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Sample records for ev optical detection

  1. Luminescence excitation characteristics of Ca-, Na- and K-aluminosilicates (feldspars), in the stimulation range 20-500 eV: optical detection of XAS

    CERN Document Server

    Poolton, N R J; Quinn, F M; Pantos, E; Andersen, C E; Bøtter-Jensen, L; Johnsen, O; Murray, A S

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that the visible/UV luminescence from common feldspar crystals (NaAlSi sub 3 O sub 8 , KAlSi sub 3 O sub 8 and CaAl sub 2 Si sub 2 O sub 8) can be used to detect detailed L-edge and associated near-edge absorption structure of the main constituent atoms (Ca, K, Na, Al, Si), when exciting in the energy range 20-500 eV. Comparisons of the spectral features are drawn with similar measurements made on the associated materials SiO sub 2 , Al sub 2 O sub 3 and CaCO sub 3. The potential for using optically detected x-ray absorption spectroscopy as a method for identifying the luminescent components of mixed mineral samples is considered.

  2. Comparative analysis of EV isolation procedures for miRNAs detection in serum samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraida Andreu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are emerging as potent non-invasive biomarkers. However, current methodologies are time consuming and difficult to translate to clinical practice. To analyse EV-encapsulated circulating miRNA, we searched for a quick, easy and economic method to enrich frozen human serum samples for EV. We compared the efficiency of several protocols and commercial kits to isolate EVs. Different methods based on precipitation, columns or filter systems were tested and compared with ultracentrifugation, which is the most classical protocol to isolate EVs. EV samples were assessed for purity and quantity by nanoparticle tracking analysis and western blot or cytometry against major EV protein markers. For biomarker validation, levels of a set of miRNAs were determined in EV fractions and compared with their levels in total serum. EVs isolated with precipitation-based methods were enriched for a subgroup of miRNAs that corresponded to miRNAs described to be encapsulated into EVs (miR-126, miR-30c and miR-143, while the detection of miR-21, miR-16-5p and miR-19a was very low compared with total serum. Our results point to precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG as a suitable method for an easy and cheap enrichment of serum EVs for miRNA analyses. The overall performance of PEG was very similar, or better than other commercial precipitating reagents, in both protein and miRNA yield, but in comparison to them PEG is much cheaper. Other methods presented poorer results, mostly when assessing miRNA by qPCR analyses. Using PEG precipitation in a longitudinal study with human samples, we demonstrated that miRNA could be assessed in frozen samples up to 8 years of storage. We report a method based on a cut-off value of mean of fold EV detection versus serum that provides an estimate of the degree of encapsulation of a given miRNA.

  3. Extra virgin (EV) and ordinary (ON) olive oils: distinction and detection of adulteration (EV with ON) as determined by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and chemometric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Júnia de O; Neto, Waldomiro B; Mitsutake, Hery; Alves, Paulo S P; Augusti, Rodinei

    2010-07-15

    Extra virgin (EV), the finest and most expensive among all the olive oil grades, is often adulterated by the cheapest and lowest quality ordinary (ON) olive oil. A new methodology is described herein that provides a simple, rapid, and accurate way not only to detect such type of adulteration, but also to distinguish between these olive oil grades (EV and ON). This approach is based on the application of direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive ion mode, ESI(+)-MS, followed by the treatment of the MS data via exploratory statistical approaches, PCA (principal component analysis) and HCA (hierarchical clustering analysis). Ten distinct brands of each EV and ON olive oil, acquired at local stores, were analyzed by ESI(+)-MS and the results from HCA and PCA clearly indicated the formation of two distinct groups related to these two categories. For the adulteration study, one brand of each olive oil grade (EV and ON) was selected. The counterfeit samples (a total of 20) were then prepared by adding assorted proportions, from 1 to 20% w/w, with increments of 1% w/w, of the ON to the EV olive oil. The PCA and HCA methodologies, applied to the ESI(+)-MS data from the counterfeit (20) and authentic (10) EV samples, were able to readily detect adulteration, even at levels as low as 1% w/w. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Magnetic Alignment Detection Using Existing Charging Facility in Wireless EV Chargers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabiao Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless charging is a promising outlet to promote the electric vehicle (EV industry due to its safe and noncontact manner. Wireless EV chargers require the secondary receiver coil to be well aligned with the primary station for efficient charging, which could require more of the driver’s time and attention when parking a vehicle. Therefore, this paper presents a magnetic alignment system to assist the EV driver during parking. The magnetic alignment approach uses the existing coil and frequency tracking control electronics of wireless chargers to detect the distance between the two coils while using 4 small auxiliary coils for direction and fine adjustment, leading to a cost effective detection method for coil alignment in electric vehicle wireless charging (EVWC. The testing results of a prototype show acceptable measurement correctness and the mean error for ten trials in range detection is within 0.25 cm at three different misalignment conditions (10.5, 15, and 20 cm. The positioning accuracy of coil alignment is within 1.2 cm for three different start positions with the auxiliary coils.

  5. Optical Detection of Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for buildup .of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate. above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time,in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need,research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde.sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To .incorporate the dye .in.an optical sensor device requires. a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar sbstrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a field able sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable; real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program,

  6. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  7. Large-scale distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10(18) eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antici'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S.L.C.; Baughman, B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K.H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S.H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Diaz, J. Chirinos; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R.M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Rio, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui De Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, Rishi; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H. H.; Sima, O.; 'Smiallkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, Arjen; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2012-01-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10(18) eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10(18) eV, and

  8. Optical detection in microfluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2009-01-01

    Optical detection schemes continue to be favoured for measurements in microfluidic systems. A selection of the latest progress mainly within the last two years is critically reviewed. Emphasis is on integrated solutions, such as planar waveguides, coupling schemes to the outside world, evanescent...

  9. Optical conductivity of Ni1 − xPtx alloys (0eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina S. Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic ellipsometry and Drude-Lorentz oscillator fitting, we determined the dielectric function and optical conductivity versus photon energy from 0.76 to 6.6 eV of 10 nm thick Ni1 − xPtx alloy (0eV due to interband optical transitions. There is a significant broadening of the UV peak with increasing Pt content, since the bandwidth of the 3d electrons in Ni is smaller than that of the 5d bands in Pt. Our experimental observation is consistent with ab initio calculations of the density of states for Ni, Pt, and the Ni3Pt compound. Annealing the metals at 500°C for 30 s increases the optical conductivity.

  10. Modelling the optical constants of cubic ZnS in the 0-20 eV spectral region

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuchiya, T; Adachi, S

    2003-01-01

    We have analysed the complex dielectric-function spectra epsilon(E) epsilon sub 1 (E) + i epsilon sub 2 (E) of cubic (c-)ZnS in the full spectral range (E = 0-20 eV) using a classical harmonic oscillator and a simplified interband transition model. The experimental epsilon(E) spectra reveal the reststrahlen band, distinct critical-point structures and cation d-band excitations in the spectra. The critical points are assigned to specific points in the Brillouin zone with the aid of the band-structure calculation. They are E sub 0 doublet at approx 3.8 eV; E sub 1 at approx 6.4 eV; E sub 2 at approx 7.0 eV; E sub 2 + delta at approx 7.4 eV; E sub 0 ' at approx 7.9 eV and E sub 1 ' at approx 9.4 eV. Excellent agreement is also achieved between the modelled and experimental epsilon(E) spectra over the entire range of photon energies. The sum rules are used to extract more detailed information. The high-frequency and static dielectric constants of c-ZnS are determined to be epsilon subinfinity = 5.1 and epsilon su...

  11. Optical Lightning Detection From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Hugh J., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1995 we have had one or more optical lightning sensors in low earth orbit (LEO) providing near continuous lightning observations of the earth. The resulting data sets have enabled scientists to study global lighting distributions and their variable. Diurnal, seasonal and interannual variabilities are clearly revealed. In addition, because of the exceptionally high detection efficiency of the optical sensing technique and the high spatial resolution, it is possible to study individual clouds and cloud system despite a viewing time that is often as short as 80 seconds. These case studies have demonstrated the importance of total lightning measurements in the study of severe weather. Results from these space-based lightning measurements will be presented as well as the next logical concept - optical observations from geostationary orbit (GEO). With a Lightning Mapper Sensor (LMS) in GEO, it will be possible to monitor severe weather on a continuous basis and to disseminate the data in less than 60 seconds.

  12. Correlation analysis of EV71 detection and case severity in hand, foot, and mouth disease in the Hunan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Dong; Hu, Shi-Xiong; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yun-Zhi; Xu, Qiao-Hua; Huang, Wei; Deng, Zhi-Hong; Zhou, Shuai-Feng; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) cases has been observed in the Hunan province of mainland China since 2009 with a particularly higher level of severe cases in 2010-2012. Intestinal viruses of the picornaviridae family are responsible for the human syndrome associated with HFMD with enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (Cox A16) being the most common causative strains. HFMD cases associated with EV71 are generally more severe with an increased association of morbidity and mortality. In this study, the etiology surveillance data of HFMD cases in Hunan province from March 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed to determine if there is a statistically relevant linear correlation exists between the detection rate of EV71 in mild cases and the proportion of severe cases among all HFMD patients. As the cases progressed from mild to severe to fatal, the likelihood of EV71 detection increased (25.78%, 52.20% and 84.18%, respectively). For all cases in the timeframe evaluated in this study, the presence of virus was detected in 63.21% of cases; among cases showing positivity for virus, EV71 infection accounted for 50.14%. These results provide evidence to support the observed higher morbidity and mortality associated with this outbreak and emphasizes the importance of early detection in order to implement necessary prevention measures to mitigate disease progression.

  13. Correlation analysis of EV71 detection and case severity in hand, foot, and mouth disease in the Hunan Province of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Dong Gao

    Full Text Available An increase in the incidence of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD cases has been observed in the Hunan province of mainland China since 2009 with a particularly higher level of severe cases in 2010-2012. Intestinal viruses of the picornaviridae family are responsible for the human syndrome associated with HFMD with enterovirus 71 (EV71 and Coxsackievirus A16 (Cox A16 being the most common causative strains. HFMD cases associated with EV71 are generally more severe with an increased association of morbidity and mortality. In this study, the etiology surveillance data of HFMD cases in Hunan province from March 2010 to October 2012 were analyzed to determine if there is a statistically relevant linear correlation exists between the detection rate of EV71 in mild cases and the proportion of severe cases among all HFMD patients. As the cases progressed from mild to severe to fatal, the likelihood of EV71 detection increased (25.78%, 52.20% and 84.18%, respectively. For all cases in the timeframe evaluated in this study, the presence of virus was detected in 63.21% of cases; among cases showing positivity for virus, EV71 infection accounted for 50.14%. These results provide evidence to support the observed higher morbidity and mortality associated with this outbreak and emphasizes the importance of early detection in order to implement necessary prevention measures to mitigate disease progression.

  14. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  15. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above 4 x 10(18) eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Pera, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaapa, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kuempe, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maure, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesa, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechcio, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouletl, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schroeder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Elipe, G. Torralba; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynski, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding 4x10(18) eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than 60 degrees detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux

  16. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  17. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  18. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; Aab, Alexander; Abreu, Pedro; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)}...

  19. Optical detection of glyphosate in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Góes, R. E.; Possetti, G. R. C.; Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    This work shows preliminary results of the detection of Glyphosate in water by using optical fiber spectroscopy. A colloid with citrate-caped silver nanoparticles was employed as substrate for the measurements. A cross analysis between optical absorption and inelastic scattering evidenced a controlled aggregation of the sample constituents, leading to the possibility of quantitative detection of the analyte. The estimate limit of detection for Glyphosate in water for the proposed sensing scheme was about 1.7 mg/L.

  20. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  1. Optical and Magneto-Optical Properties of Gd22Fe78 Thin Films in the Photon Energy Range From 1.5 to 5.5 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Jesenská

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical and magneto-optical properties of amorphous Gd22Fe78 (GdFe thin films prepared by direct current (DC sputtering on thermally oxidized substrates were characterized by the combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry and magneto-optical spectroscopy in the photon energy range from 1.5 to 5.5 eV. Thin SiNx and Ru coatings were used to prevent the GdFe surface oxidation and contamination. Using advanced theoretical models spectral dependence of the complete permittivity tensor and spectral dependence of the absorption coefficient were deduced from experimental data. No significant changes in the optical properties upon different coatings were observed, indicating reliability of used analysis.

  2. Developments in distributed optical fiber detection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Zhu, Qianxia; You, Tianrong

    2014-12-01

    The distributed optical fiber detection technology plays an important role in many fields, such as key regional security monitoring, pipeline maintenance and communication cable protection. It is superior to the traditional detector, and has a good prospect. This paper presents an overview of various distributed optical fiber sensors. At first, some related technologies of the optical fiber detection schemes are introduced in respect of sensing distance, real-time ability, signal strength, and system complexity; and the advantages and limitations of fiber gratings sensors, reflection-based optical fiber sensors, and interference- based optical fiber sensors are discussed. Then some advanced distributed optical fiber detection systems are mentioned. And the double-loop Sagnac distributed system is improved by adding photoelectric modulators and depolarizers. In order to denoise and enhance the original signal, a spectral subtraction-likelihood ratio method is improved. The experiment results show the spatial resolution is +/-15m per kilometer. Finally, based on the development trends of optical fiber detection technology at home and abroad, development tendency and application fields are predicted.

  3. Combined hostile fire and optics detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännlund, Carl; Tidström, Jonas; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2013-10-01

    Snipers and other optically guided weapon systems are serious threats in military operations. We have studied a SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) camera-based system with capability to detect and locate snipers both before and after shot over a large field-of-view. The high frame rate SWIR-camera allows resolution of the temporal profile of muzzle flashes which is the infrared signature associated with the ejection of the bullet from the rifle. The capability to detect and discriminate sniper muzzle flashes with this system has been verified by FOI in earlier studies. In this work we have extended the system by adding a laser channel for optics detection. A laser diode with slit-shaped beam profile is scanned over the camera field-of-view to detect retro reflection from optical sights. The optics detection system has been tested at various distances up to 1.15 km showing the feasibility to detect rifle scopes in full daylight. The high speed camera gives the possibility to discriminate false alarms by analyzing the temporal data. The intensity variation, caused by atmospheric turbulence, enables discrimination of small sights from larger reflectors due to aperture averaging, although the targets only cover a single pixel. It is shown that optics detection can be integrated in combination with muzzle flash detection by adding a scanning rectangular laser slit. The overall optics detection capability by continuous surveillance of a relatively large field-of-view looks promising. This type of multifunctional system may become an important tool to detect snipers before and after shot.

  4. Optical fiber probe for Cu2+ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayss, Jan; Sudolski, Grzegorz; Radzki, Stanislaw; Dargiewicz-Nowicka, Joanna

    2003-04-01

    The probe for the copper ions detection was investigated. As an optical transducer porphyrines were used H4TPPS4 and cationic H2TMePyP. The porphyrines were entrapped in a sol-gel film deposited directly on optical fiber core. The performance of the oprtodes was tested. The influence of the response time on gelation conditions of the sol-gel matrix was also investigated.

  5. Optical Detection of Lightning from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors have been developed to detect lightning from space during both day and night. These sensors have been fielded in two existing satellite missions and may be included on a third mission in 2002. Satellite-hosted, optically-based lightning detection offers three unique capabilities: (1) the ability to reliably detect lightning over large, often remote, spatial regions, (2) the ability to sample all (IC and CG) lightning, and (3) the ability to detect lightning with uniform (i.e., not range-dependent) sensitivity or detection efficiency. These represent significant departures from conventional RF-based detection techniques, which typically have strong range dependencies (biases) or range limitations in their detection capabilities. The atmospheric electricity team of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Global Hydrology and Climate Center has implemented a three-step satellite lightning research program which includes three phases: proof-of-concept/climatology, science algorithm development, and operational application. The first instrument in the program, the Optical Transient Detector (OTD), is deployed on a low-earth orbit (LEO) satellite with near-polar inclination, yielding global coverage. The sensor has a 1300 x 1300 sq km field of view (FOV), moderate detection efficiency, moderate localization accuracy, and little data bias. The OTD is a proof-of-concept instrument and its mission is primarily a global lightning climatology. The limited spatial accuracy of this instrument makes it suboptimal for use in case studies, although significant science knowledge has been gained from the instrument as deployed.

  6. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  7. Reset Tree-Based Optical Fault Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howon Kim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new reset tree-based scheme to protect cryptographic hardware against optical fault injection attacks. As one of the most powerful invasive attacks on cryptographic hardware, optical fault attacks cause semiconductors to misbehave by injecting high-energy light into a decapped integrated circuit. The contaminated result from the affected chip is then used to reveal secret information, such as a key, from the cryptographic hardware. Since the advent of such attacks, various countermeasures have been proposed. Although most of these countermeasures are strong, there is still the possibility of attack. In this paper, we present a novel optical fault detection scheme that utilizes the buffers on a circuit’s reset signal tree as a fault detection sensor. To evaluate our proposal, we model radiation-induced currents into circuit components and perform a SPICE simulation. The proposed scheme is expected to be used as a supplemental security tool.

  8. Optimizing SCR Design for Optical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    DESIGN FOR OPTICAL DETECTION Esperanza Paz C. del Casal Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S. Biomedical Engineering , University of Rochester, 2003...Professor Douglas Fouts – my thesis co-advisor MOSIS, Advanced Bionics , and Agilent – for their technical support Jefferey Catterlin – for his help

  9. Illumination methods for optical wear detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Jindang; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents some results of a study on optical wear detection. The focus of the paper is on the illumination, to optimize the contrast of the images. Various illumination methods are compared: bright field versus dark field illumination, and various kind of light sources: laser light, diffuse

  10. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  11. Enumeration Verification System (EVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — EVS is a batch application that processes for federal, state, local and foreign government agencies, private companies and internal SSA customers and systems. Each...

  12. Energy accommodation of 5-50 eV ions within an enclosure. [for subsequent detection by satellite-borne mass spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, R. R.; Boring, J. W.; Nelson, C. V.

    1981-01-01

    Beams of 5-50 eV He(+), Ar(+), Ne(+), O(+), and N2(+) ions were directed into an aluminum sphere, and the equilibrium number density of the atom or molecules was measured inside the sphere using a quadrupole mass spectrometer and signal averaging techniques. The equilibrium number density is inversely proportional to the average speed of the atoms; thus, the results are expressed in terms of the speed ratio, R = V(i)/V(s), where V(i) is the average speed within the enclosure, and V(s) is the average speed of atoms fully accommodated to the temperature of the wall. The speed ratios vary between 1.0 and 1.8. For N2, several values of R were less than 1; this was largely due to desorbed N2. There was no detectable number density for O, which is explained by the reaction of O with the surface.

  13. Optical Detection of Life on Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We describe what is known about the atmospheric properties (Teff, lob g, [FelH]) and fundamental properties (mass, age, and metal content) of nearby stars and how they influence the habitable zones and habitable eras of these stars. We then take an observer's point of view to assess the ability of optical telescopes to detect photosynthetic or methanogenic life on planets orbiting these stars.

  14. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buis E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  15. Optical Sensors for Detection of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettiwala, Aafrin M; Singh, Prabhat K

    2017-11-06

    Amino acids are crucially involved in a myriad of biological processes. Any aberrant changes in physiological level of amino acids often manifest in common metabolic disorders, serious neurological conditions and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, devising methods for detection of trace amounts of amino acids becomes highly elemental to their efficient clinical diagnosis. Recently, the domain of developing optical sensors for detection of amino acids has witnessed significant activity which is the focus of the current review article. We undertook a detailed search of the peer-reviewed literature that primarily deals with optical sensors for amino acids and focuses on the use of different type of materials as a sensing platform. Ninety-five papers have been included in the review, majority of which deals with optical sensors. We attempt to systematically classify these contributions based on applications of various chemical and biological scaffolds such as polymers, supramolecular assemblies, nanoparticles, DNA, heparin etc. for the sensing of amino acids. This review identifies that supramolecular assemblies and nanomaterial continue to be commonly used materials to devise sensors for amino acids followed by surfactant assemblies. The broad implications of amino acids in human health and diagnosis have stirred a lot of interest to develop optimized optical detection systems for amino acids in recent years, using different materials based on chemical and biological scaffolds. We have also attempted to highlight the merits and demerits of some of the noteworthy sensor systems to instigate further efforts for constructing amino acids sensor based on unconventional concepts. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Optical properties of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te studied by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry between 0.75 and 6.24 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph B. James

    2000-01-07

    Optical properties of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te (CZT) were studied by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). Measurements made by VASE were performed on CZT and CdTe samples in air at room temperature at multiple angles of incidence. A parametric function model was employed in the VASE analysis to determine the dielectric functions {var_epsilon}={var_epsilon}{sub 1} + i{var_epsilon}{sub 2} in the range of 0.75 to 6.24 eV. A two-oscillator analytical model was used to describe the dielectric response of native oxides on CZT. Surface oxide optical properties and thickness on CZT were also determined in conjunction with the VASE measurement and analysis of a CdTe sample. Two samples of CZT of different oxide thicknesses were measured and their optical constants were coupled together in a multiple-sample, multiple-model VASE analysis to resolve correlations between fitting parameters. Effective medium approximation (EMA) was used to describe the optical properties of the CZT oxide with roughness. A Kramers-Kronig self-consistency check of the real and imaginary parts of the Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1} dielectric functions was performed over the energy range 0.75 to 6.24 eV. A five-Lorentz-oscillator model was employed to describe the dielectric response of CZT in the range of 1.6 to 6.24 eV. Intensity transmission measurements were made on the Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te and CdTe, showing the absorption energy band edges of {approximately} 1.58 and 1.46 eV, respectively.

  17. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  18. Optical techniques for cervical neoplasia detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Novikova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the current research in the field of optical techniques for cervical neoplasia detection and covers a wide range of the existing and emerging technologies. Using colposcopy, a visual inspection of the uterine cervix with a colposcope (a binocular microscope with 3- to 15-fold magnification, has proven to be an efficient approach for the detection of invasive cancer. Nevertheless, the development of a reliable and cost-effective technique for the identification of precancerous lesions, confined to the epithelium (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia still remains a challenging problem. It is known that even at early stages the neoplastic transformations of cervical tissue induce complex changes and modify both structural and biochemical properties of tissues. The different methods, including spectroscopic (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, induced fluorescence and autofluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and imaging techniques (confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry, photoacoustic imaging, probe different tissue properties that may serve as optical biomarkers for diagnosis. Both the advantages and drawbacks of these techniques for the diagnosis of cervical precancerous lesions are discussed and compared.

  19. Multilayer optical disc system using homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Takahiro; Ide, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yukinobu; Watanabe, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A write/read system using high-productivity multilayer optical discs was developed. The recording medium used in the system consists of planar recording layers and a separated guide layer, and is fabricated by web coating and lamination process. The recording layers in the medium are made of one-photon-absorption material, on which data can be recorded with a normal laser diode. The developed system is capable of focusing and tracking on the medium and amplifying readout signals by using phase-diversity homodyne detection. A highly layer-selective focusing method using homodyne detection was also proposed. This method obtains stable focus-error signals with clearly separated S-shaped curves even when layer spacing is quite narrow, causing large interlayer crosstalk. Writing on the medium and reading with the signal amplification effect of homodyne detection was demonstrated. In addition, the effectiveness of the method was experimentally evaluated.

  20. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karner, Donald [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Garetson, Thomas [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  1. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  2. Integrated optic immunoassay for virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiarski, Anthony A.; Busch, James R.; Miller, Larry S.; Zulich, A. W.; Burans, James

    1995-05-01

    An integrated optic refractometer device was developed to perform a rapid one-step, label-free immunoassay. The device measures refractive index changes at the surface of a planar waveguide using interferometry. Antibodies were applied to the waveguide surface to provide a bioselective coating for detecting and quantifying a specific antigen of interest. The detection limit of this biosensor was determined for adenovirus as a model for other viral analytes of military, medical, and environmental interest. As binding of the antigen occurred on the sensor surface, a time-dependent phase shift of the helium-neon laser light beam was detected and was measured over a 10-minute time period. Adenovirus was detected at levels of 250 - 2500 viral particles/ml. This detection limit was obtained for a mono-layer of antibody attached to the sensor. Use of a high-density, multi-layer antibody coating approach resulted in improved detection limits for bacteria and protein analytes of general interest.

  3. Optical vortex filtering for the detection of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Nathaniel B.; Romanov, Gleb V.; Ames, William F.; Novikova, Irina

    2009-01-01

    We report the realization of an optical filter based on an optical vortex mask designed to exclusively detect a weak coherent laser field in the presence of much stronger spatially-overlapping field. We demonstrate the performance of such an optical vortex filter to eliminate the strong control field and detect only a weak optical field's transmission under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. The attractive feature of such filter is its insensitivity to optical field f...

  4. Optical and infrared detection using microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oden, P.I.; Datskos, P.G.; Warmack, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The feasibility of micromechanical optical and infrared (IR) detection using microcantilevers is demonstrated. Microcantilevers provide a simple means for developing single- and multi-element sensors for visible and infrared radiation that are smaller, more sensitive and lower in cost than quantum or thermal detectors. Microcantilevers coated with a heat absorbing layer undergo bending due to the differential stress originating from the bimetallic effect. Bending is proportional to the amount of heat absorbed and can be detected using optical or electrical methods such as resistance changes in piezoresistive cantilevers. The microcantilever sensors exhibit two distinct thermal responses: a fast one ({theta}{sub 1}{sup thermal} < ms) and a slower one ({tau}{sub 2}{sup thermal} {approximately} 10 ms). A noise equivalent temperature difference, NEDT = 90 mK was measured. When uncoated microcantilevers were irradiated by a low-power diode laser ({lambda} = 786 nm) the noise equivalent power, NEP, was found to be 3.5nW/{radical}Hz which corresponds to a specific detectivity, D*, of 3.6 {times} 10{sup 7} cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W at a modulation frequency of 20 Hz.

  5. Detection of splices of optical fibers with low loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salikhov, Aydar I.; Kazbaeva, Dinara A.; Komissarov, Arkadiy M.; Kisselev, Anton E.; Zhdanov, Ruslan R.

    2017-04-01

    Optical Reflectometer (OTDR-Optical Time Domain Reflectometr) of various types are widely used in almost all stages of the fiber-optic communication systems, from production of fiber optic cable to the construction of fiber-optic communication lines and their operation. OTDR provides a quick and easy diagnosis of the state of fibers, cables and fiber-optic communication lines in general. A new method of analysis allowing visually detect traces of welding with low loss.

  6. Space debris detection in optical image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Wen, Desheng; Ersoy, Okan K; Yi, Hongwei; Yao, Dalei; Song, Zongxi; Xi, Shaobo

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-accuracy, low false-alarm rate, and low computational-cost methodology for removing stars and noise and detecting space debris with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in optical image sequences. First, time-index filtering and bright star intensity enhancement are implemented to remove stars and noise effectively. Then, a multistage quasi-hypothesis-testing method is proposed to detect the pieces of space debris with continuous and discontinuous trajectories. For this purpose, a time-index image is defined and generated. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect space debris effectively without any false alarms. When the SNR is higher than or equal to 1.5, the detection probability can reach 100%, and when the SNR is as low as 1.3, 1.2, and 1, it can still achieve 99%, 97%, and 85% detection probabilities, respectively. Additionally, two large sets of image sequences are tested to show that the proposed method performs stably and effectively.

  7. Optical coherent and envelope detection for photonic wireless communication links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko; Yu, Xianbin

    We present two novel optical detection techniques for radio over fiber (RoF) communication links. Firstly, we present recent results obtained with optical digital coherent detection of optical phase-modulated ROF signals supporting error-free transmission over 25 km standard SMF with BPSK and QPSK...

  8. Optical detection of asymmetric bacteria utilizing electro orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae-Woo; Pu, Allen; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01

    We propose a bacterial detection scheme which uses no biochemical markers and can be applied in a Point-of-Care setting. The detection scheme aligns asymmetric bacteria with an electric field and detects the optical scattering.

  9. High-power, narrow-band, high-repetition-rate, 5.9 eV coherent light source using passive optical cavity for laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omachi, J; Yoshioka, K; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate a scheme for efficient generation of a 5.9 eV coherent light source with an average power of 23 mW, 0.34 meV linewidth, and 73 MHz repetition rate from a Ti: sapphire picosecond mode-locked laser with an output power of 1 W. Second-harmonic light is generated in a passive optical cavity by a BiB(3)O(6) crystal with a conversion efficiency as high as 67%. By focusing the second-harmonic light transmitted from the cavity into a β-BaB(2)O(4) crystal, we obtain fourth-harmonic light at 5.9 eV. This light source offers stable operation for at least a week. We discuss the suitability of the laser light source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy by comparing it with other sources (synchrotron radiation facilities and gas discharge lamp).

  10. Fiber Optic Detection of Action Potentials in Axons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smela, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    In prior exploratory research, we had designed a fiber optic sensor utilizing a long period Bragg grating for the purpose of detecting action potentials in axons optically, through a change in index...

  11. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  12. Modeling of Electric Vehicles (EVs) for EV Grid Integration Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    In order to successfully integrate EVs into power systems, it is necessary to develop a detailed EV model considering both the EV users’ driving requirements and the battery charging and discharging characteristics. A generic EV model was proposed which takes into account charging and discharging...

  13. Optical properties of TiBe2 in the range from 0.5 to 3.3 eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, C.; Groot, R.A. de; Vroomen, A.R. de; Mueller, F.M.

    1984-01-01

    The optical properties of polycrystalline TiBe2 have been determined by ellipsometry in the visible and infrared region. The most predominant features of the spectra are in excellent agreement with a calculation of the optical conductivity.

  14. Optical characterization of TlBr single crystals for radiation detection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Joon Ho; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Han Soo; Lee, Seung Hee; Ha, Jang Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    TlBr is of considerable technological importance for radiation detection applications where detecting high-energy photons such as X-rays and γ-rays are of prime importance. However, there were few reports on investigating optical properties of TlBr itself for deeper understandings of this material and for making better radiation detection devices. Thus, in this paper, we report on the optical characterizations of TlBr single crystals. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements at RT were performed for this work. A 2-inch TlBr single crystalline ingot was grown by using the vertical Bridgman furnace. SE measurements were performed at RT within the photon energy range from 1.1 to 6.5 eV. PL measurements were performed at RT by using a home-made PL system equipped with a 266 nm-laser and a spectrometer. Dielectric responses from SE analysis were shown to be slightly different among the different samples possibly due to the different structural/optical properties. Also from the PL measurements, it was observed that the peak intensities of the middle samples were significantly higher than those of the other two samples. With the given values for permittivity of free space (ε0 = 8.854x10{sup -1}2 F·m{sup -1}), thickness (d = 1 mm), and area (A = 10x10 mm{sup 2}) of the TlBr sample, capacitances of TlBr were 6.9 pF (at hν = 3 eV) and 4.4 pF (at hν = 6 eV), respectively. SE and PL measurement and analysis were performed to characterize TlBr samples from the optical perspective. It was observed that dielectric responses of different TlBr samples were slightly different due to the different material properties. PL measurements showed that the middle sample exhibited much stronger PL emission peaks due to the better material quality. From the SE analysis, optical, dielectric constants were extracted, and calculated capacitances were in the few pF range.

  15. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient

  16. Combined x-ray/electron/optical Monte Carlo code based on PENELOPE and DETECT-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Sempau, Josep; Boswell, Jonathan S.

    2005-04-01

    We describe MANTIS (Monte carlo x-rAy electroN opTical Imaging Simulation), a tool for simulating imaging systems that tracks x rays, electrons, and optical photons in the same geometric model. The x-ray and electron transport and involved physics models are from the PENELOPE package and include elastic and inelastic scattering, and bremsstrahlung from 100 eV to 1 GeV. The optical transport and corresponding physics models are from DETECT-II and include Fresnel refraction and reflection at material boundaries, bulk absorption and scattering. X rays are generated using the flexible source description from PENELOPE. When x rays or electrons interact and deposit energy in the scintillator, the code generates a number of optical quanta at that location, according to a model for the conversion process. The optical photons are then tracked until they reach an absorption event that in some cases contributes to the electronic signal. We demonstrate the capabilities of the new tool with respect to x-ray source, object to be imaged, and detector models. Of particular importance is the improved geometric description of structured phosphors that can handle tilted columns in needle-like phosphor screens. Examples of the simulation output with respect to signal blur and pulse-height distributions of the scintillation light are discussed and compared with previously published experimental results.

  17. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Samla Gauri; Zurina Zainal Abidin; Mohd Firdaus Kamuri; Mohd Adzir Mahdi; Nurul Amziah Md. Yunus

    2017-01-01

    This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided b...

  18. Optical correlator for textile web defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Nathalie; Prevost, Donald; Sheng, Yunlong

    2000-05-01

    Cost-effective optical correlators are now available for industrial applications. One such application field is the real-time automatic inspection of textile web, in which the high data throughput of the optical correlator over-performs that of the electronic computer. Two approaches for defect enhancement using of wavelet and Wiener filters are proposed. The band-pass wavelet filter is designed to give higher weights in the frequency band, where the energy of defect is higher than that of the web, and to suppress the zero, first and all higher diffracted orders. The Wiener filters are designed based on an average defect shape, with the web texture considered as noise. Using the technique developed at INO (National Optics Institute), a set up of the Vander Lugt type correlator demonstrates experimentally the relevancy of the algorithms. Simulation and optical results are presented.

  19. Chemical detection demonstrated using an evanescent wave graphene optical sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliakal, Ashok; Reith, Leslie; Cabot, Steve [LGS Innovations, 15 Vreeland Rd., Florham Park, New Jersey 07932 (United States)

    2016-04-11

    Graphene devices have been constructed on silicon mirrors, and the graphene is optically probed through an evanescent wave interaction in an attenuated total reflectance configuration using an infrared spectrometer. The graphene is electrically biased in order to tune its optical properties. Exposure of the device to the chemicals iodine and ammonia causes observable and reversible changes to graphene's optical absorption spectra in the mid to near infrared range which can be utilized for the purpose of sensing. Electrical current measurements through the graphene are made simultaneously with optical measurements allowing for simultaneous sensing using two separate detection modalities. Our current results reveal sub-ppm detection limits for iodine and approximately 100 ppm detection limits for ammonia. We have also demonstrated that this approach will work at 1.55 μm, which opens up the possibility for graphene optical sensors that leverage commercial telecom light sources.

  20. The simulation study on optical target laser active detection performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-chun; Hou, Zhao-fei; Fan, Youchen

    2014-12-01

    According to the working principle of laser active detection system, the paper establishes the optical target laser active detection simulation system, carry out the simulation study on the detection process and detection performance of the system. For instance, the performance model such as the laser emitting, the laser propagation in the atmosphere, the reflection of optical target, the receiver detection system, the signal processing and recognition. We focus on the analysis and modeling the relationship between the laser emitting angle and defocus amount and "cat eye" effect echo laser in the reflection of optical target. Further, in the paper some performance index such as operating range, SNR and the probability of the system have been simulated. The parameters including laser emitting parameters, the reflection of the optical target and the laser propagation in the atmosphere which make a great influence on the performance of the optical target laser active detection system. Finally, using the object-oriented software design methods, the laser active detection system with the opening type, complete function and operating platform, realizes the process simulation that the detection system detect and recognize the optical target, complete the performance simulation of each subsystem, and generate the data report and the graph. It can make the laser active detection system performance models more intuitive because of the visible simulation process. The simulation data obtained from the system provide a reference to adjust the structure of the system parameters. And it provides theoretical and technical support for the top level design of the optical target laser active detection system and performance index optimization.

  1. Detection of laser-produced tin plasma emission lines in atmospheric environment by optical emission spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadim, Kadhim A.

    2017-12-01

    A spectroscopic study on laser-produced tin plasma utilizing the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) technique is presented. Plasma is produced from a solid tin target irradiated with pulsed laser in room environment. Electron temperature is determined at different laser peak powers from the ratio of line intensities, while electron density is deduced from Saha-Boltzmann equation. A limited number of suitable tin lines are detected, and the effect of the laser peak power on the intensity of emission lines is discussed. Electron temperatures are measured in the range of 0.36 eV-0.44 eV with electron densities of the order 1017 cm-3 as the laser peak power is varied from 11 MW to 22 MW.

  2. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  3. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  4. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  5. Detection of first-order structure in optic flow fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Pas, Susan F.; Kappers, A. M L; Koenderink, Jan J.

    1996-01-01

    We measured psychophysical thresholds for the detection of four different optic flow components in the presence of a translational velocity. We also measured thresholds for detection of rotation in the presence of expansion and for expansion in the presence of rotation. Our stimuli consisted of

  6. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences ... Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate by a diacylhydrazine ligand by the formation of a colour alkali metal complex. Purnandhu Bose Ranjan ... Keywords. Anion sensing; colourimetric detection; alkali metal complex; single crystal X-ray; deprotonation.

  7. Detecting tissue optical and mechanical properties with an ultrasound modulated optical imaging system in reflection detection geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi; Li, Sinan; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue optical and mechanical properties are correlated to tissue pathologic changes. This manuscript describes a dual-mode ultrasound modulated optical imaging system capable of sensing local optical and mechanical properties in reflection geometry. The optical characterisation was achieved by the acoustic radiation force assisted ultrasound modulated optical tomography (ARF-UOT) with laser speckle contrast detection. Shear waves generated by the ARF were also tracked optically by the same system and the shear wave speed was used for the elasticity measurement. Tissue mimicking phantoms with multiple inclusions buried at 11 mm depth were experimentally scanned with the dual-mode system. The inclusions, with higher optical absorption and/or higher stiffness than background, were identified based on the dual results and their stiffnesses were quantified. The system characterises both optical and mechanical properties of the inclusions compared with the ARF-UOT or the elasticity measurement alone. Moreover, by detecting the backward scattered light in reflection detection geometry, the system is more suitable for clinical applications compared with transmission geometry.

  8. Selective detection of antibodies in microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bo Damm; Hoiby, P.E.; Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber (mPOF). The fiber core is defined by a ring of 6 air holes and a simple procedure...... was applied to selectively capture either α-streptavidin or α-CRP antibodies inside these air holes. A sensitive and easy-to-use fluorescence method was used for the optical detection. Our results show that mPOF based biosensors can provide reliable and selective antibody detection in ultra small sample...

  9. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samla Gauri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the detection of Aeromonas hydrophila using fiber optic microchannel biosensor. Microchannel was fabricated by photolithography method. The fiber optic was chosen as signal transmitting medium and light absorption characteristic of different microorganisms was investigated for possible detection. Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer and also theoretical calculation by Beer-Lambert Absorption Law. The entire detection can be done in less than 10 minutes using a total volume of 3 μL only. This result promises good potential of this fiber optic microchannel sensor as a reliable, portable, and disposable sensor.

  10. Detection of Extraterrestrial Life. Method II- Optical Rotatory Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    The object of this study is to develop polarimetric methods to detect the presence of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or its congeners in soil suspensions, and through these methods determine the existence of life (as known terrestrially) on other planets. The cotton region associated with optically active organic compounds is being used to detect and characterize the compounds above. An apparatus has been designed and assembled which can measure optical rotations in systems which strongly attenuate incident-polarized, monochromatic light. This instrument was used to measure the optical rotatory dispersion spectra of nucleosides, a polynucleotide, and proteins whose optical density at 260 microns approached 1.0. This work is discussed in the final report on Contract NASR-85, Detection of Extraterrestrial Life, Method II: Optical Rotatory Dispersion. Recent work in Melpar laboratories has reaffirmed these rotatory dispersion spectra. Based upon the analysis of the optical components associated with this apparatus, however, these measurements must be considered as qualitative rather than quantitative. The reason for this is discussed in greater detail subsequently in this report. In addition, an evaluation of the theoretical and instrumental aspects of making rotatory-dispersion measurements in the cotton region has resulted in a procedure for measuring optical rotation.

  11. Optical design of a 200 eV-2.5 keV cylindrical element monochromator for the 1.3-GeV storage ring of SRRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chu-Nan; Tseng, Ping-Chung; Song, Yunn-Fang

    1989-07-01

    Separate focus-function mirrors in combination with a simple-scanning spherical/cylindrical grating are to be used for an extreme grazing-incidence beamline design in the photon energy range of 200 eV-2.5 keV at the ARC synchrotron radiation of the TBA lattice of SRRC. Three mechanically ruled gratings are used to cover the spectral wavelength range of the extreme VUV and soft x rays. Both the throughput and the resolution of this optical system have been carefully calculated and compromised against the grazing angle, arm length, grating size, etc. The proper parameters of the optical elements as well as their geometrical arrangements are proposed. A resolving power of at least 2000 is obtainable at the high-energy end of the spectrum around 2 keV. At the low-energy end, the resolving power can be as high as 8000, comparable to a grazing-incidence Rowland circle type of monochromator. The overall resolving power has been found to be superior to that of either the plane grating monochromator (PGM) or the 10-m toroidal grazing monochromator (TGM) in the same spectral wavelength range.

  12. Optical Detection of Non-amplified Genomic DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    Nucleic acid sequences are unique to every living organisms including animals, plants and even bacteria and virus, which provide a practical molecular target for the identification and diagnosis of various diseases. DNA contains heterocyclic rings that has inherent optical absorbance at 260 nm, which is widely used to quantify single and double stranded DNA in biology. However, this simple quantification method could not differentiate sequences; therefore it is not suitable for sequence-specific analyte detection. In addition to a few exceptions such as chiral-related circular dichroism spectra, DNA hybridization does not produce significant changes in optical signals, thus an optical label is generally needed for sequence-specific DNA detection with optical means. During the last two decades, we have witnessed explosive progress in the area of optical DNA detection, especially with the help of simultaneously rapidly developed nanomaterials. In this chapter, we will summarize recent advances in optical DNA detection including colorimetric, fluorescent, luminescent, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Raman scattering assays. Challenges and problems remained to be addressed are also discussed.

  13. Optical sensors based on metal oxide nanowires for UV/IR detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Jose Luis; García Nuñez, Carlos; García Marín, Antonio; Ruiz, Eduardo; Piqueras, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Metal oxide nanowires (NWs) present high stability and excellent optical, electrical and mechanical properties. Their synthesis is cost-effective since they can be produced by means of conventional ovens using vapor phase transport or direct metal oxidation. In this work, n-type ZnO and p-type CuO NWs are deposited on pre-patterned electrodes of Aldoped ZnO (AZO) by dielectrophoresis. Performance of devices fabricated from single and multiple NWs are compared. Highly selective UV detection is demonstrated in n-type ZnO NW photoconductors with high external gains in the 0.09-1×108 range and slow time responses, both effects induced by surface effects. In contrast, n-p-n AZO/ CuO NW/AZO heterostructures show lower gains but faster optical responses, mainly limited by device parasitics. Given the CuO bandgap (1.2 eV), the results are quite promising for the development of hybrid metal oxide detection structures in imaging and photovoltaic applications.

  14. Detection of optical properties in small region by diffuse reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Shengcai; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Zongping; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties of small and highly absorbing tissues can be determined by measurement of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance at short source-detector separations. Spatial resolution and number of measuring point influence the inverting precision of optical property directly from the experimental diffuse reflectance. To increase spatial resolution and number of measuring point, a high-resolution and multiple points detection system is designed. A special optical fiber array probe is employed. Its spatial resolution is 0.125mm. The system is proved to be reliable by comparing the experimental result of diffuse reflectance from small region 0.125mm-1.25mm with that of numerical simulation. The inverting method based on Monte Carlo simulation is designed, by which optical properties can be achieved by building optical parameter date base and training artificial neural network (ANN).

  15. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  16. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Møller Jørgensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles, 2013; 2: 10 has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment or purification prior to analysis.

  17. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  18. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  19. VERTICALLY INTEGRATED OPTICAL TRANSDUCER FOR BIO-PARTICLE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANAH MASRIE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An optical transducer with vertical structure integrated with MEMS microfluidic device is developed for the detection of bio-particle. The system consists of optical detection part; electronics control part and microfluidic part. Integrating of these parts, using optical transducer as a label-free method can provide the diagnosis of low volume biological samples as well as leading to direct detection with no significant change in physical forms of the samples. A collimated light source of deep UV-AlGaN based LED and a SiC photodiode operating at 260 nm are utilized as a light transmitter and detector, respectively. The principle of bio-particle detection is based on absorption of ultraviolet (UV range of DNA biological samples extracted from a Caco-2 cell in a fluidic medium. The outcomes show that the signal is detected by the SiC photodiode for the rise time of τr ~ 118.1371 µs which shows sufficient response time to enable the detection of the bio-particle. Testing on various samples showed that the detector has no response to non-absorbance samples such as deionized (DI water, Tris-EDTA (TE buffer and protein samples. However, a significant outcome in the detection of a Caco-2 cell line with the absorbance coefficient of average 0.08 a.u was achieved.

  20. Research of detection depth for graphene-based optical sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Sun, Jialve; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2018-03-01

    Graphene-based optical sensors have been developed for research into the biological intercellular refractive index (RI) because they offer greater detection depths than those provided by the surface plasmon resonance technique. In this Letter, we propose an experimental approach for measurement of the detection depth in a graphene-based optical sensor system that uses transparent polydimethylsiloxane layers with different thicknesses. The experimental results show that detection depths of 2.5 μm and 3 μm can be achieved at wavelengths of 532 nm and 633 nm, respectively. These results prove that graphene-based optical sensors can realize long-range RI detection and are thus promising for use as tools in the biological cell detection field. Additionally, we analyze the factors that influence the detection depth and provide a feasible approach for detection depth control based on adjustment of the wavelength and the angle of incidence. We believe that this approach will be useful in RI tomography applications.

  1. The detection of ultrasound using fibre optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Brian; Thursby, Graham; Betz, Daniel; Sorazu, Boja

    2007-07-01

    Ultrasound is a valuable tool for the detection of damage in structures and the characterisation of material properties. Its detection is conventionally done by piezoelectric transducers, however fibre optic sensors can operate over a greater range of frequencies and also yield information on the direction of wave propagation. The interaction between fibre sensors and ultrasound both demonstrates the integrating features of intrinsic fibre optic sensors and presents new opportunities in ultrasonic detection, offering enormous diversity in polar and frequency response. This paper summarises the interaction mechanisms between ultrasound and fibre sensors and confirms their functional flexibility. We use these results to demonstrate the practical use of these sensors to detect and locate damage in a sample.

  2. Optical Detection Technique Using Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongpeng; Zhang, Dongdong; Dong, Lei; Zheng, Huadan; Liu, Yanyan; Yin, Wangbao; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Jia, Suotang

    2015-06-01

    A new optical detection approach based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) to detect gases is developed. The new method not only employs a modulated laser to excite acoustic wave, as the general QEPAS does, but also adds an extra laser beam without modulation as the detection source to transform the prong vibration into a laser intensity change. Due to the mechanical vibration of the prongs, the intensity of the reflection laser beam is modulated. Thus, the information of the target gas (composition, concentration, etc.) is obtained by demodulating the reflected light. The achieved sensitivity of is inter-compared to the sensitivity of the conventional QEPAS. Further developments of the new optical detection approach are also discussed in detail.

  3. Atmospheric greenhouse gases detection by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Anselmo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    This thesis concerns the theoretical and experimental development of a new methodology for greenhouse gases detection based on the optical absorption. The problem relies on the unambiguous retrieval of a gas concentration from differential absorption measurements, in which the spectral width of the light source is wider than one or several absorption lines of the considered target gas given that the detection is not spectrally resolved. This problem could lead to the development of a robust r...

  4. Processing of Graphene combining Optical Detection and Scanning Probe Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Sören

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental setup tailored for robotic processing of graphene with in-situ vision based control. A robust graphene detection approach is presented applying multiple image processing operations of the visual feedback provided by a high-resolution light microscope. Detected graphene flakes can be modified using a scanning probe based lithographical process that is directly linked to the in-situ optical images. The results of this process are discussed with respect to further application scenarios.

  5. EV-GHG Mobile Source

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The EV-GHG Mobile Source Data asset contains measured mobile source GHG emissions summary compliance information on light-duty vehicles, by model, for certification...

  6. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, Tolga; Simonsen, A; Schmid, Silvan

    2013-01-01

    reflected off its metallized surface. The circuit acts as an antenna; the voltage signals it induces are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude below that of standard optical modulators......Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency (rf) and microwave signals is an ubiquitous technological challenge, crucial in fields as diverse as radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation and communication, including those of quantum states. Efficient upconversion of rf...... that nanomechanical oscillators can couple very strongly to either microwave [3–5] or optical fields [6, 7]. An oscillator accommodating both these functionalities would bear great promise as the intermediate platform in a radio-to-optical transduction cascade. Here, we demonstrate such an opto...

  7. Pyridine Vapors Detection by an Optical Fibre Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernandez-Gutiérrez

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available An optical fibre sensor has been implemented towards pyridine vapors detection;to achieve this, a novel vapochromic material has been used, which, in solid state, suffers achange in colour from blue to pink-white in presence of pyridine vapours. This complex isadded to a solution of PVC (Poly Vinyl Chloride, TBP (Tributylphosphate andtetrahydrofuran (THF, forming a plasticized matrix; by dip coating technique, the sensingmaterial is fixed onto a cleaved ended optical fibre. The fabrication process was optimizedin terms of number of dips and dipping speed, evaluating the final devices by dynamicrange. Employing a reflection set up, the absorbance spectra and changes in the reflectedoptical power of the sensors were registered to determine their response. A linear relationbetween optical power versus vapor concentration was obtained, with a detection limit of 1ppm (v/v.

  8. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  9. Improved axial position detection in optical tweezers measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the axial position detection of a trapped microsphere in an optical trap by using a quadrant photodiode. By replacing the photodiode with a CCD camera, we obtain detailed information on the light scattered by the microsphere. The correlation of the interference pattern with the axial...

  10. Simulation-based design of a steerable acoustic warning device to increase (H)EV detectability while reducing urban noise pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Genechten, B.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation-based design methodology used in the eVADER project for the development of targeted acoustic warning devices for increased detectability of Hybrid and Electric Vehicles (HEVs) while, at the same time, reducing urban noise pollution compared to conventional

  11. Study of optical nonlinearity of a highly dispersive medium using optical heterodyne detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmick, Arup; Mohapatra, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the optical heterodyne detection technique to study the absorption and dispersion of a probe beam propagating through a medium with a narrow resonance. The technique has been demonstrated for Rydberg Electro-magnetically induced transparency (EIT) in rubidium thermal vapor and the optical non-linearity of a probe beam with variable intensity has been studied. A quantitative comparison of the experimental result with a suitable theoretical model is presented. The limitations and the working regime of the technique are discussed.

  12. The experimental cascade curves of EAS at E sub 0 10(17) eV obtained by the method of detection of Cherenkov pulse shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Y. A.; Kalmykov, G. B.; Khristiansen, M. V.; Motova, M. V.; Nechin, Y. A.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.; Efimov, N. N.; Grigoriev, V. M.; Nikiforova, E. S.

    1985-01-01

    The individual cascade curves of EAS with E sub 0 10 to the 17th power eV/I to 3/ were studied by detection of EAS Cherenkov light pulses. The scintillators located at the center of the Yakutsk EAS array within a 500-m radius circle were used to select the showers and to determine the main EAS parameters. The individual cascade curves N(t) were obtained using the EAS Cherenkov light pulses satisfying the following requirements: (1) the signal-to-noise ratio fm/delta sub n 15, (2) the EAS axis-detector distance tau sub 350 m, (3) the zenith angle theta 30 deg, (4) the probability for EAS to be detected by scintillators W 0.8. Condition (1) arises from the desire to reduce the amplitude distortion of Cherenkov pulses due to noise and determines the range of EAS sizes, N(t). The resolution times of the Cherenkov pulse shape detectors are tau sub 0 approx. 23 ns which results in distortion of a pulse during the process of the detection. The distortion of pulses due to the finiteness of tau sub 0 value was estimated. It is shown that the rise time of pulse becomes greater as tau sub 0.5/tau sub 0 ratio decreases.

  13. Evanescent Wave Fiber Optic Biosensor for Salmonella Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Bhunia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a major food-borne pathogen of world-wide concern. Sensitive and rapid detection methods to assess product safety before retail distribution are highly desirable. Since Salmonella is most commonly associated with poultry products, an evanescent wave fiber-optic assay was developed to detect Salmonella in shell egg and chicken breast and data were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF assay. Anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibody was immobilized onto the surface of an optical fiber using biotin-avidin interactions to capture Salmonella. Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated antibody (MAb 2F-11 was used as the reporter. Detection occurred when an evanescent wave from a laser (635 nm excited the Alexa Fluor and the fluorescence was measured by a laser-spectrofluorometer at 710 nm. The biosensor was specific for Salmonella and the limit of detection was established to be 103 cfu/mL in pure culture and 104 cfu/mL with egg and chicken breast samples when spiked with 102 cfu/mL after 2–6 h of enrichment. The results indicate that the performance of the fiber-optic sensor is comparable to TRF, and can be completed in less than 8 h, providing an alternative to the current detection methods.

  14. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  15. Towards Optical Partial Discharge Detection with Micro Silicon Photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ming; Zhou, Jierui; Song, Bo; Zhang, Chongxing; Dong, Ming; Albarracín, Ricardo

    2017-11-10

    Optical detection is reliable in intrinsically characterizing partial discharges (PDs). Because of the great volume and high-level power supply of the optical devices that can satisfy the requirements in photosensitivity, optical PD detection can merely be used in laboratory studies. To promote the practical application of the optical approach in an actual power apparatus, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based PD sensor is introduced in this paper, and its basic properties, which include the sensitivity, pulse resolution, correlation with PD severity, and electromagnetic (EM) interference immunity, are experimentally evaluated. The stochastic phase-resolved PD pattern (PRPD) for three typical insulation defects are obtained by SiPM PD detector and are compared with those obtained using a high-frequency current transformer (HFCT) and a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT). Because of its good performances in the above aspects and its additional advantages, such as the small size, low power supply, and low cost, SiPM offers great potential in practical optical PD monitoring.

  16. Towards Optical Partial Discharge Detection with Micro Silicon Photomultipliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ren

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical detection is reliable in intrinsically characterizing partial discharges (PDs. Because of the great volume and high-level power supply of the optical devices that can satisfy the requirements in photosensitivity, optical PD detection can merely be used in laboratory studies. To promote the practical application of the optical approach in an actual power apparatus, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM-based PD sensor is introduced in this paper, and its basic properties, which include the sensitivity, pulse resolution, correlation with PD severity, and electromagnetic (EM interference immunity, are experimentally evaluated. The stochastic phase-resolved PD pattern (PRPD for three typical insulation defects are obtained by SiPM PD detector and are compared with those obtained using a high-frequency current transformer (HFCT and a vacuum photomultiplier tube (PMT. Because of its good performances in the above aspects and its additional advantages, such as the small size, low power supply, and low cost, SiPM offers great potential in practical optical PD monitoring.

  17. Optically amplified detection for biomedical sensing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Betts, Gary; Jalali, Bahram

    2013-10-01

    Optical sensing and imaging methods for biomedical applications, such as spectroscopy and laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy, are incapable of performing sensitive detection at high scan rates due to the fundamental trade-off between sensitivity and speed. This is because fewer photons are detected during short integration times and hence the signal falls below the detector noise. Optical postamplification can, however, overcome this challenge by amplifying the collected optical signal after collection and before photodetection. Here we present a theoretical analysis of the sensitivity of high-speed biomedical sensing and imaging systems enhanced by optical postamplifiers. As a case study, we focus on Raman amplifiers because they produce gain at any wavelength within the gain medium's transparency window and are hence suitable for biomedical applications. Our analytical model shows that when limited by detector noise, such optically postamplified systems can achieve a sensitivity improvement of up to 20 dB in the visible to near-infrared spectral range without sacrificing speed. This analysis is expected to be valuable for design of fast real-time biomedical sensing and imaging systems.

  18. Periodic optical variability of radio-detected ultracool dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, L. K.; Golden, A.; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, B.; Butler, R. F. [Centre for Astronomy, National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Hallinan, G. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Boyle, R. P. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Zavala, R. T., E-mail: lkh@astro.caltech.edu [United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability, and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here, we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio-detected dwarfs, spanning the ∼M8-L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio-detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hr of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as ∼0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, although the underlying physical cause of this correlation remains unclear. In one case, we have multiple epochs of monitoring of the archetype of pulsing radio dwarfs, the M9 TVLM 513–46546, spanning a period of 5 yr, which is sufficiently stable in phase to allow us to establish a period of 1.95958 ± 0.00005 hr. This phase stability may be associated with a large-scale stable magnetic field, further strengthening the correlation between radio activity and periodic optical variability. Finally, we find a tentative spin-orbit alignment of one component of the very low mass binary, LP 349–25.

  19. Plasmonic Nanomaterial-Based Optical Biosensing Platforms for Virus Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewook; Takemura, Kenshin; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-10-13

    Plasmonic nanomaterials (P-NM) are receiving attention due to their excellent properties, which include surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects, plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET), and magneto optical (MO) effects. To obtain such plasmonic properties, many nanomaterials have been developed, including metal nanoparticles (MNP), bimetallic nanoparticles (bMNP), MNP-decorated carbon nanotubes, (MNP-CNT), and MNP-modified graphene (MNP-GRP). These P-NMs may eventually be applied to optical biosensing systems due to their unique properties. Here, probe biomolecules, such as antibodies (Ab), probe DNA, and probe aptamers, were modified on the surface of plasmonic materials by chemical conjugation and thiol chemistry. The optical property change in the plasmonic nanomaterials was monitored based on the interaction between the probe biomolecules and target virus. After bioconjugation, several optical properties, including fluorescence, plasmonic absorbance, and diffraction angle, were changed to detect the target biomolecules. This review describes several P-NMs as potential candidates of optical sensing platforms and introduces various applications in the optical biosensing field.

  20. Plasmonic Nanomaterial-Based Optical Biosensing Platforms for Virus Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewook Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanomaterials (P-NM are receiving attention due to their excellent properties, which include surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR effects, plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET, and magneto optical (MO effects. To obtain such plasmonic properties, many nanomaterials have been developed, including metal nanoparticles (MNP, bimetallic nanoparticles (bMNP, MNP-decorated carbon nanotubes, (MNP-CNT, and MNP-modified graphene (MNP-GRP. These P-NMs may eventually be applied to optical biosensing systems due to their unique properties. Here, probe biomolecules, such as antibodies (Ab, probe DNA, and probe aptamers, were modified on the surface of plasmonic materials by chemical conjugation and thiol chemistry. The optical property change in the plasmonic nanomaterials was monitored based on the interaction between the probe biomolecules and target virus. After bioconjugation, several optical properties, including fluorescence, plasmonic absorbance, and diffraction angle, were changed to detect the target biomolecules. This review describes several P-NMs as potential candidates of optical sensing platforms and introduces various applications in the optical biosensing field.

  1. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  2. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Fitzgerald, Jason [Sacramento, CA; Troppmann, Christoph [Sacramento, CA; Michalopoulou, Andromachi [Athens, GR

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  3. Damage monitoring and impact detection using optical fiber vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. C.; Han, K. S.

    2002-06-01

    Intensity-based optical fiber vibrations sensors (OFVSs) are used in damage monitoring of fiber-reinforced plastics, in vibration sensing, and location of impacts. OFVSs were constructed by placing two cleaved fiber ends in a capillary tube. This sensor is able to monitor structural vibrations. For vibration sensing, the optical fiber sensor was mounted on the carbon fiber reinforced composite beam, and its response was investigated for free and forced vibration. For locating impact points, four OFVSs were placed at chosen positions and the different arrival times of impact-generated vibration signals were recorded. The impact location can be determined from these time delays. Indentation and tensile tests were performed with the measurement of the optical signal and acoustic emission (AE). The OFVSs accurately detected both free and forced vibration signals. Accurate locations of impact were determined on an acrylate plate. It was found that damage information, comparable in quality to AE data, could be obtained from the OFVS signals.

  4. Optical sensor for real-time weld defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancona, Antonio; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Ferrara, Michele; Lugara, Pietro M.

    2002-04-01

    In this work we present an innovative optical sensor for on- line and non-intrusive welding process monitoring. It is based on the spectroscopic analysis of the optical VIS emission of the welding plasma plume generated in the laser- metal interaction zone. Plasma electron temperature has been measured for different chemical species composing the plume. Temperature signal evolution has been recorded and analyzed during several CO2-laser welding processes, under variable operating conditions. We have developed a suitable software able to real time detect a wide range of weld defects like crater formation, lack of fusion, excessive penetration, seam oxidation. The same spectroscopic approach has been applied for electric arc welding process monitoring. We assembled our optical sensor in a torch for manual Gas Tungsten Arc Welding procedures and tested the prototype in a manufacturing industry production line. Even in this case we found a clear correlation between the signal behavior and the welded joint quality.

  5. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    . The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane......Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would...... strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity...

  6. Detection system for optical coherence tomography: Czerny-Turner spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Aleksandra

    2017-08-01

    Research methods based on spectral analysis have powerful impact on development in many field of science. Signal spectrum can be a source of useful and important data. It enables to obtain information about physical and chemical properties of tested materials. This paper has been devoted to describe optical design for high resolution spectrometer, which is significant element of optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. Designed spectrometer is working in visible range (450-830 nm). Czerny-Turner configuration enables to correcting astigmatism and coma aberration over full bandwidth. Moreover, spectrometer has uncomplicated construction. Merely, two mirrors and diffraction gratings allows to design low - cost spectrometer with satisfying optical properties. Spectrum detection has been realized using CMOS line scan sensors with 6144 pixels. It provides high speed and resolution of the system.

  7. Detection of cortical optical changes during seizure activity using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Danielle; Hasan, Md.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Krishnan, Giri; Szu, Jenny I.; Myers, Timothy; Hirota, Koji; Bazhenov, Maxim; Binder, Devin K.; Park, Boris H.

    2017-02-01

    Electrophysiology has remained the gold standard of neural activity detection but its resolution and high susceptibility to noise and motion artifact limit its efficiency. Imaging techniques, including fMRI, intrinsic optical imaging, and diffuse optical imaging, have been used to detect neural activity, but rely on indirect measurements such as changes in blood flow. Fluorescence-based techniques, including genetically encoded indicators, are powerful techniques, but require introduction of an exogenous fluorophore. A more direct optical imaging technique is optical coherence tomography (OCT), a label-free, high resolution, and minimally invasive imaging technique that can produce depth-resolved cross-sectional and 3D images. In this study, we sought to examine non-vascular depth-dependent optical changes directly related to neural activity. We used an OCT system centered at 1310 nm to search for changes in an ex vivo brain slice preparation and an in vivo model during 4-AP induced seizure onset and propagation with respect to electrical recording. By utilizing Doppler OCT and the depth-dependency of the attenuation coefficient, we demonstrate the ability to locate and remove the optical effects of vasculature within the upper regions of the cortex from in vivo attenuation calculations. The results of this study show a non-vascular decrease in intensity and attenuation in ex vivo and in vivo seizure models, respectively. Regions exhibiting decreased optical changes show significant temporal correlation to regions of increased electrical activity during seizure. This study allows for a thorough and biologically relevant analysis of the optical signature of seizure activity both ex vivo and in vivo using OCT.

  8. Instant LEGO Mindstorm EV3

    CERN Document Server

    Garber, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A concise guide full of step-by-step recipes to teach you how to build and program an advanced robot.""Instant LEGO Mindstorm EV3"" is for both the adult tinkerer who has never touched LEGO before and the experienced LEGO engineer who has evolved from Mindstorm NXT to EV3. If you are interested in entering or advising students in robot competitions such as the FIRST LEGO League, the Wold Robot Olympiad, or RoboGames, then this book is a must for you. Even if you haven't purchased yo

  9. Stokes-vector direct detection for optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, William; Li, An; Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Khodakarami, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the exponential growth of the Internet traffic, optical communications has advanced by leaps and bounds. For several decades, Intensity modulation with direct detection (IM-DD) dominates the commercial short-reach optical communications. However, when upgrading the data-rate distance product to 1000 Gb/s·km per wavelength and beyond, IM-DD faces severe performance barrier. Aiming to improve the electrical SE and extend the transmission distance, advanced DD modulation formats have been proposed through a so-called self-coherent (SCOH) approach, where a carrier is transmitted together with the signal to achieve a linear mapping between the electrical baseband signal and the optical field. In that way, the impact of the CD can be removed from the received signal, greatly extending the transmission distance of the DD system. Particularly, Stokes-vector direct detection (SV-DD) has been proposed to realize linear complex optical channels as well as enhance the electrical spectral efficiency and transmission reach. In this talk, we present the principle and discuss the performance of SV-DD systems.

  10. Rejuvenating direct modulation and direct detection for modern optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Di; Li, An; Chen, Xi; Hu, Qian; Shieh, William

    2018-02-01

    High-speed transoceanic optical fiber transmission using direct modulation (DM) and direct detection (DD) was one of the most stirring breakthroughs for telecommunication in 1990s, which drove the internet as a global phenomenon. However, the later evolution of optical coherent communications in 2000s gradually took over the long-haul applications, due to its superior optical spectral efficiency. Nowadays, DM-DD systems are dominant mainly in cost- and power-sensitive short-reach applications, because of its natural characteristics-the simplicity. This paper reviews the recent advances of DM-DD transceivers from both hardware and signal processing perspectives. It introduces a variety of modified DM and/or DD systems for 3 application scenarios: very-short-reach interconnect with little fiber channel impact; single or a few spans of fiber transmission up to several hundred km; and distance beyond the 2nd scenario. Besides the DM-DD and multi-dimension DM-DD with polarization diversity, this paper focuses on how to rejuvenate traditional DM and DD technologies in order to bridge the transmission application gap between DM-DD and coherent transceivers, using technologies such as dispersion compensation, signal field recovery from the intensity-only DD receiver, and complex direct modulation with coherent detection. More than 30 years since the birth, DM and DD still hold indispensable roles in modern optical communications.

  11. Cholesterol detection using optical fiber sensor based on intensity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiyanto, Moh; Suhariningsih; Yasin, Moh

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the research is to detect the concentration of cholesterol by using the principle that a laser beam propagation is guided by optical fiber bundle in term of intensity profile through solution with vary concentrations of cholesterol from 0 to 300 ppm. The mechanism of cholesterol concentration detection is the propagation of He-Ne laser beam with wavelength of 632.5 nm through a fiber optic bundle and a solution of cholesterol, then is reflected by a flat mirror and enters receiving fiber. This signal is captured by a silicon detector (SL-818, Newport) in the form of output voltage. The result showed that the output voltage decrease linearly with the increase of concentration of cholesterol with a sensitivity of 0.0004 mV/ppm and the linearity more than 97%.

  12. Optical detection of parasitic protozoa in sol-gel matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livage, Jacques; Barreau, J. Y.; Da Costa, J. M.; Desportes, I.

    1994-10-01

    Whole cell parasitic protozoa have been entrapped within sol-gel porous silica matrices. Stationary phase promastigote cells of Leishmania donovani infantum are mixed with a silica sol before gelation occurs. They remain trapped within the growing oxide network and their cellular organization appears to be well preserved. Moreover protozoa retain their antigenic properties in the porous gel. They are still able to detect parasite specific antibodies in serum samples from infected patients via an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antigen- antibody associations occurring in the gel are optically detected via the reactions of a peroxidase conjugate with ortho-phenylenediamine leading to the formation of a yellow coloration. A clear-cut difference in optical density is measured between positive and negative sera. Such an entrapment of antigenic species into porous sol-gel matrices avoids the main problems due to non specific binding and could be advantageously used in diagnostic kits.

  13. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2018-01-30

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  14. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. VITRECTOMY FOR MACULAR RETINOSCHISIS WITHOUT A DETECTABLE OPTIC DISK PIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Masatoshi; Yamakawa, Ryoji

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of vitrectomy in the treatment of macular retinoschisis without a detectable optic disk pit. This retrospective interventional case series included eight patients with acquired, unilateral macular retinoschisis with or without foveal detachment. Patients with an optic disk pit, vitreomacular traction, or high myopia were excluded. Six of the eight patients underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and fluid-air exchange. The surgical outcome was evaluated in terms of the improvement in the macular anatomy and the best-corrected visual acuity. During vitrectomy, all the six eyes were confirmed to have preexisting posterior vitreous detachment. Macular retinoschisis was resolved or reduced in all the six eyes after vitrectomy. The mean central foveal thickness showed significant improvement at the time of the patient's final visit after vitrectomy. The mean best-corrected visual acuity was 20/52 before surgery and 20/31 at the final visit. Vitrectomy might be effective for the treatment of macular retinoschisis without an optic disk pit. Although clinically similar to optic pit maculopathy except for the absence of pit, our intraoperative observations of the posterior hyaloid membrane suggest that maculopathy without optic disk pit has a distinct pathogenesis.

  16. Optical detection and spectroscopy of single metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berciaud, S.; Lasne, D.; Blab, G. A.; Tamarat, Ph.; Cognet, L.; Lounis, B.

    2005-08-01

    Photothermal Heterodyne Imaging (PHI) is a highly sensitive optical detection method of individual absorptive nano-objects. It can be applied to absorption spectroscopy measurements Surface Plasmon Resonance spectra of individual gold nanoparticules with diameters down to 5nm were recorded. Intrinsic size effects which result in a broadening of the Resonance are unambiguously observed and analyzed within the frame of Mie theory. Preliminary results obtained with silver nanoparticles are also presented.

  17. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Joseph A Gardecki; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a...

  18. Detecting high-frequency gravitational waves with optically levitated sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2013-02-15

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 50-300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or microdisks. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for gravitational wave sources above 100 kHz by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  19. Detecting Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhujing; Li, Tongcang

    2017-09-01

    The linear momentum and angular momentum of virtual photons of quantum vacuum fluctuations can induce the Casimir force and the Casimir torque, respectively. While the Casimir force has been measured extensively, the Casimir torque has not been observed experimentally though it was predicted over 40 years ago. Here we propose to detect the Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod near a birefringent plate in vacuum. The axis of the nanorod tends to align with the polarization direction of the linearly polarized optical tweezer. When its axis is not parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal, it will experience a Casimir torque that shifts its orientation slightly. We calculate the Casimir torque and Casimir force acting on a levitated nanorod near a birefringent crystal. We also investigate the effects of thermal noise and photon recoils on the torque and force detection. We prove that a levitated nanorod in vacuum will be capable of detecting the Casimir torque under realistic conditions, and will be an important tool in precision measurements.

  20. In Vivo Optical Detection and Spectral Triangulation of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Yang, Hailing; Sanchez, Stephen R; Mao, Weiqun; Pang, Lan; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bast, Robert C; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-12-06

    In the first in vivo demonstration of spectral triangulation, biocompatible composites of single-walled carbon nanotubes in Matrigel have been surgically implanted into mouse ovaries and then noninvasively detected and located. This optical method deduces the three-dimensional position of a short-wave IR emission source from the wavelength-dependent attenuation of fluorescence in tissues. Measurements were performed with a second-generation optical scanner that uses a light-emitting diode matrix emitting at 736 nm for diffuse specimen excitation. The intrinsic short-wave IR fluorescence of the nanotubes was collected at various positions on the specimen surface, spectrally filtered, and detected by a photon-counting InGaAs avalanche photodiode. Sensitivity studies showed a detection limit of ∼120 pg of nanotubes located beneath ∼3 mm of tissue. In addition, the mass and location of implanted nanotubes could be deduced through spectral triangulation with sub-millimeter accuracy, as validated with the aid of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Dual-modality imaging combining spectral triangulation with computed tomography or MRI will allow accurate registration of emission centers with anatomical features. These results are a step toward the future use of probes with targeting agents such as antibodies linked to nanotube tags for the noninvasive detection and imaging of tumors in preclinical research on small animals. Translation to the clinic could aid in early detection of ovarian cancer and identification of metastases for resection during primary surgery.

  1. Digitaliseerimise demopäev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    8. XI tarbekunstimuuseumis, 10. XI rahvusraamatukogus digitaliseerimise demopäev koostöös OÜ Art Digitali, Eesti Kultuuriministeeriumi, Tarbekunstimuuseumi ja Eesti Rahvusraamatukoguga. OÜ Art Digital (asutasid 1998. a. Rein Tammik, Mauri Gross) skaneeris 1999. a. suvel Eesti Kunstimuuseumis 2400 graafilist lehte ja maali. Eesti digikeskuse loomisest, ülesannetest

  2. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Yuan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPDmeasurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl, ammonia (NH3, hydrazine(H4N2, and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  3. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud; Bansal, Lalitkumar; Yuan, Jianming

    2007-12-04

    Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPD)measurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl), ammonia (NH₃), hydrazine(H₄N₂), and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP) {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  4. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel About Their EVS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The EV Project is an infrastructure study that enrolled over 8,000 residential participants. These participants purchased or leased a Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicle (BEV) or Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicle (EREV) and were among the first to explore this new electric drive technology. Collectively, BEV, EREV, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are called plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). The EV Project participants were very cooperative and enthusiastic about their participation in the project and very supportive in providing feedback and information. The information and attitudes of these participants concerning their experience with their PEVs were solicited using a survey in June 2013. At that time, some had up to 3 years of experience with their PEVs.

  5. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  6. High-dose radiation sensor with wireless optical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapkiewicz, Paweł; Augustyniak, Izabela; Sareło, Katarzyna; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We present a miniature silicon-glass MEMS sensor for measurement of high doses of ionizing radiation (above 10 kGy) using a novel wireless optical detection method. The radiation sensor is a miniaturized version of the so-called hydrogen dosimeter. An amount of high-density polyethylene, located inside the MEMS sensor, degrades under ionizing radiation, releasing gaseous hydrogen. The increasing pressure deflects the thin silicon membrane. The sensor’s destructive and proportional modes of work are also proposed. In the destructive mode, sensors provide in situ information on excessive and discrete levels of radiation. The optical detection method is based on an optical head consisting of a moving membrane and a silicon screen with a matrix of micro-holes. Laser light is reflected from the membrane and scattered when the membrane is deflected, in the process illuminating the holes on the silicon screen. The number of illuminated holes is a function of the degree of membrane deflection; the transformation of the holes to the deflection allows for the calculation of pressure and eventually the dose of ionizing radiation.

  7. Maximum Likelihood Sequence Detection Receivers for Nonlinear Optical Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel N. Maggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space-time whitened matched filter (ST-WMF maximum likelihood sequence detection (MLSD architecture has been recently proposed (Maggio et al., 2014. Its objective is reducing implementation complexity in transmissions over nonlinear dispersive channels. The ST-WMF-MLSD receiver (i drastically reduces the number of states of the Viterbi decoder (VD and (ii offers a smooth trade-off between performance and complexity. In this work the ST-WMF-MLSD receiver is investigated in detail. We show that the space compression of the nonlinear channel is an instrumental property of the ST-WMF-MLSD which results in a major reduction of the implementation complexity in intensity modulation and direct detection (IM/DD fiber optic systems. Moreover, we assess the performance of ST-WMF-MLSD in IM/DD optical systems with chromatic dispersion (CD and polarization mode dispersion (PMD. Numerical results for a 10 Gb/s, 700 km, and IM/DD fiber-optic link with 50 ps differential group delay (DGD show that the number of states of the VD in ST-WMF-MLSD can be reduced ~4 times compared to an oversampled MLSD. Finally, we analyze the impact of the imperfect channel estimation on the performance of the ST-WMF-MLSD. Our results show that the performance degradation caused by channel estimation inaccuracies is low and similar to that achieved by existing MLSD schemes (~0.2 dB.

  8. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (Pcalculus.

  9. Optimal threshold detection for Málaga turbulent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Garrido-Balsellss, José María; del Castillo Vázquez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    associated to that model, we can indicate that it is written in a simple tractable closed-form expression and that it is able to unify most of the proposed statistical models for free-space optical communications derived until now in the scientific literature. Based on that Málaga model, we have analyzed...... in this paper the role of the detection threshold in a free-space optical system employing an on-off keying modulation technique and involved in different scenarios, and taking into account the extinction ratio associated to the employed laser. First we have derived some analytical expressions for the lower...... form expression for the bit error rate of that system is derived....

  10. Detailed noise statistics for an optically preamplified direct detection receiver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Søren Lykke; Mikkelsen, Benny; Durhuus, Terji

    1995-01-01

    We describe the exact statistics of an optically preamplified direct detection receiver by means of the moment generating function. The theory allows an arbitrary shaped electrical filter in the receiver circuit. The moment generating function (MGF) allows for a precise calculation of the error...... rate by using the inverse Fast Fourier transform (FFT). The exact results are compared with the usual Gaussian approximation (GA), the saddlepoint approximation (SAP) and the modified Chernoff bound (MCB). This comparison shows that the noise is not Gaussian distributed for all values of the optical...... amplifier gain. In the region from 20-30 dB gain, calculations show that the GA underestimates the receiver sensitivity while the SAP is very close to the results of our exact model. Using the MGF derived in the article we then find the optimal bandwidth of the electrical filter in the receiver circuit...

  11. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  12. Markets Share Models for EVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Christian; Christensen, Linda

    new cars to 95 g/km on average in 2020. The energy agreement from March 2012 states that the transport sec-tor is facing a radical change from fossil fuels to electricity and bio-mass in the long run. Here, the target for 2020 is 10% bio-fuels in 2020 and the tax exemption for EVs is prolonged...... of a logit choice model and based on the estimated parameters a simulation model is set up. The model will be available for assessing different scenarios and forecasts of the sales of EVs under different assumptions of prices of the cars, life-time of batteries, the operations costs, the driving range......-tion potential. The recent development has increased the knowledge of costs of stations and cars, but the knowledge of the market potential of EVs is still limited. In the traffic agreement of January 2009 electric vehicles were highlighted as part of the solution for future CO2 problems. Here, the target...

  13. Thin film detection of High Energy Materials: Optical Pumping Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Barthwal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    We present our work on High Energy Material detection based on thin film of Lithium using the phenomenon of Optical Pumping. The Li atoms present in the thin film are optically pumped to one of the ground hyperfine energy levels so that they can no more absorb light from the resonant light source. Now in presence of a RF signal, which quantifies the ambient magnetic field, this polarized atomic system is again randomized thus making it reabsorb the resonant light. This gives a quantified measurement of the magnetic field surrounding the thin film detector. This is then mapped to the presence of magnetic HEM and hence the HEM are detected. Our approach in this regard starts with verifying the stability of Lithium atoms in various solvents so as to get a suitable liquid medium to form a thin film. In this regard, various UV-visible characterization spectra are presented to finally approach a stable system for the detection. We have worked on around 10 polar and non- polar solvents to see the stability criteria....

  14. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  15. Fiber Optic Thermographic Detection of Flaws in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings bonded to surfaces of structures were used for thermographic detection of subsurface defects in structures. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The obtained data were analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with the simulation results.

  16. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  17. A Method of Detecting Fire Smoke by Using Optical Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kenji; Miyahara, Hiroyuki; Nii, Yasutoshi

    In this paper, the authors propose a method for detecting fire smoke by using the optical flow. This method is not influenced against the image obtainment environment. About 60,000 fires have occurred every year in Japan. To be most important to the fires is an early period fire fighting. At present, the automatic devices of detectiong fires is needed. The alarms which can detect smoke and heat are utilized to house fires. However, these alarms are not useful for the outside of house such as the incendiary or woodland fire. This method is able to detect such a flame that becomes a fire is the early period. First, the region of the flame in the images obtained from the observation camera is detected. Next, the characteristic quantity that expresses the smoke is extracted. This characteristic is not influenced to the motion such as the cloud, leaf and moving objects. In other words, the only smoke can be detected, from the range which looks like the flame in the image.

  18. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  19. Self-Homodyne Detection in Optical Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Puttnam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We review work on self-homodyne detection (SHD for optical communication systems. SHD uses a transmitted pilot-tone (PT, originating from the transmitter laser, to exploit phase noise cancellation at a coherent receiver and to enable transmitter linewidth tolerance and potential energy savings. We give an overview of SHD performance, outlining the key contributors to the optical signal-to-noise ratio penalty compared to equivalent intradyne systems, and summarize the advantages, differences and similarities between schemes using polarization-division multiplexed PTs (PDM-SHD and those using space-division multiplexed PTs (SDM-SHD. For PDM-SHD, we review the extensive work on the transmission of advanced modulation formats and techniques to minimize the trade-off with spectral efficiency, as well as recent work on digital SHD, where the SHD receiver is combined with an polarization-diversity ID front-end receiver to provide both polarization and modulation format alignment. We then focus on SDM-SHD systems, describing experimental results using multi-core fibers (MCFs with up to 19 cores, including high capacity transmission with broad-linewidth lasers and experiments incorporating SDM-SHD in networking. Additionally, we discuss the requirement for polarization tracking of the PTs at the receiver and path length alignment and review some variants of SHD before outlining the future challenges of self-homodyne optical transmission and gaps in current knowledge.

  20. Fiber optic confocal microscope: In vivo precancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kristen Dawn

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Many cancers originate as precancerous lesions in the epithelium which, when removed in sufficient time, can prevent progression to cancer. However, current detection techniques are typically time-consuming and expensive, limiting their acceptance and accessibility. Optical techniques, such as confocal microscopy, have significant potential to provide clinicians with real-time, high-resolution images of cells and tissue without tissue removal. These images of cell morphology and tissue architecture can be used to characterize tissue and determine the presence or extent of precancer and cancer. This dissertation explores the instrumentation and application of fiber optic reflectance confocal microscopy for in vivo precancer detection. The first part of the dissertation presents in vivo imaging of suspicious lesions in the human uterine cervix and oral mucosa using a fiber bundle based confocal microscope with a complex glass miniature objective lens. Images are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively to determine the potential of this technology in vivo. An analysis of nuclear density from images of 30 cervical epithelium sites shows differentiation between normal and precancerous sites. Similarly, images from 20 oral mucosa sites demonstrate changes in nuclear density and tissue architecture indicative of progression of precancer and cancer. In addition to this multi-fiber confocal microscope used with a glass objective lens for the clinical studies, imaging of tissue samples has been accomplished with the same confocal system using an injection molded plastic miniature objective lens demonstrating comparable optical quality for a significantly less expensive optical component. Finally, a benchtop prototype of a single fiber confocal microscope using a gimbaled two-axis MEMS scanner has been designed and constructed. Imaging of a resolution target and cellular samples demonstrates sufficient resolution and

  1. Caries Detection around Restorations Using ICDAS and Optical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Michele Baffi; Eckert, George Joseph; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Cordeiro, Rita de Cássia Loiola; Ferreira-Zandona, Andrea Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Secondary caries is the major reason for replacement of restorations in operative dentistry. New detection methods and technology have the potential to improve the accuracy for diagnosis of secondary carious lesions. This in vitro study evaluated the performance of the ICDAS (International Caries Detection and Assessment System) visual criteria and optical devices for detecting secondary caries around amalgam and composite resin restorations in permanent teeth. A total of 180 extracted teeth with Class I amalgam (N = 90) and resin composite (N = 90) restorations were selected. Two examiners analyzed the teeth twice using the visual criteria (ICDAS), laser fluorescence (LF), light-emitting diode device (MID), quantitative light-induced fluorescence system (QLF), and a prototype system based on the Fluorescence Enamel Imaging technique (Professional Caries Detection System, PCDS). The gold standard was determined by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy. High-reproducibility values were shown for all methods, except for MID in the amalgam group. For both groups the QLF and PCDS were the most sensitive methods, whereas the other methods presented better specificity (p light-induced fluorescence and a novel method based on Fluorescence Enamel Imaging technique may be effective for evaluating secondary caries around composite resin restorations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Streak detection and analysis pipeline for optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, J.; Granvik, M.; Torppa, J.; Muinonen, K.; Poikonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Säntti, T.; Komulainen, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel data processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of moving objects, either of natural (asteroids, meteors) or artificial origin (satellites, space debris). The monitoring of the space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data to support the development and validation of population models, and to build and maintain catalogues of orbital elements. The orbital catalogues are, in turn, needed for the assessment of close approaches (for asteroids, with the Earth; for satellites, with each other) and for the support of contingency situations or launches. For both types of populations, there is also increasing interest to detect fainter objects corresponding to the small end of the size distribution. We focus on the low signal-to-noise (SNR) detection of objects with high angular velocities, resulting in long and faint object trails, or streaks, in the optical images. The currently available, mature image processing algorithms for detection and astrometric reduction of optical data cover objects that cross the sensor field-of-view comparably slowly, and, particularly for satellites, within a rather narrow, predefined range of angular velocities. By applying specific tracking techniques, the objects appear point-like or as short trails in the exposures. However, the general survey scenario is always a 'track-before-detect' problem, resulting in streaks of arbitrary lengths. Although some considerations for low-SNR processing of streak-like features are available in the current image processing and computer vision literature, algorithms are not readily available yet. In the ESA-funded StreakDet (Streak detection and astrometric reduction) project, we develop and evaluate an automated processing pipeline applicable to single images (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) obtained with any observing scenario, including space-based surveys and both low- and high-altitude populations. The algorithmic

  3. Quantitative optical imaging for the detection of early cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao

    The objectives of this thesis are to provide insight of fundamental mechanisms of acetowhitening effect, upon which the colposcopic diagnosis of human cervical cancer is based and to develop novel quantitative optical imaging technologies supplementing colposcopy to improve its performance in detecting early cancer. Firstly, the temporal characteristics of acetowhitening process are studied on monolayer cell cultures. It is found that the dynamic acetowhitening processes in normal and cancerous cells are significantly different. Secondly, the changes in light scattering induced by acetic acid in intact cells and isolated cellular fractions are investigated by using confocal microscopy and light scattering spectroscopy. The results provide evidence that the small-sized components in the cytoplasm are the major contributors to the acetowhitening effect. Thirdly, a unified Mie and fractal model is proposed to interpret light scattering by biological cells. It is found that light scattering in forward directions is dominated by Mie scattering by bare cells and nuclei, whereas light scattering at large angles is determined by fractal scattering by subcellular structures. Fourthly, an optical imaging system based on active stereo vision and motion tracking is built to measure the 3-D surface topology of cervix and track the motion of patient. The information of motion tracking is used to register the time-sequenced images of cervix recorded during colposcopic examination. The imaging system is evaluated by tracking the movements of cervix models. The results demonstrate that the imaging technique holds the promise to enable the quantitative mapping of the acetowhitening kinetics over cervical surface for more accurate diagnosis of cervical cancer. At last, a calibrated autofluorescence imaging system is instrumented for detecting neoplasia in vivo. It is found that the calibrated autofluorescence signals from neoplasia are generally lower than signals from normal

  4. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  5. Optical sensing for tumor detection in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Daniel; Evers, D.J.; Nachabe, R.; Hompes, D.; van Coevorden, F.; Lucassen, G.W.; Lucassen, Gerald; Hendriks, B.H.; van Velthuysen, M.L.; Wesseling, J.; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend for optical guidance techniques in surgery. Optical imaging using Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) can distinguish different tissue types through a specific “optical fingerprint”. We investigated whether DRS could discriminate metastatic tumor tissue

  6. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  7. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  8. Optical Fluorescence Detected from X-ray Irradiated Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Andreas; Ozga, Christian; Seidel, Robert; Schmidt, Philipp; Ueltzhöffer, Timo; Holzapfel, Xaver; Wenzel, Philip; Reiß, Philipp; Pohl, Marvin N; Unger, Isaak; Aziz, Emad F; Ehresmann, Arno; Slavíček, Petr; Winter, Bernd; Knie, André

    2017-03-16

    Despite its importance, the structure and dynamics of liquid water are still poorly understood in many apsects. Here, we report on the observation of optical fluorescence upon soft X-ray irradiation of liquid water. Detection of spectrally resolved fluorescence was achieved by a combination of the liquid microjet technique and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observe a genuine liquid-phase fluorescence manifested by a broad emission band in the 170-340 nm (4-7 eV) photon wavelength range. In addition, another narrower emission near 300 nm can be assigned to the fluorescence of OH (A state) in the gas phase, the emitting species being formed by Auger electrons escaping from liquid water. We argue that the newly observed broad-band emission of liquid water is relevant in search of extraterrestrial life, and we also envision the observed electron-ejection mechanism to find application for exploring solutes at liquid-vapor interfaces.

  9. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da, E-mail: redrocks-chenqun@hotmail.com, E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  10. A portable cell-based optical detection device for rapid detection of Listeria and Bacillus toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Rickus, Jenna L.; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    A mammalian cell-based optical biosensor was built to detect pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species. This sensor measures the ability of the pathogens to infect and induce cytotoxicity on hybrid lymphocyte cell line (Ped-2E9) resulting in the release of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that can be detected optically using a portable spectrophotometer. The Ped-2E9 cells were encapsulated in collagen gel matrices and grown in 48-well plates or in specially designed filtration tube units. Toxin preparations or bacterial cells were introduced and ALP release was assayed after 3-5 h. Pathogenic L. monocytogenes strains or the listeriolysin toxins preparation showed cytotoxicity ranging from 55% - 92%. Toxin preparations (~20 μg/ml) from B. cereus strains showed 24 - 98% cytotoxicity. In contrast, a non-pathogenic L. innocua (F4247) and a B. substilis induced only 2% and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. This cell-based detection device demonstrates its ability to detect the presence of pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species and can potentially be used onsite for food safety or in biosecurity application.

  11. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Detection for Aerosol Optical Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, M.; Black, N.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-12-01

    Particulate matter emitted by anthropogenic and natural sources strongly affect the radiative budget of the Earth. Non-absorbing aerosols have a negative radiative forcing effect, acting to cool the planet and thereby masking the warming caused by greenhouse gases. Absorbing aerosols including black carbon, dust and brown carbon can provide positive radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere depending on their optical properties. Due to its short atmospheric lifetime, black carbon can have a strong regional effect (e.g. in Himalaya and in the Arctic, where surface albedo is high). How much aerosols affect the Earth’s climate however remains highly uncertain. Providing accurate, widespread and unbiased measurements of aerosol optical properties is important for understanding how aerosols will affect the future climate system. However, in depth studies on aerosol optical properties, and in particular absorption, are still lacking. Photoacoustic spectrometry has been recently employed to measure aerosol absorption. The technique is more fundamental and unbiased then traditional filter-based techniques. This type of spectrometry exploits the photoacoustic effect, which is the production of an acoustic wave from the excitation of a particle absorbing a photon. Currently available commercial spectrometers are very useful for laboratory and field experiments, but due to their typical size, they are unpractical for studies employing small payload aircrafts (e.g. unmanned aircrafts) or balloons. A recent development in photoacoustic spectrometry reported by Kosterev et al. in 2002 is the use of a quartz tuning fork for the detection, termed Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectrometry (QEPAS). Due to the high resonance frequency (~32 KHz) of the tuning fork, QEPAS has good potential for the miniaturization of a photoacoustic spectrometry system. The quartz tuning fork is piezoelectric, and a signal is generated only when the tines of the tuning fork move in opposite

  12. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  13. Recombination in the evolution of enterovirus C species sub-group that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Smura

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination is considered to be a very frequent phenomenon among enteroviruses (Family Picornaviridae, Genus Enterovirus. However, the recombination patterns may differ between enterovirus species and between types within species. Enterovirus C (EV-C species contains 21 types. In the capsid coding P1 region, the types of EV-C species cluster further into three sub-groups (designated here as A-C. In this study, the recombination pattern of EV-C species sub-group B that contains types CVA-21, CVA-24, EV-C95, EV-C96 and EV-C99 was determined using partial 5'UTR and VP1 sequences of enterovirus strains isolated during poliovirus surveillance and previously published complete genome sequences. Several inter-typic recombination events were detected. Furthermore, the analyses suggested that inter-typic recombination events have occurred mainly within the distinct sub-groups of EV-C species. Only sporadic recombination events between EV-C species sub-group B and other EV-C sub-groups were detected. In addition, strict recombination barriers were inferred for CVA-21 genotype C and CVA-24 variant strains. These results suggest that the frequency of inter-typic recombinations, even within species, may depend on the phylogenetic position of the given viruses.

  14. Improvements of the optical detection setup of COLLAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of rare isotopes it is crucial to keep the background of the measurements low. Using photomultiplier tubes for those measurements, the dark count rate should be as low as possible and the signal gain high. Therefore, it is important to use the right type of photomultiplier tubes for the purpose of single photon detection with a low signal rate. Thus, I tested several different types of photomultiplier tubes for their dark count rates and noise to signal separation. The results have identified the most suitable type of photomultiplier tubes, but further measuring for verification might be necessary. Therefore, it is very important to keep the photomultiplier tubes shut from light. Exposing the photocathode to light implies life-long damage and increased background for several days. So far, when dismounting one of these photomultiplier tubes from the setup, a big cage around the optical detection setup was covered into black sheets to keep it as dark as possible inside. Still, th...

  15. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eNissler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive / rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called intent detection, has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper we explore a novel method to solve the problem, that we call Optical Myography (OMG. The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags and a standard web-camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.. Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05 to 0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range, in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented- / virtual-reality setup.

  16. Optical Detection of Biological and Chemical Threats in Food and Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Matthew P; Treado, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    ...) and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) have teamed on a 1 year project entitled "Optical Detection of Biological and Chemical Threats in Water and Food," to develop and validate waterborne pathogen detection technology in support...

  17. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  18. Detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 000630: Implications for dark bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the discovery of the optical transient of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000630. The optical transient was detected with the Nordic Optical Telescope 21.1 hours after the burst. At the time of discovery the magnitude of the transient was R = 23.04 +/- 0.08. The transient display...

  19. Optical galaxy cluster detection across a wide redshift range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The past decade is one of the most exciting period in the history of physics and astronomy. The discovery of cosmic acceleration dramatically changed our understanding about the evolution and constituents of the Universe. To accommodate the new acceleration phase into our well established Big Bang cosmological scenario under the frame work of General Relativity, there must exist a very special substance that has negative pressure and make up about 73% of the total energy density in our Universe. It is called Dark Energy. For the first time people realized that the vast majority of our Universe is made of things that are totally different from the things we are made of. Therefore, one of the major endeavors in physics and astronomy in the coming years is trying to understand, if we can, the nature of dark energy. Understanding dark energy cannot be achieved from pure logic. We need empirical evidence to finally determine about what is dark energy. The better we can constrain the energy density and evolution of the dark energy, the closer we will get to the answer. There are many ways to constrain the energy density and evolution of dark energy, each of which leads to degeneracy in certain directions in the parameter space. Therefore, a combination of complimentary methods will help to reduce the degeneracies and give tighter constraints. Dark energy became dominate over matter in the Universe only very recently (at about z ~ 1.5) and will affect both the cosmological geometry and large scale structure formation. Among the various experiments, some of them constrain the dark energy mainly via geometry (such as CMB, Supernovae) while some others provides constraints from both structures and geometry (such as BAO, Galaxy Clusters) Galaxy clusters can be used as a sensitive probe for cosmology. A large cluster catalog that extends to high redshift with well measured masses is indispensable for precisely constraining cosmological parameters. Detecting clusters in optical

  20. EVs from a fleet perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berube, M.

    1999-07-01

    EV testing in Montreal involved a comparison of vehicle performance with a pool of targeted users. The results were an availability of less than 40% and user apathy. Recommendations are included for an apt test environment referring to recharging, vehicle supervision, data collection, and driving habits. Recharging covers limitations imposed by battery memory, the priority/ performance equation, and the performance/availability equation. For vehicle supervision one responsible person checks battery charge levels, supervises maintenance, and develops a sixth sense for the vehicles. Data collection is confined to just the essentials, and it is necessary to keep on top of users. There is a need for on-board, transparent data acquisition. The driving habits recommendation refers to the fact of different driving styles, varied performances, a self-supervision system for users, and the existence of a short learning curve. For fleet integration, the elements include: test rather than regular use, single, responsible user, and part of Montreal 2000. Fleet relevance has as its elements: poor performance/false problem, and problem met/dependability. Finally, a 20% integration is conceivable if price and performance are in line. Extra spin-offs are the corporate image, and the public is given the impression that the corporation is the major player it is expected to be.

  1. Monocular Vision Obstacle Detection Method Based on Radial Optical Flow for Rotor UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To solve the problem of traditional Pyramid LK optical flow algorithm's poor accuracy and adaptability for rotor UAV to detect obstacle in complex outdoor environment, a monocular autonomous real-time obstacle detection method based on radial optical flow is proposed. In the optical flow, the radial optical flow is computed by fusing Pyramid LK optical flow with tangential optical flow, and a new obstacles decision strategy to detect obstacles based on the radial optical flow is put forward. Experimental results show that without increasing the complexity of algorithm, the proposed method can get a higher accuracy and better adaptability than traditional Pyramid LK algorithm, which can meet the requirements of UAV autonomous obstacle avoidance.

  2. Frequency interleaving towards spectrally efficient directly detected optical OFDM for next-generation optical access networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedy, Lenin; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai

    2010-10-25

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze and demonstrate that spectral efficiency of a conventional direct detection based optical OFDM system (DDO-OFDM) can be improved significantly using frequency interleaving of adjacent DDO-OFDM channels where OFDM signal band of one channel occupies the spectral gap of other channel and vice versa. We show that, at optimum operating condition, the proposed technique can effectively improve the spectral efficiency of the conventional DDO-OFDM system as much as 50%. We also show that such a frequency interleaved DDO-OFDM system, with a bit rate of 48 Gb/s within 25 GHz bandwidth, achieves sufficient power budget after transmission over 25 km single mode fiber to be used in next-generation time-division-multiplexed passive optical networks (TDM-PON). Moreover, by applying 64- quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM), the system can be further scaled up to 96 Gb/s with a power budget sufficient for 1:16 split TDM-PON.

  3. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-09-15

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  4. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  5. Fusion of optical flow based motion pattern analysis and silhouette classification for person tracking and detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangelder, J.W.H.; Lebert, E.; Burghouts, G.J.; Zon, K. van; Den Uyl, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to detect persons in video by combining optical flow based motion analysis and silhouette based recognition. A new fast optical flow computation method is described, and its application in a motion based analysis framework unifying human tracking and detection is

  6. Position and mode dependent optical detection back-action in cantilever beam resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom; Schmid, Silvan; Dohn, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Optical detection back-action in cantilever resonant or static detection presents a challenge when striving for state-of-the-art performance. The origin and possible routes for minimizing optical back-action have received little attention in literature. Here, we investigate the position and mode ...

  7. Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Steffensen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Slow-light enhanced optical detection in liquid-infiltrated photonic crystals is theoretically studied. Using a scattering-matrix approach and the Wigner–Smith delay time concept, we show that optical absorbance benefits both from slow-light phenomena as well as a high filling factor of the energy...... existing miniaturized absorbance cells for optical detection in lab-on-a-chip systems....

  8. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng, E-mail: pengkhe@126.com; Pang, Shuwan [Department of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Xu, Dingjie [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China); Tian, Chunmiao [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  9. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van T Erve, Olaf; Hanbicki, Aubrey; Li, Connie; Jonker, Berend

    Spin Hall effects in metals have been successfully measured using electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance or spin torque transfer experiments. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. Here we present room temperature measurements of the spin Hall effect in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W using a standard bench top magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) system. With this system, one can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction. When a bias current is applied, the spin Hall effect causes electrons of opposite spin to be scattered in opposite directions, resulting in a spin accumulation at the surface of the film. The MOKE signal tracks the applied square wave bias current with an amplitude and phase directly related to the spin Hall angle. Using this technique, we show that the spin-Hall angle of β-W is opposite in sign and significantly larger than that of Pt. In addition, we use this technique to detect spin diffusion from β-W into Al thin films, as well as spin diffusion from the topological surface states of Bi2Se3 into Al. We will also show direct modulation of the reflected light up to 100 kHz, using Bi doped Cu samples. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL.

  10. Label-free optical detection of action potential in mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Bui, Loan; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra; Bachoo, Robert; Davé, Digant P

    2017-08-01

    We describe an optical technique for label-free detection of the action potential in cultured mammalian neurons. Induced morphological changes due to action potential propagation in neurons are optically interrogated with a phase sensitive interferometric technique. Optical recordings composed of signal pulses mirror the electrical spike train activity of individual neurons in a network. The optical pulses are transient nanoscale oscillatory changes in the optical path length of varying peak magnitude and temporal width. Exogenous application of glutamate to cortical neuronal cultures produced coincident increase in the electrical and optical activity; both were blocked by application of a Na-channel blocker, Tetrodotoxin. The observed transient change in optical path length in a single optical pulse is primarily due to physical fluctuations of the neuronal cell membrane mediated by a yet unknown electromechanical transduction phenomenon. Our analysis suggests a traveling surface wave in the neuronal cell membrane is responsible for the measured optical signal pulses.

  11. Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, Gerald J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2017-04-21

    Research during the granting period has been carried out in several areas concerned with sensitive detection. An infrared pyrometer based on the photoacoustic effect has been developed. The sensitivity of this instrument to temperature differentials has been shown to be 50 mK. An investigation of transients that accompany photoacoustic waves generated by pulsed lasers has been carried out. Experiments have shown the existence of the transients, and a theory based on rapid heat diffusion has been developed. The photoacoustic effect in one dimension is known to increase without bound (in the linear acoustics regime) when an optical beam moves in a fluid at the sound speed. A solution to the wave equation for pressure has been found that describes the photoacoustic effect in a cell where an infrared optical grating moves at the sound speed. It was shown that the amplification effect exists along with a cavity resonance that can be used to great advantage in trace gas detection. The theory of the photoacoustic effect in a structure where the acoustic properties periodically vary in a one-dimensional based has been formulated based on solutions to a Mathieu equation. It was found that it is possible to excite photoacoustic waves within the band gaps to produce large amplitude acoustic waves. The idea of self-oscillation in a photoacoustic cell using a continuous laser has been investigated. A theory has been completed showing that in a compressive wave, the absorption increases as a result of the density increase leading to further absorption and hence an increased amplitude photoacoustic effect with the result that in a resonator, self-oscillation can place. Experiments have been carried out where irradiation of a suspension of absorbing carbon particles with a high power laser has been shown to result in cavitation luminescence. That is, following generation of CO and H2 from the carbon particles through the carbon-steam reaction, an expanding gas bubble is

  12. EV Portfolio Management and Grid Impact Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Jensen, Jakob Munch; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    2009-01-01

    to the day‐ahead spot price pattern in the Nordic power market, the spot prices are normally low when there is a lot of wind power production. Therefore, a fleet operator based EV charging scenario considering day‐ahead spot prices is proposed to achieve this goal. The developed EV charging algorithm...

  13. Detection of dermal systemic sclerosis using noncontact optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Hicks, M. John; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc is a rare disorder, but has a high mortality, particularly in last decade of life. To improve the survival rate, an accurate and early diagnosis is crucial. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is the gold standard for evaluating SSc progression based on clinical palpation at 17 sites on the body. However, this procedure can be time consuming, and the assessed score may be biased by the experience of the clinician, causing inter- and intraobserver variabilities. Moreover, the instrinsic elasticity of skin may further bias the mRSS assessment in the early stages of SSc, such as oedematous. To overcome these limitations, there is a need for a rapid, accurate, and objective assessment technique. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a novel, rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the first use of OCE to assess the mechanical properties of control and SSc-like diseased skin non-invasively. A focused air-pulse induced an elastic wave in the skin, which was detected by a home-built OCE system. The elastic wave propagated significantly faster in SSc skin compared to healthy skin. The Young's modulus of the SSc skin was significantly higher than that of normal skin (P<0.05). Thus, OCE was able to objectively differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin completely noninvasively and is a promising and potentially useful new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc.

  14. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications. PMID:27472334

  15. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  16. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  17. Tight butt joint weld detection based on optical flow and particle filtering of magneto-optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangdong; Mo, Ling; You, Deyong; Li, Zhuman

    2017-11-01

    It is a challenge to detect the weld position during tight butt joint laser welding in that the tight butt joint is non-grooved and invisible. This paper proposes a novel method for tight butt joint weld detection based on magneto optical imaging. Two pieces of weldment were magnetized by an electromagnet so that they could show magnetic N and S polarity respectively. When a polarized light was projected on a magneto-optical film, it would deflect due to magneto-optical effect. In accordance with magneto field distribution, an image formed on the visual sensor. A transition zone of magnetic field distribution which corresponded to the butt joint could be shown in a magneto optical image of weldment. Variation features of magnetic field distribution were obtained by using image sequence optical flow method, and a particle filter was integrated to make an accurate prediction on weld position. Weld position was obtained by calculating the maximum value of optical flow intensity in the vertical direction, and a particle filter was used to realize the accurate prediction on weld position. Experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in detection of weld and realizing weld seam tracking.

  18. Hybrid Optical/Wireless Link with Software Defined Receiver for Simultaneous Baseband and Wireless Signal Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous detection of 5 Gbit/s baseband ASK data and optical phase encoded wireless signal (6 GHz RF carrier with 625 Mbaud 16QAM/QPSK data), on the same optical carrier, is experimentally demonstrated using the same software reconfigurable digital coherent receiver......Simultaneous detection of 5 Gbit/s baseband ASK data and optical phase encoded wireless signal (6 GHz RF carrier with 625 Mbaud 16QAM/QPSK data), on the same optical carrier, is experimentally demonstrated using the same software reconfigurable digital coherent receiver...

  19. Electronic structure of antiferromagnetic UN and UPtGe single crystals from optical and magneto-optical spectroscopy; Elektronische Struktur von antiferromagnetischen UN- und UPtGe-Einkristallen aus optischer und magnetooptischer Spektroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marutzky, M.

    2006-10-12

    In this thesis the study of the magneto-optical Kerr effect and the determination of the optical constants by means of ellipsometry and Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy of UN and UPtGe is described. In UPtGe an optical anisotropy was detected over a spectral range from 6 meV to 32 eV. (HSI)

  20. Design of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Cholesterol Detection in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Permata, A. N.; Eka, D.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A fiber optic sensor is to detect the cholesterol content in blood serum-based biosensor using plastic optical fiber that has been designed. The fiber optic sensor designed with sensing area was a fiber optic grated by 5 scratches then given bending treatment by 5 cm. The first test was by UV-Vis spectrometer with linearity of 0.96. The second test was by light spectrometer with linearity in white LED of 0.94. Optical fiber sensors were made to work well on a range of blood serum concentration of 140 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL.

  1. Weak scratch detection and defect classification methods for a large-aperture optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xian; Xu, De; Zhang, Zheng-Tao; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xi-Long; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2017-03-01

    Surface defects on optics cause optic failure and heavy loss to the optical system. Therefore, surface defects on optics must be carefully inspected. This paper proposes a coarse-to-fine detection strategy of weak scratches in complicated dark-field images. First, all possible scratches are detected based on bionic vision. Then, each possible scratch is precisely positioned and connected to a complete scratch by the LSD and a priori knowledge. Finally, multiple scratches with various types can be detected in dark-field images. To classify defects and pollutants, a classification method based on GIST features is proposed. This paper uses many real dark-field images as experimental images. The results show that this method can detect multiple types of weak scratches in complex images and that the defects can be correctly distinguished with interference. This method satisfies the real-time and accurate detection requirements of surface defects.

  2. Development of Fault Detection System using Wavelength Division Multiplexing Transmission of Optical Fiber Current Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaki, Masahiro; Hirata, Toshinari; Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Reishi; Yamada, Toshiharu; Itakura, Eiji

    A fault detection system is applied to power lines consisting of both overhead power line and underground power cable in order to detect a fault on the underground power cable section and prevent the automatic reclosing. The fault detection system using optical fiber current sensor has two subjects. The fist subject is that we have to use wound-type current transformer together, when applying the fault detection system to single-core underground power cable. The second subject is that we are not able to detect three-phase short-circuit fault in using the fault detection system. This paper describes that we developed a new fault detection system using optical fiber current sensor by applying the multiplex transmission technology of optical fiber current sensor signal in order to solve these subjects.

  3. Multimodal optical microscope for detecting viability of mouse embryos in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warger, William C; Laevsky, Gary S; Townsend, Daniel J; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2007-01-01

    We present a multimodal optical microscope that incorporates six imaging modalities on one common platform. The imaging modalities include three staring modes, optical quadrature microscopy (OQM), differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy, and epi-fluorescence microscopy, and three scanning modes, confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM), confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM), and two-photon microscopy (2PM). OQM reconstructs the amplitude and phase of an optically transparent specimen within a modified Mach-Zehnder configuration. DIC microscopy images the phase gradient along a specified direction of an optically transparent specimen. CRM detects index of refraction changes that modulate backscatter. Epi-fluorescence microscopy, CFM, and 2PM detect endogenous and exogenous fluorophores within a specimen. The scanning modes are inherently capable of producing three-dimensional (3-D) images due to optical sectioning and localized probing. Illumination and imaging are performed coaxially with minimal changes of optical components between modes. Multimodal images of embryos are shown to demonstrate the microscope's imaging capabilities.

  4. Feasibility of fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov effect for detecting thermal neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-06-17

    In this research, we propose a novel method for detecting thermal neutrons with a fiber-optic radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect. We fabricate a fiber-optic radiation sensor that detects thermal neutrons with a Gd-foil, a rutile crystal, and a plastic optical fiber. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation in the sensor probe of the fiber-optic radiation sensor and thermal neutron fluxes is determined using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations. To evaluate the fiber-optic radiation sensor, the Cerenkov radiation generated in the fiber-optic radiation sensor by irradiation of pure thermal neutron beams is measured according to the depths of polyethylene.

  5. Searches for Large-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of 1019 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Chae, M. J.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.; Telescope Array Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  6. Searches for large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above energy of 10{sup 19} eV at the Pierre Auger observatory and the telescope array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A. [Universität Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas-LIP and Instituto Superior Técnico-IST, Universidade de Lisboa-UL (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino (INAF), Università di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Al Samarai, I. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Université Paris 11, CNRS-IN2P3, Orsay (France); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allekotte, I.; Asorey, H. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muñiz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Batista, R. Alves [Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Università di Napoli " Federico II" and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 10{sup 19} eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 10{sup 19} eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  7. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  8. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  9. 16-level differential phase shift keying (D16PSK) in direct detection optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambaraju, R.; Tokle, Torger; Jensen, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Optical 16-level differential phase shift keying (D16PSK) carrying four bits for every symbol is proposed for direct detection optical communication systems. Transmitter and receiver schematics are presented, and the receiver sensitivity is discussed. We numerically investigate the impact...

  10. Research and Analysis Laser Target Optics Characteristics and Signal Recognition Processing in Detection Screen System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanshan Li; Yanran Li

    2014-01-01

      In order to improve the measurement accuracy of the laser measurement distance system, this paper studies the laser target optics characteristics based on the laser detection principle in the laser...

  11. An Optical Wake Vortex Detection System for Super-Density Airport Operation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OSI proposes to develop a wake vortex detection system including a group of double-ended and single-ended optical scintillometers properly deployed in the airfield...

  12. Optical coherence tomography for compound action potential detection: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Francesca; Nikolic, Konstantin; Constandinou, Timothy G.

    2017-07-01

    The feasibility of using time domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) to detect compound action potential in a peripheral nerve and the setup characteristics, are studied through the use of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique.

  13. EV and HEV Motor Development in TOSHIBA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arata, Masanori; Kurihara, Yoshihiro; Misu, Daisuke; Matsubara, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    .... Therefore, motors employing permanent magnets have been commonly used recently. For HEV and EV motors, Toshiba developed a motor that delivers a high reluctance torque, known as PRM, and has been applying it to various vehicles...

  14. Enterovirus type 71 neutralizing antibodies in the serum of macaque monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Li; Yu, Chun-I; Hu, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Tze-Jiun; Kuo, Yin-Chieh; Chi, Wei-Kuang; Lin, Ae-Ning; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2012-02-08

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) is a virulent form of enteroviruses causing hospitalizations for children less than three years of age. Currently there are no anti-viral therapies or vaccines available for EV71. Due to the high risk of poliomyelitis-like paralysis and fatal encephalitis, an effective vaccine to EV71 could potentially prevent virus-induced morbidity and mortality. In this study, we first tested a potential EV71 vaccine candidate based on virus-like particles (VLP). We vaccinated macaque monkeys to validate the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine to EV71. We detected the VLP or EV71-specific antibodies, neutralization titers, ELISPOT, and T cell response to find their immune responses to EV71. When the VLP vaccine adjuvanted with alum was given to macaque monkeys, these monkeys developed both specific humoral and cellular immune responses to EV71. Despite lower neutralizing antibodies to EV71 were found in sera of VLP-immunized monkeys than monkeys vaccinated with inactivated EV71, VLP-based vaccine generated a memory immune response to EV71. Hence, VLP-based EV71 vaccine is a potential vaccine against EV71 infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Machine Learning Techniques for Optical Performance Monitoring from Directly Detected PDM-QAM Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jakob; Wass, Jesper; Piels, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Linear signal processing algorithms are effective in dealing with linear transmission channel and linear signal detection, while the nonlinear signal processing algorithms, from the machine learning community, are effective in dealing with nonlinear transmission channel and nonlinear signal...... detection. In this paper, a brief overview of the various machine learning methods and their application in optical communication is presented and discussed. Moreover, supervised machine learning methods, such as neural networks and support vector machine, are experimentally demonstrated for in-band optical...

  16. Intrinsic fiber optic sensor for distributed water detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Mendoza, Edgar A.; Ferrell, Douglas J.; Schmidlin, Edward M.; Syracuse, Steven J.; Khalil, Albert N.; Dergevorkian, Ara; Sun, Zongjian; Gunther, Michael F.

    1994-03-01

    A distributed fiber optic moisture sensor based on intrinsic changes in the optical properties of the cladding is reported. A 10-meter-long fiber sensor was fabricated that demonstrated a response to humidity in less than 5 minutes. The humidity-sensitive cladding was fabricated on-line during fiber draw by continuously coating a multimode glass core fiber with a polyvinyl acetate cladding, in which a water-sensitive indicator had been dissolved. The indicator was a solvatochromic dye that showed a pronounced hypsochromic shift in its absorption spectrum in the presence of water. The moisture response of the sensor was monitored by measuring changes in the optical attenuation of the fiber in the region between 580 nm and 650 nm. This spectral region facilitates the use of commercially available solid state optoelectronic devices such as LEDs, laser diodes, and PIN photodiode detectors, in order to produce a low-cost, compact, lightweight humidity sensor.

  17. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  18. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucai Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0 guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  19. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  20. Research on vision-based error detection system for optic fiber winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenchao; Li, Huipeng; Yang, Dewei; Zhang, Min

    2011-11-01

    Optic fiber coils are the hearts of fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs). To detect the irresistible errors during the process of winding of optical fibers, such as gaps, climbs and partial rises between fibers, when fiber optic winding machines are operated, and to enable fully automated winding, we researched and designed this vision-based error detection system for optic fiber winding, on the basis of digital image collection and process[1]. When a Fiber-optic winding machine is operated, background light is used as illumination system to strength the contrast of images between fibers and background. Then microscope and CCD as imaging system and image collecting system are used to receive the analog images of fibers. After that analog images are shifted into digital imagines, which can be processed and analyzed by computers. Canny edge detection and a contour-tracing algorithm are used as the main image processing method. The distances between the fiber peaks were then measured and compared with the desired values. If these values fall outside of a predetermined tolerance zone, an error is detected and classified either as a gap, climb or rise. we used OpenCV and MATLAB database as basic function library and used VC++6.0 as the platform to show the results. The test results showed that the system was useful, and the edge detection and contour-tracing algorithm were effective, because of the high rate of accuracy. At the same time, the results of error detection are correct.

  1. Results of optical detection trials in harbour environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Rob A. W.; de Groot, Johannes F.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan P.; de Lange, Dirk-Jan J.; Dijk, Judith; Schwering, Piet B. W.

    2008-04-01

    In harbour environments operators should perform tasks as detection and classification. Present-day threats of small objects, as jet skis etc, should be detected, classified and recognized. Furthermore threat intention should be analysed. As harbour environments contain several hiding spaces, due to fixed and floating neutral objects, correct assessment of the threats is complicated when detection tracks are intermittently known. For this purpose we have analysed the capability of our image enhancement and detection technology to assess the performance of the algorithms in a harbour environment. Data were recorded in a warm harbour location. During these trials several small surfaces targets were used, that were equipped with ground truth equipment. In these environments short-range detection is mandatory, followed by immediate classification. Results of image enhancement and detection are shown. An analysis was made into the performance assessment of the detection algorithms.

  2. EV-Associated MMP9 in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer Is Preferentially Localized to Annexin V-Binding EVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes T. Reiner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC is the most aggressive type of ovarian cancer and is responsible for most deaths caused by gynecological cancers. Numerous candidate biomarkers were identified for this disease in the last decades, but most were not sensitive or specific enough for clinical applications. Hence, new biomarkers for HGSOC are urgently required. This study aimed to identify new markers by isolating different extracellular vesicle (EV types from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients according to their affinities for lipid-binding proteins and analyzing their protein cargo. This approach circumvents the low signal-to-noise ratio when using biological fluids for biomarker discovery and the issue of contamination by large non-EV complexes. We isolated and analyzed three distinct EV populations from the ascites of patients with ovarian cancer or cirrhosis and observed that Annexin V-binding EVs have higher levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in malignant compared to portal-hypertensive ascites. As this protein was not detected in other EV populations, this study validates our approach of using different EV types for optimal biomarker discovery. Furthermore, MMP9 in Annexin V-binding EVs could be a HGSOC biomarker with enhanced specificity, because its identification requires detection of two distinct components, that is, lipid and protein.

  3. Optical detections from worn and unworn titanium compound surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Guibert, M.; Martin, J.-M.

    2010-01-01

    repetitive cycles in a linear tribometer. The worn TiAlN layers of thicknesses up to 3 lm, with strongly developed grooves and ridges, were subsequently used for the reflectance measurements. The results show that optical reflectance monitoring is a potential technique for intelligent determination...

  4. Optical detection of singlet oxygen from single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, John; Skovsen, Esben; Lambert, John D. C.

    2006-01-01

    The lowest excited electronic state of molecular oxygen, singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a 1g), is a reactive species involved in many chemical and biological processes. To better understand the roles played by singlet oxygen in biological systems, particularly at the sub-cellular level, optical too...

  5. Automated spoof-detection for fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darlow, LN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available optical coherence tomography (OCT). This technology is able to capture a 3D representation of the internal structure of the skin and is thus not limited to a 2D surface scan. The additional information afforded by this representation means that accurate...

  6. Automated Detection of Short Optical Transients of Astrophysical Origin in Real Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sokołowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of short optical transients of astrophysical origin in real time is an important task for existing robotic telescopes. The faster a new optical transient is detected, the earlier follow-up observations can be started. The sooner the object is identified, the more data can be collected before the source fades away, particularly in the most interesting early period of the transient. In this the real-time pipeline designed for identification of optical flashes with the “Pi of the Sky” project will be presented in detail together with solutions used by other experiments.

  7. Multifunctional fiber-optic microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Nielsen, Søren Nørskov

    1998-01-01

    The multifunctionality of microwave links based on remote heterodyne detection (RHD) of signals from a dual-frequency laser transmitter is discussed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. Typically, direct detection (DD) in conjunction with optical intensity modulation is used to implemen...... carrier to a 9-GHz carrier with penalty-free transmission over 25 km of optical fiber. Finally, the transparent link transmits a standard FM video 7.6-GHz radio-link signal over 25 km of optical fiber without measurable distortion...

  8. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Richard Karl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Jeffrey B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wiemann, Dora K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Choi, Junoh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  9. Development of Laser LEDs Based a Programmable Optical Sensor for Detection of Environmental Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser LED based optical sensor and its multifunctional operation for detection of environmental pollutants are described. The work will provide the instructions to design of circuitry for optical sensor instrument with a program based on a microcontroller (8902051-24PI, and to allow this program to communicate via RS-232 with computer. An algorithm is outlined by which the sensor instrument can use three laser LEDs (blue, Green and red to quantify the composition of pollutant. The operation of measurement through optical sensor has been applied to the study of detection and rate of reaction of pollutant i.e. methyl parathion and the produced informative data were also correlated with UV-vis spectrophotometry for the validation of results. The purpose of designed optical sensor is that the sophisticated analytical techniques show costly impact, time taking process, high consumable solvents and not suit for field application purpose which focuses the merits of the optical sensor.

  10. Fiber Optic Ring Resonator Sensor Detection Technique Based on Spectral Intensity Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Sidi Priambodo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resonant field phenomenon in optical ring resonator has been a major theme for various studies and can be used for various sensor applications. The spectral response shape changes are subjects to be discussed and analyzed for detection in optical sensor system. The spectral response changes are caused by various factors ranging from refractive index of the surrounding medium, medium loss due to absorption and scattering, and coupling variation between waveguides. These optical phenomena are mostly used for bio-sensor applications, since it is free from electromagnetic interference (EMI and non-physically destructive. In this paper, we discuss our current research in developing optical bio-sensor in the form of a fiber optic ring resonator with monochromatic laser source based on spectral integration detection method, which is sufficiently sensitive and accurate.

  11. Reversible optical control of cyanine fluorescence in fixed and living cells: optical lock-in detection immunofluorescence imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuling; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Mao, Shu; Marriott, Gerard

    2013-02-05

    Optical switch probes undergo rapid and reversible transitions between two distinct states, one of which may fluoresce. This class of probe is used in various super-resolution imaging techniques and in the high-contrast imaging technique of optical lock-in detection (OLID) microscopy. Here, we introduce optimized optical switches for studies in living cells under standard conditions of cell culture. In particular, a highly fluorescent cyanine probe (Cy or Cy3) is directly or indirectly linked to naphthoxazine (NISO), a highly efficient optical switch that undergoes robust, 405/532 nm-driven transitions between a colourless spiro (SP) state and a colourful merocyanine (MC) state. The intensity of Cy fluorescence in these Cy/Cy3-NISO probes is reversibly modulated between a low and high value in SP and MC states, respectively, as a result of Förster resonance energy transfer. Cy/Cy3-NISO probes are targeted to specific proteins in living cells where defined waveforms of Cy3 fluorescence are generated by optical switching of the SP and MC states. Finally, we introduce a new imaging technique (called OLID-immunofluorescence microscopy) that combines optical modulation of Cy3 fluorescence from Cy3/NISO co-labelled antibodies within fixed cells and OLID analysis to significantly improve image contrast in samples having high background or rare antigens.

  12. Revisiting Bragg's X-ray microscope: scatter based optical transient grating detection of pulsed ionising radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K; Paganin, David M; Hall, Chris J

    2011-06-01

    Transient optical gratings for detecting ultrafast signals are routine for temporally resolved photochemical investigations. Many processes can contribute to the formation of such gratings; we indicate use of optically scattering centres that can be formed with highly variable latencies in different materials and devices using ionising radiation. Coherent light scattered by these centres can form the short-wavelength-to-optical-wavelength, incoherent-to-coherent basis of a Bragg X-ray microscope, with inherent scope for optical phasing. Depending on the dynamics of the medium chosen, the way is open to both ultrafast pulsed and integrating measurements. For experiments employing brief pulses, we discuss high-dynamic-range short-wavelength diffraction measurements with real-time optical reconstructions. Applications to optical real-time X-ray phase-retrieval are considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  14. Results of Optical Detection Trials in Harbour Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, D.J.J. de; Dijk, J.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Kemp, R.A.W.; Groot, J.F. de; Broek, S.P. van den

    2008-01-01

    In harbour environments operators should perform tasks as detection and classification. Present-day threats of smallobjects, as jet skis etc, should be detected, classified and recognized. Furthermore threat intention should be analysed. As harbour environments contain several hiding spaces, due to

  15. Internal fingerprint zone detection in optical coherence tomography fingertip scans

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darlow, LN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available details and tests a k-means clustering approach for papillary junction detection. All tested metrics are of a standard comparable to the measured human error. The technique presented in this research is highly successful in detection of the location...

  16. Near field ice detection using infrared based optical imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moati, Hazem; Morris, Jonathan; Zeng, Yousheng; Corie, Martin Wesley; Yanni, Victor Garas

    2018-02-01

    If not detected and characterized, icebergs can potentially pose a hazard to oil and gas exploration, development and production operations in arctic environments as well as commercial shipping channels. In general, very large bergs are tracked and predicted using models or satellite imagery. Small and medium bergs are detectable using conventional marine radar. As icebergs decay they shed bergy bits and growlers, which are much smaller and more difficult to detect. Their low profile above the water surface, in addition to occasional relatively high seas, makes them invisible to conventional marine radar. Visual inspection is the most common method used to detect bergy bits and growlers, but the effectiveness of visual inspections is reduced by operator fatigue and low light conditions. The potential hazard from bergy bits and growlers is further increased by short detection range (<1 km). As such, there is a need for robust and autonomous near-field detection of such smaller icebergs. This paper presents a review of iceberg detection technology and explores applications for infrared imagers in the field. Preliminary experiments are performed and recommendations are made for future work, including a proposed imager design which would be suited for near field ice detection.

  17. Label-free optical detection of action potential in mammalian neurons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Bui, Loan; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Davé, Digant P.

    2017-02-01

    Electrophysiology techniques are the gold standard in neuroscience for studying functionality of a single neuron to a complex neuronal network. However, electrophysiology techniques are not flawless, they are invasive nature, procedures are cumbersome to implement with limited capability of being used as a high-throughput recording system. Also, long term studies of neuronal functionality with aid of electrophysiology is not feasible. Non-invasive stimulation and detection of neuronal electrical activity has been a long standing goal in neuroscience. Introduction of optogenetics has ushered in the era of non-invasive optical stimulation of neurons, which is revolutionizing neuroscience research. Optical detection of neuronal activity that is comparable to electro-physiology is still elusive. A number of optical techniques have been reported recording of neuronal electrical activity but none is capable of reliably measuring action potential spikes that is comparable to electro-physiology. Optical detection of action potential with voltage sensitive fluorescent reporters are potential alternatives to electrophysiology techniques. The heavily rely on secondary reporters, which are often toxic in nature with background fluorescence, with slow response and low SNR making them far from ideal. The detection of one shot (without averaging)-single action potential in a true label-free way has been elusive so far. In this report, we demonstrate the optical detection of single neuronal spike in a cultured mammalian neuronal network without using any exogenous labels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of label free optical detection of single action potentials in a mammalian neuronal network, which was achieved using a high-speed phase sensitive interferometer. We have carried out stimulation and inhibition of neuronal firing using Glutamate and Tetrodotoxin respectively to demonstrate the different outcome (stimulation and inhibition) revealed in

  18. S/EV 92: solar and electric vehicles: Proceedings. Volume 1, Table of contents, Morning plenary sessions, EV fundamentals, Advanced EVs, Photovoltaics, Policy, Fleets, Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    These proceedings include the morning plenary sessions and then sessions on each of the following topics: Electric Vehicle (EV) fundamentals, advanced EV`s, photovoltaics, policy, and fleets. Many individual topics are considered to include: EV races, environmental benefits, demonstration programs, lightweight composite materials, advanced components, and electric batteries.

  19. Closed-loop fiber optic gyroscope with homodyne detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Qin, BingKun; Chen, Shufen

    1996-09-01

    Interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) has been analyzed with autocontrol theory in this paper. An open-loop IFOG system is not able to restrain the bias drift, but a closed-loop IFOG system can do it very well using negative feedback in order to suppress zero drift. The result of our theoretic analysis and computer simulation indicate that the bias drift of a closed-loop system is smaller than an open- loop one.

  20. Detecting nonlocal Cooper pair entanglement by optical Bell inequality violation

    OpenAIRE

    Nigg, Simon E.; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Walter, Stefan; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity, the coherent splitting of Cooper pairs from a superconductor to two spatially separated quantum dots has been predicted to generate nonlocal pairs of entangled electrons. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a scheme to transfer the spin state of a split Cooper pair onto the polarization state of a pair of optical photons. We show that the produced photon pairs can be used to violate a Bell inequality, unambiguo...

  1. Information on 'Shikoku EV Rally Festival 99' and analysis of participating EVs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyashita, K. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Takashima (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A 3 day rally was held in August 1999 in the city of Shikoku, Japan to bring electric vehicles (EVs) to the public's attention. A total of 39 EVs from 3 production series participated. This included 29 EVs converted from internal combustion engine vehicles, 5 prototype EVs and 2 hybrid electric vehicles. Thirty seven of the EVs used lead-acid batteries, one used nickel-metal hydride batteries and one used lithium-ion batteries. Each one was charged using one outlet of 3 phase 200 V, 1 phase 200 V or 1 phase 100 V at temporary charging facilities. The 340 km course ran through the city and in mountainous regions. The EVs were driven according to normal traffic rules. At the end of the rally, each EV was evaluated for their performance, hill climbing ability, and re-charging time. Several of the converted EVs drove for more than 50 km through mountainous regions using lead-acid batteries. It was determined that the poor range of EVs can be improved by an efficient daily re-charge. refs.

  2. Unusual fault detection and loss analysis in optical fiber connections with refractive index matching material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Mitsuru; Nagano, Ryuichiro; Izumita, Hisashi; Toyonaga, Masanobu

    2012-05-01

    We investigated and analyzed an unusual fault that occurs in optical access fiber networks, which is caused by a defective fiber connection. We developed a fault-detection system to locate such a fault by using both optical power level and optical pulse measurement methods. We investigated a defective mechanical splice in three laboratory tests: outward appearance, non-destructive, and dismantled. As a result, we confirmed that the defective mechanical splice had large gaps of more than 10 μm. We also analyzed the unusual fault that occurs from such a defective mechanical splice in mechanically transferrable (MT) connector experiments. The experimental results revealed that the optical performance of fiber connections with a mixture of refractive index matching material and air-filled gaps was extremely unstable and varied widely. In the worst case, the insertion loss worsened to more than 30 dB. The case of the fault caused by a mixture of refractive index matching material and air-filled gaps between the ends of optical fibers is thought to occur independently of the sorts or structures of optical fiber connectors and could be a characteristic peculiar to optical fiber connections using refractive index matching material. These findings can be applied to optical fiber connections that use refractive index matching material, such as MT connectors in outside underground facilities, mechanical splices, or field assembly connectors at aerial and home sites in optical access networks. These findings also support the practical construction and operation of optical network systems.

  3. Detection of swelling of single isolated mitochondrion with optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Daisuke; Kanematsu, Keita; Shibata, Takahiro; Haseda, Keisuke; Umeda, Norihiro; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Volume regulation under osmotic loading is one of the most fundamental functions in cells and organelles. However, the effective method to detect volume changes of a single organelle has not been developed. Here, we present a novel technique for detecting volume changes of a single isolated mitochondrion in aqueous solution based on the transmittance of the light through the mitochondrion. We found that 70% and 21% of mitochondria swelled upon addition of a hypotonic solution and Ca2+, respectively. These results show the potential of the present technique to detect the physiological volume changes of individual small organelles such as mitochondria. PMID:24688818

  4. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila Using Fiber Optic Microchannel Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samla Gauri; Zurina Zainal Abidin; Mohd Firdaus Kamuri; Mohd Adzir Mahdi; Nurul Amziah Md Yunus

    2017-01-01

    .... Experimental results showed that Aeromonas hydrophila can be detected at the region of UV-Vis spectra between 352 nm and 354 nm which was comparable to measurement provided by UV spectrophotometer...

  5. The Detection of Helicobacter hepaticus Using Whispering-Gallery Mode Microcavity Optical Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark E; O'Brien, Emily C; Grayek, Emily N; Hermansen, James K; Hunt, Heather K

    2015-08-07

    Current bacterial detection techniques are relatively slow, require bulky instrumentation, and usually require some form of specialized training. The gold standard for bacterial detection is culture testing, which can take several days to receive a viable result. Therefore, simpler detection techniques that are both fast and sensitive could greatly improve bacterial detection and identification. Here, we present a new method for the detection of the bacteria Helicobacter hepaticus using whispering-gallery mode (WGM) optical microcavity-based sensors. Due to minimal reflection losses and low material adsorption, WGM-based sensors have ultra-high quality factors, resulting in high-sensitivity sensor devices. In this study, we have shown that bacteria can be non-specifically detected using WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. The minimum detection for the device was 1 × 10(4) cells/mL, and the minimum time of detection was found to be 750 s. Given that a cell density as low as 1 × 10(3) cells/mL for Helicobacter hepaticus can cause infection, the limit of detection shown here would be useful for most levels where Helicobacter hepaticus is biologically relevant. This study suggests a new approach for H. hepaticus detection using label-free optical sensors that is faster than, and potentially as sensitive as, standard techniques.

  6. The Detection of Helicobacter hepaticus Using Whispering-Gallery Mode Microcavity Optical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Anderson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Current bacterial detection techniques are relatively slow, require bulky instrumentation, and usually require some form of specialized training. The gold standard for bacterial detection is culture testing, which can take several days to receive a viable result. Therefore, simpler detection techniques that are both fast and sensitive could greatly improve bacterial detection and identification. Here, we present a new method for the detection of the bacteria Helicobacter hepaticus using whispering-gallery mode (WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. Due to minimal reflection losses and low material adsorption, WGM-based sensors have ultra-high quality factors, resulting in high-sensitivity sensor devices. In this study, we have shown that bacteria can be non-specifically detected using WGM optical microcavity-based sensors. The minimum detection for the device was 1 × 104 cells/mL, and the minimum time of detection was found to be 750 s. Given that a cell density as low as 1 × 103 cells/mL for Helicobacter hepaticus can cause infection, the limit of detection shown here would be useful for most levels where Helicobacter hepaticus is biologically relevant. This study suggests a new approach for H. hepaticus detection using label-free optical sensors that is faster than, and potentially as sensitive as, standard techniques.

  7. Highly sensitive and selective liquid crystal optical sensor for detection of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofang; Zhong, Yuanbo; Chen, Rui; Wang, Fei; Luo, Dan

    2017-06-12

    Ammonia detection technologies are very important in environment monitoring. However, most existing technologies are complex and expensive, which limit the useful range of real-time application. Here, we propose a highly sensitive and selective optical sensor for detection of ammonia (NH3) based on liquid crystals (LCs). This optical sensor is realized through the competitive binding between ammonia and liquid crystals on chitosan-Cu2+ that decorated on glass substrate. We achieve a broad detection range of ammonia from 50 ppm to 1250 ppm, with a low detection limit of 16.6 ppm. This sensor is low-cost, simple, fast, and highly sensitive and selective for detection of ammonia. The proposal LC sensing method can be a sensitive detection platform for other molecule monitors such as proteins, DNAs and other heavy metal ions by modifying sensing molecules.

  8. Optical detection and monitoring of pigmented skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnes, J J; Ryzhikov, G; Biryulina, M; Hamre, B; Zhao, L; Stamnes, K

    2017-06-01

    A method is presented for discriminating between malignant and benign pigmented skin lesions based on multispectral and multi-angle images. It is discussed how to retrieve maps of physiology properties and morphometric parameters from recorded images using a bio-optical model, radiative transfer calculations, and nonlinear inversion, and how to employ automated zooming to extract lesion and surrounding masks. Training and validation of a classification scheme for separation between benign and malignant tissue yielded sensitivity/specificity ranging from 97%/97% for application to a small dataset comprised of lesions not used for training and validation to 99%/93% for application to a larger dataset.

  9. Detecting nonlocal Cooper pair entanglement by optical Bell inequality violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Simon E.; Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Walter, Stefan; Schmidt, Thomas L.

    2015-03-01

    Based on the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the coherent splitting of Cooper pairs from a superconductor to two spatially separated quantum dots has been predicted to generate nonlocal pairs of entangled electrons. In order to test this hypothesis, we propose a scheme to transfer the spin state of a split Cooper pair onto the polarization state of a pair of optical photons. We show that the photon pairs produced can be used to violate a Bell inequality, unambiguously demonstrating the entanglement of the split Cooper pairs.

  10. Detecting the Zambezi River plume using observed optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddorn, J R; Bowers, D G; Hoguane, A M

    2001-10-01

    In April 1998 a research cruise was carried out in the Mozambique Channel taking detailed optical, water quality and salinity measurements; the Zambezi plume waters were apparent through strong colour fronts with green waters in the plume and clear blue waters offshore. A good (r2 = 0.76) negative empirical relationship was found between the salinity (S) and yellow substance, represented by the absorption of filtered samples at 440 nm (g440). An empirical relationship was found between the salinity and a reflectance ratio: S(1/2 Zsd) = 37.45-7.07(R555/R490). An optical model in which light absorption is dominated by yellow substance and light scattering by inorganic particles confirms this empirical relationship. This has been applied to a SeaWIFS image to map salinity on the Sofala Bank, demonstrating the potential to remotely determine the distribution of the Zambezi River plume. It is thought that any significant level of chlorophyll would reduce the effectiveness of the above algorithm.

  11. Ultrasensitive detection system for fiber optic-based ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Belz, Mathias; Dress, Peter; Schelle, B.; Boyle, William J. O.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Franke, Hilmar

    1998-03-01

    A fiber optic based deep UV-absorption sensor system is characterized, using fibers for light delivery and a liquid core waveguide (LCW) for analyzing liquids. UN-improved fibers with 500 micrometers core diameter are capable of transmitting light intensities below 230 nm with spectral radiant powers above 500 nW/nm at 214 nm. Their short-term behavior and lifetime in respect to UV-stability have been investigated, using a broadband deuterium lamp. To raise the sensitivity of the total system, the absorption path length has been increased significantly using the lightguiding properties of the LCW consisting of a cylindrical glass tube with a Teflon AF 2400 inner coating of about 50 micrometers thickness. Due to lower refractive index of Teflon in comparison to water, the LCW concept offers significant advantages, especially for long optical pathlengths. However, the basic attenuation of the liquid in dependence on the wavelength as to be taken into account. Results on the use of such a system monitoring concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid, acetone and toluene in water are reported and discussed.

  12. Design of MEMS devices with optical apertures for the detection of transparent biological cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Poenar, Daniel Puiu; Liu, Kai Yu; Tse, Man Siu; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Tan, Swee Ngin

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides a novel technique to detect transparent biological living cells trapped in a microfluidic MEMS device by optical diffraction. The device essentially consists of an optical aperture or an aperture array patterned in metal layer and a microfluidic chamber positioned above the center of the aperture. When the cells in the chamber are illuminated through the aperture, the far-field diffraction pattern can be recorded by a CCD camera or a photodetector array. This diffraction pattern uniquely corresponds to the sizes, positions, and intrinsic optical properties of the aperture, cells, and the microfluidic chamber materials, so any unknown but relevant parameter is able to be extrapolated when all other parameters are fixed or identified. This paper describes in detail the designs of various microfluidic chambers and apertures for this application, and the development of a complete set of software for the analysis of the cells' optical properties. Compared with other currently available methods for the detection of transparent living cells, this method has the advantages of simple device structure, easy to manipulate, able to simultaneously detect several cells of different species, as well as providing accurate and sensitive results. Besides the detection of living cells, this technique can also be used to detect or characterize other transparent or low optical absorption particles, such as polymer spheres or insoluble droplets, inside an aqueous solution.

  13. EV Charging Analysis with High EV Penetration in the Nordic Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhaoxi; Wu, Qiuwei

    This report covers the driving pattern analysis and the electric vehicle (EV) charging ananlysis of Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland. The contents in the report are driving pattern analysis of the passenger cars and electrical charging load profiles of EVs based on the analyzed driving patterns...

  14. Absence of detectable current-induced magneto-optical Kerr effects in Pt, Ta, and W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riego, Patricia; Vélez, Saül; Gomez-Perez, Juan M.; Arregi, Jon Ander; Hueso, Luis E.; Casanova, Fèlix; Berger, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    We explore the possibility to detect spin accumulation due to the spin Hall effect (SHE) by means of the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). For this purpose, we utilize the generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry (GME), which enables the disentanglement of different magnetization components contributing to the resulting MOKE signal, and perform measurements for three different materials: Pt, W, and Ta. Although we observe a current-induced effect in the light intensity in our polarization sensitive GME setup, it does not arise from a SHE-induced light polarization signal in any of the materials, but from a change in reflectivity due to heating effects. Based on the sensitivity achieved in our experiments, we conclude that state-of-the-art magneto-optical methods utilizing linear optics are not sufficiently sensitive to detect SHE-induced spin accumulation in these metals.

  15. Linear polarization detection of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography in the early detection of the application of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zeng, Nan; Yang, Lifeng

    2010-11-01

    Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) is an important functional OCT. By extracting the polarization properties from PS-OCT signals we can obtain more information about the structural and optical features of tissues or materials. Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of people worldwide. The primary caries detection and the structure transformation of the enamel and dentin between sound and broken teeth are given serious attention by dentists. In this paper, using our Fourier-domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (FD-PS-OCT) setup by three incident linear polarization states and two detection states, we can get the 9 Mueller matrix elements from M11to M33 of the decay areas of the artificial caries measured. We also applied our polarized sensitive Monte Carlo program in the simulation of the PS-OCT detection process. We used a sphere-cylinder scattering model as an approximation of anisotropic tissues to describe the optical properties of tooth. By comparing the Mueller matrix elements of both experimental and simulation results, especially the diagonal elements (M11, M22 and M33), we reach the point that the main structural change of the caries that affects its scattering features is the expanded diameter of the enamel rods and dentinal tubules caused by the acid corrosion due to caries lesion.

  16. GASP detection of a fast optical brightening of the blazar 3C 454.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Larionov, V. M.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Nilsson, K.; Pasanen, M.; Carosati, D.

    2009-12-01

    With reference to the recent very strong gamma-ray activity of the blazar 3C 454.3 detected by Fermi-GST and AGILE (ATel #2322), the GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) reports on a simultaneous fast optical brightening of the source. After the mild activity registered in August-October 2009 (R ~ 14.5-15), the optical brightness decreased to R ~ 15-15.2 in November.

  17. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cal systems and they are also of health concern.1,2 Many synthetic chromogenic and/or fluorogenic sensors for fluoride ... not applicable in many bio-analytical applications. Of course, colourimetric detection of fluoride in ..... Hursthouse M B, Light M E, Shi A J 2002 Chem. Commun. 758; (c) Camiolo S, Gale P A, Hursthouse.

  18. Detection of ultrasonic waves in solids by an optical fiber interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.; Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An optical fiber interferometer was developed for the detection of ultrasonic waves in solids. The optical paths in both the signal and reference arms of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer are through the cores of similar lengths of single mode fiber mode stripped at both input and output. Instantaneous translation of the pattern is proportional to the localized strain produced by ultrasonic bulk waves generated in the disc and integrated along the fiber path. By spatially filtering the moving fringe pattern and synchronously demodulating the filtered optical intensity distirbution, a signal proportional to the integrated strain is obtained.

  19. Laser cooling and optical detection of excitations in a LC electrical circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, J. M.; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg; Marcus, Charles Masamed

    2011-01-01

    We explore a method for laser cooling and optical detection of excitations in a room temperature LC electrical circuit. Our approach uses a nanomechanical oscillator as a transducer between optical and electronic excitations. An experimentally feasible system with the oscillator capacitively...... coupled to the LC and at the same time interacting with light via an optomechanical force is shown to provide strong electromechanical coupling. Conditions for improved sensitivity and quantum limited readout of electrical signals with such an “optical loud speaker” are outlined....

  20. Evaluation of the Detection Efficiency of LYSO Scintillator in the Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Hee Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate fiber-optic sensors for the remote detection of gamma rays in areas that are difficult to access, such as a spent fuel pool. The fiber-optic sensor consists of a light-generating probe, such as scintillators for radiation detection, plastic optical fibers, and light-measuring devices, such as PMT. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was chosen as the light-generating probe. The (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator has higher scintillation efficiency than the others and transmits light well through an optical fiber because its refraction index is similar to the refractive index of the optical fiber. The fiber-optic radiation sensor using the (Lu,Y2SiO5:Ce(LYSO:Ce scintillator was evaluated in terms of the detection efficiency and reproducibility for examining its applicability as a radiation sensor.

  1. A novel optical rotary encoder with eccentricity self-detection ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Ye, Guoyong; Liu, Hongzhong; Ban, Yaowen; Shi, Yongsheng; Yin, Lei; Lu, Bingheng

    2017-11-01

    Eccentricity error is the main error source of optical rotary encoders. Real-time detection and compensation of the eccentricity error is an effective way of improving the accuracy of rotary optical encoders. In this paper, a novel rotary optical encoder is presented to realize eccentricity self-detection. The proposed encoder adopts a spider-web-patterned scale grating as a measuring standard which is scanned by a dual-head scanning unit. Two scanning heads of the dual-head scanning unit, which are arranged orthogonally, have the function of scanning the periodic pattern of the scale grating along the angular and radial directions, respectively. By this means, synchronous measurement of angular and radial displacements of the scale grating is realized. This paper gives the details of the operating principle of the rotary optical encoder, developing and testing work of a prototype. The eccentricity self-detection result agrees well with the result measured by an optical microscope. The experimental result preliminarily proves the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed optical encoder.

  2. EV71 vaccine, a new tool to control outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qun-ying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-05-01

    On December 3rd 2015, the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) approved the first inactivated Enterovirus 71 (EV71) whole virus vaccine for preventing severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). As one of the few preventive vaccines for children's infectious diseases generated by the developing countries in recent years, EV71 vaccine is a blessing to children's health in China and worldwide. However, there are still a few challenges facing the worldwide use of EV71 vaccine, including the applicability against various EV71 pandemic strains in other countries, international requirements on vaccine production and quality control, standardization and harmonization on different pathogen monitoring and detecting methods, etc. In addition, the affordability of EV71 vaccine in other countries is a factor to be considered in HFMD prevention. Therefore, with EV71 vaccine commercially available, there is still a long way to go before reaching effective protection against severe HFMD after EV71 vaccines enter the market. In this paper, the bottlenecks and prospects for the wide use of EV71 vaccine after its approval are evaluated.

  3. Caries Detection Methods Based on Changes in Optical Properties between Healthy and Carious Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Karlsson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A conservative, noninvasive or minimally invasive approach to clinical management of dental caries requires diagnostic techniques capable of detecting and quantifying lesions at an early stage, when progression can be arrested or reversed. Objective evidence of initiation of the disease can be detected in the form of distinct changes in the optical properties of the affected tooth structure. Caries detection methods based on changes in a specific optical property are collectively referred to as optically based methods. This paper presents a simple overview of the feasibility of three such technologies for quantitative or semiquantitative assessment of caries lesions. Two of the techniques are well-established: quantitative light-induced fluorescence, which is used primarily in caries research, and laser-induced fluorescence, a commercially available method used in clinical dental practice. The third technique, based on near-infrared transillumination of dental enamel is in the developmental stages.

  4. Advances in Optical Adjunctive Aids for Visualisation and Detection of Oral Malignant and Potentially Malignant Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of screening for oral potentially malignant disorders and oral malignancies involve a conventional oral examination with digital palpation. Evidence indicates that conventional examination is a poor discriminator of oral mucosal lesions. A number of optical aids have been developed to assist the clinician to detect oral mucosal abnormalities and to differentiate benign lesions from sinister pathology. This paper discusses advances in optical technologies designed for the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities. The literature regarding such devices, VELscope and Identafi, is critically analysed, and the novel use of Narrow Band Imaging within the oral cavity is also discussed. Optical aids are effective in assisting with the detection of oral mucosal abnormalities; however, further research is required to evaluate the usefulness of these devices in differentiating benign lesions from potentially malignant and malignant lesions.

  5. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Road to Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-01-31

    Initial progress report for EV Everywhere. The report highlights the significant cost reduction in batteries in 2014, which will enable increased PEV affordability for consumers. Also, the efforts on increasing the convenience of PEVs through the Workplace Charging Challenge, which called on U.S. employers to help develop the nation's charging infrastructure.

  6. Low cost optic sensor for hydrocarbon detection in open oceans

    OpenAIRE

    PARRA BORONAT, LORENA; Sendra, Sandra; Lloret, Jaime; Mendoza, Jonatan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are one of the most important toxics in the oceans. Their presence may cause the death of organisms. They even can affect to the human beings, when they consume products that have been in contact with the hydrocarbons. After a hydrocarbon spillage, the fishing activity, the tourism, the safety and the wildlife are endangered. The fast detection is very important in order to start as soon as possible the cleaning tasks. It can be done using sensor networks. The firs...

  7. Drugs of abuse detection in saliva based on actuated optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jie; Li, Zhenyu; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Wenlong; Wu, Yixuan

    2014-12-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the abuse of drugs during the past decade. Combing drug use with driving is very dangerous. More than 11% of drivers in a roadside survey tested positive for drugs, while 18% of drivers killed in accidents tested positive for drugs as reported in USA, 2007. Toward developing a rapid drug screening device, we use saliva as the sample, and combining the traditional immunoassays method with optical magnetic technology. There were several methods for magnetic nanoparticles detection, such as magnetic coils, SQUID, microscopic imaging, and Hall sensors. All of these methods were not suitable for our demands. By developing a novel optical scheme, we demonstrate high-sensitivity detection in saliva. Drugs of abuse are detected at sub-nano gram per milliliter levels in less than 120 seconds. Evanescent wave principle has been applied to sensitively monitor the presence of magnetic nanoparticles on the binding surface. Like the total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM), evanescent optical field is generated at the plastic/fluid interface, which decays exponentially and penetrates into the fluid by only a sub-wavelength distance. By disturbance total internal reflection with magnetic nanoparticles, the optical intensity would be influenced. We then detected optical output by imaging the sensor surface onto a CCD camera. We tested four drugs tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), methamphetamine (MAMP), ketamine (KET), morphine (OPI), using this technology. 100 ng mL-1 sensitivity was achieved, and obvious evidence showed that this results could be improved in further researches.

  8. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, B C; Wu, Y; Yu, C B; He, J R; Rao, Y J; Gong, Y; Fu, F; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R

    2016-03-24

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel 'FRET on Fiber' concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based 'FRET on fiber' configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated 'FRET on Fiber' sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response.

  9. Spectral fractionation detection of gold nanorod contrast agents using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Liu, Gangjun; Gordon, Andrew Y.; Gao, Simon S.; Pechauer, Alex D.; Stoddard, Jonathan; McGill, Trevor J.; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Huang, David

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the proof of concept of a novel Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography contrast mechanism using gold nanorod contrast agents and a spectral fractionation processing technique. The methodology detects the spectral shift of the backscattered light from the nanorods by comparing the ratio between the short and long wavelength halves of the optical coherence tomography signal intensity. Spectral fractionation further divides the halves into sub-bands to improve spectral contrast and suppress speckle noise. Herein, we show that this technique can detect gold nanorods in intralipid tissue phantoms. Furthermore, cellular labeling by gold nanorods was demonstrated using retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro. PMID:25836459

  10. Optic disc and macula detection in fundus images by means of template matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno-Alvarado, Tzolkin; Martinez-Perez, M Elena; Martinez-Castellanos, Maria A; Rodriguez-Quinones, Luvia; Salinas-Longoria, Samantha M

    2014-01-01

    Various methods for detecting optic disc and macula in fundus images have been developed. Our aim is to propose a fairly easy method for detecting both features jointly. This is achieved by first correcting in homogenous luminosity using a polynomial approximation of the background of the images. Secondly, the use of the cross-correlation in the frequency domain between the images and a steerable template which contains both structures. The 38 photographs used in this work belong to a local database of patients suffering diabetic retinopathy along its four severity stages. Our results showed 100% optic disc centers located within the OD area and 90% macula centers located within the MC area.

  11. Development of a distributed radiation detection system using optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, F.; Inouchi, Goro; Takada, Eiji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1996-07-01

    We have confirmed the importance of temperature and dose rate for the response of Ge-doped fibers to radiation. A phenomenological model have been found to account for temperature and dose rate effects. From this model it is possible to make dose predictions from attenuation measurements when the temperature and dose rate are known. Ge-doped fibers have been found to have a relatively low sensitivity to both neutron and gamma radiation. In addition, temperature and dose rate dependencies complicate the analysis. However we point out that these problems may all be solved if we use fibers, such as P-doped fibers, which contain color centers of long lifetime. This would remove both the temperature and dose rate dependencies that complicate the use of Ge-doped fibers, in addition the radiation sensitivity is increased. Finally OTDR has been investigated as a possible read-out method for distributed radiation measurements. For our system the minimum pulse length was 3ns, giving a spatial resolution in the meter range and a response length to radiation of about 10 m if accurate dose values where to be obtained. We found OTDR to be a suitable method for radiation induced attenuation measurements in optical fibers, especially for long fiber lengths and long time scales where questions of light source stability becomes important for other systems. (S.Y.)

  12. A quantum dot-based optical immunosensor for human serum albumin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meng-Che; Chang, Yun-Tzu; Kang, Yu-Ting; Chang, Hwan-You; Chang, Pin; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2012-04-15

    In this study, a CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD)-based immunosensor using a simple optical system for human serum albumin (HSA) detection is developed. Monoclonal anti-HSA (AHSA) immobilized on 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-modified glass was used to capture HSA specifically. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used to block non-specific sites. The solution, containing AHSA-QD complex prepared by mixing biotinylated polyclonal anti-HSA and streptavidin coated QD, was used to conjugate with the HSA molecules captured on AHSA/BSA/APTES-modified glass for the modification of HSA with QD. A simple optical system, comprising a diode laser (405 nm), an optical lens, a 515-nm-long pass filter, and an Si-photodiode, was used to detect fluorescence and convert it to photocurrent. The current intensity was determined by the amount of QD specifically conjugated with HSA, and was therefore HSA-concentration-dependent and could be used to quantify HSA concentration. The detection limit of the pure QD solution was ~3.5×10(-12) M, and the detection limit for the CdSe/ZnS QD-based immunosensor developed in this study was approximately 3.2×10(-5) mg/ml. This small optical biosensing system shows considerable potential for future applications of on-chip liver-function detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel algorithm based on wavelet transform for ship target detection in optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Xu, Tingfa; Chen, Sining; Huang, Tingting

    2017-07-01

    The rapid development of the satellite observation technology provides a very rich source of data for sea reconnaissance and ships surveillance. In the face of such a vast sea remote sensing data, it is urgent need to realize the automatic ship detection in optical remote sensing images, but the optical remote sensing images are easily affected by meteorological conditions, such as clouds, waves, which results in larger false alarm; and the weak contrast between optical remote sensing image target and background is easy to cause missing alarm. In this paper, a novel algorithm based on wavelet transform for ship target detection in optical remote sensing images is proposed, which can effectively remove these noise and interference. The segmentation of sea and land background is first applied to the image preprocessing to achieve more accurate detection results, and then discrete wavelet transform is used to deal with the part of sea background. The results show that almost all of the offshore ships can be detected, and through the comparison of the results of four different wavelet basis functions, the accuracy of ship detection is further improved.

  14. Recent developments in optical detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Ulrik; Hoivik, Nils

    2014-08-21

    The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a) study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b) integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance.

  15. Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Management with Dynamic Distribution System Tariff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Wu, Qiuwei; Østergaard, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    An electric vehicle (EV) charging schedule algorithm was proposed in this paper in order to charge EVs to meet EV users’ driving needs with the minimum EV charging cost and respect the local distribution system constraints. A day-ahead dynamic distribution system tariff scheme was proposed to avoid...

  16. System Architecture Design for Electric Vehicle (EV) Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao; Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    The electric vehicle (EV) system should fulfill the energy needs of EVs to meet the EV users’ driving requirements and enable the system service from EVs to support the power system operation with high penetration of renewable energy resources (RES) by providing necessary infrastructures. In order...

  17. Coherent detection of 40-Gb/s optical minimum-shift keying modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Huang, Bo; Shao, Yufeng; Zhang, Junwen; Zhu, Jiangbo; Chi, Nan

    2010-12-01

    Optical minimum-shift keying (MSK) format has constant envelope and continuous temporal phase shift, and exhibits a promising application for its high compact spectrum. Coherent detections have been proved to be effectively for the significant improvement of receiver sensitivity. In this paper, a heterodyne detection scheme to demodulate 40Gb/s MSK signal is proposed, and simulation analysis is given to the receiver sensitivity, the laser line-width and frequency offset. Comparison is drawn between the presented heterodyne detection and homodyne detection, and investigation is made on the performance of the receiver in different schemes.

  18. Structural Properties of Potexvirus Coat Proteins Detected by Optical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenyuk, P I; Karpova, O V; Ksenofontov, A L; Kalinina, N O; Dobrov, E N; Makarov, V V

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown by X-ray analysis that cores of coat proteins (CPs) from three potexviruses, flexible helical RNA-containing plant viruses, have similar α-helical structure. However, this similarity cannot explain structural lability of potexvirus virions, which is believed to determine their biological activity. Here, we used circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in the far UV region to compare optical properties of CPs from three potexviruses with the same morphology and similar structure. CPs from Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV), potato aucuba mosaic virus (PAMV), and potato virus X (PVX) have been studied in a free state and in virions. The CD spectrum of AltMV virions was similar to the previously obtained CD spectrum of papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) virions, but differed significantly from the CD spectrum of PAMV virions. The CD spectrum of PAMV virions resembled in its basic characteristics the CD spectrum of PVX virions characterized by molar ellipticity that is abnormally low for α-helical proteins. Homology modeling of the CP structures in AltMV, PAMV, and PVX virions was based on the known high-resolution structures of CPs from papaya mosaic virus and bamboo mosaic virus and confirmed that the structures of the CP cores in all three viruses were nearly identical. Comparison of amino acid sequences of different potexvirus CPs and prediction of unstructured regions in these proteins revealed a possible correlation between specific features in the virion CD spectra and the presence of disordered N-terminal segments in the CPs.

  19. Development and characterization of the integrated fiber-optic sensor for remote detection of alpha radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Hee; Moon, Joo Hyun; Seo, Bum Kyoung

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we developed and characterized an integrated fiber-optic sensor for the remote detection of alpha radiation emitted from radioactive contamination in areas relatively inaccessible by radiation workers. The fiber-optic sensor consisted of an epoxy-resin supporter and a sensing probe attached to it. The epoxy-resin supporter to hold the optical fiber tightly was fabricated by using epoxy-resin and a small amount of hardener. The sensing probe was fabricated by mixing epoxy-resin with inorganic scintillator ZnS(Ag) powder and solidifying the mixture. Then, the sensing probe was attached to the epoxy-resin supporter. As a light guide, an optical fiber, which was also compatible with the epoxy-resin, was used. The optical fiber was submerged in the epoxyresin supporter before solidification to make it in an integral form to minimize the loss of scintillation light due to incomplete connections between them. The four assembled fiber-optic sensors with sensing probes whose density thicknesses of ZnS(Ag) were 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/cm2, respectively, were evaluated in terms of the total counts of alpha radiation to determine the optimum density thickness of ZnS(Ag). From the evaluation, a density thickness of 15 mg/cm2 was found to be the best for detecting alpha radiation.

  20. A promising new mechanism of ionizing radiation detection for positron emission tomography: Modulation of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Daghighian, Henry M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Using conventional scintillation detection, the fundamental limit in positron emission tomography (PET) time resolution is strongly dependent on the inherent temporal variances generated during the scintillation process, yielding an intrinsic physical limit for the coincidence time resolution of around 100 ps. On the other hand, modulation mechanisms of the optical properties of a material exploited in the optical telecommunications industry can be orders of magnitude faster. In this paper we borrow from the concept of optics pump-probe measurement to for the first time study whether ionizing radiation can produce modulations of optical properties, which can be utilized as a novel method for radiation detection. We show that a refractive index modulation of approximately 5 × 10−6 is induced by interactions in a cadmium telluride (CdTe) crystal from a 511 keV photon source. Furthermore, using additional radionuclide sources, we show that the amplitude of the optical modulation signal varies linearly with both the detected event rate and average photon energy of the radiation source. PMID:27716640

  1. Detection of GRBs and OTs by All-Sky Optical and SID Monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hudec

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two alternative simple methods to detect counterparts of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs and optical transients (OTs. We report on the development and tests of an alternative optical all-sky monitor recently tested at the Karlovy Vary Observatory. The monitor is based on a Peleng 8 mm fish-eye lens (1 : 3,5–1 : 16 and CANON EOS 350D digital CCD camera. This type of monitor represents a low-cost device suitable for easy replication and still able to detect brighter optical transients simultaneously to GRB triggers. Such OTs have been observed for some of the GRBs such as GRB990123, GRB060117, or recently GRB080319 indicating that some fraction of GRBs can generate optical transient emission accessible by simple small aperture instrumentation as described here. These efforts are accompanied by development of dedicated programmes to access and to evaluate all-sky images; these efforts will be also briefly described. The All-Sky Monitor is a space variant optical system and its point spread function (PSF has not uniform shape in the field of view. The processing and measuring of image data is complicated, and sophisticated deconvolution algorithms are used for image restoration. The second method is the GRB detection based on their ionospheric response.

  2. All-optical non-mechanical fiber-coupled sensor for liquid- and airborne sound detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohringer, Wolfgang; Preißer, Stefan; Fischer, Balthasar

    2017-04-01

    Most fiber-optic devices for pressure, strain or temperature measurements are based on measuring the mechanical deformation of the optical fiber by various techniques. While excellently suited for detecting strain, pressure or structure-borne sound, their sensitivity to liquid- and airborne sound is so far not comparable with conventional capacitive microphones or piezoelectric hydrophones. Here, we present an all-optical acoustic sensor which relies on the detection of pressure-induced changes of the optical refractive index inside a rigid, millimeter-sized, fiber-coupled Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI). No mechanically movable or deformable parts take part in the signal transduction chain. Therefore, due to the absence of mechanical resonances, this sensing principle allows for high sensitivity as well as a flat frequency response over an extraordinary measurement bandwidth. As a fiber-coupled device, it can be integrated easily into already available distributed fiber-optic networks for geophysical sensing. We present characterization measurements demonstrating the sensitivity, frequency response and directivity of the device for sound and ultrasound detection in air and water. We show that low-frequency temperature and pressure drifts can be recorded in addition to acoustic sensing. Finally, selected application tests of the laser-based hydrophone and microphone implementation are presented.

  3. Optically detected magnetic resonance studies on π-conjugate polymers and novel carbon allotropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partee, Jonathan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    This report describes the following: introduction to photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR); introduction to π-conjugated systems; PLDMR measurements on poly(p-phenylene)-type ladder polymers; PLMDR measurements on poly(p-phenylene ethylene); and PLDMR measurements on C70, polythiophene, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) and Dan-40. Appendices to this report describe: Operation of ODMR (optically detected magnetic resonance) spectrometer; ODMR system parameters; and Special purpose circuitry.

  4. Precise and Rapid Detection of Optical Activity for Accumulative Femtosecond Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuernberger P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast and sensitive polarimeter combining common-path optical heterodyne interferometry and accumulative spectroscopy to detect rotatory power. The sensitivity of rotatory detection is determined to be 0.10 milli-degrees for a measurement time of only one second and an interaction length of 250 μm. Its suitability for femtosecond studies is demonstrated in a non-resonant two-photon photodissociation experiment.

  5. Monolithic integration of optical waveguides for absorbance detection in microfabricated electrophoresis devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Petersen, Nickolaj Jacob; Hübner, Jörg

    2001-01-01

    The fabrication and performance of an electrophoretic separation chip with integrated of optical waveguides for absorption detection is presented. The device was fabricated on a silicon substrate by standard microfabrication techniques with the use of two photolithographic mask steps. The wavegui.......2 mum rhodamine 110, 8 mum 2,7-dichlorofluorescein, 10 mum fluorescein and 18 mum 5-carboxyfluorescein was demonstrated on the device using the detection cell for absorption measurements at 488 nm....

  6. Validity of digital imaging of fiber-optic transillumination in caries detection on proximal tooth surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Laitala, M.-L. (Marja-Liisa); Piipari, L. (Liina); Sämpi, N. (Noora); Korhonen, M. (Maria); Pesonen, P. (Paula); Joensuu, T. (Tiina); Anttonen, V. (Vuokko)

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the validity of the digital imaging fiber-optic transillumination (DIFOTI) method in comparison with clinical visual examination (CV) and bitewing (BW) radiography on detecting caries lesions on proximal surfaces of teeth. Materials and Methods Proximal tooth surfaces of premolars and molars (n = 2,103) of 91 voluntary university students aged from 18 to 30 years were examined with CV, BW radiography, and the DIFOTI method. Results DIFOTI detecte...

  7. Optical spectra of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} monocrystalline films on Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (001) substrates in the 0.2-6 eV spectral range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kityk, I.V.; Burak, Ya.V.; Lutsiv, R.V.; Mervinskii, R.I.; Roter, V.E. [Franko Lvov State Univ. (Ukraine)

    1993-12-01

    Studies of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} films on Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} substrates showed that the excitation energy of plasmons related to free carriers is weakly anisotropic in the ab plane. The corresponding splitting (0.16 eV) is far less than that in crystals ({approx_equal}0.58 eV). The splitting of plasmons related to the valence electrons lies within 0.05-0.10 eV. The plasmon energies in films and in crystals are shifted by 0.5 eV. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  8. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel about Charging Their EV at Home?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Key Observations from the Survey of the EV Project Participants; In June 2013, 72% of EV Project participants were very satisfied with their home charging experience; 21% of participants relied totally on home charging for all of their charging needs; Volt owners relied more on home charging than Leaf owners, who reported more use of away-from-home charging; 74% of participants reported that they plug in their plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) every time they park at home. Others plugged in as they determined necessary to support their driving needs; 40% of participants reported that they would not have or are unsure that in June 2013 whether they would have purchased an alternating current (AC) Level 2 electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for home charging if it had not been provided by The EV Project; and 61% of participants reported that The EV Project incentive was very important or important in their decision to obtain a PEV.

  9. Porous silicon platform for optical detection of functionalized magnetic particles biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Pil Ju; Ishikawa, Ryousuke; Sohn, Honglae; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of porous materials are being exploited for a wide range of applications including optical biosensors, waveguides, gas sensors, micro capacitors, and solar cells. Here, we review the fast, easy and inexpensive electrochemical anodization based fabrication porous silicon (PSi) for optical biosensing using functionalized magnetic particles. Combining magnetically labeled biomolecules with PSi offers a rapid and one-step immunoassay and real-time detection by magnetic manipulation of superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) functionalized with target molecules onto corresponding probe molecules immobilized inside nano-pores of PSi. We first give an introduction to electrochemical and chemical etching procedures used to fabricate a wide range of PSi structures. Next, we describe the basic properties of PSi and underlying optical scattering mechanisms that govern their unique optical properties. Finally, we give examples of our experiments that demonstrate the potential of combining PSi and magnetic beads for real-time point of care diagnostics.

  10. Distributed optical fibre sensing for early detection of shallow landslides triggering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenato, Luca; Palmieri, Luca; Camporese, Matteo; Bersan, Silvia; Cola, Simonetta; Pasuto, Alessandro; Galtarossa, Andrea; Salandin, Paolo; Simonini, Paolo

    2017-10-31

    A distributed optical fibre sensing system is used to measure landslide-induced strains on an optical fibre buried in a large scale physical model of a slope. The fibre sensing cable is deployed at the predefined failure surface and interrogated by means of optical frequency domain reflectometry. The strain evolution is measured with centimetre spatial resolution until the occurrence of the slope failure. Standard legacy sensors measuring soil moisture and pore water pressure are installed at different depths and positions along the slope for comparison and validation. The evolution of the strain field is related to landslide dynamics with unprecedented resolution and insight. In fact, the results of the experiment clearly identify several phases within the evolution of the landslide and show that optical fibres can detect precursory signs of failure well before the collapse, paving the way for the development of more effective early warning systems.

  11. Full-field detection of surface defects using real-time holography and optical correlation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackshire, James L.; Duncan, Bradley D.

    1999-02-01

    Innovative optical NDE techniques are being developed for the full-field detection and evaluation of surface defects and defect precursors in titanium and aluminum based alloys. The techniques are based on frequency-translated holography and optical correlation principles, and use bacteriohodopsin (bR) holographic films and temporal correlation techniques for real-time storage and retrieval of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) features and embedded surface defect information. The SAW waves induced on the material surface being studied are made to interfere with optical light waves, and fringes are produced that are a function of optical Doppler shifts induced by phonon-photon interaction on the surface of the materials. Visualization of these SAW patterns allow for NDE characterization of features on and near the surface of the materials, including defect and defect precursor sites. Preliminary results are provided for real-time bR holographic recordings of acoustic patterns induced on Al2024-T3 material surfaces.

  12. High-Resolution "Fleezers": Dual-Trap Optical Tweezers Combined with Single-Molecule Fluorescence Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Kevin D; Comstock, Matthew J; Chemla, Yann R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in optical tweezers have greatly expanded their measurement capabilities. A new generation of hybrid instrument that combines nanomechanical manipulation with fluorescence detection-fluorescence optical tweezers, or "fleezers"-is providing a powerful approach to study complex macromolecular dynamics. Here, we describe a combined high-resolution optical trap/confocal fluorescence microscope that can simultaneously detect sub-nanometer displacements, sub-piconewton forces, and single-molecule fluorescence signals. The primary technical challenge to these hybrid instruments is how to combine both measurement modalities without sacrificing the sensitivity of either one. We present general design principles to overcome this challenge and provide detailed, step-by-step instructions to implement them in the construction and alignment of the instrument. Lastly, we present a set of protocols to perform a simple, proof-of-principle experiment that highlights the instrument capabilities.

  13. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  14. Fiber-Based Polarization Diversity Detection for Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Pahlevaninezhad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new fiber-based polarization diversity detection (PDD scheme for polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT. This implementation uses a new custom miniaturized polarization-maintaining fiber coupler with single mode (SM fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the two orthogonal OCT polarization channels prior to interference while the PM fiber outputs ensure defined orthogonal axes after interference. Advantages of this detection scheme over those with bulk optics PDD include lower cost, easier miniaturization, and more relaxed alignment and handling issues. We incorporate this PDD scheme into a galvanometer-scanned OCT system to demonstrate system calibration and PSOCT imaging of an achromatic quarter-wave plate, fingernail in vivo, and chicken breast, salmon, cow leg, and basa fish muscle samples ex vivo.

  15. Time-resolved, optically detected NMR of fluids at high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliero, Daniela; Dong, Wei; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2010-10-01

    We report on the use of optical Faraday rotation to monitor the nuclear-spin signal in a set of model F19- and H1-rich fluids. Our approach integrates optical detection with high-field, pulsed NMR so as to record the time-resolved evolution of nuclear-spins after rf excitation. Comparison of chemical-shift-resolved resonances allows us to set order-of-magnitude constrains on the relative amplitudes of hyperfine coupling constants for different bonding geometries. When evaluated against coil induction, the present detection modality suffers from poorer sensitivity, but improvement could be attained via multipass schemes. Because illumination is off-resonant i.e., the medium is optically transparent, this methodology could find extensions in a broad class of fluids and soft condensed matter systems.

  16. Realization of a fiber optic sensor detecting the presence of a liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, B.; Łakomski, M.; Nowogrodzki, K.

    2016-11-01

    Over the past thirty years, optical fibers have revolutionized the telecommunication market. Fiber optics play also important roles in other numerous applications. One of these applications is fiber sensing - very fast developing area. In this paper, realization of different configurations of a fiber optic sensor detecting the presence of liquid is presented. In the presented sensor, two multimode fibers (MMF) are placed opposite each other, where the first one transmits the light radiation, while the second one is a receiver. Due to the small size of the core (50 μm diameter), they had to be precisely positioned. Therefore the optical fibers were placed in the etched channels in the silicon substrate. In order to make sensors more sensitive, ball-lensed optical fibers were used. Four different diameters of lenses were examined. Sensitivity to the presence of liquids was compared in all realized sensors. Moreover, the influence of distance between the transmitting and receiving optical fiber on the received optical power is also described in this paper. All developed sensors were tested at 1300 nm wavelength. In the last part of this paper the detailed discussion is given.

  17. Avastamata aarete päev

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Ettevõtluse Arendamise Sihtasutus korraldas Pirita Lillepaviljonis Euroopa Komisjoni ning majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniministeeriumi toetusel 27. mail 2009 Avastamata aarete päeva. Päev oli pühendatud Eesti looduse väärtustamisele. Sõna võtsid EAS Turismiarenduskeskuse direktori asetäitja Marje Braunbrück, looduse- ja rännumees Hendrik Relve, Tallinna Ülikooli rekreatsiooniteaduste osakonna juhataja Mart Reimann ja reisikorraldaja Gerald Broddelez

  18. Tantsupäev toob auhinnad

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Rahvusvahelisel tantsupäeval, 29. apr., jõuab Kanuti Gildi saalis maailmaesietenduseni S. Pepeljajevi ja tema uue nimega trupi - teater APART - tantsulavastus "Uksed", millele järgneb Philip Morrise tantsuauhindade tseremoonia. Rahvusvahelist tantsupäeva tähistatakse maailmas 1982.a., päev on valitud prantsuse ballettmeistri J.-G. Noverre'i sünnikuupäeva järgi

  19. Optical Manipulation and Detection of Emergent Phenomena in Topological Insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedik, Nuh [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2017-02-17

    The three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) is a new quantum phase of matter that exhibits quantum-Hall-like properties, even in the absence of an external magnetic field. These materials are insulators in the bulk but have a topologically protected conducting state at the surface. Charge carriers on these surface states behave like a two-dimensional gas of massless helical Dirac fermions for which the spin is ideally locked perpendicular to the momentum. The purpose of this project is to probe the unique collective electronic behaviors of topological insulators by developing and using advanced time resolved spectroscopic techniques with state-of-the-art temporal and spatial resolutions. The nature of these materials requires development of specialized ultrafast techniques (such as time resolved ARPES that also has spin detection capability, ultrafast electron diffraction that has sub-100 fs time resolution and THz magneto-spectroscopy). The focus of this report is to detail our achievements in terms of establishing state of the art experimental facilities. Below, we will describe achievements under this award for the entire duration of five years. We will focus on detailing the development of ultrafast technqiues here. The details of the science that was done with these technqiues can be found in the publications referencing this grant.

  20. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ...) in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES) data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process...

  1. Manufacturing and testing flexible microfluidic devices with optical and electrical detection mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivan, M.G.; Vivet, F.; Meinders, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Flexible microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were manufactured by soft lithography, and tested in detection of ionic species using optical absorption spectroscopy and electrical measurements. PDMS was chosen due to its flexibility and ease of surface modification by exposure

  2. Coherent detection passive optical access network enabling converged delivery of broadcast and dedicated broadband services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Prince, Kamau; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil

    2011-01-01

    We propose a passive optical network architecture based on coherent detection for converged delivery of broadcast services from a dedicated remote broadcast server and user-specific services from a local central office. We experimentally demonstrate this architecture with mixed traffic types, wav...

  3. COHERENT DETECTION FOR SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE-CODED OPTICAL LABEL SWITCHING SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Coherent detection for spectrally encoded optical labels is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for three label tones spectrally spaced at 1 GHz. The proposed method utilizes a frequency swept local oscillator in a coherent receiver supported by digital signal processing for improved flexibi...

  4. Spectral-domain optical coherence reflectometric sensor for highly sensitive molecular detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joo, C.; de Boer, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe what we believe to be a novel use of spectral-domain optical coherence reflectometry (SD-OCR) for highly sensitive molecular detection in real time. The SD-OCR sensor allows identification of a sensor surface of interest in an OCR depth scan and monitoring the phase alteration due to

  5. High Sensitivity Detection of Broadband Acoustic Vibration Using Optical Demodulation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Measuring the high frequency acoustic vibrations represents the fundamental interest in revealing the intrinsic dynamic characteristic of board range of systems, such as the growth of the fetus, blood flow in human palms, and vibrations of carbon nanotube. However, the acoustic wave detection capability is limited by the detection bandwidth and sensitivity of the commonly used piezoelectric based ultrasound detectors. To overcome these limitations, this thesis focuses on exploring the optical demodulation method for highly sensitive detection of broadband acoustic vibration. First, a transparent optical ultrasonic detector has been developed using micro-ring resonator (MRR) made of soft polymeric materials. It outperforms the traditional piezoelectric detectors with broader detection bandwidth, miniaturized size and wide angular sensitivity. Its ease of integration into photoacoustic microscopy system has resulted in the great improvement of the imaging resolution. A theoretic framework has been developed to establish the quantitative understanding of its unique distance and angular dependent detection characteristics and was subsequently validated experimentally. The developed theoretic framework provides a guideline to fully accounts for the trade-offs between axial and lateral resolution, working distance, and the field of view in developing optimal imaging performance for a wide range of biological and clinical applications. MRR-based ultrasonic detector is further integrated into confocal fluorescence microscopy to realize the simultaneous imaging of fluorescence and optical absorption of retinal pigment epithelium, achieving multi-contrast imaging at sub-cellular level. The needs to resolve the fine details of the biological specimen with the resolution beyond the diffraction limit further motivate the development of optical demodulated ultrasonic detection method based on near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM). The nano-focusing probe was developed

  6. All-optical differential detection for suppressing multiple-access interference in coherent time-addressed optical CDMA systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Tae-Young; Park, Chul; Park, Chang-Soo; Chun, Young

    2004-05-03

    A novel scheme for suppressing the multiple-access interference (MAI) in coherent time-addressed optical CDMA systems is proposed. This is based on a differential detection using the dual-control NOLM. The basic principle for MAI suppression is described. For experimental demonstration, two encoded channels are constructed and decoded. These decoded signals are sent to the dual-control NOLM and a high autocorrelation peak with suppressed MAI at the output of NOLM is observed. Signal-to-interference ratio is improved by 7 dB.

  7. Emerging Cytokine Biosensors with Optical Detection Modalities and Nanomaterial-Enabled Signal Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein biomarkers, especially cytokines, play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide spectrum of diseases. Therefore, a critical need for advanced cytokine sensors has been rapidly growing and will continue to expand to promote clinical testing, new biomarker development, and disease studies. In particular, sensors employing transduction principles of various optical modalities have emerged as the most common means of detection. In typical cytokine assays which are based on the binding affinities between the analytes of cytokines and their specific antibodies, optical schemes represent the most widely used mechanisms, with some serving as the gold standard against which all existing and new sensors are benchmarked. With recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology, many of the recently emerging technologies for cytokine detection exploit various forms of nanomaterials for improved sensing capabilities. Nanomaterials have been demonstrated to exhibit exceptional optical properties unique to their reduced dimensionality. Novel sensing approaches based on the newly identified properties of nanomaterials have shown drastically improved performances in both the qualitative and quantitative analyses of cytokines. This article brings together the fundamentals in the literature that are central to different optical modalities developed for cytokine detection. Recent advancements in the applications of novel technologies are also discussed in terms of those that enable highly sensitive and multiplexed cytokine quantification spanning a wide dynamic range. For each highlighted optical technique, its current detection capabilities as well as associated challenges are discussed. Lastly, an outlook for nanomaterial-based cytokine sensors is provided from the perspective of optimizing the technologies for sensitivity and multiplexity as well as promoting widespread adaptations of the emerging optical techniques by lowering high

  8. Development of dithizone based fibre optic evanescent wave sensor for heavy metal ion detection in aqueous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, K.; Prabhu, R.; Pollard, P.

    2013-06-01

    Detection of highly toxic heavy metal ions requires rapid, simple, sensitive and selective detection methods in the environment. Optical fibre based sensing facilitates the remote, continuous and in-situ detection approaches in the environment. Herein, we report the development of a dithizone based fibre optic sensor with a simple procedure to detect heavy metal ions in the aqueous environment using an evanescent wave sensing approach. The chromogenic ligand dithizone and its spectral specificity with metal ions has been elaborated in this work.

  9. Co-circulation of multiple subtypes of enterovirus A71 (EV- A71) genotype C, including novel recombinants characterised by use of whole genome sequencing (WGS), Denmark 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Sofie E; Nielsen, Astrid G; Trebbien, Ramona; Poulsen, Mille W; Andersen, Peter H; Fischer, Thea K

    2017-06-29

    In Europe, enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) has primarily been associated with sporadic cases of neurological disease. The recent emergence of new genotypes and larger outbreaks with severely ill patients demonstrates a potential for the spread of new, highly pathogenic EV-A71 strains. Detection and characterisation of these new emerging EV variants is challenging as standard EV assays may not be adequate, necessitating the use of whole genome analysis. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  10. Co-circulation of multiple subtypes of enterovirus A71 (EV- A71) genotype C, including novel recombinants characterised by use of whole genome sequencing (WGS), Denmark 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midgley, Sofie E; Nielsen, Astrid G; Trebbien, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) has primarily been associated with sporadic cases of neurological disease. The recent emergence of new genotypes and larger outbreaks with severely ill patients demonstrates a potential for the spread of new, highly pathogenic EV-A71 strains. Detection...... and characterisation of these new emerging EV variants is challenging as standard EV assays may not be adequate, necessitating the use of whole genome analysis....

  11. Optical properties of materials at low temperature and their application to optical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Tarchi, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    A lumped model to represent the photodielectric effect is developed. An analog simulation for a sample in a microwave cavity with a static magnetic field is developed. A system to measure continuously the PDE is analyzed. A performance factor to compared PD detectors versus ac photoconductors is computed. The operating conditions are defined for the appropriate noise conditions. The detectivity of the detector is found to be limited by the semiconductor sample noise.

  12. Sensitivity Comparison of Vapor Trace Detection of Explosives Based on Chemo-Mechanical Sensing with Optical Detection and Capacitive Sensing with Electronic Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Strle

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a comparison of the sensitivities for vapour trace detection of Trinitrotoluene (TNT explosives of two different sensor systems: a chemo-mechanical sensor based on chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM cantilevers based on Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS technology with optical detection (CMO, and a miniature system based on capacitive detection of chemically functionalized planar capacitors with interdigitated electrodes with a comb-like structure with electronic detection (CE. In both cases (either CMO or CE, the sensor surfaces are chemically functionalized with a layer of APhS (trimethoxyphenylsilane molecules, which give the strongest sensor response for TNT. The construction and calibration of a vapour generator is also presented. The measurements of the sensor response to TNT are performed under equal conditions for both systems, and the results show that CE system with ultrasensitive electronics is far superior to optical detection using MEMS. Using CMO system, we can detect 300 molecules of TNT in 10+12 molecules of N2 carrier gas, whereas the CE system can detect three molecules of TNT in 10+12 molecules of carrier N2.

  13. Sensitivity Comparison of Vapor Trace Detection of Explosives Based on Chemo-Mechanical Sensing with Optical Detection and Capacitive Sensing with Electronic Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strle, Drago; Štefane, Bogdan; Zupanič, Erik; Trifkovič, Mario; Maček, Marijan; Jakša, Gregor; Kvasič, Ivan; Muševič, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The article offers a comparison of the sensitivities for vapour trace detection of Trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosives of two different sensor systems: a chemo-mechanical sensor based on chemically modified Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers based on Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology with optical detection (CMO), and a miniature system based on capacitive detection of chemically functionalized planar capacitors with interdigitated electrodes with a comb-like structure with electronic detection (CE). In both cases (either CMO or CE), the sensor surfaces are chemically functionalized with a layer of APhS (trimethoxyphenylsilane) molecules, which give the strongest sensor response for TNT. The construction and calibration of a vapour generator is also presented. The measurements of the sensor response to TNT are performed under equal conditions for both systems, and the results show that CE system with ultrasensitive electronics is far superior to optical detection using MEMS. Using CMO system, we can detect 300 molecules of TNT in 10+12 molecules of N2 carrier gas, whereas the CE system can detect three molecules of TNT in 10+12 molecules of carrier N2. PMID:24977388

  14. Optical fiber strain sensor for application in intelligent intruder detection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stańczyk, Tomasz; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Bienkowska, Beata; Kunicki, Daniel; Murawski, Michal; Mergo, Pawel; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays technology allows to create highly effective Intruder Detection Systems (IDS), that are able to detect the presence of an intruder within a defined area. In such systems the best performance can be achieved by combining different detection techniques in one system. One group of devices that can be applied in an IDS, are devices based on Fiber Optic Sensors (FOS). The FOS benefits from numerous advantages of optical fibers like: small size, light weight or high sensitivity. In this work we present a novel Microstructured Optical Fiber (MOF) characterized by increased strain sensitivity dedicated to distributed acoustic sensing for intelligent intruder detection systems. By designing the MOF with large air holes in close proximity to a fiber core, we increased the effective refractive index sensitivity to longitudinal strain. The presented fiber can be easily integrated in a floor system in order to detect any movement in the investigated area. We believe that sensors, based on the presented MOF, due to its numerous advantages, can find application in intelligent IDS.

  15. Exploring machine-learning-based control plane intrusion detection techniques in software defined optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huibin; Wang, Yuqiao; Chen, Haoran; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie

    2017-12-01

    In software defined optical networks (SDON), the centralized control plane may encounter numerous intrusion threatens which compromise the security level of provisioned services. In this paper, the issue of control plane security is studied and two machine-learning-based control plane intrusion detection techniques are proposed for SDON with properly selected features such as bandwidth, route length, etc. We validate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed techniques by simulations. Results show an accuracy of 83% for intrusion detection can be achieved with the proposed machine-learning-based control plane intrusion detection techniques.

  16. Optical-digital detection of dents and scratches on specular metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippincott, H W; Stark, H

    1982-08-15

    An optical-digital approach to the problem of automatic detection of dents and scratches on specular or semispecular surfaces is presented. The method uses the optical reflecting properties of dents and scratches to locate and detect them. Dents are found by a grid projection and encoding technique; scratches are found by using the property that diffuse reflectors scatter over a wider angle (Lambert's law) than specular ones and, therefore, seem brighter when viewed at certain angles. The procedure for finding dents and scratches was found to be very robust: dents as small as 1% of the viewed field and 0.0053 cm (0.0021 in.) deep and scratches as small as 0.003 cm (0.001 in.) wide and 0.00064 cm (0.00025 in.) deep and of variable minimum length were easily detected using nonspecially prepared samples.

  17. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  18. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  19. Detection of wavelengths in the visible range using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Leonardo; Morales, Yailteh; Mattos, Lorenzo; Torres, Cesar O.

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows the design and implementation of a fiber optic sensor for detecting and identifying wavelengths in the visible range. The system consists of a diffuse optical fiber, a conventional laser diode 650nm, 2.5mW of power, an ambient light sensor LX1972, a PIC 18F2550 and LCD screen for viewing. The principle used in the detection of the lambda is based on specular reflection and absorption. The optoelectronic device designed and built used the absorption and reflection properties of the material under study, having as active optical medium a bifurcated optical fiber, which is optically coupled to an ambient light sensor, which makes the conversion of light signals to electricas, procedure performed by a microcontroller, which acquires and processes the signal. To verify correct operation of the assembly were utilized the color cards of sewing thread and nail polish as samples for analysis. This optoelectronic device can be used in many applications such as quality control of industrial processes, classification of corks or bottle caps, color quality of textiles, sugar solutions, polymers and food among others.

  20. Re-configurable digital receiver for optically envelope detected half cycle BPSK and MSK radio-on-fiber signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko

    2011-01-01

    We present the first known integration of a digital receiver into optically envelope detection radio-on-fiber systems. We also present a re-configurable scheme for two different types of optically envelope detected wireless signals while keeping the complexity of used optical components low. Our ......-shift-keying and 104.17 Mbit/s minimum-shift-keying radio-frequency modulated signals after 30 km of fiber transmission....

  1. Reconfigurable intensity modulation and direct detection optical transceivers for variable-rate wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical networks utilizing digital signal processing-based symbol mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Bingbing; Chen, Yanxu; Chen, Xue

    2017-01-01

    Variable-rate intensity modulation and direct detection-based optical transceivers with software-controllable reconfigurability and transmission performance adaptability are experimentally demonstrated, utilizing M-QAM symbol mapping implemented in MATLAB® programs. A frequency division multiplexing-based symbol demapping and wavelength management method is proposed for the symbol demapper and tunable laser management used in colorless optical network unit.

  2. Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R. [Science & Engineering Associates, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an integrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface. This site characterization tool will use an optical fiber cable assembly which delivers high power laser energy to vaporize and excite a sample in-situ and return the emission spectrum from the plasma produced for chemical analysis. The chemical analysis technique, often referred to as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), has recently shown to be an effective method for the quantitative analysis of contaminants soils. By integrating the fiber optic sensor with the cone penetrometer, we anticipate that the resultant system will enable in-situ, low cost, high resolution, real-time subsurface characterization of numerous heavy metal soil contaminants simultaneously. There are several challenges associated with the integration of the LIBS sensor and cone penetrometer. One challenge is to design an effective means of optically accessing the soil via the fiber probe in the penetrometer. A second challenge is to develop the fiber probe system such that the resultant emission signal is adequate for quantitative analysis. Laboratory techniques typically use free space delivery of the laser to the sample. The high laser powers used in the laboratory cannot be used with optical fibers, therefore, the effectiveness of the LIBS system at the laser powers acceptable to fiber delivery must be evaluated. The primary objectives for this project are: (1) Establish that a fiber optic LIBS technique can be used to detect heavy metals to the required concentration levels; (2) Design and fabricate a fiber optic probe for integration with the penetrometer system for the analysis of heavy metals in soil samples; (3) Design, fabricate, and test an integrated fiber/penetrometer system; (4) Fabricate a rugged, field deployable laser source and detection hardware system; and (6) Demonstrate the prototype in field deployments.

  3. Robust Non-Local TV-L1 Optical Flow Estimation with Occlusion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxuan; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Mingrun; Li, Ming; Jiang, Shaofeng

    2017-06-05

    In this paper, we propose a robust non-local TV-L1 optical flow method with occlusion detection to address the problem of weak robustness of optical flow estimation with motion occlusion. Firstly, a TV-L1 form for flow estimation is defined using a combination of the brightness constancy and gradient constancy assumptions in the data term and by varying the weight under the Charbonnier function in the smoothing term. Secondly, to handle the potential risk of the outlier in the flow field, a general non-local term is added in the TV-L1 optical flow model to engender the typical non-local TV-L1 form. Thirdly, an occlusion detection method based on triangulation is presented to detect the occlusion regions of the sequence. The proposed non-local TV-L1 optical flow model is performed in a linearizing iterative scheme using improved median filtering and a coarse-to-fine computing strategy. The results of the complex experiment indicate that the proposed method can overcome the significant influence of non-rigid motion, motion occlusion, and large displacement motion. Results of experiments comparing the proposed method and existing state-of-the-art methods by respectively using Middlebury and MPI Sintel database test sequences show that the proposed method has higher accuracy and better robustness.

  4. Ship Detection and Classification on Optical Remote Sensing Images Using Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ying

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ship detection and classification is critical for national maritime security and national defense. Although some SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar image-based ship detection approaches have been proposed and used, they are not able to satisfy the requirement of real-world applications as the number of SAR sensors is limited, the resolution is low, and the revisit cycle is long. As massive optical remote sensing images of high resolution are available, ship detection and classification on theses images is becoming a promising technique, and has attracted great attention on applications including maritime security and traffic control. Some digital image processing methods have been proposed to detect ships in optical remote sensing images, but most of them face difficulty in terms of accuracy, performance and complexity. Recently, an autoencoder-based deep neural network with extreme learning machine was proposed, but it cannot meet the requirement of real-world applications as it only works with simple and small-scaled data sets. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel ship detection and classification approach which utilizes deep convolutional neural network (CNN as the ship classifier. The performance of our proposed ship detection and classification approach was evaluated on a set of images downloaded from Google Earth at the resolution 0.5m. 99% detection accuracy and 95% classification accuracy were achieved. In model training, 75× speedup is achieved on 1 Nvidia Titanx GPU.

  5. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  6. Damage detection of satellite structures by optical fiber with small diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashima, Shigenori; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Nobuo

    2000-06-01

    Although there have been many researches concerning health monitoring system in the aerospace field, most of such researches relate to aircraft; there are only few that relate to satellite structures. This research first points out merit of the health monitoring system. The health monitoring system usually utilizes optical fiber sensor of which the diameter is 125 micrometer. However, such fiber sensors tend to be perceived as obstacles within the structure, which affects the soundness of the structure. This is especially the case in satellite structure, which utilizes especially thin composite laminates. In view of this problem, this study utilizes small diameter optical fiber, which is less likely to affect the soundness of the structure. The optical fiber is 40 micrometer in cladding diameter, and is embedded in the composite laminate structure. The structure and the optical fiber have been visually observed. Also, tensile test has been conducted on the structure. The result of the study indicates that the small diameter optical fiber can be embedded in the structure without affecting the soundness of the structure. The study further found that compressive destruction of a face sheet of a honeycomb sandwich panel having thin face sheets can be detected by utilizing this optical fiber.

  7. Microsecond fiber laser pumped, single-frequency optical parametric oscillator for trace gas detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barria, Jessica Barrientos; Roux, Sophie; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Lefebvre, Michel

    2013-07-01

    We report on the first microsecond doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). It is based on a nested cavity OPO architecture allowing single longitudinal mode operation and low oscillation threshold (few microjoule). The combination with a master oscillator-power amplifier fiber pump laser provides a versatile optical source widely tunable in the 3.3-3.5 μm range with an adjustable pulse repetition rate (from 40 to 100 kHz), high duty cycle (~10(-2)) and mean power (up to 25 mW in the idler beam). The potential for trace gas sensing applications is demonstrated through photoacoustic detection of atmospheric methane.

  8. Structure detection in a libration vibration spectrum of water molecules by methods of nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babenko, V A; Sychev, Andrei A [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-30

    In exciting water possessing an enhanced optical strength by the radiation of a YAG : Nd{sup 3+} laser with 20-ps pulses, nonlinear scattering of light was detected in the frequency range of the optical second harmonic. A relationship was established of the signal of the nonlinear scattering with a stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of the laser radiation in water. Near the SRS threshold, the structure was observed in the spectrum of nonlinear scattering, which is related to intermolecular libration vibrations of water molecules. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Fiber optic quench detection via optimized Rayleigh Scattering in high-field YBCO accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, Gene [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-02-17

    Yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) coated conductors are known for their ability to operate in the superconducting state at relatively high temperatures, even above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K). When these same conductors are operated at lower temperatures, they are able to operate in much higher magnetic fields than traditional superconductors like NiTi or Nb3Sn. Thus, YBCO superconducting magnets are one of the primary options for generating the high magnetic fields needed for future high energy physics devices. Due to slow quench propagation, quench detection remains one of the primary limitations to YBCO magnets. Fiber optic sensing, based upon Rayleigh scattering, has the potential for spatial resolution approaching the wavelength of light, or very fast temporal resolution at low spatial resolution, and a continuum of combinations in between. This project has studied, theoretically and experimentally, YBCO magnets and Rayleigh scattering quench detection systems to demonstrate feasibility of the systems for YBCO quench protection systems. Under this grant an experimentally validated 3D quench propagation model was used to accurately define the acceptable range of spatial and temporal resolutions for effective quench detection in YBCO magnets and to evaluate present-day and potentially improved YBCO conductors. The data volume and speed requirements for quench detection via Rayleigh scattering required the development of a high performance fiber optic based quench detection/data acquisition system and its integration with an existing voltage tap/thermo-couple based system. In this project, optical fibers are tightly co-wound into YBCO magnet coils, with the fiber on top of the conductor as turn-to-turn insulation. Local changes in the temperature or strain of the conductor are sensed by the optical fiber, which is in close thermal and mechanical contact with the conductor. Intrinsic imperfections in the fiber reflect Rayleigh

  10. Multifunctional microfluidic chip for optical nanoprobe based RNA detection - application to Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Pedro Urbano; Vinhas, Raquel; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Birol, Semra Zuhal; Trabzon, Levent; Bernacka-Wojcik, Iwona; Igreja, Rui; Lopes, Paulo; Baptista, Pedro Viana; Águas, Hugo; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo

    2018-01-10

    Many diseases have their treatment options narrowed and end up being fatal if detected during later stages. As a consequence, point-of-care devices have an increasing importance for routine screening applications in the health sector due to their portability, fast analyses and decreased cost. For that purpose, a multifunctional chip was developed and tested using gold nanoprobes to perform RNA optical detection inside a microfluidic chip without the need of molecular amplification steps. As a proof-of-concept, this device was used for the rapid detection of chronic myeloid leukemia, a hemato-oncological disease that would benefit from early stage diagnostics and screening tests. The chip passively mixed target RNA from samples, gold nanoprobes and saline solution to infer a result from their final colorimetric properties. An optical fiber network was used to evaluate its transmitted spectra inside the chip. Trials provided accurate output results within 3 min, yielding signal-to-noise ratios up to 9 dB. When compared to actual state-of-art screening techniques of chronic myeloid leukemia, these results were, at microscale, at least 10 times faster than the reported detection methods for chronic myeloid leukemia. Concerning point-of-care applications, this work paves the way for other new and more complex versions of optical based genosensors.

  11. Intrinsic Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors for Subsurface Detection of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jesus [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. has developed distributed intrinsic fiber optic sensors to directly quantify the concentration of dissolved or gas-phase CO2 for leak detection or plume migration in carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). The capability of the sensor for highly sensitive detection of CO2 in the pressure and temperature range of 15 to 2,000 psi and 25°C to 175°C was demonstrated, as was the capability of operating in highly corrosive and contaminated environments such as those often found in CO2 injection sites. The novel sensor system was for the first time demonstrated deployed in a deep well, detecting multiple CO2 releases, in real time, at varying depths. Early CO2 release detection, by means of a sensor cable integrating multiple sensor segments, was demonstrated, as was the capability of quantifying the leak. The novel fiber optic sensor system exhibits capabilities not achieved by any other monitoring technology. This project represents a breakthrough in monitoring capabilities for CCS applications.

  12. Breast cancer detection based on time reversal and the optical theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Tu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    We report a wave physics-based approach to change detection which can be used to detect anomalies in biological tissues such as cancer lesions from active sensing data. Of particular interest are nonionizing radiation methods such as microwave breast imaging, ultrasound imaging, and diffuse optical tomography. The biological medium surrounding the target of interest, e.g., a tumor, is assumed to be highly nonhomogeneous and reverberating. This implies that there are in general multiple paths for the propagation of wave signals from an interior domain where the target of interest is located to the sensing aperture where the scattered fields are measured. Two physical concepts are used to exploit this rich multipath environment so as to enhance change detection performance: wave time reversal, and the optical theorem which describes energy conservation in scattering phenomena. Previous related work has reported the use of time reversal for breast cancer detection. We use not only time reversal, but also the optical theorem, and propose novel algorithms based on both.

  13. Implementing and testing a fiber-optic polarization-based intrusion detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj, Rasha El; MacDonald, Gregory; Verma, Pramode; Huck, Robert

    2015-09-01

    We describe a layer-1-based intrusion detection system for fiber-optic-based networks. Layer-1-based intrusion detection represents a significant elevation in security as it prohibits an adversary from obtaining information in the first place (no cryptanalysis is possible). We describe the experimental setup of the intrusion detection system, which is based on monitoring the behavior of certain attributes of light both in unperturbed and perturbed optical fiber links. The system was tested with optical fiber links of various lengths and types, under different environmental conditions, and under changes in fiber geometry similar to what is experienced during tapping activity. Comparison of the results for perturbed and unperturbed links has shown that the state of polarization is more sensitive to intrusion activity than the degree of polarization or power of the received light. The testing was conducted in a simulated telecommunication network environment that included both underground and aerial links. The links were monitored for intrusion activity. Attempts to tap the link were easily detected with no apparent degradation in the visual quality of the real-time surveillance video.

  14. Laser Optical Sensor, a Label-Free On-Plate Salmonella enterica Colony Detection Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Atul K.; Bettasso, Amanda M.; Bae, Euiwon; Rajwa, Bartek; Dundar, Murat M.; Forster, Mark D.; Liu, Lixia; Barrett, Brent; Lovchik, Judith; Robinson, J. Paul; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the application capabilities of a laser optical sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scatter technology) to generate differentiating scatter patterns for the 20 most frequently reported serovars of Salmonella enterica. Initially, the study tested the classification ability of BARDOT by using six Salmonella serovars grown on brain heart infusion, brilliant green, xylose lysine deoxycholate, and xylose lysine tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar plates. Highly accurate discrimination (95.9%) was obtained by using scatter signatures collected from colonies grown on XLT4. Further verification used a total of 36 serovars (the top 20 plus 16) comprising 123 strains with classification precision levels of 88 to 100%. The similarities between the optical phenotypes of strains analyzed by BARDOT were in general agreement with the genotypes analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). BARDOT was evaluated for the real-time detection and identification of Salmonella colonies grown from inoculated (1.2 × 102 CFU/30 g) peanut butter, chicken breast, and spinach or from naturally contaminated meat. After a sequential enrichment in buffered peptone water and modified Rappaport Vassiliadis broth for 4 h each, followed by growth on XLT4 (~16 h), BARDOT detected S. Typhimurium with 84% accuracy in 24 h, returning results comparable to those of the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service method, which requires ~72 h. BARDOT also detected Salmonella (90 to 100% accuracy) in the presence of background microbiota from naturally contaminated meat, verified by 16S rRNA sequencing and PFGE. Prolonged residence (28 days) of Salmonella in peanut butter did not affect the bacterial ability to form colonies with consistent optical phenotypes. This study shows BARDOT’s potential for nondestructive and high-throughput detection of Salmonella in food samples. PMID:24496794

  15. Ultrasensitive optical detection of trinitrotoluene by ethylenediamine-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dongyue; Liu, Honglin; Qian, Kai; Zhou, Xia; Yang, Liangbao; Liu, Jinhuai

    2012-09-26

    This study found that 1,2-ethylenediamine (EDA) as a primary amine could be modified onto the surface of citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), and the EDA-capped Au NPs were successfully used as an ultrasensitive optical probe for TNT detection. The strong donor-acceptor (D-A) interactions between EDA and trinitrotoluene (TNT) at the Au NP/solution interface induced significant aggregation of the EDA-capped Au NPs, and enabled to easily realize the direct colorimetric detection of ultratrace TNT. The results showed that such a color change was readily seen by the naked eye, and the colorimetric detection could be down to 400 pM level of TNT with excellent discrimination against other nitro compounds. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy was used to examine the TNT-induced changes in local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of EDA-capped Au NPs, and a new LSPR band at ca. 630 nm arose along with the addition of TNT, which produced a detection limit of TNT down to ca. 40 pM. Furthermore, dynamic light scattering measurements evidenced the ultratrace TNT-induced small changes in the size of the EDA-capped Au NPs, and realized the quick and accurate detection of TNT in 0.4 pM level. These results demonstrated the ultrahigh sensitivity of this optical probe for TNT detection. Moreover, this optical probe is sample, stable, low-cost, and these excellent properties make it quite promising for infield and rapid detection of TNT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Defect Detection in Pipes using a Mobile Laser-Optics Technology and Digital Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tezerjani Abbasali Dehghan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for defect detection in pipes using a mobile laser-optics technology and conventional digital-geometry-based image processing techniques. The laser-optics consists of a laser that projects a line onto the pipe’s surface, and an omnidirectional camera. It can be mounted on a pipe crawling robot for conducting continuous inspection. The projected laser line will be seen as a half-oval in the image. When the laser line passes over defected points, the image moments on the pixel information would change. We propose a B-spline curve fitting on the digitally-convoluted image and a curvature estimation algorithm to detect the defects from the image. Defect sizes of 2 mm or larger can be detected using this method in pipes of up to 24 inch in diameter. The proposed sensor can detect 180-degree (i.e., upper half surface of the pipe. By turning the sensor 180 degrees, one will be able to detect the other half (i.e., lower half of the pipe’s surface. While, 360-degree laser rings are available commercially, but they did not provide the intensity needed for our experimentation. We also propose a fast boundary extraction algorithm for real time detection of defects, where a trace of consecutive images are used to track the image features. Tests were carried out on PVC and steel pipes.

  17. Common-mode noise reduction in an atomic spin gyroscope using optical differential detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lihong; Quan, Wei; Jiang, Liwei; Fan, Wenfeng; Ding, Ming; Hu, Zhaohui; Fang, Jiancheng

    2017-09-20

    Optical rotation of linearly polarized light is used to measure atom spin precession in an atomic spin gyroscope (ASG). However, the common-mode noise in the polarization measurement seriously affects the performance of the sensitive ASG. Here we propose an optical differential detection method based on the photoelastic polarization modulation, which could effectively eliminate the light power fluctuation of the laser source and optical elements, while removing the polarization noise and the residual birefringence. The feasibility and efficiency of this method have been verified experimentally. The rotation sensitivity of the ASG is an order of magnitude better, and the long-time stability is significantly improved. In addition, this method is easier to implement because noise sources do not need to be strictly distinguished.

  18. Detection of delamination defect in honeycomb plate by optical NDV: Thermography and ESPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Soo; Choi, Man Yong; Park, Jung Hak [KISS, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Koung Suk [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    This paper describes optical nondestructive testing technique for honeycomb composite material, which has been used as structural material in aeronautics and space transportation. The inspection of honeycomb composite structure by conventional NDT technique remains on a difficult and complex field. Optical NDT can give a solution about the limitation. Optical NDT basically provides non-contact, whole-field inspection and easy interpretation. Representative techniques are X-ray, Thermography, Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry(ESPI), Shearography, Neutron Radiography and so on. They each have strength and weakness in a preparation of sys tem, a field application and a kind of object. Thermography and ESPI in this paper are applied to detect an artificial defect with diameter 30 mm and a delamination defect by impact inside of honeycomb composite plate, which consist of aluminum core and carbon fiber reinforced plate skin. Inspection conditions in experiment are compared with each other and results are discussed.

  19. Detection of delamination defect in honeycomb plate by optical NDV: Thermography and ESPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ki Soo; Choi, Man Yong; Park, Jung Hak [KISS, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Koung Suk [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    This paper describes optical nondestructive testing technique for honeycomb composite material, which has been used as structural material in aeronautics and space transportation. The inspection of honeycomb composite structure by conventional NDT technique remains on a difficult and complex field. Optical NDT can give a solution about the limitation. Optical NDT basically provides non-contact, whole-field inspection and easy interpretation. Representative techniques are X-ray, Thermography, Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry(ESPI), Shearography, Neutron Radiography and so on. They each have strength and weakness in a preparation of system, a field application and a kind of object. Thermography and ESPI in this paper are applied to detect an artificial defect with diameter 30 mm and a delamination defect by impact inside of honeycomb composite plate, which consist of aluminum core and carbon fiber reinforced plate skin. Inspection conditions in experiment are compared with each other and results are discussed.

  20. LHC Optics Measurement with Proton Tracks Detected by the Roman Pots of the TOTEM Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, Frigyes J

    2015-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the beam optics at the LHC is crucial to fulfill the physics goals of the TOTEM experiment, where the kinematics of the scattered protons is reconstructed with the near-beam telescopes – so-called Roman Pots (RP). Before being detected, the protons’ trajectories are influenced by the magnetic fields of the accelerator lattice. Thus precise understanding of the proton transport is of key importance for the experiment. A novel method of optics evaluation is proposed which exploits kinematical distributions of elastically scattered protons observed in the RPs. Theoretical predictions, as well as Monte Carlo studies, show that the residual uncertainty of the optics estimation method is smaller than 2.5 permille.

  1. LHC Optics Measurement with Proton Tracks Detected by the Roman Pots of the TOTEM Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00062364; Aspell, P; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F S; Catanesi, M G; Covault, C; Csanád, M; Csörgö, T; Deile, M; Doubek, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Georgiev, V; Giani, S; Grzanka, L; Hammerbauer, J; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Karev, A; Kašpar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Lokajíček, M V; Losurdo, L; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodríguez, F; Macrí, M; Mäki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Palazzi, P; Peroutka, Z; Procházka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P; Zielinski, K

    2014-10-28

    Precise knowledge of the beam optics at the LHC is crucial to fulfil the physics goals of the TOTEM experiment, where the kinematics of the scattered protons is reconstructed with the near-beam telescopes -- so-called Roman Pots (RP). Before being detected, the protons' trajectories are influenced by the magnetic fields of the accelerator lattice. Thus precise understanding of the proton transport is of key importance for the experiment. A novel method of optics evaluation is proposed which exploits kinematical distributions of elastically scattered protons observed in the RPs. Theoretical predictions, as well as Monte Carlo studies, show that the residual uncertainty of this optics estimation method is smaller than 0.25 percent.

  2. Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

    2009-11-05

    Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

  3. Respiration rate detection based on intensity modulation using plastic optical fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Anwar Zawawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of respiration rate measurement via a simple intensity-based optical fiber sensor using optical fiber technology. The breathing rate is measured based on the light intensity variation due to the longitudinal gap changes between two separated fibers. In order to monitor the breathing rate continuously, the output from the photodetector conditioning circuit is connected to a low-cost Arduino kit. At the sensing point, two optical fiber cables are positioned in series with a small gap and fitted inside a transparent plastic tube. To ensure smooth movement of the fiber during inhale and exhale processes as well as to maintain the gap of the fiber during idle condition, the fiber is attached firmly to a stretchable bandage. This study shows that this simple fiber arrangement can be applied to detect respiration activity which might be critical for patient monitoring.

  4. Respiration rate detection based on intensity modulation using plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Zawawi Mohd; Ziran Nurul Sufia, Nor; Hadi, Manap

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the implementation of respiration rate measurement via a simple intensity-based optical fiber sensor using optical fiber technology. The breathing rate is measured based on the light intensity variation due to the longitudinal gap changes between two separated fibers. In order to monitor the breathing rate continuously, the output from the photodetector conditioning circuit is connected to a low-cost Arduino kit. At the sensing point, two optical fiber cables are positioned in series with a small gap and fitted inside a transparent plastic tube. To ensure smooth movement of the fiber during inhale and exhale processes as well as to maintain the gap of the fiber during idle condition, the fiber is attached firmly to a stretchable bandage. This study shows that this simple fiber arrangement can be applied to detect respiration activity which might be critical for patient monitoring.

  5. Ground-based complex for detection and investigation of fast optical transients in wide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Emilio; Beskin, Grigory; Bondar, Sergey; Karpov, Sergey; Plokhotnichenko, Vladimir; de-Bur, Vjacheslav; Greco, Guiseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto

    2008-07-01

    To study short stochastic optical flares of different objects (GRBs, SNs, etc) of unknown localizations as well as NEOs it is necessary to monitor large regions of sky with high time resolution. We developed a system which consists of wide-field camera (FOW is 400-600 sq.deg.) using TV-CCD with time resolution of 0.13 s to record and classify optical transients, and a fast robotic telescope aimed to perform their spectroscopic and photometric investigation just after detection. Such two telescope complex TORTOREM combining wide-field camera TORTORA and robotic telescope REM operated from May 2006 at La Silla ESO observatory. Some results of its operation, including first fast time resolution study of optical transient accompanying GRB and discovery of its fine time structure, are presented. Prospects for improving the complex efficiency are given.

  6. Molecular Imaging by Optically Detected Electron Spin Resonance of Nitrogen-Vacancies in Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Alex; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2013-03-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demonstrating Optically-Detected Functional-Electron-Spin-Resonance-Imaging, OD-f-ESRI. By combining optical detection with magnetic resonance, nanodiamond imaging achieves high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. It is absent of the complications of ionizing radiation, and the cost should be similar to all-optical imaging. Because nanodiamond imaging is limited by the depth of optical penetration into tissue to depths of a few cm, nanodiamond imaging should open up new avenues of investigation for applications where high depth penetration is not required, such as in small-animal imaging, tumor margin imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping, and perhaps mammography.

  7. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  8. Moving Object Localization Using Optical Flow for Pedestrian Detection from a Moving Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van-Dung; Jo, Kang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a pedestrian detection method from a moving vehicle using optical flows and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG). A moving object is extracted from the relative motion by segmenting the region representing the same optical flows after compensating the egomotion of the camera. To obtain the optical flow, two consecutive images are divided into grid cells 14 × 14 pixels; then each cell is tracked in the current frame to find corresponding cell in the next frame. Using at least three corresponding cells, affine transformation is performed according to each corresponding cell in the consecutive images, so that conformed optical flows are extracted. The regions of moving object are detected as transformed objects, which are different from the previously registered background. Morphological process is applied to get the candidate human regions. In order to recognize the object, the HOG features are extracted on the candidate region and classified using linear support vector machine (SVM). The HOG feature vectors are used as input of linear SVM to classify the given input into pedestrian/nonpedestrian. The proposed method was tested in a moving vehicle and also confirmed through experiments using pedestrian dataset. It shows a significant improvement compared with original HOG using ETHZ pedestrian dataset. PMID:25114955

  9. Fiber optic sensor based on reflectivity configurations to detect heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunianto, M.; Marzuki, A.; Riyatun, R.; Lestari, D.

    2016-11-01

    Research of optical fiber-based heart rate detection sensor has been conducted using the reflection configurationon the thorax motion modified. Optical fiber used in this research was Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) with a diameter of 0.5. Optical fiber system is made with two pieces of fiber, the first fiber is to serve as a transmitter transmitting light from the source to the reflector membrane, the second fiber serves as a receiver. One of the endsfrom the two fibersis pressed and positioned perpendicular of reflector membrane which is placed on the surface of the chest. The sensor works on the principle of intensity changes captured by the receiver fiber when the reflector membrane gets the vibe from the heart. The light source used is in the form of Light Emitting Diode (LED) and Light Dependent Resistor (LDR) as a light sensor. Variations are performed on the reflector membrane diameter. The light intensity received by the detector increases along with the increasing width of the reflector membrane diameter. The results show that this sensor can detect the harmonic peak at a frequency of 1.5 Hz; 7.5 Hz; 10.5 Hz; and 22.5 Hz in a healthy human heart with an average value of Beat Per Minute (BPM) by 78 times, a prototype sensor that is made can work and function properly.

  10. Clinical research device for ovarian cancer detection by optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet C-visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ronie; Chandrasekaran, Archana; Brewer, Molly A.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Utzinger, Urs

    2010-09-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer could greatly increase the likelihood of successful treatment. However, present detection techniques are not very effective, and symptoms are more commonly seen in later stage disease. Amino acids, structural proteins, and enzymatic cofactors have endogenous optical properties influenced by precancerous changes and tumor growth. We present the technical details of an optical spectroscopy system used to quantify these properties. A fiber optic probe excites the surface epithelium (origin of 90% of cases) over 270 to 580 nm and collects fluorescence and reflectance at 300 to 800 nm with four or greater orders of magnitude instrument to background suppression. Up to four sites per ovary are investigated on patients giving consent to oophorectomy and the system's in vivo optical evaluation. Data acquisition is completed within 20 s per site. We illustrate design, selection, and development of the components used in the system. Concerns relating to clinical use, performance, calibration, and quality control are addressed. In the future, spectroscopic data will be compared with histological biopsies from the corresponding tissue sites. If proven effective, this technique can be useful in screening women at high risk of developing ovarian cancer to determine whether oophorectomy is necessary.

  11. Correlated Detection of sub-mHz Gravitational Waves by Two Optical-Fiber Interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Results from two optical-fiber gravitational-wave interferometric detectors are reported. The detector design is very small, cheap and simple to build and operate. Using two de- tectors has permitted various tests of the design principles as well as demonstrating the first simultaneous detection of correlated gravitational waves from detectors spatially separated by 1.1 km. The frequency spectrum of the detected gravitational waves is sub-mHz with a strain spectral index alpha = -1.4 +-0.1. As well as characterising the wave effects the detectors also show, from data collected over some 80 days in the latter part of 2007, the dominant earth rotation e ect and the earth orbit effect. The detectors op- erate by exploiting light speed anisotropy in optical-fibers. The data confirms previous observations of light speed anisotropy, earth rotation and orbit eff ects, and gravitational waves.

  12. Safe and private pedestrian detection by a low-cost fiber optic specklegram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cuevas, A.; Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Lomer, M.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    Surveillance is becoming more and more important in the recent years. In many cities, cameras have been set to look after parks, streets, roads, facilities and so on, however this fact is rising concerns about privacy. In this work, an alternative surveillance method which gather at once security and privacy has been propose and tested. Based on fiber optic specklegram technology; a system consisting of a fiber optic, a coherent light source and a photodetector has been placed under a carpet for detecting people walking over it and its accuracy, regarding measuring the steps, have been measured. Results suggest that using low exposed geometries along the carpet and basic processing methods, it is possible to detect with more than 95% of accuracy the number of steps done by the person walking over the carpet.

  13. Automatic optical detection and classification of marine animals around MHK converters using machine vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunton, Steven [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Optical systems provide valuable information for evaluating interactions and associations between organisms and MHK energy converters and for capturing potentially rare encounters between marine organisms and MHK device. The deluge of optical data from cabled monitoring packages makes expert review time-consuming and expensive. We propose algorithms and a processing framework to automatically extract events of interest from underwater video. The open-source software framework consists of background subtraction, filtering, feature extraction and hierarchical classification algorithms. This principle classification pipeline was validated on real-world data collected with an experimental underwater monitoring package. An event detection rate of 100% was achieved using robust principal components analysis (RPCA), Fourier feature extraction and a support vector machine (SVM) binary classifier. The detected events were then further classified into more complex classes – algae | invertebrate | vertebrate, one species | multiple species of fish, and interest rank. Greater than 80% accuracy was achieved using a combination of machine learning techniques.

  14. Capillary electrokinetic separations with optical detection. Technical progress report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    This multifarious research program is dedicated to the development of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques and associated optical methods of detection. Currently, research is directed at three general objectives. First, fundamental studies of pertinent separation and band broadening mechanisms are being conducted, with the emphasis on achieving rapid separations and understanding separation systems that include highly-ordered assemblies as running buffer additives. Second, instrumentation and methodologies associated with these capillary separation techniques are being advanced. Third, applications of these separation and detection systems should fill current voids in the capabilities of capillary separation techniques. In particular, it should be possible to perform rapid, highly efficient, and selective separations of hydrophobic compounds (e.g., higher MW polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes), certain optical isomers, DNA fragments, and various pollutants including certain heavy metals.

  15. Simple and Low-cost Fiber-optic Sensors for Detection of UV Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Živanov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two simple and low-cost fiberoptic sensors for detection of UV radiation are presented. A U-shaped sensor covered with an UV marker for UV radiation detection and a fiber-optic sensor with one end covered with powder from a mercury lamp are produced and described in details. Both sensors are made of large-core PMMA plastic optical fibers. As UV sources, a solar simulator and four different UV lamps are used. The light spectrum on the fiber output is measured by using an USB spectrometer. Dependence of output light intensity on the distance of end-type sensor with powder from a mercury lamp from UV lamp is investigated as well. On the output of the sensor covered with powder from a mercury lamp are obtained peaks of fluorescent emission at approximately 616 nm and 620 nm wavelengths.

  16. Damage detection of hybrid aramid/metal–PVB composite materials using optical fiber sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kojović

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Embedding optical fiber sensors within laminar thermoplastic composite material results in forming a system known as «smart structure». These sensors present the information about the inner structure health during the material exploitation and especially in the case of exterior impacts when a geometric configuration or the property changes of the material should be expected. This paper evaluates the feasibility of the real-time monitoring of indentation and low energy impact damage in composite laminates from indentation loading and Charpy pendulum impact, using the embedded intensity-based optical fiber sensors. An optical fiber sensing system, which relies solely on monitoring light intensity for providing the indication of the composite structural health, offers simplicity in design and cost-effectiveness. For this, aramid/polyvinylbutyral (PVB and aramid/metal/PVB laminates with embedded optical fibers were fabricated. Four configurations of woven composites were tested, namely, aramid/PVB, and aramid/metal/PVB in three stacking sequences of aramid and metallic woven layers. The initiation of damage and fracture during testing was detected by observation of the intensity drop of light signal transmitted through an optical fiber.

  17. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. U-bent plastic optical fiber based plasmonic biosensor for nucleic acid detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowri, A.; Sai, V. V. R.

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the development of low cost, rapid and highly sensitive plasmonic sandwich DNA biosensor using U-bent plastic optical fiber (POF) probes with high evanescent wave absorbance sensitivity and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) as labels. Plastic optical fiber (PMMA core and fluorinated polymer as cladding) offer ease in machinability and handling due to which optimum U-bent geometry (with fiber and bend diameter of 0.5 and 1.5 mm respectively) for high sensitivity could be achieved. A sensitive fiber optic DNA biosensor is realized by (i) modifying the PMMA surface using ethylenediamine (EDA) in order to maximize the immobilization of capture oligonucleotides (ONs) and (ii) conjugating probe ONs to AuNP labels of optimum size ( 35 nm) with high extinction coefficient and optimal ON surface density. The sandwich hybridization assay on U-bent POF probes results in increase in optical absorbance through the probe with increase in target ON concentration due to the presence of increased number of AuNPs. The absorbance of light passing through the U-bent probe due to the presence of AuNP labels on its surface as result of sandwich DNA hybridization is measured using a halogen lamp and a fiber optic spectrometer. A picomolar limit of detection of target ON (0.2 pM or 1 pg/ml or 5 attomol in 25 μL) is achieved with this biosensing scheme, indicating its potential for the development of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor.

  19. Reduced graphene oxide coated optical fiber for methanol and ethanol vapor detection at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavinkumar, T.; Sastikumar, D.; Manivannan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Successful isolation of single layer of graphene from graphite by mechanical exfoliation method, attracted a great attention due to its unique structural, optical, mechanical and electronic properties. This makes the graphene as a promising material in many possible applications such as energy-storage, sensing, electronic, optical devices and polymer composite materials. High quality of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) material was prepared by chemical reduction method at 100°C. The structural and optical properties of the rGO sheets were characterized by FT-IR, micro Raman, powder XRD and UV-vis-NIR techniques. FT-IR reveals the absence of oxygen functional groups on rGO due to the reduction process. Powder XRD shows the broad peak at 2θ=24.3° corresponding to interlayer spacing 3.66Å which is smaller than the graphene oxide (GO). UV-vis-NIR of rGO displays the absorption peak at 271 nm indicates the reduction of GO and the restoration of C=C bonds in the rGO sheets. The cladding removed and rGO coated poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) optical fiber is used for methanol and ethanol vapors detection in the concentration ranging from 0 to 500 ppm at room temperature. The spectral characteristics along with output intensity modulation of cladding removed and rGO coated fiber optic sensor reveal the potential of methanol and ethanol vapor sensing properties.

  20. Detection and localization of building insulation faults using optical-fiber DTS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Koudelka, Petr; Siska, Petr; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav; Jaros, Jakub; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays the trends in the construction industry are changing at an incredible speed. The new technologies are still emerging on the market. Sphere of building insulation is not an exception as well. One of the major problems in building insulation is usually its failure, whether caused by unwanted mechanical intervention or improper installation. The localization of these faults is quite difficult, often impossible without large intervention into the construction. As a proper solution for this problem might be utilization of Optical-Fiber DTS system based on stimulated Raman scattering. Used DTS system is primary designed for continuous measurement of the temperature along the optical fiber. This system is using standard optical fiber as a sensor, which brings several advantages in its application. First, the optical fiber is relatively inexpensive, which allows to cover a quite large area for a small cost. The other main advantages of the optical fiber are electromagnetic resistance, small size, safety operation in inflammable or explosive area, easy installation, etc. This article is dealing with the detection and localization of building insulation faults using mentioned system.

  1. Direct Optical Detection of Viral Nucleoprotein Binding to an Anti-Influenza Aptamer

    OpenAIRE

    Negri, Pierre; Chen, Guojun; Kage, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas; Naumann, Dieter; Xu, Bingqian; Dluhy, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated label-free optical detection of viral nucleoprotein binding to a polyvalent anti-influenza aptamer by monitoring the surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of the aptamer-nucleoprotein complex. The SERS spectra demonstrated that selective binding of the aptamer-nucleoprotein complex could be differentiated from that of the aptamer alone based solely on the direct spectral signature for the aptamer-nucleoprotein complex. Multivariate statistical methods, including principal...

  2. Multilayer cloud detection and retrieval of cloud physical and optical properties from thermal infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, H.; Tokoro, Y.; Saito, M.; Putri, N. S.; Katagiri, S.; Sekiguchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies using active remote sensing have revealed significant occurrence of multi-layer cloud. Detection of multi-layer cloud is important in passive remote sensing for quality assessment of cloud property retrieval and identification of uncertain retrievals. An algorithm using several thermal infrared (TIR) bands at 6-13.5 micron wavelengths to detect multilayer cloud and retrieve cloud physical and optical properties including cloud thermodynamic phase is developed. This significantly extends applicability of passive remote sensing and improves accuracy of cloud property retrieval. The method uses the split window bands as well as the carbon dioxide and water vapor absorption bands. The forward model uses the two-stream approximation to solve radiative transfer with gaseous absorption treated by the correlated-k distribution method. Brightness temperature errors are evaluated by model-to-model and model-to-measurement comparisons. Top pressure of lower cloud in multi-layer cloud column can be retrieved if the upper cloud optical thickness is less than 6. The optimal estimation method is used to simultaneously infer several cloud properties including water path, effective particle radius and cloud-top pressure. The method is applied to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using 10 TIR bands and compared to MODIS operational product and active remote sensing measurements, showing promising results. The TIR method well detects optically thin clouds and retrieve their properties with relatively high accuracy. Particularly, cloud-top of optically thin cloud is estimated well. Multi-layer cloud detection works usually, while the TIR measurements miss very thin cloud that appears near the tropopause. The algorithm will be applied to frequent observation data from a new Japanese geostationary satellite, Himawari-8.

  3. Low-cost fiber-optic waveguide sensor for the colorimetric detection of ammonia

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Katrin; Rist, Jonas; Peter, Carolin; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    We present the development and characterization of a low-cost fiber-optic colorimetric gas sensor for ammonia combined with the electronic circuitry for measurement control and RFID communication. The gas sensor detects ammonia using a 300 μm polyolefin fiber coated with a gas-sensitive polymer film. The spectral and time-dependent sensitivity of various polymer films was tested in transmission measurements at λ = 590 nm. A prototype of the gas sensor was tested under realistic measurement co...

  4. Optically detected cyclotron resonance in a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Gregor

    2011-09-23

    Optically detected far-infrared cyclotron resonance (FIR-ODCR) in GaAs/AlGaAs HJs is interpreted in the frame of an exciton-dissociation mechanism. It is possible to explain the ODR mechanism by an exciton drag, mediated by ballistically propagating phonons. Furthermore, very narrow resonances are presented and realistic electron mobility values can be calculated. The exceptionally narrow ODCRs allow to measure conduction-band nonparabolicity effects and resolve satellite resonances, close to the main cyclotron resonance line.

  5. S/EV 92: solar and electric vehicles: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    These proceedings include the morning plenary sessions and then sessions on each of the following topics: Electric Vehicle (EV) fundamentals, advanced EV's, photovoltaics, policy, and fleets. Many individual topics are considered to include: EV races, environmental benefits, demonstration programs, lightweight composite materials, advanced components, and electric batteries.

  6. A coherent detection technique via optically biased field for broadband terahertz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hai-Wei; Dong, Jia-Meng; Liu, Yi; Shi, Chang-Cheng; Wu, Jing-Wei; Peng, Xiao-Yu

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a coherent terahertz detection technique based on an optically biased field functioning as a local oscillator and a second harmonic induced by the terahertz electric field in the air sensor working in free space. After optimizing the polarization angle and the energy of the probe pulse, and filling the system with dry nitrogen, the terahertz radiation generated from a two-color-femtosecond-laser-pulses induced plasma filament is measured by this technique with a bandwidth of 0.1-10 THz and a signal-to-noise ratio of 48 dB. Our technique provides an alternative simple method for coherent broadband terahertz detection.

  7. Automatic Glaucoma Detection Based on Optic Disc Segmentation and Texture Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíla de Lima Claro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital image processing techniques is prominent in medical settings for the automatic diagnosis of diseases. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world and it has no cure. Currently, there are treatments to prevent vision loss, but the disease must be detected in the early stages. Thus, the objective of this work is to develop an automatic detection method of Glaucoma in retinal images. The methodology used in the study were: acquisition of image database, Optic Disc segmentation, texture feature extraction in different color models and classiffication of images in glaucomatous or not. We obtained results of 93% accuracy.

  8. Integration of fiber Bragg grating optic sensors for strain detection in structures composed of CFRP composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jason; Barjasteh, Ehsan

    2017-04-01

    The study focuses on the formation of artificial neural pathways for the use of structural health monitoring in prosthesis by means of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) optic sensors to detect shifts in strain. Implementation of these fibers are embedded into carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) based structures. CFRP was considered for its wide use application in ankle-foot prosthesis, which undergoes high loads of stress and wear.. This method acts as a system of early detection which could prevent the prosthesis from critical failure due to previously undetected interior defects, further improving the patient's well being.

  9. OPAD through 1991 - Status report no. 2. [Optical Plume Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, W. T.; Cooper, A. E.; Wallace, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) experimental program has attempted to develop a rocket engine health monitor for the detection, and if possible the quantification, of anomalous atomic and molecular species in exhaust plumes. The test program has formulated instrument designs allowing both wide spectral range and high spectral resolution. Attention is presently given to OPAD data collected for the SSME at NASA-Marshall's technology test stand, with a view to spectral emissions at startup and variations in baseline plume emissions due to changes in rated power level.

  10. A fiber-optic ice detection system for large-scale wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-gil; Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2017-09-01

    Icing causes substantial problems in the integrity of large-scale wind turbines. In this work, a fiber-optic sensor system for detection of icing with an arrayed waveguide grating is presented. The sensor system detects Fresnel reflections from the ends of the fibers. The transition in Fresnel reflection due to icing gives peculiar intensity variations, which categorizes the ice, the water, and the air medium on the wind turbine blades. From the experimental results, with the proposed sensor system, the formation of icing conditions and thickness of ice were identified successfully in real time.

  11. A confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities in a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jenny; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    A compact sample-scanning confocal optical microscope for detection of single impurities below the surface of a bulk crystal at cryogenic temperatures is described. The sample, lens, and scanners are mounted inside a helium bath cryostat and have a footprint of only 19 × 19 mm. Wide field imaging and confocal imaging using a Blu-ray lens immersed in liquid helium are demonstrated with excitation at 370 nm. A spatial resolution of 300 nm and a detection efficiency of 1.6% were achieved.

  12. Bi-orthogonal Symbol Mapping and Detection in Optical CDMA Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maw-Yang

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the bi-orthogonal symbol mapping and detection scheme is investigated in time-spreading wavelength-hopping optical CDMA communication system. The carrier-hopping prime code is exploited as signature sequence, whose put-of-phase autocorrelation is zero. Based on the orthogonality of carrier-hopping prime code, the equal weight orthogonal signaling scheme can be constructed, and the proposed scheme using bi-orthogonal symbol mapping and detection can be developed. The transmitted binary data bits are mapped into corresponding bi-orthogonal symbols, where the orthogonal matrix code and its complement are utilized. In the receiver, the received bi-orthogonal data symbol is fed into the maximum likelihood decoder for detection. Under such symbol mapping and detection, the proposed scheme can greatly enlarge the Euclidean distance; hence, the system performance can be drastically improved.

  13. Fabrication and optimisation of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme to evaluate detection of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachim, A.; Sari, A. P.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a new and simple biosensor base on alcohol oxidase (AOX)-enzyme for detecting formaldehyde in aqueous solutions has been successfully fabricated. The alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was immobilized on poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membrane containing chromoionophore. The chemical reaction between AOX and formaldehyde generates a colour change of chromoionophore detected by optical absorbance measured in UV Vis. This paper focuses on the concentration optimization of buffer phosphate solution, response time, the quantity of enzyme and the measurement of the detection range of biosensors. The result shows that the optimum concentration and pH of buffer phosphate solution is 0.05 M and pH 7, respectively. The optimum response time is 3 min, the optimum unit of enzyme for biosensor is 1 unit/sample and the detection range of biosensor is 0.264 mM with R2 = 0.9421.

  14. Automatic fishing net detection and recognition based on optical gated viewing for underwater obstacle avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Xinwei; Ren, Pengdao; Cao, Yinan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2017-08-01

    An automatic fishing net detection and recognition method for underwater obstacle avoidance is proposed. In the method, optical gated viewing technology is utilized to obtain high-resolution fishing net images and extend detection distance by suppressing water backscattering and background noise. The fishing net recognition is based on the proposed histograms of slope lines (HSLs) descriptors plus a support vector machine classifier. The extraction of HSL descriptors includes five steps of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization, the Gaussian low-pass filtering, the Canny detection, the Hough transform, and weighted vote. In the proof experiments, the detection distance of the fishing net reaches 5.7 attenuation length and the recognition accuracy reaches 93.79%.

  15. Texture based segmentation method to detect atherosclerotic plaque from optical tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ammu; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael; Sherif, Sherif

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging has been widely employed in assessing cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause cardio vascular diseases. However visual detection of atherosclerotic plaque from OCT images is often limited and further complicated by high frame rates. We developed a texture based segmentation method to automatically detect plaque and non plaque regions from OCT images. To verify our results we compared them to photographs of the vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque that we used to generate the OCT images. Our results show a close match with photographs of vascular tissue with atherosclerotic plaque. Our texture based segmentation method for plaque detection could be potentially used in clinical cardiovascular OCT imaging for plaque detection.

  16. Optical vibration detection spectral analysis assembly and method for detecting vibration in an object of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Thomas C.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    A vibration detection assembly is described which includes an emitter of light which has object and reference beams, the object beam reflected off of a vibrating object of interest; and a photorefractive substance having a given response time and which passes the reflected object beam and the reference beam, the reference beam and the object beam interfering within the photorefractive substance to create a space charge field which develops within the response time of the photorefractive substance.

  17. Ship Detection in Optical Satellite Image Based on RX Method and PCAnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xiu; Li, Huali; Lin, Hui; Kang, Xudong; Lu, Ting

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for ship detection in optical satellite image based on the ReedXiaoli (RX) method and the principal component analysis network (PCAnet). The proposed method consists of the following three steps. First, the spatially adjacent pixels in optical image are arranged into a vector, transforming the optical image into a 3D cube image. By taking this process, the contextual information of the spatially adjacent pixels can be integrated to magnify the discrimination between ship and background. Second, the RX anomaly detection method is adopted to preliminarily extract ship candidates from the produced 3D cube image. Finally, real ships are further confirmed among ship candidates by applying the PCAnet and the support vector machine (SVM). Specifically, the PCAnet is a simple deep learning network which is exploited to perform feature extraction, and the SVM is applied to achieve feature pooling and decision making. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach is effective in discriminating between ships and false alarms, and has a good ship detection performance.

  18. Tools for the quantitative analysis of sedimentation boundaries detected by fluorescence optical analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaying Zhao

    Full Text Available Fluorescence optical detection in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation allows the study of macromolecules at nanomolar concentrations and below. This has significant promise, for example, for the study of systems of high-affinity protein interactions. Here we describe adaptations of the direct boundary modeling analysis approach implemented in the software SEDFIT that were developed to accommodate unique characteristics of the confocal fluorescence detection system. These include spatial gradients of signal intensity due to scanner movements out of the plane of rotation, temporal intensity drifts due to instability of the laser and fluorophores, and masking of the finite excitation and detection cone by the sample holder. In an extensive series of experiments with enhanced green fluorescent protein ranging from low nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations, we show that the experimental data provide sufficient information to determine the parameters required for first-order approximation of the impact of these effects on the recorded data. Systematic deviations of fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity data analyzed using conventional sedimentation models developed for absorbance and interference optics are largely removed after these adaptations, resulting in excellent fits that highlight the high precision of fluorescence sedimentation velocity data, thus allowing a more detailed quantitative interpretation of the signal boundaries that is otherwise not possible for this system.

  19. Dispersion compensation of fiber optic communication system with direct detection using artificial neural networks (ANNs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Mahmoud M. T.; Kumar, Shiva; Bakr, Mohamed H.

    2018-02-01

    This work introduces a powerful digital nonlinear feed-forward equalizer (NFFE), exploiting multilayer artificial neural network (ANN). It mitigates impairments of optical communication systems arising due to the nonlinearity introduced by direct photo-detection. In a direct detection system, the detection process is nonlinear due to the fact that the photo-current is proportional to the absolute square of the electric field intensity. The proposed equalizer provides the most efficient computational cost with high equalization performance. Its performance is comparable to the benchmark compensation performance achieved by maximum-likelihood sequence estimator. The equalizer trains an ANN to act as a nonlinear filter whose impulse response removes the intersymbol interference (ISI) distortions of the optical channel. Owing to the proposed extensive training of the equalizer, it achieves the ultimate performance limit of any feed-forward equalizer (FFE). The performance and efficiency of the equalizer is investigated by applying it to various practical short-reach fiber optic communication system scenarios. These scenarios are extracted from practical metro/media access networks and data center applications. The obtained results show that the ANN-NFFE compensates for the received BER degradation and significantly increases the tolerance to the chromatic dispersion distortion.

  20. Tools for the Quantitative Analysis of Sedimentation Boundaries Detected by Fluorescence Optical Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaying; Casillas, Ernesto; Shroff, Hari; Patterson, George H.; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence optical detection in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation allows the study of macromolecules at nanomolar concentrations and below. This has significant promise, for example, for the study of systems of high-affinity protein interactions. Here we describe adaptations of the direct boundary modeling analysis approach implemented in the software SEDFIT that were developed to accommodate unique characteristics of the confocal fluorescence detection system. These include spatial gradients of signal intensity due to scanner movements out of the plane of rotation, temporal intensity drifts due to instability of the laser and fluorophores, and masking of the finite excitation and detection cone by the sample holder. In an extensive series of experiments with enhanced green fluorescent protein ranging from low nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations, we show that the experimental data provide sufficient information to determine the parameters required for first-order approximation of the impact of these effects on the recorded data. Systematic deviations of fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity data analyzed using conventional sedimentation models developed for absorbance and interference optics are largely removed after these adaptations, resulting in excellent fits that highlight the high precision of fluorescence sedimentation velocity data, thus allowing a more detailed quantitative interpretation of the signal boundaries that is otherwise not possible for this system. PMID:24204779

  1. Fibre optic sensor for the detection of adulterant traces in coconut oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeba, M.; Rajesh, M.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2005-11-01

    The design and development of a fibre optic evanescent wave refractometer for the detection of trace amounts of paraffin oil and palm oil in coconut oil is presented. This sensor is based on a side-polished plastic optical fibre. At the sensing region, the cladding and a small portion of the core are removed and the fibre nicely polished. The sensing region is fabricated in such a manner that it sits perfectly within a bent mould. This bending of the sensing region enhances its sensitivity. The oil mixture of different mix ratios is introduced into the sensing region and we observed a sharp decrease in the output intensity. The observed variation in the intensity is found to be linear and the detection limit is 2% (by volume) paraffin oil/palm oil in coconut oil. The resolution of this refractometric sensor is of the order of 10-3. Since coconut oil is consumed in large volumes as edible oil in south India, this fibre optic sensor finds great relevance for the detection of adulterants such as paraffin oil or palm oil which are readily miscible in coconut oil. The advantage of this type of sensor is that it is inexpensive and easy to set up. Another attraction of the side-polished fibre is that only a very small amount of analyte is needed and its response time is only 7 s.

  2. Detecting supercritical CO2 in brine at sequestration pressure with an optical fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bo; Melo, Luis; Davies, Benjamin; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David; Wild, Peter

    2013-01-02

    Monitoring of sequestered carbon is essential to establishing the environmental safety and the efficacy of geological carbon sequestration. Sequestration in saline aquifers requires the detection of supercritical CO(2) and CO(2)-saturated brine as distinct from the native reservoir brine. Here we demonstrate an all-optical approach to detect both supercritical CO(2), and saturated brine under sequestration conditions. The method employs a long-period grating written on an optical fiber with a resonance wavelength that is sensitive to local refractive index within a pressure- and temperature-controlled apparatus at 40 °C and 1400 psi (9.65 MPa). The supercritical CO(2) and brine are clearly distinguished by a wavelength shift of 1.149 nm (refractive index difference of 0.2371). The CO(2)-saturated brine is also detectable relative to brine, with a resonance wavelength shift of 0.192 nm (refractive index difference of 0.0396). Importantly, these findings indicate the potential for distributed, all-optical monitoring of CO(2) sequestration in saline aquifers.

  3. Capillary electrokinetic separations with optical detection. Technical progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepaniak, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This program seeks the development of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques and associated optical methods of detection. Fundamental studies of pertinent separation and band broadening mechanisms are being conducted, with the emphasis on understanding systems that include highly-ordered assemblies as running buffer additives. The additives include cyclodextrins, affinity reagents, and soluble (entangled) polymers and are employed with capillary electrophoresis, CE and/or micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, MECC modes of separation. The utility of molecular modeling techniques for predicting the effects of highly ordered assemblies on the retention behavior of isomeric compounds is under investigation. The feasibility of performing separations using a non-aqueous solvent/fullerene electrochromatographic system is being explored. The analytical methodologies associated with these capillary separation techniques are being advanced through the development of retention programming instumentation/techniques and new strategies for performing optical detection. The advantages of laser fluorimetry are extended through the inclusion of fluorogenic, reagents in the running buffer. These reagents include oligonucleotide intercalation reagents for detecting DNA fragments. Chemiluminescence detection using post-capillary reactors/flow cells is also in progress. Successful development of these separation and detection systems will fill current voids in the capabilities of capillary separation techniques.

  4. Effective Waterline Detection of Unmanned Surface Vehicles Based on Optical Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjie Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time and accurate detection of the sailing or water area will help realize unmanned surface vehicle (USV systems. Although there are some methods for using optical images in USV-oriented environmental modeling, both the robustness and precision of these published waterline detection methods are comparatively low for a real USV system moving in a complicated environment. This paper proposes an efficient waterline detection method based on structure extraction and texture analysis with respect to optical images and presents a practical application to a USV system for validation. First, the basic principles of local binary patterns (LBPs and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM were analyzed, and their advantages were integrated to calculate the texture information of river images. Then, structure extraction was introduced to preprocess the original river images so that the textures resulting from USV motion, wind, and illumination are removed. In the practical application, the waterlines of many images captured by the USV system moving along an inland river were detected with the proposed method, and the results were compared with those of edge detection and super pixel segmentation. The experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust. The average error of the proposed method was 1.84 pixels, and the mean square deviation was 4.57 pixels.

  5. Microfluidic chip with optical sensor for rapid detection of nerve agent Sarin in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng

    2007-12-01

    The chemical warfare agent Sarin is an organophosphate that is highly toxic to humans as they can act as cholinesterase inhibitors, that disrupts neuromuscular transmission. As these nerve agents are colorless, odorless and highly toxic, they can be introduced into drinking water as a means of terrorist sabotage. Hence, numerous innovative devices and methods have been developed for rapid detection of these organophosphates. Microfluidic technology allows the implementation of fast and sensitive detection of Sarin. In this paper, a micro-total analysis systems (TAS), also known as Lab-on-a-chip, fitted with an optical detection system has been developed to analyze the presence of the nerve agent sarin in water samples. In the present set-up, inhibition of co-introduced cholinesterase and water samples containing trace amounts of nerve agent sarin into the microfluidic device was used as the basis for selective detection of sarin. The device was fabricated using polymeric micromachining with PMMA (poly (methymethacrylate)) as the substrate material. A chromophore was utilized to measure the activity of remnant cholinesterase activity, which is inversely related to the amount of sarin present in the water samples. Comparisons were made between two different optical detection techniques and the findings will be presented in this paper. The presented measurement method is simple, fast and as sensitive as Gas Chromatography.

  6. Graphene oxide and DNA aptamer based sub-nanomolar potassium detecting optical nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Debopam; Sarkar, Ketaki; Mukherjee, Souvik; Meshik, Xenia; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2017-08-01

    Quantum-dot (QD) based nanosensors are frequently used by researchers to detect small molecules, ions and different biomolecules. In this article, we present a sensor complex/system comprised of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) aptamer, gold nanoparticle and semiconductor QD, attached to a graphene oxide (GO) flake for detection of potassium. As reported herein, it is demonstrated that QD-aptamer-quencher nanosensor functions even when tethered to GO, opening the way to future applications where sensing can be accomplished simultaneously with other previously demonstrated applications of GO such as serving as a nanocarrier for drug delivery. Herein, it is demonstrated that the DNA based thrombin binding aptamer used in this study undergoes the conformational change needed for sensing even when the nanosensor complex is anchored to the GO. Analysis with the Hill equation indicates the interaction between aptamer and potassium follows sigmoidal Hill kinetics. It is found that the quenching efficiency of the optical sensor is linear with the logarithm of concentration from 1 pM to 100 nM and decreases for higher concentration due to unavailability of aptamer binding sites. Such a simple and sensitive optical aptasensor with minimum detection capability of 1.96 pM for potassium ion can also be employed in-vitro detection of different physiological ions, pathogens and disease detection methods.

  7. Integration of agglutination assay for protein detection in microfluidic disc using Blu-ray optical pickup unit and optical fluid scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Rokon; Burger, Robert; Donolato, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy for thrombin detection by combining a magnetic bead based agglutination assay and low-cost microfluidic disc. The detection method is based on an optomagnetic readout system implemented using a Blu-ray optical pickup unit (OPU) as main optoelectronic component. The ass...

  8. Functional Polymers in Protein Detection Platforms: Optical, Electrochemical, Electrical, Mass-Sensitive, and Magnetic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of proteomics and related applied sectors in the life sciences demands convenient methodologies for detecting and measuring the levels of specific proteins as well as for screening and analyzing for interacting protein systems. Materials utilized for such protein detection and measurement platforms should meet particular specifications which include ease-of-mass manufacture, biological stability, chemical functionality, cost effectiveness, and portability. Polymers can satisfy many of these requirements and are often considered as choice materials in various biological detection platforms. Therefore, tremendous research efforts have been made for developing new polymers both in macroscopic and nanoscopic length scales as well as applying existing polymeric materials for protein measurements. In this review article, both conventional and alternative techniques for protein detection are overviewed while focusing on the use of various polymeric materials in different protein sensing technologies. Among many available detection mechanisms, most common approaches such as optical, electrochemical, electrical, mass-sensitive, and magnetic methods are comprehensively discussed in this article. Desired properties of polymers exploited for each type of protein detection approach are summarized. Current challenges associated with the application of polymeric materials are examined in each protein detection category. Difficulties facing both quantitative and qualitative protein measurements are also identified. The latest efforts on the development and evaluation of nanoscale polymeric systems for improved protein detection are also discussed from the standpoint of quantitative and qualitative measurements. Finally, future research directions towards further advancements in the field are considered. PMID:21691441

  9. Detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer with an optical nanotechnology detection system enabling label-free diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaja, Simon; Hilgenberg, Jill D.; Collins, Julie L.; Shah, Anna A.; Wawro, Debra; Zimmerman, Shelby; Magnusson, Robert; Koulen, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian carcinoma has the highest lethality rate of gynecologic tumors, largely attributed to the late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Reliable tools for both accurate diagnosis and early detection of disease onset are lacking, and presently less than 20% of ovarian cancers are detected at an early stage. Protein biomarkers that allow the discrimination of early and late stages of ovarian serous carcinomas are urgently needed as they would enable monitoring pre-symptomatic aspects of the disease, disease progression, and the efficacy of intervention therapies. We compare the absolute and relative protein levels of six protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer in five different established ovarian cancer cell lines, utilizing both quantitative immunoblot analysis and a guided-mode resonance (GMR) bioassay detection system that utilizes a label-free optical biosensor readout. The GMR sensor approach provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein biomarkers as validated by quantitative immunoblotting, as well as enhanced sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for quantification and detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. We identified fibronectin, apolipoprotein A1, and TIMP3 as potential protein biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Future studies are needed to confirm the suitability of protein biomarkers tested herein in patient samples.

  10. Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with speckle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrano, C J

    2004-01-13

    Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with Speckle Imaging is a high-resolution imaging system that substantially improves resolution and contrast in images acquired over long distances. This technology will increase image resolution up to an order of magnitude or greater for video surveillance systems. The system's hardware components are all commercially available and consist of a telescope or large-aperture lens assembly, a high-performance digital camera, and a personal computer. The system's software, developed at LLNL, extends standard speckle-image-processing methods (used in the astronomical community) to solve the atmospheric blurring problem associated with imaging over medium to long distances (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers) through horizontal or slant-path turbulence. This novel imaging technology will not only enhance national security but also will benefit law enforcement, security contractors, and any private or public entity that uses video surveillance to protect their assets.

  11. An Automated Measurement of Ciliary Beating Frequency using a Combined Optical Flow and Peak Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojae; Han, Tae Hwa; Kim, Hyun Jun; Park, Man Young; Kim, Ku Sang

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mucociliary transport system is a major defense mechanism of the respiratory tract. The performance of mucous transportation in the nasal cavity can be represented by a ciliary beating frequency (CBF). This study proposes a novel method to measure CBF by using optical flow. Methods To obtain objective estimates of CBF from video images, an automated computer-based image processing technique is developed. This study proposes a new method based on optical flow for image processing and peak detection for signal processing. We compare the measuring accuracy of the method in various combinations of image processing (optical flow versus difference image) and signal processing (fast Fourier transform [FFT] vs. peak detection [PD]). The digital high-speed video method with a manual count of CBF in slow motion video play, is the gold-standard in CBF measurement. We obtained a total of fifty recorded ciliated sinonasal epithelium images to measure CBF from the Department of Otolaryngology. The ciliated sinonasal epithelium images were recorded at 50-100 frames per second using a charge coupled device camera with an inverted microscope at a magnification of ×1,000. Results The mean square errors and variance for each method were 1.24, 0.84 Hz; 11.8, 2.63 Hz; 3.22, 1.46 Hz; and 3.82, 1.53 Hz for optical flow (OF) + PD, OF + FFT, difference image [DI] + PD, and DI + FFT, respectively. Of the four methods, PD using optical flow showed the best performance for measuring the CBF of nasal mucosa. Conclusions The proposed method was able to measure CBF more objectively and efficiently than what is currently possible. PMID:21886872

  12. The usage of optical fibers for damage detection in ballistic protection composite laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Irena D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the procedure of embedding fiber optic sensors in laminar thermoplastic composite material, as well as damage investigation after ballistic loading. Thermoplastic-reinforced composite materials were made for increased material damage resistance during ballistic loading. Damage inside the composite material was detected by observing the intensity drop of the light signal transmitted through the optical fibers. Experimental testing was carried out in order to observe and analyze the response of the material under various load conditions. Different types of Kevlar reinforced composite materials (thermoplastic, thermo reactive and thermoplastic with ceramic plate as the impact face were made. Material damage resistance during ballistic loading was investigated and compared. Specimens were tested under multiple load conditions. The opto-electronic part of the measurement system consists of two light-emitting diodes as light sources for the optical fibers, and two photo detectors for the light intensity measurement. The output signal was acquired from photo detectors by means of a data acquisition board and personal computer. The measurements showed an intensity drop of the transmitted light signal as a result of the applied loading on composite structure for all the optical fibers. All the diagrams show similar behavior of the light signal intensity. In fact, all of them may be divided into three zones: the zone of penetration of the first composite layer, the bullet traveling zone through the composite material till its final stop, and the material relaxation zone. The attenuation of the light signal intensity during impact is caused by the influence of the applied dynamic stress on the embedded optical fibers. The applied stress caused micro bending of the optical fiber, changes in the shape of the cross-section and the unequal changes of the indices of refraction of the core and cladding due to the stress-optic effect. The

  13. Optical biosensor system with integrated microfluidic sample preparation and TIRF based detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Eduard; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Suppan, Michael; Pichler, Heinz; Rumpler, Markus; Satzinger, Valentin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hajnsek, Martin; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    There is a steadily growing demand for miniaturized bioanalytical devices allowing for on-site or point-of-care detection of biomolecules or pathogens in applications like diagnostics, food testing, or environmental monitoring. These, so called labs-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis systems (μ-TAS) should ideally enable convenient sample-in - result-out type operation. Therefore, the entire process from sample preparation, metering, reagent incubation, etc. to detection should be performed on a single disposable device (on-chip). In the early days such devices were mainly fabricated using glass or silicon substrates and adapting established fabrication technologies from the electronics and semiconductor industry. More recently, the development focuses on the use of thermoplastic polymers as they allow for low-cost high volume fabrication of disposables. One of the most promising materials for the development of plastic based lab-on-achip systems are cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COP/COC) due to their excellent optical properties (high transparency and low autofluorescence) and ease of processing. We present a bioanalytical system for whole blood samples comprising a disposable plastic chip based on TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) optical detection. The chips were fabricated by compression moulding of COP and microfluidic channels were structured by hot embossing. These microfluidic structures integrate several sample pretreatment steps. These are the separation of erythrocytes, metering of sample volume using passive valves, and reagent incubation for competitive bioassays. The surface of the following optical detection zone is functionalized with specific capture probes in an array format. The plastic chips comprise dedicated structures for simple and effective coupling of excitation light from low-cost laser diodes. This enables TIRF excitation of fluorescently labeled probes selectively bound to detection spots at the microchannel surface

  14. Optical immunosensors for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enteritidis from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Arun K.; Geng, Tao; Lathrop, Amanda; Valadez, Angela; Morgan, Mark T.

    2004-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella are two major foodborne pathogens of significant concern. Two optical evanescent wave immunosensors were evaluated for detection: Antibody-coupled fiber-optic biosensor and a surface plasmon resonant (SPR) immunosensor. In the fiber-optic sensor, polyclonal antibodies for the test organisms were immobilized on polystyrene fiber wave -guides using streptavidin - biotin chemistry. Cyanine 5 -labeled monoclonal antibodies C11E9 (for L. monocytogenes) and SF-11 (for Salmonella Enteritidis) were used to generate a specific fluorescent signal. Signal acquisition was performed by launching a laser-light (635 nm) from an Analyte-2000. This immunosensor was able to detect 103 - 109 cfu/ml of L. monocytogenes or 106-109 cfu/ml of Salmonella Enteritidis and the assays were conducted at near real-time with results obtained within one hour of sampling. The assays were specific and showed signal even in the presence of other microorganisms such as E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella Typhimurium. In the SPR system, IAsys instrument (resonant mirror sensor) was used. Monoclonal antibody-C11E9 was directly immobilized onto a carboxylate cuvette. Whole Listeria cells at various concentrations did not yield any signal while surface protein extracts did. Crude protein extracts from L. monocytogenes and L. innocua had average binding responses of around 150 arc sec (0.25 ng/mm2), which was significantly different from L. grayi, L. ivanovii, or L. welshimeri with average responses of <48 arc sec. Both fiber-optic and SPR sensors show promise in near real-time detection of foodborne L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Enteritidis.

  15. [Generation of recombinant human antibodies for EV71 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Na; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, De-Xin; Liang, Mi-Fang

    2011-06-01

    To obtain recombinant human anti-EV71 antibodies from a EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease patient-derived antibody phage library. A combinatorial human scFv library to enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus was constructed using antibody genes harvested from the blood of EV71 virus patients. The library was panned and selected by using purified VP1 protein of EV71 virus with phage display. After that the specific antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. One unique human scFv antibody specific for EV71 virus VP1 protein was obtained by ELISA, IFA and analysis of the antibody DNA sequence. The specific anti-VP1 human scFv antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. The full human IgG antibody was tested in vitro for EV71 virus neutralization, resulting in no neutralizing activity with EV71 A type and EV71 C4 subtype. The obtained human anti-EV71 antibodies without neutralizing activity laid the foundation for diagnosis of human EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

  16. Suitability of Optical, Physical and Chemical Measurements for Detection of Changes in Bacterial Drinking Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality. PMID:24284353

  17. A Novel Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors with Special Boronic Acid Derivative to Detect Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We proposed and demonstrated a novel tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR label-free biosensor via a special boronic acid derivative to detect glycoprotein with high sensitivity and selectivity. TFBG, as an effective sensing element for optical sensing in near-infrared wavelengths, possess the unique capability of easily exciting the SPR effect on fiber surface which coated with a nano-scale metal layer. SPR properties can be accurately detected by measuring the variation of transmitted spectra at optical communication wavelengths. In our experiment, a 10° TFBG coated with a 50 nm gold film was manufactured to stimulate SPR on a sensor surface. To detect glycoprotein selectively, the sensor was immobilized using designed phenylboronic acid as the recognition molecule, which can covalently bond with 1,2- or 1,3-diols to form five- or six-membered cyclic complexes for attaching diol-containing biomolecules and proteins. The phenylboronic acid was synthetized with long alkyl groups offering more flexible space, which was able to improve the capability of binding glycoprotein. The proposed TFBG-SPR sensors exhibit good selectivity and repeatability with a protein concentration sensitivity up to 2.867 dB/ (mg/mL and a limit of detection (LOD of 15.56 nM.

  18. Suitability of optical, physical and chemical measurements for detection of changes in bacterial drinking water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-10-25

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality.

  19. In situ plankton and fish detection based on optical gated sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yuliang

    2016-06-20

    For the in situ detection technologies of planktons and fishes, optical cameras traditionally have a small and fixed sampling volume with a strong target-sized dependent (typically2  cm) with a problem of species identification. To solve the above problems, this paper proposes an in situ detection method of optical gated sampling for millimeter- to centimeter-scale plankton and fish detection. In this method, the sampling volume can be flexibly adjusted by matching the temporal parameters of gate pulses and illuminator laser pulses to satisfy target observation with different sizes. The gated sampling suppresses the backscattering of water and also filters the environment background so that transparent planktons can be detected by high contrast. Furthermore, the sampling volume is determined by the convolution of gate pulses and laser pulses, and thus the target abundance is derived. Theory and simulation of abundance measurement are established. In experiments, transparent jellyfishes are recorded with a spatial resolution of better than 100 μm. In addition, proof experiments of sampling volume adjustment and abundance measurement are demonstrated.

  20. Characterization of extracts of coals and coal-derived products by liquid chromatography using optical activity detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbitt, D.R.; Aida, T.; Chen, Y.Y.; Reitsma, B.H.; Rougvie, A.; Smith, B.F.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Extracts from various coals and coal-derived products were studied using liquid chromatography with optical activity detection. The chromatograms show that there are substantial numbers of optically active components in these samples. Since both dextrorotatory and laevorotatory components are present, some mutual cancellation would result if only the bulk optical rotation were measured. The chromatograms are generally rich in structure and contain distinct features which may be good fingerprints for establishing the origins of the coals and monitoring coal processing.

  1. High-Contrast Imaging using Adaptive Optics for Extrasolar Planet Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Julia Wilhelmsen [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Direct imaging of extrasolar planets is an important, but challenging, next step in planetary science. Most planets identified to date have been detected indirectly--not by emitted or reflected light but through the effect of the planet on the parent star. For example, radial velocity techniques measure the doppler shift in the spectrum of the star produced by the presence of a planet. Indirect techniques only probe about 15% of the orbital parameter space of our solar system. Direct methods would probe new parameter space, and the detected light can be analyzed spectroscopically, providing new information about detected planets. High contrast adaptive optics systems, also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO), will require contrasts of between 10-6 and 10-7 at angles of 4-24 λ/D on an 8-m class telescope to image young Jupiter-like planets still warm with the heat of formation. Contrast is defined as the intensity ratio of the dark wings of the image, where a planet might be, to the bright core of the star. Such instruments will be technically challenging, requiring high order adaptive optics with > 2000 actuators and improved diffraction suppression. Contrast is ultimately limited by residual static wavefront errors, so an extrasolar planet imager will require wavefront control with an accuracy of better than 1 nm rms within the low- to mid-spatial frequency range. Laboratory demonstrations are critical to instrument development. The ExAO testbed at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics was designed with low wavefront error and precision optical metrology, which is used to explore contrast limits and develop the technology needed for an extrasolar planet imager. A state-of-the-art, 1024-actuator micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror was installed and characterized to provide active wavefront control and test this novel technology. I present 6.5 x 10-8 contrast measurements with a prolate shaped pupil and

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  3. Optical Dependence of Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance in Lightly Doped Si:P Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp J.; Guy, Mallory L.; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    2017-06-01

    Using frequency-modulated electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), we show that signals measured from lightly doped (1.2 - 5 ×1 015 cm-3 ) silicon devices vary significantly with the wavelength of the optical excitation used to generate the mobile carriers. We measure EDMR spectra at 4.2 K as a function of modulation frequency and applied microwave power using a 980-nm laser, a 405-nm laser, and a broadband white-light source. EDMR signals are observed from the phosphorus donor and two distinct defect species in all of the experiments. With near-infrared irradiation, we find that the EDMR signal primarily arises from donor-defect pairs, while, at higher photon energies, there are significant additional contributions from defect-defect pairs. The contribution of spins from different spatial regions to the EDMR signal is seen to vary as the optical penetration depth changes from about 120 nm at 405-nm illumination to 100 μ m at 980-nm illumination. The modulation frequency dependence of the EDMR signal shows that the energy of the optical excitation strongly modulates the kinetics of the underlying spin-dependent recombination (SDR) process. Careful tuning of the optical photon energy could therefore be used to control both the subset of spin pairs contributing to the EDMR signal and the dynamics of the SDR process.

  4. [Research on the blood components detecting by multi-optical path length spectroscopy technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Zhe; Liu, Rui; Wang, Hui-quan; Wu, Hong-jie; Lin, Ling

    2010-09-01

    To discuss the feasibility of using the serum's multi-optical path length spectroscopy information for measuring the concentration of the human blood components, the automatic micro-displacement measuring device was designed, which can obtain the near-infrared multi-optical path length from 0 to 4.0 mm (interval is 0.2 mm) spectra of 200 serum samples with multioptical path length spectrum of serum participated in building the quantitative analysis model of four components of the human blood: glucose (GLU), total cholesterol (TC), total protein (TP) and albumin (ALB), by mean of the significant non-linear spectral characteristic of blood. Partial least square (PLS) was used to set up the calibration models of the multi-optical path length near-infrared absorption spectrum of 160 experimental samples against the biochemical analysis results of them. The blood components of another 40 samples were predicted according to the model. The prediction effect of four blood components was favorable, and the correlation coefficient (r) of predictive value and biochemical analysis value were 0.9320, 0.9712, 0.9462 and 0.9483, respectively. All of the results proved the feasibility of the multi-optical path length spectroscopy technique for blood components analysis. And this technique established the foundation of detecting the components of blood and other liquid conveniently and rapidly.

  5. Optical tweezers with fluorescence detection for temperature-dependent microrheological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shundo, Atsuomi; Hori, Koichiro; Penaloza, David P.; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a setup of optical tweezers, capable of carrying out temperature-dependent rheological measurements of soft materials. In our setup, the particle displacement is detected by imaging a bright spot due to fluorescence emitted from a dye-labeled particle against a dark background onto a quadrant photodiode. This setup has a relatively wide space around the sample that allows us to further accessorize the optical tweezers by a temperature control unit. The applicability of the setup was examined on the basis of the rheological measurements using a typical viscoelastic system, namely a worm-like micelle solution. The temperature and frequency dependences of the local viscoelastic functions of the worm-like micelle solution obtained by this setup were in good accordance with those obtained by a conventional oscillatory rheometer, confirming the capability of the optical tweezers as a tool for the local rheological measurements of soft materials. Since the optical tweezers measurements only require a tiny amount of sample (˜40 μL), the rheological measurements using our setup should be useful for soft materials of which the available amount is limited.

  6. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification.

  7. MeerLICHT and BlackGEM: custom-built telescopes to detect faint optical transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Steven; Groot, Paul; Woudt, Patrick; Klein Wolt, Marc; McBride, Vanessa; Nelemans, Gijs; Körding, Elmar; Pretorius, Margaretha L.; Roelfsema, Ronald; Bettonvil, Felix; Balster, Harry; Bakker, Roy; Dolron, Peter; van Elteren, Arjen; Elswijk, Eddy; Engels, Arno; Fender, Rob; Fokker, Marc; de Haan, Menno; Hagoort, Klaas; de Hoog, Jasper; ter Horst, Rik; van der Kevie, Giel; Kozłowski, Stanisław; Kragt, Jan; Lech, Grzegorz; Le Poole, Rudolf; Lesman, Dirk; Morren, Johan; Navarro, Ramon; Paalberends, Willem-Jelle; Paterson, Kerry; Pawłaszek, Rafal; Pessemier, Wim; Raskin, Gert; Rutten, Harrie; Scheers, Bart; Schuil, Menno; Sybilski, Piotr W.

    2016-07-01

    We present the MeerLICHT and BlackGEM telescopes, which are wide-field optical telescopes that are currently being built to study transient phenomena, gravitational wave counterparts and variable stars. The telescopes have 65 cm primary mirrors and a 2.7 square degree field-of-view. The MeerLICHT and BlackGEM projects have different science goals, but will use identical telescopes. The first telescope, MeerLICHT, will be commissioned at Sutherland (South Africa) in the first quarter of 2017. It will co-point with MeerKAT to collect optical data commensurate with the radio observations. After careful analysis of MeerLICHT's performance, three telescopes of the same type will be commissioned in La Silla (Chile) in 2018 to form phase I of the BlackGEM array. BlackGEM aims at detecting and characterizing optical counterparts of gravitational wave events detected by Advanced LIGO and Virgo. In this contribution we present an overview of the science goals, the design and the status of the two projects.

  8. Direct-detection optical OFDM superchannel for long-reach PON using pilot regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Yang, Qi; Xiao, Xiao; Gui, Tao; Li, Zhaohui; Luo, Ming; Yu, Shaohua; You, Shanhong

    2013-11-04

    We demonstrate a novel long-reach PON downstream scheme based on the regenerated pilot assisted direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) superchannel transmission. We use the optical comb source to form DDO-OFDM superchannel, and reserve the center carrier as a seed pilot. The seed pilot is further tracked and reused to generate multiple optical carriers at the local exchange. Each regenerated pilot carrier is selected to beat with an adjacent OFDM sub-band at ONU, so that the electrical bandwidth limitation can be much released compared to the conventional DDO-OFDM superchannel detection. With the proposed proof-of-concept architecture, we experimentally demonstrated a 116.7 Gb/s superchannel OFDM-PON system with transmission reach of 100 km, and 1:64 splitting ratio. We analyze the impact of carrier-to-sideband power ratio (CSPR) on system performance. The experiment result shows that, 5 dB power margin is still remained at ONU using such technique.

  9. Selective Adsorption on Fluorinated Plastic Enables the Optical Detection of Molecular Pollutants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranco, R.; Giavazzi, F.; Salina, M.; Tagliabue, G.; Di Nicolò, E.; Bellini, T.; Buscaglia, M.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous fluorinated plastic can be produced with a refractive index similar to that of water, a condition that makes it essentially invisible when immersed in aqueous solutions. Because of this property, even a small amount of adsorbed molecules on the plastic-water interface provides a detectable optical signal. We investigate two distinct substrates made of this material, characterized by different interface areas: a prism and a microporous membrane. We demonstrate that both substrates enable the label-free detection of molecular compounds in water even without any surface functionalization. The adsorption of molecules on the planar surface of the prism provides an increase of optical reflectivity, whereas the adsorption on the internal surface of the microporous membrane yields an increase of scattered light. Despite the different mechanisms, we find a similar optical response upon adsorption. We confirm this result by a theoretical model accounting for both reflection and scattering. We investigate the spontaneous adsorption process for different kinds of molecules: surfactants with different charges, a protein (lysozyme), and a constituent of gasoline (hexane). The measured equilibrium and kinetic constants for adsorption differ by orders of magnitudes among the different classes of molecules. By suitable analytical models, accounting for the effects of mass limitation and transport, we find a simple and general scaling of the adsorption parameters with the molecular size.

  10. Integrated optical systems for excitation delivery and broadband detection in micro-fluidic electrochromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEMME,SHANALYN A.; WARREN,MIAL E.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WENDT,JOEL R.; BAILEY,CHRISTOPHER G.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; ARNOLD,DON W.; CARTER,TONY RAY; ASBILL,RANDOLPH E.; SAMORA,SALLY

    2000-03-15

    The authors have designed and assembled two generations of integrated micro-optical systems that deliver pump light and detect broadband laser-induced fluorescence in micro-fluidic chemical separation systems employing electrochromatography. The goal is to maintain the sensitivity attainable with larger, tabletop machines while decreasing package size and increasing throughput (by decreasing the required chemical volume). One type of micro-optical system uses vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) as the excitation source. Light from the VCSELs is relayed with four-level surface relief diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and delivered to the chemical volume through substrate-mode propagation. Indirect fluorescence from dye-quenched chemical species is collected and collimated with a high numerical aperture DOE. A filter blocks the excitation wavelength, and the resulting signal is detected as the chemical separation proceeds. Variations of this original design include changing the combination of reflective and transmissive DOEs and optimizing the high numerical aperture DOE with a rotationally symmetric iterative discrete on-axis algorithm. The authors will discuss the results of these implemented optimizations.

  11. Detection of optical emission associated with the Galactic SNR G64.5+0.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustadt, Jack M. M.; Fesen, Robert A.; Black, Christine S.

    2017-07-01

    We present optical observations of the radio-faint Galactic supernova remnant G64.5+0.9. Despite its small angular diameter (˜8 arcmin) and nearly spherical morphology suggestive of a relatively young age, the current estimated distance of ˜11 kpc implies a large and relatively old remnant. We have detected faint H α and [S ii] emission in thin filaments around the remnant's northern and western limbs. Low-dispersion spectra indicate radiative-type shock emission with [S ii]/H α ratios of 1.1 to 1.5, consistent with that seen in old supernova remnants. The detection of associated optical emission for such a radio-faint remnant is unexpected given the remnant's estimated distance and location so close to the Galactic plane. Despite the remnant's small angular size, spherical morphology and thin emission filaments like those seen in relatively young Balmer-dominated supernova remnants, our optical spectra show radiative shock emissions consistent with an old age and large distance.

  12. Dead/alive bacteria detection using an all-fibre optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolny, E.; Swift, S.; Cheng, M.; van Binsbergen, S.; Vanholsbeeck, F.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate monitoring of microbial viability plays an essential role in pharmacodynamic studies such as in estimating the efficiency of antimicrobial agents. Traditionally, bacterial viability is determined by their ability to form colonies on solid growth medium or to proliferate in liquid nutrient broths but, with these culture-based methods, the live bacterial population can only be estimated retrospectively. To address this challenge, we have employed differential fluorescence staining and an all-fiber optical system developed by our group. The detection is based on the collection of the fluorescence from commercial dyes that produce a substantially increased signal upon binding with bacterial nucleic acids. The dyes allow discrimination between alive and dead cells through differential membrane permeability and fluorescence wavelength. The respective fluorescence signal is correlated to the number of bacterial cells present in the sample. Our setup uses DPSS lasers and a sensitive CCD-based spectrometer over the 400-800 nm wavelength range. A laser shutter allows the sample exposure time and acquisition time to be synchronized to minimize the effect of photobleaching. As a model, bacteria (Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus) killed with isopropyl alcohol were mixed with live cells at different ratios. The population ratios of alive and dead cells were accurately quantified by our optical setup providing a rapid method for the estimation of bactericidal treatments. In summary, our optical system may offer a robust, accurate and fast alternative for detection of dead/alive bacteria in turbid solution opening the new avenues for pharmacodynamic studies.

  13. Application of a novel optical fiber sensor to detection of acoustic emissions by various damages in CFRP laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we applied a novel optical fiber sensor, phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating balanced sensor with high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, to acoustic emission (AE) detection in carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs). AE signals generated in the tensile testing of angle-ply and cross-ply CFRP laminates were both detected by the novel optical fiber sensor and traditional PZT sensors. The cumulative hits detected by both sensors coincided after applying simple data processing to eliminate the noise, and clearly exhibited Kaiser effect and Felicity effect. Typical AE signals detected by both sensors were discussed and were tried to relate to micro CFRP damages observed via microscope. These results demonstrate that this novel optical fiber sensor can reliably detect AE signals from various damages. It has the potential to be used in practical AE detection, as an alternative to the piezoelectric PZT sensor.

  14. Edge detection for optical synthetic aperture based on deep neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenjie; Hui, Mei; Liu, Ming; Kong, Lingqin; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin

    2017-09-01

    Synthetic aperture optics systems can meet the demands of the next-generation space telescopes being lighter, larger and foldable. However, the boundaries of segmented aperture systems are much more complex than that of the whole aperture. More edge regions mean more imaging edge pixels, which are often mixed and discretized. In order to achieve high-resolution imaging, it is necessary to identify the gaps between the sub-apertures and the edges of the projected fringes. In this work, we introduced the algorithm of Deep Neural Network into the edge detection of optical synthetic aperture imaging. According to the detection needs, we constructed image sets by experiments and simulations. Based on MatConvNet, a toolbox of MATLAB, we ran the neural network, trained it on training image set and tested its performance on validation set. The training was stopped when the test error on validation set stopped declining. As an input image is given, each intra-neighbor area around the pixel is taken into the network, and scanned pixel by pixel with the trained multi-hidden layers. The network outputs make a judgment on whether the center of the input block is on edge of fringes. We experimented with various pre-processing and post-processing techniques to reveal their influence on edge detection performance. Compared with the traditional algorithms or their improvements, our method makes decision on a much larger intra-neighbor, and is more global and comprehensive. Experiments on more than 2,000 images are also given to prove that our method outperforms classical algorithms in optical images-based edge detection.

  15. Easy to use plastic optical fiber-based biosensor for detection of butanal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Cennamo

    Full Text Available The final goal of this work is to achieve a selective detection of butanal by the realization of a simple, small-size and low cost experimental approach. To this end, a porcine odorant-binding protein was used in connection with surface plasmon resonance transduction in a plastic optical fiber tool for the selective detection of butanal by a competitive assay. This allows to reduce the cost and the size of the sensing device and it offers the possibility to design a "Lab-on-a-chip" platform. The obtained results showed that this system approach is able to selectively detect the presence of butanal in the concentration range from 20 μM to 1000 μM.

  16. Analysis on detection accuracy of binocular photoelectric instrument optical axis parallelism digital calibration instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Jia-ju; Yin, Jian-ling; Wu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Jie; Chen, Yu-dan

    2017-11-01

    Low-light level night vision device and thermal infrared imaging binocular photoelectric instrument are used widely. The maladjustment of binocular instrument ocular axises parallelism will cause the observer the symptom such as dizziness, nausea, when use for a long time. Binocular photoelectric equipment digital calibration instrument is developed for detecting ocular axises parallelism. And the quantitative value of optical axis deviation can be quantitatively measured. As a testing instrument, the precision must be much higher than the standard of test instrument. Analyzes the factors that influence the accuracy of detection. Factors exist in each testing process link which affect the precision of the detecting instrument. They can be divided into two categories, one category is factors which directly affect the position of reticle image, the other category is factors which affect the calculation the center of reticle image. And the Synthesize error is calculated out. And further distribute the errors reasonably to ensure the accuracy of calibration instruments.

  17. Alamouti-Type Space-Time Coding for Free-Space Optical Communication with Direct Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M. K.; Vilnrotter, V.

    2003-11-01

    In optical communication systems employing direct detection at the receiver, intensity modulations such as on-off keying (OOK) or pulse-position modulation (PPM) are commonly used to convey the information. Consider the possibility of applying space-time coding in such a scenario, using, for example, an Alamouti-type coding scheme [1]. Implicit in the Alamouti code is the fact that the modulation that defines the signal set is such that it is meaningful to transmit and detect both the signal and its negative. While modulations such as phase-shift keying (PSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) naturally fall into this class, OOK and PPM do not since the signal polarity (phase) would not be detected at the receiver. We investigate a modification of the Alamouti code to be used with such modulations that has the same desirable properties as the conventional Alamouti code but does not rely on the necessity of transmitting the negative of a signal.

  18. Imaging and detection of early stage dental caries with an all-optical photoacoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D. A.; Sampathkumar, A.; Longbottom, C.; Kirk, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Tooth decay, at its earliest stages, manifests itself as small, white, subsurface lesions in the enamel. Current methods for detection in the dental clinic are visual and tactile investigations, and bite-wing X-ray radiographs. These techniques suffer from poor sensitivity and specificity at the earliest (and reversible) stages of the disease due to the small size (techniques allow. PA images were cross referenced with histology photographs to validate our experimental results. Our PA system provides a noncontact method for early detection of white-spot lesions with a high detection bandwidth that offers advantages over previously demonstrated ultrasound methods. The technique provides the sensing depth of an ultrasound system, but with the spatial resolution of an optical system.

  19. Birefringence measurement in polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using differential-envelope detection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Lin, Shey-Chien; Chuang, Chung-Yu

    2010-05-01

    In this research, we integrated two demodulating logarithmic amplifiers with one differential amplifier for use in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer so as to obtain a two-channel polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system. Birefringence signals can be acquired using this system along with a differential-envelope detection method. Because the two orthogonal polarizations are common-path propagation, common noise originating from background fluctuations or multiple scattering in turbid media can be reduced to improve the detection sensitivity and accuracy of birefringence measurement. Besides, this simple and effective technique is an analog detection method and is capable of providing high temporal response; it can also help obtain a high time-bandwidth product as compared to the conventional method of using a numerical method with a limited sampling rate. The feasibility of the proposed system is supported by theory and is also shown by performing experiments involving a human vessel, which is a highly scattering medium with weak birefringence.

  20. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  1. Fuzzy - Based Method of Detecting the Enviroment Character for UAV Optical Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Novak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An optical stabilization of UAV (UAS is a very important part of a structure in their control systems. Not only as a backup stabilization system in a case of IMU failure, but also as a main system, used for stabilization or navigation. In this paper the concept of a system for environment character detection is presented. The system can classify a surrounding environment depending on chosen characteristics. Such system can be used for a better horizon detection due to switching to a correct horizon detection algorithm, which can be used for determining the position of UAV. The system is based on Takagi - Sugeno fuzzy inference system and fuzzy artificial neural networks. An earlier work on this subject was presented last year, but concept of the system was redesigned with a usage of fuzzy artificial neural network for a more precisive outputs and automatic determination of characteristics of fuzzy sets on input.

  2. A Fiber-Optic Probe Design for Combustion Chamber Flame Detection Applications-Design Criteria, Performance Specifications, and Fabrication Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Harper, Samuel E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents the design and development of the fiber-optic probes utilized in the flame detection systems used in NASA Langley Research Center's 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8-ft HTT). Two independent flame detection systems are utilized to monitor the presence and stability of the main-burner and pilot-level flames during facility operation. Due to the harsh environment within the combustor, the successful development of a rugged and efficient fiber-optic probe was a critical milestone in the development of these flame detection systems. The final optical probe design for the two flame detection systems resulted from research that was conducted in Langley's 7-in High Temperature Pilot Tunnel (7-in HTT). A detailed description of the manufacturing process behind the optical probes used in the 8-ft HTT is provided in Appendix A of this report.

  3. Fiber-Optic Magnetic-Field-Strength Measurement System for Lightning Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurecki, Jay; Scully, Robert; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Bucholtz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system is designed to measure magnetic fields associated with a lightning stroke. Field vector magnitudes are detected and processed for multiple locations. Since physical limitations prevent the sensor elements from being located in close proximity to highly conductive materials such as aluminum, the copper wire sensor elements (3) are located inside a 4-cubic-in. (.66-cubic-cm) plastic housing sensor head and connected to a fiber-optic conversion module by shielded cabling, which is limited to the shortest length feasible. The signal path between the conversion module and the avionics unit which processes the signals are fiber optic, providing enhanced immunity from electromagnetic radiation incident in the vicinity of the measurements. The sensors are passive, lightweight, and much smaller than commercial B-dot sensors in the configuration which measures a three-dimensional magnetic field. The system is expandable, and provides a standard-format output signal for downstream processing. Inside of the sensor head, three small search coils, each having a few turns on a circular form, are mounted orthogonally inside the non-metallic housing. The fiber-optic conversion module comprises three interferometers, one for each search coil. Each interferometer has a high bandwidth optical phase modulator that impresses the signal received from its search coil onto its output. The output of each interferometer travels by fiber optic cable to the avionics unit, and the search coil signal is recovered by an optical phase demodulator. The output of each demodulator is fed to an analog-to-digital converter, whose sampling rate is determined by the maximum expected rate of rise and peak signal magnitude. The output of the digital processor is a faithful reproduction of the coil response to the incident magnetic field. This information is provided in a standard output format on a 50-ohm port that can be connected to any number of data collection and processing

  4. Toward photostable multiplex analyte detection on a single mode planar optical waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xei, Hongshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [NON LANL; Swanson, Basil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the sensitive and specific detection of biomarkers associated with disease. Our technology combines the superior optical properties of single-mode planar waveguides, the robust nature of functionalized self-assembled monolayer sensing films and the specificity of fluorescence sandwich immunoassays to detect biomarkers in complex biological samples such as serum, urine and sputum. We have previously reported the adaptation of our technology to the detection of biomarkers associated with breast cancer and anthrax. However, these approaches primarily used phospholipid bilayers as the functional film and organic dyes (ex: AlexaFluors) as the fluorescence reporter. Organic dyes are easily photodegraded and are not amenable to multiplexing because of their narrow Stokes' shift. Here we have developed strategies for conjugation of the detector antibodies with quantum dots for use in a multiplex detection platform. We have previously evaluated dihydroxylipoic acid quantum dots for the detection of a breast cancer biomarker. In this manuscript, we investigate the detection of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen using antibodies conjugated with polymer-coated quantum dots. Kinetics of binding on the waveguide-based biosensor is reported. We compare the sensitivity of quantum dot labeled antibodies to those labeled with AlexaFluor and demonstrate the photostability of the former in our assay platform. In addition, we compare sulfydryl labeling of the antibody in the hinge region to that of nonspecific amine labeling. This is but the first step in developing a multiplex assay for such biomarkers on our waveguide platform.

  5. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  6. Optical Strain and Crack-Detection Measurements on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Clem, Michelle M.; Fralick, Gustave

    2013-01-01

    The development of techniques for the in-situ measurement and structural health monitoring of the rotating components in gas turbine engines is of major interest to NASA. As part of this on-going effort, several experiments have been undertaken to develop methods for detecting cracks and measuring strain on rotating turbine engine like disks. Previous methods investigated have included the use of blade tip clearance sensors to detect the presence of cracks by monitoring the change in measured blade tip clearance and analyzing the combined disk-rotor system's vibration response. More recently, an experiment utilizing a novel optical Moiré based concept has been conducted on a subscale turbine engine disk to demonstrate a potential strain measurement and crack detection technique. Moiré patterns result from the overlap of two repetitive patterns with slightly different spacing. When this technique is applied to a rotating disk, it has the potential to allow for the detection of very small changes in spacing and radial growth in a rotating disk due to a flaw such as a crack. This investigation was a continuation of previous efforts undertaken in 2011 to 2012 to validate this optical concept. The initial demonstration attempted on a subscale turbine engine disk was inconclusive due to the minimal radial growth experienced by the disk during operation. For the present experiment a new subscale Aluminum disk was fabricated and improvements were made to the experimental setup to better demonstrate the technique. A circular reference pattern was laser etched onto a subscale engine disk and the disk was operated at speeds up to 12 000 rpm as a means of optically monitoring the Moiré created by the shift in patterns created by the radial growth due the presence of the simulated crack. Testing was first accomplished on a clean defect free disk as a means of acquiring baseline reference data. A notch was then machined in to the disk to simulate a crack and testing was

  7. Optical processor for real-time detection of defects in textile webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissl, Mario; Schwarzer, Heiko; Teiwes, Stephan; Gruber, Hartmut; Krueger, Sven; Wernicke, Guenther K.

    1997-03-01

    Image processing has become a topic of high relevance for automated product inspection in industrial manufacturing. A typical problem is the examination of structured surfaces of textiles to identify or classify defects. Product inspection under real-time conditions requires very powerful image processing systems which motivates the implementation of optical system concepts. In this paper we present a prototype of a coherent-optical processor which is used for the detection of defects in textile web images at video frame rate. After discussing the processor architecture and its underlying filter concept experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the system which is proposed to work as preprocessor in an opto-electronic image processing system.

  8. Sparse Volterra model based on optical single side-band NPAM-4 direct-detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hao; Zhu, Mingyue; Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xingwen; Song, Yang; Qiu, Kun

    2018-01-01

    Signal-to-signal beating interference (SSBI) is one of the main drawbacks in direct-detection based optical transmission systems. Volterra filter is a common equalization method to mitigate the nonlinear distortion. However, the computational complexity may be unacceptable as the transmission capacity increases. In this paper, we propose a sparse Volterra model combining the feed forward equalization (FFE) and higher order terms of a modified Volterra filter with Schmidt orthogonal searching to mitigate the linear and nonlinear interference and reduce the complexity significantly in an optical single-side band (SSB) Nyquist pulse-shaped four-level pulse amplitude (NPAM-4) system. The experimental results show that the sparse Volterra filter and full Volterra filter have comparable performance, but the former only needs half kernels of the latter.

  9. A Self-Referencing Intensity Based Polymer Optical Fiber Sensor for Liquid Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, David Sánchez; Vázquez, Carmen; Möllers, Ingo; Arrúe, Jon; Jäger, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A novel self-referencing fiber optic intensity sensor based on bending losses of a partially polished polymer optical fiber (POF) coupler is presented. The coupling ratio (K) depends on the external liquid in which the sensor is immersed. It is possible to distinguish between different liquids and to detect their presence. Experimental results for the most usual liquids found in industry, like water and oil, are given. K value increases up to 10% from the nominal value depending on the liquid. Sensor temperature dependence has also been studied for a range from 25 °C (environmental condition) to 50 °C. Any sector requiring liquid level measurements in flammable atmospheres can benefit from this intrinsically safe technology. PMID:22454594

  10. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  11. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented.

  12. Self-magnetic-leakage field detection using magneto-optical sensor technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegemann Robert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of spontaneous magnetic stray field signals has been reported to be a promising tool for capturing macro-scale information of deformation states, defects and stress concentration zones in a material structure. This paper offers a new method for self-magnetic leakage field detection using a magneto-optical (MO hand-held microscope. Its sensor has a dynamic field range between ±0.05 and ±2 kA/m and a lateral optical resolution of approx. 10 μm. We examined flat tensile test specimens of metastable austenitic steel AISI 304. Static tensile tests were repeatedly interrupted at various predetermined states of strain and the magnetic information was measured by the MO system. Comparative measurements using a high-precision magnetic field GMR-sensor, verify the outstanding capability of the MO microscope regarding spatial resolution of magnetic fields.

  13. Fiber-optic integration and efficient detection schemes for optomechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Justin D.

    With the advent of the laser in the year 1960, the field of optics experienced a renaissance from what was considered to be a dull, solved subject to an active area of development, with applications and discoveries which are yet to be exhausted 55 years later. Light is now nearly ubiquitous not only in cutting-edge research in physics, chemistry, and biology, but also in modern technology and infrastructure. One quality of light, that of the imparted radiation pressure force upon reflection from an object, has attracted intense interest from researchers seeking to precisely monitor and control the motional degrees of freedom of an object using light. These optomechanical interactions have inspired myriad proposals, ranging from quantum memories and transducers in quantum information networks to precision metrology of classical forces. Alongside advances in micro- and nano-fabrication, the burgeoning field of optomechanics has yielded a class of highly engineered systems designed to produce strong interactions between light and motion. Optomechanical crystals are one such system in which the patterning of periodic holes in thin dielectric films traps both light and sound waves to a micro-scale volume. These devices feature strong radiation pressure coupling between high-quality optical cavity modes and internal nanomechanical resonances. Whether for applications in the quantum or classical domain, the utility of optomechanical crystals hinges on the degree to which light radiating from the device, having interacted with mechanical motion, can be collected and detected in an experimental apparatus consisting of conventional optical components such as lenses and optical fibers. While several efficient methods of optical coupling exist to meet this task, most are unsuitable for the cryogenic or vacuum integration required for many applications. The first portion of this dissertation will detail the development of robust and efficient methods of optically coupling

  14. Saliva surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for noninvasive optical detection of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xueliang; Ge, Xiaosong; Xu, Zhihong; Zheng, Zuci; Huang, Wei; Hong, Quanxing; Lin, Duo

    2016-10-01

    The early cancer detection is of great significance to increase the patient's survival rate and reduce the risk of cancer development. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique, a rapid, convenient, nondestructive optical detection method, can provide a characteristic "fingerprint" information of target substances, even achieving single molecule detection. Its ultra-high detection sensitivity has made it become one of the most potential biochemical detection methods. Saliva, a multi-constituent oral fluid, contains the bio-markers which is capable of reflecting the systemic health condition of human, showing promising potential as an effect medium for disease monitoring. Compared with the serum samples, the collection and processing of saliva is safer, more convenient and noninvasive. Thus, saliva test is becoming the hotspot issues of the noninvasive cancer research field. This review highlights and analyzes current application progress within the field of SERS saliva test in cancer detection. Meanwhile, the primary research results of SERS saliva for the noninvasive differentiation of nasopharyngeal cancer, normal and rhinitis obtained by our group are shown.

  15. How Do The EV Project Participants Feel About Charging Their EV Away From Home?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The EV Project is an infrastructure study that enrolled over 8,000 residential participants. These participants purchased or leased a Nissan Leaf battery electric vehicle or Chevrolet Volt extended-range electric vehicle and were among the first to explore this new electric drive technology. Collectively, battery electric vehicles, extended-range electric vehicles, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles are called PEVs. The EV Project participants were very cooperative and enthusiastic about their participation in the project and very supportive in providing feedback and information. The information and attitudes of these participants concerning their experience with their PEVs were solicited using a survey in June 2013. At that time, some had up to 3 years of experience with their PEVs.

  16. Species-specific optical genosensors for the detection of mycotoxigenic Fusarium fungi in food samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltomaa, Riikka; Vaghini, Silvia [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Patiño, Belén [Department of Microbiology III, Faculty of Biology, Complutense University, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Benito-Peña, Elena, E-mail: elenabp@ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Moreno-Bondi, María C., E-mail: mcmbondi@ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2016-09-07

    Plant-pathogenic Fusarium species, Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum, are the major producers of fumonisins which are one of the most common mycotoxins found in maize. Herein, we report the development of specific and sensitive genosensors for detecting these two closely related Fusarium species in food samples. The sensors are based on species-specific capture and detection probes, which bind to the intergenic spacer region of rDNA (IGS). Oligonucleotide functionalized magnetic microbeads are used to capture the target DNA which is then detected using biotinylated detection probes and a streptavidin-coupled label. The developed genosensors had detection limits of 1.8 pM and 3.0 pM for F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides, respectively, using synthetic DNA targets. Furthermore, the biosensors were used to analyze natural fungal contamination of commercial maize samples. After amplification of the genomic DNA the sensors detected the presence of the fungi, in accordance with previous results obtained with PCR. No cross-reactivity between F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum, or other fungi species tested, was observed. The developed biosensors can provide a valuable tool to evaluate the potential for mycotoxin contamination in conditions where detection of mycotoxins directly is challenging. - Highlights: • Optical genosensors detect fumonisin producing Fusarium species in maize samples. • Oligonucleotide probes designed on the intergenic spacer region of rDNA can distinguish between closely related species. • Sandwich hybridization assay with magnetic microbeads allows species-specific detection of Fusarium spp. directly from PCR.

  17. Multi-sample immunoassay inside optical fiber capillary enabled by evanescent wave detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel evanescent wave-based (EW microfluidic capillary fiber-optic biosensor (MCFOB has been developed using capillaries as a transducer embedded in a multichannel device to enhance the collection efficiency of the fluorescence signal. The capillary serves dual roles as a waveguide and a container, enabling more straightforward, consistent, and compact biosensor packaging compared to conventional optical fiber biosensors and microfluidic systems. In order to detect multiple samples in one device, the biosensor incorporates a polydimethysiloxane (PDMS multi-channel device, which also serves as cladding for the biosensor. In addition, this biosensor only consumes 10 μl of a sample and does not require hydrofluoric acid etching in the fabrication process. The orientation for signal collection is optimized by comparing the lateral and normal signal directions for detected glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. C-reactive protein (CRP is used to validate the MCFOB, and the limit of detection (LOD for CRP in the MCFOB is 1.94 ng/ml (74 pM. Moreover, the real-time measurement is demonstrated to verify that the evanescent wave is the only exciting light source in the MCFOB, which gives the potential for real-time measurement applications.

  18. Optical techniques for breath analysis: from single to multi-species detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsaelae, Markus

    2017-09-05

    Optical spectroscopy can be used for trace level gas analysis in different applications, including exhaled breath research. A common approach is the targeted online, real-time analysis of small molecules (2-5 atoms). Currently, the methodology is normally used for the detection of single analytes at trace levels, or 2-3 species at most at the same time. The main limitation preventing sensitive multi-species detection has been the limited fast scanning range of the lasers used as light sources. This limitation is currently being eliminated by the availability of optical frequency combs (OFC) which offer wide spectral bandwidths and the benefits of a laser-type light source. Recent advances in mid-infrared OFC technology allow measurements in the so-called molecular fingerprint region of the electromagnetic spectrum where many molecules have strong fundamental vibrational transitions that enable sensitive detection. Several technical hurdles remain to overcome but if these problems can be solved, laser absorption spectroscopy has the potential to challenge mass spectrometry in online multi-species trace gas analysis. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Non-Intrusive Magneto-Optic Detecting System for Investigations of Air Switching Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Liu, Wanying; Geng, Yingsan

    2014-07-01

    In current investigations of electric arc plasmas, experiments based on modern testing technology play an important role. To enrich the testing methods and contribute to the understanding and grasping of the inherent mechanism of air switching arcs, in this paper, a non-intrusive detecting system is described that combines the magneto-optic imaging (MOI) technique with the solution to inverse electromagnetic problems. The detecting system works in a sequence of main steps as follows: MOI of the variation of the arc flux density over a plane, magnetic field information extracted from the magneto-optic (MO) images, arc current density distribution and spatial pattern reconstruction by inverting the resulting field data. Correspondingly, in the system, an MOI set-up is designed based on the Faraday effect and the polarization properties of light, and an intelligent inversion algorithm is proposed that involves simulated annealing (SA). Experiments were carried out for high current (2 kA RMS) discharge cases in a typical low-voltage switchgear. The results show that the MO detection system possesses the advantages of visualization, high resolution and response, and electrical insulation, which provides a novel diagnostics tool for further studies of the arc.

  20. Landslide Mapping in Vegetated Areas Using Change Detection Based on Optical and Polarimetric SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Plank

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of landslides, quickly providing information about the extent of the affected area and type and grade of damage, is crucial to enable fast crisis response, i.e., to support rescue and humanitarian operations. Most synthetic aperture radar (SAR data-based landslide detection approaches reported in the literature use change detection techniques, requiring very high resolution (VHR SAR imagery acquired shortly before the landslide event, which is commonly not available. Modern VHR SAR missions, e.g., Radarsat-2, TerraSAR-X, or COSMO-SkyMed, do not systematically cover the entire world, due to limitations in onboard disk space and downlink transmission rates. Here, we present a fast and transferable procedure for mapping of landslides, based on change detection between pre-event optical imagery and the polarimetric entropy derived from post-event VHR polarimetric SAR data. Pre-event information is derived from high resolution optical imagery of Landsat-8 or Sentinel-2, which are freely available and systematically acquired over the entire Earth’s landmass. The landslide mapping is refined by slope information from a digital elevation model generated from bi-static TanDEM-X imagery. The methodology was successfully applied to two landslide events of different characteristics: A rotational slide near Charleston, West Virginia, USA and a mining waste earthflow near Bolshaya Talda, Russia.

  1. Performance of optical biosensor using alcohol oxidase enzyme for formaldehyde detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, A. P.; Rachim, A.; Nurlely, Fauzia, V.

    2017-07-01

    The recent issue in the world is the long exposure of formaldehyde which is can increase the risk of human health, therefore, that is very important to develop a device and method that can be optimized to detect the formaldehyde elements accurately, have a long lifetime and can be fabricated and produced in large quantities. A new and simple prepared optical biosensor for detection of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions using alcohol oxidase (AOX) enzyme was successfully fabricated. The poly-n-butyl acrylic-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide (nBA-NAS) membranes containing chromoionophore ETH5294 were used for immobilization of alcohol oxidase enzyme (AOX). Biosensor response was based on the colour change of chromoionophore as a result of enzymatic oxidation of formaldehyde and correlated with the detection concentration of formaldehyde. The performance of biosensor parameters were measured through the optical absorption value using UV-Vis spectrophotometer including the repeatability, reproducibility, selectivity and lifetime. The results showed that the prepared biosensor has good repeatability (RSD = 1.9 %) and good reproducibility (RSD = 2.1 %). The biosensor was selective formaldehyde with no disturbance by methanol, ethanol, and acetaldehyde, and also stable before 49 days and decrease by 41.77 % after 49 days.

  2. Experimental detection of optical vortices with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin; Burke, Daniel; Devaney, Nicholas; Dainty, Chris

    2010-07-19

    Laboratory experiments are carried out to detect optical vortices in conditions typical of those experienced when a laser beam is propagated through the atmosphere. A Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) is used to mimic atmospheric turbulence and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is utilised to measure the slopes of the wavefront surface. A matched filter algorithm determines the positions of the Shack-Hartmann spot centroids more robustly than a centroiding algorithm. The slope discrepancy is then obtained by taking the slopes measured by the wavefront sensor away from the slopes calculated from a least squares reconstruction of the phase. The slope discrepancy field is used as an input to the branch point potential method to find if a vortex is present, and if so to give its position and sign. The use of the slope discrepancy technique greatly improves the detection rate of the branch point potential method. This work shows the first time the branch point potential method has been used to detect optical vortices in an experimental setup.

  3. Active Optical Sensors for Tree Stem Detection and Classification in Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garrido

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  4. Fiber Optic Bragg Grating Sensors for Thermographic Detection of Subsurface Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Winfree, William P.; Wu, Meng-Chou

    2009-01-01

    Conventional thermography with an infrared imager has been shown to be an extremely viable technique for nondestructively detecting subsurface anomalies such as thickness variations due to corrosion. A recently developed technique using fiber optic sensors to measure temperature holds potential for performing similar inspections without requiring an infrared imager. The structure is heated using a heat source such as a quartz lamp with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors at the surface of the structure to detect temperature. Investigated structures include a stainless steel plate with thickness variations simulated by small platelets attached to the back side using thermal grease. A relationship is shown between the FBG sensor thermal response and variations in material thickness. For comparison, finite element modeling was performed and found to agree closely with the fiber optic thermography results. This technique shows potential for applications where FBG sensors are already bonded to structures for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) strain measurements and can serve dual-use by also performing thermographic detection of subsurface anomalies.

  5. Comparison of Glaucoma Progression Detection by Optical Coherence Tomography and Visual Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinbo; Dastiridou, Anna; Francis, Brian A; Tan, Ou; Varma, Rohit; Greenfield, David S; Schuman, Joel S; Huang, David

    2017-12-01

    To compare longitudinal glaucoma progression detection using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and visual field (VF). Validity assessment. We analyzed subjects with more than 4 semi-annual follow-up visits (every 6 months) in the multicenter Advanced Imaging for Glaucoma Study. Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to map the thickness of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (NFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC). OCT-based progression detection was defined as a significant negative trend for either NFL or GCC. VF progression was reached if either the event or trend analysis reached significance. The analysis included 356 glaucoma suspect/preperimetric glaucoma (GS/PPG) eyes and 153 perimetric glaucoma (PG) eyes. Follow-up length was 54.1 ± 16.2 months for GS/PPG eyes and 56.7 ± 16.0 for PG eyes. Progression was detected in 62.1% of PG eyes and 59.8% of GS/PPG eyes by OCT, significantly (P glaucoma. While the utility of NFL declines in advanced glaucoma, GCC remains a sensitive progression detector from early to advanced stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Active optical sensors for tree stem detection and classification in nurseries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J; Hanson, Bradley D; Slaughter, David C

    2014-06-19

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  7. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  8. Detection of eccentricity in silver nanotubes by means of induced optical forces and torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeroth, R. M. Abraham; Lester, M. F.

    2015-10-01

    In previous works (Abraham et al 2011 Plasmonics 6 435; Abraham Ekeroth and Lester 2012 Plasmonics 7 579; Abraham Ekeroth and Lester 2013 Plasmonics 8 1417; Abraham Ekeroth R M and Lester M 2015 Plasmonics 10 989-98), we have conducted an exhaustive study about optical properties of metallic realistic two-dimensional (2D) nanotubes, using an experimental-interpolated dielectric function (Palik 1985 Handbook of Optical Constants of Solids (Toronto: Academic Press)). In the case of non-homogeneous metallic shells, we suggested (in a theoretical form) a procedure to detect the non-uniformity of shells in parallel, disperse and randomly oriented long nanotubes (2D system). This detection is based exclusively on the plasmonic properties of the response (Abraham Ekeroth and Lester 2012 Plasmonics 7 579). Here we consider exact calculations of forces and torques, exerted by light on these kinds of nanostructures, illustrating the mechanical effects of plasmonic excitations with one example of silver shell under p-polarized incidence. This study continues with the methodology implemented in the previous paper (Abraham Ekeroth R M and Lester M 2015 Plasmonics 10 989-98), for homogeneous nanotubes. The features of the electromagnetic interaction in these structures, from the point of view of mechanical magnitudes, make it possible to conceive new possible interesting applications. Particularly, we point out some results regarding detection of eccentricity in nanotubes in vacuum (when Brownian movement is not taken into account). We interpret the optical response of the realistic shells in the framework of plasmon hybridization model (PHM), which is deduced from a quasi-static approximation. Our integral formalism provides for retardation effects and possible errors is only due to its numerical implementation.

  9. Optically detected magnetic resonance in CdMnSe/ZnSe submonolayer quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolmachev, D.O.; Babunts, R.A.; Romanov, N.G.; Baranov, P.G.; Namozov, B.R.; Kusrayev, Yu.G. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lee, S. [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J.K. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Fine structure of isolated Mn{sup 2+} ions in CdMnSe/ZnSe quantum wells (QWs) is revealed by optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) recorded by monitoring both exciton emission and intra-Mn luminescence in the presence of simultaneous microwave irradiation. A large decrease of photoluminescence (PL) intensity of excitons and an increase of PL intensity of Mn{sup 2+} ions is observed when an applied magnetic field satisfies the Mn{sup 2+} electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) condition. This suggests that a spin-dependent energy transfer from excitons to intra-Mn excitations occurs at the EPR condition. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. PDMS membranes as sensing element in optical sensors for gas detection in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Torino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS has been introduced the first time about 20years ago. This polymer is worldwide used for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic device through a replica molding process. However, the great popularity of PDMS is not only related to its easy processability, but also to its chemical and physical properties. For its interesting properties, the polymer has been implied for several applications, including sensing. In this work, we investigated how to use functionalized PDMS membranes as sensing elements in optical sensors for gas detection in water samples. Keywords: Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR sensors, Gas sensor

  11. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  12. Homodyne laser vibrometer capable of detecting nanometer displacements accurately by using optical shutters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, JingHao; Hu, Pengcheng; Tan, JiuBin

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a homodyne laser vibrometer with optical shutters. The parameters that define the nonlinearity of the quadrature signals in a vibrometer can be pre-extracted before the measurement, and can then be used to compensate for nonlinear errors, such as unequal AC amplitudes and DC offsets. The experimental results indicated that the homodyne laser vibrometer developed has the ability to accurately detect the vibration state of the object to be measured, even when the amplitude is ≤λ/4. The displacement residual error can be reduced to a value under 0.9 nm.

  13. PMD compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using LDPC-coded OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2007-04-02

    The possibility of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using a simple channel estimation technique and low-density parity-check (LDPC)-coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is demonstrated. It is shown that even for differential group delay (DGD) of 4/BW (BW is the OFDM signal bandwidth), the degradation due to the first-order PMD can be completely compensated for. Two classes of LDPC codes designed based on two different combinatorial objects (difference systems and product of combinatorial designs) suitable for use in PMD compensation are introduced.

  14. Design of a smartphone plastic optical fiber chemical sensor for hydrogen sulfide detection

    OpenAIRE

    Sultangazin, Alimzhan; Kusmangaliyev, Janysbek; Aitkulov, Arman; Akilbekova, Dana; Olivero, Massimo; Tosi, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    We present a low-cost, handheld plastic optical fiber (POF) sensor for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) detection integrated onto a smartphone. The sensor uses smartphone flashlight as a source and camera as a pixel-based intensity detector. The POF is interconnected to the smartphone with a 3-D-printed connector on both source/detector sides. The sensing mechanism is embedded in the fiber link, making the system an all-fiber smartphone architecture. A mobile application handles data acquisition on the...

  15. Nanomaterials-Based Optical Techniques for the Detection of Acetylcholinesterase and Pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The large amount of pesticide residues in the environment is a threat to global health by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Biosensors for inhibition of AChE have been thus developed for the detection of pesticides. In line with the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have attracted great attention and have been intensively studied in biological analysis due to their unique chemical, physical and size properties. The aim of this review is to provide insight into nanomaterial-based optical techniques for the determination of AChE and pesticides, including colorimetric and fluorescent assays and surface plasmon resonance.

  16. Detection of Light Dark Matter With Optical Phonons in Polar Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Knapen, Simon; Lin, Tongyan; Pyle, Matt; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    We show that polar materials are ideal targets for direct detection of sub-GeV dark matter due to the presence of gapped optical phonons as well as acoustic phonons with high sound speed. We take the example of Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), which has the properties needed for experimental realization, and where many results can be estimated analytically. We find GaAs has excellent reach to dark photon absorption, can completely cover the freeze-in benchmark for scattering via an ultralight dark ph...

  17. Integrated light collimating system for extended optical-path-length absorbance detection in microchip-based capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Kyung Won; Lim, Kwanseop; Shim, Bong Chu; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2005-08-15

    We have developed an integrated light collimating system with a microlens and a pair of slits for extended optical path length absorbance detection in a capillary electrophoresis (CE) microchip. The collimating system is made of the same material as the chip, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), and it is integrated into the chip during the molding of the CE microchannels. In this microchip, the centers of an extended 500-microm detection cell and two optical fibers are self-aligned, and a planoconvex microlens (r = 50 microm) for light collimation is placed in front of a light-delivering fiber. To block stray light, two rectangular apertures, realized by a specially designed three-dimensional microchannel, are made on each end of the detection cell. In comparison to conventional extended detection cell having no collimator, the percentage of stray radiation readout fraction in the collimator integrated detection cell is significantly reduced from 31.6 to 3.8%. The effective optical path length is increased from 324 to 460 microm in the collimator integrated detection cell. The detection sensitivity is increased by 10 times in the newly developed absorbance detection cell as compared to an unextended, 50-microm-long detection cell. The concentration detection limit (S/N = 3) for fluorescein in the collimator integrated detection cell is 1.2 microM at the absorbance detection limit of 0.001 AU.

  18. Optical Biomedical Diagnostics: Sensors with Optical Response Based on Two-Photon Excited Luminescent Dyes for Biomolecules Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yashchuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of novel styryl dyes developed for the biomacromolecules (such as DNA detection and imaging were investigated. The energy structures of dye molecules were examined. The spectral data prove that dyes aggregate and interact with DNA. The essential increase of the fluorescence intensity of dyes in the presence of DNA was observed. The photostability and phototoxic influence on the DNA of several styryl dyes were studied by analyzing absorption, fluorescence, and phosphorescence spectra of these dyes and dye-DNA systems. Changes of the optical density value of dye-DNA solutions caused by the irradiation were fixed in the DNA and dye absorption wavelength regions. Fluorescence emission of dye-DNA complexes upon two-photon excitation at wavelength 1064 nm with the 20-nanosecond pulsed YAG:Nd3+ laser and at 840 nm with the 90 famtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser was registered. The values of two-photon absorption cross-sections of dye-DNA complexes were evaluated.

  19. Fabrication of Chitosan-gold Nanocomposites Combined with Optical Fiber as SERS Substrates to Detect Dopamine Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jaewook; Kang, Ikjoong [Gachon Univ., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This research was aimed to fabricate an optical fiber-based SERS substrate which can detect dopamine neurotransmitters. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) were firstly anchored on the surface of optical fiber, and then gold layer was subseque N{sub T}ly deposited on the anchored chitosan NPs via electroless plating method. Finally, chitosan-gold nanocomposites combined with optical fiber reacted with dopamine molecules of 100-1500 mg/ day which is a standard daily dose for Parkinson's disease patientss. The amplified Raman signal at 1348 cm{sup -1} obtained from optical fiber-based SERS substrate was plotted versus dopamine concentrations (1-10 mM), demonstrating an approximate linearity of Y = 303.03X + 2385.8 (R{sup 2} = 0.97) with narrow margin errors. The optical fiber-based Raman system can be potentially applicable to in-vitro (or in-vivo) detection of probe molecules.

  20. An Optical Test Strip for the Detection of Benzoic Acid in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Abu Bakar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of a test strip for detection of benzoic acid was successfully implemented by immobilizing tyrosinase, phenol and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH onto filter paper using polystyrene as polymeric support. The sensing scheme was based on the decreasing intensity of the maroon colour of the test strip when introduced into benzoic acid solution. The test strip was characterized using optical fiber reflectance and has maximum reflectance at 375 nm. It has shown a highly reproducible measurement of benzoic acid with a calculated RSD of 0.47% (n = 10. The detection was optimized at pH 7. A linear response of the biosensor was obtained in 100 to 700 ppm of benzoic acid with a detection limit (LOD of 73.6 ppm. At 1:1 ratio of benzoic acid to interfering substances, the main interfering substance is boric acid. The kinetic analyses show that, the inhibition of benzoic is competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant (Ki is 52.9 ppm. The activity of immobilized tyrosinase, phenol, and MBTH in the test strip was fairly sustained during 20 days when stored at 3 °C. The developed test strip was used for detection of benzoic acid in food samples and was observed to have comparable results to the HPLC method, hence the developed test strip can be used as an alternative to HPLC in detecting benzoic acid in food products.

  1. Automated Fovea Detection in Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Scans of Exudative Macular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT volumes, detection of the foveal center is required for accurate and reproducible follow-up studies, structure function correlation, and measurement grid positioning. However, disease can cause severe obscuring or deformation of the fovea, thus presenting a major challenge in automated detection. We propose a fully automated fovea detection algorithm to extract the fovea position in SD-OCT volumes of eyes with exudative maculopathy. The fovea is classified into 3 main appearances to both specify the detection algorithm used and reduce computational complexity. Based on foveal type classification, the fovea position is computed based on retinal nerve fiber layer thickness. Mean absolute distance between system and clinical expert annotated fovea positions from a dataset comprised of 240 SD-OCT volumes was 162.3 µm in cystoid macular edema and 262 µm in nAMD. The presented method has cross-vendor functionality, while demonstrating accurate and reliable performance close to typical expert interobserver agreement. The automatically detected fovea positions may be used as landmarks for intra- and cross-patient registration and to create a joint reference frame for extraction of spatiotemporal features in “big data.” Furthermore, reliable analyses of retinal thickness, as well as retinal structure function correlation, may be facilitated.

  2. Detection of herbicide subclasses by an optical multibiosensor based on an array of photosystem II mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Guzzella, Licia; Euzet, Pierre; Rouillon, Regis; Esposito, Dania

    2005-07-15

    Massive use of herbicides in agriculture over the last few decades has become a serious environmental problem. The residual concentration of these compounds frequently exceeds the maximum admissible concentration in drinking water for human consumption and is a real environmental risk for the aquatic ecosystem. Herbicides inhibiting photosynthesis via targeting photosystem II function still represent the basic means of weed control. A multibiosensor was constructed for detecting herbicides using as biosensing elements photosynthetic preparations coupled to an optical fluorescence transduction system (Giardi et al. EU patent EP1134585, 01830148.1-2204); this paper is about its application in the detection of herbicide subclasses in river water. Photosynthetic material was immobilized on a silicio septum inside a series of flow cells, close to diodes so as to activate photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. The principle of the detection was based on the factthat herbicides selectively modify PSII fluorescence activity. The multibiosensor has the original feature of being able to distinguish the subclasses of the photosynthetic herbicides by using specific immobilized biomediators isolated from mutated organisms. This setup resulted in a reusable, portable multibiosensor for the detection of herbicide subclasses with a half-life of 54 h for spinach thylakoids and limit of detection of 3 x 10(-9) M for herbicides present in river water.

  3. Machine learning plus optical flow: a simple and sensitive method to detect cardioactive drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugene K.; Kurokawa, Yosuke K.; Tu, Robin; George, Steven C.; Khine, Michelle

    2015-07-01

    Current preclinical screening methods do not adequately detect cardiotoxicity. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPS-CMs), more physiologically relevant preclinical or patient-specific screening to detect potential cardiotoxic effects of drug candidates may be possible. However, one of the persistent challenges for developing a high-throughput drug screening platform using iPS-CMs is the need to develop a simple and reliable method to measure key electrophysiological and contractile parameters. To address this need, we have developed a platform that combines machine learning paired with brightfield optical flow as a simple and robust tool that can automate the detection of cardiomyocyte drug effects. Using three cardioactive drugs of different mechanisms, including those with primarily electrophysiological effects, we demonstrate the general applicability of this screening method to detect subtle changes in cardiomyocyte contraction. Requiring only brightfield images of cardiomyocyte contractions, we detect changes in cardiomyocyte contraction comparable to - and even superior to - fluorescence readouts. This automated method serves as a widely applicable screening tool to characterize the effects of drugs on cardiomyocyte function.

  4. An optical fiber surface plasmon resonance biosensor for wide range detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Kai; Guo, Jia; Wang, Meiyu; Dang, Peng; Wang, Fucheng; Zhang, Yungang; Wang, Meiting

    2017-10-01

    An optical fiber surface plasmon resonance biosensor is presented that allows to numerically demonstrate, using transfer matrix method and the finite difference time domain method, the detection range is very wide. Two different structures of graphene photonic crystal multilayer (i.e. sensor I and sensor II) are constructed in the cladding region of single-mode fiber. Graphene is used as the plasma layer instead of the traditional metal. According to the analysis, the properties of graphene can be changed by adjusting the chemical potential µc. In the spectral region of 1.667|µc| < ћω < 2|µc|, the imaginary part of conductivity σ″ becomes negative. Thus the weakly bounded low-less TE-SPR is supported by graphene. The results of the numerical simulation show that the relationship between refractive index and resonant wavelength is linear. The sensor I can detect the refractive index range of 1.33-1.4, and the sensitivity is 1942 nm/RIU. The sensor II can detect the refractive index range of 1.41-1.67, and the sensitivity is up to 2315.4 nm/RIU. Therefore, the detection of wide refractive index range of 1.33-1.67 or simultaneous detection of different biological medium concentration is realized by the sensor.

  5. Optical biosensor system for the quick and reliable detection of virus infections: VIROSENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proll, Günther; Hartjes, Anja; Sinclair, Alexander; Markovic, Goran; Pröll, Florian; Patel, Pranav; Niedrig, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    Viral infections are of special threat because they can induce severe courses of disease but only few medical treatments are available. Because of socio-economic and climate changes, increased worldwide mobility and population growth, the risk of newly occurring and quickly spreading viral pathogens has increased. A diagnosis of these diseases at an early stage is essential for a quick risk assessment and a proper health management as well as patient's treatment in an optimal way. Currently, the diagnosis of such diseases is based on time consuming and costly detection methods that can only be performed by specially trained personnel in laboratories at specific security levels. Aim of the project VIROSENS is the development of a biosensor platform that can specifically detect virus particles as well as virus-specific antibodies out of biological matrices like blood, serum, plasma and other body fluids. For this purpose, a disposable cartridge for such antibody- and virus-arrays is designed and developed within the project. The optical detection of viruses is performed with a portable device that will be benchmarked and evaluated concerning currently used standard detection methods in terms of its analytical performance. Within this project, a novel combination of serological tests and direct detection of virus particles will be developed, which will provide faster and more reliable results than presently available and used test systems.

  6. Study on the defects detection in composites by using optical position and infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwn, Koo Ahn; Choi, Man Yong; Park, Jeong Hak; Choi, Won Jae [Safety Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Sang [Dept. of Research and Development, Korea Research Institute of Smart Material and Structures System Association, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Non-destructive testing methods for composite materials (e.g., carbon fiber-reinforced and glass fiber-reinforced plastic) have been widely used to detect damage in the overall industry. This study detects defects using optical infrared thermography. The transient heat transport in a solid body is characterized by two dynamic quantities, namely, thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity. The first quantity describes the speed with thermal energy diffuses through a material, whereas the second one represents a type of thermal inertia. The defect detection rate is increased by utilizing a lock-in method and performing a comparison of the defect detection rates. The comparison is conducted by dividing the irradiation method into reflection and transmission methods and the irradiation time into 50 mHz and 100 mHz. The experimental results show that detecting defects at 50 mHz is easy using the transmission method. This result implies that low-frequency thermal waves penetrate a material deeper than the high-frequency waves.

  7. Optical tool for salinity detection by remote sensing spectroscopy: application on Oran watershed, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Dehni; Mourad, Lounis

    2017-07-01

    Soil salinity is a complex problem that affects groundwater aquifers and agricultural lands in the semiarid regions. Remote sensing and spectroscopy database systems provide accuracy for salinity autodetection and dynamical delineation. Salinity detection techniques using polychromatic wavebands by field geocomputation and experimental data are time consuming and expensive. This paper presents an automated spectral detection and identification of salt minerals using a monochromatic waveband concept from multispectral bands-Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) and spectroscopy United States Geological Survey database. For detecting mineral salts related to electrolytes, such as electronical and vibrational transitions, an integrated approach of salinity detection related to the optical monochromatic concept has been addressed. The purpose of this paper is to discriminate waveband intrinsic spectral similarity using the Beer-Lambert and Van 't Hoff laws for spectral curve extraction such as transmittance, reflectance, absorbance, land surface temperature, molar concentration, and osmotic pressure. These parameters are primordial for hydrodynamic salinity modeling and continuity identification using chemical and physical approaches. The established regression fitted models have been addressed for salt spectroscopy validation for suitable calibration and validation. Furthermore, our analytical tool is conducted for better decision interface using spectral salinity detection and identification in the Oran watershed, Algeria.

  8. Optical communication with two-photon coherent states. II - Photoemissive detection and structured receiver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J. H.; Yuen, H. P.; Machado Mata, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    In a previous paper (1978), the authors developed a method of analyzing the performance of two-photon coherent state (TCS) systems for free-space optical communications. General theorems permitting application of classical point process results to detection and estimation of signals in arbitrary quantum states were derived. The present paper examines the general problem of photoemissive detection statistics. On the basis of the photocounting theory of Kelley and Kleiner (1964) it is shown that for arbitrary pure state illumination, the resulting photocurrent is in general a self-exciting point process. The photocount statistics for first-order coherent fields reduce to those of a special class of Markov birth processes, which the authors term single-mode birth processes. These general results are applied to the structure of TCS radiation, and it is shown that the use of TCS radiation with direct or heterodyne detection results in minimal performance increments over comparable coherent-state systems. However, significant performance advantages are offered by use of TCS radiation with homodyne detection. The abstract quantum descriptions of homodyne and heterodyne detection are derived and a synthesis procedure for obtaining quantum measurements described by arbitrary TCS is given.

  9. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jennifer S [Santa Fe, NM; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos, NM; Shively, John E [Arcadia, CA; Li, Lin [Monrovia, CA

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  10. Optical detection system using time structure of UVSOR for combined laser-SR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, J; Tsujibayashi, T; Itoh, M; Watanabe, M; Arimoto, O; Nakanishi, S; Itoh, H; Kamada, M

    2001-01-01

    A new TAC-MCA detection system has been developed for combined laser-SR spectroscopy such as two-photon excitation or pump-probe experiments in the VUV region. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio, the time structure under partial-filling operation of UVSOR is utilized together with this detection system. In our experiment, where the two-photon excitation efficiency of laser and SR is more important than the time resolution, a pulse stretching technique using optical fiber is applied to the output pulse of a CW mode-locked Ti : sapphire laser. The usefulness of the present system is successfully demonstrated by observing luminescence signals from the two-photon-excited core state in BaF sub 2 crystals.

  11. Fiber Optic Long Period Grating Based Sensor for Coconut Oil Adulteration Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Libish

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the development and demonstration of a Long-Period Grating (LPG based optical fiber sensor for determining the adulteration of coconut oil by palm oil. The fundamental principle of detection is the sensitive dependence of the resonance peaks of LPG on the changes of the refractive index of the environmental medium around the cladding surface of the grating. Refractive index sensing with LPGs employs light coupling between core and cladding modes in the grating section. The transmittance spectra of a long period grating element immersed in different mixtures of coconut oil and palm oil were recorded. Results show that resonance wavelengths and transmission intensities varied as a function of the adulteration level of coconut oil. Detection limit of adulteration was found to be 2 % for coconut oil–palm oil binary mixture.

  12. DESIGN OF DPSK MODULATOR AND DIRECT DETECTION RECEIVER FOR DWDM BASED OPTICAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a 16-bit differential phase shift keying (DPSK modulator is designed for 32 dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM channels. The DWDM channels are designed with 0.8nm separation in wavelength and operated at 4dBm input power. In the DWDM system, these 32 multiplexed signals propagate through a fiber length of 100 km followed by an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA inline. The channel is equipped with pre-amplifier and a dispersion compensating fiber for better performance. Also, a threshold detector is designed for both in-phase and quadrature components to detect the input amplitude and provide a quantized output amplitude level. The result shows that, a 16-bit DPSK optical signal is demodulated successfully using direct detection receiver.

  13. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  14. Automated basal cell carcinoma detection in high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan Li; Jun Cheng; Ai Ping Yow; Srivastava, Ruchir; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Hong Liang Tey; Jiang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common non-melanoma skin cancer. Conventional diagnosis of BCC requires invasive biopsies. Recently, a high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) technique has been developed, which provides a non-invasive in vivo imaging method of skin. Good agreements of BCC features between HD-OCT images and histopathological architecture have been found. Therefore it is possible to automatically detect BCC using HD-OCT. This paper presents a novel BCC detection method that consists of four steps: graph based skin surface segmentation, surface flattening, deep feature extraction and the BCC classification. The effectiveness of the proposed method is well demonstrated on a dataset of 5,040 images. It can therefore serve as an automatic tool for screening BCC.

  15. Optical biosensors with an integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometer for detection of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dibyo; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Jamal, Iqbal; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we have demonstrated an efficient optical immunoassay technique for the detection of a food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, using a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) configuration. We have investigated ten different MZI configurations with angular and Sbend Y-junction geometries. An efficient Hydrofluoric acid (HF) based technique was used for rapid and specific binding of L. monocytogenes to the sensor arm of the MZI biosensor. The MZI biosensor was able to detect L. monocytogenes at concentrations of the order of 10(5) CFU/ml, which is lower than the infection dose for healthy human beings. SEM analysis and light intensity measurements showed the biosensor is highly selective to L. monocytogenes over other microbial species (such as Escherichia coli). Finally, a novel calibration scheme of the MZI biosensor was developed from experimental data that can be used for determining unknown concentrations of L. monocytogenes.

  16. Investigation of a driven fermionic system and detecting chiral edge modes in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görg, Frederik; Messer, Michael; Jotzu, Gregor; Sandholzer, Kilian; Desbuquois, Rémi; Goldman, Nathan; Esslinger, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    Periodically driven systems of ultracold fermions in optical lattices allow to implement a large variety of effective Hamiltonians through Floquet engineering. An important question is whether this method can be extended to interacting systems. We investigate driven two-body systems in an array of double wells and measure the double occupancy and the spin-spin correlator in the large frequency limit and when driving resonantly to an energy scale of the underlying static Hamiltonian. We analyze whether the emerging states of the driven system can be adiabatically connected to states in the unshaken lattice. In addition, we measure the amplitude of the micromotion which describes the short time dynamics of the system and compare it directly to theory. In another context we propose a method to create topological interfaces and detect chiral edge modes in a two dimensional optical lattice. We illustrate this through an optical lattice realization of the Haldane model for cold atoms, where an additional spatially-varying lattice potential induces distinct topological phases in separated regions of space.

  17. Review of plasmonic fiber optic biochemical sensors: improving the limit of detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Guo, Tuan; Albert, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of the technologies used to implement surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effects into fiber-optic sensors for chemical and biochemical applications and a survey of results reported over the last ten years. The performance indicators that are relevant for such systems, such as refractometric sensitivity, operating wavelength, and figure of merit (FOM), are discussed and listed in table form. A list of experimental results with reported limits of detection (LOD) for proteins, toxins, viruses, DNA, bacteria, glucose, and various chemicals is also provided for the same time period. Configurations discussed include fiber-optic analogues of the Kretschmann-Raether prism SPR platforms, made from geometry-modified multimode and single-mode optical fibers (unclad, side-polished, tapered, and U-shaped), long period fiber gratings (LPFG), tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBG), and specialty fibers (plastic or polymer, microstructured, and photonic crystal fibers). Configurations involving the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) on continuous thin metal layers as well as those involving localized SPR (LSPR) phenomena in nanoparticle metal coatings of gold, silver, and other metals at visible and near-infrared wavelengths are described and compared quantitatively.

  18. Investigation of optic neuritis related examination for evaluating visual function and efficacy detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the reliability of visual electrophysiological examination(pattern visual evoked potentials, P-VEP,visual field,fundus photography and optical coherence tomography(OCTto patients with optic neuritis.METHODS: Visualelectrophysiological examination, visual field, fundus photography and OCT were used in 75 cases(103 eyes. The results of the positive rate of P-VEP, visual field examination,fundus photography and OCT were used to analyze the correlation.RESULTS: In 75 cases(103 eyes, the P-VEP successfully acquired positive case images in 78 eyes(75.7%, no obvious abnormal in 25 eyes(24.3%. Fundus photography successfully acquired positive case images in 89 eyes(86.4%, no obvious abnormal in 14 eyes(13.6%. Visual field examination successfully acquired positive case images in 85 eyes(82.5%, no obvious abnormal in 18 eyes(17.5%. OCT successfully acquired positive case images in 97 eyes(94.2%, no obvious abnormal in 6 eyes(5.8%. CONCLUSION: Visual electrophysiological detection, visual field examination, fundus photography and OCT can predict the visual acuity in patients with optic neuritis.

  19. UV Radiation Detection Using Optical Sensor Based on Eu3+ Doped PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miluski Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Progress in UV treatment applications requires new compact and sensor constructions. In the paper a hybrid (organic-inorganic rare-earth-based polymeric UV sensor construction is proposed. The efficient luminescence of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA matrix doped by europium was used for testing the optical sensor (optrode construction. The europium complex assures effective luminescence in the visible range with well determined multi-peak spectrum emission enabling construction of the optrode. The fabricated UV optical fibre sensor was used for determination of Nd:YAG laser intensity measurements at the third harmonic (355 nm in the radiation power range 5.0-34.0 mW. The multi-peak luminescence spectrum was used for optimization of the measurement formula. The composition of luminescent peak intensity enables to increase the slope of sensitivity up to −2.8 mW-1. The obtained results and advantages of the optical fibre construction enable to apply it in numerous UV detection systems.

  20. Polymer single-arm optical waveguide interferometer for detection of toxic industrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.; Adamovsky, Grigory

    2001-12-01

    We report a novel single-arm double-mode double-order waveguide interferometer being used as a chemical sensor for detection f toxic industrial materials such as ammonia in air. The sensor is based on thin films of polymers poly(methyl methacrylate) and polyimide doped with indicator dyes bromocresol purple and bromothymol blue. These dye- doped polymer materials exhibit a reversible optical absorption in a band near 600 nm being exposed to ammonia in wet air. The rise of absorption is accompanied by the change of the refractive index in near IR region out of the absorption band. The distinguished feature of the sensor is that is uses for reading the change of the refractive index of the dye-doped polymer film the interference of two propagation waveguide modes of different orders. The modes TM0 and TM1 are simultaneously excited in the light- guiding polymer film with a focusing optics and a prism coupler. The modes are decoupled from the film and recombined producing an interference pattern in the face of an output optical fiber. The sensitivity of the sensor to ammonia is 200 ppm per one full oscillation of the signal. We analyze effects of various factors such as polymer composition, light wavelength, ambient humidity and atmospheric pressure on the performance of the sensor. Various design and fabrication issues are also discussed. The problems of particular interest are reduction of losses and sensitivity improvement.

  1. Cosmic Rays above 1019 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. A.

    A brief overview of the methods of detection of ultra high-energy cosmic rays is given along with a description of data on energy spectrum, arrival directions and mass composition of the particles. The enigma presented is emphasised and the explanations currently in vogue are summarised. New instruments being developed are described along with the prospects for neutrino and photon detection.

  2. Automated detection of optic disk in retinal fundus images using intuitionistic fuzzy histon segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Chua, Chua Kuang; Min, Lim Choo; Ng, E Y K; Mushrif, Milind M; Laude, Augustinus

    2013-01-01

    The human eye is one of the most sophisticated organs, with perfectly interrelated retina, pupil, iris cornea, lens, and optic nerve. Automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early detection of eye diseases. Uncontrolled diabetic retinopathy (DR) and glaucoma may lead to blindness. The identification of retinal anatomical regions is a prerequisite for the computer-aided diagnosis of several retinal diseases. The manual examination of optic disk (OD) is a standard procedure used for detecting different stages of DR and glaucoma. In this article, a novel automated, reliable, and efficient OD localization and segmentation method using digital fundus images is proposed. General-purpose edge detection algorithms often fail to segment the OD due to fuzzy boundaries, inconsistent image contrast, or missing edge features. This article proposes a novel and probably the first method using the Attanassov intuitionistic fuzzy histon (A-IFSH)-based segmentation to detect OD in retinal fundus images. OD pixel intensity and column-wise neighborhood operation are employed to locate and isolate the OD. The method has been evaluated on 100 images comprising 30 normal, 39 glaucomatous, and 31 DR images. Our proposed method has yielded precision of 0.93, recall of 0.91, F-score of 0.92, and mean segmentation accuracy of 93.4%. We have also compared the performance of our proposed method with the Otsu and gradient vector flow (GVF) snake methods. Overall, our result shows the superiority of proposed fuzzy segmentation technique over other two segmentation methods.

  3. Supernova 2010ev: A reddened high velocity gradient type Ia supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Folatelli, Gastón; Pignata, Giuliano; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; Morrell, Nidia; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taubenberger, Stefan; Bufano, Filomena; Olivares E., Felipe; Haislip, Joshua B.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present and study the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2010ev. Methods: We obtain and analyze multiband optical light curves and optical/near-infrared spectroscopy at low and medium resolution spanning -7 days to +300 days from the B-band maximum. Results: A photometric analysis shows that SN 2010ev is a SN Ia of normal brightness with a light-curve shape of Δm15(B) = 1.12 ± 0.02 and a stretch s = 0.94 ± 0.01 suffering significant reddening. From photometric and spectroscopic analysis, we deduce a color excess of E(B - V) = 0.25 ± 0.05 and a reddening law of Rv = 1.54 ± 0.65. Spectroscopically, SN 2010ev belongs to the broad-line SN Ia group, showing stronger than average Si IIλ6355 absorption features. We also find that SN 2010ev is a high velocity gradient SN with v˙Si = 164 ± 7 km s-1 d-1. The photometric and spectral comparison with other supernovae shows that SN 2010ev has similar colors and velocities to SN 2002bo and SN 2002dj. The analysis of the nebular spectra indicates that the [Fe II]λ7155 and [Ni II]λ7378 lines are redshifted, as expected for a high velocity gradient supernova. All these common intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the high velocity gradient (HVG) group are different from the low velocity gradient (LVG) normal SN Ia population and suggest significant variety in SN Ia explosions. This paper includes data gathered with the Du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2010A-Q-14). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programme 085.D-0577).

  4. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  5. Automated stent defect detection and classification with a high numerical aperture optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Carlos; Laguarta, Ferran; Cadevall, Cristina; Matilla, Aitor; Ibañez, Sergi; Artigas, Roger

    2017-06-01

    Stent quality control is a highly critical process. Cardiovascular stents have to be inspected 100% so as no defective stent is implanted in a human body. However, this visual control is currently performed manually and every stent could need tenths of minutes to be inspected. In this paper, a novel optical inspection system is presented. By the combination of a high numerical aperture (NA) optical system, a rotational stage and a line-scan camera, unrolled sections of the outer and inner surfaces of the stent are obtained and image-processed at high speed. Defects appearing in those surfaces and also in the edges are extremely contrasted due to the shadowing effect of the high NA illumination and acquisition approach. Therefore by means of morphological operations and a sensitivity parameter, defects are detected. Based on a trained defect library, a binary classifier sorts each kind of defect through a set of scoring vectors, providing the quality operator with all the required information to finally take a decision. We expect this new approach to make defect detection completely objective and to dramatically reduce the time and cost of stent quality control stage.

  6. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-04

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency.

  7. Detection of inflammatory cytokines using a fiber optic microsphere immunoassay array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2006-10-01

    A multiplexed fiber optic microsphere-based immunoassay array capable of simultaneously measuring five inflammatory cytokines has been developed. Five groups of amine-functionalized 3.1 micron microspheres were internally encoded with five distinct concentrations of a europium dye and converted to cytokine probes by covalently coupling monoclonal capture antibodies specific for human VEGF, IFN-gamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3 to the microspheres via glutaraldehyde chemistry. The microspheres were pooled and loaded into a 1 mm diameter fiber optic bundle containing ~50,000 individual etched microwells, producing the multiplexed cytokine immunoassay array. Multiple arrays can be created from a single microsphere pool for high throughput sample analysis. Sandwich fluoroimmunoassays were performed by incubating the probe array in a sample, followed by incubation in a mixture of biotin-labeled detection antibodies that are complementary to the five cytokines. Finally, universal detection of each protein was performed using a fluorescence imaging system after briefly immersing the array in a solution of fluorophore-labeled streptavidin. The multiplexed cytokine array has been shown to respond selectively to VEGF, IFNgamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3, permitting multiplexed quantitative analysis. Ultimately, the multiplexed cytokine array will be utilized to evaluate the potential of using saliva as a noninvasive diagnostic fluid for pulmonary inflammatory diseases such as asthma.

  8. Design and performance of optical endoscopes for the early detection of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Maureen Molly

    Cancer is a multistage, heterogeneous disease that develops through a series of genetic mutations. Early stage cancer is most responsive to treatment but can be the hardest to detect due to its small size, lack of definitive symptoms and potential location deep in the body. Whole body imaging methods, MRI/CT/PET, lack the necessary resolution to detect cellular level abnormalities. Optical methods, which have sufficient resolution, can be miniaturized into endoscopes, which are necessary to overcome limited penetration of light into tissue. By combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence imaging methods it is possible to create endoscopes sensitive to molecular and structural changes. I applied a dual-modality 2mm diameter rigid endoscope to the study of the natural history of colon cancer in a mouse model, and later applied this knowledge to the design and characterization of a 0.8 mm dual-modality flexible probe for use in human fallopian tubes. By using this endoscope, which is introduced through the natural orifice and is compatible with existing hysteroscopes, high-risk women could be screened in a procedure at a similar level of invasiveness as a colonoscopy. Therefore, the endoscope fills this gap in clinical care for women at high-risk for ovarian cancer.

  9. New Nanomaterials and Luminescent Optical Sensors for Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A. Burmistrova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate methods that can continuously detect low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 have a huge application potential in biological, pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis. Luminescent probes and nanomaterials are used for fabrication of sensors for H2O2 that can be applied for these purposes. In contrast to previous reviews focusing on the chemical design of molecular probes for H2O2, this mini-review highlights the latest luminescent nanoparticular materials and new luminescent optical sensors for H2O2 in terms of the nanomaterial composition and luminescent receptor used in the sensors. The nanomaterial section is subdivided into schemes based on gold nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles with embedded enzymes, probes showing aggregation-induced emission enhancement, quantum dots, lanthanide-based nanoparticles and carbon based nanomaterials, respectively. Moreover, the sensors are ordered according to the type of luminescent receptor used within the sensor membranes. Among them are lanthanide complexes, metal-ligand complexes, oxidic nanoparticles and organic dyes. Further, the optical sensors are confined to those that are capable to monitor the concentration of H2O2 in a sample over time or are reusable. Optical sensors responding to gaseous H2O2 are not covered. All nanomaterials and sensors are characterized with respect to the analytical reaction towards H2O2, limit of detection (LOD, analytical range, electrolyte, pH and response time/incubation time. Applications to real samples are given. Finally, we assess the suitability of the nanomaterials to be used in membrane-based sensors and discuss future trends and perspectives of these sensors in biomedical research.

  10. Optical emission from a kilonova following a gravitational-wave-detected neutron-star merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis; Poznanski, Dovi; Kasen, Daniel; Barnes, Jennifer; Zaltzman, Michael; Vasylyev, Sergiy; Maoz, Dan; Valenti, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The merger of two neutron stars has been predicted to produce an optical-infrared transient (lasting a few days) known as a ‘kilonova’, powered by the radioactive decay of neutron-rich species synthesized in the merger. Evidence that short γ-ray bursts also arise from neutron-star mergers has been accumulating. In models of such mergers, a small amount of mass (10-4-10-2 solar masses) with a low electron fraction is ejected at high velocities (0.1-0.3 times light speed) or carried out by winds from an accretion disk formed around the newly merged object. This mass is expected to undergo rapid neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis, leading to the formation of radioactive elements that release energy as they decay, powering an electromagnetic transient. A large uncertainty in the composition of the newly synthesized material leads to various expected colours, durations and luminosities for such transients. Observational evidence for kilonovae has so far been inconclusive because it was based on cases of moderate excess emission detected in the afterglows of γ-ray bursts. Here we report optical to near-infrared observations of a transient coincident with the detection of the gravitational-wave signature of a binary neutron-star merger and with a low-luminosity short-duration γ-ray burst. Our observations, taken roughly every eight hours over a few days following the gravitational-wave trigger, reveal an initial blue excess, with fast optical fading and reddening. Using numerical models, we conclude that our data are broadly consistent with a light curve powered by a few hundredths of a solar mass of low-opacity material corresponding to lanthanide-poor (a fraction of 10-4.5 by mass) ejecta.

  11. Nano-structured optical fiber bundles for remote SPR detection: a first step toward in vivo biomolecular analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vindas, Karim; Engel, Elodie; Garrigue, Patrick; Livache, Thierry; Arbault, Stéphane; Sojic, Neso; Leroy, Loic

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the proof of concept of the detection of global and surface optical index variations by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) thanks to optical fiber bundles. This work is the first necessary step for the future design of a lab-on-fiber tool dedicated to molecular analysis for endoscopic diagnosis. Our approach is based on nanostructured optical fiber bundles comprising several thousands of individual optical fibers. These nanostructures were coated by a thin gold layer in order to gain interesting optical properties such like SPR. The sensitivity and resolution of the bundle to global optical index changes were measured in retro-reflection. We performed numerical simulations in order to optimize the fiber tip geometry, gold coating thickness and finally enhance their analytical performances. We achieved a resolution of 10-4 refractive index unit, which is fully compatible with the detection of biological interactions involving large proteins or bacteria. Finally, we proved that our sensor was sensitive to surface optical index variations and able to detect the adsorption of a thin self-assembled molecular layer.

  12. Research on fiber-optic cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Xinlei; Gong, Zhenfeng; Yu, Shaochen; Qu, Chao; Guo, Min; Yu, Qingxu

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme of cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy, combining a sensitivity-improved fiber-optic cantilever acoustic sensor with a tunable high-power fiber laser, for trace gas detection. The Fabry-Perot interferometer based cantilever acoustic sensor has advantages such as high sensitivity, small size, easy to install and immune to electromagnetic. Tunable erbium-doped fiber ring laser with an erbium-doped fiber amplifier is used as the light source for acoustic excitation. In order to improve the sensitivity for photoacoustic signal detection, a first-order longitudinal resonant photoacoustic cell with the resonant frequency of 1624 Hz and a large size cantilever with the first resonant frequency of 1687 Hz are designed. The size of the cantilever is 2.1 mm×1 mm, and the thickness is 10 μm. With the wavelength modulation spectrum and second-harmonic detection methods, trace ammonia (NH3) has been measured. The gas detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio = 1) near the wavelength of 1522.5 nm is achieved to be 3 ppb.

  13. Sensitive Detection of Small Particles in Fluids Using Optical Fiber Tip with Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsin Tai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents using a tapered fiber tip coated with thin metallic film to detect small particles in water with high sensitivity. When an AC voltage applied to the Ti/Al coated fiber tip and indium tin oxide (ITO substrate, a gradient electric field at the fiber tip induced attractive/repulsive force to suspended small particles due to the frequency-dependent dielectrophoresis (DEP effect. Such DEP force greatly enhanced the concentration of the small particles near the tip. The increase of the local concentration also increased the scattering of surface plasmon wave near the fiber tip. Combined both DEP effect and scattering optical near-field, we show the detection limit of the concentration for 1.36 μm polystyrene beads can be down to 1 particle/mL. The detection limit of the Escherichia coli (E. coli bacteria was 20 CFU/mL. The fiber tip sensor takes advantages of ultrasmall volume, label-free and simple detection system.

  14. Optical method and apparatus for detection of defects and microstructural changes in ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, William A.; Todd, Judith A.; Sun, Jiangang

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus detects defects and microstructural changes in hard translucent materials such as ceramic bulk compositions and ceramic coatings such as after use under load conditions. The beam from a tunable laser is directed onto the sample under study and light reflected by the sample is directed to two detectors, with light scattered with a small scatter angle directed to a first detector and light scattered with a larger scatter angle directed to a second detector for monitoring the scattering surface. The sum and ratio of the two detector outputs respectively provide a gray-scale, or "sum" image, and an indication of the lateral spread of the subsurface scatter, or "ratio" image. This two detector system allows for very high speed crack detection for on-line, real-time inspection of damage in ceramic components. Statistical image processing using a digital image processing approach allows for the quantative discrimination of the presence and distribution of small flaws in a sample while improving detection reliability. The tunable laser allows for the penetration of the sample to detect defects from the sample's surface to the laser's maximum depth of penetration. A layered optical fiber directs the incoming laser beam to the sample and transmits each scattered signal to a respective one of the two detectors.

  15. A portable optical waveguide resonance light-scattering scanner for microarray detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xuefeng; Liu, Wanyao; Li, Tao; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Wu, Dongyang; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-07

    In the present work, a portable and low-cost planar waveguide based resonance light scattering (RLS) scanner (termed as: PW-RLS scanner) has been developed for microarray detection. The PW-RLS scanner employs a 2 × 4 white light emitting diode array (WLEDA) as the excitation light source, a folded optical path with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) as the signal/image acquisition device and stepper motors with gear drives as the mechanical drive system. The biological binding/recognizing events on the microarray can be detected with an evanescent waveguide-directed illumination and light-scattering label (e.g., nanoparticles) while the microarray slide acts as an evanescent waveguide substrate. The performance of the as-developed PW-RLS scanner has been evaluated by analyzing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk genes. Highly selective and sensitive (less than 1% allele frequency at the attomole-level) T2DM risk gene detection is achieved using single-stranded DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-GNPs) as detection probes. Additionally, the successful simultaneous analysis of 15 T2DM patient genotypes suggests that the device has great potential for the realization of a personalized diagnostic test for a given disease or patient follow-up.

  16. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Leak Detection in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinko, John E.; Korman, Valentin; Hendrickson, Adam; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic, laser-based, interferometric leak detector is presented for application as a means to detect on-orbit gas leaks. The sensor employs a fiber-coupled modified Michelson interferometer to detect gas leaks by measuring an increase in gas density in the sensing region. Monitoring changes in the fringe pattern output by the interferometer allows for direct measurement of the gas density in the sensing region and, under the assumption of an equation of state, this can be used to obtain a pressure measurement. Measurements obtained over a pressure range from 20 mtorr to 760 torr using a prototypical interferometer on working gases of air, nitrogen, argon, and helium generally exhibit agreement with a theoretical prediction of the pressure increase required before an interference fringe completely moves over the detector. Additional measurements performed on various gases demonstrate the range of detectable species, measuring sub-torr pressure changes in the process. A high-fidelity measurement places the ultimate pressure resolution for this particular sensor configuration in the 10 mtorr range. Time-resolved data prove the capability of this sensor to detect fast gas flow phenomena associated with transients and pressure waves.

  17. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules for optical detection of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Guat Wei; Lim, Jit Kang; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-03-01

    The direct correlation between disease and lysozyme (LYZ) levels in human body fluids makes the sensitive and convenient detection of LYZ the focus of scientific research. Fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymer has emerged as a new alternative for LYZ detection in order to resolve the limitation of immunoassays, which are expensive, unstable, require complex preparation, and are time consuming. In this study, a novel fluorescence molecularly imprinted polymer based on Navicula sp. frustules (FITC-MIP) has been synthesized via post-imprinting treatment for LYZ detection. Navicula sp. frustules were used as supported material because of their unique properties of moderate surface area, reproducibility, and biocompatibility, to address the drawbacks of nanoparticle core material with low adsorption capacity. The FITC acts as recognition signal and optical readout, whereas MIP provides LYZ selectivity. The synthesized FITC-MIP showed a response time as short as 5 min depending on the concentration of LYZ. It is found that the LYZ template can significantly quench the fluorescence intensity of FITC-MIP linearly within a concentration range of 0 to 0.025 mg mL(-1), which is well described by Stern-Volmer equation. The FITC-MIP can selectively and sensitively detect down to 0.0015 mg mL(-1) of LYZ concentration. The excellent sensing performance of FITC-MIP suggests that FITC-MIP is a potential biosensor in clinical diagnosis applications.

  18. Suboptimal maximum likelihood detection of on-off keying for a wireless optical communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijie; Ding, Shengli; Dang, Anhong

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates a detection scheme without channel state information for wireless optical communication systems. Employing conventional on-off keying signals, we supposed that conditional probability density function P(r|0) is much bigger than P(r|1) when r<0. Under this assumption, the suboptimal maximum likelihood scheme is obtained by utilizing the probability density function without channel information. Theoretical analysis shows the performance of the proposed scheme is close to the maximum likelihood symbol-by-symbol detection. Compared with the maximum likelihood symbol by symbol detection, Monte Carlo simulations show that the performance of the proposed scheme is about 0.62 dB loss for a gamma-gamma channel with a Rytov variance of 1 at the signal-to-noise ratio of 2 dB, but the efficient algorithm makes the real-time implementation of detection based on maximum likelihood feasible. Besides, the experiment is set up under 2 Gbps, and the experimental results match well with that of the theory and simulation.

  19. Early detection of glaucomatous damage. II. Changes in the appearance of the optic disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, H A

    1985-01-01

    Once we understand that an increase in the size of the optic disk cup is due to loss of optic nerve fibers combined with some physical tissue rearrangements, it is quite clear that cupping begins as soon as nerve loss begins. Methods to detect cupping are more sensitive to the earliest glaucoma damage than are present field testing methods. This conclusion is supported by large clinical studies and histological demonstration of nerve fiber loss prior to field loss in eyes with abnormal cups, asymmetric cupping, or nerve fiber layer abnormalities. While automated perimetry is likely to increase the sensitivity of detection, better test methodologies are needed to combine with the objectivity of computer-assisted machines. Disk hemorrhages, nerve fiber layer defects, and color vision abnormalities are early signs of damage, supporting the conclusion that damage is present before field loss. A number of other methods await further testing to determine their effectiveness. The idea that the disease glaucoma is defined by a certain visual field finding on the Goldmann perimeter is not valid if we define glaucoma as an eye with a history of elevated IOP and optic nerve damage. While such field loss is a convenient means of defining a particular stage of damage in glaucoma, there are clearly earlier stages of damage, whether we can always detect them or not. No patient should be told that he or she does not have glaucoma, but rather has ocular hypertension, based on a particular visual field finding. As testing and examination methods improve, so, hopefully, will our ability to determine whether damage is present. As this occurs, we will be better enabled to select most rationally those patients who will benefit from therapy. The idea that field testing is relatively insensitive to the earliest glaucoma damage might lead the skeptic to conclude that perimetry is not worth the trouble. This review has indicated that none of our present methods, ophthalmoscopic

  20. A novel minimally invasive dual-modality fiber optic probe for prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikrant

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in males, and is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in United States. In prostate cancer diagnostics and therapy, there is a critical need for a minimally invasive tool for in vivo evaluation of prostate tissue. Such a tool finds its niche in improving TRUS (trans-rectal ultrasound) guided biopsy procedure, surgical margin assessment during radical prostatectomy, and active surveillance of patients with a certain risk levels. This work is focused on development of a fiber-based dual-modality optical device (dMOD), to differentiate prostate cancer from benign tissue, in vivo. dMOD utilizes two independent optical techniques, LRS (light reflectance spectroscopy) and AFLS (auto-fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy). LRS quantifies scattering coefficient of the tissue, as well as concentrations of major tissue chromophores like hemoglobin derivatives, β-carotene and melanin. AFLS was designed to target lifetime signatures of multiple endogenous fluorophores like flavins, porphyrins and lipo-pigments. Each of these methods was independently developed, and the two modalities were integrated using a thin (1-mm outer diameter) fiber-optic probe. Resulting dMOD probe was implemented and evaluated on animal models of prostate cancer, as well as on human prostate tissue. Application of dMOD to human breast cancer (invasive ductal carcinoma) identification was also evaluated. The results obtained reveal that both LRS and AFLS are excellent techniques to discriminate prostate cancer tissue from surrounding benign tissue in animal models. Each technique independently is capable of providing near absolute (100%) accuracy for cancer detection, indicating that either of them could be used independently without the need of implementing them together. Also, in case of human breast cancer, LRS and AFLS provided comparable accuracies to dMOD, LRS accuracy (96%) being the highest for the studied population. However, the

  1. Re-configurable digital receiver for optically envelope detected half cycle BPSK and MSK radio-on-fiber signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Neil Guerrero; Prince, Kamau; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2011-01-01

    We present the first known integration of a digital receiver into optically envelope detection radio-on-fiber systems. We also present a re-configurable scheme for two different types of optically envelope detected wireless signals while keeping the complexity of used optical components low. Our novel digital receiver consists of a digital signal processing unit integrating functions such as filtering, peak-powers detection, symbol synchronization and signal demodulation for optically envelope detected half-cycle binary phase-shift-keying and minimum-shift-keying signals. Furthermore, radio-frequency signal down-conversion is not required in our proposed approach; simplifying evens more the optical receiver front-end. We experimentally demonstrate error-free optical transmission (bit-error rate corresponding to 10 -3 related to FEC-compatible levels) for both 416.6 Mbit/s half-cycle binary phase-shift-keying and 104.17 Mbit/s minimum-shift-keying radio-frequency modulated signals after 30 km of fiber transmission.

  2. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available A Similarity Ratio Analysis (SRA method is proposed for early-stage Fault Detection (FD in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process. The method processes spectrum scans at successive time points and uses a windowing mechanism over the time series to alleviate problems with timing uncertainties due to process shift from one process run to another. A SRA library is first built to capture features of a healthy etching process. By comparing with the SRA library, a Similarity Ratio (SR statistic is then calculated for each spectrum scan as the monitored process progresses. A fault detection mechanism, named 3-Warning-1-Alarm (3W1A, takes the SR values as inputs and triggers a system alarm when certain conditions are satisfied. This design reduces the chance of false alarm, and provides a reliable fault reporting service. The SRA method is demonstrated on a real semiconductor manufacturing dataset. The effectiveness of SRA-based fault detection is evaluated using a time-series SR test and also using a post-process SR test. The time-series SR provides an early-stage fault detection service, so less energy and materials will be wasted by faulty processing. The post-process SR provides a fault detection service with higher reliability than the time-series SR, but with fault testing conducted only after each process run completes.

  3. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A; Franco, Lina S; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A; Pech-Pacheco, José L; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de Los Monteros, Luz E; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcina-Rejon, Julian E

    2017-08-17

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20-200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system.

  4. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Antonio A.; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A.; Pech-Pacheco, José L.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H.; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M.; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de los Monteros, Luz E.; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20–200 nm gold nanoparticles using a green laser were compared to green light emitting diode (LED) light source signals and to Mie theory. The change in signal from 60 to 120 nm decreased in the order of Mie Theory > optical caustic scattering > 90° scattering. These results suggested that conjugating 60 nm gold nanoparticles and using an optical caustic system to detect plasmonic light scattering, would result in a sensitive test for detecting human antibodies in serum. Therefore, we studied the light scattering response of conjugated gold nanoparticles exposed to different concentrations of anti-protein E antibody, and a feasibility study of 10 human serum samples using dot blot and a handheld optical caustic-based sensor device. The overall agreement between detection methods suggests that the new sensor concept shows promise to detect gold nanoparticle aggregation in a homogeneous assay. Further testing and protocol optimization is needed to draw conclusions on the positive and negative predictive values for this new testing system. PMID:28817080

  5. Optical instrument development for detection of pesticide residue in apple surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Li, Yongyu; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei

    2013-05-01

    Apple is the world largest produced and consumed fruit item. At the same time, apple ranks number one among the fruit item contaminated with pesticide. This research focuses on development of laboratory based self-developed software and hardware for detection of commercially available organophosphorous pesticide (chlorpyrifos) in apple surface. A laser light source of 785nm was used to excite the sample, and Raman spectroscopy assembled with CCD camera was used for optical data acquisition. A hardware system was designed and fabricated to clamp and rotate apple sample of varying size maintaining constant working distance between optical probe and sample surface. Graphical Users Interface (GUI) based on LabView platform was developed to control the hardware system. The GUI was used to control the Raman system including CCD temperature, exposure time, track height and track centre, data acquisition, data processing and result prediction. Different concentrations of commercially available 48% chlorpyrifos pesticide solutions were prepared and gently placed in apple surface and dried. Raman spectral data at different points from same apple along the equatorial region were then acquired. The results show that prominent peaks at 341cm-1, 632cm-1 and 680 cm-1 represent the pesticide residue. The laboratory based experiment was able to detect pesticide solution of 20ppm within 3 seconds. A linear relation between Raman intensity and pesticide residue was developed with accuracy of 97.8%. The result of the research is promising and thus is a milestone for developing industrially desired real time, non-invasive pesticide residue detection technology in future.

  6. Feasibility Study of an Optical Caustic Plasmonic Light Scattering Sensor for Human Serum Anti-Dengue Protein E Antibody Detection

    OpenAIRE

    García, Antonio A.; Franco, Lina S.; Pirez-Gomez, Miguel A.; Pech-Pacheco, José L.; Mendez-Galvan, Jorge F.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes; Espinosa-Carrillo, José H.; Duarte-Villaseñor, Miriam M.; Be-Ortiz, Christian; Espinosa-de los Monteros, Luz E.; Castillo-Pacheco, Ariel; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibody detection and accurate diagnosis of tropical diseases is essential to help prevent the spread of disease. However, most detection methods lack cost-effectiveness and field portability, which are essential features for achieving diagnosis in a timely manner. To address this, 3D-printed oblate spheroid sample chambers were fabricated to measure green light scattering of gold nanoparticles using an optical caustic focus to detect antibodies. Scattering signals of 20–200 nm gold nanopart...

  7. Potential Analysis of Electric Vehicle (EV) Grid Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde; Østergaard, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) have been considered as distributed energy resources (DER) to handle the fluctuation from renewable energy resources (RES), especially the wind power. The intelligent management of EV charging and discharging can achieve the goal of providing up and down regulating power...

  8. Driving Pattern Analysis for Electric Vehicle (EV) Grid Integration Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    In order to facilitate the integration of electric vehicles (EVs) into the Danish power system, the driving data in Denmark were analyzed to extract the information of driving distances and driving time periods which were used to represent the driving requirements and the EV unavailability...

  9. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  10. EV and HP Providing Ancillary Services in the Nordic Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhaoxi; Wu, Qiuwei

    This report covers the analysis of the electric vehicle (EV) and heat pump (HP) providing ancillary services to the power system of the Nordic region including Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The analysis is to investigate the feasibility of EVs and HPs to serve as demand as frequency reserve...... (DFR) providers in the distribution power system in the four mentioned Nordic countries....

  11. All-optical scheme for detecting the possible Majorana signature based on QD and nanomechanical resonator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, HuaJun; Zhu, KaDi

    2015-05-01

    Majorana fermions (MFs) are exotic particles that are their own anti-particles. Currently, the search for MFs occurring as quasiparticle excitations in condensed matter systems has attracted widespread interest, because of their importance in fundamental physics and potential applications in topological quantum computation based on solid-state devices. Motivated by recent experimental progress towards the detection and manipulation of MFs in hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures, in this review, we present a novel proposal to probe MFs in all-optical domain. We introduce a single quantum dot (QD), a hybrid quantum dot-nanomechanical resonators (QD-NR) system, and a carbon nanotube (CNT) resonator implanted in a single electron spin system with optical pump-probe technology to detect MFs, respectively. With this scheme, a possible Majorana signature is investigated via the probe absorption spectrum and nonlinear optical Kerr effect, and the coupling strength between MFs and the QD or the single electron spin is also determined. In the hybrid QD-NR system, vibration of the NR will enhance the nonlinear optical effect, which makes the MFs more sensitive for detection. In the CNT resonator with a single electron, the single electron spin can be considered as a sensitive probe, and the CNT resonator behaved as a phonon cavity is robust for detecting of MFs. This optical scheme will provide another method for the detection MFs and will open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of MFs to quantum information processing based on MFs.

  12. Automated boundary detection of the optic disc and layer segmentation of the peripapillary retina in volumetric structural and angiographic optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Pengxiao; Gao, Simon S; Hwang, Thomas S; Flaxel, Christina J; Wilson, David J; Morrison, John C; Huang, David; Li, Dengwang; Jia, Yali

    2017-03-01

    To improve optic disc boundary detection and peripapillary retinal layer segmentation, we propose an automated approach for structural and angiographic optical coherence tomography. The algorithm was performed on radial cross-sectional B-scans. The disc boundary was detected by searching for the position of Bruch's membrane opening, and retinal layer boundaries were detected using a dynamic programming-based graph search algorithm on each B-scan without the disc region. A comparison of the disc boundary using our method with that determined by manual delineation showed good accuracy, with an average Dice similarity coefficient ≥0.90 in healthy eyes and eyes with diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. The layer segmentation accuracy in the same cases was on average less than one pixel (3.13 μm).

  13. Local-oscillator-free wireless-optical-wireless data link at 1.25 Gbit/s over a 40 GHz carrier employing carrier preservation and envelope detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seoane, Jorge; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Prince, Kamau

    2008-01-01

    A local-oscillator-free wireless-optical-wireless system at 1.25 Gb/s over a 40 GHz carrier and 100 km of NZDSF is demonstrated employing optical half-wave rectification, carrier remodulation and envelope detection.......A local-oscillator-free wireless-optical-wireless system at 1.25 Gb/s over a 40 GHz carrier and 100 km of NZDSF is demonstrated employing optical half-wave rectification, carrier remodulation and envelope detection....

  14. Automatic stent strut detection in intravascular optical coherence tomographic pullback runs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ancong; Eggermont, Jeroen; Dekker, Niels; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M; Pawar, Ravindra; Reiber, Johan H C; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2013-01-01

    We developed and evaluated an automatic stent strut detection method in intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) pullback runs. Providing very high resolution images, IVOCT has been rapidly accepted as a coronary imaging modality for the optimization of the stenting procedure and its follow-up evaluation based on stent strut analysis. However, given the large number of struts visible in a pullback run, quantitative three-dimensional analysis is only feasible when the strut detection is performed automatically. The presented method first detects the candidate pixels using both a global intensity histogram and the intensity profile of each A-line. Gaussian smoothing is applied followed by specified Prewitt compass filters to detect the trailing shadow of each strut. Next, the candidate pixels are clustered using the shadow information. In the final step, several filters are applied to remove the false positives such as the guide wire. Our new method requires neither a priori knowledge of the strut status nor the lumen/vessel contours. In total, 10 IVOCT pullback runs from a 1-year follow-up study were used for validation purposes. 18,311 struts were divided into three strut status categories (malapposition, apposition or covered) and classified based on the image quality (high, medium or low). The inter-observer agreement is 95%. The sensitivity was defined as the ratio of the number of true positives and the total number of struts in the expert defined result. The proposed approach demonstrated an average sensitivity of 94%. For malapposed, apposed and covered stent struts, the sensitivity of the method is respectively 91, 93 and 94%, which shows the robustness towards different situations. The presented method can detect struts automatically regardless of the strut status or the image quality, and thus can be used for quantitative measurement, 3D reconstruction and visualization of the stents in IVOCT pullback runs.

  15. Novel Signal-Enhancing Approaches for Optical Detection of Nucleic Acids—Going beyond Target Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miotke

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of low-abundance nucleic acids is a challenging task, which over the last two decades has been solved using enzymatic target amplification. Enzymatic synthesis enhances the signal so that diverse, scientifically and clinically relevant molecules can be identified and studied, including cancer DNA, viral nucleic acids, and regulatory RNAs. However, using enzymes increases the detection time and cost, not to mention the high risk of mistakes with amplification and data alignment. These limitations have stimulated a growing interest in enzyme-free methods within researchers and industry. In this review we discuss recent advances in signal-enhancing approaches aimed at nucleic acid diagnostics that do not require target amplification. Regardless of enzyme usage, signal enhancement is crucial for the reliable detection of nucleic acids at low concentrations. We pay special attention to novel nanomaterials, fluorescence microscopy, and technical advances in detectors for optical assessment. We summarize sensitivity parameters of the currently available assays and devices which makes this review relevant to the broad spectrum of researchers working in fields from biophysics, to engineering, to synthetic biology and bioorganic chemistry.

  16. Non-invasive optical detection of HBV based on serum surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zuci; Wang, Qiwen; Weng, Cuncheng; Lin, Xueliang; Lin, Yao; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-10-01

    An optical method of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for non-invasive detection of hepatitis B surface virus (HBV). Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an established serological marker that is routinely used for the diagnosis of acute or chronic hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection. Utilizing SERS to analyze blood serum for detecting HBV has not been reported in previous literature. SERS measurements were performed on two groups of serum samples: one group for 50 HBV patients and the other group for 50 healthy volunteers. Blood serum samples are collected from healthy control subjects and patients diagnosed with HBV. Furthermore, principal components analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were employed to differentiate HBV patients from healthy volunteer and achieved sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 74.0%. This exploratory work demonstrates that SERS serum analysis combined with PCA-LDA has tremendous potential for the non-invasive detection of HBV.

  17. Cup-shaped choroidal excavation detected by optical coherence tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Sachi; Yamamoto, Teiko; Kirii, Eriko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report a case with a cup-shaped choroidal excavation in the fovea. This condition was detected only by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and seems to be rare. This was an observational case report. A 29-year-old man had a central scotoma in his right eye. Color photography showed a reddish lesion in the fovea of the right eye, which was shown as a window defect on fluorescein angiography. Tomography with time-domain OCT showed a retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal excavation corresponding to the reddish macular lesion in the right eye. By using spectral-domain OCT, the inner segment and outer segment junctions of photoreceptors line thickening was detected by tomography, and the retinal pigment epithelium line was observed in the area of choroidal excavation by segmentation analysis. The reddish lesion on ophthalmoscope corresponded to the excavation lesion, detected in the fovea only by OCT; this indicates a new clinical availability of OCT in clinical diagnosis.

  18. Detection of occlusal caries in primary teeth using swept source optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yukie; Shimada, Yasushi; Sadr, Alireza; Wada, Ikumi; Miyashin, Michiyo; Takagi, Yuzo; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) as a detecting tool for occlusal caries in primary teeth. At the in vitro part of the study, 38 investigation sites of occlusal fissures (noncavitated and cavitated) were selected from 26 extracted primary teeth and inspected visually using conventional dental equipment by six examiners without any magnification. SS-OCT cross-sectional images at 1330-nm center wavelength were acquired on the same locations. The teeth were then sectioned at the investigation site and directly viewed under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) by two experienced examiners. The presence and extent of caries were scored in each observation. The results obtained from SS-OCT and conventional visual inspections were compared with those of CLSM. Consequently, SS-OCT could successfully detect both cavitated and noncavitated lesions. The magnitude of sensitivity for SS-OCT was higher than those for visual inspection (sensitivity of visual inspection and SS-OCT, 0.70 versus 0.93 for enamel demineralization, 0.49 versus 0.89 for enamel cavitated caries, and 0.36 versus 0.75 for dentin caries). Additionally, occlusal caries of a few clinical cases were observed using SS-OCT in vivo. The results indicate that SS-OCT has a great detecting potential for occlusal caries in primary teeth.

  19. Loose powder detection and surface characterization in selective laser sintering via optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guangying; Hirsch, Matthias; Syam, Wahyudin P.; Leach, Richard K.; Huang, Zhihong; Clare, Adam T.

    2016-07-01

    Defects produced during selective laser sintering (SLS) are difficult to non-destructively detect after build completion without the use of X-ray-based methods. Overcoming this issue by assessing integrity on a layer-by-layer basis has become an area of significant interest for users of SLS apparatus. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used in this study to detect surface texture and sub-surface powder, which is un-melted/insufficiently sintered, is known to be a common cause of poor part integrity and would prevent the use of SLS where applications dictate assurance of defect-free parts. To demonstrate the capability of the instrument and associated data-processing algorithms, samples were built with graduated porosities which were embedded in fully dense regions in order to simulate defective regions. Simulated in situ measurements were then correlated with the process parameters used to generate variable density regions. Using this method, it is possible to detect loose powder and differentiate between densities of ±5% at a sub-surface depth of approximately 300 μm. In order to demonstrate the value of OCT as a surface-profiling technique, surface texture datasets are compared with focus variation microscopy. Comparable results are achieved after a spatial bandwidth- matching procedure.

  20. Optical detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples for diagnosis purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis, Elvio; Romero, Graciela; Alvarez, Liliana; Martinez, Carlos C.; Basombrio, Miguel A.

    2004-10-01

    An optical method for detection of Trypanosoma Cruzi (T. cruzi) parasites in blood samples of mice infected with Chagas disease is presented. The method is intended for use in human blood, for diagnosis purposes. A thin layer of blood infected by T. cruzi parasites, in small concentrations, is examined in an interferometric microscope in which the images of the vision field are taken by a CCD camera and temporarily stored in the memory of a host computer. The whole sample is scanned displacing the microscope plate by means of step motors driven by the computer. Several consecutive images of the same field are taken and digitally processed by means of image temporal differentiation in order to detect if a parasite is eventually present in the field. Each field of view is processed in the same fashion, until the full area of the sample is covered or until a parasite is detected, in which case an acoustical warning is activated and the corresponding image is displayed permitting the technician to corroborate the result visually. A discussion of the reliability of the method as well as a comparison with other well established techniques are presented.