancer activity was significantly higher in A549 than HepG2 cell line. This study suggests that f-SWCNTs could be developed as an efficient drug carrier to conjugate drugs for pharmaceutical applications in cancer chemotherapies.

  15. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Development and evaluation of diclofenac sodium thermorevesible subcutaneous drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Jamshaid A; Khan, Abad; Khuda, Fazli; Ahmad, Lateef; Khan, Amirzada; Khan, Abbas; Dayoo, Abdullah; Roohullah

    2012-12-15

    The objective of current work was to develop and evaluate thermoreversible subcutaneous drug delivery system for diclofenac sodium. The poloxamer 407, methyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose and polyethylene glycol were used alone and in combination in different ratios to design the delivery system. The physical properties like Tsol-gel, viscosity, clarity of solution and gel were evaluated. The in vitro release of the drug delivery system was evaluated using membrane less method and the drug release kinetics and mechanism was predicted by applying various mathematical models to the in vitro dissolution data. Rabbits were used as in vivo model following subcutaneous injection to predict various pharmacokinetics parameters by applying Pk-Summit software. The in vitro and in vivo data revealed that the system consisting of the poloxamer 407 in concentration of 20% (DP20) was the most capable formulation for extending the drug release and maintaining therapeutic blood level of DS for longer duration (144 h). The data obtained for drug content after autoclaving the solutions indicate that autoclaving results in 6% degradation of DS. The data also suggested that the studied polymers poloxamer, MC and PG are good candidate to extend the drug release possessing a unique thermoreversible property. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of contact sensitivity to topical drugs in patients with contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Bülbül Şen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Topical drugs are an important group of contact allergens. The present study aimed to evaluate contact sensitivity to topical drugs in patients with contact dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Between 2003 and 2008, 129 patients were followed up at the Department of Dermatology at Ankara University School of Medicine with clinically suspected contact sensitivity to topical drugs. In this study, the patch test reactions to the European Standard Battery and topical drugs used by the patients and medicament patch test results were evaluated. Results: Positive patch test reaction to one or more allergens was found in 80 (62.0% of 129 patients included in the study. Sixty-one of the 80 patients (61/129, 47.3% had positive patch test reaction to medicaments. Medicament sensitivity was detected in 37.9% (49/129 of subjects. Nitrofurazone was found to be the most common allergen (18.6%. Discussion: The present study showed that topical drugs are a frequent cause of allergic contact dermatitis. Therefore, the probability of contact sensitivity to topical drugs should also be considered in patients with the clinical diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis and, suspected cases should be evaluated further with patch testing in order to find the responsible allergens.

  18. Assessment of a Pharmaceutical Advertisement Analysis Module in a Drug Literature Evaluation Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohamed Ezzat Khamis; Fattouh, Youssef

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of an educational module on students' self-efficacy when analyzing the content of promotional drug brochures (PDBs) and to assess the students' value of PDBs' as an educational tool. Methods. Third-year bachelor of pharmacy students participated in a one-hour lecture and a two-hour laboratory. Students completed a survey before and after participating in the module. Results. The module elicited a statistically significant change in students' self-efficacy beliefs regarding evaluating promotional drug brochures, while the average perceived value of promotional drug brochures did not change significantly after the module. Conclusion. A brief educational module can increase students' self-efficacy in evaluating the content of PDBs.

  19. Development and evaluation of accelerated drug release testing methods for a matrix-type intravaginal ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Externbrink, Anna; Eggenreich, Karin; Eder, Simone; Mohr, Stefan; Nickisch, Klaus; Klein, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated drug release testing is a valuable quality control tool for long-acting non-oral extended release formulations. Currently, several intravaginal ring candidates designed for the long-term delivery of steroids or anti-infective drugs are being in the developing pipeline. The present article addresses the demand for accelerated drug release methods for these formulations. We describe the development and evaluation of accelerated release methods for a steroid releasing matrix-type intravaginal ring. The drug release properties of the formulation were evaluated under real-time and accelerated test conditions. Under real-time test conditions drug release from the intravaginal ring was strongly affected by the steroid solubility in the release medium. Under sufficient sink conditions that were provided in release media containing surfactants drug release was Fickian diffusion driven. Both temperature and hydro-organic dissolution media were successfully employed to accelerate drug release from the formulation. Drug release could be further increased by combining the temperature effect with the application of a hydro-organic release medium. The formulation continued to exhibit a diffusion controlled release kinetic under the investigated accelerated conditions. Moreover, the accelerated methods were able to differentiate between different prototypes of the intravaginal ring that exhibited different release profiles under real-time test conditions. Overall, the results of the present study indicate that both temperature and hydro-organic release media are valid parameters for accelerating drug release from the intravaginal ring. Variation of either a single or both parameters yielded release profiles that correlated well with real-time release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of Altered Drug Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adults Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Michael A; Sieg, Adam C

    2017-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-support modality used in patients with refractory cardiac and/or respiratory failure. A significant resurgence in the use ECMO has been seen in recent years as a result of substantial improvements in technology and survival benefit. With expanding ECMO use, a better understanding of how ECMO affects drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is necessary. The vast majority of PK studies in patients receiving ECMO have been conducted within neonatal or pediatric populations or within a controlled environment (e.g., in vitro or ex vivo). Because of significant differences in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, it may be inappropriate to extrapolate these PK data to adults. Thus, the aims of this review are to evaluate the changes in drug PK during ECMO and to summarize the available PK data for common drugs used in the adult critically ill patients during ECMO support. A search of the PubMed (1965-July 2016), EMBASE (1965-July 2016), and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register databases was performed. All relevant studies describing PK alterations during ECMO in ex vivo experiments and in adults were included. Evaluation of the data indicated that drug PK in adults receiving ECMO support may be significantly altered. Factors influencing these alterations are numerous and have intricate relationships with each other but can generally be classified as ECMO circuit factors, drug factors, and patient factors. Commonly used drugs in these patients include antimicrobials, sedatives, and analgesics. PK data for most of these drugs are generally lacking; however, recent research efforts in this patient population have provided some limited guidance in drug dosing. With an improved understanding of altered drug PK secondary to ECMO therapy, optimization of pharmacotherapy within this critically ill population continues to move forward. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  1. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale metabolic models (GeMMs of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1, choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5 metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  2. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.

    2018-01-04

    Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1), choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5) metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  3. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob Johan; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-01-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article “Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel” addresses this theme...... by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general—particularly in Dolliver's article—poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study...

  4. Evaluation of skin absorption of drugs from topical and transdermal formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luís Morais Ruela

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The skin barrier function has been attributed to the stratum corneum and represents a major challenge in clinical practice pertaining to cutaneous administration of drugs. Despite this, a large number of bioactive compounds have been successfully administered via cutaneous administration because of advances in the design of topical and transdermal formulations. In vitro and in vivo evaluations of these novel drug delivery systems are necessary to characterize their quality and efficacy. This review covers the most well-known methods for assessing the cutaneous absorption of drugs as an auxiliary tool for pharmaceutical formulation scientists in the design of drug delivery systems. In vitro methods as skin permeation assays using Franz-type diffusion cells, cutaneous retention and tape-stripping methods to study the cutaneous penetration of drugs, and in vivo evaluations as pre-clinical pharmacokinetic studies in animal models are discussed. Alternative approaches to cutaneous microdialysis are also covered. Recent advances in research on skin absorption of drugs and the effect of skin absorption enhancers, as investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy, Raman confocal microscopy, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, are reviewed.

  5. Evaluation of MGIT 960 System for the Second-Line Drugs Susceptibility Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many laboratories validate DST of the second-line drugs by BACTEC MGIT 960 system. The objective of this study is to evaluate the critical concentration and perform DST for the 2nd line drugs. We evaluated 193 clinical strains of M. tuberculosis isolated from patients in South Korea. Testing the critical concentration of six second-line drugs was performed by MGIT 960 and compared with L-J proportion method. The critical concentration was determined to establish the most one that gave the difference between drug resistance and susceptibility in MGIT960 system. Good agreement of the following concentrations was found: Concordance was 95% for 0.5 μg/mL of moxifloxacin; 93.6%, 1.0 μg/mL of levofloxacin; 97.5%, 2.5 μg/mL of kanamycin; 90.6%, 2.5 μg/mL of capreomycin; 86.2%, 5.0 μg/mL of ethionamide; and 90.8%, 2.0 μg/mL of ρ-aminosalicylic acid. The critical concentrations of the four drugs, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin, were concordant and reliable for testing 2nd line drug resistance. Further study of ethionamide and ρ-aminosalicylic acid is required.

  6. A knowledge-based approach for identification of drugs against vivapain-2 protein of Plasmodium vivax through pharmacophore-based virtual screening with comparative modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Amisha; Swati, D

    2014-08-01

    Malaria is one of the most infectious diseases in the world. Plasmodium vivax, the pathogen causing endemic malaria in humans worldwide, is responsible for extensive disease morbidity. Due to the emergence of resistance to common anti-malarial drugs, there is a continuous need to develop a new class of drugs for this pathogen. P. vivax cysteine protease, also known as vivapain-2, plays an important role in haemoglobin hydrolysis and is considered essential for the survival of the parasite. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of vivapain-2 is not predicted experimentally, so its structure is modelled by using comparative modelling approach and further validated by Qualitative Model Energy Analysis (QMEAN) and RAMPAGE tools. The potential binding site of selected vivapain-2 structure has been detected by grid-based function prediction method. Drug targets and their respective drugs similar to vivapain-2 have been identified using three publicly available databases: STITCH 3.1, DrugBank and Therapeutic Target Database (TTD). The second approach of this work focuses on docking study of selected drug E-64 against vivapain-2 protein. Docking reveals crucial information about key residues (Asn281, Cys283, Val396 and Asp398) that are responsible for holding the ligand in the active site. The similarity-search criterion is used for the preparation of our in-house database of drugs, obtained from filtering the drugs from the DrugBank database. A five-point 3D pharmacophore model is generated for the docked complex of vivapain-2 with E-64. This study of 3D pharmacophore-based virtual screening results in identifying three new drugs, amongst which one is approved and the other two are experimentally proved. The ADMET properties of these drugs are found to be in the desired range. These drugs with novel scaffolds may act as potent drugs for treating malaria caused by P. vivax.

  7. Building a structured monitoring and evaluating system of postmarketing drug use in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenmin; Levine, Mitchell; Wang, Longxing; Zhang, Yaohua; Yi, Chengdong; Wang, Hongmin; Wang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hongjuan; Xu, Jianglong; Jin, Huilin; Wang, Tongchun; Huang, Gan; Wu, Ye

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand a drug's full profile in the post-marketing environment, information is needed regarding utilization patterns, beneficial effects, ADRs and economic value. China, the most populated country in the world, has the largest number of people who are taking medications. To begin to appreciate the impact of these medications, a multifunctional evaluation and surveillance system was developed, the Shanghai Drug Monitoring and Evaluative System (SDMES). Set up by the Shanghai Center for Adverse Drug Reaction Monitoring in 2001, the SDMES contains three databases: a population health data base of middle aged and elderly persons; hospital patient medical records; and a spontaneous ADR reporting database. Each person has a unique identification and Medicare number, which permits record-linkage within and between these three databases. After more than three years in development, the population health database has comprehensive data for more than 320,000 residents. The hospital database has two years of inpatient medical records from five major hospitals, and will be increasing to 10 hospitals in 2007. The spontaneous reporting ADR database has collected 20,205 cases since 2001 from approximately 295 sources, including hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, drug wholesalers and pharmacies. The SDMES has the potential to become an important national and international pharmacoepidemiology resource for drug evaluation.

  8. Curriculum and instructional methods for drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics: survey of US pharmacy schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer A; Gabay, Michael P; Ficzere, Cathy; Ward, Kristina E

    2012-06-01

    The drug information curriculum in US colleges of pharmacy continues to evolve. The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Drug Information Practice and Research Network (DI PRN) published an opinion paper with specific recommendations regarding drug information education in 2009. Adoption of these recommendations has not been evaluated. To assess which recommendations made in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper are included in US pharmacy school curricula and characterize faculty qualifications, educational methods, and recent changes in drug information education. An electronic survey was designed using the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education standards and guidelines for accreditation of PharmD programs in the US. Survey questions addressed curricular content within the following categories: drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics. A letter including the online survey link was sent via email to the dean of each US college/school of pharmacy (N = 128). Recipients were instructed to forward the email to the individual at their institution who was the most knowledgeable about the content and methodology used for didactic drug information education. Sixty-four responses were included in the final analysis. Of the 19 ACCP DI PRN minimum core concepts, 9 (47%) were included in curricula of all responding institutions; 14 of 19 (74%) were included in curricula for all but 1 institution. In contrast, 5 of 16 concepts (31%) were not formally taught by a number of institutions. Many respondents noted an increased focus on evidence-based medicine, medication safety, and informatics. Although a survey of drug information curricula documented substantial inclusion of the essential concepts presented in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper, room for improvement remains in drug information curricula in US colleges of pharmacy.

  9. Multicenter evaluation of a new closed system drug-transfer device in reducing surface contamination by antineoplastic hazardous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Sylvia B; Tyler, Timothy G; Power, Luci A

    2018-02-15

    Results of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a recently introduced closed system drug-transfer device (CSTD) in reducing surface contamination during compounding and simulated administration of antineoplastic hazardous drugs (AHDs) are reported. Wipe samples were collected from 6 predetermined surfaces in compounding and infusion areas of 13 U.S. cancer centers to establish preexisting levels of surface contamination by 2 marker AHDs (cyclophosphamide and fluorouracil). Stainless steel templates were placed over the 6 previously sampled surfaces, and the marker drugs were compounded and infused per a specific protocol using all components of the CSTD. Wipe samples were collected from the templates after completion of tasks and analyzed for both marker AHDs. Aggregated results of wipe sampling to detect preexisting contamination at the 13 study sites showed that overall, 66.7% of samples (104 of 156) had detectable levels of at least 1 marker AHD; subsequent testing after CSTD use per protocol found a sample contamination rate of 5.8% (9 of 156 samples). In the administration areas alone, the rate of preexisting contamination was 78% (61 of 78 samples); with use of the CSTD protocol, the contamination rate was 2.6%. Twenty-six participants rated the CSTD for ease of use, with 100% indicating that they were satisfied or extremely satisfied. A study involving a rigorous protocol and 13 cancer centers across the United States demonstrated that the CSTD reduced surface contamination by cyclophosphamide and fluorouracil during compounding and simulated administration. Participants reported that the CSTD was easy to use. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Elite Athletes to Promote Drug Abstinence: Evaluation of a Single-Session School-Based Drug Use Prevention Program Delivered by Junior Hockey Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    School-based substance use prevention programs are a common method to approaching drug use in youths. Project SOS is a single-session drug prevention program developed by police officers and delivered by elite junior hockey players to students in grades 6 and 7. The current study evaluates the effects of Project SOS at achieving its objectives of…

  11. Evaluating Drug Cost per Response with SGLT2 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Janice M S; Macomson, Brian; Ektare, Varun; Patel, Dipen; Botteman, Marc

    2015-09-01

    The sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, which include canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin, represent a new class of antihyperglycemic agents. Few studies have assessed their cost per response, with "cost per response" being the total cost of a select drug, divided by the resulting change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. To examine the drug cost of SGLT2 inhibitors per a reduction in placebo-adjusted 1% HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who received treatment during 26 weeks with canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, or empagliflozin. The drug cost per response for each of the 3 agents individually was assessed based on data from a subset of clinical trials discussed in the prescribing information for each drug that were all placebo-controlled studies evaluating each drug as monotherapy, dual therapy (combined with metformin), and triple therapy (combined with metformin and a sulfonylurea) in patients with uncontrolled, type 2 diabetes mellitus. The US 2015 wholesale acquisition cost for each drug was used to calculate each drug's treatment costs over 26 weeks. The average cost per response for each drug was defined as the prescription drug cost of each SGLT2 inhibitor, divided by the average, placebo-adjusted HbA1c reduction at 26 weeks. The drug cost per unit dose was the same for canagliflozin (100 mg or 300 mg), dapagliflozin (5 mg or 10 mg), and empagliflozin (10 mg or 25 mg), at $11.43. The drug cost per placebo-adjusted 1% HbA1c reduction varied by agent and by dose, as a result of the differences in the treatment responses for each of the 3 drugs. The costs per response for canagliflozin 100 mg as monotherapy, dual therapy, and triple therapy regimens ranged from $2286 to $3355, and for canagliflozin 300 mg, from $1793 to $2702. The costs per response for dapagliflozin 5 mg as monotherapy and dual therapy (triple therapy was not available at the time of the study) ranged from $4161 to $5201; the cost for dapagliflozin

  12. The prevalence and degree of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to first-line antimalarial drugs: an in vitro study from a malaria endemic region in Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shamahy, H.; Al-Harazy, Abdulilah Hussein; Harmal, Nabil S.; Al-Kabsi, Abdulgudos N.

    2007-01-01

    Unpublished studies on antimalarial drug efficacy have found low levels of chloroquine resistance in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the current prevalence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen to the main anti-malarial drugs and to determine the effective concentration (EC) values. The WHO standard protocol was used for the selection of subjects, collection of blood samples, culture techniques, examination of post-culture blood slides and interpretation of results. The in vitro micro-test Mark III was used for assessing susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates. The criteria for blood parasite density was met by 219 P. falciparum malaria patients. Chloroquine resistance was found in 47% of isolated P. falciparum schizonts. Mefloquine resistance was found in 5.2%. In addition, the EC50 and EC95 values in blood that inhibited schizont maturation in resistant isolates were higher than the normal therapeutic level for mefloquine. No resistance occurred against quinine or artemisinin, with no growth at the cut off level for quinine and inhibition at low concentrations of artemisinin. Our study confirmed the occurrence of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum and a slow increase in the rate of this resistance will increase further and spread over all the foci of malaria in Yemen. The low rate of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was lower than that reported in Africa or Southeast Asia, but is the first report of the mefloquine resistance in Yemen. Finally, the isolates were sensitive to low concentrations of quinine and artemisinin. (author)

  13. In vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma anomala subsp. gerrardii (Asteraceae): identification of its main active constituent, structure-activity relationship studies and gene expression profiling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, JVW

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-malarial drug resistance threatens to undermine efforts to eliminate this deadly disease. The resulting omnipresent requirement for drugs with novel modes of action prompted a national consortium initiative to discover new anti...

  14. A Census of Prison-Based Drug Treatment Programs: Implications for Programming, Policy, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Wayne N.; Zajac, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Despite a growing realization that unmeasured programmatic differences influence prison-based drug treatment effectiveness, few attempts to systematically measure such differences have been made. To improve program planning and evaluation in this area, we developed a census instrument to collect descriptive information about 118 prison-based drug…

  15. Therapeutic drug monitoring of infliximab : performance evaluation of three commercial ELISA kits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, E.M.H.; van de Kerkhof, D.; Hamann, D.; van Dongen, J.L.J.; Kuijper, P.H.M.; Brunsveld, L.; Scharnhorst, V.; Broeren, M.A.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of infliximab (IFX, Remicade®) can aid to optimize therapy efficacy. Many assays are available for this purpose. However, a reference standard is lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the analytical performance, agreement and clinically relevant differences

  16. Evaluation of new drugs in daily clinical practice: anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the value and the validity of data collected in daily clinical practice for drug evaluation and cost-effectiveness studies, using data collected on TNFa blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis. First, the need for and value of information from daily

  17. [Guidance of FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy and enlightenment to drug risk management of post-marketing Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The FDA risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) aims to drugs or biological products known or potential serious risk management. Analysis with the example of the content of the Onsolis REMS named FOCOS. Our country can be reference for the analysis of relevant experience and establish a scientific evaluation mechanism, strengthen the drug risk consciousness, promote the rational drug use, organic combined with the before-marketing and post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine, and promote the evaluation of risk management of the drug development and improvement.

  18. 77 FR 69634 - Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Effectiveness of Anticoccidial Drugs in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0784] Guidance for Industry on Evaluating the Effectiveness of Anticoccidial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals... Effectiveness of Anticoccidial Drugs in Food-Producing Animals.'' The guidance provides guidance to industry for...

  19. A rapid in vitro screening system for the identification and evaluation of anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.W.; Collins, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of an in vitro screening system that can be used to identify new anticancer drugs that are specifically cytotoxic for dividing cells. The screening system takes advantage of the potential of many cell lines, including tumor cells, to stop dividing when they are plated at high cell density. The cytotoxic effects of anticancer drugs on dividing (i.e., cells plated at low cell density) and nondividing cells (i.e., cells plated at high cell density) is measured by the incorporation of 51Cr. This in vitro system was evaluated by measuring the cytotoxic effects of the anticancer drugs cisplatin, thiotepa, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and vinblastine on the cell lines B/C-N, ME-180, and MCF-7. In this in vitro system the concentrations of the anticancer drugs that produced significant cytotoxicity on only dividing cells are similar to the concentrations that are used clinically. The fact that this in vitro system is rapid, simple, applicable to many cell types, and able to predict effective concentrations of anticancer drugs should make it useful for the screening of new anticancer drugs and for the design of preclinical studies

  20. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive floating tablets of an antidepressant drug by thermoplastic granulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ashok Pawar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken with an aim to formulate, develop and evaluate gastroretentive floating tablets of an antidepressant drug, Venlafaxine HCl (hydrochloride, which release the drug in a sustained manner over a period of 24 h. Three different hydrophobic retardants namely hydrogenated cottonseed oil, carnauba wax, cetyl alcohol and a hydrophilic polymer Methocel® (hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K15M were used in different combinations at different ratios for the preparation of tablets. The tablets were prepared by Hot Melt or Thermoplastic granulation method and evaluated for tablet thickness, hardness, weight variation, friability, floating lag time and in vitro drug release. Formulation F8 with hydrophilic polymer (Methocel® K15M and hydrophobic retardant (carnauba wax in the ratio 1:2.6 (approx. was considered as an optimized formulation. The optimized formulation showed satisfactory sustained drug release and remained buoyant on the surface of the medium for more than 24 h and its release profile was comparable with the marketed formulation (VENTAB-XL 37.5. It can also be concluded that floating drug delivery system of Venlafaxine HCl can be successfully formulated as an approach to increase gastric residence time and thereby improving its bioavailability.

  1. Evaluation of In-Use Stability of Anticoagulant Drug Products: Warfarin Sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyenpho, Agnes; Ciavarella, Anthony B; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Akhtar, Sohail; Hunt, Robert; Korang-Yeboah, Maxwell; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the stability of warfarin products during use by patients or caregivers. For evaluation, three commercial products manufactured by different processes were selected and placed at 30°C/75%RH to simulate in use condition. Samples were withdrawn up to 12 weeks and analyzed for the physicochemical changes. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated increasing holes and craters in the tablets over the timeframe. Near-infrared chemical imaging and powder X-ray powder diffraction corroborated the change arising from conversion of crystalline to amorphous forms of the drug. Hardness and disintegration time of the tablets were found to increase progressively. With increasing time, moisture contents of the products were found to increase and consequent decrease in isopropyl alcohol content of the product. Dissolution of the tablets in media at pH 4.5 demonstrated discrimination between crystalline and amorphous drug products. Overall, percent drug dissolved in each product at 30 min was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. Dissolution of drug decreased from 54% to 38% and 82% to 54% for the two products while the third product maintained consistently high level of dissolution. These results suggest that the drug product quality attributes can change during use. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. [Evaluation of drug addicts with associated pathology. Clinical and therapeutic aspects of the integral attention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muga, Roberto; Guardiola, Helena; Rey-Joly, Celestino

    2004-05-01

    We review the evaluation and treatment of patients with drug addictions complicated by other acute or chronic diseases from the perspective of the hospital setting. The spectrum of drug addiction's complications is broad and in many instances it is predetermined by the abuse substance and its administration route. Some complications of intravenous drug addiction have dramatically decreased in the last few years as a result of a better knowledge of hygienic customs and after the implementation of some health interventions such as the provision of sterile injectable devices. Two highly prevalent infections --HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C-- remain from the period in which most HIV infections owed to the intravenous use of heroin. Of note, these two infections largely account for the survival and quality of life of those who quit their addiction. On the other hand, it is still common the hospitalization of patients with both alcohol dependence and intercurrent diseases in whom their drug addiction may pass unnoticed. Other common situations include the treatment of acute patients with cocaine addiction and psychiatric comorbidity, patients under methadone therapy and, in general, all those cases in which, in emergency, ordinary hospital wards and specialized units, a wide differential diagnosis is raised when there is a coexistence of signs and symptoms common to an addiction, infection and/or intoxication. An integral vision of drug addiction and its complications, as well as the clinical evaluation of all health problems, is fundamental for the prognosis and treatment of these patients.

  3. Development and evaluation of 'Pure Rush': An online serious game for drug education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapinski, Lexine A; Reda, Bill; Newton, Nicola C; Lawler, Siobhan; Rodriguez, Daniel; Chapman, Catherine; Teesson, Maree

    2018-04-01

    Learning is most effective when it is active, enjoyable and incorporates feedback. Past research demonstrates that serious games are prime candidates to utilise these principles, however the potential benefits of this approach for delivering drug education are yet to be examined in Australia, a country where drug education in schools is mandatory. The serious game 'Pure Rush' was developed across three stages. First, formative consultation was conducted with 115 students (67% male, aged 15-17 years), followed by feasibility and acceptability testing of a prototype of the game (n = 25, 68% male). In the final stage, 281 students (62% female, aged 13-16 years) were randomly allocated to receive a lesson involving Pure Rush or an active control lesson. The lessons were compared in terms of learning outcomes, lesson engagement and future intentions to use illicit drugs. Students enjoyed playing Pure Rush, found the game age-appropriate and the information useful to them. Both the Pure Rush and the active control were associated with significant knowledge increase from pre to post-test. Among females, multi-level mixed-effects regression showed knowledge gain was greater in the Pure Rush condition compared to control (β = 2.36, 95% confidence interval 0.36-4.38). There was no evidence of between condition differences in lesson engagement or future intentions to use illicit drugs. Pure Rush is an innovative online drug education game that is well received by students and feasible to implement in schools. [Stapinski LA, Reda B, Newton NC, Lawler S, Rodriguez D, Chapman C, Teesson M. Development and evaluation of 'Pure Rush': An online serious game for drug education. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  4. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Laurent; Gego, Audrey; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Franetich, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier; Rametti, Armelle; Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Sauerwein, Robert; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Vaillant, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, Alan W; Snounou, Georges; Kocken, Clemens H M; Mazier, Dominique

    2011-03-31

    Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites. P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured. The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine. Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a practical medium

  5. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dembele

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites.P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured.The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine.Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a

  6. Evaluation of rational drug use based on World Health Organization core drug use indicators in selected public hospitals of eastern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Mekonnen; Mengistu, Getnet; Molla, Bereket; Amare, Firehiwot; Gabriel, Tesfaye

    2017-02-23

    Despite the complexity of drug use, a number of indicators have been developed, standardized and evaluated by the World Health Organization (WHO). These indicators are grouped in to three categories namely: prescribing indicators, patient care indicators and facility indicators. The study was aimed to evaluate rational drug use based on WHO-core drug use indicators in Dilchora referral hospital, Dire Dawa; Hiwot Fana specialized university hospital, Harar and Karamara general hospital, Jigjiga, eastern Ethiopia. Hospital based quantitative cross sectional study design was employed to evaluate rational drug use based on WHO core drug use indicators in selected hospitals. Systematic random sampling for prescribing indicators and convenient sampling for patient care indicators was employed. Taking WHO recommendations in to account, a total of 1,500 prescription papers (500 from each hospitals) were investigated. In each hospital, 200 outpatient attendants and 30 key essential drugs were also selected using the WHO recommendation. Data were collected using retrospective and prospective structured observational check list. Data were entered to EPI Data Version 3.1, exported and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Besides, the data were evaluated as per the WHO guidelines. Statistical significance was determined by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for some variables. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Finally, tabular presentation was used to present the data. Mean, 2.34 (±1.08) drugs were prescribed in the selected hospitals. Prescriptions containing antibiotics and that of injectables were 57.87 and 10.9% respectively. The average consultation and dispensing time were 276.5 s and 61.12 s respectively. Besides, 75.77% of the prescribed drugs were actually dispensed. Only 3.3% of prescriptions were adequately labeled and 75.7% patients know about the dosage of the prescription. Not more than, 20(66.7%) key drugs were available in

  7. Driving under the influence of drugs -- evaluation of analytical data of drugs in oral fluid, serum and urine, and correlation with impairment symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toennes, Stefan W; Kauert, Gerold F; Steinmeyer, Stefan; Moeller, Manfred R

    2005-09-10

    A study was performed to acquire urine, serum and oral fluid samples in cases of suspected driving under the influence of drugs of abuse. Oral fluid was collected using a novel sampling/testing device (Dräger DrugTest System). The aim of the study was to evaluate oral fluid and urine as a predictor of blood samples positive for drugs and impairment symptoms. Analysis for cannabinoids, amphetamine and its derivatives, opiates and cocaine was performed in urine using the Mahsan Kombi/DOA4-test, in serum using immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation and in oral fluid by GC-MS. Police and medical officer observations of impairment symptoms were rated and evaluated using a threshold value for the classification of driving inability. Accuracy in correlating drug detection in oral fluid and serum were >90% for all substances and also >90% in urine and serum except for THC (71.0%). Of the cases with oral fluid positive for any drug 97.1% of corresponding serum samples were also positive for at least one drug; of drug-positive urine samples this were only 82.4%. In 119 of 146 cases, impairment symptoms above threshold were observed (81.5%). Of the cases with drugs detected in serum, 19.1% appeared not impaired which were the same with drug-positive oral fluid while more persons with drug-positive urine samples appeared uninfluenced (32.7%). The data demonstrate that oral fluid is superior to urine in correlating with serum analytical data and impairment symptoms of drivers under the influence of drugs of abuse.

  8. Hazardous drug residue on exterior vial surfaces: evaluation of a commercial manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Luci A; Sessink, Paul J M; Gesy, Kathy; Charbonneau, Flay

    2014-04-01

    Hazardous drug residue on the exterior surface of drug vials poses a potential risk for exposure of health care workers involved in handling these products. The purpose of this article is to heighten the awareness of this serious issue and to evaluate a commercial manufacturing process for removing and containing hazardous drug (HD) residue on exterior vial surfaces. Additionally, findings from this study are interpreted, incorporated into the current body of evidence, and discussed by experts in this field. This study includes separate evaluations for the presence or absence of surface drug contamination on the vials of 3 HD products: 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and methotrexate. The drug products were packaged in vials using a patented prewashing/decontamination method, application of a polyvinylchloride (PVC) base, and use of clear glass vials. An additional step of encasing the vial in a shrink-wrapped sheath was used for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. Of all 5-fluorouracil (110 vials), methotrexate (60 vials), and cisplatin (60 vials) tested, only 2 had detectable amounts of surface residue. One 5-fluorouracil vial was found to have approximately 4 mg of 5-fluorouracil on the surface of the vial. The second contaminated vial was cisplatin, which was discovered to have 131 ng of platinum, equal to 200 ng of cisplatin or 0.2 μL of cisplatin solution, on the vial sheath. Using validated extraction and analytic methods, all but 2 of the 230 tested vials were found to be free of surface drug contamination. Pharmacy leaders need to take an active role in promoting the need for clean HD vials. Manufacturers should be required to provide their clients with data derived from externally validated analytic studies, reporting the level of HD contamination on the exterior of their vial products.

  9. [Evaluation of the medical value of a drug. A necessity for the Transparency Commission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avouac, B

    1992-01-01

    The marketing approval (AMM) is based on criteria of pharmaceutical quality, efficacy and safety of use. Before marketing, the data are collected by means of double-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trials that compare the study product to a reference product. A post-AMM assessment is needed to define the increase of the medical benefit (ASMR) and the therapeutic value of the new drugs. The quantification of the ASMR is essential for registration on the list of drugs reimbursable for those who benefit from Social Security. The evaluation of the therapeutic value and the nature of the affection treated are the criteria upon which the reimbursement ratio is chosen. After marketing, the reevaluation of the medical benefit and the drugs' usefulness may be compared to the treatment's net medical cost (direct + indirect cost--avoided cost) in cost/utility or cost/benefit studies. The Transparency Commission has worked out a scale of assessment of the ASMR which will orient recommendation, or non-recommendation, of registration on the list of reimbursable drugs as well as price fixing proposals. In the future, the Transparency Commission is to strengthen its position regarding the good use of the drug through a better prescriber information system. Thanks to the pharmaco-epidemiology and the pharmaco-vigilance data, the Transparency Commission will be able to guarantee the post-marketing follow-up of the drugs. The examination of the products' conditions of use, the reevaluation of the treatment's advantages based on the utility studies and the epidemiological surveys, and the cost-benefit studies will contribute to a medical control of health spending linked to drug consumption.

  10. A controlled evaluation of family behavior therapy in concurrent child neglect and drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Azrin, Nathan H; Bradshaw, Kelsey; Van Hasselt, Vincent B; Cross, Chad L; Urgelles, Jessica; Romero, Valerie; Hill, Heather H; Allen, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 50% of child protective service (CPS) referrals abuse drugs; yet, existing treatment studies in this population have been limited to case examinations. Therefore, a family-based behavioral therapy was evaluated in mothers referred from CPS for child neglect and drug abuse utilizing a controlled experimental design. Seventy-two mothers evidencing drug abuse or dependence and child neglect were randomly assigned to family behavior therapy (FBT) or treatment as usual (TAU). Participants were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 10 months postrandomization. As hypothesized, intent-to-treat repeated measures analyses revealed mothers referred for child neglect not due to their children being exposed to illicit drugs demonstrated better outcomes in child maltreatment potential from baseline to 6- and 10-month postrandomization assessments when assigned to FBT, as compared with TAU mothers and FBT mothers who were referred due to child drug exposure. Similar results occurred for hard drug use from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. However, TAU mothers referred due to child drug exposure were also found to decrease their hard drug use more than TAU mothers of non-drug-exposed children and FBT mothers of drug-exposed children at 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Although effect sizes for mothers assigned to FBT were slightly larger for marijuana use than TAU (medium vs. large), these differences were not statistically significant. Specific to secondary outcomes, mothers in FBT, relative to TAU, increased time employed from baseline to 6 and 10 months postrandomization. Mothers in FBT, compared to TAU, also decreased HIV risk from baseline to 6 months postrandomization. There were no differences in outcome between FBT and TAU for number of days children were in CPS custody and alcohol intoxication, although FBT mothers demonstrated marginal decreases (p = .058) in incarceration from baseline to 6 months postrandomization relative to TAU mothers

  11. Feasibility of abdominal plain film images in evaluation suspected drug smuggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sormaala, Markus J., E-mail: markus.sormaala@welho.com [Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Salonen, Hanna-Mari, E-mail: hanna-mari.salonen@hus.fi [Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Ville M., E-mail: ville.mattila@uta.fi [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Trauma, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Kivisaari, Arto, E-mail: arto.kivisaari@hus.fi [Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Autti, Taina, E-mail: taina.autti@hus.fi [Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: Drug smuggling in the gastrointestinal tract has soared within the last 20 years. Though illegal substances in the gastrointestinal tract can be visualized with ultrasound, MRI and CT, the abdominal radiograph has by far remained the most frequently used way of detecting smuggled drugs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the inter-radiologist interpretation error and the reliability of the abdominal radiograph in detecting smuggled drugs. Materials and methods: A total of 279 abdominal radiographs of suspected smugglers were classified by three radiologists as clearly positive or negative for drug smuggling. All available information about the cases was collected from the customs officers and police. Results: Out of these cases 203 (73%) were interpreted as negative and 35 (13%) as positive by all three radiologists. In 86% of the cases there was, therefore, an inter-radiological agreement in interpreting the images. In 41 (14%) cases, however, there was an inter-radiologist disagreement. Kappa-value for inter-observer variability was 0.70. Conclusions: In up to a seventh of the abdominal radiographs the interpretation can be challenging even for an experienced radiologist. False positive interpretation can lead to innocent passengers being detained in vain. As negatively interpreted images usually result in releasing of the suspect, there is no way of knowing how many false negative occur. This makes the abdominal radiograph a suboptimal examination, and low dose CT should be considered as the screening modality for gastrointestinal drug smugglers.

  12. Feasibility of abdominal plain film images in evaluation suspected drug smuggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sormaala, Markus J.; Salonen, Hanna-Mari; Mattila, Ville M.; Kivisaari, Arto; Autti, Taina

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Drug smuggling in the gastrointestinal tract has soared within the last 20 years. Though illegal substances in the gastrointestinal tract can be visualized with ultrasound, MRI and CT, the abdominal radiograph has by far remained the most frequently used way of detecting smuggled drugs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the inter-radiologist interpretation error and the reliability of the abdominal radiograph in detecting smuggled drugs. Materials and methods: A total of 279 abdominal radiographs of suspected smugglers were classified by three radiologists as clearly positive or negative for drug smuggling. All available information about the cases was collected from the customs officers and police. Results: Out of these cases 203 (73%) were interpreted as negative and 35 (13%) as positive by all three radiologists. In 86% of the cases there was, therefore, an inter-radiological agreement in interpreting the images. In 41 (14%) cases, however, there was an inter-radiologist disagreement. Kappa-value for inter-observer variability was 0.70. Conclusions: In up to a seventh of the abdominal radiographs the interpretation can be challenging even for an experienced radiologist. False positive interpretation can lead to innocent passengers being detained in vain. As negatively interpreted images usually result in releasing of the suspect, there is no way of knowing how many false negative occur. This makes the abdominal radiograph a suboptimal examination, and low dose CT should be considered as the screening modality for gastrointestinal drug smugglers

  13. Evaluating the administration costs of biologic drugs: development of a cost algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Ebenezer K; Morris, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Biologic drugs, as with all other medical technologies, are subject to a number of regulatory, marketing, reimbursement (financing) and other demand-restricting hurdles applied by healthcare payers. One example is the routine use of cost-effectiveness analyses or health technology assessments to determine which medical technologies offer value-for-money. The manner in which these assessments are conducted suggests that, holding all else equal, the economic value of biologic drugs may be determined by how much is spent on administering these drugs or trade-offs between drug acquisition and administration costs. Yet, on the supply-side, it seems very little attention is given to how manufacturing and formulation choices affect healthcare delivery costs. This paper evaluates variations in the administration costs of biologic drugs, taking care to ensure consistent inclusion of all relevant cost resources. From this, it develops a regression-based algorithm with which manufacturers could possibly predict, during process development, how their manufacturing and formulation choices may impact on the healthcare delivery costs of their products.

  14. Impact of the Mass Drug Administration for malaria in response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregawi, Maru; Smith, Samuel J; Sillah-Kanu, Musa; Seppeh, John; Kamara, Anitta R Y; Williams, Ryan O; Aponte, John J; Bosman, Andrea; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-09-20

    As emergency response to the Ebola epidemic, the Government of Sierra Leone and its partners implemented a large-scale Mass Drug Administration (MDA) with artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) covering >2.7 million people in the districts hardest hit by Ebola during December 2014-January 2015. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) evaluated the impact of the MDA on malaria morbidity at health facilities and the number of Ebola alerts received at District Ebola Command Centres. The coverage of the two rounds of MDA with ASAQ was estimated by relating the number anti-malarial medicines distributed to the estimated resident population. Segmented time-series analysis was applied to weekly data collected from 49 primary health units (PHUs) and 11 hospitals performing malaria parasitological testing during the study period, to evaluate trends of malaria cases and Ebola alerts during the post-MDA weeks compared to the pre-MDA weeks in MDA- and non-MDA-cheifdoms. After two rounds of the MDA, the number of suspected cases tested with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) decreased significantly by 43 % (95 % CI 38-48 %) at week 1 and remained low at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA and at week 1 and 3 post-second MDA; RDT positive cases decreased significantly by 47 % (41-52 %) at week 1 post-first and remained lower throughout all post-MDA weeks; and the RDT test positivity rate (TPR) declined by 35 % (32-38 %) at week 2 and stayed low throughout all post-MDA weeks. The total malaria (clinical + confirmed) cases decreased significantly by 45 % (39-52 %) at week 1 and were lower at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA; and week 1 post-second MDA. The proportion of confirmed malaria cases (out of all-outpatients) fell by 33 % (29-38 %) at week 1 post-first MDA and were lower during all post-MDA weeks. On the contrary, the non-malaria outpatient cases (cases due to other health conditions) either remained unchanged or fluctuated insignificantly

  15. Usefulness of zebrafish larvae to evaluate drug-induced functional and morphological renal tubular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgulho, Rita; Jacinto, Raquel; Lopes, Susana S; Pereira, Sofia A; Tranfield, Erin M; Martins, Gabriel G; Gualda, Emilio J; Derks, Rico J E; Correia, Ana C; Steenvoorden, Evelyne; Pintado, Petra; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Monteiro, Emilia C; Morello, Judit

    2018-01-01

    Prediction and management of drug-induced renal injury (DIRI) rely on the knowledge of the mechanisms of drug insult and on the availability of appropriate animal models to explore it. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers unique advantages for assessing DIRI because the larval pronephric kidney has a high homology with its human counterpart and it is fully mature at 3.5 days post-fertilization. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the usefulness of zebrafish larvae as a model of renal tubular toxicity through a comprehensive analysis of the renal alterations induced by the lethal concentrations for 10% of the larvae for gentamicin, paracetamol and tenofovir. We evaluated drug metabolic profile by mass spectrometry, renal function with the inulin clearance assay, the 3D morphology of the proximal convoluted tubule by two-photon microscopy and the ultrastructure of proximal convoluted tubule mitochondria by transmission electron microscopy. Paracetamol was metabolized by conjugation and oxidation with further detoxification with glutathione. Renal clearance was reduced with gentamicin and paracetamol. Proximal tubules were enlarged with paracetamol and tenofovir. All drugs induced mitochondrial alterations including dysmorphic shapes ("donuts", "pancakes" and "rods"), mitochondrial swelling, cristae disruption and/or loss of matrix granules. These results are in agreement with the tubular effects of gentamicin, paracetamol and tenofovir in man and demonstrate that zebrafish larvae might be a good model to assess functional and structural damage associated with DIRI.

  16. Is Project Towards No Drug Abuse (Project TND) an evidence-based drug and violence prevention program? A review and reappraisal of the evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dennis M

    2014-08-01

    This paper critically reviews the published evidence pertaining to Project Towards No Drug Abuse (Project TND). Publications from seven evaluation studies of Project TND are reviewed, and the results from these are discussed as related to the following outcomes: main effects on the use of cigarettes, alcohol and marijuana; main effects on the use of "hard drugs," defined in the evaluations as cocaine, hallucinogens, stimulants, inhalants, ecstasy and other drugs (e.g., depressants, PCP, steroids and heroin); subgroup and interaction analyses of drug use; and violence-related behaviors. Very few main effects have been found for cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use in the Project TND evaluations. While studies do report main effects for hard drug use, these findings are subject to numerous threats to validity and may be attributable to the data analyses employed. Similarly, while isolated subgroup and interaction effects were found for alcohol use among baseline nonusers and some violence-related behaviors in the early Project TND evaluations, these findings have not been replicated in more recent studies and may result from multiple comparisons between study conditions. In conclusion, there is little evidence to support the assertion that Project TND is an effective drug or violence prevention program. The broader implications of these findings for prevention science are discussed and suggestions are made as to how the quality of research in the field might be improved.

  17. Illicit drug exposure in patients evaluated for alleged child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Resmiye; Bayman, Levent; Assad, Abraham; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Buhrow, Jakob; Austin, Andrea; Bayman, Emine O

    2011-06-01

    Substantiation of drug exposure in cases with alleged maltreatment is important to provide proper treatment and services to these children and their families. A study performed at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics showed that 30% of pediatric patients with burn injuries, which were due to child maltreatment, were also exposed to illicit drugs. The children presenting to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics with alleged maltreatment have been tested for illicit substances since 2004. The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of illicit drug exposure in the pediatric subpopulation admitted to pediatric inpatient and outpatient units for an evaluation for abuse/neglect. The study design is a retrospective chart review. Using hospital databases, every pediatric chart with a child abuse/neglect allegation was retrieved. The association between risk factors and clinical presentation and illicit drug test result was assessed. Excel and SAS were used for statistical analysis. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct this study. Six hundred sixty-five charts met study inclusion criteria for child abuse/neglect allegation. Of those, 232 cases were tested for illicit drugs between 2004 and 2008 per the testing protocol. Thirty-four cases (14.7%) tested positive on a drug test. Positive test rates based on clinical presentation were 28.6% (18/63) in neglect cases, 16.1% (5/31) in cases with soft tissue injuries, 14.3% (4/28) in burn injuries, 10.0% (2/20) in cases with sexual abuse, 7.1% (2/28) in cases with fractures, and 4.8% (3/62) in abusive head trauma cases. There were long-term abuse findings in 129 children (55.6%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that positive drug testing was most significantly associated with clinical symptoms suggesting physical abuse or neglect versus sexual abuse (odds ratio [OR] = 6.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-35.49; P = 0.026), no or public health insurance versus those with

  18. The law on the streets: Evaluating the impact of Mexico's drug decriminalization reform on drug possession arrests in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, J; Gaines, T; Manian, S; Vilalta, C; Bañuelos, A; Strathdee, S A; Beletsky, L

    2018-04-01

    In 2009, Mexican Federal Government enacted "narcomenudeo" reforms decriminalizing possession of small amounts of drugs, delegating prosecution of retail drug sales to the state courts, and mandating treatment diversion for habitual drug users. There has been insufficient effort to formally assess the decriminalization policy's population-level impact, despite mounting interest in analagous reforms across the globe. Using a dataset of municipal police incident reports, we examined patterns of drug possession, and violent and non-violent crime arrests between January 2009 and December 2014. A hierarchical panel data analysis with random effects was conducted to assess the impact of narcomenudeo's drug decriminalization provision. The reforms had no significant impact on the number of drug possession or violent crime arrests, after controlling for other variables (e.g. time trends, electoral cycles, and precinct-level socioeconomic factors). Time periods directly preceding local elections were observed to be statistically associated with elevated arrest volume. Analysis of police statistics parallel prior findings that Mexico's reform decriminalizing small amounts of drugs does not appear to have significantly shifted drug law enforcement in Tijuana. More research is required to fully understand the policy transformation process for drug decriminalization and other structural interventions in Mexico and similar regional and international efforts. Observed relationship between policing and political cycles echo associations in other settings whereby law-and-order activities increase during mayoral electoral campaigns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of a Potential Metabolism-Mediated Drug-Drug Interaction Between Atomoxetine and Bupropion in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Ioana; Popa, Adina; Neag, Maria; Muntean, Dana; Bocsan, Corina; Buzoianu, Anca; Vlase, Laurian; Gheldiu, Ana-Maria; Briciu, Corina

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of bupropion on the pharmacokinetic profile of atomoxetine and its main active metabolite (glucuronidated form), 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, in healthy volunteers. An open-label, non-randomized, two-period, sequential clinical trial was conducted as follows: during Period I (Reference), each volunteer received a single oral dose of 25 mg atomoxetine, whilst during Period II (Test), a combination of 25 mg atomoxetine and 300 mg bupropion was administered to all volunteers, after a pretreatment regimen with bupropion for 7 days. Next, after determining atomoxetine and 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide plasma concentrations, their pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a noncompartmental method and subsequently compared to determine any statistically significant differences between the two periods. Bupropion intake influenced all the pharmacokinetic parameters of both atomoxetine and its metabolite. For atomoxetine, Cmax increased from 226±96.1 to 386±137 ng/mL and more importantly, AUC0-∞ was significantly increasedfrom 1580±1040 to 8060±4160 ng*h/mL, while the mean t1/2 was prolonged after bupropion pretreatment. For 4-hydroxyatomoxetine-O-glucuronide, Cmax and AUC0-∞  were decreased from 707±269 to 212±145 ng/mL and from 5750±1240 to 3860±1220 ng*h/mL, respectively. These results demonstrated that the effect of bupropion on CYP2D6 activity was responsible for an increased systemic exposure to atomoxetine (5.1-fold) and also for a decreased exposure to its main metabolite (1.5-fold). Additional studies are required in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of this pharmacokinetic drug interaction.This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  20. The political and scientific challenges in evaluating compulsory drug treatment centers in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, Thu; Nguyen, Nhu; Le, Giang; Shanahan, Marian; Ali, Robert; Ritter, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Background In Vietnam, like many countries in Southeast Asia, the commonly used approach of center-based compulsory drug treatment (CCT) has been criticized on human rights ground. Meanwhile, community-based voluntary methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been implemented for nearly a decade with promising results. Reform-minded leaders have been seeking empirical evidence of the costs and effectiveness associated with these two main treatment modalities. Conducting evaluations of these t...

  1. Evaluation of new drugs in daily clinical practice: anti-TNF alpha in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Kievit, W.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to explore the value and the validity of data collected in daily clinical practice for drug evaluation and cost-effectiveness studies, using data collected on TNFa blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis. First, the need for and value of information from daily clinical practice was researched. Together, the results of Chapters 3, 4 and 5 illustrated that treatment of RA patients with anti-TNFa blocking agents in daily clinical practice was different from what ...

  2. A computerized stroop test for the evaluation of psychotropic drugs in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Raveendranadh; Naidu, Mur; Pingali, Usha Rani; Shobha, J C; Reddy, A Praveen

    2013-04-01

    The Stroop paradigm evaluates susceptibility to interference and is sensitive to dysfunction in frontal lobes and drug effects. The aim of the present study was to establish a simple and reliable computerized version of Stroop color-word test, which can be used for screening of various psychotropic drugs. The standardized method was followed in all cases, by recording the reaction time (RT) in msec in 24 healthy participants using computerized version of Stroop color-word test. Reproducibility of the test procedure was evaluated by recording the RTs by a single experimenter on two sessions (interday reproducibility). Validity of the model was further tested by evaluating the psychotropic effect of Zolpidem 5 mg, Caffeine 500 mg, or Placebo on 24 healthy subjects in a randomized, double blind three-way crossover design. The method was found to produce low variability with coefficient of variation less than 10%. Interday reproducibility was very good as shown by Bland-Altman plot with most of the values within ±2SD. There was a significant increase in RTs in Stroop performance with Zolpidem at 1 hr and 2 hrs; in contrast, caffeine significantly decreased RTs in Stroop performance at 1 hr only compared to placebo. The Stroop color-word recording and analysis system is simple, sensitive to centrally acting drug effects, and has potential for future experimental psychomotor assessment studies.

  3. Evaluation of the physicochemical properties of liposomes as potential carriers of anticancer drugs: spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pentak, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle size and composition are a critical parameter for determining the circulation half-life of liposomes. Size influences the degree of drug encapsulation in liposomes. The geometry, size, and properties of liposomes in an aqueous environment have to be described to enable potential applications of liposome systems as drug carriers. The characteristics of multiple thermotropic phase transitions are also an important consideration in liposomes used for analytical and bioanalytical purposes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of liposomes which accommodate hydrophilic and amphiphilic drugs used in cancer therapy. The studied liposomes were prepared with the involvement of the modified reverse-phase evaporation method (mREV). The prepared liposomes had a diameter of 70–150 nm. The analyzed compounds were 1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide. In literature, there is no information about simultaneous incorporation of cytarabine, ifosfamide, and cyclophosphamide, in spite of the fact that these drugs have been used for more than 30 years. A combination of the examined drugs is used in CODOX-M/IVAC therapy. CODOX-M/IVAC (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine) is one of the currently preferred intensive-dose chemotherapy regimens for Burkitt lymphoma (BL). The present research demonstrates the pioneering studies of incorporation of ifosfamide into liposome vesicles, location of and competition between the analyzed drugs and liposome vesicles. The applied methods were nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).Graphical Abstract.

  4. Evaluation of the physicochemical properties of liposomes as potential carriers of anticancer drugs: spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentak, Danuta, E-mail: danuta.pentak@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Department of Materials Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemistry (Poland)

    2016-05-15

    Vesicle size and composition are a critical parameter for determining the circulation half-life of liposomes. Size influences the degree of drug encapsulation in liposomes. The geometry, size, and properties of liposomes in an aqueous environment have to be described to enable potential applications of liposome systems as drug carriers. The characteristics of multiple thermotropic phase transitions are also an important consideration in liposomes used for analytical and bioanalytical purposes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of liposomes which accommodate hydrophilic and amphiphilic drugs used in cancer therapy. The studied liposomes were prepared with the involvement of the modified reverse-phase evaporation method (mREV). The prepared liposomes had a diameter of 70–150 nm. The analyzed compounds were 1-β-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide. In literature, there is no information about simultaneous incorporation of cytarabine, ifosfamide, and cyclophosphamide, in spite of the fact that these drugs have been used for more than 30 years. A combination of the examined drugs is used in CODOX-M/IVAC therapy. CODOX-M/IVAC (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, high-dose methotrexate/ifosfamide, etoposide, and high-dose cytarabine) is one of the currently preferred intensive-dose chemotherapy regimens for Burkitt lymphoma (BL). The present research demonstrates the pioneering studies of incorporation of ifosfamide into liposome vesicles, location of and competition between the analyzed drugs and liposome vesicles. The applied methods were nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).Graphical Abstract.

  5. Comprehensive evaluation of carboxylated nanodiamond as a topical drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae Gon; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Eunah; Lim, Sun Hee; Ricci, Jeremy; Sung, Si Kwon; Kwon, Myoung Taek; Jeong, Seong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The best strategy in the development of topical drug delivery systems may be to facilitate the permeation of drugs without any harmful effects, while staying on the skin surface and maintaining stability of the system. Nanodiamonds (NDs) play a key role with their excellent physicochemical properties, including high biocompatibility, physical adsorption, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capability, and photostabilizing activity. Z-average sizes of carboxylated ND (ND-COOH) agglutinate decreased significantly as the pH increased. Fluorescein-conjugated ND was observed only on the stratum corneum, and no sample diffused into the dermal layer even after 48 hours. Moreover, ND-COOH and ND-COOH/eugenol complex did not show significant toxic effects on murine macrophage cells. ND improved in vitro skin permeation >50% acting as a "drug reservoir" to maintain a high drug concentration in the donor chamber, which was supported by quartz crystal microbalance results. Moreover, ND-COOH could adsorb a drug amount equivalent to 80% of its own weight. A photostability study showed that ND-COOH increased the photostability ~47% with regard to rate constant of the eugenol itself. A significant decrease in ROS was observed in the ND-COOH and ND-COOH/eugenol complex compared with the negative control during intracellular ROS assay. Moreover, ROS and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity evaluation showed that ND-COOH had synergistic effects of antioxidation with eugenol. Therefore, ND-COOH could be used as an excellent topical drug delivery system with improved permeability, higher stability, and minimized safety issue.

  6. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-06-01

    Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940's, and during the last 10-15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d -amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence.

  7. Evaluation of Tissue Interactions with Mechanical Elements of a Transscleral Drug Delivery Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Borenstein

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to evaluate tissue-device interactions due to implantation of a mechanically operated drug delivery system onto the posterior sclera. Two test devices were designed and fabricated to model elements of the drug delivery device—one containing a free-spinning ball bearing and the other encasing two articulating gears. Openings in the base of test devices modeled ports for drug passage from device to sclera. Porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membranes were attached to half of the gear devices to minimize tissue ingrowth through these ports. Test devices were sutured onto rabbit eyes for 10 weeks. Tissue-device interactions were evaluated histologically and mechanically after removal to determine effects on device function and changes in surrounding tissue. Test devices were generally well-tolerated during residence in the animal. All devices encouraged fibrous tissue formation between the sclera and the device, fibrous tissue encapsulation and invasion around the device, and inflammation of the conjunctiva. Gear devices encouraged significantly greater inflammation in all cases and a larger rate of tissue ingrowth. PTFE membranes prevented tissue invasion through the covered drug ports, though tissue migrated in through other smaller openings. The torque required to turn the mechanical elements increased over 1000 times for gear devices, but only on the order of 100 times for membrane-covered gear devices and less than 100 times for ball bearing devices. Maintaining a lower device profile, minimizing microscale motion on the eye surface and covering drug ports with a porous membrane may minimize inflammation, decreasing the risk of damage to surrounding tissues and minimizing disruption of device operation.

  8. Efficacy evaluation of the school program Unplugged for drug use prevention among Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zila M. Sanchez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most Brazilian schools do not have a continuous program for drug use prevention and do not conduct culturally adapted activities for that purpose. This study evaluated the impact of the Unplugged program on drug use prevention among children and adolescents in public middle schools of Brazil. Methods A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2013 with 2185 students in 16 public schools from 3 Brazilian cities. The intervention group attended 12 weekly classes of the Unplugged program for drug use prevention, and the control group did not attend to any school prevention programs in the same year. Multilevel analyses were used to evaluate temporal and between group changes in the consumption of each drug. Results The study suggested that there was no evidence that Unplugged effected 11- to 12-year-old students. However, the program seemed to stimulate a decrease in recent marijuana use (transition from use to non-use in 85.7% of intervention cases and 28.6% of control cases, OR = 17.5, p = 0.039 among 13- to 15-year-old students. In addition, students in this age range who received the Unplugged program had similar drug consumption levels to those observed before the program began. However, students in the control group presented a significant tendency to increase marijuana use and binge drinking. Conclusions This study adds to the evidence of program efficacy among Brazilian middle school students by presenting marginal effects on binge drinking and marijuana use. An 18-month randomized controlled trial is recommended for a future study.

  9. Reducing the Risk of Drug Involvement among Early Adolescents: An Evaluation of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Michele Alicia

    1993-01-01

    DARE's effectiveness in Charleston County (South Carolina) was studied by comparing 341 DARE to 367 non-DARE fifth-grade students. DARE teaches students to recognize and resist social pressures to use drugs. DARE has positive impacts on anti-substance abuse attitudes, assertiveness, positive peer association, association with drug-using peers, and…

  10. Metabolic Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Considering its advantages over the other chemical synthesis routes ... such as an anti-malarial drug (artemesinin), chemicals required as the raw ... Assistant Professor at. Symbiosis ... research interests are in ... Synthetic biology, commodity.

  11. Evaluation of the functionality of biodegradable polymeric platforms for drug delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gioti, M., E-mail: mgiot@physics.auth.gr; Karagkiozaki, V.; Basgiouraki, A.; Karagiannidis, P.G.; Logothetidis, S.

    2013-09-15

    We present the development of a drug-loaded triple-layer platform consisting of thin film biodegradable polymers, in a properly designed form for the desired gradual degradation. Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA (65:35), PLGA (75:25)) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were grown by spin coating technique, to synthesize the platforms with the order PCL/PLGA (75:25)/PLGA (65:35) that determine their degradation rates. The outer PLGA (65:35) layer was loaded with dipyridamole, an antiplatelet drug. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the Vis-far UV range was used to determine the nanostructure, as well as the content of the incorporated drug in the as-grown platforms. In situ and real-time SE measurements were carried out using a liquid cell for the dynamic evaluation of the fibrinogen and albumin protein adsorption processes. Atomic force microscopy studies justified the SE results concerning the nanopores formation in the polymeric platforms, and the dominant adsorption mechanisms of the proteins, which were defined by the drug incorporation in the platforms.

  12. In vitro evaluation of paclitaxel loaded amorphous chitin nanoparticles for colon cancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, K T; Anitha, A; Furuike, T; Tamura, H; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-04-01

    Chitin and its derivatives have been widely used in drug delivery applications due to its biocompatible, biodegradable and non-toxic nature. In this study, we have developed amorphous chitin nanoparticles (150±50 nm) and evaluated its potential as a drug delivery system. Paclitaxel (PTX), a major chemotherapeutic agent was loaded into amorphous chitin nanoparticles (AC NPs) through ionic cross-linking reaction using TPP. The prepared PTX loaded AC NPs had an average diameter of 200±50 nm. Physico-chemical characterization of the prepared nanoparticles was carried out. These nanoparticles were proven to be hemocompatible and in vitro drug release studies showed a sustained release of PTX. Cellular internalization of the NPs was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy as well as by flow cytometry. Anticancer activity studies proved the toxicity of PTX-AC NPs toward colon cancer cells. These preliminary results indicate the potential of PTX-AC NPs in colon cancer drug delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug repurposing: a systematic approach to evaluate candidate oral neuroprotective interventions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M Vesterinen

    Full Text Available To develop and implement an evidence based framework to select, from drugs already licenced, candidate oral neuroprotective drugs to be tested in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.Systematic review of clinical studies of oral putative neuroprotective therapies in MS and four other neurodegenerative diseases with shared pathological features, followed by systematic review and meta-analyses of the in vivo experimental data for those interventions. We presented summary data to an international multi-disciplinary committee, which assessed each drug in turn using pre-specified criteria including consideration of mechanism of action.We identified a short list of fifty-two candidate interventions. After review of all clinical and pre-clinical evidence we identified ibudilast, riluzole, amiloride, pirfenidone, fluoxetine, oxcarbazepine, and the polyunsaturated fatty-acid class (Linoleic Acid, Lipoic acid; Omega-3 fatty acid, Max EPA oil as lead candidates for clinical evaluation.We demonstrate a standardised and systematic approach to candidate identification for drug rescue and repurposing trials that can be applied widely to neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Self-microemulsifying drug delivery system for improved oral bioavailability of dipyridamole: preparation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhong, Haijun; He, Jing; Xie, Baogang; Liu, Fen; Xu, Helin; Liu, Minmin; Xu, Chunlian

    2011-07-01

    Dipyridamole shows poor and variable bioavailability after oral administration due to pHdependent solubility, low biomembrane permeability as well as being a substrate of P-glycoprotein. In order to improve the oral absorption of dipyridamole, a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for dipyridamole was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The optimum formulation was 18% oleic acid, 12% Labrafac lipophile WL 1349, 42% Solutol HS 15 and 28% isopropyl alcohol. It was found that the performance of self-microemulsification with the combination of oleic acid and Labrafac lipophile WL 1349 increased compared with just one oil. The results obtained from an in vitro dissolution assay indicated that dipyridamole in SMEDDS dissolved rapidly and completely in pH 6.8 aqueous media, while the commercial drug tablet was less soluble. An oral bioavailability study in rats showed that dipyridamole in the SMEDDS formulation had a 2.06-fold increased absorption compared with the simple drug suspension. It was evident that SMEDDS may be an effective approach to improve the oral absorption for drugs having pH-dependent solubility.

  15. Evaluation of a needle social marketing strategy to control HIV among injecting drug users in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zunyou; Luo, Wei; Sullivan, Sheena G; Rou, Keming; Lin, Peng; Liu, Wei; Ming, Zhongqiang

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a needle social marketing strategy to reduce needle sharing and hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV transmission among injecting drug users (IDU) in China. Two-armed, prospective, community-randomized prevention trial. Four counties/townships in Guangxi and Guangdong provinces; one randomized to intervention the other to control in each province. Injecting drug users: 823 (443 intervention, 382 control) at baseline and 852 (415 intervention, 407 control) at the second cross-sectional survey 12 months later. A needle social marketing programme, including promotion of safe injection norms and increased access to clean needles over a 12 month period. Cross sectional surveys at baseline and follow-up compared changes in drug using behaviours and HIV and HCV rates in the intervention and control communities. Needle sharing behaviours were similar in the two groups at baseline (68.4 vs. 67.8%), and dropped significantly to 35.3% in the intervention community and remained relatively stable in the control community (62.3%; P marketing can reduce risky injecting behaviour and HIV/HCV transmission among injecting drug users in China and should be expanded.

  16. Development, Characterization and Evaluation of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as a potential Anticancer Drug Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meghavi

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) consist of spherical solid lipid particles in the nanometer size range, which are dispersed in water or in an aqueous surfactant solution. SLN technology represents a promising new approach to deliver hydrophilic as well as lipophilic drugs. The commercialization of SLN technology remains limited despite numerous efforts from researchers. The purpose of this research was to advance SLN preparation methodology by investigating the feasibility of preparing glyceryl monostearate (GMS) nanoparticles by using three preparation methods namely microemulsion technique, magnetic stirring technique and temperature modulated solidification technique of which the latter two were developed in our laboratory. An anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil was incorporated in the SLNs prepared via the temperature modulated solidification process. Optimization of the magnetic stirring process was performed to evaluate how the physicochemical properties of the SLN was influenced by systematically varying process parameters including concentration of the lipid, concentration of the surfactant, type of surfactant, time of stirring and temperature of storage. The results demonstrated 1:2 GMS to tween 80 ratio, 150 ml dispersion medium and 45 min stirring at 4000 RPM speed provided an optimum formulation via the temperature modulated solidification process. SLN dispersions were lyophilized to stabilize the solid lipid nanoparticles and the lyophilizates exhibited good redispersibility. The SLNs were characterized by particle size analysis via dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), drug encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies. Particle size of SLN dispersion prepared via the three preparation techniques was approximately 66 nm and that of redispersed lyophilizates was below 500 nm. TEM images showed spherical to oval particles that were less dense in the core

  17. Evaluation of Patients Hospitalized in Intensive Care Unit Due to Drug-Related Suicide Attempt and Access to Drugs: A Single Center Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Doğu Geyik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to evaluate patients who were hospitalized in our intensive care unit due to drug-related suicide attempt (medical or insecticides and their access to these drugs. Methods: We prospectively recorded the demographic characteristics and medical data of 50 patients (32 females and 18 males who were hospitalized in our intensive care unit due to drug-related suicide attempt. Results: 66% of subjects were between the ages of 15 and 24 years with a mean age of 25.4±8.8 years. Multiple drug overdose was observed in 28% of patients. The unemployment rate was higher for women than men (p<0.001. Men obtained drugs from pharmacy more often than women (27.8% vs 6.2%, p=0,03. Of the patients, 86% got the drugs from home medicine cabinet while this rate was 93% among women (n=30. The level of toxicity was higher among patients who got the drugs from pharmacy than in those who used drugs at home (p=0.06. The length of stay in the intensive care unit was longer among patients with toxic level of medication (p=0.001. Conclusion: Patients usually use drugs or insecticides available at home to commit suicide. We believe that in patients with risk of suicide attempt, access to drugs should be limited and state regulations should be applied. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52:111-5

  18. Comparative evaluation of polymersome versus micelle structures as vehicles for the controlled release of drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alibolandi, Mona [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Biotechnology Research Center, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezani, Mohammad; Abnous, Khalil [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Pharmaceutical Research Center, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Fatemeh, E-mail: sadeghif@mums.ac.ir [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Targeted Drug Delivery Research Center, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadizadeh, Farzin, E-mail: hadizadehf@mums.ac.ir [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Biotechnology Research Center, School of Pharmacy (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Di-block copolymers composed of two biocompatible polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(d,l-lactide), were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization for the preparation of doxorubicin-loaded self-assembled nanostructures, including polymeric vesicles (polymersomes) and micelles. The capability and stability of the nanostructures prepared for the controlled release of DOX are discussed in this paper. The in vitro drug release at 37 °C was evaluated up to 6 days at pH 7.4 and 5.5 and in the presence of 50 % FBS. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity effect of both formulations were also evaluated in the MCF-7 cell line. The SEM and AFM images confirmed the hollow spherical structure of the polymersomes and the solid round structures of the micelles. The TEM results also revealed the uniformity in size and shape of the drug-loaded micelle and polymersome nanostructures. The DOX-loaded micelles and polymersomes presented efficient anticancer performance, as verified by flow cytometry and MTT assay tests. The most important finding of this study is that the prepared nanopolymersomes presented significant increases in the doxorubicin encapsulation efficiency and the stability of the formulation in comparison with the micelle formulation. In vitro studies revealed that polymersomes may be stable in the blood circulation and meet the requirements for an effective drug delivery system.

  19. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kejian, E-mail: kejian.wang.bio@gmail.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Zuquan [Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki (Japan); Sun, Liya [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); He, Lin, E-mail: helin@Bio-X.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  20. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development

  1. Evaluation and appraisal of drug information services in a rural secondary level care hospital, Anantapur, AP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Bhavsar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug Information Center (DIC is an information center which provides drug information (DI to healthcare professionals. The aim was to evaluate the performance of DIC for improving the quality and quantity of information services provided to the healthcare professionals. The service was provided free of cost to the customers. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted for the period of 6 months from February to August 2011 excluding May due to vacation. Customers were asked: how did they find the service provided to them? Was it good, satisfactory, or need improvement? There were written feedback forms to be filled by the customers, including customer satisfaction questions. The official publication of the DIC, RIPER PDIC Bulletin was screened for its types of articles/number of drug news published. The bulletin is circulated for free to the healthcare professionals electronically. Results and Discussion: A total of 232 queries were obtained during the study period of 6 months. Average number of queried received to the DIC was 39 per month. Most preferred mode of queries was personal access (89%. Majority of queries were received from nurses, i.e., 162 (70% queries and 81% of all queries were drug oriented for improving knowledge. There were only 19% of the queries for individual patients; doctors asked most of those queries. Only 3% queries answered were rated as need improvement by the healthcare professionals. Rest were considered as either Good (56% or satisfactory (49%. Range of drug news published in each bulletin was 3-4 and most of the other articles include expert opinion to improve practice or training. Conclusion: The DI services were satisfactorily used for academic interests. Nurses used the service for the highest compared to other health care professionals. Future studies should plan to establish the usefulness of DI to improve healthcare practice.

  2. The American Medicine Chest Challenge: Evaluation of a Drug Take-Back and Disposal Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovitzky, Itzhak

    2016-07-01

    Prescription drug take-back programs provide a safe and convenient way to dispose of expired, unwanted, or unused medications that people store in homes, thus limiting the potential misuse of prescription drugs. This study evaluated public response to a social marketing campaign promoting a community-based drug take-back program, the American Medicine Chest Challenge. A telephone survey was conducted with a representative sample of adults in New Jersey (N = 906) 2 weeks following the conclusion of the statewide collection day event in November 2010. The survey assessed public exposure to the campaign and the extent to which it is associated with public perceptions and behaviors the campaign was designed to influence. The campaign, which relied heavily on community channels for the dissemination of messages, was able to reach directly more than 60% of its target audience. When potential confounders were controlled for, campaign exposure was a strong predictor of a respondent having one or more conversations with others about medicine disposal (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, 95% CI [1.5, 3.6]); actually disposing of expired, unwanted, or unused medicine in a collection site (OR = 2.14, 95% CI [1.15, 3.9]); and talking to kids about the dangers of prescription drug abuse (OR = 1.65, 95% CI [1.1, 2.45])-all of which were exclusively promoted through the campaign. This case illustrates the potential efficacy of community-based prevention marketing efforts to stimulate community discourse regarding the dangers of prescription drug misuse and to decrease the availability of expired, unwanted, or unused medicine in the community.

  3. Evaluation of anti-GERD activity of gastro retentive drug delivery system of itopride hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Trilochan; Panda, Prasana K; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2010-08-01

    The present work describes the formulation and evaluation of the gastroretentive system of Itopride hydrochloride. In this research, we have formulated floating hydrogel-based microspheres employing calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) as a gas forming agent dispersed in alginate matrix. In vitro characterizations such as drug content, particle size, and drug release were carried out. GI motility was determined by administration of charcoal meal to rats. Results demonstrated that prepared microspheres were spherical in shape with smooth surface, good loading efficiency, and excellent buoyancy. The gastro retentive dosage form of itiopride demonstrated significant antacid, anti-ulcer, and anti-GERD activity after 12 hours in comparison with the conventional dosage form.

  4. Development of gellan gum containing formulations for transdermal drug delivery: Component evaluation and controlled drug release using temperature responsive nanogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Moran, Carlos A; Zavgorodnya, Oleksandra; Penman, Andrew D; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Bridges, S Louis; Hergenrother, Robert W; Singh, Jasvinder A; Wick, Timothy M

    2016-07-25

    Enhancing skin permeation is important for development of new transdermal drug delivery formulations. This is particularly relevant for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To address this, semisolid gel and solid hydrogel film formulations containing gellan gum as a gelling agent were developed and the effects of penetration enhancers (dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl alcohol and propylene glycol) on transport of the NSAID diclofenac sodium was quantified. A transwell diffusion system was used to accelerate formulation development. After 4h, diclofenac flux from a superior formulation of the semisolid gel or the solid hydrogel film was 130±11μg/cm(2)h and 108±7μg/cm(2)h, respectively, and significantly greater than that measured for a currently available diclofenac sodium topical gel (30±4μg/cm(2)h, ptransdermal drug formulations with adjustable drug transport kinetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. DRUG COURTS: Better DOJ Data Collection and Evaluation Efforts Needed to Measure Impact of Drug Court Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Under this concept, in exchange for the possibility of dismissed charges or reduced sentences, defendants are diverted to drug court programs in various ways and at various stages in the judicial process...

  6. A Reliable Method for the Evaluation of the Anaphylactoid Reaction Caused by Injectable Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adverse reactions of injectable drugs usually occur at first administration and are closely associated with the dosage and speed of injection. This phenomenon is correlated with the anaphylactoid reaction. However, up to now, study methods based on antigen detection have still not gained wide acceptance and single physiological indicators cannot be utilized to differentiate anaphylactoid reactions from allergic reactions and inflammatory reactions. In this study, a reliable method for the evaluation of anaphylactoid reactions caused by injectable drugs was established by using multiple physiological indicators. We used compound 48/80, ovalbumin and endotoxin as the sensitization agents to induce anaphylactoid, allergic and inflammatory reactions. Different experimental animals (guinea pig and nude rat and different modes of administration (intramuscular, intravenous and intraperitoneal injection and different times (15 min, 30 min and 60 min were evaluated to optimize the study protocol. The results showed that the optimal way to achieve sensitization involved treating guinea pigs with the different agents by intravenous injection for 30 min. Further, seven related humoral factors including 5-HT, SC5b-9, Bb, C4d, IL-6, C3a and histamine were detected by HPLC analysis and ELISA assay to determine their expression level. The results showed that five of them, including 5-HT, SC5b-9, Bb, C4d and IL-6, displayed significant differences between anaphylactoid, allergic and inflammatory reactions, which indicated that their combination could be used to distinguish these three reactions. Then different injectable drugs were used to verify this method and the results showed that the chosen indicators exhibited good correlation with the anaphylactoid reaction which indicated that the established method was both practical and reliable. Our research provides a feasible method for the diagnosis of the serious adverse reactions caused by injectable drugs which

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of carboxylated nanodiamond as a topical drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim DG

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dae Gon Lim,1,* Ki Hyun Kim,1,* Eunah Kang,2 Sun Hee Lim,3 Jeremy Ricci,3 Si Kwon Sung,3 Myoung Taek Kwon,3 Seong Hoon Jeong1 1College of Pharmacy, Dongguk University-Seoul, Gyeonggi, 2School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Chung-Ang University, 3NanoResource Co. Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The best strategy in the development of topical drug delivery systems may be to facilitate the permeation of drugs without any harmful effects, while staying on the skin surface and maintaining stability of the system. Nanodiamonds (NDs play a key role with their excellent physicochemical properties, including high biocompatibility, physical adsorption, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging capability, and photostabilizing activity. Z-average sizes of carboxylated ND (ND–COOH agglutinate decreased significantly as the pH increased. Fluorescein-conjugated ND was observed only on the stratum corneum, and no sample diffused into the dermal layer even after 48 hours. Moreover, ND–COOH and ND–COOH/eugenol complex did not show significant toxic effects on murine macrophage cells. ND improved in vitro skin permeation >50% acting as a “drug reservoir” to maintain a high drug concentration in the donor chamber, which was supported by quartz crystal microbalance results. Moreover, ND–COOH could adsorb a drug amount equivalent to 80% of its own weight. A photostability study showed that ND–COOH increased the photostability ~47% with regard to rate constant of the eugenol itself. A significant decrease in ROS was observed in the ND–COOH and ND–COOH/eugenol complex compared with the negative control during intracellular ROS assay. Moreover, ROS and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity evaluation showed that ND–COOH had synergistic effects of antioxidation with eugenol. Therefore, ND–COOH could be used as an excellent topical drug delivery system with improved permeability

  8. A study on regional comprehensive performance evaluation indicator system of rational use of drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Tongda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current research presents the design of a 4-degree-3-level performance evaluation indicator system of rational use of drugs for health care institutions accord with the Balanced Score Card (BSC method. Financial index, patient index, professional process index, and development and blazing new trials index are adopted in the light of scientific, guiding, operable and generalizable principles. The index weight is based on the analytic hierarchy process, and comprehensive performance evaluation indicators are calculated by a linear integrated weighting method. Its practical application in 21 state-run health care institutions in Ningbo, from 2008 to 2012, has arrived at the finding that the comprehensive performance evaluation indicator system offers a scientific, practical and effective performance management quantification and is thus worth popularizing.

  9. The Suitability of P. falciparum Merozoite Surface Proteins 1 and 2 as Genetic Markers for In Vivo Drug Trials in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abd, Nazeh M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M. Q.; Snounou, Georges; Abdul-Majid, Nazia B.; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Fong, Mun Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy of the conclusions from in vivo efficacy anti-malarial drug trials depends on distinguishing between recrudescences and re-infections which is accomplished by genotyping genes coding P. falciparum merozoite surface 1 (MSP1) and MSP2. However, the reliability of the PCR analysis depends on the genetic markers’ allelic diversity and variant frequency. In this study the genetic diversity of the genes coding for MSP1 and MSP2 was obtained for P. falciparum parasites circulating in Yemen. Methods Blood samples were collected from 511 patients with fever and screened for malaria parasites using Giemsa-stained blood films. A total 74 samples were infected with P. falciparum, and the genetic diversity was assessed by nested PCR targeting Pfmsp1 (Block2) and Pfmsp2 (block 3). Results Overall, 58%, 28% and 54% of the isolates harboured parasites of the Pfmsp1 K1, MAD20 and RO33 allelic families, and 55% and 89% harboured those of the Pfmsp2 FC27 and 3D7 allelic families, respectively. For both genetic makers, the multiplicity of the infection (MOI) was significantly higher in the isolates from the foothills/coastland areas as compared to those from the highland (PYemen Pfmsp1 should not be used for PCR correction of in vivo clinical trials outcomes, and that caution should be exercised when employing Pfmsp2. PMID:23861823

  10. Evaluation of the ASCO Value Framework for Anticancer Drugs at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Leslie; Lin, Tracy; Wang, Ling; Patel, Tanuja; Tran, Denise; Kim, Sarah; Dacey, Katie; Yuen, Courtney; Kroon, Lisa; Brodowy, Bret; Rodondi, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Anticancer drug prices have increased by an average of 12% each year from 1996 to 2014. A major concern is that the increasing cost and responsibility of evaluating treatment options are being shifted to patients. This research compared 2 value-based pricing models that were being considered for use at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center to address the growing burden of high-cost cancer drugs while improving patient-centered care. The Medication Outcomes Center (MOC) in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), School of Pharmacy focuses on assessing the value of medication-related health care interventions and disseminating findings to the UCSF Medical Center. The High Cost Oncology Drug Initiative at the MOC aims to assess and adopt tools for the critical assessment and amelioration of high-cost cancer drugs. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Value Framework (2016 update) and a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) framework were identified as potential tools for adoption. To assess 1 prominent value framework, the study investigators (a) asked 8 clinicians to complete the ASCO Value Framework for 11 anticancer medications selected by the MOC; (b) reviewed CEAs assessing the drugs; (c) generated descriptive statistics; and (d) analyzed inter-rater reliability, convergence validity, and ranking consistency. On the scale of -20 to 180, the mean ASCO net health benefit (NHB) total score across 11 drugs ranged from 7.6 (SD = 7.8) to 53 (SD = 9.8). The Kappa coefficient (κ) for NHB scores across raters was 0.11, which is categorized as "slightly reliable." The combined κ score was 0.22, which is interpreted as low to fair inter-rater reliability. Convergent validity indicates that the correlation between NHB scores and CEA-based incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) was low (-0.215). Ranking of ICERs, ASCO scores, and wholesale acquisition costs indicated different results

  11. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kejian; Weng, Zuquan; Sun, Liya; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; He, Lin

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Risk Versus Benefit Information in Direct-To-Consumer (DTC) Prescription Drug Television Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Germin; Toscani, Michael; Barone, Joseph A; Wang, Chris; Gandhi, Shivani

    2018-01-01

    The FDA's Presenting Risk Information draft guidance from May 2009 states that the time of risk versus benefit is a factor taken into consideration when evaluating audio and video direct-to-consumer (DTC) broadcasts. The objective of the study is to evaluate the proportion of risk narration on television (TV) advertisements in comparison to the actual proportion of serious adverse effects findings across select therapeutic areas. The study reviews prescription drug TV advertisements between the years 2010 and 2015 separated by therapeutic class. Indicators to assess risk versus benefit are as follows: total benefit time, total risk time, total ad time, percentage proportion of risk, and number of serious adverse effects (SAEs) listed in the package insert. The objective is establishing proportion of risk-to-benefit narration across therapeutic areas and the proportion of risk narration compared to the number of SAEs in the package insert. These outcomes will reflect whether TV advertisements abide by the "fair balance" rule and if the time spent on risk narrations is proportional to the number of SAEs across therapeutic areas. An analysis of risk versus benefit showed that there was a vast range of percentage differences in risk versus benefit narration across the products selected. The majority of the products narrated showed a 40% to 60% risk-to-benefit ratio. Six out of the 10 products evaluated communicated applicable black box warnings. There was variability among the SAE percentages presented between products. Lack of consistency exists between risks versus benefit proportions among different drug products.

  13. Mid-Term Assessment of the EU Drugs Strategy 2013-2020 and Final Evaluation of the Action Plan on Drugs 2013-2016: Final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilie, Balbirnie; Matthew, Davies; Emma, Disley; Cristina Gonzalez, Monsalve; Stephen, Hartka; Stijn, Hoorens; Kristy, Kruithof; Martin, Sacher; Jirka, Taylor

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the EU Drugs Strategy 2013-2020 is to contribute to a reduction in drug demand and drug supply within the EU. The Strategy has so far been implemented by an Action Plan covering the period 2013-2016. This article sets out the findings of an evaluation that assesses the degree of implementation of the Strategy and the Action Plan in terms of outputs and, where possible, impacts. It looks at the extent to which the objectives of the Strategy have been achieved. The evaluation aims to provide evidence to support the European Commission's decision about whether to propose a new Action Plan for the period 2017-2020 and, if so, what changes would be needed compared to the current plan. Through applying a mixed-methods approach, the evaluation examined the effectiveness, efficiency, relevance and coherence of the actions undertaken on the basis of the EU Drugs Strategy and the Action Plan, as well as their EU added value. The evaluation makes 20 recommendations, addressed to the European Commission, Member States, the European Council and other stakeholders. The key recommendation for the Commission is that a new Action Plan should be implemented for the period 2017-2020. This should be an updated version of the current Action Plan, rather than taking a new approach or introducing more new actions.

  14. PFCRT and DHFR-TS Sequences for Monitoring Drug Resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    from falciparum malaria isolates collected in Adzopé City, Côte d'Ivoire in 2007. Methods: Blood ... performed using specific primers of pfcrt and dhfr-ts. During the study .... The following mixture was prepared to a final volume of 50 ..... following the withdrawal of these anti- malarials as ... Malaria vaccines in Africa. Acta Trop.

  15. Macrophage models of Gaucher disease for evaluating disease pathogenesis and candidate drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflaki, Elma; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Maniwang, Emerson; Lopez, Grisel; Moaven, Nima; Goldin, Ehud; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Dutra, Amalia; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Tayebi, Nahid; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-06-11

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of glucocerebrosidase that manifests with storage of glycolipids in lysosomes, particularly in macrophages. Available cell lines modeling Gaucher disease do not demonstrate lysosomal storage of glycolipids; therefore, we set out to develop two macrophage models of Gaucher disease that exhibit appropriate substrate accumulation. We used these cellular models both to investigate altered macrophage biology in Gaucher disease and to evaluate candidate drugs for its treatment. We generated and characterized monocyte-derived macrophages from 20 patients carrying different Gaucher disease mutations. In addition, we created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophages from five fibroblast lines taken from patients with type 1 or type 2 Gaucher disease. Macrophages derived from patient monocytes or iPSCs showed reduced glucocerebrosidase activity and increased storage of glucocerebroside and glucosylsphingosine in lysosomes. These macrophages showed efficient phagocytosis of bacteria but reduced production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and impaired chemotaxis. The disease phenotype was reversed with a noninhibitory small-molecule chaperone drug that enhanced glucocerebrosidase activity in the macrophages, reduced glycolipid storage, and normalized chemotaxis and production of reactive oxygen species. Macrophages differentiated from patient monocytes or patient-derived iPSCs provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and facilitate drug development. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Evaluations of imidazolium ionic liquids as novel skin permeation enhancers for drug transdermal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding; Wang, Huai-Ji; Cui, Xiu-Ming; Wang, Cheng-Xiao

    2017-06-01

    In this work, imidazolium ionic liquids (imidazolium ILs) were employed as the novel chemical permeation enhancers (CPEs) and their performances and mechanisms of action were deeply investigated. Testosterone was used as a model drug to investigate the transdermal delivery enhancement of twenty imdidazolium ILs. The results suggested that the promotion activity connected to the structure and composition of the ILs. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model revealed a good linearity between the electronic properties of ILs and their enhancements. Furthermore, the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and scanning laser confocal microscope (CLSM) examinations showed the strong improvement of ILs on skin barrier permeability, which were well correlated with the drug penetration profiles. The total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscope (AFM) evaluations of skins indicated that the ILs can disrupt the regular and compact arrangements of the corneocytes, change the surface properties of stratum corneum, and make the skin structure more permeable. Our work demonstrated the significant skin permeation promotion profiles of the imidazolium ILs, which are of great potential in transdermal drug delivery systems.

  17. Calcium antagonistic effects of Chinese crude drugs: Preliminary investigation and evaluation by 45Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ning; Yang Yuanyou; Mo Shangwu; Liao Jiali; Jin Jiannan

    2005-01-01

    Coronary and other diseases in cardiac or brain blood vessels are considered to be due to the excessive influx of Ca 2+ into cytoplasm. If Ca 2+ channels in cell membrane are blocked by medicines or other substances with considerable calcium antagonistic effects, these diseases might be cured or controlled. The influence of some Chinese crude drugs, including Crocus sativus, Carthamus tinctorius, Ginkgo biloba and Bulbus allii macrostemi on Ca 2+ influx in isolated rat aortas was investigated by using 45 Ca as a radioactive tracer, and their calcium antagonistic effects were evaluated. It can be noted that Ca 2+ uptake in isolated rat aorta rings in normal physiological status was not markedly altered by these drugs, whereas the Ca 2+ influxes induced by norepinephrine of 1.2 μmol/L and KCl of 100 mmol/L were significantly inhibited by Crocus, Carthamus and Bulbus in a concentration-dependent manner, but not by Ginkgo. The results show that extracellular Ca 2+ influx through receptor-operated Ca 2+ channels and potential-dependent Ca 2+ channels can be blocked by Crocus, Carthamus and Bulbus. This implies that these Chinese crude drugs have obvious calcium antagonistic effects

  18. Formulation, optimization, and evaluation of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems of nevirapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapudi, Ramprasad; Murthy, T E G K; Lakshmi, K Rajya; Manohar, G Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and optimize the self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) of nevirapine (NVP) by use of 2(2) factorial designs to enhance the oral absorption of NVP by improving its solubility, dissolution rate, and diffusion profile. SEDDS are the isotropic mixtures of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant and drug that form oil in water microemulsion when introduced into the aqueous phase under gentle agitation. Solubility of NVP in different oils, surfactants, and co-surfactants was determined for the screening of excipients. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed by the aqueous titration method, and formulations were developed based on the optimum excipient combinations with the help of data obtained through the maximum micro emulsion region containing combinations of oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant. The formulations of SEDDS were optimized by 2(2) factorial designs. The optimum formulation of SEDDS contains 32.5% oleic acid, 44.16% tween 20, and 11.9% polyethylene glycol 600 as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant respectively. The SEDDS was evaluated for the following drug content, self-emulsification time, rheological properties, zeta potential, in vitro diffusion studies, thermodynamic stability studies, and in vitro dissolution studies. An increase in dissolution was achieved by SEDDS compared to pure form of NVP. Overall, this study suggests that the dissolution and oral bioavailability of NVP could be improved by SEDDS technology.

  19. Evaluation of optimized bronchoalveolar lavage sampling designs for characterization of pulmonary drug distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewe, Oskar; Karlsson, Mats O; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is a pulmonary sampling technique for characterization of drug concentrations in epithelial lining fluid and alveolar cells. Two hypothetical drugs with different pulmonary distribution rates (fast and slow) were considered. An optimized BAL sampling design was generated assuming no previous information regarding the pulmonary distribution (rate and extent) and with a maximum of two samples per subject. Simulations were performed to evaluate the impact of the number of samples per subject (1 or 2) and the sample size on the relative bias and relative root mean square error of the parameter estimates (rate and extent of pulmonary distribution). The optimized BAL sampling design depends on a characterized plasma concentration time profile, a population plasma pharmacokinetic model, the limit of quantification (LOQ) of the BAL method and involves only two BAL sample time points, one early and one late. The early sample should be taken as early as possible, where concentrations in the BAL fluid ≥ LOQ. The second sample should be taken at a time point in the declining part of the plasma curve, where the plasma concentration is equivalent to the plasma concentration in the early sample. Using a previously described general pulmonary distribution model linked to a plasma population pharmacokinetic model, simulated data using the final BAL sampling design enabled characterization of both the rate and extent of pulmonary distribution. The optimized BAL sampling design enables characterization of both the rate and extent of the pulmonary distribution for both fast and slowly equilibrating drugs.

  20. Evaluation of hydrophobic materials as matrices for controlled-release drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadir, Mohiuddin Abdul; Rahman, M Sharifur; Karim, M Ziaul; Akter, Sanjida; Awkat, M Talat Bin; Reza, Md Selim

    2003-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of different insoluble and erodable wax-lipid based materials and their content level on the release profile of drug from matrix systems. Matrix tablets of theophylline were prepared using carnauba wax, bees wax, stearic acid, cetyl alcohol, cetostearyl alcohol and glyceryl monostearate as rate-retarding agents by direct compression process. The release of theophylline from these hydrophobic matrices was studied over 8-hours in buffer media of pH 6.8. Statistically significant difference was found among the drug release profile from different matrices. The release kinetics was found to be governed by the type and content of hydrophobic materials in the matrix. At lower level of wax matrices (25%), a potential burst release was observed with all the materials being studied. Bees wax could not exert any sustaining action while an extensive burst release was found with carnauba wax at this hydrophobic load. Increasing the concentration of fat-wax materials significantly decreased the burst effect of drug from the matrix. At higher hydrophobic level (50% of the matrix), the rate and extent of drug release was significantly reduced due to increased tortuosity and reduced porosity of the matrix. Cetostearyl alcohol imparted the strongest retardation of drug release irrespective of fat-wax level. Numerical fits indicate that the Higuchi square root of time model was the most appropriate one for describing the release profile of theophylline from hydrophobic matrices. The release mechanism was also explored and explained with biexponential equation. Application of this model indicates that Fickian or case I kinetics is the predominant mechanism of drug release from these wax-lipid matrices. The mean dissolution time (MDT) was calculated for all the formulations and the highest MDT value was obtained with cetostearyl matrix. The greater sustaining activity of cetostearyl alcohol can be attributed to some level of

  1. Batch-to-Batch Quality Consistency Evaluation of Botanical Drug Products Using Multivariate Statistical Analysis of the Chromatographic Fingerprint

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X.; Qu, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many ...

  2. Preparation and Evaluation of Taste Masked Famotidine Formulation Using Drug/β-cyclodextrin/Polymer Ternary Complexation Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ashok R.; Vavia, Pradeep R.

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to evaluate potential of ternary complexation (comprising of drug, cyclodextrin and polymer) as an approach for taste masking. For this purpose famotidine with property of bitter taste was selected as a model drug. Improvement in taste masking capability of cyclodextrin towards famotidine was evaluated by formulating a ternary complex including hydrophilic polymer hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC 5 cps) as the third component. Phase solubility analy...

  3. Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Potential Between Sacubitril/Valsartan (LCZ696) and Statins Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen; Ji, Tao; Einolf, Heidi; Ayalasomayajula, Surya; Lin, Tsu-Han; Hanna, Imad; Heimbach, Tycho; Breen, Christopher; Jarugula, Venkateswar; He, Handan

    2017-05-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696) has been approved for the treatment of heart failure. Sacubitril is an in vitro inhibitor of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs). In clinical studies, LCZ696 increased atorvastatin C max by 1.7-fold and area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.3-fold, but had little or no effect on simvastatin or simvastatin acid exposure. A physiologically based pharmacokinetics modeling approach was applied to explore the underlying mechanisms behind the statin-specific LCZ696 drug interaction observations. The model incorporated OATP-mediated clearance (CL int,T ) for simvastatin and simvastatin acid to successfully describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of either analyte in the absence or presence of LCZ696. Moreover, the model successfully described the clinically observed drug effect with atorvastatin. The simulations clarified the critical parameters responsible for the observation of a low, yet clinically relevant, drug-drug interaction DDI between sacubitril and atorvastatin and the lack of effect with simvastatin acid. Atorvastatin is administered in its active form and rapidly achieves C max that coincide with the low C max of sacubitril. In contrast, simvastatin requires a hydrolysis step to the acid form and therefore is not present at the site of interactions at sacubitril concentrations that are inhibitory. Similar models were used to evaluate the drug-drug interaction risk for additional OATP-transported statins which predicted to maximally result in a 1.5-fold exposure increase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The principle of safety evaluation in medicinal drug - how can toxicology contribute to drug discovery and development as a multidisciplinary science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical (drug) safety assessment covers a diverse science-field in the drug discovery and development including the post-approval and post-marketing phases in order to evaluate safety and risk management. The principle in toxicological science is to be placed on both of pure and applied sciences that are derived from past/present scientific knowledge and coming new science and technology. In general, adverse drug reactions are presented as "biological responses to foreign substances." This is the basic concept of thinking about the manifestation of adverse drug reactions. Whether or not toxic expressions are extensions of the pharmacological effect, adverse drug reactions as seen from molecular targets are captured in the category of "on-target" or "off-target", and are normally expressed as a biological defense reaction. Accordingly, reactions induced by pharmaceuticals can be broadly said to be defensive reactions. Recent molecular biological conception is in line with the new, remarkable scientific and technological developments in the medical and pharmaceutical areas, and the viewpoints in the field of toxicology have shown that they are approaching toward the same direction as well. This paper refers to the basic concept of pharmaceutical toxicology, the differences for safety assessment in each stage of drug discovery and development, regulatory submission, and the concept of scientific considerations for risk assessment and management from the viewpoint of "how can multidisciplinary toxicology contribute to innovative drug discovery and development?" And also realistic translational research from preclinical to clinical application is required to have a significant risk management in post market by utilizing whole scientific data derived from basic and applied scientific research works. In addition, the significance for employing the systems toxicology based on AOP (Adverse Outcome Pathway) analysis is introduced, and coming challenges on precision

  6. The political and scientific challenges in evaluating compulsory drug treatment centers in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Thu; Nguyen, Nhu; Le, Giang; Shanahan, Marian; Ali, Robert; Ritter, Alison

    2017-01-11

    In Vietnam, like many countries in Southeast Asia, the commonly used approach of center-based compulsory drug treatment (CCT) has been criticized on human rights ground. Meanwhile, community-based voluntary methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been implemented for nearly a decade with promising results. Reform-minded leaders have been seeking empirical evidence of the costs and effectiveness associated with these two main treatment modalities. Conducting evaluations of these treatments, especially where randomization is not ethical, presents challenges. The aim of this paper is to discuss political challenges and methodological issues when conducting cost-effectiveness studies within the context of a non-democratic Southeast Asian country. A retrospective analysis of the political and scientific challenges that were experienced in the study design, sample size determination, government approval and ethics approvals, participant recruitment, data collection, and determination of sources, and quantification of cost and effectiveness data was undertaken. As a consequence of the non-randomized design, analysis of patient characteristics for both treatment types was undertaken to identify the magnitude of baseline group differences. Concordance between self-reported heroin use and urine drug testing was undertaken to determine the reliability of self-report data in a politically challenging environment. We demonstrate that conducting research around compulsory treatment in a non-democratic society is feasible, yet it is politically challenging and requires navigation between science and politics. We also demonstrate that engagement with the government decision makers in the research conception, implementation, and dissemination of the results increases the likelihood of research evidence being considered for change in a contentious drug policy area. Local empirical evidence on the comparative cost-effectiveness of CCT and MMT in a Southeast Asian setting is

  7. Monitoring of drug intake during pregnancy by questionnaires and LC-MS/MS drug urine screening: evaluation of both monitoring methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Henrike; Roeder, Stefan; Bertsche, Thilo; Lehmann, Irina; Borte, Michael; von Bergen, Martin; Wissenbach, Dirk K

    2015-08-01

    Various studies pointed towards a relationship between chronic diseases such as asthma and allergy and environmental risk factors, which are one aspect of the so-called Exposome. These environmental risk factors include also the intake of drugs. One critical step in human development is the prenatal period, in which exposures might have critical impact on the child's health outcome. Thereby, the health effects of drugs taken during gestation are discussed controversially with regard to newborns' disease risk. Due to this, the drug intake of pregnant women in the third trimester was monitored by questionnaire, in addition to biomonitoring using a local birth cohort study, allowing correlations of drug exposure with disease risk. Therefore, 622 urine samples were analyzed by an untargeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) urine screening and the results were compared to self-administered questionnaires. In total, 48% (n = 296) reported an intake of pharmaceuticals, with analgesics as the most frequent reported drug class in addition to dietary supplements. 182 times compounds were detected by urine screening, with analgesics (42%; n = 66) as the predominantly drug class. A comparison of reported and detected drug intake was performed for three different time spans between completion of the questionnaires and urine sampling. Even if the level of accordance was low in general, similar percentages (~25%, ~19%, and ~ 20%) were found for all groups. This study illustrates that a comprehensive evaluation of drug intake is neither achieved by questionnaires nor by biomonitoring alone. Instead, a combination of both monitoring methods, providing complementary information, should be considered. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. IN VITRO MODELS TO EVALUATE DRUG-INDUCED HYPERSENSITIVITY: POTENTIAL TEST BASED ON ACTIVATION OF DENDRITIC CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Galbiati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ('allergic' and non immune-mediated ('pseudo allergic' reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon.We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells.

  9. Design of colon targeting drug delivery systems using natural polymeric carriers and their evaluation by gamma scintigraphy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.; Sawarkar, S.P.; Deshpande, S.G.; Bajaj, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Of late, there has been a great awareness in the concept of drug targeting and delivery to a specific site (organ, tissue or cell) in the body to maximize therapeutic effect and reduce toxicity. The various approaches of site-specific drug delivery are implantable pumps, adhesive patches impregnated with drugs, vesicle enclosed drugs and drug carriers. Colonic drug delivery is intended for local and systemic treatment in the diseases of colon like inflammatory bowel conditions. Several approaches using viz. pro-drugs, biodegradable polymers and pH sensitive polymer coatings have been used to achieve colonic delivery. Natural polysaccarides like guar gum and pectin are promising candidates because they are susceptible to degradation by colonic bacteria and thus can release the entrapped drug in the colonic region. These indigenous natural polymers are cheaply and readily available. They comprise of polygalactouronic acid and refractory to host enzymes present in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are degraded by the enzymes produced by the colonic microflora. They were evaluated as a colonic carrier using 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) as a model drug. After successful in vitro testing, gamma scintigraphy technique was used to assess in-vivo behavior of the colon specific drug delivery after a coat of Guar gum and Pectin

  10. Performance evaluation of enzyme immunoassay for voriconazole therapeutic drug monitoring with automated clinical chemistry analyzers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbum Jeon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Voriconazole is a triazole antifungal developed for the treatment of fungal infectious disease, and the clinical utility of its therapeutic drug monitoring has been evaluated. Recently, a new assay for analyzing the serum voriconazole concentration with an automated clinical chemistry analyzer was developed. We evaluated the performance of the new assay based on standardized protocols. Methods: The analytical performance of the assay was evaluated according to its precision, trueness by recovery, limit of quantitation, linearity, and correlation with results from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The evaluation was performed with the same protocol on two different routine chemistry analyzers. All evaluations were performed according to CLSI Guidelines EP15, EP17, EP6, and EP9 [1–4]. Results: Coefficients of variation for within-run and between-day imprecision were 3.2–5.1% and 1.5–3.0%, respectively, on the two different analyzers for pooled serum samples. The recovery rates were in the range of 95.4–102.2%. The limit of blank was 0.0049 μg/mL, and the limit of detection of the samples was 0.0266–0.0376 μg/mL. The percent recovery at three LoQ levels were 67.9–74.6% for 0.50 μg/mL, 75.5–80.2% for 0.60 μg/mL, and 89.9–96.6% for 0.70 μg/mL. A linear relationship was demonstrated between 0.5 μg/mL and 16.0 μg/mL (R2=0.9995–0.9998. The assay correlated well with LC-MS/MS results (R2=0.9739–0.9828. Conclusions: The assay showed acceptable precision, trueness, linearity, and limit of quantification, and correlated well with LC-MS/MS. Therefore, its analytical performance is satisfactory for monitoring the drug concentration of voriconazole. Keywords: Voriconazole, Antifungal agents, Therapeutic drug monitoring

  11. Creative Destruction: Next Generation Sequencing in Drug Development, Formulary Evaluations and Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has the potential to disrupt not only the accepted process of drug development but also the hurdles a drug manufacturer would be expected to face in securing formulary approval and a possible premium price for the new compound. The purpose of this commentary is to consider the role of NGS in this process, one which is characterized as a process of creative destruction, where adoption of NGS in personalized medicine sets in train a mechanism of incessant product and process review. A mechanism driven by continuing modifications and extensions to NGS platforms as our understanding of the role of mutations and mutation load in therapy choice expands. At the same time this mechanism has significant implications for the continued revision of treatment guidelines and their adoption of NGS as integral parts of the treatment pathway. There are, however, a number of unresolved issues which have to be addressed. These include the choice of NGS platform, barriers to integrating evidence to support NGS-based therapy choices in treatment guidelines, the implications of NGS for drug development and the modification or rejection of current trial structures, the integration of comorbid disease states and the standards that formulary committees should adopt to evaluate NGS claims. The overarching theme, however, is the need to invest in a robust and credible evidence base. While we are a long way from achieving this, the focus must be on putting claims for therapy choice forward that are credible, evaluable and replicable.   Type: Commentary

  12. Preclinical quantitative MicroPET imaging in evaluation of neuroprotective drug candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Ji Yeon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Kyeong Min; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    Using in vivo molecular imaging with microPET/SPECT has been expected to facilitate drug discovery and development. In this study, we applied quantitative microPET to the preclinical evaluation of the effects of two neuroprotective drug candidates to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal damage. Fifteen SD rats were divided into three groups. The rats of each group were orally administrated one of neuroprotective candidate; NeuProtec (100mg/kg bid) and SureCero (10mg/kg, qd) or normal saline (0.1ml, qd) for 3 weeks. 6-OHDA was sterotactically placed to the right striatum on eighth day after starting while continuing the medication for additional 14 days. [ 124 I]FP-ClT PET scans were obtained using microPET R4 scanner. The behavioral test by amphetamine-induced rotation and the histological examination after thyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical staining were performed. Different uptake in the lesioned striatum among the groups were demonstrated on [ 124 I]FP-CIT PET images. The rats with NeuProtec showed higher binding in the lesion than controls. No differences were observed in SureCere groups. The FP-CIT uptake in the lesioned striatum was well correlated with the % reduction of TH(+) cells (rho =0.73, p=0.025), and also correlated with rotation test (rho =0.79, p=0.001) [ 124 I]FP-CIT animal PET depicted the neuroprotective effects of NeuProtec to the 6-OHDA neurotoxicity in the rat striatum. No demonstrable effect of SureCero might indicate that inadequate dosage was used in this study. MicroPET imaging with small animal could be a great tool in preclinical evaluation of drug efficacy

  13. Basic evaluation of typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier: Structure, wettability and hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Guo, Yingyu

    2017-04-01

    Herein, the present work devoted to study the basic capacity of nanoporous silica nanoparticles in being drug carrier that covered structure, wettability and hemolysis so as to provide crucial evaluation. Typical nanoporous silica nanoparticles that consist of nanoporous silica nanoparticles (NSN), amino modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (amino-NSN), carboxyl modified nanoporous silica nanoparticles (carboxyl-NSN) and hierachical nanoporous silica nanoparticles (hierachical-NSN) were studied. The results showed that their wettability and hemolysis were closely related to structure and surface modification. Basically, wettability became stronger as the amount of OH on the surface of NSN was higher. Both large nanopores and surface modification can reduce the wettability of NSN. Furthermore, NSN series were safe to be used when they circulated into the blood in low concentration, while if high concentration can not be avoided during administration, high porosity or amino modification of NSN were safer to be considered. It is believed that the basic evaluation of NSN can make contribution in providing scientific instruction for designing drug loaded NSN systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of package inserts of Ayurveda drug formulations from Mumbai city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirolkar, Sudatta; Tripathi, Raakhi K; Potey, Anirudha V

    2015-01-01

    Package insert (PI) is a vital document accompanying a prescribed medication to provide information to the prescriber and end-user at a glance. Studies regarding PIs of Ayurvedic medicines in accordance with standard guidelines are lacking. Present study was undertaken to evaluate PI of Ayurveda drugs. PIs of Ayurveda drugs were obtained from five randomly selected Ayurveda medical shops located in three main zones of Mumbai. From each medical shop, a range of 15-20 PI was planned to be collected for different formulations. It was decided to collect a minimum fifty PIs/group for equitable distribution of various formulations in period of January-June2013. Checklist was prepared, and content validity was achieved. Final validated checklist contained a total of 13 items, and the presence or absence of information pertaining to these items on the PI was evaluated. Any other additional information present on PI was also noted. Each item was analyzed and expressed as percentages. The information on 258 PIs included: Name of ingredients (67%), quantity of ingredients (47.27%), route of administration (86.8%), dosage form (86.8%), indications (18%), dose (18%), contraindications (18%), side effects (9%), shelf life (5.81%), storage conditions (11%), and manufacturers name with contact details (34%). PIs accompanying Ayurveda medicinal products in India are deficient in information required to be furnished by them.

  15. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-09-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel" addresses this theme by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general-particularly in Dolliver's article-poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study. The replication study is not based on Dolliver's original dataset, but on a second dataset collected applying the same methodology. We have found that the results produced by Dolliver differ greatly from our replicated study. While a margin of error is to be expected, the inconsistencies we found are too great to attribute to anything other than methodological issues. The analysis and conclusions drawn from studies using these methods are promising and insightful. However, based on the replication of Dolliver's study, we suggest that researchers using these methodologies consider and that datasets be made available for other researchers, and that methodology and dataset metrics (e.g. number of downloaded pages, error logs) are described thoroughly in the context of web-o-metrics and web crawling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Professional practice evaluation of injectable drug preparation and administration in neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P; Guillois, B; Gloanec, L; Chatelier, N; Saint-Lorant, G

    2017-09-01

    Adverse drug events are a daily concern in neonatology departments. The aim of this study was to assess the professional practices of preparation and administration of injectable forms of medications in neonatology. A professional practice evaluation with regard to the preparation and administration of various injectable forms of medications in different neonatology units within a given department was conducted by a pharmacy intern based on an assessment grid comprising ten criteria. Following an initial assessment, the results were presented to the care team, which validated the corrective measures put forward by a multiprofessional work group. A second assessment was conducted following the same methodology. Fifty of the department's 76 pediatric nurses were assessed during the first round of the audit and 21 during the second round. Two improvement priorities were identified: taking account of the dead volume of medication in needles and syringe hubs, together with complete identification of syringes used to administer medication. During the second round, these two aspects were improved, progressing from 38% to 100% and from 59% to 89%, respectively. To improve drug administration in neonatology and consequently, to improve patient safety, professional practice evaluation is an essential tool that requires close collaboration between the paramedical team, physicians and pharmacists. Its main value lies in the mobilization of the entire team around the subject in question, hence generating improved understanding and application of corrective measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhancement of the efficiency of magnetic targeting for drug delivery: Development and evaluation of magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Quanliang; Han Xiaotao; Li Liang

    2011-01-01

    Deep magnetic capture and clinical application are the current trends for magnetic targeted drug delivery system. More promising and possible strategies are needed to overcome the current limitations and further improve the magnetic targeting technique. Recent advances in the development of targeting magnet system show promise in progressing this technology from the laboratory to the clinic. Starting from well-known basic concepts, current limitations of magnetic targeted drug delivery system are analyzed. Meanwhile, the design concepts and evaluations of some effective improvements in magnet system are discussed and reviewed with reference to (i) reasonable design of magnet system; (ii) control modes of magnet system used to generate dynamical magnetic fields; and (iii) magnetic field driving types. - Research Highlights: → The current limitations of MTDDS for deep capture and clinical application are analyzed. → The development of magnet system shows promise in progressing MTDDS to clinical application. → The design concepts and evaluations of improvements in magnet system are reviewed and discussed. → The key to improve magnet system lies in controllable magnets and different excitations.

  18. Self-reported and laboratory evaluation of late pregnancy nicotine exposure and drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E S; Wexelblatt, S L; Greenberg, J M

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of late pregnancy nicotine exposures, including secondhand smoke exposures, and to evaluate the associated risk of exposure to drugs of abuse. The study was a retrospective single-center cohort analysis of more than 18 months. We compared self-reported smoking status from vital birth records with mass spectrometry laboratory results of maternal urine using a chi-square test. Logistic regression estimated adjusted odds for detection of drugs of abuse based on nicotine detection. Compared with 8.6% self-reporting cigarette use, mass spectrometry detected high-level nicotine exposures for 16.5% of 708 women (Pdrugs of abuse, presented as adjusted odds ratios, (95% confidence interval (CI), for both low-level (5.69, CI: 2.09 to 15.46) and high-level (13.93, CI: 7.06 to 27.49) nicotine exposures. Improved measurement tactics are critically needed to capture late pregnancy primary and passive nicotine exposures from all potential sources.

  19. The role of the anaesthetised guinea-pig in the preclinical cardiac safety evaluation of drug candidate compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Louise, E-mail: louise.marks@astrazeneca.com [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Borland, Samantha; Philp, Karen; Ewart, Lorna; Lainée, Pierre; Skinner, Matthew [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Kirk, Sarah [Innovative Medicines, Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom); Valentin, Jean-Pierre [Safety Assessment UK, AstraZeneca, Mereside, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire, SK10 4TG (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Despite rigorous preclinical and clinical safety evaluation, adverse cardiac effects remain a leading cause of drug attrition and post-approval drug withdrawal. A number of cardiovascular screens exist within preclinical development. These screens do not, however, provide a thorough cardiac liability profile and, in many cases, are not preventing the progression of high risk compounds. We evaluated the suitability of the anaesthetised guinea-pig for the assessment of drug-induced changes in cardiovascular parameters. Sodium pentobarbitone anaesthetised male guinea-pigs received three 15 minute intravenous infusions of ascending doses of amoxicillin, atenolol, clonidine, dobutamine, dofetilide, flecainide, isoprenaline, levosimendan, milrinone, moxifloxacin, nifedipine, paracetamol, verapamil or vehicle, followed by a 30 minute washout. Dose levels were targeted to cover clinical exposure and above, with plasma samples obtained to evaluate effect/exposure relationships. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, contractility function (left ventricular dP/dt{sub max} and QA interval) and lead II electrocardiogram were recorded throughout. In general, the expected reference compound induced effects on haemodynamic, contractility and electrocardiographic parameters were detected confirming that all three endpoints can be measured accurately and simultaneously in one small animal. Plasma exposures obtained were within, or close to the expected clinical range of therapeutic plasma levels. Concentration–effect curves were produced which allowed a more complete understanding of the margins for effects at different plasma exposures. This single in vivo screen provides a significant amount of information pertaining to the cardiovascular risk of drug candidates, ultimately strengthening strategies addressing cardiovascular-mediated compound attrition and drug withdrawal. -- Highlights: ► Evaluation of the anaesthetised guinea-pig to determine cardiac liability.

  20. The role of the anaesthetised guinea-pig in the preclinical cardiac safety evaluation of drug candidate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Louise; Borland, Samantha; Philp, Karen; Ewart, Lorna; Lainée, Pierre; Skinner, Matthew; Kirk, Sarah; Valentin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Despite rigorous preclinical and clinical safety evaluation, adverse cardiac effects remain a leading cause of drug attrition and post-approval drug withdrawal. A number of cardiovascular screens exist within preclinical development. These screens do not, however, provide a thorough cardiac liability profile and, in many cases, are not preventing the progression of high risk compounds. We evaluated the suitability of the anaesthetised guinea-pig for the assessment of drug-induced changes in cardiovascular parameters. Sodium pentobarbitone anaesthetised male guinea-pigs received three 15 minute intravenous infusions of ascending doses of amoxicillin, atenolol, clonidine, dobutamine, dofetilide, flecainide, isoprenaline, levosimendan, milrinone, moxifloxacin, nifedipine, paracetamol, verapamil or vehicle, followed by a 30 minute washout. Dose levels were targeted to cover clinical exposure and above, with plasma samples obtained to evaluate effect/exposure relationships. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, contractility function (left ventricular dP/dt max and QA interval) and lead II electrocardiogram were recorded throughout. In general, the expected reference compound induced effects on haemodynamic, contractility and electrocardiographic parameters were detected confirming that all three endpoints can be measured accurately and simultaneously in one small animal. Plasma exposures obtained were within, or close to the expected clinical range of therapeutic plasma levels. Concentration–effect curves were produced which allowed a more complete understanding of the margins for effects at different plasma exposures. This single in vivo screen provides a significant amount of information pertaining to the cardiovascular risk of drug candidates, ultimately strengthening strategies addressing cardiovascular-mediated compound attrition and drug withdrawal. -- Highlights: ► Evaluation of the anaesthetised guinea-pig to determine cardiac liability. ► Haemodynamic

  1. DRUG EVALUATION AND DECISION MAKING IN CATALONIA: DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A METHODOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK BASED ON MULTI-CRITERIA DECISION ANALYSIS (MCDA) FOR ORPHAN DRUGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Perramon, Antoni; Torrent-Farnell, Josep; Catalan, Arancha; Prat, Alba; Fontanet, Manel; Puig-Peiró, Ruth; Merino-Montero, Sandra; Khoury, Hanane; Goetghebeur, Mireille M; Badia, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to adapt and assess the value of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) framework (EVIDEM) for the evaluation of Orphan drugs in Catalonia (Catalan Health Service). The standard evaluation and decision-making procedures of CatSalut were compared with the EVIDEM methodology and contents. The EVIDEM framework was adapted to the Catalan context, focusing on the evaluation of Orphan drugs (PASFTAC program), during a Workshop with sixteen PASFTAC members. The criteria weighting was done using two different techniques (nonhierarchical and hierarchical). Reliability was assessed by re-test. The EVIDEM framework and methodology was found useful and feasible for Orphan drugs evaluation and decision making in Catalonia. All the criteria considered for the development of the CatSalut Technical Reports and decision making were considered in the framework. Nevertheless, the framework could improve the reporting of some of these criteria (i.e., "unmet needs" or "nonmedical costs"). Some Contextual criteria were removed (i.e., "Mandate and scope of healthcare system", "Environmental impact") or adapted ("population priorities and access") for CatSalut purposes. Independently of the weighting technique considered, the most important evaluation criteria identified for orphan drugs were: "disease severity", "unmet needs" and "comparative effectiveness", while the "size of the population" had the lowest relevance for decision making. Test-retest analysis showed weight consistency among techniques, supporting reliability overtime. MCDA (EVIDEM framework) could be a useful tool to complement the current evaluation methods of CatSalut, contributing to standardization and pragmatism, providing a method to tackle ethical dilemmas and facilitating discussions related to decision making.

  2. Maximizing Health or Sufficient Capability in Economic Evaluation? A Methodological Experiment of Treatment for Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goranitis, Ilias; Coast, Joanna; Day, Ed; Copello, Alex; Freemantle, Nick; Frew, Emma

    2017-07-01

    Conventional practice within the United Kingdom and beyond is to conduct economic evaluations with "health" as evaluative space and "health maximization" as the decision-making rule. However, there is increasing recognition that this evaluative framework may not always be appropriate, and this is particularly the case within public health and social care contexts. This article presents a methodological case study designed to explore the impact of changing the evaluative space within an economic evaluation from health to capability well-being and the decision-making rule from health maximization to the maximization of sufficient capability. Capability well-being is an evaluative space grounded on Amartya Sen's capability approach and assesses well-being based on individuals' ability to do and be the things they value in life. Sufficient capability is an egalitarian approach to decision making that aims to ensure everyone in society achieves a normatively sufficient level of capability well-being. The case study is treatment for drug addiction, and the cost-effectiveness of 2 psychological interventions relative to usual care is assessed using data from a pilot trial. Analyses are undertaken from a health care and a government perspective. For the purpose of the study, quality-adjusted life years (measured using the EQ-5D-5L) and years of full capability equivalent and years of sufficient capability equivalent (both measured using the ICECAP-A [ICEpop CAPability measure for Adults]) are estimated. The study concludes that different evaluative spaces and decision-making rules have the potential to offer opposing treatment recommendations. The implications for policy makers are discussed.

  3. Embryonic Zebrafish Model - A Well-Established Method for Rapidly Assessing the Toxicity of Homeopathic Drugs - Toxicity Evaluation of Homeopathic Drugs Using Zebrafish Embryo Model -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu R Gupta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Advancements in nanotechnology have led to nanoparticle (NP use in various fields of medicine. Although the potential of NPs is promising, the lack of documented evidence on the toxicological effects of NPs is concerning. A few studies have documented that homeopathy uses NPs. Unfortunately, very few sound scientific studies have explored the toxic effects of homeopathic drugs. Citing this lack of high-quality scientific evidence, regulatory agencies have been reluctant to endorse homeopathic treatment as an alternative or adjunct treatment. This study aimed to enhance our insight into the impact of commercially-available homeopathic drugs, to study the presence of NPs in those drugs and any deleterious effects they might have, and to determine the distribution pattern of NPs in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio. Methods: Homeopathic dilutions were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (SAED. For the toxicity assessment on Zebrafish, embryos were exposed to a test solution from 4 - 6 hours post-fertilization, and embryos/larvae were assessed up to 5 days post-fertilization (dpf for viability and morphology. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. Around 5 dpf was found to be the optimum developmental stage for evaluation. Results: The present study aimed to conclusively prove the presence of NPs in all high dilutions of homeopathic drugs. Embryonic zebrafish were exposed to three homeopathic drugs with two potencies (30CH, 200CH during early embryogenesis. The resulting morphological and cellular responses were observed. Exposure to these potencies produced no visibly significant malformations, pericardial edema, and mortality and no necrotic and apoptotic cellular death. Conclusion: Our findings clearly demonstrate that no toxic effects were observed for these three homeopathic drugs at the potencies and

  4. Embryonic Zebrafish Model - A Well-Established Method for Rapidly Assessing the Toxicity of Homeopathic Drugs: - Toxicity Evaluation of Homeopathic Drugs Using Zebrafish Embryo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himanshu R; Patil, Yogesh; Singh, Dipty; Thakur, Mansee

    2016-12-01

    Advancements in nanotechnology have led to nanoparticle (NP) use in various fields of medicine. Although the potential of NPs is promising, the lack of documented evidence on the toxicological effects of NPs is concerning. A few studies have documented that homeopathy uses NPs. Unfortunately, very few sound scientific studies have explored the toxic effects of homeopathic drugs. Citing this lack of high-quality scientific evidence, regulatory agencies have been reluctant to endorse homeopathic treatment as an alternative or adjunct treatment. This study aimed to enhance our insight into the impact of commercially-available homeopathic drugs, to study the presence of NPs in those drugs and any deleterious effects they might have, and to determine the distribution pattern of NPs in zebrafish embryos ( Danio rerio ). Homeopathic dilutions were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (SAED). For the toxicity assessment on Zebrafish, embryos were exposed to a test solution from 4 - 6 hours post-fertilization, and embryos/larvae were assessed up to 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) for viability and morphology. Toxicity was recorded in terms of mortality, hatching delay, phenotypic defects and metal accumulation. Around 5 dpf was found to be the optimum developmental stage for evaluation. The present study aimed to conclusively prove the presence of NPs in all high dilutions of homeopathic drugs. Embryonic zebrafish were exposed to three homeopathic drugs with two potencies (30CH, 200CH) during early embryogenesis. The resulting morphological and cellular responses were observed. Exposure to these potencies produced no visibly significant malformations, pericardial edema, and mortality and no necrotic and apoptotic cellular death. Our findings clearly demonstrate that no toxic effects were observed for these three homeopathic drugs at the potencies and exposure times used in this study. The embryonic zebrafish

  5. Strategies for the early detection of drug-induced hepatic steatosis in preclinical drug safety evaluation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacher, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in the liver. Although relatively benign, simple steatosis can eventually lead to the development of steatohepatitis, a more serious condition characterized by fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventual liver failure if the underlying cause is not eliminated. According to the 'two hit' theory of steatohepatitis, the initial hit involves fat accumulation in the liver, and a second hit leads to inflammation and subsequent tissue injury. Because some xenobiotics target liver fatty acid metabolism, especially mitochondrial β-oxidation, it is important to avoid potential drug candidates that can contribute to either the initiation of liver steatosis or progression to the more injurious steatohepatitis. The gold standard for the detection of these types of hepatic effects is histopathological examination of liver tissue. In animal studies, these examinations are slow, restricted to a single sampling time, and limited tissue sections. Recent literature suggests that rapid in vitro screening methods can be used early in the drug R and D process to identify compounds with steatotic potential. Further, progress in the identification of potential serum or plasma protein biomarkers for these liver changes may provide additional in vivo tools to the preclinical study toxicologist. This review summarizes recent developments for in vitro screening and in vivo biomarker detection for steatotic drug candidates.

  6. Considerations for the nonclinical safety evaluation of antibody drug conjugates for oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stanley A; Andrews, Paul A; Blanset, Diann; Flagella, Kelly M; Gorovits, Boris; Lynch, Carmel M; Martin, Pauline L; Kramer-Stickland, Kimberly; Thibault, Stephane; Warner, Garvin

    2013-12-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) include monoclonal antibodies that are linked to cytotoxic small molecules. A number of these agents are currently being developed as anti-cancer agents designed to improve the therapeutic index of the cytotoxin (i.e., cytotoxic small molecule or cytotoxic agent) by specifically delivering it to tumor cells. This paper presents primary considerations for the nonclinical safety evaluation of ADCs and includes strategies for the evaluation of the entire ADC or the various individual components (i.e., antibody, linker or the cytotoxin). Considerations are presented on how to design a nonclinical safety assessment program to identify the on- and off-target toxicities to enable first-in-human (FIH) studies. Specific discussions are also included that provide details as to the need and how to conduct the studies for evaluating ADCs in genetic toxicology, tissue cross-reactivity, safety pharmacology, carcinogenicity, developmental and reproductive toxicology, biotransformation, toxicokinetic monitoring, bioanalytical assays, immunogenicity testing, test article stability and the selection of the FIH dose. Given the complexity of these molecules and our evolving understanding of their properties, there is no single all-encompassing nonclinical strategy. Instead, each ADC should be evaluated on a case-by-case scientifically-based approach that is consistent with ICH and animal research guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of an Official Guideline for the Economic Evaluation of Drugs/Medical Devices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroiwa, Takeru; Fukuda, Takashi; Ikeda, Shunya; Takura, Tomoyuki; Moriwaki, Kensuke

    2017-03-01

    In Japan, cost-effectiveness evaluation was implemented on a trial basis from fiscal year 2016. The results will be applied to the future repricing of drugs and medical devices. On the basis of a request from the Central Social Insurance Medical Council (Chuikyo), our research team drafted the official methodological guideline for trial implementation. Here, we report the process of developing and the contents of the official guideline for cost-effectiveness evaluation. The guideline reflects discussions at the Chuikyo subcommittee (e.g., the role of quality-adjusted life-year) and incorporates our academic perspective. Team members generated research questions for each section of the guideline and discussions on these questions were carried out. A draft guideline was prepared and submitted to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), and then to the subcommittee. The draft guideline was revised on the basis of the discussions at the subcommitte, if appropriate. Although the "public health care payer's perspective" is standard in this guideline, other perspectives can be applied as necessary depending on the objective of analysis. On the basis of the discussions at the subcommittee, quality-adjusted life-year will be used as the basic outcome. A discount rate of 2% per annum for costs and outcomes is recommended. The final guideline was officially approved by the Chuikyo general assembly in February 2016. This is the first officially approved guideline for the economic evaluation of drugs and medical devices in Japan. The guideline is expected to improve the quality and comparability of submitted cost-effectiveness data for decision making. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [An evaluation of a symposium via satellite on alcoholism and drug dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Espinosa, E; Martínez-Salgado, H; Ruíz-Tapia, R; Domínguez-Cherit, L

    1993-01-01

    Results of a test given to participants in a symposium on alcoholism and drug abuse are presented. The symposium was broadcast via satellite simultaneously to five cities in Mexico, and included 8 pretaped panels covering topics on alcoholism and drug abuse. The methodology used for broadcasting the symposium allowed the interactive exchange of information between expert lecturers and participants. The quantitative and qualitative evaluation used the pretest-posttest design. Most of the participants were physicians (28.9%) followed by psychologists (25.7%) and social workers (18.1%). The global cognitive change among participants was 6 per cent. Almost 77 per cent of participants had scores between 51 and 70 points (over a possible maximum score of 100) in the pre-evaluation test, and 76.4 per cent had scores between 61 and 80 points in the postevaluation test. Health professionals with 1-3 years of experience had the largest change in scores (9%), followed by those with 3 to 5 years experience (8%). Professionals with 5 to 10 years of experience had a change of 5 per cent. Physicians showed the greatest cognitive change (7%) followed by psychologists and social workers with 5 per cent change. In the qualitative evaluation, 87.6 per cent of participants thought that the educational method used was "Excellent" of "Good". With respect to the satellite transmission, 79.4 per cent of participants thought it was "Excellent" or "Good". It is concluded that this type of educational events are useful in reaching health professionals who otherwise would not have access to specialized and updated information.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Evaluation of Electronic Healthcare Databases for Post-Marketing Drug Safety Surveillance and Pharmacoepidemiology in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Gao, Shuangqing; Lin, Hongbo; Xie, Yanming; Feng, Yuji; Huang, Kui; Zhan, Siyan

    2018-01-01

    Electronic healthcare databases (EHDs) are used increasingly for post-marketing drug safety surveillance and pharmacoepidemiology in Europe and North America. However, few studies have examined the potential of these data sources in China. Three major types of EHDs in China (i.e., a regional community-based database, a national claims database, and an electronic medical records [EMR] database) were selected for evaluation. Forty core variables were derived based on the US Mini-Sentinel (MS) Common Data Model (CDM) as well as the data features in China that would be desirable to support drug safety surveillance. An email survey of these core variables and eight general questions as well as follow-up inquiries on additional variables was conducted. These 40 core variables across the three EHDs and all variables in each EHD along with those in the US MS CDM and Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) CDM were compared for availability and labeled based on specific standards. All of the EHDs' custodians confirmed their willingness to share their databases with academic institutions after appropriate approval was obtained. The regional community-based database contained 1.19 million people in 2015 with 85% of core variables. Resampled annually nationwide, the national claims database included 5.4 million people in 2014 with 55% of core variables, and the EMR database included 3 million inpatients from 60 hospitals in 2015 with 80% of core variables. Compared with MS CDM or OMOP CDM, the proportion of variables across the three EHDs available or able to be transformed/derived from the original sources are 24-83% or 45-73%, respectively. These EHDs provide potential value to post-marketing drug safety surveillance and pharmacoepidemiology in China. Future research is warranted to assess the quality and completeness of these EHDs or additional data sources in China.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evaluation of pathogen burden and drug-resistance trends in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.; Hussain, S.; Ahmad, A.

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the pathogen burden and antibiotic-resistance trends of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among hospitalised patients at a tertiary care hospital. Study Design:Retrospective, hospital record-based, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study:Microbiology Laboratory, Allama Iqbal Medical College/Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, from January 2014 to December 2016. Methodology:A total of 5,960 samples were collected from clinically suspected cases of bacterial infections, admitted to the hospital. Microbial identification and antibiotic susceptibility pattern were carried out and analysed. Results:Out of a total of 5,960 samples, Pseudomonas aeruginosawas isolated from 1,268 (21.2%) specimens. Department-wise isolation rate was n=600 (42.9%), n=268 (15.4%), n=201 (12.6%), and n=199 (16.0%) from intensive care unit (ICU), surgical units, medical units, and Gynae wards, respectively (p<0.0001). Sample-wise isolation rate was, wound swabs n=448 (35%), urine n=356 (28%), sputum n=187 (14 %), tracheal aspirate n=127 (10%), blood n=99 (7%), and broncho-alveolar lavage n=51 (4%) (p<0.0001). Drug-resistance pattern showed low rates for carbapenems (meropenem n=440 (35%), Imipenem n=436 (34%) and beta-lactam + beta-lactamase inhibitor combination (piperacillin+ tazobactam n=437 (34%) while alarming rates were observed for cephalosporins (ceftazidime n=716 (56%), fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin n=690 (54%), cefoperazone+sulbactam n=685 (54%), aminoglycosides (gentamicin, n=669 (53%), amikacin n=608 (48%), and monobactams (aztreonam n=666 (52%). Decreasing trend was observed only for amikacin 63% to 37%, aztreonam showed similar pattern throughout, while there was an increasing trend of drug resistance in all groups of antibiotics. Conclusion:Emerging drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosaare probably linked to the injudicious use of antibiotics, leading to ineffective empirical therapy. Therefore, we suggest that culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing should

  11. Cost evaluation of therapeutic drug monitoring of gentamicin at a teaching hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim MI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM makes use of serum drug concentrations as an adjunct to decision-making. Preliminary data in our hospital showed that approximately one-fifth of all drugs monitored by TDM service were gentamicin. Objective: In this study, we evaluated the costs associated with providing the service in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin. Methods: We retrospectively collected data from medical records of patients admitted to the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia over a 5-year period. These patients were diagnosed with bronchopneumonia and were on gentamicin as part of their treatment. Five hospitalisation costs were calculated; (i cost of laboratory and clinical investigations, (ii cost associated with each gentamicin dose, (iii fixed and operating costs of TDM service, (iv cost of providing medical care, and (v cost of hospital stay during gentamicin treatment. Results: There were 1920 patients admitted with bronchopneumonia of which 67 (3.5% had TDM service for gentamicin. Seventy-three percent (49/67 patients were eligible for final analysis. The duration of gentamicin therapy ranged from 3 to 15 days. The cost of providing one gentamicin assay was MYR25, and the average cost of TDM service for each patient was MYR104. The average total hospitalisation cost during gentamicin treatment for each patient was MYR442 (1EUR approx. MYR4.02. Conclusion: Based on the hospital perspective, in patients with bronchopneumonia and treated with gentamicin, the provision of TDM service contributes to less than 25% of the total cost of hospitalization.

  12. Evaluation of transporters in drug development: Current status and contemporary issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue-Chih; Arya, Vikram; Yang, Xinning; Volpe, Donna A; Zhang, Lei

    2017-07-01

    Transporters govern the access of molecules to cells or their exit from cells, thereby controlling the overall distribution of drugs to their intracellular site of action. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions mediated by transporters are of increasing interest in drug development. Drug transporters, acting alone or in concert with drug metabolizing enzymes, can play an important role in modulating drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, thus affecting the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of a drug. The drug interaction guidance documents from regulatory agencies include various decision criteria that may be used to predict the need for in vivo assessment of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. Regulatory science research continues to assess the prediction performances of various criteria as well as to examine the strength and limitations of each prediction criterion to foster discussions related to harmonized decision criteria that may be used to facilitate global drug development. This review discusses the role of transporters in drug development with a focus on methodologies in assessing transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions, challenges in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of transporters, and emerging transporter research areas including biomarkers, assessment of tissue concentrations, and effect of diseases on transporters. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Cationic Gelatin Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery to the Ocular Surface: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Li Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop an effective ocular drug delivery carrier, we prepared two different charged gelatin nanoparticles (GPs and evaluated particle size, surface charge, and morphology. The in vitro biocompatibility of GPs was assessed using human corneal epithelium (HCE cells and in vivo safety by administering them as eye drops to New Zealand rabbits. The GPs prepared using type A gelatin were positively charged (GP(+, +33 mV; size, 180.6±45.7 nm. Water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1 assay showed that both GPs were nontoxic to HCE cells. The fluorescence intensity of HCE cells cultured with cationic GPs conjugated with a fluorescent dye was higher than that of the anionic GP-treated HCE cells. In vivo examination showed no serious irritation to the rabbit eyes. Furthermore, corneal thickness and ocular pressure in the eyes of the treated rabbits were similar to those in the eyes of normal rabbits. Microscopic examination of corneal cryosections showed widely distributed fluorescent nanocarriers, from the anterior to the posterior part of the cornea of the GP(+ group, and higher fluorescence intensity in the GP(+ group was also observed. In conclusion, GPs as cationic colloidal carriers were efficiently adsorbed on the negatively charged cornea without irritating the eyes of the rabbits and can be retained in the cornea for a longer time. Thus, GPs(+ have a great potential as vehicles for ocular drug delivery.

  14. Relationship between xerostomia and psychotropic drugs in patients with schizophrenia: evaluation using an oral moisture meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A; Miyachi, H; Tanaka, K; Chikazu, D; Miyaoka, H

    2016-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia are most commonly treated with antipsychotic medications, often with the addition of anxiolytics. This study used an oral moisture meter to evaluate xerostomia in patients with schizophrenia taking typical and atypical antipsychotics, anxiolytics and non-psychotropic medications. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to ICD-10 criteria in the Department of Psychiatry, Kitasato University East, and affiliated hospitals were studied. All patients were on psychotropic medications. Patients with diseases associated with xerostomia, such as Sjögren's syndrome I, were excluded. A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Mean oral moisture was 27·81 ± 2·27% (normal, ≥30·0%). A significant association was observed between objective oral moisture and the subjective sense of dry mouth. Multivariate analysis revealed a negative correlation between the number of antipsychotics and, especially, anxiolytics, and the degree of oral moisture. Drug dosages themselves were not significantly correlated with dry mouth. These findings suggest that objective oral moisture measurements show decreased moisture in patients on these medications and that the degree of moisture shows a greater negative correlation with the number, as opposed to the dosages, of psychotropic drugs administered. When patients with schizophrenia visit a dental clinic, it is important for the dentist to accurately assess the degree of oral moisture and to determine the medications being taken. Based on these findings of the association of polypharmacy with xerostomia, dentists are encouraged to inform the psychiatrist of the need to actively manage patients' xerostomia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Toxicity Evaluation of Through Fish Bioassay Raw Bulk Drug Industry Wastewater After Electrochemical Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Satyanarayan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high pollution potential that the synthetic Bulk Drug industry Wastewater (BDW possesses due to the presence of variety of refractory organics, toxicity evaluation is of prime importance in assessing the efficiency of the applied wastewater treatment system and in establishing the discharge standards. Therefore, in this study the toxic effects of high strength bulk drug industry wastewater before and after electrochemical treatment on common fish Lebistes reticulatus-(peter were studied under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that wastewater being very strong in terms of color, COD and BOD is found to be very toxic to the studied fish. The LC50 values for raw wastewater and after electrochemical treatment with carbon and aluminium electrodes for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between, 2.5-3.6%, 6.8-8.0%, 5.0-5.8% respectively. Carbon electrode showed marginally better removals for toxicity than aluminium electrode. It was evident from the studies that electrochemical treatment reduces toxicity in proportion to the removal efficiency shown by both the electrodes. The reduction in toxicity after treatment indicates the intermediates generated are not toxic than the parent compounds. Furthermore, as the electrochemical treatment did not result in achieving disposal standards it could be used only as a pre-treatment and the wastewater needs further secondary treatment before final disposal.

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effects of drugs in treating traumatic brain edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J.; Qian, Z.; Yang, T.; Li, W.; Hu, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several drugs in treating traumatic brain edema (TBE) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) technology. Rats with TBE models were given hypertonic saline (HS), mannitol and mannitol+HS respectively for different groups. Light scattering properties of rat's local cortex was measured by NIRs within the wavelength range from 700 to 850 nm. TBE models were built in rats' left brains. The scattering properties of the right and left target corresponding to the position of normal and TBE tissue were measured and recorded in vivo and real-time by a bifurcated needle probe. The brain water contents (BWC) were measured by the wet and dry weight method after injury and treatment hours 1, 6, 24, 72 and 120. A marked linear relationship was observed between reduced scattering coefficient (μs') and BWC. By recording μs' of rats' brains, the entire progressions of effects of several drugs were observed. The result may suggest that the NIRs techniques have a potential for assessing effects in vivo and real-time on treatment of the brain injury.

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug evaluation of pazopanib for the treatment of uterine leiomyosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Simone; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Aiello, Nicoletta; Barra, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Bogani, Giorgio; Raspagliesi, Francesco; Lorusso, Domenica

    2017-08-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcomas (ULMS) represent 1.3% of all uterine malignant tumors. Surgery is the curative treatment for patients with early stage disease. In case of advanced, persistent or recurrent tumor, chemotherapy represents the standard of care, but these patients have a poor prognosis. As the results with available therapies are far from being satisfactory, research is focusing on identification of new compounds. In 2012 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed pazopanib for the treatment of advanced soft-tissue sarcomas failing previous chemotherapy. Areas covered: The aim of this article is to review the literature on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy and safety of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), pazopanib in the treatment of ULMS. Expert opinion: The discovery of some relevant signalling pathways in LMS cells led to the development of new targeted drugs with promising results in the management of these tumors. Pazopanib is a multi-target second-generation TKI with activity against growth factors involved in angiogenesis. It has shown promising results both in terms of efficacy and safety, as shown in the EORTC 62043 Study and the PALETTE trial. Further studies are awaited to evaluate its efficacy in uterine leiomyosarcomas.

  18. Xenon-133 determination of muscle blood flow: Use in evaluating cardioactive drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wexler, J.P.; Davis, L.; Mancini, D.; Chadwick, B.; Le Jemtel, T.

    1985-01-01

    Cardioactive drugs may effect both the central and peripheral circulatory systems. The effects on the central and peripheral circulatory systems of chronic Captorpril therapy in 7 pts with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) were evaluated simultaneously. Skeletal muscle blood flow (SMBF) determined using 133-Xe washout and a Cd/Te detector, oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2/), and radial artery and femoral vein O/sub 2/ concentration difference (A-V) were determined at rest and peak upright bicycle exercise before (BT) and after (AT) 6-12 weeks of Captopril therapy. In CI pts there was a significant increase in VO/sub 2/ and SMBF AT vs BT. In contrast, in CNC pts there was no change in VO/sub 2/ and a significant decrease in SMBF AT vs BT. In pts with severe CHF who are CI, there is an apparent fall in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR). In contrast, in CNC pts there is an increase in PVR. This study demonstrates that SMBF determines using 133-Xe is an important method for determining the effects of cardioactive drugs

  19. Near-infrared spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effects of drugs in treating traumatic brain edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J; Qian, Z; Li, W; Hu, G [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Nanjing 210016 (China); Yang, T, E-mail: zhiyu@nuaa.edu.cn [School of Clinical Medicine, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several drugs in treating traumatic brain edema (TBE) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) technology. Rats with TBE models were given hypertonic saline (HS), mannitol and mannitol+HS respectively for different groups. Light scattering properties of rat's local cortex was measured by NIRs within the wavelength range from 700 to 850 nm. TBE models were built in rats' left brains. The scattering properties of the right and left target corresponding to the position of normal and TBE tissue were measured and recorded in vivo and real-time by a bifurcated needle probe. The brain water contents (BWC) were measured by the wet and dry weight method after injury and treatment hours 1, 6, 24, 72 and 120. A marked linear relationship was observed between reduced scattering coefficient ({mu}{sub s}') and BWC. By recording {mu}{sub s}' of rats' brains, the entire progressions of effects of several drugs were observed. The result may suggest that the NIRs techniques have a potential for assessing effects in vivo and real-time on treatment of the brain injury.

  20. Evaluating an approach to improving the adoption rate of wireless drug library updates for smart pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Lindsey B; Eckel, Stephen F

    2011-01-15

    An academic medical center's approach to improving the adoption rate of wireless drug library updates for smart pumps was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team composed of pharmacy, nursing, medical engineering, materials management, and patient equipment personnel at an academic medical center collaborated to update the drug libraries of more than 1800 smart pumps via a wireless control system. Two pilot tests were completed to identify and resolve issues before the live wireless update was attempted. The second pilot test, a passive approach, produced an adoption rate of 42% of 1804 pumps at the end of one week and a rate of 56% on day 10. The goal of 80% was not achieved until day 22. The change to an active multidisciplinary process three months later produced an adoption rate of 80% for 1869 pumps on day 10, resulting in a 45.4% increase in the adoption rate between the two trials on day 10 (p libraries reduced the amount of time required to reach a goal adoption rate of 80%.

  1. Feasibility evaluation of 3 automated cellular drug screening assays on a robotic workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soikkeli, Anne; Sempio, Cristina; Kaukonen, Ann Marie; Urtti, Arto; Hirvonen, Jouni; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the implementation and optimization of 3 cell-based assays on a TECAN Genesis workstation-the Caspase-Glo 3/7 and sulforhodamine B (SRB) screening assays and the mechanistic Caco-2 permeability protocol-and evaluates their feasibility for automation. During implementation, the dispensing speed to add drug solutions and fixative trichloroacetic acid and the aspiration speed to remove the supernatant immediately after fixation were optimized. Decontamination steps for cleaning the tips and pipetting tubing were also added. The automated Caspase-Glo 3/7 screen was successfully optimized with Caco-2 cells (Z' 0.7, signal-to-base ratio [S/B] 1.7) but not with DU-145 cells. In contrast, the automated SRB screen was successfully optimized with the DU-145 cells (Z' 0.8, S/B 2.4) but not with the Caco-2 cells (Z' -0.8, S/B 1.4). The automated bidirectional Caco-2 permeability experiments separated successfully low- and high-permeability compounds (Z' 0.8, S/B 84.2) and passive drug permeation from efflux-mediated transport (Z' 0.5, S/B 8.6). Of the assays, the homogeneous Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay benefits the most from automation, but also the heterogeneous SRB assay and Caco-2 permeability experiments gain advantages from automation.

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effects of drugs in treating traumatic brain edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, J; Qian, Z; Li, W; Hu, G; Yang, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several drugs in treating traumatic brain edema (TBE) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRs) technology. Rats with TBE models were given hypertonic saline (HS), mannitol and mannitol+HS respectively for different groups. Light scattering properties of rat's local cortex was measured by NIRs within the wavelength range from 700 to 850 nm. TBE models were built in rats' left brains. The scattering properties of the right and left target corresponding to the position of normal and TBE tissue were measured and recorded in vivo and real-time by a bifurcated needle probe. The brain water contents (BWC) were measured by the wet and dry weight method after injury and treatment hours 1, 6, 24, 72 and 120. A marked linear relationship was observed between reduced scattering coefficient (μ s ') and BWC. By recording μ s ' of rats' brains, the entire progressions of effects of several drugs were observed. The result may suggest that the NIRs techniques have a potential for assessing effects in vivo and real-time on treatment of the brain injury.

  3. Formulation and evaluation of gastroretentive microballoons containing baclofen for a floating oral controlled drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, T S; Ranpise, N S; Ranade, A N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to fabricate and evaluate a multiparticulate oral gastroretentive dosage form of baclofen characterized by a central large cavity (hollow core) promoting unmitigated floatation with practical applications to alleviate the signs and symptoms of spasticity and muscular rigidity. Solvent diffusion and evaporation procedure were applied to prepare floating microspheres with a central large cavity using various combinations of ethylcellulose (release retardant) and HPMC K4M (release modifier) dissolved in a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (2:1). The obtained microspheres (700-1000 µm) exhibit excellent floating ability (86 ± 2.00%) and release characteristics with entrapment efficiency of 95.2 ± 0.32%. Microspheres fabricated with ethylcellulose to HPMC K4M in the ratio 8.5:1.5 released 98.67% of the entrapped drug in 12 h. Muscle relaxation caused by baclofen microspheres impairs the rotarod performance for more than 12 h. Abdominal X-ray images showed that the gastroretention period of the floating barium sulfate- labeled microspheres was no less than 10 h. The buoyant baclofen microspheres provide a promising gastroretentive drug delivery system to deliver baclofen in spastic patients with a sustained release rate.

  4. Performance evaluation of enzyme immunoassay for voriconazole therapeutic drug monitoring with automated clinical chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yongbum; Han, Minje; Han, Eun Young; Lee, Kyunghoon; Song, Junghan; Song, Sang Hoon

    2017-08-01

    Voriconazole is a triazole antifungal developed for the treatment of fungal infectious disease, and the clinical utility of its therapeutic drug monitoring has been evaluated. Recently, a new assay for analyzing the serum voriconazole concentration with an automated clinical chemistry analyzer was developed. We evaluated the performance of the new assay based on standardized protocols. The analytical performance of the assay was evaluated according to its precision, trueness by recovery, limit of quantitation, linearity, and correlation with results from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The evaluation was performed with the same protocol on two different routine chemistry analyzers. All evaluations were performed according to CLSI Guidelines EP15, EP17, EP6, and EP9 [1-4]. Coefficients of variation for within-run and between-day imprecision were 3.2-5.1% and 1.5-3.0%, respectively, on the two different analyzers for pooled serum samples. The recovery rates were in the range of 95.4-102.2%. The limit of blank was 0.0049 μg/mL, and the limit of detection of the samples was 0.0266-0.0376 μg/mL. The percent recovery at three LoQ levels were 67.9-74.6% for 0.50 μg/mL, 75.5-80.2% for 0.60 μg/mL, and 89.9-96.6% for 0.70 μg/mL. A linear relationship was demonstrated between 0.5 μg/mL and 16.0 μg/mL ( R 2 =0.9995-0.9998). The assay correlated well with LC-MS/MS results ( R 2 =0.9739-0.9828). The assay showed acceptable precision, trueness, linearity, and limit of quantification, and correlated well with LC-MS/MS. Therefore, its analytical performance is satisfactory for monitoring the drug concentration of voriconazole.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures and drug delivery tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeh, Naser Ali

    us to explore requirements for generating peptides with optimized drug encapsulation and to establish correlations between the structure of peptides with their drug entrapment properties. Thus, the general objective of this dissertation was to design and evaluate additional cyclic or amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures, compare their efficiency in delivery of small molecules with the previously reported cyclic peptides containing tryptophan and arginine residues. This dissertation consists of three chapters. Chapter 1. MANUSCRIPT (published in Current Organic Chemistry 2014). The objective of this work was to design amphiphilic linear and cyclic peptides containing hydrophobic tryptophan W residues that were linked through a triazole ring to positively charged arginine R and lysine (K) residues. The peptides were synthesized through click chemistry between hydrophobic peptides containing alkyne and positively charged peptides containing azide groups. Characterization of their structures like solubility, CD, TEM, cytotoxicity were investigated. The conjugates were showed minimal cytotoxicity at two cell lines. The secondary structures of both peptides were similar to a distorted α-helix as shown by CD spectroscopy. TEM imaging also showed that linear-linear (WG(triazole-KR-NH2))3 and cyclic-linear [WG(triazole-KR-NH2)]3 peptides formed nano-sized structures. Chapter 2. MANUSCRIPT I (Submitted to Journal of Molecular Modeling). In this work, we investigated the structural and dynamical aspects of cyclic-linear peptide ([WG(triazole-KR-NH2)] 3 and linear-linear peptide (WG(triazole-KR-NH2))3) formed nanostructures compared to a drug delivery system with [WR]4. While [WR]4 was found to be an efficient molecular transporter for small molecule drugs, such as lamivudine and dasatinib, cyclic-linear peptide ([WG(triazole-KR-NH2)]3 was inefficient. Molecular modeling was used to explain the differential behavior of these peptides. We showed how the morphology of these

  6. Economic Evaluation of the Juvenile Drug Court/Reclaiming Futures (JDC/RF) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollister, Kathryn; Baumer, Pamela; Davis, Monica; Greene, Alison; Stevens, Sally; Dennis, Michael

    2018-07-01

    Juvenile drug court (JDC) programs are an increasingly popular option for rehabilitating juvenile offenders with substance problems, but research has found inconsistent evidence regarding their effectiveness and economic impact. While assessing client outcomes such as reduced substance use and delinquency is necessary to gauge program effectiveness, a more comprehensive understanding of program success and sustainability can be attained by examining program costs and economic benefits. As part of the National Cross-Site Evaluation of JDC and Reclaiming Futures (RF), an economic analysis of five JDC/RF programs was conducted from a multisystem and multiagency perspective. The study highlights the direct and indirect costs of JDC/RF and the savings generated from reduced health problems, illegal activity, and missed school days. Results include the average (per participant) cost of JDC/RF, the total economic benefits per JDC/RF participant, and the net savings of JDC/RF relative to standard JDC.

  7. Evaluating a policing strategy intended to disrupt an illicit street-level drug market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Nicholas; Brunson, Rod K; McGarrell, Edmund F

    2010-12-01

    The authors examined a strategic policing initiative that was implemented in a high crime Nashville, Tennessee neighborhood by utilizing a mixed-methodological evaluation approach in order to provide (a) a descriptive process assessment of program fidelity; (b) an interrupted time-series analysis relying upon generalized linear models; (c) in-depth resident interviews. Results revealed that the initiative corresponded with a statistically significant reduction in drug and narcotics incidents as well as perceived changes in neighborhood disorder within the target community. There was less-clear evidence, however, of a significant impact on other outcomes examined. The implications that an intensive crime prevention strategy corresponded with a reduction in specific forms of neighborhood crime illustrates the complex considerations that law enforcement officials face when deciding to implement this type of crime prevention initiative.

  8. Challenges in economic evaluation of new drugs: experience with rituximab in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodszky, Valentin; Orlewska, Ewa; Pentek, Martha; Karpati, Krisztian; Skoupa, Jana; Gulacsi, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of a new therapy into clinical practice is a complex process. Various countries have different requirements for information but most often focus on economic evaluation, which often plays a stronger role in healthcare decision making than does clinical evidence. To identify all potential challenges in economic evaluation, the case of a new biological drug, rituximab, used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, has been taken as an example. We present methods and results of economic assessment, highlighting the specific issues that should be considered in countries with economic and health care conditions similar to those of Hungary. In principle, economic evaluation requires data on characteristics of target population, disease progression, treatment impact, preferences, resource utilization and unit prices. Treatment effect/relative risk reduction and clinical practice patterns (resource use) may be more generalizable, whereas prices and baseline risk need to be jurisdiction specific. In order to address issues of transferability, investments need to be made in the collection of epidemiological and demographic data, plus data on clinical practice patterns, resource use, costs and health state valuation. In Hungary this problem has been solved through conducting a well designed 255 patient cross-sectional study. The Hungarian example shows that there should be more investment in data collection for those parameters that are thought to differ most from place to place. Owing to the similarities between Central and Eastern Europe countries in health care systems, clinical practice patterns and economic indicators, they may be able to develop partnerships to develop relevant regional databases and registries.

  9. Transmission assessment surveys (TAS to define endpoints for lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration: a multicenter evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lymphatic filariasis (LF is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA. Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached a level low enough that it cannot be sustained even in the absence of drug intervention. Guidelines advanced by WHO call for a transmission assessment survey (TAS to determine if MDA can be stopped within an LF evaluation unit (EU after at least five effective rounds of annual treatment. To test the value and practicality of these guidelines, a multicenter operational research trial was undertaken in 11 countries covering various geographic and epidemiological settings. METHODOLOGY: The TAS was conducted twice in each EU with TAS-1 and TAS-2 approximately 24 months apart. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS formed the basis of the TAS survey design but specific EU characteristics defined the survey site (school or community, eligible population (6-7 year olds or 1(st-2(nd graders, survey type (systematic or cluster-sampling, target sample size, and critical cutoff (a statistically powered threshold below which transmission is expected to be no longer sustainable. The primary diagnostic tools were the immunochromatographic (ICT test for W. bancrofti EUs and the BmR1 test (Brugia Rapid or PanLF for Brugia spp. EUs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS: In 10 of 11 EUs, the number of TAS-1 positive cases was below the critical cutoff, indicating that MDA could be stopped. The same results were found in the follow-up TAS-2, therefore, confirming the previous decision outcome. Sample sizes were highly sex and age-representative and closely matched the target value after factoring in estimates of non-participation. The TAS was determined to be a practical and effective evaluation tool for stopping MDA although its validity for longer-term post

  10. Intracranial drug-delivery scaffolds: Biocompatibility evaluation of sucrose acetate isobutyrate gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, James; Jallo, George I.; Penno, Margaret B.; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Young, G. David; Johnson, Randolph M.; Gillis, Edward M.; Rampersaud, Charles; Carson, Benjamin S.; Guarnieri, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Sucrose acetate isobutyrate (SAIB) is a water insoluble, biodegradable gel used for controlled-release oral and subcutaneous drug delivery. We investigated SAIB compatibility in the rat central nervous system (CNS) by implanting solutions of SAIB in adult and in neonatal brains. Methods: 10-15 μL solutions of SAIB gels in 0-30% ethanol were injected into the cerebral cortex of adult Fischer 344 rats. Control animals were implanted with a 10 mg biodegradable poly anhydride copolymer of poly [bis (p-carboxyphenoxy) propane] anhydride and sebacic acid (PCPP:SA). Adult rats were evaluated for signs of pain and distress, including changes in posture, facial signs, and grooming behavior. 1-2 μL solutions of SAIB gels in 15% ethanol were injected into brains of 12-24 h-old rats. Neonatal rats were evaluated for survival. Adult and neonatal brains were examined by histopathology 3-48 days after implant. Results: Gel implants produced elliptical compression of cortical tissue, cell loss, and inflammation. Cell loss appeared to be confined to the implantation wound and associated neuronal fields. In adult rats, neurophil compression, inflammation, and cell loss appeared similar with the 10-mg PCPP:SA implants and the 10-mg SAIB implants. There was no clinical evidence of pain or distress from SAIB implants. 1-2 μL implants of SAIB-15% ethanol had no effect on survival of neonatal animals. Conclusion: Brain implants of SAIB induce a mild to moderate inflammatory response and associated neuronal cell damage. The implants appeared to be biocompatible in adult and neonatal animals. These results suggest that further studies of SAIB as an injectable drug-delivery scaffold for CNS therapeutic agents are warranted

  11. Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) to define endpoints for lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration: a multicenter evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian K; Deming, Michael; Biritwum, Nana-Kwadwo; Bougma, Windtaré R; Dorkenoo, Améyo M; El-Setouhy, Maged; Fischer, Peter U; Gass, Katherine; Gonzalez de Peña, Manuel; Mercado-Hernandez, Leda; Kyelem, Dominique; Lammie, Patrick J; Flueckiger, Rebecca M; Mwingira, Upendo J; Noordin, Rahmah; Offei Owusu, Irene; Ottesen, Eric A; Pavluck, Alexandre; Pilotte, Nils; Rao, Ramakrishna U; Samarasekera, Dilhani; Schmaedick, Mark A; Settinayake, Sunil; Simonsen, Paul E; Supali, Taniawati; Taleo, Fasihah; Torres, Melissa; Weil, Gary J; Won, Kimberly Y

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is targeted for global elimination through treatment of entire at-risk populations with repeated annual mass drug administration (MDA). Essential for program success is defining and confirming the appropriate endpoint for MDA when transmission is presumed to have reached a level low enough that it cannot be sustained even in the absence of drug intervention. Guidelines advanced by WHO call for a transmission assessment survey (TAS) to determine if MDA can be stopped within an LF evaluation unit (EU) after at least five effective rounds of annual treatment. To test the value and practicality of these guidelines, a multicenter operational research trial was undertaken in 11 countries covering various geographic and epidemiological settings. The TAS was conducted twice in each EU with TAS-1 and TAS-2 approximately 24 months apart. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) formed the basis of the TAS survey design but specific EU characteristics defined the survey site (school or community), eligible population (6-7 year olds or 1(st)-2(nd) graders), survey type (systematic or cluster-sampling), target sample size, and critical cutoff (a statistically powered threshold below which transmission is expected to be no longer sustainable). The primary diagnostic tools were the immunochromatographic (ICT) test for W. bancrofti EUs and the BmR1 test (Brugia Rapid or PanLF) for Brugia spp. EUs. In 10 of 11 EUs, the number of TAS-1 positive cases was below the critical cutoff, indicating that MDA could be stopped. The same results were found in the follow-up TAS-2, therefore, confirming the previous decision outcome. Sample sizes were highly sex and age-representative and closely matched the target value after factoring in estimates of non-participation. The TAS was determined to be a practical and effective evaluation tool for stopping MDA although its validity for longer-term post-MDA surveillance requires further investigation.

  12. Batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation of botanical drug products using multivariate statistical analysis of the chromatographic fingerprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X; Qu, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many kinds of industrial products. In this paper, the combined use of multivariate statistical analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting is presented here to evaluate batch-to-batch quality consistency of botanical drug products. A typical botanical drug product in China, Shenmai injection, was selected as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. The high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint data of historical batches were collected from a traditional Chinese medicine manufacturing factory. Characteristic peaks were weighted by their variability among production batches. A principal component analysis model was established after outliers were modified or removed. Multivariate (Hotelling T(2) and DModX) control charts were finally successfully applied to evaluate the quality consistency. The results suggest useful applications for a combination of multivariate statistical analysis with chromatographic fingerprinting in batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation for the manufacture of botanical drug products.

  13. Quality Evaluation of Ayurvedic Crude Drug Daruharidra, Its Allied Species, and Commercial Samples from Herbal Drug Markets of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata known as “Daruharidra” in Ayurveda is a versatile medicinal plant used singly or in combination with other medicinal plants for treating a variety of ailments like jaundice, enlargement of spleen, leprosy, rheumatism, fever, morning/evening sickness, snakebite, and so forth. A major bioactive marker of this genus is an alkaloid berberine, which is known for its activity against cholera, acute diarrhea, amoebiasis, and latent malaria and for the treatment of oriental sore caused by Leishmania tropica. Although the roots of B. aristata are considered as the official drug (Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, the study revealed that different species of Berberis, namely. B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium are also used under the name of Daruharidra in different parts of the country. Detailed physicochemical and phytochemical studies of subjects like total ash, acid insoluble ash, tannins, and total alkaloids were calculated from the shade dried powdered material according to the recommended procedures. Further, heavy metal studies and quantitative estimation of berberine through HPTLC have also been performed as per ICH guidelines. A detailed study of four Berberis species, namely B. aristata, B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium, which are implicated as Daruharidra and collected from wild and ten commercial samples procured from various important drug markets in India has been carried out, which may be useful to pharmaceutical industries for the authentication of the commercial samples and exploring the possibilities of using other species as a substitute of B. aristata.

  14. Evaluation of γ-cyclodextrin effect on permeation of lipophilic drugs: application of cellophane/fused octanol membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muankaew, Chutimon; Jansook, Phatsawee; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2017-06-01

    According to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System, oral bioavailability of drugs is determined by their aqueous solubility and the ability of the dissolved drug molecules to permeate lipophilic biological membranes. Similarly topical bioavailability of ophthalmic drugs is determined by their solubility in the aqueous tear fluid and their ability to permeate the lipophilic cornea. Enabling pharmaceutical excipients such as cyclodextrins can have profound effect on the drug bioavailability. However, to fully appreciate such enabling excipients, the relationship between their effects and the physicochemical properties of the permeating drug needs to be known. In this study, the permeation enhancing effect of γ-cyclodextrin (γCD) on saturated drug solutions containing hydrocortisone (HC), irbesartan (IBS), or telmisartan (TEL) was evaluated using cellophane and fused cellulose-octanol membranes in a conventional Franz diffusion cell system. The flux (J), the flux ratio (J R ) and the apparent permeability coefficients (P app ) demonstrate that γCD increases drug permeability. However, its efficacy depends on the drug properties. Addition of γCD increased P app of HC (unionized) and IBS (partially ionized) through the dual membrane but decreased the P app of TEL (fully ionized) that displays low complexation efficacy. The dual cellophane-octanol membrane system was simple to use and gave reproducible results.

  15. Evaluation of gum mastic (Pistacia lentiscus as a microencapsulating and matrix forming material for sustained drug release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh M. Morkhade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a natural gum mastic was evaluated as a microencapsulating and matrix-forming material for sustained drug release. Mastic was characterized for its physicochemical properties. Microparticles were prepared by oil-in-oil solvent evaporation method. Matrix tablets were prepared by wet and melt granulation techniques. Diclofenac sodium (DFS and diltiazem hydrochloride (DLTZ were used as model drugs. Mastic produced discrete and spherical microspheres with DLTZ and microcapsules with DFS. Particle size and drug loading of microparticles was in the range of 22–62 µm and 50–87%, respectively. Increase in mastic: drug ratio increased microparticle size, improved drug loading and decreased the drug release rate. Microparticles with gum: drug ratio of 2:1 could sustain DLTZ release up to 12 h and released 57% DFS in 12 h. Mastic produced tablets with acceptable pharmacotechnical properties. A 30% w/w of mastic in tablet could sustain DLTZ release for 5 h from wet granulation, and DFS release for 8 h and 11 h from wet and melt granulation, respectively. Results revealed that a natural gum mastic can be used successfully to formulate matrix tablets and microparticles for sustained drug release.

  16. Evaluation of Container Closure System Integrity for Frozen Storage Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Nikoloff, Jonas; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, drug product for parenteral administration is stored in a frozen state (e.g., -20 °C or -80 °C), particularly during early stages of development of some biotech molecules in order to provide sufficient stability. Shipment of frozen product could potentially be performed in the frozen state, yet possibly at different temperatures, for example, using dry ice (-80 °C). Container closure systems of drug products usually consist of a glass vial, rubber stopper, and an aluminum crimped cap. In the frozen state, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of commonly used rubber stoppers is between -55 and -65 °C. Below their Tg, rubber stoppers are known to lose their elastic properties and become brittle, and thus potentially fail to maintain container closure integrity in the frozen state. Leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are likely to be transient, yet, can possibly risk container closure integrity and lead to microbial contamination. After thawing, the rubber stopper is supposed to re-seal the container closure system. Given the transient nature of the possible impact on container closure integrity in the frozen state, typical container closure integrity testing methods (used at room temperature conditions) are unable to evaluate and thus confirm container closure integrity in the frozen state. Here we present the development of a novel method (thermal physical container closure integrity) for direct assessment of container closure integrity by a physical method (physical container closure integrity) at frozen conditions, using a modified He leakage test. In this study, different container closure systems were evaluated with regard to physical container closure integrity in the frozen state to assess the suitability of vial/stopper combinations and were compared to a gas headspace method. In summary, the thermal physical container closure integrity He leakage method was more sensitive in detecting physical container closure

  17. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of polyamidoamine conjugate containing pamidronate and platinum drug

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndamase, AS

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates have been found to be effective when combined with anticancer drugs for chemotherapy. In this paper, pamidronate and platinum complexes were conjugated to linear poly(amidoamine)s (PAMAM) to improve the drug efficacy. The conjugates...

  18. Limitations of drug registries to evaluate orphan medicinal products for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, Carla E. M.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Aymé, Ségolène; Manuel, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Orphan drugs are often approved under exceptional circumstances, requiring submission of additional data on safety and effectiveness through registries. These registries are mainly focused on one drug only and data is frequently incomplete. Some registries also address phenotypic heterogeneity and

  19. Structured evaluation of rodent behavioral tests used in drug discovery research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eHånell

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A large variety of rodent behavioral tests are currently being used to evaluate traits such as sensory-motor function, social interactions, anxiety-like and depressive-like behavior, substance dependence and various forms of cognitive function. Most behavioral tests have an inherent complexity, and their use requires consideration of several aspects such as the source of motivation in the test, the interaction between experimenter and animal, sources of variability, the sensory modality required by the animal to solve the task as well as costs and required work effort. Of particular importance is a test’s validity because of its influence on the chance of successful translation of preclinical results to clinical settings. High validity may, however, have to be balanced against practical constraints and there are no behavioral tests with optimal characteristics. The design and development of new behavioral tests is therefore an ongoing effort and there are now well over one hundred tests described in the contemporary literature. Some of them are well established following extensive use, while others are novel and still unproven. The task of choosing a behavioral test for a particular project may therefore be daunting and the aim of the present review is to provide a structured way to evaluate rodent behavioral tests aimed at drug discovery research.

  20. Residues of carcinogenic animal drugs in food: difficulties in evaluation of human safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, A

    1979-01-01

    The indisputable need to intensify animal production in order to provide an adequate food supply for the world population involves the use of substances that are highly potent pharmacologically and toxicologically. The history of regulatory action with regard to such additives is similar to that for other substances: first, no regulation; next, an over-reaction; and now decisions based on judicious evaluation of scientific facts. One factor that differentiates the chemicals used in animal production from other food additives is that both the parent compounds and their metabolites appear in edible products, posing problems both for the analytical detection and safety evaluation of such residues. It would be unrealistic to propose 'zero' tolerances for these additives, even if they are carcinogenic. The benefits gained from drugs that cure and prevent infections and parasitic diseases in food-producing animals, and the fact that analytical methods can now detect very small quantities make the presence of low levels of these substances in food unobjectionable.

  1. In Vitro/In Vivo Evaluation of Dexamethasone--PAMAM Dendrimer Complexes for Retinal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Burçin; Pehlivan, Sibel Bozdağ; Vural, İmran; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2015-11-01

    Current treatment options for diabetic retinopathy (DR) have side effects because of invasive application and topical application does not generally result in therapeutic levels in the target tissue. Therefore, improving the drug delivery to retina, following topical administration, might be a solution to DR treatment problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the complexation effects of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers on ocular absorption of dexamethasone (DEX). Using different PAMAM generations, complex formulations were prepared and characterized. Formulations were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity and cell permeability, as well as ex vivo transport across ocular tissues. The ocular pharmacokinetic properties of DEX formulations were studied in Sprague-Dawley rats following topical and subconjunctival applications, to evaluate the effect of PAMAM on retinal delivery of DEX. Methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium (MTT) assay indicated that all groups resulted in cell viability comparable to DEX solution (87.5%), with the cell viability being the lowest for G3 complex at 73.5%. Transport study results showed that dendrimer complexation increases DEX transport across both cornea and sclera tissues. The results of in vivo studies were also indicated that especially anionic DEX-PAMAM complex formulations have reached higher DEX concentrations in ocular tissues compared with plain DEX suspension. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. Evaluation of Drug Use Attitudes of Patient and Its Relatives Attending to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Karatas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Irrational drug usage is one of the important public health problems in all countries. Also in our country irrational drug usage patterns is a serious problem and it increases the drug’s share of public health care costs. The aim of our study was evaluate the drug use patterns of patients and relatives of patients in Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital. Material and Methods: Face-to-face interviews (using a questionnaire about Rational Drug Use Survey with 209 patients and patients relatives, admitted to Cukurova University Medical Faculty Balcali Hospital clinics. Results: 209 people participated in this study and 58 % (124 of these are women. The mean age of women was 41,39±13,76 and the mean age of the man was 44,67±13,55. If we decompose the participants to their educational attainment; primary school (34,4 %, secondary school (18,7 %, high school (26,3 % and university (20,6 %. 11,0 % of the participants have no social security. 5,7 % of the participants have acute disease, 54,5 % of them have chronic disease and 39,7 % of them have no medical problems. 53,1 % of the participants said that they do not use drugs without consulting a medical doctor, 11,0 % of the participants said that they sometimes use drugs, 30,6 % of the participants said that they rarely use drugs and 5,3 % of the participants said that they often use drugs without consulting a medical doctor. 14,8 % of the participants said that they use drugs with advise of their relatives, friends and neighbors, 17,2 % of the participants said that they advise the drugs to their relatives, friends and neighbors when they were sick. 16,7 % of the participants said that they often use antibiotics and 77,5 % of the participants said that they sometimes use antibiotics without consulting a doctor when they had common cold or flu. 40,2 % of the participants said that they do not use herbal medicine in treatment. Patients with canser 2,4 %, patients with

  3. Evaluating the Effects of Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations on Medicare Part D Drug Spending and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuting; Caines, Kadin J; Powers, Christopher A

    2017-05-01

    The improvement of medication use is a critical mechanism that accountable care organization (ACO) could use to save overall costs. Currently pharmaceutical spending is not part of the calculation for ACO-shared savings and risks. Thus, ACO providers may have strong incentives to prescribe more medications hoping to avoid expensive downstream medical costs. We designed a quasinatural experiment study to evaluate the effects of Pioneer ACOs on Medicare Part D spending and utilization. Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with Part D drug coverage who were aligned to a Pioneer ACO were compared with a random 5% sample of non-ACO beneficiaries. Outcomes included changes in Part D spending, number of prescription fills, percent of brand medications, and total Part A and B medical spending. We utilized a generalized linear model with a difference-in-differences approach to estimate 2011-2012 changes in these outcomes among beneficiaries aligned with Pioneer ACOs, adjusting for all beneficiary-level demographics, income and insurance status, clinical characteristics, and regional fixed effects. Being in an ACO did not significantly affect Part D spending (-$23.52; P=0.19), total prescriptions filled (-0.12; P=0.27), and the percent of claims for brand-name drugs (0.06%; P=0.23). The ACO group was associated with savings in Parts A and B spending of $345 (PPioneer ACOs were not associated with changes in pharmaceutical spending and use, but were associated with savings in Parts A and B spending in 2012.

  4. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions between cilnidipine and valsartan, in healthy volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieon; Lee, Howard; Jang, Kyungho; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Shin, Dongseong; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although cilnidipine and valsartan are widely coadministered to patients with hypertension, their drug–drug interaction potential has not been investigated. This study compared the pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamic (PD), and tolerability profiles of cilnidipine and valsartan, both alone and in combination, in healthy male subjects. Patients and methods Fifty-four subjects, enrolled into an open-label, single-dose, three-treatment, three-period crossover study, randomly received cilnidipine (10 mg), valsartan (160 mg), or both according to one of six sequences. Blood samples were collected at baseline and up to 24 hours after drug administration in each period. Plasma concentrations of cilnidipine and valsartan were determined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to the last measurable time (AUClast) were estimated using a noncompartmental method. Tolerability was evaluated by assessing adverse events (AEs), vital signs, electrocardiograms, and clinical laboratory tests. Blood pressure was also measured for PD assessment. Results A total of 51 subjects completed the study. The PK profile of cilnidipine was not significantly affected by coadministered valsartan; the geometric mean ratio and 90% confidence interval (90% CI) of AUClast for cilnidipine with and without valsartan was 1.04 (0.98–1.10). Likewise, cilnidipine did not affect the PK of valsartan; the geometric mean ratio (90% CI) of AUClast for valsartan with and without cilnidipine was 0.94 (0.83–1.07). Coadministration of cilnidipine and valsartan reduced blood pressure in an additive way. No serious AEs were reported, and both cilnidipine and valsartan were well tolerated. Conclusion Coadministered cilnidipine and valsartan do not cause a significant PK or PD interaction, and they are well tolerated. PMID:25336921

  5. Comparison of Tetrazolium Salt Assays for Evaluation of Drug Activity against Leishmania spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginouves, Marine; Carme, Bernard; Couppie, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    In French Guiana, leishmaniasis is an essentially cutaneous infection. It constitutes a major public health problem, with a real incidence of 0.2 to 0.3%. Leishmania guyanensis is the causal species most frequently encountered in French Guiana. The treatment of leishmaniasis is essentially drug based, but the therapeutic compounds available have major side effects (e.g., liver damage and diabetes) and must be administered parenterally or are costly. The efficacy of some of these agents has declined due to the emergence of resistance in certain strains of Leishmania. There is currently no vaccine against leishmaniasis, and it is therefore both necessary and urgent to identify new compounds effective against Leishmania. The search for new drugs requires effective tests for evaluations of the leishmanicidal activity of a particular molecule or extract. Microculture tetrazolium assays (MTAs) are colorimetric tests based on the use of tetrazolium salts. We compared the efficacies of three tetrazolium salts—3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT), and 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-8)—for quantification of the promastigotes of various species of Leishmania. We found that the capacity of Leishmania to metabolize a tetrazolium salt depended on the salt used and the species of Leishmania. WST-8 was the tetrazolium salt best metabolized by L. guyanensis and gave the best sensitivity. PMID:24719447

  6. Development and evaluation of a chronotherapeutic drug delivery system of torsemide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songa Ambedkar Sunil

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prepare and evaluate chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems (ChrDDs of torsemide. Compression coated tablets (CCT containing torsemide in the core tablet were prepared by the compression coating technique with different grades of polyethylene oxide (PEO WSR 301 & 1105. The optimized formulations were characterised for tabletting parameters and drug polymer interaction by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR.The hardness of all the CCT using PEO WSR 301 & PEO WSR 1105 were in the range 6-8 kg/cm² & 5.5 to 7 kg/cm² respectively. Their friability values were 99%. The FTIR studies showed no interaction throughout the process of development. Formulations of F7 and of P7 were considered optimized formulations since they yielded a predetermined lag time of 6h before burst release. Hence, these formulations can be exploited to achieve chronotherapeutic drug delivery systems of Torsemide for the treatment of hypertension at the time the patient needs it.O objetivo deste estudo foi preparar e avaliar sistemas cronoterapêuticos de liberação de fármacos (ChrDDs de torsemida. Comprimidos revestidos por compressão (CCT contendo torsemida no (núcleo foram preparados pela técnica de revestimento por compressão, com diferentes categorias de óxido de polietileno (PEO WSR 301 & 1105. As formulações otimizadas foram caracterizadas por parâmetros de compressão e interação fármaco polímero por Infravermelho com Transformada de Fourier (FTIR. A dureza dos CCT utilizando PEO WSR 301 e PEO WSR 1105 foi entre 6-8 kg/cm² e 5,5 a 7 kg/cm², respectivamente. Os valores de friabilidade foram 99%. Os estudos de FTIR mostraram que não h[a interação durante o processo de desenvolvimento. As formulações F7 e P7 foram consideradas otimizadas, uma vez que resultaram em tempo de retardo pré-determinado de 6 h antes da liberação por meio de explosão. Dessa forma, estas formulações podem ser exploradas para

  7. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Conjugated Silicon Quantum Dots: Their Cytotoxicity and Biological Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs have great potential for biomedical applications, including their use as biological fluorescent markers and carriers for drug delivery systems. Biologically inert Si-QDs are less toxic than conventional cadmium-based QDs, and can modify the surface of the Si-QD with covalent bond. We synthesized water-soluble alminoprofen-conjugated Si-QDs (Ap-Si. Alminoprofen is a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID used as an analgesic for rheumatism. Our results showed that the “silicon drug” is less toxic than the control Si-QD and the original drug. These phenomena indicate that the condensed surface integration of ligand/receptor-type drugs might reduce the adverse interaction between the cells and drug molecules. In addition, the medicinal effect of the Si-QDs (i.e., the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme was maintained compared to that of the original drug. The same drug effect is related to the integration ratio of original drugs, which might control the binding interaction between COX-2 and the silicon drug. We conclude that drug conjugation with biocompatible Si-QDs is a potential method for functional pharmaceutical drug development.

  8. Design, formulation, in vitro, in vivo, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of nisoldipine-loaded self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, Balakumar; Habibur Rahman, S. M.; Tamil selvan, N. [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Hari prasad, R. [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis (India); Rajkumar, M. [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Siva selvakumar, M. [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis (India); Vamshikrishna, K. [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Gregory, Marslin [University of Minho, Department of Biology (Portugal); Vijayaraghavan, Chellan, E-mail: balakumar-27@yahoo.co.uk, E-mail: drvijayaragha@gmail.com [PSG College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and optimize the self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) of poor aqueous soluble and less bioavailable nisoldipine to improve its solubility and bioavailability. The solubility of nisoldipine was assessed in various vehicles and ternary phase diagram was constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The selected formulations were evaluated for self-emulsification time, droplet size analysis, and in vitro drug release profile. The optimized formulation ACP 19 had reduced particle size (118.3 ± 1.53 nm), when compared to PCT 08 (740 ± 1.16 nm). In vitro drug release study revealed that 98.05 ± 0.95 and 93.71 ± 1.05 % of drug was, respectively, released from ACP 19 and PCT 08 formulations at 24 h, whereas only 47.42 ± 0.65 % was released from drug in suspension. ACT 19 and PCT 08, respectively, showed 2.5- and 2.22-folds greater bioavailability than drug in suspension. PK Solver 2.0 was used for analysis of data obtained from in vivo study and the results revealed that both ACP 19 SNEDDS and drug in suspension fit into one-compartment pharmacokinetic model.

  9. Design, formulation, in vitro, in vivo, and pharmacokinetic evaluation of nisoldipine-loaded self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Balakumar; Habibur Rahman, S. M.; Tamil selvan, N.; Hari prasad, R.; Rajkumar, M.; Siva selvakumar, M.; Vamshikrishna, K.; Gregory, Marslin; Vijayaraghavan, Chellan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and optimize the self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) of poor aqueous soluble and less bioavailable nisoldipine to improve its solubility and bioavailability. The solubility of nisoldipine was assessed in various vehicles and ternary phase diagram was constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The selected formulations were evaluated for self-emulsification time, droplet size analysis, and in vitro drug release profile. The optimized formulation ACP 19 had reduced particle size (118.3 ± 1.53 nm), when compared to PCT 08 (740 ± 1.16 nm). In vitro drug release study revealed that 98.05 ± 0.95 and 93.71 ± 1.05 % of drug was, respectively, released from ACP 19 and PCT 08 formulations at 24 h, whereas only 47.42 ± 0.65 % was released from drug in suspension. ACT 19 and PCT 08, respectively, showed 2.5- and 2.22-folds greater bioavailability than drug in suspension. PK Solver 2.0 was used for analysis of data obtained from in vivo study and the results revealed that both ACP 19 SNEDDS and drug in suspension fit into one-compartment pharmacokinetic model

  10. Psychotropic drug use in people with intellectual disability: patterns of use and critical evaluation : patterns of use and critical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheifes, A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with psychotropic drugs is highly prevalent in people with intellectual disability, especially in those with behavioural problems. The high rates of psychotropic drug use in this population is contrasted by the limited evidence on their effectiveness and the high risk of adverse events.

  11. Multimodal system designed to reduce errors in recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia: prospective randomised clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Alan F; Webster, Craig S; Hannam, Jacqueline; Mitchell, Simon J; Henderson, Robert; Reid, Papaarangi; Edwards, Kylie-Ellen; Jardim, Anisoara; Pak, Nick; Cooper, Jeremy; Hopley, Lara; Frampton, Chris; Short, Timothy G

    2011-09-22

    To clinically evaluate a new patented multimodal system (SAFERSleep) designed to reduce errors in the recording and administration of drugs in anaesthesia. Prospective randomised open label clinical trial. Five designated operating theatres in a major tertiary referral hospital. Eighty nine consenting anaesthetists managing 1075 cases in which there were 10,764 drug administrations. Use of the new system (which includes customised drug trays and purpose designed drug trolley drawers to promote a well organised anaesthetic workspace and aseptic technique; pre-filled syringes for commonly used anaesthetic drugs; large legible colour coded drug labels; a barcode reader linked to a computer, speakers, and touch screen to provide automatic auditory and visual verification of selected drugs immediately before each administration; automatic compilation of an anaesthetic record; an on-screen and audible warning if an antibiotic has not been administered within 15 minutes of the start of anaesthesia; and certain procedural rules-notably, scanning the label before each drug administration) versus conventional practice in drug administration with a manually compiled anaesthetic record. Primary: composite of errors in the recording and administration of intravenous drugs detected by direct observation and by detailed reconciliation of the contents of used drug vials against recorded administrations; and lapses in responding to an intermittent visual stimulus (vigilance latency task). Secondary: outcomes in patients; analyses of anaesthetists' tasks and assessments of workload; evaluation of the legibility of anaesthetic records; evaluation of compliance with the procedural rules of the new system; and questionnaire based ratings of the respective systems by participants. The overall mean rate of drug errors per 100 administrations was 9.1 (95% confidence interval 6.9 to 11.4) with the new system (one in 11 administrations) and 11.6 (9.3 to 13.9) with conventional methods (one

  12. Drugs and herbs given to prevent hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis therapy: systematic review of ingredients and evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Binghua

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs to protect the liver are frequently prescribed in some countries as part of treatment for tuberculosis. The biological rationale is not clear, they are expensive and may do harm. We conducted a systematic review to a describe the ingredients of "liver protection drugs"; and b compare the evidence base for the policy against international standards. Methods We searched international medical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the specialised register of the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group and Chinese language databases (CNKI, VIP and WanFang to April 2007. Our inclusion criteria were research papers that reported evaluating any liver protection drug or drugs for preventing liver damage in people taking anti-tuberculosis treatment. Two authors independently categorised and extracted data, and appraised the stated methods of evaluating their effectiveness. Results Eighty five research articles met our inclusion criteria, carried out in China (77, India (2, Russia (4, Ukraine (2. These articles evaluated 30 distinct types of liver protection compounds categorised as herbal preparations, manufactured herbal products, combinations of vitamins and other non-herbal substances and manufactured pharmaceutical preparations. Critical appraisal of these articles showed that all were small, poorly conducted studies, measuring intermediate outcomes. Four trials that were described as randomised controlled trials were small, had short follow up, and did not meet international standards. Conclusion There is no reliable evidence to support prescription of drugs or herbs to prevent liver damage in people on tuberculosis treatment.

  13. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Hashami, Zainab; Al-Farsi, Hissa; Al-mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Idris, Mohamed A; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Babiker, Hamza A

    2013-07-15

    Despite evident success of malaria control in many sites in the Arabian Peninsula, malaria remains endemic in a few spots, in Yemen and south-west of Saudi Arabia. In addition to local transmission, imported malaria sustains an extra source of parasites that can challenge the strengths of local control strategies. This study examined the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen and mutations of drug resistant genes, to elucidate parasite structure and distribution of drug resistance genotypes in the region. Five polymorphic loci (MSP-2, Pfg377 and three microsatellites on chromosome 8) not involved in anti-malarial drug resistance, and four drug resistant genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr and dhps) were genotyped in 108 P. falciparum isolates collected in three sites in Yemen: Dhamar, Hodeidah and Taiz. High diversity was seen in non-drug genes, pfg377 (He = 0.66), msp-2 (He = 0.80) and three microsatellites on chr 8, 7.7 kb (He = 0.88), 4.3 kb (He = 0.77) and 0.8 kb (He = 0.71). There was a high level of mixed-genotype infections (57%), with an average 1.8 genotypes per patient. No linkage disequilibrium was seen between drug resistant genes and the non-drug markers (p Yemen is indicative of a large parasite reservoir, which represents a challenge to control efforts. The presence of two distinct pfcrt genotype, CVIET and SVMNT, suggests that chloroquine resistance can possibly be related to a migratory path from Africa and Asia. The absence of the triple mutant dhfr genotype (IRN) and dhps mutations supports the use of artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as first-line therapy. However, the prevalent pfmdr1 genotype NFSND [21%] has previously been associated with tolerance/resistance response to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Regular surveys are, therefore, important to monitor spread of pfmdr1 and dhfr mutations and response to ACT.

  14. Formulation and evaluation of xanthan gum based aceclofenac tablets for colon targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruganesh Ramasamy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to develop a colon targeted drug delivery systems for Aceclofenac using xanthan gum as a carrier. In this study, multilayer coated system that is resistant to gastric and small intestinal conditions but can be easily degraded by colonic bacterial enzymes was designed to achieve effective colon delivery of Aceclofenac. The xanthan gum, the drug and the physical mixture were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. All the formulations were evaluated for hardness, drug content uniformity and other physical properties. Release aspects of Aceclofenac in simulated gastrointestinal fluid and colonic fluid with enzymes were investigated. From these results, Eudragit coated system exhibited gastric and small intestinal resistance to the release of Aceclofenac. The rapid increase in release of Aceclofenac in SCF was revealed as due to the degradation of the xanthan gum membrane by bacterial enzymes. The designed system could be used potentially as a carrier for colon delivery of Aceclofenac by regulating drug release in stomach and the small intestine.O presente estudo teve como objetivo o desenvolvimento de sistema de liberação cólon-alvo de aceclofenaco empregando goma xantana. Nesse trabalho, o revestimento de múltiplas camadas com característica de resistência às condições do intestino delgado além de gastrorresistência oferece como vantagem a rápida degradação desse sistema por enzimas bacterianas colônicas. Dessa forma, o planejamento de tal sistema possibilitou a liberação específica do aceclofenaco no cólon. A goma xantana e o fármaco, além da mistura física desses dois componentes, foram caracterizados por espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FTIR e calorimetria diferencial exploratória (DSC. Todas as formulações foram avaliadas no que se refere à dureza, à uniformidade de conteúdo do f

  15. Estimating the Impact of Means-tested Subsidies under Treatment Externalities with Application to Anti-Malarial Bednets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debopam; Dupas, Pascaline; Kanaya, Shin

    and its neighbors. Using experimental data from Kenya where subsidies were randomized, coupled with GPS-based location information, we show how to estimate aggregate ITN use resulting from means-tested subsidies in the presence of such spatial spillovers. Accounting for spillovers introduces infinite......-dimensional estimated regressors corresponding to continuously distributed location coordinates and makes the inference problem novel. We show that even if individual ITN use unambiguously increases with increasing incidence of subsidy in the neighborhood, ignoring spillovers may over- or under-predict overall ITN use...... resulting from a specific targeting rule, depending on the resulting aggregate incidence of subsidy. Applying our method to the Kenyan data, we find that (i) individual ITN use rises with neighborhood subsidy-rates, (ii) under means-testing, predicted ITN use is a convex increasing function of the subsidy...

  16. 78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... consistent, predictable communication of medical policy decisions to the public through guidance, notice and... protection, (6) bioresearch monitoring, (7) good clinical practice, (8) counter-terrorism drug development...

  17. Predictive tools for the evaluation of microbial effects on drugs during gastrointestinal passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Ines A; Bertau, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Predicting drug metabolism after oral administration is highly complex, yet indispensable. Hitherto, drug metabolism mainly focuses on hepatic processes. In the intestine, drug molecules encounter the metabolic activity of microorganisms prior to absorption through the gut wall. Drug biotransformation through the gastrointestinal microflora has the potential to evoke serious problems because the metabolites formed may cause unexpected and undesired side effects in patients. Hence, in the course of drug development, the question has to be addressed if microbially formed metabolites are physiologically active, pharmaceutically active or even toxic. In order to provide answers to these questions and to keep the number of laboratory tests needed low, predictive tools - in vivo as well as in silico - are invaluable. This review gives an outline of the current state of the art in the field of predicting the drug biotransformation through the gastrointestinal microflora on several levels of modelling. A comprehensive review of the literature with a thorough discussion on assets and drawbacks of the different modelling approaches. The impact of the gastrointestinal drug biotransformation on patients' health will grow with increasing complexity of drug entities. Predicting metabolic fates of drugs by combining in vitro and in silico models provides invaluable information which will be suitable to particularly reduce in vivo studies.

  18. Evaluation of Drug Interactions and Prescription Errors of Poultry Veterinarians in North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madadi MS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug prescription errors are a common cause of adverse incidents and may lead to adverse outcomes, sometimes in subtle ways, being compounded by circumstances or further errors. Therefore, it is important that veterinarians issue the correct drug at the correct dose. Using two or more prescribed drugs may lead to drug interactions. Some drug interactions are very harmful and may have potential threats to the patient's health that is called antagonism. In a survey study, medication errors of 750 prescriptions, including dosage errors and drug interactions were studied. The results indicated that 20.8% of prescriptions had at least one drug interaction. The most interactions were related to antibiotics (69.1%, Sulfonamides (46.7%, Methenamine (46.7% and Florfenicol (20.2%. Analysis of dosage errors indicated that total drugs consumed by broilers in the summer are more than winter seasons. Based on these results, avoiding medication errors are important in the balanced prescribing of drugs and regular education of veterinary practitioners in a certain interval is needed.

  19. Evaluation of successive Tc-99m brain angiography and vasoactive drugs on occlusive cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, Osamu

    1986-01-01

    Cerebral circulation in the patients with unilateral occlusive cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in chronic stage was evaluated by radionuclide angiography (RNA) using Tc-99m pertechnetate. RNA (each Tc-99m dose = 20 mCi) was repeated in short time interval. Employed parameters were as follows; appearance to peak time (APT), brain transit time (BTT), peak count (PC) and up slope (US). These parameters were calculated from time activity curve (TAC) of ''region of interest'' on each hemisphere and the values obtained in affected side were compared with those of normal side and control hemisphere. Reproducibility of these values were satisfactory in PC and US. The results obtained were as follows: In affected hemisphere, PC and US were significantly reduced, while APT and BTT were not significantly affected. The ratio of PC and US between left and right hemispheres increased in the patients with CVD and the latter was particularly significant to detect the abnormality. Effect of vasoactive drugs such as papaverine, acetazolamide, angiotensin II or methoxamine on these parameters was studied in 24 patients with CVD and 16 patients without CVD. Papaverine and acetazolamide increased significantly PC and US in normal hemisphere of patients without CVD and US in normal hemisphere of patients with CVD, while US in these hemispheres were decreased under high blood pressure induced by angiotensin II and methoxamine. These responses, however, were mild or not detected in the affected hemispheres. (J.P.N.)

  20. Evaluation of a novel photosensitizing drug having antitumor effect for advanced prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Sachiko; Inai, Mizuho; Honda, Norihiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Awazu, Kunio

    2017-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer among men worldwide and a novel treatment for the disease is required. Replication-deficient virus particles, hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E), has cytotoxicity to cancer cells. To enhance the therapeutic effect of HVJ-E by photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a trigger of HVJ-E's anti-tumor effect, talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin) used for PDT was encapsulated into HVJ-E to produce a novel photosensitizing drug, named Laserphyrin ®-HVJ-E, and its therapeutic effect for prostate cancer cells (PC-3) was evaluated. As the results, direct cytotoxicities of HVJ-E and Laserphyrin ®-HVJ-E for PC-3 after an administration time of 48 h were almost the same. Cell survival rates of PC-3, which were irradiated 2 h after administration of Laserphyrin ®-HVJ-E, were about 7.8%. Although further study is needed to find an optimal PDT condition, these results suggest that Laserphyrin ®-HVJ-E is useful for treatment of prostate cancer due to the combination of cytotoxicities of HVJ-E and PDT.

  1. Can surveillance systems identify and avert adverse drug events? A prospective evaluation of a commercial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish K; Laguette, Julia; Seger, Andrew; Bates, David W

    2008-01-01

    Computerized monitors can effectively detect and potentially prevent adverse drug events (ADEs). Most monitors have been developed in large academic hospitals and are not readily usable in other settings. We assessed the ability of a commercial program to identify and prevent ADEs in a community hospital. and Measurement We prospectively evaluated the commercial application in a community-based hospital. We examined the frequency and types of alerts produced, how often they were associated with ADEs and potential ADEs, and the potential financial impact of monitoring for ADEs. Among 2,407 patients screened, the application generated 516 high priority alerts. We were able to review 266 alerts at the time they were generated and among these, 30 (11.3%) were considered substantially important to warrant contacting the physician caring for the patient. These 30 alerts were associated with 4 ADEs and 11 potential ADEs. In all 15 cases, the responsible physician was unaware of the event, leading to a change in clinical care in 14 cases. Overall, 23% of high priority alerts were associated with an ADE (95% confidence interval [CI] 12% to 34%) and another 15% were associated with a potential ADE (95% CI 6% to 24%). Active surveillance used approximately 1.5 hours of pharmacist time daily. A commercially available, computer-based ADE detection tool was effective at identifying ADEs. When used as part of an active surveillance program, it can have an impact on preventing or ameliorating ADEs.

  2. Clinical evaluation of domestic biodegradable drug-eluting stents in the treatment of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongying; Suo Chuantao; Shang Ruiping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of domestic biodegradable drug-eluting stent, EXCEL, in clinical treatment of coronary heart disease. Methods: During the period of Jan. 2008-Oct. 2008, 100 patients with coronary heart disease who consented to PCI and postoperative coronary angiography were selected and enrolled in the study. The patients were divided into EXCEL group (n = 58) and Cypher group (n = 42). The immediate successful rate of interventional therapy and the complications occurred during hospitalization were observed. Postoperative follow-up and checkup coronary angiography were conducted. Results: No significant difference in the relevant clinical data, in the number and type of diseased coronary branch and in the mean length of implanted stents existed between two groups. Also, no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of major adverse cardiac event (MACE), in-stent restenosis and thrombosis was present between two groups. Conclusion: Compared with Cypher stenting, EXCEL stenting carries similar, i.e. rather low, occurrence of MACE and in-stent restenosis. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of Aerosol Delivery of Nanosuspension for Pre-clinical Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Po-Chang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are pulmonary diseases that are characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production, and airway hyper-reactivity. Most of the effector cells responsible for these pathologies reside in the lungs. One of the most direct ways to deliver drugs to the target cells is via the trachea. In a pre-clinical setting, this can be achieved via intratracheal (IT, intranasal (IN, or aerosol delivery in the desired animal model. In this study, we pioneered the aerosol delivery of a nanosuspension formulation in a rodent model. The efficiency of different dosing techniques and formulations to target the lungs were compared, and fluticasone was used as the model compound. For the aerosol particle size determination, a ten-stage cascade impactor was used. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD was calculated based on the percent cumulative accumulation at each stage. Formulations with different particle size of fluticasone were made for evaluation. The compatibility of regular fluticasone suspension and nanosuspension for aerosol delivery was also investigated. The in vivo studies were conducted on mice with optimized setting. It was found that the aerosol delivery of fluticasone with nanosuspension was as efficient as intranasal (IN dosing, and was able to achieve dose dependent lung deposition.

  4. A standardized procedure for using human corpus cavernosum strips to evaluate drug activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, V; Sorrentino, R; di Villa Bianca, R; Imbimbo, C; Palmieri, A; Fusco, F; Tajana, G; Cirino, G

    2000-01-01

    The main problem of using human corpus cavernosum (HCC) tissue to perform bioassay is linked to its limited availability further complicated by the heterogeneous source of the tissues used. Here, we show that gender reassignment is a reliable source of human tissue without major ethical problems. Indeed, the entire corpus cavernosum is obtained from the surgery procedure, which allows creating a standardized procedure to prepare HCC strip. In addition, human tissue, if kept in the fridge in the condition described, does not loose its ability to contract to phenylephrine (PE; alpha agonist), angiotensin II (AG II) and KCl up to 4 days. Furthermore, once contracted with PE, HCC relaxes to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent mechanism); sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent mechanism); cromakalim (CRK), a K(ATP) channel opener; or alprostadil, a synthetic PGE2 (ALPR). In conclusion, we have standardized a procedure that allows the use of HCC strips to evaluate drug activity and/or to study pathophysiological mechanisms with an intact functional human tissue up to 4 days from the surgery procedure.

  5. Identification of anthranilamide derivatives as potential factor Xa inhibitors: drug design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Junhao; Yang, Lingyun; Li, Hui; Li, Qing; Zhao, Leilei; Wang, Xinning; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Muxing; Zhou, Jinpei; Zhang, Huibin

    2015-05-05

    The coagulation enzyme factor Xa (fXa) plays a crucial role in the blood coagulation cascade. In this study, three-dimensional fragment based drug design (FBDD) combined with structure-based pharmacophore (SBP) model and structural consensus docking were employed to identify novel fXa inhibitors. After a multi-stage virtual screening (VS) workflow, two hit compounds 3780 and 319 having persistent high performance were identified. Then, these two hit compounds and several analogs were synthesized and screened for in-vitro inhibition of fXa. The experimental data showed that most of the designed compounds displayed significant in vitro potency against fXa. Among them, compound 9b displayed the greatest in vitro potency against fXa with the IC50 value of 23 nM and excellent selectivity versus thrombin (IC50 = 40 μM). Moreover, the prolongation of the prothrombin time (PT) was measured for compound 9b to evaluate its in vitro anticoagulant activity. As a result, compound 9b exhibited pronounced anticoagulant activity with the 2 × PT value of 8.7 μM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Evaluation and classification of drug therapy for breast cancer with bone-only metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X Y; Song, S T

    2017-03-23

    Skeleton is one of the most common metastatic organs for breast cancer, which has a better prognosis than visceral metastases. Bone-only metastasis was defined"non-measurable" in the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria, and was excluded by clinical trials. However, patients with bone-only metastasis are also in need of effective treatment to prolong survival. Endocrine therapy is the most important treatment for bone metastatic patients. Tumor response of bone metastases can be determined objectively by bone-window CT. Effective treatment should be continued if the symptoms are relieved or osteogenesis is observed. Osteoblastic change in bone-window CT is a sign of improvement after treatment. Endocrine therapy is proper for ER-positive patients. The patients with initial osteoblastic metastasis should not be treated with salvage chemotherapy or anti-HER2 treatment, only if osteolytic metastasis or visceral metastasis is observed. Bishosphonates are just auxiliary drugs in bone metastasis, which should not be abused.

  7. Student perceptions of digital badges in a drug information and literature evaluation course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajiculay, Jay R; Parikh, Bhavini T; Wright, Casey V; Sheehan, Amy Heck

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe student perceptions of implementation of digital badges in a drug information and literature evaluation course. Two digital badges were developed as voluntary learning opportunities. Student perceptions were obtained through pre- and post-survey instruments consisting of selected questions from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. The response rate was 69% (106/153). At baseline, 53% of respondents agreed that digital badges could help them better understand course material. More students agreed they would share earned digital badges on LinkedIn (68%) than Facebook (19%). Most students who earned digital badges agreed that badges helped increase their confidence in course material (73%), focus on specific learning objectives (55%), look deeper into course competencies (64%), and were a useful adjunct to the traditional teaching method (82%). Digital badges were perceived by students as a positive adjunct to learning and may provide a novel mechanism for development of an electronic skills-based portfolio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Covariate analysis of QTc and T-wave morphology: new possibilities in the evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Struijk, Johannes J.; Matz, J

    2010-01-01

    This study adds the dimension of a T-wave morphology composite score (MCS) to the QTc interval-based evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization. Electrocardiographic recordings from 62 subjects on placebo and 400 mg moxifloxacin were compared with those from 21 subjects on 160 and 320...

  9. Evaluation of a fluorescence-based method for antibabesial drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Elsayed, Shimaa Abd Elsalam; Youssef, Mohamed Ahmed; ElSaid, ElSaid El Shirbini; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2014-08-01

    In vitro evaluation of chemotherapeutic agents against Babesia and Theileria parasites has become routine, and the effectiveness of these chemicals is usually determined by comparing the parasitemia dynamics of untreated and treated parasites. Although microscopy is widely used to calculate parasitemia, several disadvantages are associated with this technique. The present study evaluated a fluorescence-based method using SYBR green I stain (SG I) to screen antibabesial agents in in vitro cultures of Babesia bovis. The linearity between relative fluorescence units (RFU) and parasitemia was found to be well correlated with a 0.9944 goodness-of-fit (r(2)) value. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated for 3 antiprotozoan agents, diminazene aceturate, nimbolide, and gedunin, by this method. For diminazene aceturate and nimbolide, the IC(50)s determined by the fluorescence-based method (408 nM and 8.13 μM, respectively) and microscopy (400.3 nM and 9.4 μM, respectively) were in agreement. Furthermore, the IC50 of gedunin determined by the fluorescence-based method (19 μM) was similar to the recently described microscopy-based value (21.7 μM) for B. bovis. Additionally, the Z' factor (0.80 to 0.90), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio (44.15 to 87.64), coefficient of variation at the maximum signal (%CVmax) (0.50 to 2.85), and coefficient of variation at the minimum signal (%CVmin) (1.23 to 2.21) calculated for the fluorescence method using diminazene aceturate were comparable to those previously determined in malaria research for this assay. These findings suggest that the fluorescence-based method might be useful for antibabesial drug screening and may have potential to be developed into a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction Between Delayed-Release Dimethyl Fumarate and a Commonly Used Oral Contraceptive (Norgestimate/Ethinyl Estradiol) in Healthy Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Nestorov, Ivan; Zhao, Guolin; Meka, Venkata; Leahy, Mark; Kam, Jeanelle; Sheikh, Sarah I

    2017-11-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an oral therapy for relapsing multiple sclerosis with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. This 2-period crossover study was conducted to evaluate the potential for drug-drug interaction between DMF (240 mg twice daily) and a combined oral contraceptive (OC; norgestimate 250 μg, ethinyl estradiol 35 μg). Forty-six healthy women were enrolled; 32 completed the study. After the lead-in period (OC alone), 41 eligible participants were randomized 1:1 to sequence 1 (OC and DMF coadministration in period 1; OC alone in period 2) or sequence 2 (regimens reversed). Mean concentration profiles of plasma norelgestromin (primary metabolite of norgestimate) and ethinyl estradiol were superimposable following OC alone and OC coadministered with DMF, with 90% confidence intervals of geometric mean ratios for area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval and peak plasma concentration contained within the 0.8-1.25 range. Low serum progesterone levels during combined treatment confirmed suppression of ovulation. The pharmacokinetics of DMF (measured via its primary active metabolite, monomethyl fumarate) were consistent with historical data when DMF was administered alone. No new safety concerns were identified. These results suggest that norgestimate/ethinyl estradiol-based OCs may be used with DMF without dose modification. © 2017, The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. A method to evaluate the effect of contact with excipients on the surface crystallization of amorphous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Wei; Yu, Lian; Huang, Jun; Hussain, Munir A; Derdour, Lotfi; Qian, Feng; de Villiers, Melgardt M

    2014-12-01

    Amorphous drugs are used to improve the solubility, dissolution, and bioavailability of drugs. However, these metastable forms of drugs can transform into more stable, less soluble, crystalline counterparts. This study reports a method for evaluating the effect of commonly used excipients on the surface crystallization of amorphous drugs and its application to two model amorphous compounds, nifedipine and indomethacin. In this method, amorphous samples of the drugs were covered by excipients and stored in controlled environments. An inverted light microscope was used to measure in real time the rates of surface crystal nucleation and growth. For nifedipine, vacuum-dried microcrystalline cellulose and lactose monohydrate increased the nucleation rate of the β polymorph from two to five times when samples were stored in a desiccator, while D-mannitol and magnesium stearate increased the nucleation rate 50 times. At 50% relative humidity, the nucleation rates were further increased, suggesting that moisture played an important role in the crystallization caused by the excipients. The effect of excipients on the crystal growth rate was not significant, suggesting that contact with excipients influences the physical stability of amorphous nifedipine mainly through the effect on crystal nucleation. This effect seems to be drug specific because for two polymorphs of indomethacin, no significant change in the nucleation rate was observed under the excipients.

  13. A research framework for pharmacovigilance in health social media: Identification and evaluation of patient adverse drug event reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Chen, Hsinchun

    2015-12-01

    Social media offer insights of patients' medical problems such as drug side effects and treatment failures. Patient reports of adverse drug events from social media have great potential to improve current practice of pharmacovigilance. However, extracting patient adverse drug event reports from social media continues to be an important challenge for health informatics research. In this study, we develop a research framework with advanced natural language processing techniques for integrated and high-performance patient reported adverse drug event extraction. The framework consists of medical entity extraction for recognizing patient discussions of drug and events, adverse drug event extraction with shortest dependency path kernel based statistical learning method and semantic filtering with information from medical knowledge bases, and report source classification to tease out noise. To evaluate the proposed framework, a series of experiments were conducted on a test bed encompassing about postings from major diabetes and heart disease forums in the United States. The results reveal that each component of the framework significantly contributes to its overall effectiveness. Our framework significantly outperforms prior work. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Evaluation of the on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX in routine forensic autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Instrumental identification of drugs with quantification is essential in forensic toxicology, while on-site immunoassay urinalysis drug-screening devices conveniently provide preliminary information when adequately used. However, suitable or sufficient urine specimens are not always available. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX (Alere Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), which has recently been developed to provide objective data on the one-step automated processor, using 51 urine and 19 pericardial fluid samples from 66 forensic autopsy cases, compared with Triage-Drug of Abuse (DOA) and Monitect-9. For benzodiazepines, the positive predictive value and specificity of Triage-TOX were higher than those of Triage-DOA; however, sensitivity was higher with Monitect-9, despite frequent false-positives. The results for the other drugs with the three devices also included a few false-negatives and false-positives. These observations indicate the applicability of Triage-TOX in preliminary drug screening using urine or alternative materials in routine forensic autopsy, when a possible false-negative is considered, especially for benzodiazepines, providing objective information; however, the combined use of another device such as Monitect-9 can help minimize misinterpretation prior to instrumental analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum for in vitro growth inhibition assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crabb Brendan S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth inhibition assays are widely used to evaluate and quantify the functional activity of acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies and the anti-malarial activity of known drugs and novel compounds. However, several constraints have limited the use of these assays in large-scale population studies, vaccine trials and compound screening for drug discovery and development. Methods The D10 P. falciparum line was transfected to express green fluorescent protein (GFP. In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed over one or two cycles of P. falciparum asexual replication using inhibitory polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, human serum samples, and anti-malarials. Parasitaemia was evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Transfected parasites expressed GFP throughout all asexual stages and were clearly detectable by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Measurement of parasite growth inhibition was the same when determined by detection of GFP fluorescence or staining with ethidium bromide. There was no difference in the inhibitory activity of samples when tested against the transfected parasites compared to the parental line. The level of fluorescence of GFP-expressing parasites increased throughout the course of asexual development. Among ring-stages, GFP-fluorescent parasites were readily separated from uninfected erythrocytes by flow cytometry, whereas this was less clear using ethidium bromide staining. Inhibition by serum and antibody samples was consistently higher when tested over two cycles of growth compared to one, and when using a 1 in 10 sample dilution compared to 1 in 20, but there was no difference detected when using a different starting parasitaemia to set-up growth assays. Flow cytometry based measurements of parasitaemia proved more reproducible than microscopy counts. Conclusions Flow cytometry based assays using GFP

  16. Implementation of a reference standard and proficiency testing programme by the World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Karen I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN is a global collaboration to support the objective that anyone affected by malaria receives effective and safe drug treatment. The Pharmacology module aims to inform optimal anti-malarial drug selection. There is an urgent need to define the drug exposure - effect relationship for most anti-malarial drugs. Few anti-malarials have had their therapeutic blood concentration levels defined. One of the main challenges in assessing safety and efficacy data in relation to drug concentrations is the comparability of data generated from different laboratories. To explain differences in anti-malarial pharmacokinetics in studies with different measurement laboratories it is necessary to confirm the accuracy of the assay methods. This requires the establishment of an external quality assurance process to assure results that can be compared. This paper describes this process. Methods The pharmacology module of WWARN has established a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC programme consisting of two separate components: 1. A proficiency testing programme where blank human plasma spiked with certified reference material (CRM in different concentrations is sent out to participating bioanalytical laboratories. 2. A certified reference standard programme where accurately weighed amounts of certified anti-malarial reference standards, metabolites, and internal standards are sent to participating bioanalytical and in vitro laboratories. Conclusion The proficiency testing programme is designed as a cooperative effort to help participating laboratories assess their ability to carry out drug analysis, resolve any potential problem areas and to improve their results - and, in so doing, to improve the quality of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic data published and shared with WWARN. By utilizing the same source of standards for all laboratories, it is possible to minimize bias arising from poor

  17. Strategic Regulatory Evaluation and Endorsement of the Hollow Fiber Tuberculosis System as a Novel Drug Development Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Klaus; Clay, Robert; Hanna, Debra

    2015-08-15

    The first nonclinical drug development tool (DDT) advanced by the Critical Path to TB Drug Regimens (CPTR) Initiative through a regulatory review process has been endorsed by leading global regulatory authorities. DDTs with demonstrated predictive accuracy for clinical and microbiological outcomes are needed to support decision making. Regulatory endorsement of these DDTs is critical for drug developers, as it promotes confidence in their use in Investigational New Drug and New Drug Application filings. The in vitro hollow fiber system model of tuberculosis (HFS-TB) is able to recapitulate concentration-time profiles (exposure) observed in patients for single drugs and combinations, by evaluating exposure measures for the ability to kill tuberculosis in different physiologic conditions. Monte Carlo simulations make this quantitative output useful to inform susceptibility breakpoints, dosage, and optimal combination regimens in patients, and to design nonclinical experiments in animal models. The Pre-Clinical and Clinical Sciences Working Group within CPTR executed an evidence-based evaluation of the HFS-TB for predictive accuracy. This extensive effort was enabled through the collaboration of subject matter experts representing the pharmaceutical industry, academia, product development partnerships, and regulatory authorities including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). A comprehensive analysis plan following the regulatory guidance documents for DDT qualification was developed, followed by individual discussions with the FDA and the EMA. The results from the quantitative analyses were submitted to both agencies, pursuing regulatory DDT endorsement. The EMA Qualification Opinion for the HFS-TB DDT was published 26 January 2015 (available at: http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/regulation/document_listing/document_listing_000319.jsp). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  18. Renewable poly(δ-decalactone based block copolymer micelles as drug delivery vehicle: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep K. Bansal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymers from natural resources are attracting much attention in various fields including drug delivery as green alternatives to fossil fuel based polymers. In this quest, novel block copolymers based on renewable poly(δ-decalactone (PDL were evaluated for their drug delivery capabilities and compared with a fossil fuel based polymer i.e. methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(ε-caprolactone (mPEG-b-PCL. Using curcumin as a hydrophobic drug model, micelles of PDL block copolymers with different orientation i.e. AB (mPEG-b-PDL, ABA (PDL-b-PEG-b-PDL, ABC (mPEG-b-PDL-b-poly(pentadecalactone and (mPEG-b-PCL were prepared by nanoprecipitation method. The size, drug loading and curcumin stability studies results indicated that mPEG-b-PDL micelles was comparable to its counterpart mPEG-b-PCL micelles towards improved delivery of curcumin. Therefore, mixed micelles using these two copolymers were also evaluated to see any change in size, loading and drug release. Drug release studies proposed that sustained release can be obtained using poly(pentadecalactone as crystalline core whereas rapid release can be achieved using amorphous PDL core. Further, mPEG-b-PDL micelles were found to be non-haemolytic, up to the concentration of 40 mg/mL. In vivo toxicity studies on rats advised low-toxic behaviour of these micelles up to 400 mg/kg dose, as evident by histopathological and biochemical analysis. In summary, it is anticipated that mPEG-b-PDL block copolymer micelles could serve as a renewable alternative for mPEG-b-PCL copolymers in drug delivery applications.

  19. Method Development for Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation of Pediatric Drugs Based on Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: Application to Inhaled Corticosteroids for Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuncui; Jia, Lulu; Meng, Yao; Hu, Lihua; Liu, Yiwei; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Xuan; Han, Sheng; Peng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xiaoling

    2018-04-01

    Establishing a comprehensive clinical evaluation system is critical in enacting national drug policy and promoting rational drug use. In China, the 'Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation System for Pediatric Drugs' (CCES-P) project, which aims to compare drugs based on clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness to help decision makers, was recently proposed; therefore, a systematic and objective method is required to guide the process. An evidence-based multi-criteria decision analysis model that involved an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was developed, consisting of nine steps: (1) select the drugs to be reviewed; (2) establish the evaluation criterion system; (3) determine the criterion weight based on the AHP; (4) construct the evidence body for each drug under evaluation; (5) select comparative measures and calculate the original utility score; (6) place a common utility scale and calculate the standardized utility score; (7) calculate the comprehensive utility score; (8) rank the drugs; and (9) perform a sensitivity analysis. The model was applied to the evaluation of three different inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) used for asthma management in children (a total of 16 drugs with different dosage forms and strengths or different manufacturers). By applying the drug analysis model, the 16 ICSs under review were successfully scored and evaluated. Budesonide suspension for inhalation (drug ID number: 7) ranked the highest, with comprehensive utility score of 80.23, followed by fluticasone propionate inhaled aerosol (drug ID number: 16), with a score of 79.59, and budesonide inhalation powder (drug ID number: 6), with a score of 78.98. In the sensitivity analysis, the ranking of the top five and lowest five drugs remains unchanged, suggesting this model is generally robust. An evidence-based drug evaluation model based on AHP was successfully developed. The model incorporates sufficient utility and flexibility for aiding the decision-making process, and can be a useful

  20. The challenges of changing national malaria drug policy to artemisinin-based combinations in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otieno Dorothy N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound Sulphadoxine/sulphalene-pyrimethamine (SP was adopted in Kenya as first line therapeutic for uncomplicated malaria in 1998. By the second half of 2003, there was convincing evidence that SP was failing and had to be replaced. Despite several descriptive investigations of policy change and implementation when countries moved from chloroquine to SP, the different constraints of moving to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in Africa are less well documented. Methods A narrative description of the process of anti-malarial drug policy change, financing and implementation in Kenya is assembled from discussions with stakeholders, reports, newspaper articles, minutes of meetings and email correspondence between actors in the policy change process. The narrative has been structured to capture the timing of events, the difficulties and hurdles faced and the resolutions reached to the final implementation of a new treatment policy. Results Following a recognition that SP was failing there was a rapid technical appraisal of available data and replacement options resulting in a decision to adopt artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the recommended first-line therapy in Kenya, announced in April 2004. Funding requirements were approved by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM and over 60 million US$ were agreed in principle in July 2004 to procure AL and implement the policy change. AL arrived in Kenya in May 2006, distribution to health facilities began in July 2006 coincidental with cascade in-service training in the revised national guidelines. Both training and drug distribution were almost complete by the end of 2006. The article examines why it took over 32 months from announcing a drug policy change to completing early implementation. Reasons included: lack of clarity on sustainable financing of an expensive therapeutic for a common disease, a delay in release of funding, a lack of comparative efficacy data

  1. Evaluation of proanthocyanidin-crosslinked electrospun gelatin nanofibers for drug delivering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chiung-Hua; Chi, Chin-Ying; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Yu; Chen, Pei-Lain; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are excellent candidates for various biomedical applications. We successfully fabricated proanthocyanidin‐crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers. Proanthocyanidin, a low cytotoxic collagen crosslinking reagent, increased the gelatin crosslinking percentage in the nanofibers from 53% to 64%. The addition of proanthocyanidin kept the nanofibers from swelling, and, thus, made the fibers more stable in the aqueous state. The compatibility and the release behavior of the drug in the nanofibers were examined using magnesium ascorbyl phosphate as the model drug. Proanthocyanidin also promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. These properties make the proanthocyanidin‐crosslinked gelatin nanofibers an excellent material for drug delivery. In the cell culture study, L929 fibroblast cells had a significantly higher proliferation rate when cultured with the gelatin/proanthocyanidin blended nanofibers. This characteristic showed that proanthocyanidin‐crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers could potentially be employed as a wound healing material by increasing cell spreading and proliferation. - Highlights: ► Proanthocyanidin‐crosslinked gelatin nanofibers (GEL/PA) is synthesized. ► Proanthocyanidin promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. ► The GEL/PA nanofibers accelerate fibroblast cell proliferation. ► The GEL/PA nanofibers increase the drug loading efficiency.

  2. Consensus-based evaluation of clinical significance and management of anticancer drug interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansman, F.G.A.; Reyners, A.K.L.; van Roon, E.N.; Smorenburg, C.H.; Helgason, H.H.; le Comte, M.; Wensveen, B.M.; van den Tweel, A.M.A.; de Blois, M.; Kwee, W.; Kerremans, A.L.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    Background: Anticancer drug interactions can affect the efficacy and toxicity of anticancer treatment and that of the interacting drugs. However, information on the significance, prevention, and management of these interactions is currently lacking. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess

  3. Fabrication, characterization and evaluation of bacterial cellulose-based capsule shells for oral drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Hanif; Badshah, Munair; Mäkilä, Ermei

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) was investigated for the first time for the preparation of capsule shells for immediate and sustained release of drugs. The prepared capsule shells were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The BC...... to gelatin capsules with both immediate and sustained drug release properties depending upon the compositions of the encapsulated materials....

  4. Evaluation of 8-Hydroxyquinoline Derivatives as Hits for Antifungal Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippi, Bruna; Reginatto, Paula; Machado, Gabriella da Rosa Monte; Bergamo, Vanessa Zafaneli; Lana, Daiane Flores Dalla; Teixeira, Mario Lettieri; Franco, Lucas Lopardi; Alves, Ricardo José; Andrade, Saulo Fernandes; Fuentefria, Alexandre Meneghello

    2017-10-01

    Clioquinol is an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative that was widely used from the 1950s to 1970s as an oral antiparasitic agent. In 1970, the oral forms were withdrawn from the market due to reports of toxicity, but topical formulations for antifungal treatment remained available. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity, anti-Candida and antidermatophyte activity and to determine pharmacodynamic characteristics of clioquinol and other 8-hydroxyquinoline derivatives (8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid and 8-hydroxy-7-iodo-5-quinolinesulfonic acid). Antifungal activity was tested by broth microdilution and the fungicidal or fungistatic effect was checked by a time-kill assay. Permeation and histopathological evaluation were performed in Franz diffusion cells with ear skin of pigs and examined under light microscopy. An HET-CAM test was used to determine the potential irritancy. The three compounds were active against all isolates showing anti-Candida and antidermatophyte activity, with MIC ranges of 0.031-2 μg/ml, 1-512 μg/ml, and 2-1024 μg/ml for clioquinol, 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid, and 8-hydroxy-7-iodo-5-quinolinesulfonic acid, respectively. All compounds showed fungistatic effect for Candida, 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid, and 8-hydroxy-7-iodo-5-quinolinesulfonic acid showed a fungicidal effect for M. canis and T. mentagrophytes, and clioquinol showed a fungicidal effect only for T. mentagrophytes. Furthermore, they presented a fungicidal effect depending on the time and concentration. The absence of lesions was observed in histopathological evaluation and no compound was irritating. Moreover, clioquinol and 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid accumulated in the epithelial tissue, and 8-hydroxy-7-iodo-5-quinolinesulfonic acid had a high degree of permeation. In conclusion, 8-hydroxyquinoline derivatives showed antifungal activity and 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid demonstrated the potential for antifungal drug design.

  5. Drug overprescription in nursing homes: an empirical evaluation of administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroka, Magdalena A

    2016-04-01

    A widely discussed shortcoming of long-term care in nursing homes for the elderly is the inappropriate or suboptimal drug utilization, particularly of psychotropic drugs. Using administrative data from the largest sickness fund in Germany, this study was designed to estimate the effect of institutionalization on the drug intake of the frail elderly. Difference-in-differences propensity score matching techniques were used to compare drug prescriptions for the frail elderly who entered a nursing home with those who remained in the outpatient care system; findings suggest that nursing home residents receive more doses of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and analgesics. The potential overprescription correlates with estimated drug costs of about €87 million per year.

  6. Evaluation of short course drug therapy for tuberculosis in pediatric ward of Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshjoo Kh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis appears to be a disease as old as human history. Tuberculosis is of great public health importance in the developing countries. Its clinical profile is different in developing countries in comparison to countries of Europe and North America. The recent epidemic of HIV has slowed down the declining trend in the incidence of tuberculosis. Bacilli are transmitted from one infected person to the others as an aerosol. In some cases contaminated milk may also be responsible. However despite effective regimens and addition of new drugs and improved pharmacokinetic knowledge the chemotherapy of tuberculosis still remains a challenge. Poor drug-compliance by patients being one of the foremost reason for frequent relapses and bacterial resistance. Some important and concrete steps to meet these challenges have been judicious use of two or more bactericidal drugs and introduction of short courses regiment. Multiple drugs therapy may shorten the duration of treatment and prevent emergence of drug resistance.

  7. Preparation of finasteride capsules-loaded drug nanoparticles: formulation, optimization, in vitro, and pharmacokinetic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed TA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tarek A Ahmed1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: In this study, optimized freeze-dried finasteride nanoparticles (NPs were prepared from drug nanosuspension formulation that was developed using the bottom–up technique. The effects of four formulation and processing variables that affect the particle size and solubility enhancement of the NPs were explored using the response surface optimization design. The optimized formulation was morphologically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Physicochemical interaction among the studied components was investigated. Crystalline change was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD. Crystal growth of the freeze-dried NPs was compared to the corresponding aqueous drug nanosuspension. Freeze-dried NPs formulation was subsequently loaded into hard gelatin capsules that were examined for in vitro dissolution and pharmacokinetic behavior. Results revealed that in most of the studied variables, some of the quadratic and interaction effects had a significant effect on the studied responses. TEM image illustrated homogeneity and shape of the prepared NPs. No interaction among components was noticed. XRPD confirmed crystalline state change in the optimized NPs. An enhancement in the dissolution rate of more than 2.5 times from capsules filled with optimum drug NPs, when compared to capsules filled with pure drug, was obtained. Crystal growth, due to Ostwald ripening phenomenon and positive Gibbs free energy, was reduced following lyophilization of the nanosuspension formulation. Pharmacokinetic parameters from drug NPs were superior to that of pure drug and drug microparticles. In conclusion, freeze-dried NPs based on drug nanosuspension formulation is a successful

  8. Role of the laboratory in the evaluation of suspected drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M S; Dackis, C A

    1986-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of substance abuse, it remains a common cause of misdiagnosis. In patients who have abused or who are currently abusing drugs, symptoms of a psychiatric illness may be mimicked by either the drug's presence or absence. The laboratory can aid in making a differential diagnosis and eliminating drugs from active consideration as a cause of psychosis, depression, mania, and personality changes. Treatment planning and prevention of serious medical consequences often rest on the accuracy of the admission drug screen. Testing is widely used to assess improvement in substance abuse in both inpatient and outpatient settings. In occupational settings, testing has been used as an early indicator that a problem exists and as a successful prevention tool. The appropriate use of analytic technology in drug abuse testing requires an understanding of available test methodologies. These include drug screens by thin-layer chromatography, comprehensive testing using enzyme immunoassay, and computer-assisted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Testing for specific drugs considered likely causes or precipitants of "psychiatric" complaints is available with enzyme assays, radioimmunoassay, or definitive forensic-quality testing using GC-MS.

  9. Evaluation of Laser-Assisted Trans-Nail Drug Delivery with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Tsan Tsai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nail provides a functional protection to the fingertips and surrounding tissue from external injuries. The nail plate consists of three layers including dorsal, intermediate, and ventral layers. The dorsal layer consists of compact, hard keratins, limiting topical drug delivery through the nail. In this study, we investigate the application of fractional CO2 laser that produces arrays of microthermal ablation zones (MAZs to facilitate drug delivery in the nails. We utilized optical coherence tomography (OCT for real-time monitoring of the laser–skin tissue interaction, sparing the patient from an invasive surgical sampling procedure. The time-dependent OCT intensity variance was used to observe drug diffusion through an induced MAZ array. Subsequently, nails were treated with cream and liquid topical drugs to investigate the feasibility and diffusion efficacy of laser-assisted drug delivery. Our results show that fractional CO2 laser improves the effectiveness of topical drug delivery in the nail plate and that OCT could potentially be used for in vivo monitoring of the depth of laser penetration as well as real-time observations of drug delivery.

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Microparticulate Drug Delivery Systems Composed of Macromolecular Prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Machida

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecular prodrugs are very useful systems for achieving controlled drug release and drug targeting. In particular, various macromolecule-antitumor drug conjugates enhance the effectiveness and improve the toxic side effects. Also, polymeric micro- and nanoparticles have been actively examined and their in vivo behaviors elucidated, and it has been realized that their particle characteristics are very useful to control drug behavior. Recently, researches based on the combination of the concepts of macromolecular prodrugs and micro- or nanoparticles have been reported, although they are limited. Macromolecular prodrugs enable drugs to be released at a certain controlled release rate based on the features of the macromolecule-drug linkage. Micro- and nanoparticles can control in vivo behavior based on their size, surface charge and surface structure. These merits are expected for systems produced by the combination of each concept. In this review, several micro- or nanoparticles composed of macromolecule-drug conjugates are described for their preparation, in vitro properties and/or in vivo behavior.

  11. [Drug administration to pediatric patients: Evaluation of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménétré, S; Weber, M; Socha, M; Le Tacon, S; May, I; Schweitzer, C; Demoré, B

    2018-04-01

    In hospitals, the nursing staff is often confronted with the problem of the preparation and administration of drugs for their pediatric patients because of the lack of indication, pediatric dosage, and appropriate galenic form. The goal of this study was to give an overview of the nurses' preparation habits in pediatric units and highlight their daily problems. This single-center prospective study was conducted through an observation of the nursing staff during the drug preparation process in medicine, surgery and intensive care units. We included 91 patients (55 boys and 36 girls), with an average age of 6.3 years (youngest child, 10 days old; oldest child, 18 years old). We observed a mean 2.16 drug preparations per patient [1-5]. We collected 197 observation reports regarding 66 injectable drugs and 131 oral drugs (71 liquid forms and 60 solid forms). The majority of these reports concerned central nervous system drugs (63/197), metabolism and digestive system drugs (50/197), and anti-infective drugs (46/197). The study highlights the nurses' difficulties: modification of the solid galenic forms, lack of knowledge on oral liquid form preservation or reconstitution methods, withdrawal of small volumes, and vague and noncompliant labeling. This study led to the creation of a specific working group for pediatrics. This multidisciplinary team meets on a regular basis to work toward improving the current habits to both simplify and secure drug administration to hospitalized children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the sequel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolliver, Diana S

    2015-11-01

    Housing an illicit, online drug retail market generating sales in the millions of USD, the Silk Road was a profitable marketplace with a growing and loyal consumer base. Following its FBI-forced shut down in October 2013, the Silk Road enjoyed newfound fame that contributed to an increase in new users downloading and accessing the Tor Network; however, with this particular marketplace out of order, Silk Road 2 was launched to fill the void. The goals of this study were to (1) compare the metrics of Silk Road 2 to the original site, and to (2) determine if there were any indications of the presence of more sophisticated drug trafficking operations. Data were collected from Silk Road 2 during the months of August and September 2014 using webcrawling software. Silk Road 2 was a much smaller marketplace than the original Silk Road. Of the 1834 unique items for sale, 348 were drug items sold by 145 distinct vendors shipping from 19 countries. Of the drug items advertised, most were stimulants and hallucinogens. The United States is both the number one country of origin for drug sales on Silk Road 2 and the number one destination country. Interestingly, 73% of all vendor accounts on Silk Road 2 advertised drug items, even though drugs only constituted 19% of all items advertised. This study was the first to research Silk Road 2, the replacement illicit marketplace to the original virtual Silk Road. This study was also the first to examine indications of the presence of more coordinated drug trafficking efforts in an online setting. The findings indicated that while Silk Road 2 was not primarily a drug market, there were indications that some vendor accounts may have connections reaching beyond a base retail market. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [THE USE OF THE MODEL MOUSE ICR--VARIOLA VIRUS FOR EVALUATION OF ANTIVIRAL DRUG EFFICACY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Shishkina, L N; Zamedyanskaya, A S; Nesterov, A E; Glotov, A G; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Mice of the ICR outbred population were infected intranasally (i/n) with the variola virus (VARV, strain Ind-3a). Clinical signs of the disease did not appear even at the maximum possible dose of the virus 5.2 lg PFU/head (plaque-forming units per head). In this case, 50% infective dose (ID50) of VARV estimated by the presence or absence of the virus in the lungs three days after infection (p.i.) was equal to 2.7 ± 0.4 lg PFU/head. Taking into account the 10% application of the virus in the lungs during the intranasal infection of the mice, it was adequate to 1.7 lg PFU/lungs. This indicates a high infectivity of the VARV for mice comparable to its infectivity for humans. After the i/n infection of mice with the VARV at a dose 30 ID50/ head the highest concentration of the virus detected in the lungs (4.9 ± 0.0 lg PFU/ml of homogenate) and in nasal cavity tissues (4.8 ± 0.0 lg PFU/ml) were observed. The pathomorphological changes in the respiratory organs of the mice infected with the VARV appeared at 3-5 days p.i., and the VARV reproduction noted in the epithelial cells and macrophages were noticed. When the preparations ST-246 and NIOCH-14 were administered orally at a dose of 60 μg/g of mouse weight up to one day before infection, after 2 hours, 1 and 2 days p.i., the VARV reproduction in the lungs after 3 days p.i. decreased by an order of magnitude. Thus, outbred ICR mice infected with the VARV can be used as a laboratory model of the smallpox when evaluating the therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of the antismallpox drugs.

  14. Economic and microbiologic evaluation of single-dose vial extension for hazardous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Erinn C; Savage, Scott W; Rutala, William A; Weber, David J; Gergen-Teague, Maria; Eckel, Stephen F

    2012-07-01

    The update of US Pharmacopeia Chapter in 2008 included guidelines stating that single-dose vials (SDVs) opened and maintained in an International Organization for Standardization Class 5 environment can be used for up to 6 hours after initial puncture. A study was conducted to evaluate the cost of discarding vials after 6 hours and to further test sterility of vials beyond this time point, subsequently defined as the beyond-use date (BUD). Financial determination of SDV waste included 2 months of retrospective review of all doses prescribed. Additionally, actual waste log data were collected. Active and control vials (prepared using sterilized trypticase soy broth) were recovered, instead of discarded, at the defined 6-hour BUD. The institution-specific waste of 19 selected SDV medications discarded at 6 hours was calculated at $766,000 annually, and tracking waste logs for these same medications was recorded at $770,000 annually. Microbiologic testing of vial extension beyond 6 hours showed that 11 (1.86%) of 592 samples had one colony-forming unit on one of two plates. Positive plates were negative at subsequent time points, and all positives were single isolates most likely introduced during the plating process. The cost of discarding vials at 6 hours was significant for hazardous medications in a large academic medical center. On the basis of microbiologic data, vial BUD extension demonstrated a contamination frequency of 1.86%, which likely represented exogenous contamination; vial BUD extension for the tested drugs showed no growth at subsequent time points and could provide an annual cost savings of more than $600,000.

  15. Patented drug extension strategies on healthcare spending: a cost-evaluation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaz, Nathalie; Haller, Guy; Girardin, François; Huttner, Benedikt; Combescure, Christophe; Dayer, Pierre; Muscionico, Daniel; Salomon, Jean-Luc; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Drug manufacturers have developed "evergreening" strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs) on the healthcare system as a whole ("spillover effect"). We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. "Extra costs" were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1) all brand (i.e., initially patented) drugs, (2) all follow-on drugs, or (3) brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated "extra costs" over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2) million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7) million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8) million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover "extra cost" of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800), whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100). Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in "extra costs" of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100). Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to increased overall healthcare costs by listing follow-on drugs in

  16. Patented drug extension strategies on healthcare spending: a cost-evaluation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vernaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug manufacturers have developed "evergreening" strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs on the healthcare system as a whole ("spillover effect". METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. "Extra costs" were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1 all brand (i.e., initially patented drugs, (2 all follow-on drugs, or (3 brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated "extra costs" over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2 million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7 million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8 million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover "extra cost" of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800, whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100. Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in "extra costs" of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100. CONCLUSIONS: Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to increased

  17. Patented Drug Extension Strategies on Healthcare Spending: A Cost-Evaluation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernaz, Nathalie; Haller, Guy; Girardin, François; Huttner, Benedikt; Combescure, Christophe; Dayer, Pierre; Muscionico, Daniel; Salomon, Jean-Luc; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug manufacturers have developed “evergreening” strategies to compete with generic medication after patent termination. These include marketing of slightly modified follow-on drugs. We aimed to estimate the financial impact of these drugs on overall healthcare costs and also to examine the impact of listing these drugs in hospital restrictive drug formularies (RDFs) on the healthcare system as a whole (“spillover effect”). Methods and Findings We used hospital and community pharmacy invoice office data in the Swiss canton of Geneva to calculate utilisation of eight follow-on drugs in defined daily doses between 2000 and 2008. “Extra costs” were calculated for three different scenarios assuming replacement with the corresponding generic equivalent for prescriptions of (1) all brand (i.e., initially patented) drugs, (2) all follow-on drugs, or (3) brand and follow-on drugs. To examine the financial spillover effect we calculated a monthly follow-on drug market share in defined daily doses for medications prescribed by hospital physicians but dispensed in community pharmacies, in comparison to drugs prescribed by non-hospital physicians in the community. Estimated “extra costs” over the study period were €15.9 (95% CI 15.5; 16.2) million for scenario 1, €14.4 (95% CI 14.1; 14.7) million for scenario 2, and €30.3 (95% CI 29.8; 30.8) million for scenario 3. The impact of strictly switching all patients using proton-pump inhibitors to esomeprazole at admission resulted in a spillover “extra cost” of €330,300 (95% CI 276,100; 383,800), whereas strictly switching to generic cetirizine resulted in savings of €7,700 (95% CI 4,100; 11,100). Overall we estimated that the RDF resulted in “extra costs” of €503,600 (95% CI 444,500; 563,100). Conclusions Evergreening strategies have been successful in maintaining market share in Geneva, offsetting competition by generics and cost containment policies. Hospitals may be contributing to

  18. [Evaluation of the influence of humidity and temperature on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ning; Sun, Hechun; Dai, Miaomiao

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of temperature and humidity on the drug stability by initial average rate experiment, and to obtained the kinetic parameters. The effect of concentration error, drug degradation extent, humidity and temperature numbers, humidity and temperature range, and average humidity and temperature on the accuracy and precision of kinetic parameters in the initial average rate experiment was explored. The stability of vitamin C, as a solid state model, was investigated by an initial average rate experiment. Under the same experimental conditions, the kinetic parameters obtained from this proposed method were comparable to those from classical isothermal experiment at constant humidity. The estimates were more accurate and precise by controlling the extent of drug degradation, changing humidity and temperature range, or by setting the average temperature closer to room temperature. Compared with isothermal experiments at constant humidity, our proposed method saves time, labor, and materials.

  19. Evaluation of three rapid oral fluid test devices on the screening of multiple drugs of abuse including ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Magdalene H Y; Ching, C K; Poon, Simon; Chan, Suzanne S S; Ng, W Y; Lam, M; Wong, C K; Pao, Ronnie; Lau, Angus; Mak, Tony W L

    2018-05-01

    Rapid oral fluid testing (ROFT) devices have been extensively evaluated for their ability to detect common drugs of abuse; however, the performance of such devices on simultaneous screening for ketamine has been scarcely investigated. The present study evaluated three ROFT devices (DrugWipe ® 6S, Ora-Check ® and SalivaScreen ® ) on the detection of ketamine, opiates, methamphetamine, cannabis, cocaine and MDMA. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS) assay was firstly established and validated for confirmation analysis of the six types of drugs and/or their metabolites. In the field test, the three ROFT devices were tested on subjects recruited from substance abuse clinics/rehabilitation centre. Oral fluid was also collected using Quantisal ® for confirmation analysis. A total of 549 samples were collected in the study. LCMS analysis on 491 samples revealed the following drugs: codeine (55%), morphine (49%), heroin (40%), methamphetamine (35%), THC (8%), ketamine (4%) and cocaine (2%). No MDMA-positive cases were observed. Results showed that the overall specificity and accuracy were satisfactory and met the DRUID standard of >80% for all 3 devices. Ora-Check ® had poor sensitivities (ketamine 36%, methamphetamine 63%, opiates 53%, cocaine 60%, THC 0%). DrugWipe ® 6S showed good sensitivities in the methamphetamine (83%) and opiates (93%) tests but performed relatively poorly for ketamine (41%), cocaine (43%) and THC (22%). SalivaScreen ® also demonstrated good sensitivities in the methamphetamine (83%) and opiates (100%) tests, and had the highest sensitivity for ketamine (76%) and cocaine (71%); however, it failed to detect any of the 28 THC-positive cases. The test completion rate (proportion of tests completed with quality control passed) were: 52% (Ora-Check ® ), 78% (SalivaScreen ® ) and 99% (DrugWipe ® 6S). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    , risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites...

  1. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of nanodiamonds as pH triggered drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Jingjing; Guo, Yong; Altawashi, Azza; Moosa, Basem; Lecommandoux, Sé bastien; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) and its derivatives have been widely used for drug, protein and gene delivery. Herein, experimental and theoretical methods have been combined to investigate the effect of pH on the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) from fluorescein

  2. Evaluation of the US Food and Drug Administration sentinel analysis tools in confirming previously observed drug-outcome associations: The case of clindamycin and Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Ryan M; Kuntz, Jennifer L; Wang, Shirley V; Fuller, Candace; Gagne, Joshua J; Leonard, Charles E; Hennessy, Sean; Meyer, Tamra; Archdeacon, Patrick; Chen, Chih-Ying; Panozzo, Catherine A; Toh, Sengwee; Katcoff, Hannah; Woodworth, Tiffany; Iyer, Aarthi; Axtman, Sophia; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-13

    The Food and Drug Administration's Sentinel System developed parameterized, reusable analytic programs for evaluation of medical product safety. Research on outpatient antibiotic exposures, and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) with non-user reference groups led us to expect a higher rate of CDI among outpatient clindamycin users vs penicillin users. We evaluated the ability of the Cohort Identification and Descriptive Analysis and Propensity Score Matching tools to identify a higher rate of CDI among clindamycin users. We matched new users of outpatient dispensings of oral clindamycin or penicillin from 13 Data Partners 1:1 on propensity score and followed them for up to 60 days for development of CDI. We used Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by Data Partner and matched pair to compare CDI incidence. Propensity score models at 3 Data Partners had convergence warnings and a limited range of predicted values. We excluded these Data Partners despite adequate covariate balance after matching. From the 10 Data Partners where these models converged without warnings, we identified 807 919 new clindamycin users and 8 815 441 new penicillin users eligible for the analysis. The stratified analysis of 807 769 matched pairs included 840 events among clindamycin users and 290 among penicillin users (hazard ratio 2.90, 95% confidence interval 2.53, 3.31). This evaluation produced an expected result and identified several potential enhancements to the Propensity Score Matching tool. This study has important limitations. CDI risk may have been related to factors other than the inherent properties of the drugs, such as duration of use or subsequent exposures. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of the Roche prototype 454 HIV-1 ultradeep sequencing drug resistance assay in a routine diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Diaz, A; Guerrero-Ramos, A; McCormick, A L; Macartney, M; Conibear, T; Johnson, M A; Haque, T; Webster, D P

    2013-10-01

    Studies have shown that low-frequency resistance mutations can influence treatment outcome. However, the lack of a standardized high-throughput assay has precluded their detection in clinical settings. To evaluate the performance of the Roche prototype 454 UDS HIV-1 drug resistance assay (UDS assay) in a routine diagnostic laboratory. 50 plasma samples, previously characterized by population sequencing and that had shown ≥1 resistance associated mutation (RAM), were retrospectively tested by the UDS assay, including 18 B and 32 non-B subtypes; viral loads between 114-1,806,407 cp/ml; drug-naive (n=27) and drug-experienced (n=23) individuals. The UDS assay was successful for 37/50 (74%) samples. It detected all RAMs found by population sequencing at frequencies above 20%. In addition, 39 low-frequency RAMs were exclusively detected by the UDS assay at frequencies below 20% in both drug-naïve (19/26, 73%) and drug-experienced (9/18, 50%) individuals. UDS results would lead to changes from susceptible to resistant to efavirenz (EFV) in one drug-naive individual with suboptimal response to an EFV-containing regimen and from susceptible to resistance to lamivudine (3TC) in one drug naïve subject who subsequently failed a 3TC-containing regimen and in a treatment experienced subject who had failed a 3TC-containing regimen. The UDS assay performed well across a wide range of subtypes and viral loads; it showed perfect agreement with population sequencing for all RAMs analyzed. In addition, the UDS assay detected additional mutations at frequencies below 20% which correlate with patients' treatment history and had in some cases important prognostic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Disintegration mediated controlled release supersaturating solid dispersion formulation of an insoluble drug: design, development, optimization, and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjay; Rudraraju, Varma S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a solid dispersion based controlled release system for drug substances that are poorly soluble in water. A wax-based disintegration mediated controlled release system was designed based on the fact that an amorphous drug can crystallize out from hydrophilic matrices. For this study, cilostazol (CIL) was selected as the model drug, as it exhibits poor aqueous solubility. An amorphous solid dispersion was prepared to assist the drug to attain a supersaturated state. Povidone was used as carrier for solid dispersion (spray drying technique), hydrogenated vegetable oil (HVO) as wax matrix former, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) as a disintegrant. The extreme vertices mixture design (EVMD) was applied to optimize the designed and developed composition. The optimized formulation provided a dissolution pattern which was equivalent to the predicted curve, ascertaining that the optimal formulation could be accomplished with EVMD. The release profile of CIL was described by the Higuchi's model better than zero-order, first-order, and Hixson-Crowell's model, which indicated that the supersaturation state of CIL dominated to allow drug release by diffusion rather than disintegration regulated release as is generally observed by Hixson-Crowell's model. The optimized composition was evaluated for disintegration, dissolution, XRD, and stability studies. It was found that the amorphous state as well as the dissolution profile of CIL was maintained under the accelerated conditions of 40°C/75% RH for 6 months.

  5. The Metaboloepigenetic Dimension of Cancer Stem Cells: Evaluating the Market Potential for New Metabostemness-Targeting Oncology Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    The current global portfolio of oncology drugs is unlikely to produce durable disease remission for millions of cancer patients worldwide. This is due, in part, to the existence of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), a particularly aggressive type of malignant cell that is capable of indefinite self-replication, is refractory to conventional treatments, and is skilled at spreading and colonizing distant organs. To date, no drugs from big-league Pharma companies are capable of killing CSCs. Why? Quite simply, a classic drug development approach based on mutated genes and pathological protein products cannot efficiently target the plastic, epigenetic proclivity of cancer tissues to generate CSCs. Recent studies have proposed that certain elite metabolites (oncometabolites) and other common metabolites can significantly influence the establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures of stemness and cancer. Consequently, cellular metabolism and the core epigenetic codes, DNA methylation and histone modification, can be better viewed as an integrated metaboloepigenetic dimension of CSCs, which we have recently termed cancer metabostemness. By targeting weaknesses in the bridge connecting metabolism and epigenetics, a new generation of metabostemnessspecific drugs can be generated for potent and long-lasting elimination of life-threatening CSCs. Here I evaluate the market potential of re-modeling the oncology drug pipeline by discovering and developing new metabolic approaches able to target the apparently undruggable epigenetic programs that dynamically regulate the plasticity of non-CSC and CSC cellular states.

  6. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a hydrogel reservoir as a continuous drug delivery system for inner ear treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Hütten

    Full Text Available Fibrous tissue growth and loss of residual hearing after cochlear implantation can be reduced by application of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone-21-phosphate-disodium-salt (DEX. To date, sustained delivery of this agent to the cochlea using a number of pharmaceutical technologies has not been entirely successful. In this study we examine a novel way of continuous local drug application into the inner ear using a refillable hydrogel functionalized silicone reservoir. A PEG-based hydrogel made of reactive NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO prepolymers was evaluated as a drug conveying and delivery system in vitro and in vivo. Encapsulating the free form hydrogel into a silicone tube with a small opening for the drug diffusion resulted in delayed drug release but unaffected diffusion of DEX through the gel compared to the free form hydrogel. Additionally, controlled DEX release over several weeks could be demonstrated using the hydrogel filled reservoir. Using a guinea-pig cochlear trauma model the reservoir delivery of DEX significantly protected residual hearing and reduced fibrosis. As well as being used as a device in its own right or in combination with cochlear implants, the hydrogel-filled reservoir represents a new drug delivery system that feasibly could be replenished with therapeutic agents to provide sustained treatment of the inner ear.

  7. Differences in physicochemical properties to consider in the design, evaluation and choice between microparticles and nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Daniel P; Otto, Anja; de Villiers, Melgardt M

    2015-05-01

    The increase in the development of novel nanoparticle drug delivery systems makes the choice between micro- and nanoscale drug delivery systems ubiquitous. Changes in physical and chemical properties between micro- to nanosized particles give them different properties that influence their physiological, anatomical and clinical behavior and therefore potential application. This review focuses on the effect changes in the surface-to-volume ratio have on the thermal properties, solubility, dissolution and crystallization of micro- versus nanosized drug delivery systems. With these changes in the physicochemical properties in mind, the review covers computational and biophysical approaches to the design and evaluation of micro- and nanodelivery systems. The emphasis of the review is on the effect these properties have on clinical performance in terms of drug release, tissue retention, biodistribution, efficacy, toxicity and therefore choice of delivery system. Ultimately, the choice between micro- and nanometer-sized delivery systems is not straightforward. However, if the fundamental differences in physical and chemical properties are considered, it can be much easier to make a rational choice of the appropriate drug delivery system size.

  8. 5-Fluorouracil Encapsulated Chitosan Nanoparticles for pH-Stimulated Drug Delivery: Evaluation of Controlled Release Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seda Tığlı Aydın

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles consisting of human therapeutic drugs are suggested as a promising strategy for targeted and localized drug delivery to tumor cells. In this study, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared in order to investigate potentials of localized drug delivery for tumor environment due to pH sensitivity of chitosan nanoparticles. Optimization of chitosan and 5-FU encapsulated nanoparticles production revealed 148.8±1.1 nm and 243.1±17.9 nm particle size diameters with narrow size distributions, which are confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM images. The challenge was to investigate drug delivery of 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles due to varied pH changes. To achieve this objective, pH sensitivity of prepared chitosan nanoparticle was evaluated and results showed a significant swelling response for pH 5 with particle diameter of ∼450 nm. In vitro release studies indicated a controlled and sustained release of 5-FU from chitosan nanoparticles with the release amounts of 29.1–60.8% due to varied pH environments after 408 h of the incubation period. pH sensitivity is confirmed by mathematical modeling of release kinetics since chitosan nanoparticles showed stimuli-induced release. Results suggested that 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles can be launched as pH-responsive smart drug delivery agents for possible applications of cancer treatments.

  9. A systematic review of modelling approaches in economic evaluations of health interventions for drug and alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van Phuong; Shanahan, Marian; Shukla, Nagesh; Perez, Pascal; Farrell, Michael; Ritter, Alison

    2016-04-13

    The overarching goal of health policies is to maximize health and societal benefits. Economic evaluations can play a vital role in assessing whether or not such benefits occur. This paper reviews the application of modelling techniques in economic evaluations of drug and alcohol interventions with regard to (i) modelling paradigms themselves; (ii) perspectives of costs and benefits and (iii) time frame. Papers that use modelling approaches for economic evaluations of drug and alcohol interventions were identified by carrying out searches of major databases. Thirty eight papers met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the cohort Markov models remain the most popular approach, followed by decision trees, Individual based model and System dynamics model (SD). Most of the papers adopted a long term time frame to reflect the long term costs and benefits of health interventions. However, it was fairly common among the reviewed papers to adopt a narrow perspective that only takes into account costs and benefits borne by the health care sector. This review paper informs policy makers about the availability of modelling techniques that can be used to enhance the quality of economic evaluations for drug and alcohol treatment interventions.

  10. Human Laboratory Settings for Assessing Drug Craving; Implications for the Evaluation of Treatment Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on assessing craving in laboratory settings often involves inducing and then measuring craving in subjects. Cue-induced craving is studied in laboratory settings using the cue reactivity paradigm, in which drug-related photos, videos, evocative scripts, olfactory cues, and paraphernalia may induce craving. Cue-induced craving evoked by drug-related stimuli could be associated with relapse and recurrence of drug addiction. In this article, the authors review different methods of assessing craving in laboratory settings and explain how human laboratory settings can bridge the gap between randomized clinical trials (RCTs and animal models on pharmacological treatments for drug dependence. The brief reviewed literature provides strong evidence that laboratory-based studies of craving may improve our understanding of how subjective reports of drug craving are related to objective measures of drug abuse and laboratory settings provide an opportunity to measure the degree to which they co-vary during pharmacological interventions. This issue has important implications inclinical studies.

  11. Evaluation of the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modeling of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Anum; Azam, Shumaila; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I

    2018-08-14

    The Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a supporting tool in drug discovery and improvement. Simulations produced by these models help to save time and aids in examining the effects of different variables on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. For this purpose, Sheila and Peters suggested a PBPK model capable of performing simulations to study a given drug absorption. There is a need to extend this model to the whole body entailing all another process like distribution, metabolism, and elimination, besides absorption. The aim of this scientific study is to hypothesize a WB-PBPK model through integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination processes with the existing PBPK model.Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination models are designed, integrated with PBPK model and validated. For validation purposes, clinical records of few drugs are collected from the literature. The developed WB-PBPK model is affirmed by comparing the simulations produced by the model against the searched clinical data. . It is proposed that the WB-PBPK model may be used in pharmaceutical industries to create of the pharmacokinetic profiles of drug candidates for better outcomes, as it is advance PBPK model and creates comprehensive PK profiles for drug ADME in concentration-time plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Laboratory Settings for Assessing Drug Craving Implications for the Evaluation of Treatment Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on assessing craving in laboratory settings often involves inducing and then measuring craving in subjects. Cue-induced craving is studied in laboratory settings using the cue reactivity paradigm, in which drug-related photos, videos, evocative scripts, olfactory cues, and paraphernalia may induce craving. Cue-induced craving evoked by drug-related stimuli could be associated with relapse and recurrence of drug addiction. In this article, the authors review different methods of assessing craving in laboratory settings and explain how human laboratory settings can bridge the gap between randomized clinical trials (RCTs and animal models on pharmacological treatments for drug dependence. The brief reviewed literature provides strong evidence that laboratory-based studies of craving may improve our understanding of how subjective reports of drug craving are related to objective measures of drug abuse and laboratory settings provide an opportunity to measure the degree to which they co-vary during pharmacological interventions. This issue has important implications inclinical studies.

  13. Economic evaluation and the Jordan Rational Drug List: an exploratory study of national-level priority setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafi, Rania; Robinson, Suzanne; Williams, Iestyn

    2012-01-01

    To explore the extent of and barriers to the use of economic evaluation in compiling the Jordan Rational Drug List in the health care system of Jordan. The research reported in this article involved a case study of the Jordan Rational Drug List. Da