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Sample records for eutectic solidification mode

  1. The effect of the solidification mode on eutectic structure in Fe-C-V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fras, E.; Guzik, E.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine such a chemical composition of Fe-C-V alloys which would ensure the formation of perfectly eutectic structures as well as to investigate the eutectic morphology of these alloys when undergoing bulk and directional solidification. Attempts have been done to get in situ composites from Fe-C-V alloys. The adopted testing methods as well as obtained results are described in detail. (H.M.)

  2. General characteristics of eutectic alloy solidification mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, Clement.

    1977-01-01

    The eutectic alloy sodification was studied in binary systems: solidification of non facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy (theoretical aspects, variation of the lamellar spacing, crystallographic relation between the various phases); solidification of facetted - non facetted eutectic alloy; coupled growth out of eutectic alloy; eutectic nucleation [fr

  3. Physico-mechanical properties of naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system by different modes of solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.L.; Gupta, S.; Tandon, S.; Kant, R.

    2008-01-01

    Anisotropic crystal growth kinetics from compositional melts encompassing the entire naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system, evidentially, evinces the dislocation mechanism. Rheological properties of eutectic phase melts at different temperatures explore the occurrence of molecular interactions emanating molecular clusters, rich in one phase or the other, in the eutectic melt. Microscopic studies confirm the crystalline faceted-faceted structure of the naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system. Implicit in the present work is the concept of strength-growth relationship that follows an identical form of the Weibull probability distribution curve. The curve exhibits two cut-off points corresponding to a lower strength limit in the slow and fast growth regions, and an upper strength limit in the moderate growth region. Relational essence between microstructural parameters essentially structuring morphology and excess thermodynamic functions implicitly governing molten state of the naphthalene-acenaphthene eutectic system is extracted

  4. Initial stages of solidification of eutectic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, Clement

    1980-01-01

    The study of the various initial stages of eutectic solidification - i.e. primary nucleation, eutectic structure formation and stable growth conditions - was undertaken with various techniques including low angle neutron diffusion, in-situ electron microscopy on solidifying alloys and classical metallography. The results obtained allow to discuss the effect of metastable states during primary nucleation, of surface dendrite during eutectic nucleation and also of the crystallographic anisotropy during growth. (author) [fr

  5. Containerless solidification of undercooled oxide and metallic eutectic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mingjun; Nagashio, Kosuke; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A high-speed video was employed to monitor the in situ recalescence of undercooled oxide Al 2 O 3 -36.8 at.% ZrO 2 and metallic Ni-18.7 at.% Sn eutectics that were processed on an aero-acoustic levitator and an electromagnetic levitator, respectively. For the oxide eutectic, the entire sample becomes brighter and brighter without any clear recalescence front during spontaneous crystallization. When the sample was seeded at desired undercoolings, crystallization started from the seeding point and then spread through the entire sample. Microstructures of the oxide solidified via both the spontaneous crystallization and external seeding consist of many independent eutectic colonies at the sample surface, indicating that copious nucleation takes place regardless of melt undercooling and solidification mode. For the metallic eutectics, two kinds of recalescence are visualized. The surface and cross sectional microstructures reveal that copious nucleation is also responsible for the formation of independent eutectic colonies distributing within the entire sample. It is not possible to measure the growth velocity of a single eutectic colony using optical techniques under the usual magnification. The conventional nucleation concept derived from single-phase alloys may not be applicable to the free solidification of the undercooled double-phase oxide and metallic eutectic systems

  6. Containerless solidification of acoustically levitated Ni-Sn eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, D.L.; Xie, W.J.; Wei, B. [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an (China)

    2012-10-15

    Containerless solidification of Ni-18.7at%Sn eutectic alloy has been achieved with a single-axis acoustic levitator. The temperature, motion, and oscillation of the sample were monitored by a high speed camera. The temperature of the sample can be determined from its image brightness, although the sample moves vertically and horizontally during levitation. The experimentally observed frequency of vertical motion is in good agreement with theoretical prediction. The sample undergoes shape oscillation before solidification finishes. The solidification microstructure of this alloy consists of a mixture of anomalous eutectic plus regular lamellar eutectic. This indicates the achievement of rapid solidification under acoustic levitation condition. (orig.)

  7. Solidification with back-diffusion of irregular eutectics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trepczyńska-Łent

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The definition of the α - parameter back-diffusion has been introduced in the work. The alternative models of solidification were describedtaking into consideration back-diffusion process. The possibility of using those models for eutectic alloys solidification is worthyof interest.

  8. Application of SEM/EBSD and FEG-TEM/CBED to determine eutectic solidification mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogita, K.; Dahle, A.K.; Drennan, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: This study shows the application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in SEM and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) in FEG-TEM to determine eutectic nucleation and growth in hypoeutectic Al-Si foundry alloys. Because the eutectic reaction is often the final stage of solidification it can be expected to have a significant impact on the formation of casting defects, particularly porosity. Previous EBSD work by Nogita and Dahle (2001), Dahle et al (2001), has shown that the eutectic nucleates on the primary phase in the unmodified alloy, and eutectic grains are nucleated in the intergranular liquid, instead of filling the dendrite envelopes, when Sr or Sb is added. However, the orientation relationship between silicon and aluminium in the eutectic has so far not been determined because of difficulties with sample preparation for EBSD and also detection limitations of Kikuchi refraction of silicon and aluminium, particularly in modified alloys with a refined eutectic. The combination of the EBSD technique in SEM and CBED in TEM analyses can provide crystallographic orientation relationships between primary aluminium dendrites, eutectic aluminium and silicon, which are important to explicitly define the solidification mode of the eutectic in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. These relationships are influenced, and altered, by the addition of certain elements. This paper also describes the sample preparation techniques for SEM and TEM for samples with different eutectic structures. The advantages the techniques are discussed. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  9. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  10. Rapid solidification growth mode transitions in Al-Si alloys by dynamic transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehling, John D.; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Gibbs, John W.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Mertens, James C.E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Clarke, Amy J.; McKeown, Joseph T.

    2017-01-01

    In situ dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) imaging of Al-Si thin-film alloys was performed to investigate rapid solidification behavior. Solidification of alloys with compositions from 1 to 15 atomic percent Si was imaged during pulsed laser melting and subsequent solidification. Solely α-Al solidification was observed in Al-1Si and Al-3Si alloys, and solely kinetically modified eutectic growth was observed in Al-6Si and Al-9Si alloys. A transition in the solidification mode in eutectic and hypereutectic alloys (Al-12Si and Al-15Si) from nucleated α-Al dendrites at lower solidification velocities to planar eutectic growth at higher solidification velocities was observed, departing from trends previously seen in laser-track melting experiments. Comparisons of the growth modes and corresponding velocities are compared with previous solidification models, and implications regarding the models are discussed.

  11. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  12. On the stable eutectic solidification of iron–carbon–silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Alonso, Gorka; Larrañaga, Pello; Suarez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Extensive effort was expanded to elucidate the growth and morphology of the stable eutectic grains during early solidification of continuous cooled Fe–C–Si alloys. To this purpose, quenching experiments at successive stages during solidification have been carried out on five cast irons with various magnesium and titanium levels designed to produce graphite morphologies ranging from lamellar to mixed compacted–spheroidal. The graphite shape factors were measured on the metallographic samples, and their evolution as a function of the chemical composition and the solid fraction was analyzed. Extensive scanning electron microscopy was carried on to evaluate the change in graphite shape during early solidification, to establish the fraction of solid at which the transition from spheroidal-to-compacted-to-lamellar graphite occurs, and to outline the early morphology of the eutectic grains. It was confirmed that solidification of Mg containing irons started with the development of spheroidal graphite even at Mg levels as low as 0.013 mass%. Then, as solidification proceeds, when some spheroids developed one or more tails (tadpole graphite), the spheroidal-to-compacted graphite transition occurs. The new findings were then integrated in previous knowledge to produce an understanding of the eutectic solidification of these materials. It was concluded that in hypoeutectic lamellar graphite iron austenite/graphite eutectic grains can nucleate at the austenite/liquid interface or in the bulk of the liquid, depending on the sulfur content and on the cooling rate. When graphite nucleation occurs on the primary austenite, several eutectic grains can nucleate and grow on the same dendrite. The primary austenite continues growing as eutectic austenite and therefore the two have the same crystallographic orientation. Thus, a final austenite grain may include several eutectic grains. In eutectic irons the eutectic grains nucleate and grow mostly in the liquid. The eutectic

  13. Directional solidification and characterization of the Al Nb2 - Al3 Nb eutectic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevisan, Eduardo A.O.; Andreotti, Fabio; Caram, Rubens

    1996-01-01

    The manufacturing of components to operate at high temperatures requires the use of metallic materials which can keep satisfactory mechanical and chemical properties, even at temperatures beyond 1000 deg C. An interesting alternative is the use of directionally solidified eutectic alloys. The eutectic alloy solidification makes possible the production of 'in situ' composite. A potentially useful system for manufacturing structural materials is the Al-Nb eutectic system. The aim of this work is to present the directional solidification of the Al-Nb eutectic alloy. (author)

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of the Solidification of Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Catalina, A. V.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The eutectic alloys have a wide spectrum of applications due to their good castability and physical and mechanical properties. The interphase spacing resulting during solidification is an important microstructural feature that significantly influences the mechanical behavior of the material. Thus, knowledge of the evolution of the interphase spacing during solidification is necessary in order to properly design the solidification process and optimize the material properties. While the growth of regular eutectics is rather well understood, the irregular eutectics such as Al-Si or Fe-graphite exhibit undercoolings and lamellar spacings much larger than those theoretically predicted. Despite of a considerable amount of experimental and theoretical work a clear understanding of the true mechanism underlying the spacing selection in irregular eutectics is yet to be achieved. A new experimental study of the solidification of the eutectic Al-Si alloy will be reported in this paper. The measured interface undercoolings and lamellar spacing will be compared to those found in the literature in order to get more general information regarding the growth mechanism of irregular eutectics. A modification of the present theory of the eutectic growth is also proposed. The results of the modified mathematical model, accounting for a non-isothermal solid/liquid interface, will be compared to the experimental measurements.

  15. On the relation between primary and eutectic solidification structures in gray iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmquist, L; Sonawane, P A

    2012-01-01

    The solidification of hypoeutectic gray cast iron starts with the nucleation of primary austenite crystals. Before graphite is nucleated, and the eutectic structure is formed, these crystals start to grow as columnar or equiaxed dendrites. However, very little is known about these dendrites, and especially how they influence the subsequent eutectic structure. Besides, it has previously been shown that the primary solidification structure influences the formation of defects. Shrinkage porosity was found between the dendrites, in the grain boundaries, and the formation of the primary solidification structure was found to influence problems related to metal expansion penetration. Therefore a better understanding about the formation of this structure is of importance. In this work, different inoculants and their influence on the formation of the micro- and macrostructures has been investigated. The inoculants considered are commercially used inoculants, i.e. inoculants used in the foundries, as well as different iron powders. The addition of iron powder is used to promote the primary solidification structure. It is shown that the nucleation of the dendrites is influenced by the amount of iron powder. Secondary dendrite arm spacing is a quantitative measurement in the microstructure related to these dendrites, which in turn depends on the solidification time. Eutectic cell size, on the other hand, is found to depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing. It is shown how the addition of inoculants influences both primary and eutectic solidification structures, and how they are related to each other.

  16. Self-consistent theory of steady-state lamellar solidification in binary eutectic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, G.E.; Glicksman, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential theoretic methods developed recently at NRL for solving the diffusion equation are applied to the free-boundary problem describing lamellar eutectic solidification. Using these techniques, the original boundary value problem is reduced to a set of coupled integro-differential equations for the shape of the solid/liquid interface and various quantities defined on the interface. The behavior of the solutions is discussed in a qualitative fashion, leading to some interesting inferences regarding the nature of the eutectic solidification process. Using the information obtained from the analysis referred to above, an approximate theory of the lamellar-rod transition is formulated. The predictions of the theory are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations of this transition. In addition, a simplified version of the general integro-differential equations is developed and is used to assess the effect of interface curvature on the interfacial solute concentrations, and to check the new theory for consistency with experiment

  17. Directional solidification of filamentary shapes of Pb--Cd and Pb--Sn eutectic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhindaw, B.K.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Spencer, C.R.; Gibson, E.D.

    1978-01-01

    Eutectic alloys of Pb--Cd and Pb--Sn were directionally solidified as thin filamentary strips contained in stainless steel and quartz capillaries. As the solidification rate increased the filament width, w, had to be reduced to maintain complete alignment of the lamellae clear across the filament. It was determined that in order to achieve complete alignment the ratio of filament width to lamellar spacing, w/lambda had to be less than about 30. Experiments were carried out at rates of 2-400 μm/s and at temperature gradients of 130 and 320 0 C/cm

  18. Influence of Lanthanum on Solidification, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Eutectic Al-Si Piston Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R.; Asmael, M. B. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Lanthanum (La) concentration on the solidification parameters of the α-Al, Al-Si, and Al-Cu phases and on the microstructure, tensile, and hardness properties of eutectic Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy were systematically investigated. The solidification parameters were examined using computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA-CCTA). The cooling curve and microstructure analysis showed that La altered the Si structure. The nucleation and growth temperatures of eutectic Si decreased when 0.3 wt.% La was added, and a high depression temperature was obtained with 1.0 wt.% La. High amounts of La considerably modified the Si structure and decreased the area and aspect ratio by 69.9 and 51%, respectively. The thermal analysis result recorded a faster freezing time with the La addition and a 36% alteration in the secondary dendrite arm spacing. Two secondary or ternary La-rich intermetallic phases were formed with needle- and plate-like structures. Furthermore, the mechanical properties were investigated by hardness and tensile tests with different La concentrations. The addition of small amounts of La (0.1 wt.%) significantly improved the ultimate tensile strength and quality index of the Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy. In addition, the hardness value of Al-11Si-Cu increased by 7-8% with the increasing amount of La added.

  19. Study of the thermal and kinetic parameters during directional solidification of zinc-aluminum eutectic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueijman, Sergio Fabian; Ares, Alicia Esther; Schvezov, Carlos Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Much work has been done recently on investigating zinc-based binary alloys, with different aluminum content, and modified or not with small amounts of other alloying elements. Some of these alloys have interesting properties, such as, the ZA alloys that have properties similar to some bronzes that are used in applications that require pieces with enough resistance to mechanical stresses. The longitudinal thermal gradients, the minimal gradients, the velocities of the liquid interphases, the velocities of the solid interphases and the accelerations of both interphases as a function of time and position were determined for each diluted alloy of the eutectic concentration considered (Zn-5%Al, % in weight), solidified horizontally with caloric extraction from both ends of the test pieces. The values obtained from the horizontal solidification with two directions of predominant caloric extraction are compared to previous values obtained for the same vertically solidified alloy system with a predominantly caloric extraction direction

  20. Thermoelectric and morphological effects of Peltier pulsing on directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.; Dressler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive in situ thermal measurements using Peltier Interface Demarcation (PID) during directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi were carried out. Observations indicate that significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample as a result of the Peltier pulsing. The contributions of the Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heats were separated and studied as a function of pulse intensity and polarity. The Joule and the combined Peltier and Thomson thermal contributions were determined as a function of time during and after the current pulses, close to the solid/liquid interface. Variations of the Bi/MnBi particle morphology clearly reveal the interface shape, changes in interface velocity, meltback, and temporary loss of cooperative growth, as a result of the pulsing.

  1. The buoyancy convection during directional solidification of AlZn eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazak, M.; Procio, M.; Holecek, S.

    1993-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of buoyancy convection during the directional solidification of AlZn eutectic alloy. Experiments have been conducted using a Bridgman-Stockbarger arrangement with the furnace moving along the specimen. The apparatus rotated around the horizontal axis, which made it possible to carry out measurements at different angles β contained by the gravity and temperature gradient vectors in the specimen. The anisotropy of both the linear thermal expansion coefficient a and the hardness HK measured by the Knoop method has been studied. The dilatation measurements confirmed the expected anisotropy of the linear thermal expansion of directionally solidified specimens. The values of HK correspond with the lamellar spacing measured in the metallographic study. (orig.)

  2. The Influence of Cr on the Solidification Behavior of Polycrystalline γ(Ni)/ γ'(Ni3Al)- δ(Ni3Nb) Eutectic Ni-Base Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mengtao; Helmink, Randolph; Tin, Sammy

    2012-04-01

    In the current investigation, the effect of Cr on the solidification characteristics and as-cast microstructure of pseudobinary γ- δ eutectic alloys based on a near-eutectic composition (Ni-5.5Al-13.5Nb at. pct) was investigated. It was found that Cr additions promote the formation of a higher volume fraction of γ- δ eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region. Increasing levels of Cr also triggered morphological changes in the γ- δ eutectic and the formation of γ- γ'- δ ternary eutectic during the last stage of solidification. A detailed characterization of the as-cast alloys also revealed that Cr additions suppressed the liquidus, solidus, and γ' precipitation temperature of these γ/ γ'- δ eutectic alloys. A comparison of the experimental results with thermodynamic calculations using the CompuTherm Pandat database (CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI) showed qualitative agreement.

  3. Validated thermodynamic prediction of AlP and eutectic (Si) solidification sequence in Al-Si cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, S M; Schmid-Fetzer, R

    2016-01-01

    The eutectic microstructure in hypoeutectic Al-Si cast alloys is strongly influenced by AlP particles which are potent nuclei for the eutectic (Si) phase. The solidification sequence of AlP and (Si) phases is, thus, crucial for the nucleation of eutectic silicon with marked impact on its morphology. This study presents this interdependence between Si- and P-compositions, relevant for Al-Si cast alloys, on the solidification sequence of AlP and (Si). These data are predicted from a series of thermodynamic calculations. The predictions are based on a self-consistent thermodynamic description of the Al-Si-P ternary alloy system developed recently. They are validated by independent experimental studies on microstructure and undercooling in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. A constrained Scheil solidification simulation technique is applied to predict the undercooling under clean heterogeneous nucleation conditions, validated by dedicated experimental observations on entrained droplets. These specific undercooling values may be very large and their quantitative dependence on Si and P content of the Al alloy is presented. (paper)

  4. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al2Au eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 μm. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity

  5. Nucleation-controlled microstructures and anomalous eutectic formation in undercooled Co-Sn and Ni-Si eutectic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjun; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2003-12-01

    with the correct order of magnitude. Solidification modes in some eutectic alloys are predicted on the basis of the present criterion. Future work that may result in some probable errors is briefly directed to improve the model.

  6. Free energy change of off-eutectic binary alloys on solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Lin, J.-C.; Perepezko, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A formula for the free energy difference between the undercooled liquid phase and the stable solid phase is derived for off-eutectic binary alloys in which the equilibrium solid/liquid transition takes place over a certain temperature range. The free energy change is then evaluated numerically for a Bi-25 at. pct Cd alloy modeled as a sub-subregular solution.

  7. Directional solidification of Zn-Al-Cu eutectic alloy by the vertical Bridgman method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büyük U.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the effect of growth rate and temperature gradient on microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn-7wt.%Al-4wt.%Cu eutectic alloy has been investigated. Alloys prepared under steady-state conditions by vacuumed hot filing furnace. Then, the alloys were directionally solidified upward with different growth rates (V=11.62-230.77 mm/s at a constant temperature gradient (G=7.17 K/mm and with different temperature gradients (G=7.17-11.04 K/mm at a constant growth rate (V=11.62 mm/s by a Bridgman furnace. The microstructures were observed to be lamellae of Zn, Al and broken lamellae CuZn4 phases from quenched samples. The values of eutectic spacing, microhardness and ultimate tensile strength of alloys were measured. The dependency of the microstructure and mechanical properties on growth rate and temperature gradient were investigated using regression analysis.

  8. 3D CAFE modeling of grain structures: application to primary dendritic and secondary eutectic solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carozzani, T; Digonnet, H; Gandin, Ch-A

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented for the prediction of grain structures formed in casting. It is based on direct tracking of grain boundaries using a cellular automaton (CA) method. The model is fully coupled with a solution of the heat flow computed with a finite element (FE) method. Several unique capabilities are implemented including (i) the possibility to track the development of several types of grain structures, e.g. dendritic and eutectic grains, (ii) a coupling scheme that permits iterations between the FE method and the CA method, and (iii) tabulated enthalpy curves for the solid and liquid phases that offer the possibility to work with multicomponent alloys. The present CAFE model is also fully parallelized and runs on a cluster of computers. Demonstration is provided by direct comparison between simulated and recorded cooling curves for a directionally solidified aluminum–7 wt% silicon alloy

  9. Directional solidification of Al2-Cu-Al and Al3-Ni-Al eutectics during TEXUS rocket flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, J. J.; Degoer, J.

    1984-01-01

    One lamellar eutectic sample and one fiber-like eutectic sample were solidified directionally during the TEXUS-6 rocket flight. The microstructures and the results of the thermal analysis, obtained from the temperatures recorded on the cartridge skin, are compared. No appreciable modifications of the regularity of the eutectic structures were observed by passing from 1 g to 0.0001 g in these experiments. No steady state growth conditions were achieved in these experiments.

  10. Role of bismuth on solidification, microstructure and mechanical properties of a near eutectic Al-Si alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahany, Saeed; Ourdjini, Ali; Bakar, Tuty Asma Abu; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah

    2014-09-01

    Computer aided thermal analysis and microstructural observation showed that addition of bismuth (Bi) within the range of 0.25 and 2 wt% produced a greater effect on the Al-Si eutectic phase than on primary aluminium and Al2Cu phases. Results showed that with addition of 1 wt% Bi the eutectic silicon structure was refined from flake-like morphology into lamellar. Bi refines rather than modifies the Si structure and increases the Al-Si eutectic fraction solid and more significantly there was no fading even up to 180 min of melt holding. Transmission electron microscopy study showed that the Si twin spacing decreased from 160 to 75 nm which is likely attributed to the refining effect of Bi. It was also found that addition of 1 wt% Bi increased the tensile strength, elongation and the absorbed energy for fracture due to the refined eutectic silicon structure.

  11. Observation of an Aligned Gas - Solid "Eutectic" during Controlled Directional Solidification Aboard the International Space Station - Comparison with Ground-based Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.; Anilkumar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Direct observation of the controlled melting and solidification of succinonitrile was conducted in the glovebox facility of the International Space Station (ISS). The experimental samples were prepared on ground by filling glass tubes, 1 cm ID and approximately 30 cm in length, with pure succinonitrile (SCN) in an atmosphere of nitrogen at 450 millibar pressure for eventual processing in the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI) apparatus in the glovebox facility (GBX) on board the ISS. Real time visualization during controlled directional melt back of the sample showed nitrogen bubbles emerging from the interface and moving through the liquid up the imposed temperature gradient. Over a period of time these bubbles disappear by dissolving into the melt. Translation is stopped after melting back of about 9 cm of the sample, with an equilibrium solid-liquid interface established. During controlled re-solidification, aligned tubes of gas were seen growing perpendicular to the planar solid/liquid interface, inferring that the nitrogen previously dissolved into the liquid SCN was now coming out at the solid/liquid interface and forming the little studied liquid = solid + gas eutectic-type reaction. The observed structure is evaluated in terms of spacing dimensions, interface undercooling, and mechanisms for spacing adjustments. Finally, the significance of processing in a microgravity environment is ascertained in view of ground-based results.

  12. Capture and Solidification of Rare Earth Nuclide (Nd) in LiCl-KCl Eutectic Salt Using a Synthetic Inorganic Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Na-Young; Eun, Hee-Chul; Park, Hwan-Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, neodymium (Nd) nuclides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salts were captured and solidified using a synthetic inorganic composite (Li{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), a process that allows the selective capture of Nd and fabrication of a composite with Nd captured from waste, without additional additives or mixing. The Nd nuclides in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were mainly captured in the form of LiNdSiO{sub 4}, and it was confirmed that NdSiO{sub 3} can be formed in the composite with captured Nd when the content of Nd in the composite is increased. The capture efficiency was higher than about 98 wt%. It was thought that the salt recovered from the Nd capture test was a renewable form could be reused in the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel, because the composite has high chemical durability in a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt at 900 ℃. The composite captured Nd was fabricated into a homogeneous glass form and a stable ceramic form.

  13. Effect of Manganese on Microstructures and Solidification Modes of Cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huabei; Wen, Yuhua; Du, Yangyang; Yu, Qinxu; Yang, Qin

    2013-10-01

    We investigated microstructures and solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni shape memory alloys to clarify whether Mn was an austenite former during solidification. Furthermore, we examined whether the Creq/Nieq equations (Delong, Hull, Hammer and WRC-1992 equations) and Thermo-Calc software® together with database TCFE6 were valid to predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni shape memory alloys. The results have shown that the solidification modes of Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni alloys changed from the F mode to the FA mode with increasing the Mn concentration. Mn is an austenite former during the solidification for the cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni shape memory alloys. The Delong, Hull, Hammer, and WRC-1992 equations as well as Thermo-Calc software® together with database TCFE6 are invalid to predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-(13-27)Mn-5.5Si-8.5Cr-5Ni SMAs. To predict the solidification modes of cast Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni alloys, a new Creq/Nieq equation should be developed or the thermodynamic database of Thermo-Calc software® should be corrected.

  14. The influence of Ta on the solidification microstructure and segregation behavior of γ(Ni)/γ′(Ni3Al)–δ(Ni3Nb) eutectic Ni-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, M.; Helmink, R.; Tin, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ta and Nb have a nominally identical influence on equilibrium δ volume fraction. ► Ta and Nb impact the sequence and segregation differently during solidification. ► Microstructure varies with both overall Ta + Nb level and Ta/Nb ratio. ► Pandat (PanNi7) is unable to predict trends quantitatively in this system. -- Abstract: Polycrystalline γ/γ′–δ eutectic Ni-base superalloys based on the Ni–Al–Nb alloy system were recently demonstrated to possess excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance. Investigations aimed to establish the fundamental relationships between alloy chemistry, solidification behavior and cast microstructure in these novel Ni–Al–Nb γ/γ′–δ alloy systems are currently underway. This particular study is focused on understanding the influence of Ta additions on the solidification sequence, phase volume fraction, distribution coefficient and solid state partitioning parameter of this eutectic alloy system by systematically investigating a series of experimental alloys with nominally constant overall levels of Ta + Nb content but varying Ta/Nb ratios. Although many of the tendencies observed in these multi-component γ/γ′–δ eutectic alloys are in agreement with trends observed in lower order model alloy systems, Ta additions were found to significantly modify solidification characteristics of the alloys. The experimental observations were also used to critically assess the predictive capability of thermodynamic database calculations. Despite the qualitative agreement observed between the experimental results and predictions for relatively simple quaternary and quinary model alloys, comparison of the results for higher order, multi-component γ/γ′–δ eutectic alloys reveals notable differences

  15. Development of neural network models for the prediction of solidification mode, weld bead geometry and sensitisation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Raj, B.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative models describing the effect of weld composition on the solidification mode, ferrite content and process parameters on the weld bead geometry are necessary in order to design composition of the welding consumable to ensure primary ferritic solidification mode, proper ferrite content and to ensure right choice of process parameters to achieve good bead geometry. A quantitative model on sensitisation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels is also necessary to optimise the composition of the austenitic stainless steel and to limit the strain on the material in order to enhance the resistance to sensitisation. The present paper discuss the development of quantitative models using artificial neural networks to correlate weld metal composition with solidification mode, process parameter with weld bead geometry and time for sensitisation with composition, strain in the material before welding and the temperature of exposure in austenitic stainless steels. (author)

  16. A basic study on capture and solidification of rare earth nuclide (Nd) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt using an inorganic composite with Li{sub 2}OAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}- SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Na Young; Eum, Hee Chul; Park, Hwan Seo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel generates LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing radioactive rare earth nuclides. It is necessary to develop a simple process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste in a hot-cell facility. In this study, capture and solidification of a rare earth nuclide (Nd) in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt using an inorganic composite with a Li{sub 2}OAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}- SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system was conducted to simplify the existing separation and solidification process of rare earth nuclides in LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt from the pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. More than 98wt% of Nd in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt was captured when the mass ratio of the composite was 0.67 over NdCl3 in the eutectic salt. The content of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the Nd captured-composite reached about 50wt%, and this composite was directly fabricated into a homogeneous and chemical resistant glass waste in a monolithic form. These results will be utilized in designing a process to simplify the existing separation and solidification process.

  17. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  18. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höche, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle; Müller, Sven; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  19. Relation between feeding mechanisms and solidification mode in 380 aluminium alloy with different iron contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovio, D. O.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Mugica, G. W.; Cuyas, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work the effect of iron (0.15, 0.42 and 0.86%) content in feeding mechanisms for 380 aluminium alloy has been studied. The feeding capacity has been evaluated by a device that produces a barrier removable to allowing the movement of the inter dendritic liquid. The results show the flow of different quantity of liquid, it depends of the temperature of operating the device and of the iron content. For minimum and maximum iron content, the inter dendritic and bursts feeding mechanisms are fundamentally involved, for 0.42% of iron the feeding mechanisms was the inter dendritic. The authors establish this behavior by the solidification mode of alloy, which promotes the presence of particles of Si or plates of b-Al 3 FeDi phase, in the inter dendritic channels and produce the different feeding mechanisms. (Author) 15 refs

  20. Solidification behaviors of a single-crystal superalloy under lateral constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuangqi Hu; Huaming Wang

    1993-01-01

    The effect of lateral constraints ahead of solidification interface on the solidification behaviors of a newly developed hot corrosion resistant single-crystal nickel-base superalloy was investigated under commercial single-crystal production conditions. The lateral constraints or section variations ahead of solidification front were found to have drastic influences both on the modes of solidification and the profiles of solute segregation. As lateral constraints were imposed ahead of the directionally solidifying interface, the solidification microstructure of the single-crystal superalloy changed suddenly, through a γ/γ' eutectic-free zone which is characterized by an extremely-fine and highly-developed dendrite network, from the original well-branched dendritic structure to a fine cellular-dendrite or regular cell structure, accompanying which the primary arm spacing, the severity of segregation and the amount of microporosity decreased remarkably. The newly formed cellular dendrite or cell structure transforms always gradually to the initial coarse dendrite structure as the lateral constraint is finally released whether gradually or sharply. Moreover, an abnormal porosity zone was readily observed in the initial section beneath and away from the eutectic-free zone. The solidification microstructural changes were attributed to the drastic dynamical changes in local solidification cooling conditions and in momentum transport during solidification due to the presence of lateral constraint

  1. Study of the influence of gravity on the thermodynamic equilibrium of a liquid alloy, and on its solidification: application to eutectic Al-Ge and monotectic Al-In alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinet, Bernard

    1981-01-01

    After having recalled the meaning of gravity, this research thesis addresses the study of movements within the Earth gravity field to assess accelerations for a centrifuged system, and to describe conditions which create weightlessness. The various actions of gravity on fluid phases are analysed by highlighting phenomena of convection and segregation. In a second part, the author addresses the issue of local order. The third part addresses the influence of gravity conditions on the distribution of components of a binary liquid alloy in thermodynamic equilibrium. The fourth part addresses experimental means. The next parts address the eutectic Al-Ge alloy and the monotectic Al-In alloy. Results obtained for liquid alloy are presented, and the author analyse segregations which appeared during solidification in gravity conditions between 40 and 100 g. The influence of these conditions of the structure of both alloys is then studied

  2. Phase-field model of eutectic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karma, A.

    1994-01-01

    A phase-field model which describes the solidification of a binary eutectic alloy with a simple symmetric phase diagram is introduced and the sharp-interface limit of this model is explored both analytically and numerically

  3. Influence of Secondary Cooling Mode on Solidification Structure and Macro-segregation Behavior for High-carbon Continuous Casting Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Kun; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Qing; Huang, Yunhua; Dong, Hongbiao

    2017-07-01

    A cellular automaton-finite element coupling model for high-carbon continuously cast bloom of GCr15 steel is established to simulate the solidification structure and to investigate the influence of different secondary cooling modes on characteristic parameters such as equiaxed crystal ratio, grain size and secondary dendrite arm spacing, in which the effect of phase transformation and electromagnetic stirring is taken into consideration. On this basis, evolution of carbon macro-segregation for GCr15 steel bloom is researched correspondingly via industrial tests. Based on above analysis, the relationship among secondary cooling modes, characteristic parameters for solidification structure as well as carbon macro-segregation is illustrated to obtain optimum secondary cooling strategy and alleviate carbon macro-segregation degree for GCr15 steel bloom in continuous casting process. The evaluating method for element macro-segregation is applicable in various steel types.

  4. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 angstrom Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 angstrom, 500 angstrom, and 300 angstrom per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 angstrom/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 angstrom/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study

  5. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, W.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  6. Structure of the aluminium-uranium eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Vieira, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The authors discuss the factors which might effect the eutectic structure, including external conditions during solidification as well as factors peculiar to each individual system. They studied the structure of the A1-U eutectic, consisting of the solid solution of uranium in aluminium and UA1 4 , as obtained in ingot moulds and by unidirectional solidification, and found a tendency for the structure to develop in a spiral, in the form of a rhombus. They discuss this structure in terms of certain variables with emphasis on the growth characteristics of the phases comprising the eutectic, the velocity of growth and thermal gradient in the liquid [pt

  7. Morphology of the aluminium-uranium eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Vieira, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The factors which might affect the eutectic structure including external condition during solidification as well as factors peculiar to each individual system is discussed. The structure of the Al-U eutectic, consisting of the solid solution of uranium in aluminium and UAl 4 , as obtained in ingot moulds and by unidirectional solidification. The extructure in terms of certain variables with emphasis on the growth characteristics of the phases comprising the eutectic the velocity of growth and thermal gradient in the liquid is also presented [pt

  8. Microstructure Of MnBi/Bi Eutectic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, William R.; Eisa, G. F.; Baskaran, B.; Richardson, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Collection of three reports describes studies of directional solidification of MnBi/Bi eutectic alloy. Two of the reports, "Influence of Convection on Lamellar Spacing of Eutectics" and "Influence of Convection on Eutectic Microstructure," establish theoretical foundation for remaining document. Reports seek to quantify effect of convection on concentration field of growing lamellar eutectic. Remaining report, "Study of Eutectic Formation," begins by continuing theoretical developments. New technique under development by one of the authors helps to reveal three-dimensional microstructures of alloys.

  9. Interest and difficulties of O-g studies of the mechanisms of eutectic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaignan, Clement; Malmejac, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The possible modifications of the very diverse mechanisms involved in a typical eutectic solidification due to the effects of O-g conditions are described. The convection effects, eutectic solidification, nucleation and relations between interlamellar spacing and growth rate are studied [fr

  10. Pseudobinary eutectics in Cu–Ag–Ge alloy droplets under containerless condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, Y.; Wang, X.J.; Lu, X.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two pseudobinary eutectics form in Cu–Ag–Ge alloy. ► It is influenced by thermodynamic and kinetic factors of the alloy in the drop tube. ► As droplet size reduces, anomalous → lamellar → anomalous transition happens in (Ag + ζ). ► (Ag + ε 2 ) is a product of both peri-eutectic and pseudobinary eutectic transitions. -- Abstract: Pseudobinary eutectic generated by pseudobinary eutectic transition or peri-eutectic transition is a crucial structure in ternary alloy systems. Its formation mechanism strongly influences mechanical properties of these metallic materials. However, it was customarily neglected. In this paper, two pseudobinary eutectics, i.e. (Ag + ζ) and (Ag + ε 2 ), were investigated during the rapid solidification of Cu–Ag–Ge ternary alloy in a 3 m-drop tube. The sharp temperature variations and dramatic kinetic activities of the falling alloy droplets before solidification cause special microstructural characteristics. (Ag) dendrite is the heterogeneous nucleus for anomalous (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic in large droplets. Lamellar (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic grain forms independently on condition that primary (Ag) dendrite cannot form and its eutectic morphology becomes anomalous with the decrease of droplet size. Nanoscaled (Ag + ε 2 ) pseudobinary eutectic generating at the last stage of solidification is the product of both peri-eutectic and pseudobinary eutectic transitions. It distributes in the gaps of (Ag + ζ) pseudobinary eutectic grains and its morphology remains lamellar regardless of droplet size

  11. The growth of faceted/nonfaceted eutectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchtelen, J. van

    1976-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the unidirectional solidification of eutectic melts in which one of the phases has a faceted, the other a nonfaceted solid-liquid interface. The occurrence of complex microstructures in such eutectics is explained as a growth phenomenon. The essential condition for the occurrence of such structures is a non-isothermal solid-liquid interface, developing into a faceted-cellular structure. The faceted shape of the cells is imposed by the faceted component of the eutectic. Breakdown to such a cellular structure occurs not only in constitutional-supercooling conditions, but under any circumstances, the cellular period being a function of growth velocity, temperature gradient etc. The two-phase morphology of the eutectic structure is discussed in terms of the relative magnitude of the periods of the cellular and of the eutectic structure. (orig.) [de

  12. Modelling Eutectic Growth in Unmodified and Modified Near-Eutectic Al-Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Taylor, John A.

    2013-01-01

    growth parameters from the literature that depend on the type of modification (unmodified, Na-modified or Sr-modified) are used to describe differences in growth of the alloys. Modelling results are compared with solidification experiments where an Al-12.5wt%Si alloy was cast in unmodified, Na modified......A numerical model that describes solidification of primary aluminium grains and nucleation and growth of eutectic cells is used to analyse the solidification of an Al-12.5wt% Si alloy. Nucleation of eutectic cells is modelled using an Oldfield-type nucleation model where the number of nuclei...... and Sr modified forms. The model confirms experimental observations of how modification and alloy composition influence nucleation, growth and finally the size of eutectic cells in the alloys. Modelling results are used to explain how cooling conditions in the casting act together with the nuclei density...

  13. Metallurgical Parameters Controlling the Eutectic Silicon Charateristics in Be-Treated Al-Si-Mg Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed F; Elgallad, Emad M; Valtierra, Salvador; Doty, Herbert W; Samuel, Fawzy H

    2016-01-27

    The present work was carried out on Al-7%Si-0.4%Mg-X alloy (where X = Mg, Fe, Sr or Be), where the effect of solidification rate on the eutectic silicon characteristics was investigated. Two solidification rates corresponding to dendrite arm spacings (DAS) of 24 and 65 μm were employed. Samples with 24 μm DAS were solution heat-treated at 540 °C for 5 and 12 h prior to quenching in warm water at 65 °C. Eutectic Si particle charateristics were measured using an image analyzer. The results show that the addition of 0.05% Be leads to partial modification of the Si particles. Full modification was only obtained when Sr was added in an amount of 150-200 ppm, depending on the applied solidification rate. Increasing the amount of Mg to 0.8% in Sr-modified alloys leads to a reduction in the effectiveness of Sr as the main modifier. Similar observations were made when the Fe content was increased in Be-treated alloys due to the Be-Fe interaction. Over-modification results in the precipitation of hard Sr-rich particles, mainly Al₄SrSi₂, whereas overheating causes incipient melting of the Al-Cu eutectic and hence the surrounding matrix. Both factors lead to a deterioration in the alloy mechanical properties. Furthermore, the presence of long, acicular Si particles accelerates the occurrence of fracture and, as a result, yields poor ductility. In low iron (less than 0.1 wt%) Al-Si-Mg alloys, the mechanical properties in the as cast, as well as heat treated conditions, are mainly controlled by the eutectic Si charatersitics. Increasing the iron content and, hence, the volume fraction of Fe-based intermetallics leads to a complex fracture mode.

  14. Metallurgical Parameters Controlling the Eutectic Silicon Charateristics in Be-Treated Al-Si-Mg Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out on Al-7%Si-0.4%Mg-X alloy (where X = Mg, Fe, Sr or Be, where the effect of solidification rate on the eutectic silicon characteristics was investigated. Two solidification rates corresponding to dendrite arm spacings (DAS of 24 and 65 μm were employed. Samples with 24 μm DAS were solution heat-treated at 540 °C for 5 and 12 h prior to quenching in warm water at 65 °C. Eutectic Si particle charateristics were measured using an image analyzer. The results show that the addition of 0.05% Be leads to partial modification of the Si particles. Full modification was only obtained when Sr was added in an amount of 150–200 ppm, depending on the applied solidification rate. Increasing the amount of Mg to 0.8% in Sr-modified alloys leads to a reduction in the effectiveness of Sr as the main modifier. Similar observations were made when the Fe content was increased in Be-treated alloys due to the Be-Fe interaction. Over-modification results in the precipitation of hard Sr-rich particles, mainly Al4SrSi2, whereas overheating causes incipient melting of the Al-Cu eutectic and hence the surrounding matrix. Both factors lead to a deterioration in the alloy mechanical properties. Furthermore, the presence of long, acicular Si particles accelerates the occurrence of fracture and, as a result, yields poor ductility. In low iron (less than 0.1 wt% Al-Si-Mg alloys, the mechanical properties in the as cast, as well as heat treated conditions, are mainly controlled by the eutectic Si charatersitics. Increasing the iron content and, hence, the volume fraction of Fe-based intermetallics leads to a complex fracture mode.

  15. The preferential orientation and lattice misfit of the directionally solidified Fe-Al-Ta eutectic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chunjuan; Wang, Pei; Yang, Meng; Wen, Yagang; Ren, Chiqiang; Wang, Songyuan

    2018-01-01

    Fe-Al intermetallic compound has been paid more attentions recently in many fields such as aeronautic, aerospace, automobile, energy and chemical engineering, and so on. In this paper Fe-Al-Ta eutectic was prepared by a modified Bridgman directional solidification technique, and it is found that microstructure of the Fe-Al-Ta eutectic alloy transforms from the broken-lamellar eutectic to cellular eutectic with the increase of the solidification rate. In the cellular eutectic structure, the fibers are parallel to each other within the same grain, but some fibers are deviated from the original orientation at the grain boundaries. To study the crystallographic orientation relationship (OR) between the two phases, the preferential orientation of the Fe-Al-Ta eutectic alloy at the different solidification rates was studied by Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). Moreover, the lattice misfit between Fe2Ta(Al) Laves phase and Fe(Al,Ta) matrix phase was calculated.

  16. Efficient estimation of diffusion during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeum, K. S.; Poirier, D. R.; Laxmanan, V.

    1989-01-01

    A very efficient finite difference method has been developed to estimate the solute redistribution during solidification with diffusion in the solid. This method is validated by comparing the computed results with the results of an analytical solution derived by Kobayashi (1988) for the assumptions of a constant diffusion coefficient, a constant equilibrium partition ratio, and a parabolic rate of the advancement of the solid/liquid interface. The flexibility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to the dendritic solidification of a Pb-15 wt pct Sn alloy, for which the equilibrium partition ratio and diffusion coefficient vary substantially during solidification. The fraction eutectic at the end of solidification is also obtained by estimating the fraction solid, in greater resolution, where the concentration of solute in the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic composition of the alloy.

  17. Study on the morphology of Pb-Sn eutectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Gentile, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    The influence of factors such as rate of growth of the solid phase, thermal gradient in the liquid and presence of impurities on the solidification of eutectic structures is studied. To emphasize certain aspects of the basic concept, the technique of unidirectional cooling was used in a specially constructed apparatus. Micrographs of the structure obtained with the eutectic Pb-Sn alloy are shown and a purely qualitative analysis of the factors described is given [pt

  18. Solidification microstructures of aluminium-uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrozio Filho, F.; Vieira, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The solidification of microstrutures of aluminium-uranium alloys in the range of 4 to 20% uranium is investigated. The solidification was obtained both in ingot molds and under controlled directional solidification. The conditions for the presence of primary crystals and eutectic are discussed and an analysis of the influence of variables (growth rate and thermal gradient in the liquid) on the alloy structure is made. The effect of cooling rate on the alloy structures has been determined. It is found that the resulting structure can be derived from the kinectics concept, as required by the coupled-zone theory. Suggestions on the qualitative intervals of composition and temperatures with eutectic growth are presented [pt

  19. Organic alloy systems suitable for the investigation of regular binary and ternary eutectic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, L.; Witusiewicz, V. T.; Hecht, U.; Rex, S.

    2004-09-01

    Transparent organic alloys showing a plastic crystal phase were investigated experimentally using differential scanning calorimetry and directional solidification with respect to find a suitable model system for regular ternary eutectic growth. The temperature, enthalpy and entropy of phase transitions have been determined for a number of pure substances. A distinction of substances with and without plastic crystal phases was made from their entropy of melting. Binary phase diagrams were determined for selected plastic crystal alloys with the aim to identify eutectic reactions. Examples for lamellar and rod-like eutectic solidification microstructures in binary systems are given. The system (D)Camphor-Neopentylglycol-Succinonitrile is identified as a system that exhibits, among others, univariant and a nonvariant eutectic reaction. The ternary eutectic alloy close to the nonvariant eutectic composition solidifies with a partially faceted solid-liquid interface. However, by adding a small amount of Amino-Methyl-Propanediol (AMPD), the temperature of the nonvariant eutectic reaction and of the solid state transformation from plastic to crystalline state are shifted such, that regular eutectic growth with three distinct nonfaceted phases is observed in univariant eutectic reaction for the first time. The ternary phase diagram and examples for eutectic microstructures in the ternary and the quaternary eutectic alloy are given.

  20. Solidification of Hypereutectic Thin Wall Ductile Cast Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2006-01-01

    solidification. The first stage, which was relatively short, had none or very little recalescence. Further under cooling, followed by reheating during recalescence, was necessary to initiate the second part of the eutectic solidification. Both the secondary under cooling and recalescence was larger in the 3 mm...... a higher Si content in the ferrite around the larger nodules compared to the ferrite around the rest of the nodules. This indicates that solidification took place along the following path: The solidification starts with nucleation and growth of primary graphite nodules. This probably starts during...

  1. Growth and Morphology of Rod Eutectics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing Teng; Shan Liu; R. Trivedi

    2008-03-17

    The formation of rod eutectic microstructure is investigated systematically in a succinonitrile-camphor alloy of eutectic composition by using the directional solidification technique. A new rod eutectic configuration is observed in which the rods form with elliptical cylindrical shape. Two different orientations of the ellipse are observed that differ by a 90{sup o} rotation such that the major and the minor axes are interchanged. Critical experiments in thin samples, where a single layer of rods forms, show that the spacing and orientation of the elliptic rods are governed by the growth rate and the sample thickness. In thicker samples, multi layers of rods form with circular cross-section and the scaling law between the spacing and velocity predicted by the Jackson and Hunt model is validated. A theoretical model is developed for a two-dimensional array of elliptical rods that are arranged in a hexagonal or a square array, and the results are shown to be consistent with the experimental observations. The model of elliptic rods is also shown to reduce to that for the circular rod eutectic when the lengths of the two axes are equal, and to the lamellar eutectic model when one of the axes is much larger than the other one.

  2. Phase change and heat transfer characteristics of a eutectic mixture of palmitic and stearic acids as PCM in a latent heat storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, Guelseren; Sari, Ahmet

    2003-01-01

    The phase change and heat transfer characteristics of a eutectic mixture of palmitic and stearic acids as phase change material (PCM) during the melting and solidification processes were determined experimentally in a vertical two concentric pipes energy storage system. This study deals with three important subjects. First is determination of the eutectic composition ratio of the palmitic acid (PA) and stearic acid (SA) binary system and measurement of its thermophysical properties by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Second is establishment of the phase transition characteristics of the mixture, such as the total melting and solidification temperatures and times, the heat transfer modes in the melted and solidified PCM and the effect of Reynolds and Stefan numbers as initial heat transfer fluid (HTF) conditions on the phase transition behaviors. Third is calculation of the heat transfer coefficients between the outside wall of the HTF pipe and the PCM, the heat recovery rates and heat fractions during the phase change processes of the mixture and also discussion of the effect of the inlet HTF parameters on these characteristics. The DSC results showed that the PA-SA binary system in the mixture ratio of 64.2:35.8 wt% forms a eutectic, which melts at 52.3 deg. C and has a latent heat of 181.7 J g -1 , and thus, these properties make it a suitable PCM for passive solar space heating and domestic water heating applications with respect to climate conditions. The experimental results also indicated that the eutectic mixture of PA-SA encapsulated in the annulus of concentric double pipes has good phase change and heat transfer characteristics during the melting and solidification processes, and it is an attractive candidate as a potential PCM for heat storage in latent heat thermal energy storage systems

  3. Solidification processing of intermetallic Nb-Al alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Preston P.; Oliver, Ben F.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1992-01-01

    Several Nb-Al alloys, including single-phase NbAl3 and the eutectic of Nb2Al and NbAl3, were prepared either by nonconsumable arc melting in Ar or by zone processing in He following initial induction melting and rod casting, and the effect of the solidification route on the microstructure and room-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys was investigated. Automated control procedures and melt conditions for directional solidification of NbAl3 and the Nb2Al/Nb3Al eutectic were developed; high purity and stoichiometry were obtained. The effects of ternary additions of Ti and Ni are described.

  4. Solidification control in continuous casting of steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Solidification in continuous casting (CC) technology is initiated in a water- ..... to fully austenitic solidification, and FP between 0 and 1 indicates mixed mode. ... the temperature interval (LIT – TSA) corresponding to fs = 0⋅9 → 1, is in reality the.

  5. Oxygen partial pressure: a key to alloying and discovery in metal oxide--metal eutectic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, J.D.; Clark, G.W.; Oliver, B.F.

    1978-01-01

    Control of oxygen partial pressure is essential in the directional solidification of oxide--metal eutectic composites by techniques involving gas-solid and gas-liquid interactions. The existence of end components in the eutectic composite is Po 2 sensitive as are melt stoichiometry, solid phase compositions, and vapor losses due to oxidation-volatilization. Simple criteria are postulated which can aid the experimentalist in selecting the proper gas mixture for oxide--metal eutectic composite growth. The Cr 2 O 3 --Mo--Cr systems was used to verify certain aspects of the proposed criteria

  6. The novel eutectic microstructures of Si-Mn-P ternary alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yaping; Liu Xiangfa

    2010-01-01

    The microstructures of Si-Mn-P alloy manufactured by the technique of combining phosphorus transportation and alloy melting were investigated using electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). The phase compositions were determined by energy spectrum and the varieties of eutectic morphologies were discussed. It is found that there is no ternary compound but Si, MnP and MnSi 1.75-x could appear when the Si-Mn-P alloy's composition is proper. Microstructure is greatly refined by rapid solidification technique and the amount of eutectic phases change with faster cooling rates. Moreover, primary Si or MnP are surrounded firstly by the binary eutectic (Si + MnP) and then the ternary eutectic (Si + MnSi 1.75-x + MnP) which also exhibit binary structures due to divorced eutectic determined by the particularity of some Si-Mn-P alloys.

  7. Solidification process of a tool steel with niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makray, E.T.; Bresciani Filho, E.; Martinez Nazar, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    The solidification process of M2 high speed steel where tungsten was totally substituted by niobium was analysed. It occurs through a eutectic type reaction, in four steps. It was verified that one can apply the Coupled Zone Concept to explain the solification mechanism of this alloy: there is a primary phase (NbC), which is envolved by the other phase (ferrite) as a halo in order to send the composition back to the coupled growth region, where the binary eutectic forms. The last step is the formation of other compounds at the grain boundary. (Author) [pt

  8. Microstructural investigation of D2 tool steel during rapid solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delshad Khatibi, Pooya

    Solidification is considered as a key processing step in developing the microstructure of most metallic materials. It is, therefore, important that the solidification process can be designed and controlled in such a way so as to obtain the desirable properties in the final product. Rapid solidification refers to the system's high undercooling and high cooling rate, which can yield a microstructure with unique chemical composition and mechanical properties. An area of interest in rapid solidification application is high-chromium, high-carbon tool steels which experience considerable segregation of alloying elements during their solidification in a casting process. In this dissertation, the effect of rapid solidification (undercooling and cooling rate) of D2 tool steel on the microstructure and carbide precipitation during annealing was explored. A methodology is described to estimate the eutectic and primary phase undercooling of solidifying droplets. The estimate of primary phase undercooling was confirmed using an online measurement device that measured the radiation energy of the droplets. The results showed that with increasing primary phase and eutectic undercooling and higher cooling rate, the amount of supersaturation of alloying element in metastable retained austenite phase also increases. In the case of powders, the optimum hardness after heat treatment is achieved at different temperatures for constant periods of time. Higher supersaturation of austenite results in obtaining secondary hardness at higher annealing temperature. D2 steel ingots generated using spray deposition have high eutectic undercooling and, as a result, high supersaturation of alloying elements. This can yield near net shape D2 tool steel components with good mechanical properties (specifically hardness). The data developed in this work would assist in better understanding and development of near net shape D2 steel spray deposit products with good mechanical properties.

  9. Joining of superalloy Inconel 600 by diffusion induced isothermal solidification of a liquated insert metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbewande, A.T.; Chukwukaeme, C.; Ojo, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of process variables on the microstructure of transient liquid phase bonded IN 600 using a commercial filler alloy was studied. Microstructural examination of bonded specimens showed that isothermal solidification of the liquated insert occurred during holding at the joining temperatures. In cases where the holding time was insufficient for complete isothermal solidification, the residual liquid transformed on cooling into a centerline eutectic product. The width of the eutectic decreased with increased holding time and an increase in initial gap width resulted in thicker eutectic width in specimens bonded at the same temperature and for equivalent holding times. In addition to the centerline eutectic microconstituent, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed within the base metal region adjacent to the substrate-joint interface. Formation of these particles appeared to have influenced the rate of solidification of the liquated interlayer during bonding. In contrast to the conventional expectation of an increase in the rate of isothermal solidification with an increase in temperature, a decrease in the rate was observed with an increase in temperatures above 1160 deg. C. This could be related to a decrease in solubility of boron in nickel above the Ni-B eutectic temperature

  10. Review of possible experiments in the eutectic growth and thermodiffusion fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmejac, Yves.

    1976-01-01

    The results now available from the SKYLAB and ASTP programmes give a clearer indication of the lines of the research to pursue in the years to come. The criteria necessary for the choice of experiments are analysed in the fields of eutectic solidification and diffusion along a temperature gradient in liquid alloys [fr

  11. Coupled growth of Al-Al2Cu eutectics in Al-Cu-Ag alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, U; Witusiewicz, V; Drevermann, A

    2012-01-01

    Coupled eutectic growth of Al and Al 2 Cu was investigated in univariant Al-Cu-Ag alloys during solidification with planar and cellular morphology. Experiments reveal the dynamic selection of small spacings, below the minimum undercooling spacing and show that distinct morphological features pertain to nearly isotropic or anisotropic Al-Al 2 Cu interfaces.

  12. Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plapp, Mathis

    2007-05-01

    The phase-field method has become the method of choice for simulating microstructural pattern formation during solidification. One of its main advantages is that time-dependent three-dimensional simulations become feasible, which makes it possible to address long-standing questions of pattern stability and pattern selection. Here, a brief introduction to the phase-field model and its implementation is given, and its capabilities are illustrated by examples taken from the directional solidification of binary alloys. In particular, the morphological stability of hexagonal cellular arrays and of eutectic lamellar patterns is investigated.

  13. Solidification at the micro-scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.

    2003-01-01

    The experimental determination and computer simulation of the micro-segregation accompanying the solidification of alloys continues to be a subject of much academic and industrial interest. Both are subject to progressively more sophisticated analyses, and a discussion is offered regarding the development and practical use of such studies. Simple steels are particularly difficult targets for such work: solidification does not end conveniently in a eutectic, the rapid diffusion particularly in the delta-ferrite phase obscures most evidence of what had occurred at the micro-scale during solidification, and one or more subsequent solid state phase transformations further obscure such details. Also, solidification at the micro-scale is inherently variable: the usual, dendrite morphologies encountered are, after all, instabilities in growth behaviour, and therefore such variability should be expected. For questions such as the relative susceptibility of different grades to particular problems, it is the average, typical behaviour that is of interest, whereas for other questions such as the on-set of macro-segregation, the local variability is paramount. Depending on the question being asked, and indeed the accuracy with which validatory data are available, simple pseudo-analytical equations employing various limiting assumptions, or sophisticated models which remove the need for most such limitations, could be appropriate. This paper highlights the contribution to such studies of various collaborative research forums within the European Union with which the author is involved. (orig.) [de

  14. Solidification microstructures and solid-state parallels: Recent developments, future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asta, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Beckermann, C. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kurz, W. [Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: wilfried.kurz@epfl.ch; Napolitano, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, and Ames Laboratory USDOE, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Plapp, M. [Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Purdy, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4L7 (Canada); Rappaz, M. [Institute of Materials, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Trivedi, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, and Ames Laboratory USDOE, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Rapid advances in atomistic and phase-field modeling techniques as well as new experiments have led to major progress in solidification science during the first years of this century. Here we review the most important findings in this technologically important area that impact our quantitative understanding of: (i) key anisotropic properties of the solid-liquid interface that govern solidification pattern evolution, including the solid-liquid interface free energy and the kinetic coefficient; (ii) dendritic solidification at small and large growth rates, with particular emphasis on orientation selection; (iii) regular and irregular eutectic and peritectic microstructures; (iv) effects of convection on microstructure formation; (v) solidification at a high volume fraction of solid and the related formation of pores and hot cracks; and (vi) solid-state transformations as far as they relate to solidification models and techniques. In light of this progress, critical issues that point to directions for future research in both solidification and solid-state transformations are identified.

  15. Modelling of Eutectic Saturation Influence on Microstructure in Thin Wall Ductile Iron Casting Using Cellular Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burbelko A.A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of the globular eutectic solidification in 2D was designed. Proposed model is based on the Cellular Automaton Finite Differences (CA-FD calculation method. Model has been used for studies of the primary austenite and of globular eutectic grains growth during the ductile iron solidification in the thin wall casting. Model takes into account, among other things, non-uniform temperature distribution in the casting wall cross-section, kinetics of the austenite and graphite grains nucleation, and non-equilibrium nature of the interphase boundary migration. Calculation of eutectic saturation influence (Sc = 0.9 - 1.1 on microstructure (austenite and graphite fraction, density of austenite and graphite grains and temperature curves in 2 mm wall ductile iron casting has been done.

  16. Relationships Between Solidification Parameters in A319 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersluis, E.; Ravindran, C.

    2018-03-01

    The design of high-performance materials depends on a comprehensive understanding of the alloy-specific relationships between solidification and properties. However, the inconsistent use of a particular solidification parameter for presenting materials characterization in the literature impedes inter-study comparability and the interpretation of findings. Therefore, there is a need for accurate expressions relating the solidification parameters for each alloy. In this study, A319 aluminum alloy castings were produced in a permanent mold with various preheating temperatures in order to control metal cooling. Analysis of the cooling curve for each casting enabled the identification of its liquidus, Al-Si eutectic, and solidus temperatures and times. These values led to the calculation of the primary solidification rate, total solidification rate, primary solidification time, and local solidification time for each casting, which were related to each other as well as to the average casting SDAS and material hardness. Expressions for each of their correlations have been presented with high coefficients of determination, which will aid in microstructural prediction and casting design.

  17. Microstructure of directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy with low interstitial and high mechanical strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contieri, R. J.; Lopes, E. S. N.; Taquire de La Cruz, M.; Costa, A. M.; Afonso, C. R. M.; Caram, R.

    2011-10-01

    The performance of Ti alloys can be considerably enhanced by combining Ti and other elements, causing an eutectic transformation and thereby producing composites in situ from the liquid phase. This paper reports on the processing and characterization of a directionally solidified Ti-Fe eutectic alloy. Directional solidification at different growth rates was carried out in a setup that employs a water-cooled copper crucible combined with a voltaic electric arc moving through the sample. The results obtained show that a regular fiber-like eutectic structure was produced and the interphase spacing was found to be a function of the growth rate. Mechanical properties were measured using compression, microindentation and nanoindentation tests to determine the Vickers hardness, compressive strength and elastic modulus. Directionally solidified eutectic samples presented high values of compressive strength in the range of 1844-3000 MPa and ductility between 21.6 and 25.2%.

  18. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genau, Amber Lynn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  19. Radioactive gas solidification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji; Yabu, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Handling of a solidification container from the completion for the solidifying processing to the storage of radioactive gases by a remote control equipment such as a manipulator requires a great cost and is difficult to realize. In a radioactive gas solidification device for injection and solidification in accumulated layers of sputtered metals by glow discharge, radiation shieldings are disposed surrounding the entire container, and cooling water is supplied to a cooling vessel formed between the container and the shielding materials. The shielding materials are divided into upper and lower shielding materials, so that solidification container can be taken out from the shielding materials. As a result, the solidification container after the solidification of radioactive gases can be handled with ease. Further, after-heat can be removed effectively from the ion injection electrode upon solidifying treatment upon storage, to attain a radioactive gas solidifying processing apparatus which is safe, economical and highly reliable. (N.H.)

  20. Morphological variants of carbides of solidification origin in the rapidly solidified powder particles of hypereutectic iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, M.; Grgac, P.; Behulova, M.; Vyrostkova, A.; Miglierini, M.

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the analysis of the morphological variants of solidification microstructures and vanadium rich M 4 C 3 carbide phases in the rapidly solidified (RS) powder particles from hypereutectic Fe-C-Cr-V alloy prepared by the nitrogen gas atomisation. Five main types of solidification microstructures were identified in RS particles: microstructure with globular carbides, microstructure with globular and star-like carbides, microstructure with primary carbides in the centres of eutectic colonies, microstructure with eutectic colonies without primary carbides and microstructure with eutectic spherulites. Based on the morphological features of carbide phases and the thermal history of RS particles, the microstructures were divided into two groups - microstructures morphologically affected and non-affected during the post-recalescence period of solidification. Thermophysical reasons for the morphologically different M 4 C 3 carbide phases development in the RS powder particles are discussed

  1. The microstructure and composition of equilibrium phases formed in hypoeutectic Te-In alloy during solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Baoguang [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Jinwu [Center of Failure Analysis, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Chongyun; Yang, Wenhui [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Tian, Wenhuai, E-mail: wenhuaitian@ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-03-15

    As a key tellurium atoms evaporation source for ultraviolet detection photocathode, the hypoeutectic Te{sub 75}In{sub 25} alloy was prepared by employing a slow solidification speed of about 10{sup −2} K/s. The microstructure and chemical composition of the equilibrium phases formed in the as-prepared alloy were studied in this research work. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Te-In alloy was constituted by primary In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase and eutectic In{sub 2}Te{sub 5}/Te phases. The eutectic In{sub 2}Te{sub 5}/Te phases are distributed in the grain boundaries of primary In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. With the slow solidification speed, a pure eutectic Te phase without any excessive indium solute was obtained, where Te content of eutectic Te phase is 100 mass%. Moreover, it can be considered that the stress between the In{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and Te phases plays an important role in reducing the tellurium vapor pressure in Te{sub 75}In{sub 25} alloy. - Highlights: • The microstructure of Te-In alloy as an evaporation source was analyzed. • A pure eutectic Te phase was obtained by using a slow solidification speed method. • The relation between vapor pressure and inner-stress in the alloy was discussed.

  2. Directionally solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xue; Su, Haijun; Guo, Fengwei; Tan, Xi; Cao, Lamei

    2016-11-01

    We reported a novel route to prepare directionally solidified (DS) Al2O3/GAP eutectic ceramics by micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method. The eutectic crystallizations, microstructure characters and evolutions, and their mechanical properties were investigated in detail. The results showed that the Al2O3/GAP eutectic composites can be successfully fabricated through μ-PD method, possessed smooth surface, full density and large crystal size (the maximal size: φ90 mm × 20 mm). At the process of Diameter, the as-solidified Al2O3/GAP eutectic presented a combination of "Chinese script" and elongated colony microstructure with complex regular structure. Inside the colonies, the rod-type or lamellar-type eutectic microstructures with ultra-fine GAP surrounded by the Al2O3 matrix were observed. At an appropriate solidificational rate, the binary eutectic exhibited a typical DS irregular eutectic structure of "chinese script" consisting of interpenetrating network of α-Al2O3 and GAP phases without any other phases. Therefore, the interphase spacing was refined to 1-2 µm and the irregular microstructure led to an outstanding vickers hardness of 17.04 GPa and fracture toughness of 6.3 MPa × m1/2 at room temperature.

  3. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Matthew G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100-1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  4. Relation between feeding mechanisms and solidification mode in 380 aluminium alloy with different iron contents; Relacion entre los mecanismos de alimentacion y el modo de solidificacion en una aleacion de aluminio 380 con distintos contenidos de hierro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tovio, D. O.; Gonzalez, A.C.; Mugica, G. W.; Cuyas, J. C.

    2003-07-01

    In the present work the effect of iron (0.15, 0.42 and 0.86%) content in feeding mechanisms for 380 aluminium alloy has been studied. The feeding capacity has been evaluated by a device that produces a barrier removable to allowing the movement of the inter dendritic liquid. The results show the flow of different quantity of liquid, it depends of the temperature of operating the device and of the iron content. For minimum and maximum iron content, the inter dendritic and bursts feeding mechanisms are fundamentally involved, for 0.42% of iron the feeding mechanisms was the inter dendritic. The authors establish this behavior by the solidification mode of alloy, which promotes the presence of particles of Si or plates of b-Al{sub 3}FeDi phase, in the inter dendritic channels and produce the different feeding mechanisms. (Author) 15 refs.

  5. Calculation of solidification microstructure maps for the system Al-Fe-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilgien, P.

    1996-01-01

    Computer programs have been developed in order to calculate solidification microstructure maps for binary and ternary alloys. These programs are based on recent analytical models for the constrained growth of dendrites and eutectics. Due to the importance of phase diagrams data, programs for the calculation of growth kinetics are coupled with ThermoCalc, a commercial software for phase diagram calculations. These programs have been used to calculate a solidification microstructure map for the Al-Fe system from 0 to 4 at%Fe. Comparison of the calculated results with an experimental solidification microstructure map from the literature shows that all microstructure transitions were predicted. Nevertheless there remain significant discrepancies between some calculated and experimental transition velocities. The programs were also used to calculate solidification microstructure maps in the Al-rich corner of the Al-Fe-Si system (0 to 8 at% Fe and 0 to 8 at% Si). In this case also, calculated results were in satisfactory agreement with experimental solidification microstructure maps, although the comparison was only partial since experimental ternary microstructure maps are less complete than for the binary system, and because the available thermodynamic database does not, as yet, include metastable phases. Laser surface remelting experiments were carried out on an Al-4 at% Fe alloy in order to link results from the literature, obtained at high solidification rates by laser surface remelting and at low solidification rates by Bridman experiments. Finally, Bridman experiments were carried out with an Al-2.63 wt% Fe alloy in order to determine the critical velocity at which a planar Al-Al 13 Fe 4 eutectic front is destabilised in a cellular eutectic by a small amount of Si. The critical solidification velocity thus obtained was in agreement with a criterion of constitutional undercooling. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  6. Fundamental Metallurgy of Solidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels

    2004-01-01

    The text takes the reader through some fundamental aspects of solidification, with focus on understanding the basic physics that govern solidification in casting and welding. It is described how the first solid is formed and which factors affect nucleation. It is described how crystals grow from...

  7. Solidification microstructure development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A majority of manufacturing processes involve melting and solidification of metals and ... In such a case (for example, chill casting), the solidification thickness (S) is ... (5). Here, LX is the system length scale in one dimension and DS is the solute diffusivity in solid. Thermal and solutal diffusivities are finite and usually very ...

  8. Quantitative Comparison of Ternary Eutectic Phase-Field Simulations with Analytical 3D Jackson-Hunt Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Philipp; Kellner, Michael; Hötzer, Johannes; Nestler, Britta

    2018-02-01

    For the analytical description of the relationship between undercoolings, lamellar spacings and growth velocities during the directional solidification of ternary eutectics in 2D and 3D, different extensions based on the theory of Jackson and Hunt are reported in the literature. Besides analytical approaches, the phase-field method has been established to study the spatially complex microstructure evolution during the solidification of eutectic alloys. The understanding of the fundamental mechanisms controlling the morphology development in multiphase, multicomponent systems is of high interest. For this purpose, a comparison is made between the analytical extensions and three-dimensional phase-field simulations of directional solidification in an ideal ternary eutectic system. Based on the observed accordance in two-dimensional validation cases, the experimentally reported, inherently three-dimensional chain-like pattern is investigated in extensive simulation studies. The results are quantitatively compared with the analytical results reported in the literature, and with a newly derived approach which uses equal undercoolings. A good accordance of the undercooling-spacing characteristics between simulations and the analytical Jackson-Hunt apporaches are found. The results show that the applied phase-field model, which is based on the Grand potential approach, is able to describe the analytically predicted relationship between the undercooling and the lamellar arrangements during the directional solidification of a ternary eutectic system in 3D.

  9. Effect of chemical composition and cooling conditions on solidification hot cracking of Ni-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vito, Sophie

    2000-01-01

    Ni-based alloys 690 present solidification hot cracks during welding of vapour generators. Hot cracks are qualitatively known to be due to the formation of inter-dendritic liquid films and of secondary phases down to low temperatures. This study aims at establishing the link between thermodynamics, solidification and hot cracking. Experimental solidification paths of high purity alloys (with varying Nb and Si contents) are obtained from quenching during directional solidification and TIG-welding experiments. They are compared to Thermo-Calc computations, assuming no diffusion in the solid. From directional solidification samples, good agreement between computed and experimental solidification paths is shown in the quenched liquid. Secondary arms of dendrites are affected by solid state diffusion of Nb. Combined effect of diffusion and solute build-up in the liquid phase modifies micro-segregation in the solid region. Solidification paths from welding specimens are similar to those of the solid region of quenched samples. Nb solid state diffusion is negligible but undercooling compensates the effect of solid state diffusion in directional solidification. Evolution of liquid fraction at the end of the solidification is in accordance with the hot cracking classification of the alloys. Nb favours formation of inter-dendritic liquid films and eutectic-like phases down to low temperature. (author) [fr

  10. Coatings for directional eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Coatings developed to provide oxidation protection for the directionally-solidified eutectic alloy NiTaC-B (4.4 weight percent Cr) were evaluated. Of seven Co-, Fe- and Ni-base coatings that were initially investigated, best resistance to cyclic oxidation was demonstrated by duplex coatings fabricated by depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam source followed by deposition of an Al overlayer using the pack cementation process. It was found that addition of carbon to the coating alloy substantially eliminated the problem of fiber denudation in TaC-type eutectic alloys. Burner rig cycled NiTaC-B samples coated with Ni-20Cr-5Al-0.1C-0.1Y+Al and rupture-tested at 1100 deg C performed as well as or better than uncoated, vacuum cycled and air-tested NiTaC-13; however, a slight degradation with respect to uncoated material was noted in air-stress rupture tests at 870 deg C for both cycled and uncycled samples.

  11. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni 5 Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results

  12. Advances in Solidification Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo F. Lopez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Melt solidification is the shortest and most viable route to obtain components, starting from the design to the finished products. Hence, a sound knowledge of the solidification of metallic materials is essential for the development of advanced structural metallic components that drive modern technological societies. As a result, there have been innumerable efforts and full conferences dedicated to this important subject [1–6]. In addition, there are various scientific journals fully devoted to investigating the various aspects which give rise to various solidification microstructures [7–9]. [...

  13. Fabrication and characterization of large size {sup 6}LiF/CaF{sub 2}:Eu eutectic composites with the ordered lamellar structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corporation, 3-3-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro, E-mail: ken-fukuda@tokuyama.co.jp [Tokuyama Corporation, 3-3-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yokota, Yuui [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Suyama, Toshihisa [Tokuyama Corporation, 3-3-1 Shibuya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8383 (Japan); Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    As alternative candidates for the {sup 3}He neutron detectors, {sup 6}LiF/CaF{sub 2}:Eu eutectic composites were fabricated and their scintillation properties were evaluated. Large size LiF/CaF{sub 2}:Eu eutectic composites of 58 mm diameter and 50 mm thickness were produced by Bridgman method. The composites had a finely ordered lamellar structure along the solidification direction. The lamellar structure was controlled by the direction and the rate of solidification, and it was optimized to improve the scintillation properties. Better results were achieved when thinner lamellar layers were aligned along the scintillation light path.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of large size 6LiF/CaF2:Eu eutectic composites with the ordered lamellar structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yokota, Yuui; Suyama, Toshihisa; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2011-01-01

    As alternative candidates for the 3 He neutron detectors, 6 LiF/CaF 2 :Eu eutectic composites were fabricated and their scintillation properties were evaluated. Large size LiF/CaF 2 :Eu eutectic composites of 58 mm diameter and 50 mm thickness were produced by Bridgman method. The composites had a finely ordered lamellar structure along the solidification direction. The lamellar structure was controlled by the direction and the rate of solidification, and it was optimized to improve the scintillation properties. Better results were achieved when thinner lamellar layers were aligned along the scintillation light path.

  15. Solidification of Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2Oy and Bi2Sr1.75Ca0.25CuOy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J.; Viswanathan, H.K.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    The solidification processes for the compositions Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y (2212) and Bi 2 Sr 1.75 Ca 0.25 CuO y (2201) were determined as a function of oxygen partial pressure. During solidification in argon, the superconducting phases were generally not observed to form for either composition. In both cases, the solidus is lowered to approximately 750 degree C. Solidification of Bi 2 Sr 1.75 Ca 0.25 CuO y in Ar resulted in a divorced eutectic structure of Bi 2 Sr 2-x Ca x O y (22x) and Cu 2 O while solidification of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y in Ar resulted in a divorced eutectic structure of Bi 2 Sr 3-x Ca x O y (23x) and Cu 2 O. Solidification of Bi 2 Sr 1.75 Ca 0.25 CuO y in O 2 resulted in large grains of 2201 interspersed with small regions containing the eutectic structure of 22x and CuO/Cu 2 O. Solidification of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O y in partial pressures of 1%, 20%, and 100% oxygen resulted in multiphase samples consisting of 2212, 2201, some alkaline-earth cuprates, and both divorced eutectic structures found during solidification in Ar. For both compositions, these latter structures can be attributed to oxygen deficiencies present in the melt regardless of the overpressure of oxygen. These eutectic structures are unstable and convert into the superconducting phases during subsequent anneals in oxygen. The formation process of the 2212 phase during solidification from the melt was determined to proceed through an intermediate state involving the 2201 phase

  16. Chemical radwaste solidification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Some of these processes and their problems are briefly reviewed: early cement systems; urea-formaldehyde; Dow solidification process; low-viscosity chemical agents (POLYPAC); and water-extensible polyester. 9 refs

  17. The influence of high gravity in PbSn eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, F.E.; Toledo, R.C.; Poli, A.K.S.; An, C.Y.; Bandeira, I.N., E-mail: filipe.estevao@gmail.com, E-mail: chen@las.inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The study of materials processed in centrifuges improves the understanding of the acceleration influence in the convection behavior in materials processing. This work aims to study the influence of high gravity in PbSn eutectic alloy solidification using a small centrifuge designed and built in the Associate Laboratory of Sensors and Materials of the Brazilian Space Research Institute (LAS/INPE). The samples were analyzed by densitometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  18. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  19. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutra, A.T. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Ferrandini, P.L. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Costa, C.A.R. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, M.C. [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Caram, R. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6122, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2005-08-16

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni{sub 3}Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni{sub 3}Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni{sub 3}Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface.

  20. Growth and solid/solid transformation in a Ni-Si eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutra, A.T.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Costa, C.A.R.; Goncalves, M.C.; Caram, R.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature structural components demand materials that maintain satisfactory mechanical and chemical characteristics. These needs may be met by applying some eutectic alloys, including Ni-Ni 3 Si. This paper deals with the directional solidification of Ni-Ni 3 Si grown under several growth rates. The analysis of the eutectic microstructure was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results obtained provided a precise analysis of the Ni 3 Si phase. It could be noticed that the solid/solid transformations by which Ni 3 Si phase goes through, deeply affects its morphology. In addition, quantitative information on the eutectic structure was obtained. It was confirmed that the growth rate variation deeply affects the final microstructure as it influences the efficiency of atomic diffusion along the solid/liquid interface

  1. Solidification of salt solutions on a horizontal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, S.L.; Viskanta, R.

    1990-01-01

    The freezing of water-salt solutions on a horizontal wall is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The growth of the solid-liquid region is observed for NaCl - H sub(2)O and N H sub(4)Cl - H sub(2)O systems under different temperature and concentration conditions. A unidirectional mathematical model is used to predict the solidification process. The transport of heat is by diffusion, and convection is absent. The mass diffusion is neglected and the growth of crystal is governed by the transport of heat. In all experiments, the solution salt concentration is smaller than the eutectic composition, and the wall temperature is higher than the eutectic temperature. The predicted temperature and salt concentration profiles, as well as the interface position, are compared with experimental data. (author)

  2. Variations of Microsegregation and Second Phase Fraction of Binary Mg-Al Alloys with Solidification Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A systematic experimental investigation on microsegregation and second phase fraction of Mg-Al binary alloys (3, 6, and 9 wt pct Al) has been carried out over a wide range of cooling rates (0.05 to 700 K/s) by employing various casting techniques. In order to explain the experimental results, a solidification model that takes into account dendrite tip undercooling, eutectic undercooling, solute back diffusion, and secondary dendrite arm coarsening was also developed in dynamic linkage with an accurate thermodynamic database. From the experimental data and solidification model, it was found that the second phase fraction in the solidified microstructure is not determined only by cooling rate but varied independently with thermal gradient and solidification velocity. Lastly, the second phase fraction maps for Mg-Al alloys were calculated from the solidification model.

  3. Numerical modelling of solidification of thin walled hypereutectic ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Hattel, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of solidification of ductile cast iron is normally based on a model where graphite nodules are surrounded by an austenite shell. The two phases are then growing as two concentric spheres governed by diffusion of carbon through the austenite shell. Experiments have however shown...... simulation of thin-walled ductile iron castings. Simulations have been performed with a 1-D numerical solidi¬fication model that includes the precipitation of non-eutectic austenite during the eutectic stage. Results from the simulations have been compared with experimental castings with wall thick...

  4. Radioactive waste solidification material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Yukio; Wakuta, Kuniharu; Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Koyanagi, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ikuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a radioactive waste solidification material containing vermiculite cement used for a vacuum packing type waste processing device, which contains no residue of calcium hydroxide in cement solidification products. No residue of calcium hydroxide means, for example, that peak of Ca(OH) 2 is not recognized in an X ray diffraction device. With such procedures, since calcium sulfoaluminate clinker and Portland cement themselves exhibit water hardening property, and slugs exhibit hydration activity from the early stage, the cement exhibits quick-hardening property, has great extension of long term strength, further, has no shrinking property, less dry- shrinkage, excellent durability, less causing damages such as cracks and peeling as processing products of radioactive wastes, enabling to attain highly safe solidification product. (T.M.)

  5. Polymer solidification national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings

  6. Structural models of faceted-faceted eutectic system vanillin-acenaphthene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermodynamic model for the eutectic system vanillin-acenaphthene has been developed by analysing the excess functions computed from its experimentally determined solidus-liquidus equilibrium data. Spontaneous nucleation model has been explored from the maximum limit of undercooling of the system and verified by the experimental evidences of dislocation mechanism governing the anisotropic velocity of crystallisation determined at different undercoolings. Viscosity measurements of eutectic and non-eutectic melts at different temperatures revealed the essence of peculiar structural changes and specific energy interactions in the eutectic melt in the temperature range near its melting temperature. The rheological activation energy, E vis for eutectic and non-eutectic melts is found to be a function of temperature. Crystalline faceted structure of the system has been furnished with morphological evidences obtained from microscopic studies at different growth rates, whereas whisker reinforced structural model has been accomplished with mechanical properties computed for both isotropic and anisotropic modes of growth. Of greater interest is the special reference of moderate anisotropic growth, since experimental confirmation was obtained for the theoretical shape of parabolic variation in the mechanical properties of eutectic composite material with growth velocity. Direct evidence of three- to four-fold increase in strength properties of the eutectic material at its moderate anisotropic growth velocity (3.11x10 -7 m 3 s -1 ) in comparison with its isotropic growth in an ice bath (∼273 K), confirms a complete composite microstructure with whiskers in equilibrium with the matrix, embedded parallel to the growth direction

  7. Microstructural evolution of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy inside ultrasonic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic field with a frequency of 20 kHz is introduced into the solidification process of ternary Ag33Cu42Ge25 eutectic alloy from the sample bottom to its top. The ultrasound stimulates the nucleation of alloy melt and prevents its bulk undercooling. At low ultrasound power of 250 W, the primary ε2 phase in the whole alloy sample grows into non-faceted equiaxed grains, which differs to its faceted morphology of long strip under static condition. The pseudobinary (Ag+ε2 eutectic transits from dendrite shape grain composed of rod type eutectic to equiaxed chrysanthemus shape formed by lamellar structure. By contrast, the ultrasound produces no obvious variation in the morphology of ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic except a coarsening effect. When ultrasound power rises to 500 W, divorced ternary (Ag+Ge+ε2 eutectic forms at the sample bottom. However, in the upper part, the ultrasonic energy weakens, and it only brings about prominent refining effect to primary ε2 phase. The microstructural evolution mechanism is investigated on the cavitation, acoustic streaming and acoustic attenuation.

  8. Radioactive gas solidification treatment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Ryokichi; Watanabe, Yu; Seki, Eiji.

    1992-01-01

    In a radioactive gas solidification treatment device by using sputtering, spiral pipelines are disposed with a gap therebetween for cooling an ion injection electrode by passing cooling water during operation of the solidification treatment. During the operation of the solidification treatment, cooling water is passed in the pipelines to cool the ion injection electrode. During storage, a solidification vessel is cooled by natural heat dissipation from an exposed portion at the surface of the solidification vessel. Accordingly, after-heat of radioactive gas solidified in a metal accumulation layer can be removed efficiently, safely and economically to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  9. A dendritic solidification experiment under large gravity - implications for the Earth's inner core solidification regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussière, T.; Brito, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Earth's inner core solidification regime is usually thought to be dendritic, which should results in the formation of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary, possibly extending deep in the inner core. The release of latent heat and solute associated with crystallization provides an important boyancy source to drive thermo- chemical convection in the core. In the laboratory, two modes of convection associated with the crystallization of mushy layers have been observed. One is a boundary layer mode originating from the destabilisation of the chemical boundary layer present at the mush-liquid interface; the second is the so-called 'mushy layer mode' which involves the whole mushy layer. In the mushy layer mode, convection usually takes the form of narrow plumes rising through crystal free conduits called chimneys. One particularity of inner core crystallization is its extremely small solidification rate compared to typical outer core convective timescales. We have designed and build an experiment devoted to the study of crystallization under a large gravity field, using a centrifuge, of an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride, which is a good analogue to metallic alloys. The large gravity field allows to reach Rayleigh numbers much larger than in typical solidification experiments. Under large gravity fields, we observe the disappearance of chimney convection and show that the large gravity field promotes the boundary layer convection mode at the expent of the mushy layer mode. As the gravitationnal forcing is increased, convective heat and solute transport are significantly enhanced, which results in larger solid fraction directly below the mush-liquid interface. The increase in solid fraction results in a dramatic decrease of the permeability in the mushy layer, which eventually becomes subcritical in respect to the mushy layer mode. Because of the very slow solidification rate of the inner core, convective transport of heat and solute from the ICB is

  10. Halo Formation During Solidification of Refractory Metal Aluminide Ternary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, N.; Feitosa, L. M.; West, G. D.; Dong, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of eutectic morphologies following primary solidification has been studied in the refractory metal aluminide (Ta-Al-Fe, Nb-Al-Co, and Nb-Al-Fe) ternary systems. The undercooling accompanying solid growth, as related to the extended solute solubility in the primary and secondary phases can be used to account for the evolution of phase morphologies during ternary eutectic solidification. For small undercooling, the conditions of interfacial equilibrium remain valid, while in the case of significant undercooling when nucleation constraints occur, there is a departure from equilibrium leading to unexpected phases. In Ta-Al-Fe, an extended solubility of Fe in σ was observed, which was consistent with the formation of a halo of μ phase on primary σ. In Nb-Al-Co, a halo of C14 is formed on primary CoAl, but very limited vice versa. However, in the absence of a solidus projection it was not possible to definitively determine the extended solute solubility in the primary phase. In Nb-Al-Fe when nucleation constraints arise, the inability to initiate coupled growth of NbAl3 + C14 leads to the occurrence of a two-phase halo of C14 + Nb2Al, indicating a large undercooling and departure from equilibrium.

  11. The solidification behavior of dilute aluminium-scandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.F.; Prangnell, P.B.; McEwen, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    The solidification behavior of dilute Sc containing Al alloys has been investigated. In binary Al-Sc alloys, Sc additions greater than the eutectic composition (0.55 wt%) were found to produce a remarkable refinement in the grain size of aluminum castings, of two orders of magnitude, due to the formation of the primary Al 3 Sc intermetallic phase during solidification. The refinement in grain size only occurred in hypereutectic compositions and was shown to be far greater than can be achieved by conventional Al grain refiners. Grain refinement by the addition of Sc is accompanied by a change in growth morphology from dendritic, in the large unrefined grains, to fine spherical grains with a divorced eutectic appearing on the grain boundaries in the refined castings. Similar levels of refinement were observed in Al-Sc-Zr and Al-Cu-Sc alloys. In the latter, a change in the segregation behavior of Cu was observed, from a strongly interdendritic segregation pattern to a more homogeneous distribution. The supersaturated Al-Sc solid solution can decompose via a discontinuous precipitation reaction to form coherent rod-like precipitates of the L1 2 Al 3 Sc phase

  12. Finite-element solidification modelling of metals and binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, P.M.

    1986-12-01

    In the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, cast metals and alloys are being evaluated for their ability to support a metallic fuel waste container shell under disposal vault conditions and to determine their performance as an additional barrier to radionuclide release. These materials would be cast to fill residual free space inside the container and allowed to solidify without major voids. To model their solidification characteristics following casting, a finite-element model, FAXMOD-3, was adopted. Input parameters were modified to account for the latent heat of fusion of the metals and alloys considered. This report describes the development of the solidification model and its theoretical verification. To model the solidification of pure metals and alloys that melt at a distinct temperature, the latent heat of fusion was incorporated as a double-ramp function in the specific heat-temperature relationship, within an interval of +- 1 K around the solidification temperature. Comparison of calculated results for lead, tin and lead-tin eutectic melts, unidirectionally cooled with and without superheat, showed good agreement with an alternative technique called the integral profile method. To model the solidification of alloys that melt over a temperature interval, the fraction of solid in the solid-liquid region, as calculated from the Scheil equation, was used to determine the fraction of latent heat to be liberated over a temperature interval within the solid-liquid zone. Comparison of calculated results for unidirectionally cooled aluminum-4 wt.% copper melt, with and without superheat, showed good agreement with alternative finite-difference techniques

  13. Nuclear waste solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  14. Nuclear waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition

  15. Process gas solidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A process for withdrawing gaseous UF 6 from a first system and directing same into a second system for converting the gas to liquid UF 6 at an elevated temperature, additionally including the step of withdrawing the resulting liquid UF 6 from the second system, subjecting it to a specified sequence of flash-evaporation, cooling and solidification operations, and storing it as a solid in a plurality of storage vessels. (author)

  16. Microwave solidification project overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included.

  17. Microwave solidification project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included

  18. Advanced modeling of solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet-Melou, P.; Fichot, F.; Goyeau, B.; Gobin, D.; Quintard, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical and numerical macroscopic modeling of the solidification of binary mixtures is presented. The growth of a solid-liquid region (mushy zone), represented by a non-homogeneous porous medium, is considered. A macroscopic model for momentum, heat and mass transfer during solidification is derived using the volume averaging method, and the effective transport properties (permeability, effective diffusivities, mass exchange coefficients) are defined by associated closure problems (set of microscopic balance equations). Consequently, the effects of the dendritic geometry (tortuosity) and of microscopic transfer phenomena (dispersion, interfacial exchange) are introduced in the averaged balance equations and in the representation of the effective transport coefficients. This closure method provides an original approach of solidification modeling. The resulting macroscopic model is based on the local thermal equilibrium assumption (one-temperature model) while a two-phase description of macroscopic species transfer is introduced using solid and liquid mass exchange coefficients. The phase diagram is used to predict the solid and liquid equilibrium concentrations at the solid-liquid interface. This two-phase approach extends the classical limiting cases that correspond to the lever-rule and Scheil descriptions. (authors)

  19. Divorced eutectic in a HPDC magnesium-aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbagallo, S.; Laukli, H.I.; Lohne, O.; Cerri, E.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology of the eutectic in a thin-wall high pressure die cast (HPDC) U-shape AM60 magnesium box was investigated by light microscope, SEM, TEM and EPMA. The extremely fast cooling rate taking place in the solidification process produces a highly segregated zone near the boundaries of small grains and a fine distribution of β particles, which is typical of a completely divorced eutectic. It was shown that the segregated zone is coherent with the primary α-Mg grain core even if the increased aluminium content produces a deformation of the hexagonal crystal lattice, which was estimated through diffraction patterns (SADP). The variation of the alloying elements content through the grain boundaries was shown by means of EPMA line scanning. The β particle composition was quantitatively investigated and the results show that, in comparison with the equilibrium phase diagram, the non-equilibrium phase boundary of the Mg 17 Al 12 region is moved some percent towards the lower aluminium content, at the high cooling rate that occurs in high pressure die castings. The cubic structure of the β phase was revealed by diffraction pattern. The presence of small Al-Mn particles both inside the grain and in the boundary region was also put in evidence by TEM

  20. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  1. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-07-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  2. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan, E-mail: ahsan.mian@wright.edu; Srinivasan, Raghavan [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  3. Effects of Eutectic Si and Secondary Dendrite Arm Spacing on the Mechanical Properties of Al-Si-Cu Cast Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyungmin; Kim, Yumi; Kim, Youngman; Hong, Sungkil; Choi, Seweon; Kim, Youngchan; Kang, Changseok

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si and Secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) on mechanical properties of Al-Si-Cu alloy. Heat treatment and controlling of solidification rate affect to microstructure of Al-Si-Cu alloy. Al-Si-Cu alloy was dissolved in an electric furnace. The alloy cast in STD61 mold which had been pre-heated to 95 ℃ and 200 ℃. Eutectic Si and SDAS were finer as cooling rate increased. Image analysis technique has been utilized to examine the microstructure. Microstructure observation results showed that T6 heat treatment has a strong influence eutectic Si particle morphology. The mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, were improved by ASTM E8 standard. Tensile properties of the Al-Si-Cu alloys prepared by different cooling rates were the same as each other by T6 heat treatment.

  4. Modeling of Eutectic Formation in Al-Si Alloy Using A Phase-Field Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Z.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized a phase-field model to investigate the evolution of eutectic silicon in Al-Si alloy. The interfacial fluctuations are included into a phase-field model of two-phase solidification, as stochastic noise terms and their dominant role in eutectic silicon formation is discussed. We have observed that silicon spherical particles nucleate on the foundation of primary aluminum phase and their nucleation continues on concentric rings, through the Al matrix. The nucleation of silicon particles is attributed to the inclusion of fluctuations into the phase-field equations. The simulation results have shown needle-like, fish-bone like and flakes of silicon phase by adjusting the noise coefficients to larger values. Moreover, the role of primary Al phase on nucleation of silicon particles in Al-Si alloy is elaborated. We have found that the addition of fluctuations plays the role of modifiers in our simulations and is essential for phase-field modeling of eutectic growth in Al-Si system. The simulated finger-like Al phases and spherical Si particles are very similar to those of experimental eutectic growth in modified Al-Si alloy.

  5. Flux flow and proximity effects in aligned Pb--Cd eutectic lamellar structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, C. R.

    1977-09-01

    A high speed directional solidification technique was used to fabricate lamellar Pb-Cd and (Pb-Mg)--(Cd-Mg) superconductor-normal metal composites in which all the lamellae are oriented perpendicular to the broad surface of the sample. These lamellar composites are found to behave like a large number (approximately 1000) of superconducting-normal-superconducting junctions. For the Pb-Cd eutectic system, the critical current densities and critical fields have shown no dependence upon the lamellar periods between 1.0 and 3.1 microns. The critical current density of the aligned lamellar Pb-Cd structures was enhanced approximately 50% when compared to quenched eutectic alloy and to pure Pb. The superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, varies inversely with the square of the thickness of the superconducting material as expected from Ginzburg-Landau theory. Upon annealing, the Pb lamellae change from type II to type I superconductivity.

  6. Flux flow and proximity effects in aligned Pb--Cd eutectic lamellar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, C.R.

    1977-09-01

    A high speed directional solidification technique was used to fabricate lamellar Pb-Cd and (Pb-Mg)--(Cd-Mg) superconductor-normal metal composites in which all the lamellae are oriented perpendicular to the broad surface of the sample. These lamellar composites are found to behave like a large number (approximately 1000) of superconducting-normal-superconducting junctions. For the Pb-Cd eutectic system, the critical current densities and critical fields have shown no dependence upon the lamellar periods between 1.0 and 3.1 microns. The critical current density of the aligned lamellar Pb-Cd structures was enhanced approximately 50% when compared to quenched eutectic alloy and to pure Pb. The superconducting transition temperature, T/sub c/, varies inversely with the square of the thickness of the superconducting material as expected from Ginzburg-Landau theory. Upon annealing, the Pb lamellae change from type II to type I superconductivity

  7. Solidification process for sludge residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report investigates the solidification process used at 100-N Basin to solidify the N Basin sediment and assesses the N Basin process for application to the K Basin sludge residue material. This report also includes a discussion of a solidification process for stabilizing filters. The solidified matrix must be compatible with the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility acceptance criteria

  8. Evaporation Behavior and Characterization of Eutectic Solvent and Ibuprofen Eutectic Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun; Charoensuksai, Purin

    2016-10-01

    Liquid eutectic system of menthol and camphor has been reported as solvent and co-solvent for some drug delivery systems. However, surprisingly, the phase diagram of menthol-camphor eutectic has not been reported previously. The evaporation behavior, physicochemical, and thermal properties of this liquid eutectic and ibuprofen eutectic solution were characterized in this study. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis indicated that a eutectic point of this system was near to 1:1 menthol/camphor and its eutectic temperature was -1°C. The solubility of ibuprofen in this eutectic was 282.11 ± 6.67 mg mL(-1) and increased the drug aqueous solubility fourfold. The shift of wave number from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated the hydrogen bonding of each compound in eutectic mixture. The weight loss from thermogravimetric analysis of menthol and camphor related to the evaporation and sublimation, respectively. Menthol demonstrated a lower apparent sublimation rate than camphor, and the evaporation rate of eutectic solvent was lower than the sublimation rate of camphor but higher than the evaporation of menthol. The evaporation rate of the ibuprofen eutectic solution was lower than that of the eutectic solvent because ibuprofen did not sublimate. This eutectic solvent prolonged the ibuprofen release with diffusion control. Thus, the beneficial information for thermal behavior and related properties of eutectic solvent comprising menthol-camphor and ibuprofen eutectic solution was attained successfully. The rather low evaporation of eutectic mixture will be beneficial for investigation and tracking the mechanism of transformation from nanoemulsion into nanosuspension in the further study using eutectic as oil phase.

  9. A Real Time Investigation of Morphological Evolution During Solidification of Different Alloy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification phenomenon which occur at the solid/liquid (s/I) interface play a major role in the determination of structure and hence the technologically important properties of a casting. However, metals being opaque, conclusions related to several important phenomenon such as boundary layer thickness, morphological evolution, and eutectic and cell spacing are deduced from quenching experiments and subsequent post solidification metallographic analysis. Consequently, limited information is obtained about the dynamics of the process. This paper will discuss the recent efforts at the Space Science Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, to view and quantify in-situ and in real time the dynamics of the solidification process and to measure interfacial undercooling. First, a high resolution x-ray transmission microscope (XTM) has been developed to monitor fundamental interfacial phenomena during directional solidification of metals and alloys. The XTM operates in the range of 10-100 KeV and through projection is capable of achieving magnification of up to 16OX. Secondly, an innovative collapsible furnace has been designed to quantify interfacial undercooling by measuring the temperature of a moving s/I interface in reference to a fixed s/l interface. This measurement technique is non-intrusive in nature and is based on the Seebeck principle. In this paper real time results obtained to characterize the dynamics of irregular eutectic spacing will be presented. As an example fiber to lamella or plate transition in the Al-Al2Au eutectic system will be discussed. Further, a resolution limit of 25 micron has permitted viewing in real time morphological instability and cellular growth in Al-Au and Al-Ag systems. Simultaneously, a systematic investigation has been carried out to measure interfacial undercooling for Pb-1 wt.% Sn at and near the marginal stability regime. In conjunction with the XTM observations this study attempts to validate existing relationships

  10. Low-level radwaste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naughton, M.D.; Miller, C.C.; Nelson, R.A.; Tucker, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of ''Advanced Low-Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Systems'' conducted under an EPRI contract. The object of the study is to identify advanced lowlevel radwaste treatment systems that are commercially available or are expected to be in the near future. The current state-ofthe-art in radwaste solidification technology is presented. Related processing technologies, such as the compaction of dry active waste (DAW), containers available for radwaste disposal, and the regulatory aspects of radwaste transportation and solidification, are described. The chemical and physical properties of the currently acceptable solidification agents, as identified in the Barnwell radwaste burial site license, are examined. The solidification agents investigated are hydraulic cements, thermoplastic polymers, and thermosetting polymers. It is concluded that solidification processes are complex and depend not only on the chemical and physical properties of the binder material and the waste, but also on how these materials are mixed

  11. Plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Over 20 years have elapsed after the start of nuclear power development, and the nuclear power generation in Japan now exceeds the level of 10,000 MW. In order to meet the energy demands, the problem of the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear power stations must be solved. The purpose of the plastic solidification of such wastes is to immobilize the contained radionuclides, same as other solidification methods, to provide the first barrier against their move into the environment. The following matters are described: the nuclear power generation in Japan, the radioactive wastes from LWR plants, the position of plastic solidification, the status of plastic solidification in overseas countries and in Japan, the solidification process for radioactive wastes with polyethylene, and the properties of solidified products, and the leachability of radionuclides in asphalt solids. (J.P.N.)

  12. Spatial profile of thermoelectric effects during Peltier pulsing in Bi and Bi/MnBi eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial profile of the thermal transients that occur during and following the current pulsing associated with Peltier Interface Demarcation during directional solidification is studied. Results for pure Bi are presented in detail and compared with corresponding results for the Bi/MnBi eutectic. Significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample that can be accounted for by the Peltier effect, the Thomson effect, and Joule heating. These effects are separated and their behavior is studied as a function of time, current density, and position with respect to the solid/liquid interface.

  13. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  14. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  15. Metallurgical phenomena in laser finishing: Interdependences between solidification morphologies and hot cracking in laser welding of mostly austenitic materials. Final reportc; Metallkundliche Phaenomene der Laserstrahlmaterialbearbeitung. Teilvorhaben: Zusammenhaenge zwischen Erstarrungsmorphologien und Heissrissentstehung beim Laserschweissen von vornehmlich austenitischen Werkstoffen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobbert, H.

    2000-06-01

    Austentic stainless steels are widely used in safety relevant applications such as chemical plant industry or off-shore industry. Due to the rapid development of laser welding processes, the economical efficiency increases and leads to a growing interest in industry for the production of, for example, straight bead welded pipes. A specific problem of laser welding is the economically desirable high welding speed, which leads in austenitic stainless steels to a change of solidification mode and thus, to a restricted hot cracking resistance. Thus, the solidification morphologies of austenitic stainless steels near the eutectic trough during laser welding were investigated. Thereby, the main aspect was the evaluation of a short-term metallurgical kinetic effects under rapid solidification conditions. It was proven that three widely used stainless steels (1.4828, 1.4306, and 1.4404) show a transition of primary solidifcation mode from primary ferritic to primary austenitic solidification depending on the solidification rate. The approximate value of the critical soldification rate can be determined using a newly developed model by analyzing the geometric structures of solidification. The critical solidification rate for the transition of the solidification mode depends on the chemical composition of the base metal. It was shown that austenitic stainless steels have a critical solidification rate of approximately 1 m/min. As a main result, it was proven that a transition of the solidification mode to primary austenitic solidification promotes the predicted susceptibiliyy of hot cracking. For this, a hot cracking test assembly has been developed in order to determine the hot cracking behavior under laser beam conditions. In contrast to existing hot crack tests, a critical strain rate for hot crack initiation could be measured. A classification of the materials with respect to their hot cracking susceptibility under the solidification conditions during laser welding can

  16. The solidification and structure of Al-17wt.%Si alloy modified with intermetallic phases containing Ti and Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the process of casting and solidification of Al-17wt.%Si alloy that have been modified with composite powdercontaining the intermetallic phases of Ti and Fe. The chemical and phase composition of the applied modifier was described with thefollowingformula:FeAlx–TiAlx–Al2O3. Applying the method of thermal analysis ATD, the characteristic parameters of the solidificationprocess were determined, and exo-and endothermic effects of the modifying powder on the run of the silumin solidification curves wereobserved. By the methods of light, scanning, and X-ray microscopy, the structure of alloy and the chemical composition of the dispersionhardening precipitates were examined. A change in the morphology of Al-Si eutectic from the lamellar to fibrous type was reportedtogether with changes in the form of complex eutectics of an Al-Si-Ti and Al-Si-Fe type and size reduction of primary silicon crystals.

  17. Effects of Eutectic Si Particles on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Toughness of Cast A356 Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Hong; Lee, Sung Hak; Kwon, Yong Nam

    2007-01-01

    The present study aims at investigating the effects of eutectic Si particles on mechanical properties and fracture toughness of three A356 aluminum alloys. These A356 alloys were fabricated by casting processes such as rheo-casting, squeeze-casting, and casting-forging, and their mechanical properties and fracture toughness were analyzed in relation with microfracture mechanism study. All the cast A356 alloys contained eutectic Si particles mainly segregated along solidification cells, and the distribution of Si particles was modified by squeeze-casting and casting-forging processes. Microfracture observation results showed that eutectic Si particles segregated along cells were cracked first, but that aluminum matrix played a role in blocking crack propagation. Tensile properties and fracture toughness of the squeeze cast and cast-forged alloys having homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles were superior to those of the rheo-cast alloy. In particular, the cast-forged alloy had excellent hardness, strength, ductility, and fracture toughness because of the matrix strengthening and homogeneous distribution of eutectic Si particles due to forging process

  18. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  19. Solidification method of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Tsutomu; Chino, Koichi; Sasahira, Akira; Ikeda, Takashi

    1992-07-24

    Metal solidification material can completely seal radioactive wastes and it has high sealing effect even if a trace amount of evaporation should be caused. In addition, the solidification operation can be conducted safely by using a metal having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the radioactive wastes. Further, the radioactive wastes having a possibility of evaporation and scattering along with oxidation can be solidified in a stable form by putting the solidification system under an inert gas atmosphere. Then in the present invention, a metal is selected as a solidification material for radioactive wastes, and a metal, for example, lead or tin having a melting point of lower than that of the decomposition temperature of the wastes is used in order to prevent the release of the wastes during the solidification operation. Radioactive wastes which are unstable in air and scatter easily, for example, Ru or the like can be converted into a stable solidification product by conducting the solidification processing under an inert gas atmosphere. (T.M.).

  20. Monotonic and fatigue deformation of Ni--W directionally solidified eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garmong, G.; Williams, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    Unlike many eutectic composites, the Ni--W eutectic exhibits extensive ductility by slip. Furthermore, its properties may be greatly varied by proper heat treatments. Results of studies of deformation in both monotonic and fatigue loading are reported. During monotonic deformation the fiber/matrix interface acts as a source of dislocations at low strains and an obstacle to matrix slip at higher strains. Deforming the quenched-plus-aged eutectic causes planar matrix slip, with the result that matrix slip bands create stress concentrations in the fibers at low strains. The aged eutectic reaches generally higher stress levels for comparable strains than does the as-quenched eutectic, and the failure strains decrease with increasing aging times. For the composites tested in fatigue, the aged eutectic has better high-stress fatigue resistance than the as-quenched material, but for low-stress, high-cycle fatigue their cycles to failure are nearly the same. However, both crack initiation and crack propagation are different in the two conditions, so the coincidence in high-cycle fatigue is probably fortuitous. The effect of matrix strength on composite performance is not simple, since changes in strength may be accompanied by alterations in slip modes and failure processes. (17 fig) (auth)

  1. Thermo-physical stability of fatty acid eutectic mixtures subjected to accelerated aging for thermal energy storage (TES) application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzi, Hadi; Metselaar, Hendrik S.C.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Silakhori, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    The thermo-physical stability of fatty acids eutectic mixtures subjected to accelerated number of melting/solidification processes has been identified using thermal cycling test in this study. Myristic acid/palmitic acid (MA/PA) (70/30, wt.%) and myristic acid/palmitic acid/sodium stearate (MA/PA/SS) (70/30/5, wt.%) were selected as eutectic phase change materials (PCMs) to evaluate their stability of phase transition temperature, latent heat of fusion, chemical structure, and volume changes after 200, 500, 1000, and 1500 thermal cycles. The thermal properties of each eutectic PCMs measured by differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) indicated the phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion values of MA/PA/SS has a smallest changes after 1500 thermal cycles than MA/PA eutectic mixture. MA/PA/SS also has a better chemical structure stability and smaller volume change which is 1.2%, compared to MA/PA with a volume change of 1.6% after 1500 cycles. Therefore, it is concluded that the MA/PA/SS eutectic mixture is suitable for use as a phase change material in thermal energy storage (TES) such as solar water heating and solar space heating applications. - Highlights: •The prepared MA/PA and MA/PA/SS were used as eutectic phase change materials (PCM). •Thermo-physical reliability of eutectic PCMs evaluated using a thermal cycling test. •MA/PA/SS has a great thermo-physical stability than MA/PA after 1500 thermal cycles

  2. Rock solidification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Iwao; Murakami, Tadashi; Miyake, Takafumi; Funakoshi, Toshio; Inagaki, Yuzo; Hashimoto, Yasuhide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To convert radioactive wastes into the final state for storage (artificial rocks) in a short period of time. Method: Radioactive burnable wastes such as spent papers, cloths and oils and activated carbons are burnt into ashes in a burning furnace, while radioactive liquid wastes such as liquid wastes of boric acid, exhausted cleaning water and decontaminating liquid wastes are powderized in a drying furnace or calcining furnace. These powders are joined with silicates as such as white clay, silica and glass powder and a liquid alkali such as NaOH or Ca(OH) 2 and transferred to a solidifying vessel. Then, the vessel is set to a hydrothermal reactor, heated and pressurized, then taken out about 20 min after and tightly sealed. In this way, radioactive wastes are converted through the hydrothermal reactions into aqueous rock stable for a long period of time to obtain solidification products insoluble to water and with an extremely low leaching rate. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Al-Si-Re Alloys Cast by the Rapid Solidification Process / Stopy Al-Si-Re Odlewane Metodą Rapid Solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymanek M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the studies described in this article was to present the effect of rare earth elements on aluminium alloys produced by an unconventional casting technique. The article gives characteristics of the thin strip of Al-Si-RE alloy produced by Rapid Solidification (RS. The effect of rare earth elements on structure refinement, i.e. on the size of near-eutectic crystallites in an aluminium-silicon alloy, was discussed. To determine the size of crystallites, the Scherrer X-ray diffraction method was used. The results presented capture relationships showing the effect of variable casting parameters and chemical composition on microstructure of the examined alloys. Rapid Solidification applied to Al-Si alloys with the addition of mischmetal (Ce, La, Ne, Pr refines their structure.

  4. Scaling-Up Eutectic Freeze Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genceli, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel crystallization technology, Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) has been investigated and further developed in this thesis work. EFC operates around the eutectic temperature and composition of aqueous solutions and can be used for recovery of (valuable) dissolved salts (and/or or acids)

  5. Formation and microstructure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG eutectic ceramics by phase transformation from metastable system to equilibrium system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagira, Tomoya; Yasuda, Hideyuki; Yoshiya, Masato [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: nagira@ams.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-05-01

    Unidirectionally solidified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG(Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}: yttrium-aluminum-garnet) eutectic ceramic composites have been recognized as encouraging heat-resistance materials because of the superior mechanical properties at high temperatures. In addition to the excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, some interesting solidification phenomena have been reported in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAG equilibrium eutectic at 2099 K and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP metastable eutectic at 1975 K exist in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The heating the metastable eutectic up to temperatures above the metastable eutectic temperature produced the undercooled melt. Solidification in the equilibrium path accompanied the melting of the metastable eutectic. The solidification process using undercooled melt resulted in the fine and uniform eutectic structure. In this study, the effect of the initial Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP particles size on the undercooled melt formation was examined. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP particles with diameters more than several {mu}m resulted in the transformation through the undercooled melt. EBSD analysis showed that the domains of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains with same crystallographic orientation were observed and that their domain size depended on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP particles size. On the other hand, for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP particles with a diameter of 500 nm, the each Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grain with diameter of about 1 {mu}m had the different crystallographic orientations, which suggested that the transformation from metastable eutectic to equilibrium eutectic occurred in the solid state. The increase in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-YAP free surface area suppressed the undercooled melt formation.

  6. Solidification and solid state phenomena during TLP bonding of IN718 superalloy using Ni–Si–B ternary filler alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouranvari, M., E-mail: mpouranvari@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-11155 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ekrami, A.; Kokabi, A.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11365-11155 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-06-25

    Highlights: ► Microstructure evolution during TLP bonding of IN718 using Ni–Si–B filler. ► Athermal solidification path is influenced by severe segregation of B and Si in residual liquid. ► High hardness of ASZ microconstituents necessitates designing a PBHT to avert brittleness. ► Diffusion induced Cr–Mo–Nb based boride precipitation was observed in DAZ. ► Boride precipitates in DAZ influence the corrosion resistance and aging behavior. -- Abstract: This paper addresses solidification and solid state precipitation phenomena during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of wrought IN718 nickel base superalloy using Ni–4.5Si–3.2B (wt.%) ternary filler alloy. The solidification sequence of the residual liquid in the joint centerline was found to be (1) formation of proeutectic γ, followed by (2) γ/Ni{sub 3}B eutectic reaction, followed by (3) ternary eutectic of γ/Ni{sub 3}B/Ni{sub 6}Si{sub 2}B. Extensive fine Ni{sub 3}Si formed within the eutectic-γ via solid state precipitation during cooling. Extensive Cr–Mo–Nb rich boride precipitates were formed in the substrate region due to boron diffusion into the base metal during bonding process. The implications of the phase transformations on the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and aging behavior of the joint, which are pertinent to the development of an optimum post bond heat treatment, are highlighted.

  7. Solidification and solid state phenomena during TLP bonding of IN718 superalloy using Ni–Si–B ternary filler alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouranvari, M.; Ekrami, A.; Kokabi, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microstructure evolution during TLP bonding of IN718 using Ni–Si–B filler. ► Athermal solidification path is influenced by severe segregation of B and Si in residual liquid. ► High hardness of ASZ microconstituents necessitates designing a PBHT to avert brittleness. ► Diffusion induced Cr–Mo–Nb based boride precipitation was observed in DAZ. ► Boride precipitates in DAZ influence the corrosion resistance and aging behavior. -- Abstract: This paper addresses solidification and solid state precipitation phenomena during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding of wrought IN718 nickel base superalloy using Ni–4.5Si–3.2B (wt.%) ternary filler alloy. The solidification sequence of the residual liquid in the joint centerline was found to be (1) formation of proeutectic γ, followed by (2) γ/Ni 3 B eutectic reaction, followed by (3) ternary eutectic of γ/Ni 3 B/Ni 6 Si 2 B. Extensive fine Ni 3 Si formed within the eutectic-γ via solid state precipitation during cooling. Extensive Cr–Mo–Nb rich boride precipitates were formed in the substrate region due to boron diffusion into the base metal during bonding process. The implications of the phase transformations on the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and aging behavior of the joint, which are pertinent to the development of an optimum post bond heat treatment, are highlighted

  8. Solidification structure and abrasion resistance of high chromium white irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Laird, G.

    1997-06-01

    Superior abrasive wear resistance, combined with relatively low production costs, makes high Cr white cast irons (WCIs) particularly attractive for applications in the grinding, milling, and pumping apparatus used to process hard materials. Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic cast iron compositions, containing either 15 or 26 wt pct chromium, were studied with respect to the macrostructural transitions of the castings, solidification paths, and resulting microstructures when poured with varying superheats. Completely equiaxed macrostructures were produced in thick section castings with slightly hypereutectic compositions. High-stress abrasive wear tests were then performed on the various alloys to examine the influence of both macrostructure and microstructure on wear resistance. Results indicated that the alloys with a primarily austenitic matrix had a higher abrasion resistance than similar alloys with a pearlitic/bainitic matrix. Improvement in abrasion resistance was partially attributed to the ability of the austenite to transform to martensite at the wear surface during the abrasion process.

  9. Examination of Clustering in Eutectic Microstrcture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortnyik K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The eutectic microstructures are complex microstructures and a hard work to describe it with few numbers. The eutectics builds up eutectic cells. In the cells the phases are clustered. With the development of big databases the data mining also develops, and produces a lot of method to handling the large datasets, and earns information from the sets. One typical method is the clustering, which finds the groups in the datasets. In this article a partitioning and a hierarchical clustering is applied to eutectic structures to find the clusters. In the case of AlMn alloy the K-means algorithm work well, and find the eutectic cells. In the case of ductile cast iron the hierarchical clustering works better. With the combination of the partitioning and hierarchical clustering with the image transformation, an effective method is developed for clustering the objects in the microstructures.

  10. Method of storing solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Yutaro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to efficiently and satisfactorily cool and store solidification products of liquid wastes generated from the reactor spent fuel reprocessing process by a simple facility. Method: Liquid wastes generated from the reactor spent fuel reprocessing process are caused to flow from the upper opening to the inside of a spherical canistor. The opening of the spherical canistor is welded with a lid by a remote control and the liquid wastes are tightly sealed within the spherical canistor as glass solidification products. Spherical canistors having the solidification products tightly sealed therein are sent into and stored in a hopper by the remote control. Further, a blower is driven upon storing to suck cooling air from the cooling air intake port to the inside of the hopper to absorb the decay heat of radioactive materials in the solidification products and the air is discharged from the duct and through the stack to the atmosphere. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Simulating the Effect of Space Vehicle Environments on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, D. G.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    Space microgravity missions are designed to provide a microgravity environment for scientific experiments, but these missions cannot provide a perfect environment, due to vibrations caused by crew activity, on-board experiments, support systems (pumps, fans, etc.), periodic orbital maneuvers, and water dumps. Therefore, it is necessary to predict the impact of these vibrations on space experiments, prior to performing them. Simulations were conducted to study the effect of the vibrations on the directional solidification of a dendritic alloy. Finite element ca!cu!attie?ls were dme with a simd2titcr based on a continuum model of dendritic solidification, using the Fractional Step Method (FSM). The FSM splits the solution of the momentum equation into two steps: the viscous intermediate step, which does not enforce continuity; and the inviscid projection step, which calculates the pressure and enforces continuity. The FSM provides significant computational benefits for predicting flows in a directionally solidified alloy, compared to other methods presently employed, because of the efficiency gains in the uncoupled solution of velocity and pressure. finite differences, arises when the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic temperature and concentration. When a node reaches eutectic temperature, it is assumed that the solidification of the eutectic liquid continues at constant temperature until all the eutectic is solidified. With this approach, solidification is not achieved continuously across an element; rather, the element is not considered solidified until the eutectic isotherm overtakes the top nodes. For microgravity simulations, where the convection is driven by shrinkage, it introduces large variations in the fluid velocity. When the eutectic isotherm reaches a node, all the eutectic must be solidified in a short period, causing an abrupt increase in velocity. To overcome this difficulty, we employed a scheme to numerically predict a more accurate value

  12. Laboratory micro- and nanoscale X-ray tomographic investigation of Al–7 at.%Cu solidification structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.M.; Henderson, K.C.; Gibbs, P.J.; Imhoff, S.D.; Clarke, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography across multiple length scales provides an opportunity to non-destructively visualize and quantify the micro- to nano-scale microstructural features of solidification structures in three dimensions. Aluminum–7 at.%copper samples were directionally solidified at three cooling rates (0.44, 0.67, and 1.33 °C/s), resulting in systematic changes in the as-solidified microstructure, which are difficult to quantify using traditional microscopic techniques. The cooling rate of a material affects its ultimate microstructure, and characterizing that microstructure is key to predicting and understanding its bulk properties. Here, two different laboratory X-ray computed tomography instruments were used to characterize as-solidified microstructures, including micro-scale computed tomography with approximately 1 mm field-of-view, ∼ 1.7 μm resolution, and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography ∼ 65 μm FOV, 150 nm resolution. Micro-scale X-ray radiography and computed tomography enabled a quantitative investigation of changes in the primary dendritic solidification structure with increasing cooling rate. Nano-scale absorption contrast X-ray computed tomography resolved the distinct phases of the lamellar eutectic structure and three dimensional measurements of the ∼ 1 μm interlamellar spacing. It is found that the lamella eutectic structure thickness is inversely proportional to the cooling rate. Nano-scale Zernike phase contrast was also used to image voids at eutectic colony boundaries. The application and resolution of these two instruments are discussed with respect to the resolvable features of the solidification structures. - Highlights: • Al–Cu eutectic is a model system for studying solidification microstructure. • X-ray computed tomography provides a 3D picture of these complex structures. • Micro-scale tomography images the primary and secondary dendritic structures. • Nano-scale tomography images the eutectic lamella and

  13. Laboratory micro- and nanoscale X-ray tomographic investigation of Al–7 at.%Cu solidification structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, B.M., E-mail: bpatterson@lanl.gov; Henderson, K.C.; Gibbs, P.J.; Imhoff, S.D.; Clarke, A.J.

    2014-09-15

    X-ray computed tomography across multiple length scales provides an opportunity to non-destructively visualize and quantify the micro- to nano-scale microstructural features of solidification structures in three dimensions. Aluminum–7 at.%copper samples were directionally solidified at three cooling rates (0.44, 0.67, and 1.33 °C/s), resulting in systematic changes in the as-solidified microstructure, which are difficult to quantify using traditional microscopic techniques. The cooling rate of a material affects its ultimate microstructure, and characterizing that microstructure is key to predicting and understanding its bulk properties. Here, two different laboratory X-ray computed tomography instruments were used to characterize as-solidified microstructures, including micro-scale computed tomography with approximately 1 mm field-of-view, ∼ 1.7 μm resolution, and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography ∼ 65 μm FOV, 150 nm resolution. Micro-scale X-ray radiography and computed tomography enabled a quantitative investigation of changes in the primary dendritic solidification structure with increasing cooling rate. Nano-scale absorption contrast X-ray computed tomography resolved the distinct phases of the lamellar eutectic structure and three dimensional measurements of the ∼ 1 μm interlamellar spacing. It is found that the lamella eutectic structure thickness is inversely proportional to the cooling rate. Nano-scale Zernike phase contrast was also used to image voids at eutectic colony boundaries. The application and resolution of these two instruments are discussed with respect to the resolvable features of the solidification structures. - Highlights: • Al–Cu eutectic is a model system for studying solidification microstructure. • X-ray computed tomography provides a 3D picture of these complex structures. • Micro-scale tomography images the primary and secondary dendritic structures. • Nano-scale tomography images the eutectic lamella and

  14. Structural perfection of directionally solidified lamellar eutectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attallah, T.; Gurzleski, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The mechanisms for the formation of faults in lamellar eutectics are reviewed, and it is postulated that faults play several roles in eutectic freezing with their exact importance depending on the specific alloy system and the growth conditions. Faults are not the cause of lamellar spiralling although they are necessary for it to occur. Lamellar spiralling is found to occur only when the crystallographic orientations of the two eutectic phases lead to a growth component normal to the lamellar plane, and although some systems such as Pb-Sn normally spiral it is possible for them to achieve orientation relationships where no spiralling occurs

  15. Brazing characteristics of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe eutectic alloy filler metal for Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung G.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Rhee, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    A Zr-Ti-Cu-Fe quaternary eutectic alloy was employed as a new Be-free brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 to supersede physically vapor-deposited Be coatings used conventionally with several disadvantages. The quaternary eutectic composition of Zr58Ti16Cu10Fe16 (at.%) showing a low melting temperature range from 832 °C to 853 °C was designed by a partial substitution of Zr with Ti based on a Zr-Cu-Fe ternary eutectic system. By applying an alloy ribbon with the determined composition, a highly reliable joint was obtained with a homogeneous formation of predominantly grown α-Zr phases owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting strength higher than that of Zircaloy-4. The homogenization of the joint was rate-controlled by the diffusion of the filler elements (Ti, Cu, and Fe) into the Zircaloy-4 base metal, and the detrimental segregation of the Zr2Fe phase in the central zone was completely eliminated by an isothermal holding at a brazing temperature of 920 °C for 10 min.

  16. Raman mapping in the elucidation of solid salt eutectic and near eutectic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Kerridge, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of the different components of solidified eutectic or near-eutectic salt mixtures (eutectics) was examined by use of Raman microscope mapping of the structures formed when these melts were slowly cooled. Seven binary and one ternary system were investigated. In most cases...... and the composition. When unidirectional cooling was applied it was possible for the system (KCl-Na2SO4, 60:40 mol/mol) to observe lamellar arrangements of the component phases, in an arrangement closely similar to what is frequently found among metallic or ceramic eutectics. Each area, conglomerate or lamellar, did...

  17. Interfacial wave theory of pattern formation in solidification dendrites, fingers, cells and free boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    This comprehensive work explores interfacial instability and pattern formation in dynamic systems away from the equilibrium state in solidification and crystal growth. Further, this significantly expanded 2nd edition introduces and reviews the progress made during the last two decades. In particular, it describes the most prominent pattern formation phenomena commonly observed in material processing and crystal growth in the framework of the previously established interfacial wave theory, including free dendritic growth from undercooled melt, cellular growth and eutectic growth in directional solidification, as well as viscous fingering in Hele-Shaw flow. It elucidates the key problems, systematically derives their mathematical solutions by pursuing a unified, asymptotic approach, and finally carefully examines these results by comparing them with the available experimental results. The asymptotic approach described here will be useful for the investigation of pattern formation phenomena occurring in a much b...

  18. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  19. Solidification of cast iron - A study on the effect of microalloy elements on cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham

    The present thesis deals with the heat transfer and solidification of ductile and microalloyed grey cast iron. Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. A series of ductile iron samples with two different...... of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The superfine graphite which forms in this type of irons is short (10-20µm) and stubby. The microstructure of this kind of graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. The methods to prepare samples of cast iron...... for comprehensive transmission electron microscopy of graphite and the surrounding iron matrix have been developed and explained. Dual beam microscopes are used for sample preparation. A TEM study has been carried out on graphite flakes in grey cast iron using selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Based...

  20. Macrosegregation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification through Cross-Section Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R..; Grugel, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Al-7 wt% Si and Pb-6 wt% Sb alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS), with liquid above and solid below and gravity pointing down, in cylindrical graphite crucibles through an abrupt cross-section change. Fraction eutectic distribution in the microstructure, primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameters have been measured in the DS samples in the vicinity of section change in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal factors and solidification shrinkage. It is observed that convection not only produces extensive radial and axial macrosegregation near cross-section change, it also affects the dendritic array morphology. Primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameter, both, are influenced by this convection. In addition to the experimental results, preliminary results from a numerical model which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone in its analysis will also be presented

  1. Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of Al-Si and magnesium lightweight casting alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosch, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings

  2. Solidification microstructures in a short fiber reinforced alloy composite containing different fiber fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JING Qing-xiu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The solidification microstructures and micro-segregation of a fiber reinforced Al-9 Cu alloy, containing different volume fractions of Al2O3 short fibers about 6 μm diameter and made by squeeze casting have been studied. The results indicate that as volume fraction of fiber Vf increases, the size of final grains becomes finer in the matrix. If λf /λ>1, the fibers have almost no influence on the solidification behavior of the matrix, so the final grains grow coarse, where λf is the average inter-fiber spacing and λ is the secondary dendrite arm spacing. While if λf /λ<1, the growth of crystals in the matrix is affected significantly by the fibers and the grain size is reduced to the value of the inter-fiber spacing. The fibers influence the average length of a solidification volume element L of the matrix and also influence the solidification time θt of the matrix. As a result of fibers influencing L and θt, the micro-segregation in the matrix is improved when the composite contains more fibers, although the level of the improvement is slight. The Clyne-Kurz model can be used to semi-quantitatively analyze the relationship between Vf and the volume fraction fe of the micro-segregation eutectic structure.

  3. UNCONSTRAINED MELTING AND SOLIDIFICATION INSIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... There is a large number of experimental and numerical works on melting and solidification of PCM[6-10], and also its usage as thermal management in building [11-14], electronic devices [15-16] and solar energy. [17-20].Most investigated geometries in melting and freezing process are sphere (spherical.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of Bi, Sb, Sr and cooling condition on eutectic phases in an Al–Si–Cu alloy (ADC12) by in situ thermal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahany, S., E-mail: saeedfarahany@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A.; Idrsi, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Shabestari, S.G. [Center of Excellence for High Strength Alloys Technology (CEHSAT), School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), 16846-13114 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: • Combined effect of Bi, Sb and Sr additions, and cooling condition was evaluated. • Two different scenarios of recalecense in response to cooling rate were observed. • Fraction solid increased in the order of Sr > Bi > Sb, corresponds to Si morphologies. • Only Bi decreased the nucleation temperature of Al{sub 2}Cu eutectic phase. - Abstract: Al–Si and Al–Cu eutectic phases strongly affect the properties of Al–Si–Cu cast alloys. The characteristic parameters of these two eutectic phases with addition of bismuth, antimony and strontium under different cooling rates (0.6–2 °C/s) were investigated in ADC12 alloy using in situ thermal analysis. Results show that additives affect the Al–Si phase more than the Al–Cu (Al{sub 2}Cu) phase. Addition elements showed two different scenarios in response to cooling rate in terms of recalescence of the Al–Si eutectic phase. Both Bi and Sb caused an increase in recalescence with increased cooling rate but Sr addition reduced the recalescence. Additions of Sb and Sr increased the nucleation temperature of Al{sub 2}Cu, but addition of Bi produced an opposite effect. There seems to be relationship between the solidification temperature range and fraction solid of Al–Si and Al{sub 2}Cu eutectic phases. As the cooling rate increases the fraction solid of Al–Si decreased and that of Al{sub 2}Cu increased.

  5. Evaluation of the effect of Bi, Sb, Sr and cooling condition on eutectic phases in an Al–Si–Cu alloy (ADC12) by in situ thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahany, S.; Ourdjini, A.; Idrsi, M.H.; Shabestari, S.G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Combined effect of Bi, Sb and Sr additions, and cooling condition was evaluated. • Two different scenarios of recalecense in response to cooling rate were observed. • Fraction solid increased in the order of Sr > Bi > Sb, corresponds to Si morphologies. • Only Bi decreased the nucleation temperature of Al 2 Cu eutectic phase. - Abstract: Al–Si and Al–Cu eutectic phases strongly affect the properties of Al–Si–Cu cast alloys. The characteristic parameters of these two eutectic phases with addition of bismuth, antimony and strontium under different cooling rates (0.6–2 °C/s) were investigated in ADC12 alloy using in situ thermal analysis. Results show that additives affect the Al–Si phase more than the Al–Cu (Al 2 Cu) phase. Addition elements showed two different scenarios in response to cooling rate in terms of recalescence of the Al–Si eutectic phase. Both Bi and Sb caused an increase in recalescence with increased cooling rate but Sr addition reduced the recalescence. Additions of Sb and Sr increased the nucleation temperature of Al 2 Cu, but addition of Bi produced an opposite effect. There seems to be relationship between the solidification temperature range and fraction solid of Al–Si and Al 2 Cu eutectic phases. As the cooling rate increases the fraction solid of Al–Si decreased and that of Al 2 Cu increased

  6. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  7. Disorder trapping in Ni3(Al, Ti) by solidification from the undercooled melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetzinger, R.; Kurz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Modelling of rapid solidification predicts disorder trapping in the superlattice structure of Ni 3 Al. However, experimental investigations on this compound suffer from ambiguities concerning the solidification path. There is a phase selection competition between the ordered fcc γ'-phase (Ni 3 Al), the ordered bcc β-phase (NiAl), the disordered fcc γ-phase (Ni), the stable γ'/β eutectic and the metastable γ/β eutectic, and there are subsequent solid state transformations. A replacement of several at.% Al by Ti leads to a stabilization of the γ'-phase and to an avoidance of most of the problems encountered on Ni 3 Al. The experiments on Ni 3 (Al, Ti) presented here clearly show the expected disordered crystallization from the undercooled melt. This was proven by measuring the dendrite growth velocity of electromagnetically levitated droplets and by analysing the data in the framework of dendrite and kinetic growth models. Complementary microstructural investigations were performed on the as-solidified samples. (orig.)

  8. Variation in diffusion-induced solidification rate of liquated Ni-Cr-B insert during TLP bonding of Waspaloy superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokoro, K.; Wikstrom, N.P.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    A microstructural study was performed on transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded Waspaloy superalloy with a Ni-Cr-B filler. The applicability of a diffusion model based on Fick's second law of diffusion to determine the time required for complete isothermal solidification (t f ) was investigated. Over the temperature range of 1065-1110 deg. C, experimental observations of t f were in reasonable agreement with t f values predicted by the diffusion model. However, a notable deviation was observed in joints prepared between 1175 and 1225 deg. C in that the rate of isothermal solidification was reduced at these temperatures resulting in the formation of a centerline eutectic-type microconstituent, which in contrast, was prevented from forming after holding the brazing assembly for an equivalent bonding time at a lower temperature of 1145 deg. C. Boride particles were observed as part of the eutectic product, which suggested that diffusion of boron out of the liquated insert was also reduced at these higher temperatures. A decrease in solubility of the melting point depressing solute, boron, with increase in temperature is suggested to be an important factor contributing to the reduction in isothermal solidification rate observed at the higher bonding temperatures

  9. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface.

  10. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meco, Halim [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  11. Direct observation of spatially isothermal equiaxed solidification of an Al-Cu alloy in microgravity on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A. G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Lockowandt, C.; Henriksson, K.; Melville, N.; Browne, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, isothermal equiaxed solidification of a metallic alloy has been observed in situ in space, providing unique benchmark experimental data. The experiment was completed on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket, launched in December 2015, using a newly developed isothermal solidification furnace. A grain-refined Al-20 wt%Cu sample was fully melted and solidified during 360 s of microgravity and the solidification sequence was recorded using time-resolved X-radiography. Equiaxed nucleation, dendritic growth, solutal impingement, and eutectic transformation were thus observed in a gravity-free environment. Equiaxed nucleation was promoted through application of a controlled cooling rate of -0.05 K/s producing a 1D grain density of 6.5 mm-1, uniformly distributed throughout the field of view (FOV). Primary growth slowed to a visually imperceptible level at an estimated undercooling of 7 K, after which the cooling rate was increased to -1.0 K/s for the remainder of solidification and eutectic transformation, ensuring the sample was fully solidified inside the microgravity time window. The eutectic transformation commenced at the centre of the FOV proceeding radially outwards covering the entire FOV in 3 s Microgravity-based solidification is compared to an identical pre-flight ground-based experiment using the same sample and experiment timeline. The ground experiment was designed to minimise gravity effects, by choice of a horizontal orientation for the sample, so that any differences would be subtle. The first equiaxed nucleation occurred at an apparent undercooling of 0.6 K less than the equivalent event during microgravity. During primary equiaxed solidification, as expected, no buoyant grain motion was observed during microgravity, compared to modest grain rotation and reorientation observed during terrestrial-based solidification. However, when the cooling rate was increased from -0.05 K/s to -1.0 K/s during the latter stages of solidification, in

  12. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  13. Solidification paths of multicomponent monotectic aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Groebner, Joachim [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Metallurgy, Robert-Koch-Street 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer [Clausthal University of Technology, Institute of Metallurgy, Robert-Koch-Street 42, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)], E-mail: schmid-fetzer@tu-clausthal.de

    2008-10-15

    Solidification paths of three ternary monotectic alloy systems, Al-Bi-Zn, Al-Sn-Cu and Al-Bi-Cu, are studied using thermodynamic calculations, both for the pertinent phase diagrams and also for specific details concerning the solidification of selected alloy compositions. The coupled composition variation in two different liquids is quantitatively given. Various ternary monotectic four-phase reactions are encountered during solidification, as opposed to the simple binary monotectic, L' {yields} L'' + solid. These intricacies are reflected in the solidification microstructures, as demonstrated for these three aluminum alloy systems, selected in view of their distinctive features. This examination of solidification paths and microstructure formation may be relevant for advanced solidification processing of multicomponent monotectic alloys.

  14. Solidification behavior and rheo-diecasting microstructure of A356 aluminum alloy prepared by self-inoculation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Semisolid slurry of A356 aluminum alloy was prepared by self-inoculation method, and the microstructure and solidification behavior during rheo-diecasting process were investigated. The results indicate that the semisolid slurry of A356 aluminum alloy can be prepared by self-inoculation method at 600 °C. Primary α-Al particles with fine and spherical morphologies are uniformly distributed when the isothermal holding time of slurry is 3 min. Liquid phase segregation occurs during rheo-diecasting process of semisolid slurry and the primary particles (α1 show obvious plastic deformation in the area of high stress and low cooling rate. A small amount of dendrites resulting from the relatively low temperature of the shot chamber at the initial stage of secondary solidification are fragmented as they pass through the in-gate during the mould filling process. The amount of dendrite fragments decreases with the increase of filling distance. During the solidification process of the remaining liquid, the nucleation rate of secondary particles (α2 increases with the increase of cooling rate, and the content of Si in secondary particles (α2 are larger than primary particles (α1. With the increase of cooling rate, the content of Si in secondary particles (α2 gradually increases. The morphologies of eutectic Si in different parts of die casting are noticeably different. The low cooling rate in the first filling positions leads to coarse eutectic structures, while the high cooling rate in the post filling positions promotes small and compact eutectic structures.

  15. Into the depths of deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, N.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been successfully tested in a wide range of applications; however, their high price and complicated synthesis make them infeasible for large scale implementation. A decade ago, a new generation of solvents so called deep eutectic solvents (DESs) was reported for the first

  16. Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Based on Eutectic Mixture of Tetradecanol and Fatty Acids for Building Energy Storage: Preparation and Performance Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on preparation and performance analysis of a series of form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs, based on eutectic mixtures as phase change materials (PCMs for thermal energy storage and high-density polyethylene (HDPE-ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA polymer as supporting materials. The PCMs were eutectic mixtures of tetradecanol (TD–capric acid (CA, TD–lauric acid (LA, and TD–myristic acid (MA, which were rarely explored before. Thermal properties of eutectic mixtures and FSPCMs were measured by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. The onset melting/solidification temperatures of form-stable PCMs were 19.13 °C/13.32 °C (FS TD–CA PCM, 24.53 °C/24.92 °C (FS TD–LA PCM, and 33.15 °C/30.72 °C (FS TD–MA PCM, respectively, and latent heats were almost greater than 90 J/g. The surface morphologies and chemical stability of form-stable PCM were surveyed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, respectively. The thermal cycling test revealed that the thermal reliability of these three form-stable PCMs was good. Thermal storage/release experiment indicated melting/solidification time was shortened by introducing 10 wt % aluminum powder (AP. It is concluded that these FSPCMs can act as potential building thermal storage materials in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties.

  17. Form-Stable Phase Change Materials Based on Eutectic Mixture of Tetradecanol and Fatty Acids for Building Energy Storage: Preparation and Performance Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingyu; Lu, Shilei; Kong, Xiangfei; Liu, Shangbao; Li, Yiran

    2013-10-22

    This paper is focused on preparation and performance analysis of a series of form-stable phase change materials (FSPCMs), based on eutectic mixtures as phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage and high-density polyethylene (HDPE)-ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) polymer as supporting materials. The PCMs were eutectic mixtures of tetradecanol (TD)-capric acid (CA), TD-lauric acid (LA), and TD-myristic acid (MA), which were rarely explored before. Thermal properties of eutectic mixtures and FSPCMs were measured by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset melting/solidification temperatures of form-stable PCMs were 19.13 °C/13.32 °C (FS TD-CA PCM), 24.53 °C/24.92 °C (FS TD-LA PCM), and 33.15 °C/30.72 °C (FS TD-MA PCM), respectively, and latent heats were almost greater than 90 J/g. The surface morphologies and chemical stability of form-stable PCM were surveyed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, respectively. The thermal cycling test revealed that the thermal reliability of these three form-stable PCMs was good. Thermal storage/release experiment indicated melting/solidification time was shortened by introducing 10 wt % aluminum powder (AP). It is concluded that these FSPCMs can act as potential building thermal storage materials in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties.

  18. MCWASP XIV: International Conference on Modelling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, H

    2015-01-01

    The current volume represents contributed papers of the proceedings of the 14th international conference on ''Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP XIV)'', Yumebutai International Conference Center, Awaji island, Hyogo, Japan on 21 – 26 June, 2016. The first conference of the series 'Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes (MCWASP)' was started up in 1980, and this is the 14th conference. The participants are more than 100 scientists from industry and academia, coming from 19 countries. In the conference, we have 5 invited, 70 oral and 31 poster presentations on different aspects of the modeling. The conference deals with various casting processes (Ingot / shape casting, continuous casting, direct chill casting and welding), fundamental phenomena (nucleation and growth, dendritic growth, eutectic growth, micro-, meso- and macrostructure formation and defect formation), coupling problems (electromagnetic interactions, application of ultrasonic wave), development of experimental / computational methods and so on. This volume presents the cutting-edge research in the modeling of casting, welding and solidification processes. I would like to thank MAGMA Giessereitechnologie GmbH, Germany and SCSK Corporation, Japan for supporting the publication of contributed papers. Hideyuki Yasuda Conference Chairman Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University Japan (preface)

  19. The sequence of intermetallic formation and solidification pathway of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahany, Saeed, E-mail: saeedfarahany@gmail.com [Department of Materials, Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Nordin, Nur Azmah; Ourdjini, Ali; Abu Bakar, TutyAsma; Hamzah, Esah; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah [Department of Materials, Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Hekmat-Ardakan, Alireza [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Dép. de Génie Chimique, P.O. Box 6079, Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The phase transformation sequence and solidification behaviour of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite was examined using a combination of computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis and interrupted quenching techniques. Five different phases were identified by analysing the derivative cooling curves, the X-ray diffraction profile, optical and scanning electron microscopy images and the corresponding energy dispersive spectroscopy. It has been found that the solidification of this alloy begins with primary Mg{sub 2}Si precipitation and continues with the formation of eutectic Al–Mg{sub 2}Si, followed by Al{sub 5}FeSi and simultaneous precipitation of Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} and Al{sub 2}Cu complex intermetallic phases. The formation of the last three intermetallic compounds changes the solidification behaviour of these composites remarkably due to their complex eutectic formation reactions. The solidification of the alloy, calculated using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software, has demonstrated a good agreement with the experiments in terms of compound prediction, their weight fractions and reaction temperatures. - Highlights: • Solidification path of a commercial Al-13Mg-7Si-2Cu composite was characterized. • Five different phases were identified and then confirmed with EDS and XRD results. • Mg{sub 2}Si, Al-Mg{sub 2}Si,Al{sub 5}FeSi (β),Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} (Q) and Al{sub 2}Cu(θ) precipitated respectively. • Solidification was predicted using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software.

  20. Liquid-liquid structure transition and nucleation in undercooled Co-B eutectic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yixuan [Northwestern Polytechnical University, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Xi' an, Shanxi (China); Universite Grenoble Alpes, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); CNRS, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); Li, Jinshan; Wang, Jun; Kou, Hongchao [Northwestern Polytechnical University, State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Xi' an, Shanxi (China); Beagunon, Eric [Universite Grenoble Alpes, LNCMI, Grenoble (France); CNRS, LNCMI, Grenoble (France)

    2017-06-15

    Cyclic superheating and cooling were carried out for the undercooled hypereutectic Co{sub 80}B{sub 20}, eutectic Co{sub 81.5}B{sub 18.5,} and hypoeutectic Co{sub 83}B{sub 17} alloys. For each alloy, there is a critical overheating temperature T{sub c}° at which there is a sharp increase of the mean undercooling, i.e., below (above) T{sub c}°, and the mean undercooling is about 80 °C (200 °C). DSC measurements show that there is a thermal absorption peak in the heating process, the peak temperature of which is nearly equal to the critical overheating temperature, indicating that the temperature-induced liquid-liquid structure transition does occur and should relate highly to nucleation in the undercooled Co-B eutectic melts. The effect of the liquid-liquid structure transition on nucleation was interpreted by the recent nucleation theory that considers the structures of overheated melts, and the composition-dependent overheating temperature was ascribed to the change of local favored structures. The present work provides further evidences for the liquid-liquid structure transition and is helpful for understanding solidification in undercooled melts. (orig.)

  1. Sr-Al-Si co-segregated regions in eutectic Si phase of Sr-modified Al-10Si alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpel, M; Wanderka, N; Schlesiger, R; Yamamoto, T; Isheim, D; Schmitz, G; Matsumura, S; Banhart, J

    2013-09-01

    The addition of 200 ppm strontium to an Al-10 wt% Si casting alloy changes the morphology of the eutectic silicon phase from coarse plate-like to fine fibrous networks. In order to clarify this modification mechanism the location of Sr within the eutectic Si phase has been investigated by a combination of high-resolution methods. Whereas three-dimensional atom probe tomography allows us to visualise the distribution of Sr on the atomic scale and to analyse its local enrichment, transmission electron microscopy yields information about the crystallographic nature of segregated regions. Segregations with two kinds of morphologies were found at the intersections of Si twin lamellae: Sr-Al-Si co-segregations of rod-like morphology and Al-rich regions of spherical morphology. Both are responsible for the formation of a high density of multiple twins and promote the anisotropic growth of the eutectic Si phase in specific crystallographic directions during solidification. The experimental findings are related to the previously postulated mechanism of "impurity induced twinning". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of melting and solidification enthalpy of hypereutectic silumins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was related with determination of the values of enthalpy of melting and solidification of hypereutectic AlSi18, AlSi21 and AlSi24 silumins modified with phosphorus in the form of Cu-P. The calorimetry, preceded by thermal analysis and derivative thermal analysis (TA and DTA, respectively was carried out on a high-temperature scanning calorimeter, model MHTC-96, made by SETARAM, applying the method of direct determination of parameters of the high-temperature process, and in particular of the enthalpy of phase transformations. Modern control and measuring instruments coupled with PC computer provide a very precise tool for determination of these transformations. An additional advantage was development of appropriate software called „SETSOFT”, owing to which it was possible to determine in an easy way the enthalpy of the investigated phase transformations. Moreover, an additional thermal effect, related most probably with pre-eutectic crystallization of primary silicon, was observed and confirmed by calorimetric examinations.

  3. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Eutectic Hydrate Salt Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new cold storage phase change material eutectic hydrate salt (K2HPO4·3H2O–NaH2PO4·2H2O–Na2S2O3·5H2O was prepared, modified, and tested. The modification was performed by adding a nucleating agent and thickener. The physical properties such as viscosity, surface tension, cold storage characteristics, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles were studied. Results show that the use of nucleating agents, such as sodium tetraborate, sodium fluoride, and nanoparticles, are effective. The solidification temperature and latent heat of these materials which was added with 0, 3, and 5 wt% thickeners were −11.9, −10.6, and −14.8°C and 127.2, 118.6, 82.56 J/g, respectively. Adding a nucleating agent can effectively improve the nucleation rate and nucleation stability. Furthermore, increasing viscosity has a positive impact on the solidification rate, supercooling, and the stability during freeze-thaw cycles.

  4. Formation of bands of ultrafine beryllium particles during rapid solidification of Al-Be alloys: Modeling and direct observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, J.W.; Tanner, L.E.; Smith, P.M.; Wall, M.A.; Aziz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Rapid solidification of dilute hyper-eutectic and monotectic alloys sometimes produces a dispersion of ultrafine randomly-oriented particles that lie in arrays parallel to the advancing solidification front. The authors characterize this effect in Al-Be where Be-rich particles with diameters on the order of 10 nm form in arrays spaced approximately 25 nm apart, and they present a model of macroscopically steady state but microscopically oscillatory motion of the solidification front to explain this unusual microstructure. The proposed mechanism involves; (i) the build-up of rejected solute in a diffusional boundary layer which slows down the growing crystal matrix, (2) the boundary layer composition entering a metastable liquid miscibility gap, (3) homogeneous nucleation of solute rich liquid droplets in the boundary layer, and crystallization of these droplets, and (4) growth of the matrix past the droplets and its reformation into a planar interface. The size of the Be-rich particles is limited by the beryllium supersaturation in the diffusional boundary layer. A numerical model was developed to investigate this solidification mechanism, and the results of the model are in good agreement with experimental observations of rapidly solidified Al-5 at.% Be

  5. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation ...

  6. Microstructure and crystallography of Al2O3-Y3Al5O12-ZrO2 ternary eutectic oxide grown by the micropulling down technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamara, Omar; Cherif, Maya; Duffar, Thierry; Lebbou, Kheirreddine

    2015-11-01

    The directional solidification of Al2O3-YAG-ZrO2 eutectic ceramic by a micro-pulling down (μ-PD) technique is investigated. The effect of the pulling rate (0.1-1 mm min-1) on the crystallography and the microstructure is discussed. This ternary eutectic system has a Chinese script microstructure and the eutectic spacing λ depends on the pulling rate υ following the law: λ = 6.5υ-1/2 where λ is in μm and υ in μm/s as derived from the Jackson-Hunt model. With the lower pulling rates, all phases are oriented with the direction parallel to the growth direction; however other orientations appear at the higher pulling rates. The Cr3+ ions R-lines emission in the sapphire phase in the ternary eutectic composite is measured to estimate the stress in the alumina phase which is also shown to depend on the pulling rate.

  7. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  8. Thermal energy storage using chloride salts and their eutectics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Philip D.; Goswami, D. Yogi

    2016-01-01

    Achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sunshot initiative requires (1) higher operating temperatures for concentrating solar power (CSP) plants to increase theoretical efficiency, and (2) effective thermal energy storage (TES) strategies to ensure dispatchability. Current inorganic salt-based TES systems in large-scale CSP plants generally employ molten nitrate salts for energy storage, but nitrate salts are limited in application to lower temperatures—generally, below 600 °C. These materials are sufficient for parabolic trough power plants, but they are inadequate for use at higher temperatures. At the higher operating temperatures achievable in solar power tower-type CSP plants, chloride salts are promising candidates for application as TES materials, owing to their thermal stability and generally lower cost compared to nitrate salts. In light of this, a recent study was conducted, which included a preliminary survey of chloride salts and binary eutectic systems that show promise as high temperature TES media. This study provided some basic information about the salts, including phase equilibria data and estimates of latent heat of fusion for some of the eutectics. Cost estimates were obtained through a review of bulk pricing for the pure salts among various vendors. This review paper updates that prior study, adding data for additional salt eutectic systems obtained from the literature. Where possible, data are obtained from the thermodynamic database software, FactSage. Radiative properties are presented, as well, since at higher temperatures, thermal radiation becomes a significant mode of heat transfer. Material compatibility for inorganic salts is another important consideration (e.g., with regard to piping and/or containment), so a summary of corrosion studies with various materials is also presented. Lastly, cost data for these systems are presented, allowing for meaningful comparison among these systems and other materials for TES

  9. Characteristics of Cement Solidification of Metal Hydroxide Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Seo Koo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To perform the permanent disposal of metal hydroxide waste from electro-kinetic decontamination, it is necessary to secure the technology for its solidification. The integrity tests on the fabricated solidification should also meet the criteria of the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency. We carried out the solidification of metal hydroxide waste using cement solidification. The integrity tests such as the compressive strength, immersion, leach, and irradiation tests on the fabricated cement solidifications were performed. It was also confirmed that these requirements of the criteria of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency on these cement solidifications were met. The microstructures of all the cement solidifications were analyzed and discussed.

  10. Characteristics of cement solidification of metal hydroxide waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Dae Seo; Sung, Hyun Hee; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Gye Nam; Choi, Jong Won [Dept. of Decontemination Decommission Technology Development, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    To perform the permanent disposal of metal hydroxide waste from electro-kinetic decontamination, it is necessary to secure the technology for its solidification. The integrity tests on the fabricated solidification should also meet the criteria of the Korea Radioactive Waste Agency. We carried out the solidification of metal hydroxide waste using cement solidification. The integrity tests such as the compressive strength, immersion, leach, and irradiation tests on the fabricated cement solidifications were performed. It was also confirmed that these requirements of the criteria of Korea Radioactive Waste Agency on these cement solidifications were met. The microstructures of all the cement solidifications were analyzed and discussed.

  11. Dual-scale phase-field simulation of Mg-Al alloy solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monas, A; Shchyglo, O; Tegeler, M; Steinbach, I; Höche, D

    2015-01-01

    Phase-field simulations of the nucleation and growth of primary α-Mg phase as well as secondary, β-phase of a Mg-Al alloy are presented. The nucleation model for α- and β-Mg phases is based on the “free growth model” by Greer et al.. After the α-Mg phase solidification we study a divorced eutectic growth of α- and β-Mg phases in a zoomed in melt channel between α-phase dendrites. The simulated cooling curves and final microstructures of α-grains are compared with experiments. In order to further enhance the resolution of the interdendritic region a high-performance computing approach has been used allowing significant simulation speed gain when using supercomputing facilities. (paper)

  12. On the Effect of Pouring Temperature on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron Solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Escobar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the effect of pouring temperature on the thermal-microstructural response of an eutectic spheroidal graphite cast iron (SGCI. To this end, experiments as well as numerical simulations were carried out. Solidification tests in a wedge-like part were cast at two different pouring temperatures. Five specific locations exhibiting distinct cooling rates along the sample were chosen for temperature measurements and metallographic analysis to obtain the number and size of graphite nodules at the end of the process. The numerical simulations were performed using a multinodular-based model. Reasonably good numerical-experimental agreements were obtained for both the cooling curves and the graphite nodule counts.

  13. Phase-Field Modeling of Polycrystalline Solidification: From Needle Crystals to Spherulites—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gránásy, László; Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Korbuly, Bálint; Tóth, Gyula I.; Környei, László; Pusztai, Tamás

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the orientation-field-based phase-field (PF) models made in the past are reviewed. The models applied incorporate homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of growth centers and several mechanisms to form new grains at the perimeter of growing crystals, a phenomenon termed growth front nucleation. Examples for PF modeling of such complex polycrystalline structures are shown as impinging symmetric dendrites, polycrystalline growth forms (ranging from disordered dendrites to spherulitic patterns), and various eutectic structures, including spiraling two-phase dendrites. Simulations exploring possible control of solidification patterns in thin films via external fields, confined geometry, particle additives, scratching/piercing the films, etc. are also displayed. Advantages, problems, and possible solutions associated with quantitative PF simulations are discussed briefly.

  14. Micro-scale thermocapillary convection with solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.; Liu, J.C.; Chai, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study performed on heat transfer in sessile drops of lysozyme solutions with solidification. Solidification inside the sessile drop is initiated by means of the center cooling method. The internal flow behavior and solidification front movement are observed using a microscope-video monitor system. Results are obtained for lysozyme, and buffer solutions, and water, representing media possessing surface tension coefficients. It is disclosed that the time history of the solidification front movement can be divided into two stages; initial and stable. In the stable stage, the front movement x follows the power-law behavior x = Ct n . C is an empirical constant, and t denotes time. The exponent n takes on a value close to unity in the stable stage

  15. Low level waste solidification practice in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, S.; Kuribayashi, H.; Kono, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Both sea dumping and land isolation are planned to be accomplished for low level waste disposal in Japan. The conceptual design of land isolation facilities has been completed, and site selection will presently get underway. With respect to ocean dumping, safety surveys are being performed along the lines of the London Dumping Convention and the Revised Definitions and Recommendations of the IAEA, and the review of Japanese regulations and applicable criteria is being expedited. This paper discusses the present approach to waste solidification practices in Japan. It reports that the bitumen solidification process and the plastic solidification process are being increasingly used in Japan. Despite higher investment costs, both processes have advantages in operating cost, and are comparable to the cement solidification process in overall costs

  16. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  17. Method of reprocessing radioactive asphalt solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Iwao; Murakami, Tadashi; Miyake, Takafumi; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain heat-stable solidification products and decrease the total volume thereof by modifying the solidified form by the reprocessing of existent radioactive asphalt solidification products. Method: Radioactive asphalt solidification products are heated into a fluidized state. Then, incombustible solvents such as perchloroethylene or trichloroethylene are added to a dissolving tank to gradually dissolve the radioactive asphalt solidification products. Thus, organic materials such as asphalts are transferred into the solvent layer, while inorganic materials containing radioactive materials remain as they are in the separation tank. Then, the inorganic materials containing the radioactive materials are taken out and then solidified, for example, by converting them into a rock or glass form. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Effect of carbon content on solidification behaviors and morphological characteristics of the constituent phases in Cr-Fe-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chi-Ming; Lai, Hsuan-Han; Kuo, Jui-Chao; Wu, Weite

    2011-01-01

    A combination of transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and wavelength dispersive spectrum has been used to identify crystal structure, grain boundary characteristic and chemical composition of the constituent phases in Cr-Fe-C alloys with three different carbon concentrations. Depending on the three different carbon concentrations, the solidification structures are found to consist of primary α-phase and [α + (Cr,Fe) 23 C 6 ] eutectic in Cr-18.4Fe-2.3 C alloy; primary (Cr,Fe) 23 C 6 and [α + (Cr,Fe) 23 C 6 ] eutectic in Cr-24.5Fe-3.8 C alloy and primary (Cr,Fe) 7 C 3 and [α + (Cr,Fe) 7 C 3 ] eutectic in Cr-21.1Fe-5.9 C alloy, respectively. The grain boundary analysis is useful to understand growth mechanism of the primary phase. The morphologies of primary (Cr,Fe) 23 C 6 and (Cr,Fe) 7 C 3 carbides are faceted structures with polygonal shapes, different from primary α-phase with dendritic shape. The primary (Cr,Fe) 23 C 6 and (Cr,Fe) 7 C 3 carbides with strong texture exist a single crystal structure and contain a slight low angle boundary, resulting in the polygonal growth mechanism. Nevertheless, the primary α-phase with relative random orientation exhibits a polycrystalline structure and comprises a massive high-angle boundary, caused by the dendritic growth mechanism. - Highlights: ► Microstructures of the as-clad Cr-based alloys are characterized by TEM. ► EBSD technique has been use to characterize the grain boundary of primary phases. ► We examine transitions in morphology about the primary phases. ► Morphologies of primary carbides are polygonal different from primary α-phase. ► Solidification structures rely on C concentrations in Cr-Fe-C alloy.

  19. Precision of the eutectic points determination by the isopleths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsyk, V I; Sumkina, O G; Savinov, V V; Zelenaya, A E, E-mail: vluts@pres.bscnet.ru [Physical Problems Department, Buryat Scientific Center of RAS (Siberian Branch), 8 Sakhyanova st., Ulan-Ude, 670047 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-29

    An imitation of quaternary eutectic point searching techniques by means of two-dimensional sections set construction (tie-lines method) was made, using the model of T-x-y-z diagram of eutectic type without solid-phases solubility as an example. The errors, appearing in sections graphics of experimentally studied systems, are analyzed.

  20. Method of plastic solidification of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Yasuo; Tokimitsu, Fujio.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent occurrence of deleterious cracks to the inside and the surface of solidification products, as well as eliminate gaps between the products and the vessel inner wall upon plastic solidification processing for powdery or granular radioactive wastes. Method: An appropriate amount of thermoplastic resins such as styrenic polymer or vinyl acetate type polymer as a low shrinking agent is added and mixed with unsaturated polyester resins to be mixed with radioactive wastes so as to reduce the shrinkage-ratio to 0 % upon curing reaction. Thus, a great shrinkage upon hardening the mixture is suppressed to prevent the occurrence of cracks to the surface and the inside of the solidification products, as well as prevent the gaps between the inner walls of a drum can vessel and the products upon forming solidification products to the inside of the drum can. The resultant solidification products have a large compression strength and can sufficiently satisfy the evaluation standards as the plastic solidification products of radioactive wastes. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Directional Solidification Microstructure of a Ni-Based Superalloy: Influence of a Weak Transverse Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A Ni-based superalloy CMSX-6 was directionally solidified at various drawing speeds (5–20 μm·s−1 and diameters (4 mm, 12 mm under a 0.5 T weak transverse magnetic field. The results show that the application of a weak transverse magnetic field significantly modified the solidification microstructure. It was found that if the drawing speed was lower than 10 μm·s−1, the magnetic field caused extensive macro-segregation in the mushy zone, and a change in the mushy zone length. The magnetic field significantly decreases the size of γ’ and the content of γ-γ’ eutectic. The formation of macro-segregation under a weak magnetic field was attributed to the interdendritic solute transport driven by the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC. The γ’ phase refinement could be attributed to a decrease in nucleation activation energy owing to the magnetic field during solid phase transformation. The change of element segregation is responsible for the content decrease of γ-γ’ eutectic.

  2. Crystallization characteristics of cast aluminum alloys during a unidirectional solidification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: mitsuhiro.okayasu@utoronto.ca; Takeuchi, Shuhei

    2015-05-01

    The crystal orientation characteristics of cast Al–Si, Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys produced by a unidirectional solidification process are examined. Two distinct crystal orientation patterns are observed: uniform and random formation. A uniform crystal orientation is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites in the alloys with low proportions of alloying element, e.g., the Al–Si alloy (with Si <12.6%) and the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys (with Cu and Mg <2%). A uniformly organized crystal orientation with [100] direction is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites. With increasing proportion of alloying element (>2% Cu or Mg), the uniform crystal orientations collapse in the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys, owing to interruption of the columnar α-Al dendrite growth as a result of different dynamics of the alloying atoms and the creation of a core for the eutectic phases. For the hypo-eutectic Al–Si alloys, a uniform crystal orientation is obtained. In contrast, a random orientation can be detected in the hyper-eutectic Al–Si alloy (15% Si), which results from interruption of the growth of the α-Al dendrites due to precipitation of primary Si particles. There is no clear effect of crystal formation on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), whereas crystal orientation does influence the material ductility, with the alloys with a uniform crystal orientation being elongated beyond their UTS points and with necking occurring in the test specimens. In contrast, the alloys with a nonuniform crystal orientation are not elongated beyond their UTS points.

  3. Crystallization characteristics of cast aluminum alloys during a unidirectional solidification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    The crystal orientation characteristics of cast Al–Si, Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys produced by a unidirectional solidification process are examined. Two distinct crystal orientation patterns are observed: uniform and random formation. A uniform crystal orientation is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites in the alloys with low proportions of alloying element, e.g., the Al–Si alloy (with Si <12.6%) and the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys (with Cu and Mg <2%). A uniformly organized crystal orientation with [100] direction is created by columnar growth of α-Al dendrites. With increasing proportion of alloying element (>2% Cu or Mg), the uniform crystal orientations collapse in the Al–Cu and Al–Mg alloys, owing to interruption of the columnar α-Al dendrite growth as a result of different dynamics of the alloying atoms and the creation of a core for the eutectic phases. For the hypo-eutectic Al–Si alloys, a uniform crystal orientation is obtained. In contrast, a random orientation can be detected in the hyper-eutectic Al–Si alloy (15% Si), which results from interruption of the growth of the α-Al dendrites due to precipitation of primary Si particles. There is no clear effect of crystal formation on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), whereas crystal orientation does influence the material ductility, with the alloys with a uniform crystal orientation being elongated beyond their UTS points and with necking occurring in the test specimens. In contrast, the alloys with a nonuniform crystal orientation are not elongated beyond their UTS points

  4. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  5. Structure of eutectic alloys of Au with Si and Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Tahara, S.; Nakashima, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S.; Itou, M. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Koto Sayo-cho, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2008-03-06

    Au-Si and Au-Ge alloy systems have a deep eutectic point in the Au-rich concentration region where the melting point falls down to 633 K. In order to investigate the liquid structure in relation to the glass-forming tendency of these alloys, high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out at the eutectic composition and at compositions with excess amounts of Au or IVb element. The nearest neighbor correlations in the eutectic liquids are intense and sharp in the pair distribution function and exhibit a rather small temperature dependence in comparison with those alloys of other than the eutectic composition. Structural models for these liquid alloys are proposed with the aid of reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The reproduced atomic arrangements around the eutectic region exhibit a substitutional-type structure where the dense random packing of Au atoms is preserved and Si or Ge atoms occupy the Au-sites at random.

  6. Solidification of radioactive aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikawa, Hideaki; Kato, Kiyoshi; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1970-09-07

    A process for solidifying a radioactive waste solution is provided, using as a solidifying agent a mixture of calcined gypsum and burnt vermiculite. The quantity ratio of the mixture is preferred to be 1:1 by volume. The quantity of impregnation is 1/2 of the volume of the total quantity of the solidifying agent. In embodiments, 10 liters of plutonium waste solution was mixed with a mixture of 1:1 calcined gypsum and burnt vermiculite contained in a 20-liter cylindrical steel container lined with asphalt. The plutonium waste solution from the laboratory was neutralized with a caustic soda aqueous solution to prevent explosion due to the nitration of organic compounds. The neutralization is not always necessary. A market available dental gypsum was calcined at 400 to 500/sup 0/C and a vermiculite from Illinois was burnt at 1,100/sup 0/C to prepare the agents. The time required for the impregnation with 10 liters of plutonium solution was four minutes. After impregnation, the temperature rose to 40/sup 0/C within 30 minutes to one hour. Next, it was cooled to room temperature by standing for 3-4 hours. Solidification time was about 1 hour. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Insitute had treated and disposed about 1,000 tons of plutonium waste by this process as of August 19, 1970.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy induced by crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment in directionally-solidified eutectic Mn-Sb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Chang-Sheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang Ligong University, Shenyang 110159 (China); Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Tie, E-mail: liutie@epm.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Meng; Wu, Chun; Shao, Jian-Guo; Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2017-02-15

    The influences of the crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials were investigated. Microstructures obtained in eutectic Mn-Sb alloys via directional solidification simultaneously displayed crystallographic orientation and morphological alignment. Both the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment were able to induce magnetic anisotropy in the alloys, wherein the influence of the crystallographic orientation and the morphological alignment upon the magnetic anisotropic behavior of the alloys strongly depended upon their directions and exhibited either mutual promotion or competition. These findings may provide useful guidance for the fabrication design of functional magnetic materials. - Highlights: • We study effects of orientation in crystal and morphology on magnetic anisotropy. • Both orientation in crystal and morphology can induce magnetic anisotropy. • Their effects depend on direction and exhibit either mutual promotion or competition.

  8. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  9. Sandia solidification process: a broad range aqueous waste solidification method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, R.W.; Dosch, R.G.; Kenna, B.T.; Johnstone, J.K.; Nowak, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    New ion-exchange materials of the hydrous oxide type were developed for solidifying aqueous radioactive wastes. These materials have the general formula M[M'/sub x/O/sub y/H/sub z/]/sub n/, where M is an exchangeable cation of charge +n and M' may be Ti; Nb; Zr, or Ta. Affinities for polyvalent cations were found to be very high and ion-exchange capacities large (e.g., 4.0--4.5 meq/g for NaTi 2 O 5 H depending on moisture content). The effectiveness of the exchangers for solidifying high-level waste resulting from reprocessing light-water reactor fuel was demonstrated in small-scale tests. Used in conjunction with anion exchange resin, these materials reduced test solution radioactivity from approximately 0.2 Ci/ml to as low as approximately 2 nCi/ml. The residual radioactivity was almost exclusively due to 106 Ru and total α-activity was only a few pCi/ml. Alternative methods of consolidating the solidified waste were evaluated using nonradioactive simulants. Best results were obtained by pressure-sintering which yielded essentially fully dense ceramics, e.g., titanate/titania ceramics with bulk density as high as 4.7 g/cm 3 , waste oxide content as high as 1.2 g/cm 3 , and leach resistance comparable to good borosilicate glass. Based on the above results, a baseline process for solidifying high-level waste was defined and approximate economic analyses indicated costs were not prohibitive. Additional tests have demonstrated that, if desired, operating conditions could be modified to allow recovery of radiocesium (and perhaps other isotopes) during solidification of the remaining constituents of high-level waste. Preliminary tests have also shown that these materials offer promise for treating tank-stored neutralized wastes

  10. Phase selection and microstructure in directional solidification of glass forming Pd-Si-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yang

    Phase selection and microstructure formation during the rapid solidification of alloy melts has been a topic of substantial interest over the last several decades, attributed mainly to the access to novel structures involving metastable crystalline and non-crystalline phases. In this work, Bridgeman type directional solidification was conducted in Pd-Si-Cu glass forming system to study such cooling rate dependent phase transition and microstructure formation. The equilibrium state for Pd-Si-Cu ternary system was investigated through three different works. First of all, phase stabilities for Pd-Si binary system was accessed with respects of first-principles and experiments, showing Pd5Si, Pd9Si2, Pd3Si and Pd 2Si phase are stable all way to zero Kevin while PdSi phase is a high temperature stable phase, and Pd2Si phase with Fe2P is a non-stoichiometry phase. A thermodynamic database was developed for Pd-Si system. Second, crystal structures for compounds with ternary compositions were studied by XRD, SEM and TEM, showing ordered and disordered B2/bcc phases are stable in Pd-rich part. At last, based on many phase equilibria and phase transitions data, a comprehensive thermodynamic discrption for Pd-Si-Cu ternary system was first time to be developed, from which different phase diagrams and driving force for kinetics can be calculated. Phase selection and microstructure formation in directional solidification of the best glass forming composition, Pd 77.5Si16.5Cu6, in this system with growth velocities from 0.005 to 7.5mm/s was systematically studied and the solidification pathways at different conditions were interpreted from thermodynamic simulation. The results show that for growth velocities are smaller than 0.1mm/s Pd 3Si phase is primary phase and Pd9Si2 phase is secondary phase, the difficulty for Pd9Si2 phase nucleation gives rise to the formation of two different eutectic structure. For growth velocities between 0.4 and 1mm/s, instead of Pd3Si phase, Pd9Si2

  11. Eutectics as improved pharmaceutical materials: design, properties and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Nangia, Ashwini

    2014-01-28

    Eutectics are a long known class of multi-component solids with important and useful applications in daily life. In comparison to other multi-component crystalline solids, such as salts, solid solutions, molecular complexes and cocrystals, eutectics are less studied in terms of molecular structure organization and bonding interactions. Classically, a eutectic is defined based on its low melting point compared to the individual components. In this article, we attempt to define eutectics not just based on thermal methods but from a structural organization view point, and discuss their microstructures and properties as organic materials vis-a-vis solid solutions and cocrystals. The X-ray crystal structure of a cocrystal is different from that of the individual components whereas the unit cell of a solid solution is similar to that of one of the components. Eutectics are closer to the latter species in that their crystalline arrangement is similar to the parent components but they are different with respect to the structural integrity. A solid solution possesses structural homogeneity throughout the structure (single phase) but a eutectic is a heterogeneous ensemble of individual components whose crystal structures are like discontinuous solid solutions (phase separated). Thus, a eutectic may be better defined as a conglomerate of solid solutions. A structural analysis of cocrystals, solid solutions and eutectics has led to an understanding that materials with strong adhesive (hetero) interactions between the unlike components will lead to cocrystals whereas those having stronger cohesive (homo/self) interactions will more often give rise to solid solutions (for similar structures of components) and eutectics (for different structures of components). We demonstrate that the same crystal engineering principles which have been profitably utilized for cocrystal design in the past decade can now be applied to make eutectics as novel composite materials, illustrated by

  12. Liquidus projection of the Nb-Cr-Al system near the Al3(Nb,Cr) + Cr(Al,Nb) eutectic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, S.A.; Ferrandini, P.L.; Nunes, C.A.; Coelho, A.A.; Caram, R.

    2006-01-01

    The system Nb-Cr-Al was investigated in the region near the Al 3 (Nb,Cr) + Cr(Al,Nb) eutectic and the liquidus projection of that region was determined based on the microstructural characterization of arc melted alloys. The characterization utilized scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results allowed one to determine three primary solidification liquidus surfaces ((Cr,Al) 2 Nb, Cr(Al,Nb) and Al 3 (Nb,Cr)), that are originated from the binary systems Cr-Nb, Cr-Al and Al-Nb. It is proposed the occurrence of the invariant reaction L + (Cr,Al) 2 Nb ↔ Al 3 (Nb,Cr) + Cr(Al,Nb) and of a point of minimum, which involves a three phase reaction, L ↔ Al 3 (Nb,Cr) + Cr(Al,Nb). All alloys studied showed formation of the Al 3 (Nb,Cr) + Cr(Al,Nb) eutectic as the last solidification step with Al(Nb)Cr 2 precipitating from Cr(Al,Nb)

  13. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, ... Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to ... behaviour appear to be complex and the mechanisms thereof are not completely under- stood. Development of ...

  14. Eutectic propeties of primitive Earth's magma ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Nigro, G.; Andrault, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Perillat, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    It is widely accepted that the early Earth was partially molten (if not completely) due to the high energy dissipated by terrestrial accretion [1]. After core formation, subsequent cooling of the magma ocean has led to fractional crystallization of the primitive mantle. The residual liquid corresponds to what is now called the fertile mantle or pyrolite. Melting relations of silicates have been extensively investigated using the multi-anvil press, for pressures between 3 and 25 GPa [2,3]. Using the quench technique, it has been shown that the pressure affects significantly the solidus and liquidus curves, and most probably the composition of the eutectic liquid. At higher pressures, up to 65 GPa, melting studies were performed on pyrolite starting material using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) technique [4]. However, the quench technique is not ideal to define melting criteria, and furthermore these studies were limited in pressure range of investigation. Finally, the use of pyrolite may not be relevant to study the melting eutectic temperature. At the core-mantle boundary conditions, melting temperature is documented by a single data point on (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine, provided by shock wave experiments at around 130-140 GPa [5]. These previous results present large uncertainties of ~1000 K. The aim of this study is to determine the eutectic melting temperature in the chemically simplified system composed of the two major lower mantle phases, the MgSiO3 perovskite and MgO periclase. We investigated melting in-situ using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell coupled with angle dispersive X-ray diffraction at the ID27 beamline of the ESRF [6]. Melting relations were investigated in an extended P-T range comparable to those found in the Earth's lower mantle, i.e. from 25 to 120 GPa and up to more than 5000 K. Melting was evidenced from (a) disappearance of one of the two phases in the diffraction pattern, (b) drastic changes of the diffraction image itself, and

  15. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  16. In Situ Study of Microstructure Evolution in Solidification of Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys with Application of Thermal Analysis and Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediako, Dimitry G.; Kasprzak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the kinetics of solid-phase evolution in solidification of hypereutectic aluminum alloys is a key to control their as-cast microstructure and resultant mechanical properties, and in turn, to enhance the service characteristics of actual components. This study was performed to evaluate the solidification kinetics for three P-modified hypereutectic Al-19 pct Si alloys: namely, Al-Si binary alloy and with the subsequent addition of 2.8 pct Cu and 2.8 pct Cu + 0.7 pct Mg. Metallurgical evaluation included thermodynamic calculations of the solidification process using the FactSage™ 6.2 software package, as well as experimental thermal analysis, and in situ neutron diffraction. The study revealed kinetics of solid α-Al, solid Si, Al2Cu, and Mg2Si evolution, as well as the individual effects of Cu and Mg alloying additions on the solidification path of the Al-Si system. Various techniques applied in this study resulted in some discrepancies in the results. For example, the FactSage computations, in general, resulted in 281 K to 286 K (8 °C to 13 °C) higher Al-Si eutectic temperatures than the ones recorded in the thermal analysis, which are also ~278 K (~5 °C) higher than those observed in the in situ neutron diffraction. None of the techniques can provide a definite value for the solidus temperature, as this is affected by the chosen calculation path [283 K to 303 K (10 °C to 30 °C) higher for equilibrium solidification vs non-equilibrium] for the FactSage analysis; and further complicated by evolution of secondary Al-Cu and Mg-Si phases that commenced at the end of solidification. An explanation of the discrepancies observed and complications associated with every technique applied is offered in the paper.

  17. Defect generation during solidification of aluminium foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.

    2010-01-01

    The reason for the frequent occurrence of cell wall defects in metal foams was investigated. Aluminium foams often expand during solidification, a process which is referred as solidification expansion (SE). The effect of SE on the structure of aluminium foams was studied in situ by X-ray radioscopy and ex situ by X-ray tomography. A direct correlation between the magnitude of SE and the number of cell wall ruptures during SE and finally the number of defects in the solidified foams was found.

  18. Incorporating interfacial phenomena in solidification models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckermann, Christoph; Wang, Chao Yang

    1994-01-01

    A general methodology is available for the incorporation of microscopic interfacial phenomena in macroscopic solidification models that include diffusion and convection. The method is derived from a formal averaging procedure and a multiphase approach, and relies on the presence of interfacial integrals in the macroscopic transport equations. In a wider engineering context, these techniques are not new, but their application in the analysis and modeling of solidification processes has largely been overlooked. This article describes the techniques and demonstrates their utility in two examples in which microscopic interfacial phenomena are of great importance.

  19. Plastic solidification system for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kani, Jiro; Irie, Hiromitsu; Obu, Etsuji; Nakayama, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1979-01-01

    The establishment of a new solidification system is an important theme for recent radioactive-waste disposal systems. The conditions required of new systems are: (1) the volume of the solidified product to be reduced, and (2) the property of the solidified product to be superior to the conventional ones. In the plastic solidification system developed by Toshiba, the waste is first dried and then solidified with thermosetting resin. It has been confirmed that the property of the plastic solidified product is superior to that of the cement-or bitumen-solidified product. Investigation from various phases is being carried on for the application of this method to commercial plants. (author)

  20. Deep Eutectic Solvents Enable More Robust Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Pengfei; Wang, Xuping; Zeng, Chaoxi; Wang, Weifei; Yang, Bo; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    A chemoenzymatic method for the production of epoxidized vegetable oils was developed. The unique combination of the commercial lipase G from Penicillieum camembertii with certain deep eutectic solvents enabled the efficient production of epoxidized vegetable oils.

  1. The creep behavior of In-Ag eutectic solder joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, H.L.; Kang, S.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA

    1999-01-01

    The addition of 3 wt.% Ag to In results in a eutectic composition with improved mechanical properties while only slightly lowering the melting temperature. Steady-state creep properties of In-Ag eutectic solder joints have been measured using constant load tests at 0, 30, 60, and 90 C. Constitutive equations are derived to describe the creep behavior. The data are well represented by an equation of the form proposed by Dorn: a power-law equation applies to each independent creep mechanism. Two parallel mechanisms were observed for the In-Ag eutectic joints. The high-stress mechanism is a bulk mechanism with a thermal dependence dominated by the thermal dependence of creep in the In-rich matrix. The low-stress mechanism is a grain boundary mechanism. Results of this work are discussed with regard to creep behavior of typical eutectic systems

  2. Effect of the delta ferrite solidification morphology of austenitic steels weld metal on the joint properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilmes, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Llorente, C.; Solari, M.

    1996-01-01

    The properties of austenitic stainless steel weld metals are largely influenced by the appearance in the microstructure of delta ferrite of a given morphology. The susceptibility to hot cracks and low temperature toughness are deeply conditioned by the mixed complex austenitic-ferritic structures which depending on the steel chemical composition and on the cooling rate may be developed. The latest research on this issue points out the importance of the sodification mode as regards to the influence in the appearance of delta ferrite of a certain morphology. In fact, it is very important to understand the solidification sequences, the primary solidification modes which are possible and the subsequent solid state transformations to correlate the structural elements of the weld metal with the parameters of the welding process on the one had, and the weld joint properties on the other. (Author) 19 refs

  3. Instabilities in rapid directional solidification under weak flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Davis, Stephen H.; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2017-12-01

    We examine a rapidly solidifying binary alloy under directional solidification with nonequilibrium interfacial thermodynamics viz. the segregation coefficient and the liquidus slope are speed dependent and attachment-kinetic effects are present. Both of these effects alone give rise to (steady) cellular instabilities, mode S , and a pulsatile instability, mode P . We examine how weak imposed boundary-layer flow of magnitude |V | affects these instabilities. For small |V | , mode S becomes a traveling and the flow stabilizes (destabilizes) the interface for small (large) surface energies. For small |V | , mode P has a critical wave number that shifts from zero to nonzero giving spatial structure. The flow promotes this instability and the frequencies of the complex conjugate pairs each increase (decrease) with flow for large (small) wave numbers. These results are obtained by regular perturbation theory in powers of V far from the point where the neutral curves cross, but requires a modified expansion in powers of V1 /3 near the crossing. A uniform composite expansion is then obtained valid for all small |V | .

  4. A comparative study on the compatibility of liquid lead–gold eutectic and liquid lead–bismuth eutectic with T91 and SS 316LN steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Y.; Gao, W.; Zhang, T.; Platacis, E.; Heinitz, S.; Thomsen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid lead–gold eutectic (LGE) is considered as a potential target material for high power spallation sources. In the present work, the corrosion effects of LGE on T91 and SS 316LN steels have been investigated in comparison with that of liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) under the same testing conditions. Two tests were conducted at 400 °C for 1800 h and at 450 °C for 1300 h, in which specimens of the two steels were exposed to 1 m/s flowing LGE and LBE. Surface inspections showed that the specimens underwent a mixed corrosion mode of dissolution and oxidation. The results obtained from the SS 316LN specimens are very interesting. Firstly, EDX (electron energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry) analyses revealed that Ni, Cr and Mn have a higher dissolution rate in LGE than in LBE. Secondly, it was observed that LBE attacked strongly on grain-boundaries (GBs) and twin-boundaries (TBs), while LGE did not preferentially attack GBs and TBs. Further, the diffusion or penetration paths of LBE look straight, while those of LGE look like a complex network. In the attacked regions the chemical composition of the steel did not change much in the LBE case, but changed greatly in the LGE case. The T91 specimens exhibited considerably weaker corrosion effects under the present testing conditions.

  5. Sufficient condition for generation of multiple solidification front in one-dimensional solidification of binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobula, E.; Kalicka, Z.

    1981-10-01

    In the paper we consider the one-dimensional solidification of binary alloys in the finite system. The authors present the sufficient condition for solidification in the liquid in front of the moving solid-liquid interface. The effect may produce a fluctuating concentration distributin in the solid. The convection in the liquid and supercooling required for homogeneous nucleation are omitted. A local-equilibrium approximation at the liquid-solid interface is supposed. (author)

  6. Solidification of oils and organic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The suitability of selected solidification media for application in the disposal of low-level oil and other organic liquid wastes has been investigated. In the past, these low-level wastes (LLWs) have commonly been immobilized by sorption onto solid absorbents such as vermiculite or diatomaceous earth. Evolving regulations regarding the disposal of these materials encourage solidification. Solidification media which were studied include Portland type I cement; vermiculite plus Portland type I cement; Nuclear Technology Corporation's Nutek 380-cement process; emulsifier, Portland type I cement-sodium silicate; Delaware Custom Materiel's cement process; and the US Gypsum Company's Envirostone process. Waste forms have been evaluated as to their ability to reliably produce free standing monolithic solids which are homogeneous (macroscopically), contain < 1% free standing liquids by volume and pass a water immersion test. Solidified waste form specimens were also subjected to vibratory shock testing and flame testing. Simulated oil wastes can be solidified to acceptable solid specimens having volumetric waste loadings of less than 40 volume-%. However, simulated organic liquid wastes could not be solidified into acceptable waste forms above a volumetric loading factor of about 10 volume-% using the solidification agents studied

  7. NPP radioactive waste processing and solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.S.; Polyakov, A.S.; Zakharova, K.P.

    1983-01-01

    The problems of proce-sing NPP intermediate level- and low-level liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) are considered. Various methods are compared of LWR solidification on the base of bituminization, cement grouting and inclusion into synthetic resins. It is concluded that the considered methods ensure radioactive radionuclides effluents into open hydronetwork at the level below the sanitary, standards

  8. Solidification of highly active liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.B.

    1985-03-01

    This document contains the annual progress reports on the following subjects: Joule ceramic melter; microwave vitrification; glass technology; identification, evaluation and review of potential alternative solidification processes; rotary kiln calcination; alternative glass feedstocks; volatile ruthenium trapping by solid adsorbents; irrigated baffle column dust scrubber. (author)

  9. Current high-level waste solidification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Ross, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Technology has been developed in the U.S. and abroad for solidification of high-level waste from nuclear power production. Several processes have been demonstrated with actual radioactive waste and are now being prepared for use in the commercial nuclear industry. Conversion of the waste to a glass form is favored because of its high degree of nondispersibility and safety

  10. Polymer Solidification Technology - Technical Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Charles; Kim, Juyoul

    2010-01-01

    Many factors come into play, most of which are discovered and resolved only during full-scale solidification testing of each of the media commonly used in nuclear power plants. Each waste stream is unique, and must be addressed accordingly. This testing process is so difficult that Diversified's Vinyl Ester Styrene and Advanced Polymer Solidification are the only two approved processes in the United States today. This paper summarizes a few of the key obstacles that must be overcome to achieve a reliable, repeatable process for producing an approved Stable Class B and C waste form. Before other solidification and encapsulation technologies can be considered compliant with the requirements of a Stable waste form, the tests, calculations and reporting discussed above must be conducted for both the waste form and solidification process used to produce the waste form. Diversified's VERI TM and APS TM processes have gained acceptance in the UK. These processes have also been approved and gained acceptance in the U. S. because we have consistently overcome technical hurdles to produce a complaint product. Diversified Technologies processes are protected intellectual property. In specific instances, we have patents pending on key parts of our process technology

  11. Method of processing solidification product of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daime, Fumiyoshi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the long-time stability of solidification products by providing solidification products with liquid tightness, gas tightness, abrasion resistance, etc., of the products in the course of the solidification for the treatment of radioactive wastes. Method: The surface of solidification products prepared by mixing solidifying agents with powder or pellets is entirely covered with high molecular polymer such as epoxy resin. The epoxy resin has excellent properties such as radiation-resistance, heat resistance, water proofness and chemical resistance, as well as have satisfactory mechanical properties. This can completely isolate the solidification products of radioactive wastes from the surrounding atmosphere. (Yoshino, Y.)

  12. Numerical study on morphology and solidification characteristics of successive droplet depositions on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaikalanathan, Vimalan

    accounting for the latent heat. It is coupled with the flow solver through an Enthalpy-Porosity technique. A modified boundary condition which incorporates the contact resistance has also been implemented. The case of multiple eutectic solder droplet depositions has been simulated to study the various aspects of splat morphology and solidification characteristics. Effects of impact conditions on single as well as successive droplet depositions have been examined. The role of convection terms in the energy equation has been emphasized and quantitatively analysed. The effect of impact velocity is manifested as surface curvature of the pre-solidified splat and in turn, affects morphology of the subsequent droplets. Initial droplet temperature influences the solidification time of both single and multiple droplets. Under certain conditions, remelting of pre-solidified splat has been observed and its causes have been discussed. Contact resistance has been reported in the literature and has been found to have a strong influence not only on the heat transfer but also the spreading behaviour. Frequency of successive impingements is also an important factor affecting the metallurgical bonding properties.

  13. Mechanism of eutectic formation upon compaction and its effects on tablet properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Mingda; Hwang, Sung-Joo; Morris, Kenneth R.

    2003-01-01

    The unique property of a eutectic mixture is a lower melting temperature than that of any of its pure components. What differentiates a eutectic mixture from a simple physical mixture is less well understood. This impedes the ability to anticipate and/or detect unintentional eutectic formation during pharmaceutical tablet manufacturing and any potential negative impact. In this study, a thermodynamic/heat transfer approach was used to explain the mechanism of eutectic formation upon exposure to a physical stress, i.e. compaction, and a differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) method was developed to detect and quantify the amount of eutectic formed in the compacts. Furthermore, the mechanism of eutectic formation upon compaction was tested experimentally by correlating the amount of eutectic formed in tablets with the particle size, compaction force, the estimated intimate contact area between the eutectic-forming materials, calculated tablet tensile strength, and tablet porosity. The effect of the presence of eutectics on tablet properties was also investigated. The results show that intimate contact and mutual solubility between eutectic-forming materials are the necessary and sufficient criteria for eutectic formation upon compaction. The systems of acetaminophen (APAP)/caffeine and APAP/propylphenazone were both shown to exhibit eutectic behavior upon compaction and the extent of formation was dependent upon the amount of intimate contact between eutectic-forming materials. Finally, it was found that eutectic had no negative effect on tablet hardness

  14. Crystallization behavior of Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 films in optical disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khulbe, Pramod K.; Hurst, Terril; Mansuripur, Masud; Horie, Michikazu

    2002-01-01

    We report laser-induced crystallization behavior of binary Sb-Te and ternary Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin film samples in a typical quadrilayer stack as used in phase-change optical disk data storage. Several experiments have been conducted on a two-laser static tester in which one laser operating in pulse mode writes crystalline marks on amorphous film or amorphous marks on crystalline film, while the second laser operating at low-power cw mode simultaneously monitors the progress of the crystalline or amorphous mark formation in real time in terms of the reflectivity variation. The results of this study show that the crystallization kinetics of this class of film is strongly growth dominant, which is significantly different from the crystallization kinetics of stochiometric Ge-Sb-Te compositions. In Sb-Te and Ge-doped eutectic Sb70Te30 thin-film samples, the crystallization behavior of the two forms of amorphous states, namely, as-deposited amorphous state and melt-quenched amorphous state, remains approximately same. We have also presented experiments showing the effect of the variation of the Sb/Te ratio and Ge doping on the crystallization behavior of these films

  15. Influence of convection on eutectic microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, V.; Eisa, G. F.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    When the MnBi-Bi eutectic is directionally solidified, it forms fibers of MnBi in a matrix of bismuth. When the material solidified in space at rates of 30 and 50 cm/hr, the average fiber spacing lambda was about one half of the value obtained in cases in which the same material solidified on earth. Neither an altered temperature gradient nor a fluctuating freezing rate are apparently responsible for the change in lambda, and the possibility is studied that natural convection increases lambda on earth by perturbing the compositional field in the melt ahead of the growing solid. A theoretical analysis is conducted along with some experiments. On the basis of the theoretical results for lamellar growth, it is concluded that the spacing lambda increases with increasing stirring, especially at small freezing rates. The experiments indicate that at low growth rates the cross-sectional area of the MnBi blades increases with increased stirring and with decreased growth rate.

  16. Developments of high strength Bi-containing Sn0.7Cu lead-free solder alloys prepared by directional solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xiaowu, E-mail: xwhmaterials@aliyun.com [School of Mechanical Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Li, Yulong [School of Mechanical Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Min, Zhixian [China Electronics Technology Group Corporation No. 38 Research Institute, Hefei 230088 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The Sn0.7Cu–xBi solder alloys were directionally solidified. • Both spacing and diameter of fibers decreased with increasing solidification rate. • The UTS and YS first increased with increased solidification rate, then decreased. • The UTS and YS of Sn0.7Cu–xBi first increased with increased Bi content. - Abstract: Bi-containing Sn0.7Cu (SC) eutectic solder alloys were prepared and subjected to directional solidification, through which new types of fiber reinforced eutectic composites were generated. The influences of Bi addition on the microstructures and tensile properties of directionally solidified (DS) Bi-containing eutectic SC lead-free solder alloys have been investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and a tensile testing machine. The experimental results showed that addition of Bi could effectively reduce both the melting temperature and undercooling of SC solder alloy. The microstructures of DS SC–xBi solder alloys were composed of Sn-rich phase (β) and Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} fiber. No other intermetallic compounds (IMCs) with Bi content were observed in the solder matrix for SC solder alloys with various Bi contents. Both fiber spacing and diameter all decreased gradually with increasing growth rate and/or Bi content. Besides, the regularity of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} fibers alignment also decreased with increasing growth rate, too. The tensile strengths of the SC–xBi eutectic solder alloys varied parabolically with growth rate (R). When R was 60 μm/s, maximum tensile strengths of 43.8, 55.2 and 56.37 MPa were reached for SC, SC0.7Bi and SC1.3Bi solder alloys. A comparison of tensile strength of SC, SC0.7Bi and SC1.3Bi with the same R indicated that the tensile strength increased with increasing Bi content, which was attributed to the presence of Bi and its role in refining microstructure and solid solution strengthening.

  17. Shape rheocasting of unmodified Al-Si binary eutectic

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, UA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available a solidification temperature range. Silicon leads the aluminium coupled crystal growth subjected to convection by induction during thermal arrest. The semi-solid structure during thermal arrest is captured after rheo-processing and casting....

  18. Continuum simulation of heat transfer and solidification behavior of AlSi10Mg in Direct Metal Laser Sintering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Akash; Samantaray, Mihir; Nath Thatoi, Dhirendra; Sahoo, Seshadev

    2018-03-01

    Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) process is a laser based additive manufacturing process, which built complex structures from powder materials. Using high intensity laser beam, the process melts and fuse the powder particles makes dense structures. In this process, the laser beam in terms of heat flux strikes the powder bed and instantaneously melts and joins the powder particles. The partial solidification and temperature distribution on the powder bed endows a high cooling rate and rapid solidification which affects the microstructure of the build part. During the interaction of the laser beam with the powder bed, multiple modes of heat transfer takes place in this process, that make the process very complex. In the present research, a comprehensive heat transfer and solidification model of AlSi10Mg in direct metal laser sintering process has been developed on ANSYS 17.1.0 platform. The model helps to understand the flow phenomena, temperature distribution and densification mechanism on the powder bed. The numerical model takes into account the flow, heat transfer and solidification phenomena. Simulations were carried out for sintering of AlSi10Mg powders in the powder bed having dimension 3 mm × 1 mm × 0.08 mm. The solidification phenomena are incorporated by using enthalpy-porosity approach. The simulation results give the fundamental understanding of the densification of powder particles in DMLS process.

  19. Solidification in Multicomponent Multiphase Systems (SIMMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, S.; Hecht, U.

    2005-06-01

    The multiphase microstructures that evolve during the solidification of multicomponent alloys are attracting widespread interest for industrial applications and fundamental research.Thermodynamic databases are now well-established for many alloy systems. Thermodynamic calculations provide all the required information about phase equilibria, forming an integral part of both dedicated and comprehensive microstructure models. Among the latter, phase-field modelling has emerged as the method of choice. Solidification experiments are intended to trigger model development or to serve as benchmarks for model validation. For benchmarking, microgravity conditions offer a unique opportunity for avoiding buoyancy-induced convection and buoyancy forces in bulk samples. However, diffusion and the free-energy of interfaces and its anisotropy need to be determined.The measurement of chemical diffusivities in the liquid state can equally benefit from microgravity experiments.

  20. Retrofit of radwaste solidification systems in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorcillo, R.; Virzi, E.

    1983-01-01

    In order to meet current Spanish engineering criteria as well as to provide for likely future Spanish Regulatory requirements, utilities committed to a major policy change in the preferred radwaste solidification media. In the early 1970's Spanish utilities, following the United States experience, purchased inexpensive solidification systems which used urea formaldehyde (UF) as the binding matrix. By the late 1970's the Spanish utilities, seeing the deterioration of the UF position and slow progress toward its improvement, unilaterally changed their binding matrix to cement. This paper illustrates the implementation of this change at the ASCO Nuclear Plant. The problems of layout modifications, shortened delivery schedule and criteria unique for Spain are addressed. Also presented is the operating experience acquired during the pre-operational start-up of the ASCO I Radwaste System

  1. Solidification processing of monotectic alloy matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frier, Nancy L.; Shiohara, Yuh; Russell, Kenneth C.

    1989-01-01

    Directionally solidified aluminum-indium alloys of the monotectic composition were found to form an in situ rod composite which obeys a lambda exp 2 R = constant relation. The experimental data shows good agreement with previously reported results. A theoretical boundary between cellular and dendritic growth conditions was derived and compared with experiments. The unique wetting characteristics of the monotectic alloys can be utilized to tailor the interface structure in metal matrix composites. Metal matrix composites with monotectic and hypermonotectic Al-In matrices were made by pressure infiltration, remelted and directionally solidified to observe the wetting characteristics of the alloys as well as the effect on structure of solidification in the constrained field of the fiber interstices. Models for monotectic growth are modified to take into account solidification in these constrained fields.

  2. Cement radwaste solidification studies third annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; James, J.M.; Lee, D.J.; Smith, D.L.; Walker, A.T.

    1982-03-01

    This report summarises cement radwaste studies carried out at AEE Winfrith during 1981 on the encapsulation of medium and low active waste in cement. During the year more emphasis has been placed on the work which is directly related to the solidification of SGHWR active sludge. Information has been obtained on the properties of 220 dm 3 drums of cemented waste. The use of cement grouts for the encapsulation of solid items has also been investigated during 1981. (U.K.)

  3. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  4. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology

  5. Inspection method for solidification product of radioactive waste and method of preparing solidification product of radiation waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo; Tamada, Shin; Matsuda, Masami; Kamata, Shoji; Kikuchi, Makoto.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful X-ray generation device using an electron-ray accelerator is used for inspecting presence or absence of inner voids in solidification products of radioactive wastes during or after solidification. By installing the X-ray CT system and the radioactive waste solidifying facility together, CT imaging for solidification products is conducted in a not-yet cured state of solidifying materials during or just after the injection. If a defect that deteriorates the durability of the solidification products should be detected, the solidification products are repaired, for example, by applying vibrations to the not-yet cured solidification products. Thus, since voids or cracks in the radioactive wastes solidification products, which were difficult to be measured so far, can be measured in a short period of time accurately thereby enabling to judge adaptability to the disposal standards, inspection cost for the radioactive waste solidification product can be saved remarkably. Further, the inside of the radioactive waste solidification products can be evaluated correctly and visually, so that safety in the ground disposal storage of the radioactive solidification products can be improved remarkably. (N.H.)

  6. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs

  7. Material properties influence on steam explosion efficiency. Prototypic versus simulant melts, eutectic versus non-eutectic melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, M.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    A steam explosion may occur during a severe nuclear reactor accident if the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. Details of processes taking place prior and during the steam explosion have been experimentally studied for a number of years with adjunct efforts in modelling these processes to address the scaling of these experiments. Steam explosion experiments have shown that there are important differences of behaviour between simulant and prototypical melts, and that also at prototypical melts the fuel coolant interactions depend on the composition of the corium. In experiments with prototypic materials no spontaneous steam explosions occurred (except with an eutectic composition), whereas with simulant materials the steam explosions were triggered spontaneously. The energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with prototypic melts is at least one order of magnitude lower than the energy conversion ratio of steam explosions with simulant melts. Although the different behaviour of prototypic and simulant melts has been known for a number of years, there is no reliable explanation for these differences. Consequently it is not possible to reliably estimate whether corium would behave so non-explosive also in reactor conditions, where the mass of poured melt is nearly three orders of magnitude larger than in experimental conditions. An even more fascinating material effect was observed recently at corium experiments with eutectic and non-eutectic compositions. It turned out that eutectic corium always exploded spontaneously, whereas non-eutectic corium never exploded spontaneously. In the paper, a possible explanation of both material effects (prototypic/simulant melts, eutectic/non-eutectic corium) on the steam explosion is provided. A model for the calculation of the

  8. In situ observations of solidification processes in γ-TiAl alloys by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuleshova, Olga; Holland-Moritz, Dirk; Loeser, Wolfgang; Voss, Andrea; Hartmann, Helena; Hecht, Ulrike; Witusiewicz, Victor T.; Herlach, Dieter M.; Buechner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In situ observations of phase transformations involving melts are performed using energy-dispersive diffraction of synchrotron X-rays on electromagnetically levitated γ-TiAl alloys containing Nb. The determined primary solidification modes, confirmed by microstructure analysis, delivered new reliable data about the boundary of the α(Ti) solidification domain, which differs in the various Ti-Al-Nb phase diagram descriptions. These data have been used for a reassessment of the thermodynamic database of the ternary Ti-Al-Nb system. The new description realistically reflects the experimental findings. Liquidus and solidus temperatures determined by the pyrometric method agree fairly well with the calculated values. Direct experimental information on the nature of the reactions along the univariant lines is provided.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow

  10. Solidification process for toxic and hazardous wastes. Second part: Cement solidification matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, A.; Arcuri, L.; Dotti, M.; Pace, A.; Pietrelli, L.; Ricci, G.; Basta, M.; Cali, V.; Pagliai, V.

    1989-05-01

    This paper reports the second part of a general study carried out at the Nuclear Fuel Division aiming at verifying the possible application of the radioactive waste solidification processes to industrial hazardous wastes (RTN). The cement solidification of several RTN types has been taken into consideration, both from the technical and from the economic point of view. After a short examination of the Italian juridical and economical situation in the field, which demonstrates the need of the RTN solidification, the origin and characteristics of the RTN considered in the study and directly provided by the producing industries are reviewed. The laboratory experimental results of the cementation of RTN produced by gold manufacturing industries and by galvanic industries are reported. The cementation process can be considered a very effective mean for reducing both the RTN management costs and the environmental impact of RTN disposal. (author)

  11. Effect of rare earth elements on uranium electrodeposition in LiCl-KCI eutectic salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Peak, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to investigate the electrodeposition behavior of uranium and other elements on the cathode in the electrorefining process to recover the uranium selectively from the reduced metals of the electrolytic reduction process since transuranic elements and rare earth elements is dissolved in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. Study on separation factors of U, Ce, Y and Nd based on U and Ce was performed to investigate the deposition behavior of the cathode with respect to the concentration of rare earth elements in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt. After electrorefining with constant current mode by using Ce metal as a sacrifice anode, the contents of U, Ce, Y and Nd in the salt phase and the deposit phase of the cathode were analyzed, and separation factors of the elements were obtained from the analyses. Securing conditions of pure uranium recovery in the electrorefining process was investigated by considering the separation factors with respect to UCl 3 and CeCl 3 /UCl 3 ratio

  12. On the Role of Mantle Overturn during Magma Ocean Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukaré, C. E.; Parmentier, E.; Parman, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Solidification of potential global magma ocean(s) (MO) early in the history of terrestrial planets may play a key role in the evolution of planetary interiors by setting initial conditions for their long-term evolution. Constraining this initial structure of solid mantles is thus crucial but remains poorly understood. MO fractional crystallization has been proposed to generate gravitationally unstable Fe-Mg chemical stratification capable of driving solid-state mantle overturn. Fractional solidification and overturn hypothesis, while only an ideal limiting case, can explain important geochemical features of both the Moon and Mars. Current overturn models consider generally post-MO overturn where the cumulate pile remains immobile until the end of MO solidification. However, if the cumulate pile overturns during MO solidification, the general picture of early planet evolution might differ significantly from the static crystallization models. We show that the timing of mantle overturn can be characterized with a dimensionless number measuring the ratio of the MO solidification time and the purely compositional overturn timescale. Syn-solidification overturn occurs if this dimensionless parameter, Rc, exceeds a critical value. Rc is mostly affected by the competition between the MO solidification time and mantle viscosity. Overturn that occurs during solidification can result in smaller scales of mantle chemical heterogeneity that could persist for long times thus influencing the whole evolution of a planetary body. We will discuss the effects of compaction/percolation on mantle viscosity. If partially molten cumulate do not have time to compact during MO solidification, viscosity of cumulates would be significantly lower as the interstitcial melt fraction would be large. Both solid mantle remelting during syn-solidification overturn and porous convection of melt retained with the cumulates are expected to reduce the degree of fractional crystallization. Syn-solidification

  13. The role of ultrasonic cavitation in refining the microstructure of aluminum based nanocomposites during the solidification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yang; Nastac, Laurentiu

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies showed that the microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum based nanocomposites can be significantly improved when ultrasonic cavitation and solidification processing is used. This is because ultrasonic cavitation processing plays an important role not only in degassing and dispersion of the nanoparticles, but also in breaking up the dendritic grains and refining the as-cast microstructure. In the present study, A356 alloy and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles are used as the matrix alloy and the reinforcement, respectively. Nanoparticles were added into the molten A356 alloy and dispersed via ultrasonic cavitation processing. Ultrasonic cavitation was applied over various temperature ranges during molten alloy cooling and solidification to investigate the grain structure formation and the nanoparticle dispersion behavior. Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to investigate in detail the differences in the microstructure characteristics and the nanoparticle distribution. Experimental results indicated that the ultrasonic cavitation processing and Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles play an important role for microstructure refinement. In addition, it was shown in this study that the Al 2 O 3 nanoparticles modified the eutectic phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Sr and solidification conditions on characteristics of intermetallic in Al-Si 319 industrial alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza-Cuadra, J.; Gallegos-Acevedo, P.; Mancha-Molinar, H.; Picado, A.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine the effect of strontium (Sr) on the characteristic of intermetallic phases, particularly the Al 5 FeSi phase which present morphology of platelets or needle-like. The results showed that within the range of variables studied, the modification process caused the disappearance of the needles and only occur the precipitation of phase α (chinese script-like). Refinement of the intermetallic phases occurs in conjunction with the refinement in grain size. Both parameters depend strongly on local cooling rate (T), temperature gradient (G) and apparent rate of solidification front (V). In the case of equiaxed structures the refinement of grain size and intermetallic occurs with increasing local cooling rate and temperature gradient and decrease the apparent rate of solidification front. In the case of columnar structures, refinement of grains and intermetallic requires the increase in values of the three variables indicated. Moreover, the addition of Sr resulted in the modification of silicon eutectic, as noted in others research works.

  15. Solidification and vitrification life-cycle economics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450 000 cm 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes a detailed study done to: (1) compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes, (2) determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted and, (3) determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at Fernald is warranted

  16. Grain Floatation During Equiaxed Solidification of an Al-Cu Alloy in a Side-Cooled Cavity: Part II—Numerical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Walker, Mike J.; Sundarraj, Suresh; Dutta, Pradip

    2011-08-01

    In this article, a single-phase, one-domain macroscopic model is developed for studying binary alloy solidification with moving equiaxed solid phase, along with the associated transport phenomena. In this model, issues such as thermosolutal convection, motion of solid phase relative to liquid and viscosity variations of the solid-liquid mixture with solid fraction in the mobile zone are taken into account. Using the model, the associated transport phenomena during solidification of Al-Cu alloys in a rectangular cavity are predicted. The results for temperature variation, segregation patterns, and eutectic fraction distribution are compared with data from in-house experiments. The model predictions compare well with the experimental results. To highlight the influence of solid phase movement on convection and final macrosegregation, the results of the current model are also compared with those obtained from the conventional solidification model with stationary solid phase. By including the independent movement of the solid phase into the fluid transport model, better predictions of macrosegregation, microstructure, and even shrinkage locations were obtained. Mechanical property prediction models based on microstructure will benefit from the improved accuracy of this model.

  17. Catalytic Gasification of Coal using Eutectic Salt Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atul Sheth; Pradeep Agrawal; Yaw D. Yeboah

    1998-12-04

    The objectives of this study are to: identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process. A review of the collected literature was carried out. The catalysts which have been used for gasification can be roughly classified under the following five groups: alkali metal salts; alkaline earth metal oxides and salts; mineral substances or ash in coal; transition metals and their oxides and salts; and eutectic salt mixtures. Studies involving the use of gasification catalysts have been conducted. However, most of the studies focused on the application of individual catalysts. Only two publications have reported the study of gasification of coal char in CO2 and steam catalyzed by eutectic salt mixture catalysts. By using the eutectic mixtures of salts that show good activity as individual compounds, the gasification temperature can be reduced possibly with still better activity and gasification rates due to improved dispersion of the molten catalyst on the coal particles. For similar metal/carbon atomic ratios, eutectic catalysts were found to be consistently more active than their respective single salts. But the exact roles that the eutectic salt mixtures play in these are not well understood and details of the mechanisms remain unclear. The effects of the surface property of coals and the application methods of eutectic salt mixture catalysts with coal chars on the reactivity of gasification will be studied. Based on our preliminary evaluation of the literature, a ternary

  18. Phase-field simulation of peritectic solidification closely coupled with directional solidification experiments in an Al-36 wt% Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siquieri, R; Emmerich, H; Doernberg, E; Schmid-Fetzer, R

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present experimental and theoretical investigations of the directional solidification of Al-36 wt% Ni alloy. A phase-field approach (Folch and Plapp 2005 Phys. Rev. E 72 011602) is coupled with the CALPHAD (calculation of phase diagrams) method to be able to simulate directional solidification of Al-Ni alloy including the peritectic phase Al 3 Ni. The model approach is calibrated by systematic comparison to microstructures grown under controlled conditions in directional solidification experiments. To illustrate the efficiency of the model it is employed to investigate the effect of temperature gradient on the microstructure evolution of Al-36 wt% Ni during solidification.

  19. Aluminum alloy weldability. Identification of weld solidification cracking mechanisms through novel experimental technique and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coniglio, Nicolas

    2008-07-01

    solidification range, refinement in grain size from 63 to 51 {mu}m, centerline columnar grains disappearance, and decreased cooling rate from 113 to 89 C/s. Moreover, in order to make direct comparison with literature, castings of controlled mixtures of alloys 6060 and 4043 were also investigated, thereby simulating weld metal composition under controlled cooling conditions. Castings showed a different trend than welds with small increases in silicon content (i.e. increase in 4043 filler dilution) resulting in huge effect on microstructure, no effect on liquidus temperature, drop in solidus temperature from 577 C to 509 C, increase in quantity of interdendritic constituent from 2% to 14%, and different phase formation. Binary {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, Mg{sub 2}Si, and Si phases are replaced with ternary {beta}-Al{sub 5}FeSi, {pi}-Al{sub 8}FeMg{sub 3}Si{sub 6}, and a low melting quaternary eutectic involving Mg{sub 2}Si, {pi}, and Si. Also, variation of the cooling conditions in castings revealed the existence of a critical cooling rate, above which the solidification path and microstructure undergo a major change. Cracking Model. Implementing the critical conditions for cracking into the Rappaz- Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) model revealed a pressure drop in the interdendritic liquid on the order of 10{sup -1} atm, originating primarily from straining conditions. Since, according to literature, a minimum of 1,760 atm is required to fracture pure aluminum liquid (theoretical), this demonstrates that cavitation as a liquid fracture mechanism is not likely to occur, even when accounting for dissolved hydrogen gas. Instead, a porosity-based crack initiation model has been developed based upon pore stability criteria, assuming that gas pores expand from pre-existing nuclei. Crack initiation is taken to occur when stable pores form within the coherent dendrite region, critical to crack initiation being weld metal hydrogen content. Following initiation, a mass-balance approach developed by Braccini

  20. Deep eutectic solvents as performance additives in biphasic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, Dongming; Wang, Xuping; Zhou, Pengfei; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents act as surfactants in biphasic (hydrophobic/aqueous) reaction mixtures enabling higher interfacial surface areas at lower mechanical stress as compared to simple emulsions. Exploiting this effect the rate of a chemoenzymatic epoxidation reaction was increased more than

  1. Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents as water-immiscible extractants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, van D.J.G.P.; Zubeir, L.F.; Bruinhorst, van den A.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are presented for the first time. They consist of decanoic acid and various quaternary ammonium salts. The effect of the alkyl chains on the hydrophobicity and the equilibrium of the two-phase DES–water system were investigated. These new DESs were

  2. Effect of titanium on the near eutectic grey iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    The effect of Titanium on the microstructure of grey iron was investigated experimentally in this work. Tensile test bars of grey cast iron of near eutectic alloys containing 0.01, 0.1, 0.26 and 0.35% Ti, respectively were made in green sand moulds. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation...

  3. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  4. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  5. Interface stability during rapid directional solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoglund, D.E.; Aziz, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that at the solidification velocities observed during pulsed laser annealing, the planar interface between solid and liquid is stabilized by capillarity and nonequilibrium effects such as solute trapping. The authors used Rutherford backscattering and electron microscopy to determine the nonequilibrium partition coefficient and critical concentration for breakdown of the planar interface as a function of interface velocity for Sn-implanted silicon. This allows the authors to test the applicability of the Mulliins-Sekerka stability theory to interfaces not in local equilibrium and to test the Coriell-Sekerka and other theories for oscillatory instabilities

  6. Modular radwaste volume reduction and solidification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes both the modular transportable and the modular mobile liquid radwaste volume reduction and solidification units based on a General Electric Company developed and patented process called AZTECH (a trademark of GE). An AZTECH system removes all water by azeotropic distillation and encapsulates the remaining solids in a polyester compound. The resulting monolith is suitable for either long term above ground storage or shallow land burial. Pilot and demonstration plant testing has confirmed the design parameters. The three processing modules are covered together with data which resulted in Nuclear Regulatory Commission approval on Dec. 30, 1985

  7. The solidification velocity of nickel and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altgilbers, Alex Sho

    2002-09-01

    The solidification velocity of several Ni-Ti, Ni-Sn, Ni-Si, Ti-Al and Ti-Ni alloys were measured as a function of undercooling. From these results, a model for alloy solidification was developed that can be used to predict the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling more accurately. During this investigation a phenomenon was observed in the solidification velocity that is a direct result of the addition of the various alloying elements to nickel and titanium. The additions of the alloying elements resulted in an additional solidification velocity plateau at intermediate undercoolings. Past work has shown a solidification velocity plateau at high undercoolings can be attributed to residual oxygen. It is shown that a logistic growth model is a more accurate model for predicting the solidification of alloys. Additionally, a numerical model is developed from simple description of the effect of solute on the solidification velocity, which utilizes a Boltzmann logistic function to predict the plateaus that occur at intermediate undercoolings.

  8. ''New ' technology of solidification of liquid radioactive waste'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sytyl, V.A.; Svistova, L.M.; Spiridonova, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the best method of processing of radioactive waste is its solidification and then storage. At present time, three methods of solidification of radioactive waste are widely used in the world: cementation, bituminous grouting and vitrification. But they do not solve the problem of ecologically processing of waste because of different disadvantages. General disadvantages are: low state of filling, difficulties in solidification of the crystalline hydrated forms of radioactive waste; particular sphere of application and economical difficulties while processing the great volume of waste. In connection with it the urgent necessity is emerging: to develop less expensive and ecologically more reliable technology of solidification of radioactive waste. A new method of solidification is presented with its technical schema. (N.C.)

  9. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  10. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  11. Solidification microstructure of centrifugally cast Inconel 625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Barella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal casting is a foundry process allowing the production of near net-shaped axially symmetrical components. The present study focuses on the microstructural characterization of centrifugally cast alloys featuring different chemical compositions for the construction of spheres applied in valves made of alloy IN625 for operation at high pressure. Control of the solidification microstructure is needed to assure the reliability of the castings. Actually, a Ni-base superalloy such as this one should have an outstanding combination of mechanical properties, high temperature stability and corrosion resistance. Alloys such as IN625 are characterised by a large amount of alloying elements and a wide solidification range, so they can be affected by micro-porosity defects, related to the shrinkage difference between the matrix and the secondary reinforcing phases (Nb-rich carbides and Laves phase. In this study, the microstructure characterization was performed as a function of the applied heat treatments and it was coupled with a calorimetric analysis in order to understand the mechanism ruling the formation of micro-porosities that can assure alloy soundness. The obtained results show that the presence of micro-porosities is governed by morphology and by the size of the secondary phases, and the presence of the observed secondary phases is detrimental to corrosion resistance.

  12. Solidification processing of high-Tc superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Shiohara, Y; Nakamura, Y; Izumi, T

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in the solidification processing of RE-system (RE:Y, Sm, Nd etc.) oxide superconducting materials is reviewed. The superconducting YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub y/(Y123) phase is solidified from Y/sub 2/BaCuO/sub 5/(Y211) and liquid phases, by a peritectic reaction. The solidified micro and macro structure can not be explained by the peritectic reaction with diffusion in the solid but rather by diffusion in the liquid. A solidification model for this reaction is developed. It is confirmed that the prediction from the model calculation is in good agreement with the experimental results. Furthermore, the basic idea is expanded to develop a novel single crystal pulling process. Y211 powders were placed at the bottom of the crucible as the solute source for the growth and a BaO-CuO composite (Ba to Cu cation ratio was 3 to 5) was placed on the layer of Y211 powders. Temperature gradient was provided in the melt. Large bulk single crystals were obtained by this technique, and the growth mechanism was al...

  13. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, B. J., E-mail: brendan.florio@ul.ie [University of Limerick, Mathematics Applications Consortium for Science and Industry (MACSI), Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Ireland); Myers, T. G., E-mail: tmyers@crm.cat [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  14. Solidification of radioactive waste solutions by pelletization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, A.H.; Koester, R.; Rudolph, G.

    1980-04-01

    A possible way of performing the cement fixation of radioactive wastes is the incorporation into cement pellets on a pan pelletizer, followed by embedding the pellets into an inactive cement matrix. This procedure is suitable for various types of waste, particularly for medium level liquid wastes, and can be used both at drum disposal and at in-situ solidification. This report describes some initial studies on the pelletization technique using a laboratory pelletizer. Formation and size of the pellets have been found to be determined by speed, angle, and load of the pan, ratio and mode of addition of the liquid and solid components, ect. Pellets in various compositions have been produced from cement and water or simulated waste solution, in some cases with the addition of bentonite for improving cesium retention. Some mechanical properties of the pellets such as fall height of fresh pellets, development of hardness (crush test), impact and abrasion resistance, have been determined. Some preliminary experiments were done on backfilling the void space between the pellets - about 40 per cent of the bulk volume - with cement grouts of appropriate compositions. (orig.) [de

  15. Modified Welding Technique of a Hypo-Eutectic Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, B. R.; Gupta, R. K.; Biju, S.; Sinha, P. P.

    GTAW process is used for welding of pressure vessels made of hypo-eutectic Al-Cu alloy AA2219 containing 6.3% Cu. As welded Yield strength of the alloy was found to be in the range of 140-150 MPa, using conventional single pass GTAW technique on both AC and DCSP modes. Interestingly, it was also found that weld-strength decreased with increase in thickness of the weld coupons. Welding metallurgy of AA2219 Al alloy was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Multipass GTAW on DCSP mode was postulated to improve the weld strength of this alloy. A systematic experimentation using 12 mm thick plates was carried out and YS of 200 MPa has been achieved in the as welded condition. Thorough characterization including optical and electron microscopy was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld strength. This paper presents the conceptual understanding of welding metallurgy of AA2219 alloy and validation by experiments, which could lead to better weld properties using multipass GTAW on DCSP mode.

  16. Fluid flow solidification simulation of molten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaschnitz, E.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to minimize costs and to obtain optimum designs, computer simulation of shape casting processes is more and more used as a development tool. Accurate predictions are possible by means of three dimensional fluid flow and solidification modelling. The bases of the model are the transient laminar Navier-Stokes-equations for a Newtonian fluid including the tracking of the free surface. They are describing the melt flow pattern during the mold filling sequence. Simultaneously, the temperature development in the alloy and mold is calculated using Fourier's heat transfer equation. At OEGI, a commercial software package (MAGMAsoft) with a finite difference equation solver is used for improvement of casting processes. Different examples of industrial applications will be shown. (author)

  17. Simulation of continuous cast steel product solidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardelean, E.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary cooling – inside the tundish – has a great impact over the thickness of the solidified steel crust. If on exiting the tundish the crust is too thin, it can punch and break, as a result of the ferrostatic pressure exerted from the inside by the liquid steel as well as because of the weight of the molten steel. The parameters that influence the amount of dissipated heat depend on the cooling water flow of the tundish, on the pressure and temperature of the cooling water but also on the overheating of the continuously cast steel. The secondary cooling takes place at the exit of the semi-finished product from the tundish, when the solidification is supposed to take place all along the cross section of the strand. In order to achieve it, in addition to a correctly managed primary cooling, it is necessary to obtain the proper correlation of the factors that influence the secondary cooling as well: the water flow rate long the three zones of the installation and its pressure in the secondary circuit. All these have in view a proper solidification length; an intense cooling can generate cracks due to the thermal stress, while a too slow cooling can generate a partial solidification of the strand up to the cropping machine area. The paper presents a mathematical simulation of the continuously cast steel solidification.

    El enfriamiento primario del cristalizador tiene una gran importancia sobre el espesor de la costra de acero solidificado. Si al salir del cristalizador, esta costra es demasiado sutil, bajo la acción de la presión ferro estática ejercitada por el acero líquido del interior y gracias el peso propio del hilo, ésta, puede perforar resultando su rompimiento. Los parámetros que influenyen sobre la cantidad de calor cedida dependen del agua de enfriamiento del catalizador, de la presión y de la temperatura de agua de enfriamiento, pero también del sobrecalentamiento del acero fundido continuamente. A la salida del

  18. The cement solidification systems at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veazey, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    There are two major cement solidification systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both are focused primarily around treating waste from the evaporator at TA-55, the Plutonium Processing Facility. The evaporator receives the liquid waste stream from TA-55's nitric acid-based, aqueous-processing operations and concentrates the majority of the radionuclides in the evaporator bottoms solution. This is sent to the TA-55 cementation system. The evaporator distillate is sent to the TA-50 facility, where the radionuclides are precipitated and then cemented. Both systems treat TRU-level waste, and so are operated according to the criteria for WIPP-destined waste, but they differ in both cement type and mixing method. The TA-55 systems uses Envirostone, a gypsum-based cement and in-drum prop mixing; the TA-50 systems uses Portland cement and drum tumbling for mixing

  19. Evaluation of stabilization-solidification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goubier, R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that among the techniques applied to treat polluting residue in France for the past ten years has been the mixing of pollutants with reactive agents in order to fix the contaminants and to give them a solid consistency. The first applications of these stabilization/solidification processes occurred in 1978 in the treatment of oil residues from the AMOCO CADIZ spill. They have also been used for the treatment of a mayor dump site for petroleum residues, for the disposal of mineral sludges of a detoxication plant, and for the rehabilitation of sites contaminated by various industrial residues, specially acid tars generated by oil refining plants. Although from the beginning these techniques appeared to be able to transform filthy lagoons into solid and apparently safe areas, it was necessary to evaluate their efficiency and to determine the conditions and limits of application

  20. Plastic solidification method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshihide; Inakuma, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    Condensed liquid wastes in radioactive wastes are formed by mixing and condensing several kinds of liquid wastes such as liquid wastes upon regeneration of ion exchange resins, floor draining liquid wastes and equipment draining liquid wastes. Accordingly, various materials are contained, and it is found that polymerization reaction of plastics is inhibited especially when reductive material, such as sodium nitrite is present. Then, in the present invention, upon mixing thermosetting resins to radioactive wastes containing reducing materials, an alkaline material is admixed to an unstaturated polyester resin. This can inactivate the terminal groups of unsaturated polyester chain, to prevent the dissociation of the reducing agent such as sodium nitrite. Further, if an unsaturated polyester resin of low acid value and a polymerization initiator for high temperature are used in addition to the alkaline material, the effect is further enhanced, thereby enabling to obtain a strong plastic solidification products. (T.M.)

  1. Solidification paths in modified Inconel 625 weld overlay material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Karthik; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Inconel 625 is commonly used for overlay welding to protect the base metal against high temperature corrosion. The efficiency of corrosion protection depends on effective mixing of the overlay weld with the base metal and the subsequent segregation of alloy elements during solidification....... Metallographic analysis of solidified samples of Inconel 625 with addition of selected elements is compared with thermodynamic modelling of segregation during solidification. The influence of changes in the melt chemistry on the formation of intermetallic phases during solidification is shown. In particular...

  2. Inverse thermal analysis method to study solidification in cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dioszegi, Atilla; Hattel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Solidification modelling of cast metals is widely used to predict final properties in cast components. Accurate models necessitate good knowledge of the solidification behaviour. The present study includes a re-examination of the Fourier thermal analysis method. This involves an inverse numerical...... solution of a 1-dimensional heat transfer problem connected to solidification of cast alloys. In the analysis, the relation between the thermal state and the fraction solid of the metal is evaluated by a numerical method. This method contains an iteration algorithm controlled by an under relaxation term...... inverse thermal analysis was tested on both experimental and simulated data....

  3. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge (100) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900 angstrom/surface to 300 angstrom/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500 angstrom/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300 angstrom/surface Au sample show epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200 angstrom/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150 angstrom across an interval of lmm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons

  4. The Effect of Water Mist Cooling of Casting Die on the Solidification, Microstructure and Properties of AlSi20 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysiak R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unmodified AlSi20 alloy were casted at the research station, allowing for sequential multipoint cooling using a dedicated computer- controlled program. This method allows for the formation of the microstructure of hypereutectic AlSi20 alloy and also increases hardness. Primary silicon dendrites were found in the microstructure of cooled samples. Based on these dendrites, the formation of primary silicon particles is explained. Cooling of casting die with a water mist stream causes changes in solidification, which leads to expansion of the boundary layer with columnar crystals and shrinkage of the core zone with equiaxed crystals. It also causes more regular hardness distribution around pre-eutectic Si crystals, which can lead to tensile strength and machinability improvement.

  5. Effect of length scale on mechanical properties of Al-Cu eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, C. S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2012-10-01

    This paper attempts a quantitative understanding of the effect of length scale on two phase eutectic structure. We first develop a model that considers both the elastic and plastic properties of the interface. Using Al-Al2Cu lamellar eutectic as model system, the parameters of the model were experimentally determined using indentation technique. The model is further validated using the results of bulk compression testing of the eutectics having different length scales.

  6. The solidification of aluminum production waste in geopolymer matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 84, DEC 1 (2014), s. 657-662 ISSN 0959-6526 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : aluminum waste * solidification * recycling * geopolymer Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 3.844, year: 2014

  7. Particle Trapping and Banding in Rapid Colloidal Solidification

    KAUST Repository

    Elliott, J. A. W.; Peppin, S. S. L.

    2011-01-01

    We derive an expression for the nonequilibrium segregation coefficient of colloidal particles near a moving solid-liquid interface. The resulting kinetic phase diagram has applications for the rapid solidification of clay soils, gels, and related

  8. Effect Of Natural Convection On Directional Solidification Of Pure Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypczak T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the modeling of the directional solidification process of pure metal. During the process the solidification front is sharp in the shape of the surface separating liquid from solid in three dimensional space or a curve in 2D. The position and shape of the solid-liquid interface change according to time. The local velocity of the interface depends on the values of heat fluxes on the solid and liquid sides. Sharp interface solidification belongs to the phase transition problems which occur due to temperature changes, pressure, etc. Transition from one state to another is discontinuous from the mathematical point of view. Such process can be identified during water freezing, evaporation, melting and solidification of metals and alloys, etc.

  9. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Streitz, Frederick H.

    2004-01-01

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized

  10. Plastic solidification system at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Hiroyuki; Iokibe, Hiroyuki; Tsukiyama, Shigeru; Suzuki, Michio; Yamaguchi, Masato

    1987-01-01

    In Unit 1 and 2 of the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, radioactive waste was previously solidified in cement. By this method, the quantity of waste thus treated is relatively small, resulting in large number of the solidified drums. In order to solve this problem, the solidification facility using a thermosetting resin was employed, which is in operation since January 1986 for Unit 1, 2 and 3. As compared with the cement solidification, the solidified volume of concentrated liquid is about 1/12 and of spent-resin slurry is about 1/4 in plastic solidification. The following are described: course leading to the employment, the plastic solidification facility, features of the facility, operation results so far with the facility, etc. (Mori, K.)

  11. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refe...

  12. Multi-scale Modeling of Dendritic Alloy Solidification

    OpenAIRE

    Dagner, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Solidification of metallic melts is one of the most important processes in material science. The microstructure, which is formed during freezing, determines the mechanical properties of the final product largely. Many physical phenomena influence the solidification process and hence the resulting microstructure. One important parameter is influence of melt flow, which may modify heat and species transport on a large range of length- and time-scales. On the micro-scale, it influences the conce...

  13. Solute redistribution in dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of solute redistribution during dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid has been performed using numerical techniques. The extent of diffusion is characterized by the instantaneous and average diffusion parameters. These parameters are functions of the diffusion Fourier number, the partition ratio and the fraction solid. Numerical results are presented as an approximate model, which is used to predict the average diffusion parameter and calculate the composition of the interdendritic liquid during solidification.

  14. EFFECT OF COOLING RATES ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... eutectic under three cooling conditions were proposed. In the DTA mode (slow cooling), the relationship between the two phases was stable. However as the cooling rates increased ( quenching and meltspun modes), the relationship tended towards metastability. KEY WORDS: alloy, solidification, microstructure, eutectic, ...

  15. Solidification and vitrification life-cycle economics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method, whereas vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ex situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper s a detailed study done to: compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes; determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted; determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at Fernald is warranted. Common parameters were determined and detailed life-cycle cost estimates were made. Incorporating the unit costs into a computer spreadsheet allowed 'what if' scenarios to be performed. Some scenarios investigated included variation of: remediation times, amount of wastes treated, treatment efficiencies, electrical and material costs and escalation

  16. Modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Kajornchaiyakul, Julathep [National Metal and Material Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@kmutt.ac.th [Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Program, Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Morphologies and growth of Sc and Sr-modified eutectic silicon resemble those of dendrites. •Crystal orientation of eutectic aluminum depends on growth characteristics of eutectic silicon. •We report strong evidence of the occurrence of an impurity-induced twinning mechanism. -- Abstract: The modification mechanism of eutectic silicon in Al–6Si–0.3Mg alloy with scandium was studied. The crystallographic orientation relationships between primary dendrites and the eutectic phase of unmodified and modified Al–6Si–0.3 Mg alloys were determined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The orientation of aluminum modified with scandium in the eutectic phase was different from that of the neighboring primary dendrites. This result implies that eutectic aluminum grows epitaxially from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the unmodified alloy and that eutectic aluminum grows competitively from the surrounding primary aluminum dendrites in the modified alloy. The pole figure maps of eutectic Si in the [1 0 0], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] axes of the unmodified and Sc-modified alloys were different, suggesting that the eutectic Al and Si crystals in modified alloy growth are more isotropic and cover a larger set of directions. The lattice fringes of Si of the alloys with and without Sc modification were different in the TEM results. The lattice fringes of Si in modified alloy were found to be multiple twins. However, this was not observed in the unmodified alloy. The growth characteristic of eutectic Si crystal in modified alloy suggests the occurrence of multiple twinning reactions and the formation of a high density of twins. This modification mechanism by Sc is explained by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, which provide strong evidence of the occurrence of the impurity-induced twinning (IIT) mechanism.

  17. Effect of Ni on eutectic structural evolution in hypereutectic Al-Mg2Si cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chong; Wu Yaping; Li Hui; Wu Yuying; Liu Xiangfa

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → By the injection of rod-like NiAl 3 phase in Al-Mg 2 Si alloys, Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic structure gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic. → The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. → The mechanism of structural evolution was analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations. → The high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structural evolution. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to investigate the eutectic structural evolution of hypereutectic Al-20% Mg 2 Si with Ni addition under a gravity casting process. Three-dimensional morphologies of eutectic phases were observed in detail using field emission scanning electron microscopy, after Al matrix was removed by deep etching or extraction. The results show that Al-Mg 2 Si binary eutectic gradually evolves into Al-Mg 2 Si-NiAl 3 ternary eutectic with the increase of Ni content, and flake-like eutectic Mg 2 Si transforms into rods. The ternary eutectic presents a unique double rod structure that rod-like NiAl 3 and Mg 2 Si uniformly distribute in Al matrix. Further, the high temperature (350 deg. C) tensile strength of the alloy increases by 23% due to the eutectic structure evolution, and the mechanism of structural evolution was discussed and analyzed in terms of the detailed microstructural observations.

  18. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  19. Electric melting furnace for waste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    To avoid electric troubles or reduction of waste processing performance even when platinum group elements are contained in wastes to be applied with glass solidification. For this purpose, a side electrode is disposed to the side wall of a melting vessel and a central electrode serving as a counter electrode is disposed about at the center inside the melting vessel. With such a constitution, if conductive materials are deposited at the bottom of the furnace or the bottom of the melting vessel, heating currents flow selectively between the side electrode and the central electrode. Accordingly, no electric currents flow through the conductive deposits thereby enabling to prevent abnormal heating in the bottom of the furnace. Further, heat generated by electric supply between the side electrode and the central electrode is supplied efficiently to raw material on the surface of the molten glass liquid to improve the processing performance. Further, disposition of the bottom electrode at the bottom of the furnace enables current supply between the central electrode and the bottom electrode to facilitate the temperature control for the molten glass in the furnace than in the conventional structure. (I.S.)

  20. Glass solidification material confinement test device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiki, Shigekazu.

    1997-01-01

    In a device for confining glass solidification materials, a pipeline connecting a detection vessel and a detector is formed to have a double walled structure, and air blowing holes are formed on the wall of the inner pipe, and an air supply mechanism is connected to inner and outer pipes for supplying blowing air thereby preventing deposition on the inner pipe wall. The air blowing holes are formed by constituting the pipe by using a porous sintered material and porous portions thereof are defined as the air blowing holes, or holes are formed on the pipe wall made of a metal by machining. A blowing boundary layer is formed by blowing the supplied air along the pipe wall of the inner pipe, by which deposition of the sucked materials to the inner wall of the inner pipe is prevented, and all of the materials sucked from the detection vessel are collected to the detector. In addition, an air exit pipe is formed into a double walled structure so as to be supplied blowing air from the air supply mechanism thereby enabling to prevent deposition of sucked materials more reliably. (N.H.)

  1. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized

  2. Interface Pattern Selection in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Rohit; Tewari, Surendra N.

    2001-01-01

    The central focus of this research is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. Ground-based studies have established that the conditions under which cellular and dendritic microstructures form are precisely where convection effects are dominant in bulk samples. Thus, experimental data can not be obtained terrestrially under pure diffusive regime. Furthermore, reliable theoretical models are not yet possible which can quantitatively incorporate fluid flow in the pattern selection criterion. Consequently, microgravity experiments on cellular and dendritic growth are designed to obtain benchmark data under diffusive growth conditions that can be quantitatively analyzed and compared with the rigorous theoretical model to establish the fundamental principles that govern the selection of specific microstructure and its length scales. In the cellular structure, different cells in an array are strongly coupled so that the cellular pattern evolution is controlled by complex interactions between thermal diffusion, solute diffusion and interface effects. These interactions give infinity of solutions, and the system selects only a narrow band of solutions. The aim of this investigation is to obtain benchmark data and develop a rigorous theoretical model that will allow us to quantitatively establish the physics of this selection process.

  3. Method of manufacturing borosilicate glass solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tsuneya.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain glass solidification products efficiently in a dry process from medium and high level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from PWR type reactors. Method: Boric acid-containing radioactive liquid wastes generated from primary coolants of PWR type reactors are evaporated to condensate as the pre-treatment. The concentrated liquid wastes are supplied to a drum type rotary kiln. While on the other hand, usual glass frits are introduced into the kiln. The liquid wastes are dried in the rotary kiln, as well as B 2 O 3 and the glass frits in the liquid wastes are combined into glass particles. In this case, since the kiln is rotated, no glass particles are deposited on the wall of the kiln. Then, the glass particles are introduced for melting into a high frequency melting furnace made of metal. The melting temperature is set to 1100 - 1150 deg C. The molten borosilicate glass is recovered from the bottom of the melting furance, contained in a canister and cooled for several hours, and then a cover is welded to the canister. (Ikeda, J.)

  4. Effect of high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation on the modification of solidification microstructure in a Si-rich hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, A., E-mail: A.Das@swansea.ac.uk [Materials Research Centre, School of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Kotadia, H.R. [Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology, Brunel University, Uxbridge, UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Effect of high-intensity ultrasound irradiation in modifying complex solidification microstructure is explored in a high Si containing Al-Si alloy and the origin of microstructural changes explained on the basis of nucleation and growth behaviour. Complete suppression of dendritic growth and dramatic refinement to globular morphology were observed for primary {alpha}-Al grains. Strong supportive evidence is presented towards enhanced and prolonged heterogeneous nucleation triggered by cavitation induced increase in the equilibrium melting point and effective dissipation of latent heat at the solidification front. Morphological evolution of eutectic Si and intermetallic particles is found to be dominated by coarsening and spherodisation from strong fluid flow in areas of intense cavitation near the ultrasonic radiator. Outside the region of direct energy transfer, Si particle morphology appears to be controlled predominantly by the imposed cooling conditions. Extremely fine and short Si-platelets observed in the intergranular spaces near the radiator are explained on the basis of probable rapid cooling of final liquid pockets of small volume and large surface area, rather than refinement through ultrasound.

  5. Development of high temperature fasteners using directionally solidified eutectic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, F. D.

    1972-01-01

    The suitability of the eutectics for high temperature fasteners was investigated. Material properties were determined as a function of temperature, and included shear parallel and perpendicular to the growth direction and torsion parallel to it. Techniques for fabricating typical fastener shapes included grinding, creep forming, and direct casting. Both lamellar Ni3Al-Ni3Nb and fibrous (Co,Cr,Al)-(Cr,Co)7C3 alloys showed promise as candidate materials for high temperature fastener applications. A brief evaluation of the performance of the best fabricated fastener design was made.

  6. Exploring orange peel treatment with deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bruinhorst, A.; Kouris, P.; Timmer, J.M.K.; de Croon, M.H.J.M.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of orange peel waste in deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids is presented in this work. The albedo and flavedo layers of the peel were studied separately, showing faster disintegration of the latter. Addition of water to the deep eutectic solvents lowered the amount of

  7. Phase equilibrium, crystallization behavior and thermodynamic studies of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) eutectic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jayram; Singh, N.B.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The phase diagram of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system. - Highlights: • (Thaw + melt) method has shown that (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system forms simple eutectic type phase diagram. • Excess thermodynamic functions showed that eutectic mixture is non-ideal. • The flexural strength measurements have shown that in eutectic mixture, crystallization occurs in an ordered way. - Abstract: The phase diagram of (m-dinitrobenzene + vanillin) system has been studied by the thaw melt method and an eutectic type phase diagram was obtained. The linear velocities of crystallization of the parent components and the eutectic mixture were determined. The enthalpy of fusion of the components and the eutectic mixture were determined using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. Excess Gibbs energy, excess entropy, excess enthalpy of mixing, and interfacial energy have been calculated. FTIR spectroscopic studies and flexural strength measurements were also made. The results have shown that the eutectic is a non-ideal mixture of the two components. On the basis of Jackson’s roughness parameter, it is predicted that the eutectic has faceted morphology

  8. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ , ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  9. Rate of solidification of aluminium casting in varying wall thickness of cylindrical metallic moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsina Christopher BALA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The quality of final casting mainly depends on the rate of solidification as rapid solidification produces fine grains structures with better mechanical properties. The analysis of heat transfer during the casting and solidification of aluminium alloy as well as the experimental investigation of the rate of solidification in varying thicknesses of cylindrical metallic mould was carried out. The temperature variation with time of the casting was recorded from which cooling curves were obtained for the determination of solidification time of the cast. The results showed that as the cylindrical mould thickness increases the solidification time decreases due to the chilling effect of the mould.

  10. Influence of additives on the microstructure and tensile properties of near-eutectic Al-10.8%Si cast alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.A.; Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.; Doty, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    The continuing quest for aluminum castings with enhanced mechanical properties for applications in the automotive industries has intensified the interest in aluminum-silicon alloys. In Al-Si alloys, the properties are influenced by the shape and distribution of the eutectic silicon particles in the matrix, as also by the iron intermetallics and copper phases that occur upon solidification. The detailed microstructure and tensile properties of as-cast and heat-treated new experimental alloy belonging to cast Al-Si near-eutectic alloys have been investigated as a function of Fe, Mn, Cu, and Mg content. Microstructural examination was carried out using optical microscopy, image analysis, and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), wavelength dispersive spectroscopic (WDS) analysis facilities. Tensile properties upon artificial aging in the temperature range of 155-240 o C for 5 h were also investigated. The results show that the volume fraction of Fe-intermetallics increases as the iron or manganese contents increase. Compact polygonal or star-like particles form when the sludge factor is greater than 2.1. The Al 2 Cu phase was observed to dissolve almost completely during solution heat treatment of all the alloys studied, especially those containing high levels of Mg and Fe, while Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 , sludge, and α-Fe phases were found to persist after solution heat treatment. The β-Al 5 (Fe,Mn)Si phase dissolved partially in Sr-modified alloys, and its dissolution became more pronounced after solution heat treatment. At 0.5% Mn, the β-Fe phase forms when the Fe content is above 0.75%, causing the tensile properties to decrease drastically. The same results are obtained when the levels of both Fe and Mn are increased beyond 0.75%, because of sludge formation. On the other hand, the tensile properties of the Cu-containing alloys are affected slightly at high levels of Mg as a result of the formation of Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 which decreases the amount of free Mg

  11. Antimony Influence on Shape of Eutectic Silicium in Al-Si Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolibruchová D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid AI-Si alloys are usually given special treatments before they are cast to obtain finer or modified matrix and eutectic structures, leading to improved properties. For many years, sodium additions to hypoeutectic and eutectic AI-Si melts have been recognized as the most effective method of modifying the eutectic morphology, although most of the group IA or IIA elements have significant effects on the eutectic structure. Unfortunately, many of these approaches also have associated several founding difficulties, such as fading, forming dross in presence of certain alloying elements, reduced fluidity, etc. ln recent years, antimony additions to AI-Si castings have attracted considerable attention as an alternative method of refining the eutectic structure. Such additions eliminate many of the difficulties listed above and provide permanent (i.e. non-fading refining ability. In this paper, the authors summarize work on antimony treatment of Al-Si based alloys.

  12. High-purity metal-carbon eutectic systems as thermometric fixed points in the range from 1000 K to 3500 K; Des systemes eutectiques metal-carbone de grande purete comme points fixes de temperature dans l'intervalle 1000-3500 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloembergen, P.; Yamada, Y.; Sasajima, N.; Yamamoto, N. [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), AIST, Tsukuba (Japan); Torizuka, S.; Yoshida, N. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    A survey will be given of metal-carbon (M-C) and metal carbide-carbon (MC-C) systems presently in development for applications in thermometry in the range from 1000 K to about 3500 K. The advantages of these systems as fixed points at high temperatures as compared to systems relying on pure metals will be elucidated. Purification of the components making up the M-C or MC-C systems is a prerequisite to their implementation as reference fixed points in thermometry, requiring a high level of reproducibility of the eutectic temperature. To set an example a study on the effect of impurities on the eutectic transition of Fe-C is included in the survey. Experimentally obtained melting curves are compared with the curves calculated on the basis of a thermodynamic model, which includes the impurities in question as components. The calculations of the melting curves are based upon: (1) the Equilibrium solidification model and (2) the Scheil-Gulliver solidification model, which handle the effects of the impurities on the transition process in such a way that they may be assumed to set lower and upper boundaries to the associated melting ranges, respectively. We will conclude pointing out fields of common interest to materials science and thermometry within the realm of ultra-pure materials. (authors)

  13. Stabilization/Solidification Remediation Method for Contaminated Soil: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is typically a process that involves a mixing of waste with binders to reduce the volume of contaminant leachability by means of physical and chemical characteristics to convert waste in the environment that goes to landfill or others possibly channels. Stabilization is attempts to reduce the solubility or chemical reactivity of the waste by changing the physical and chemical properties. While, solidification attempt to convert the waste into easily handled solids with low hazardous level. These two processes are often discussed together since they have a similar purpose of improvement than containment of potential pollutants in treated wastes. The primary objective of this review is to investigate the materials used as a binder in Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) method as well as the ability of these binders to remediate the contaminated soils especially by heavy metals.

  14. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  15. Matemathical description of solidification cooling curves of pure metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno Müller

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of an "incubation time" to the Schwarz classical mathematical description of metals solidification, resulted in a new model called Modified Schwarz Model. By doing so it was possible to identify and quantify the "delay time" that separates the two heat waves traveling independently in a casting during the solidification: the Supercooled / Superheated Liquid and the Solid / Liquid. The thermal shock produced in the initial stage of the undercooling generation process, can be used as an important parameter in the forecasting of the solidification's behavior of pure metals and alloys, when changing mold's materials, pouring and ambient temperatures. The hypercooling proneness degree of metals and alloys, can also be calculated.

  16. Solidification Mapping of a Nickel Alloy 718 Laboratory VAR Ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Trevor J.; Taleff, Eric M.; Lopez, Felipe; Beaman, Joe; Williamson, Rodney

    The solidification microstructure of a laboratory-scale Nickel alloy 718 vacuum arc remelted (VAR) ingot was analyzed. The cylindrical, 210-mm-diameter ingot was sectioned along a plane bisecting it length-wise, and this mid-plane surface was ground and etched using Canada's reagent to reveal segregation contrast. Over 350 photographs were taken of the etched mid-plane surface and stitched together to form a single mosaic image. Image data in the resulting mosaic were processed using a variety of algorithms to extract quantities such as primary dendrite orientation, primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), and secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS) as a function of location. These quantities were used to calculate pool shape and solidification rate during solidification using existing empirical relationships for Nickel Alloy 718. The details and outcomes of this approach, along with the resulting comparison to experimental processing conditions and computational models, are presented.

  17. Microstructure and Solidification Crack Susceptibility of Al 6014 Molten Alloy Subjected to a Spatially Oscillated Laser Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minjung; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Cheolhee

    2018-04-23

    Oscillating laser beam welding for Al 6014 alloy was performed using a single mode fiber laser and two-axis scanner system. Its effect on the microstructural evolution of the fusion zone was investigated. To evaluate the influence of oscillation parameters, self-restraint test specimens were fabricated with different beam patterns, widths, and frequencies. The behavior of hot cracking propagation was analyzed by high-speed camera and electron backscatter diffraction. The behavior of crack propagation was observed to be highly correlated with the microstructural evolution of the fusion zone. For most oscillation conditions, the microstructure resembled that of linear welds. A columnar structure was formed near the fusion line and an equiaxed structure was generated at its center. The wide equiaxed zone of oscillation welding increased solidification crack susceptibility. For an oscillation with an infinite-shaped scanning pattern at 100 Hz and 3.5 m/min welding speed, the bead width, solidification microstructure, and the width of the equiaxed zone at the center of fusion fluctuated. Furthermore, the equiaxed and columnar regions alternated periodically, which could reduce solidification cracking susceptibility.

  18. Microstructure and Solidification Crack Susceptibility of Al 6014 Molten Alloy Subjected to a Spatially Oscillated Laser Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oscillating laser beam welding for Al 6014 alloy was performed using a single mode fiber laser and two-axis scanner system. Its effect on the microstructural evolution of the fusion zone was investigated. To evaluate the influence of oscillation parameters, self-restraint test specimens were fabricated with different beam patterns, widths, and frequencies. The behavior of hot cracking propagation was analyzed by high-speed camera and electron backscatter diffraction. The behavior of crack propagation was observed to be highly correlated with the microstructural evolution of the fusion zone. For most oscillation conditions, the microstructure resembled that of linear welds. A columnar structure was formed near the fusion line and an equiaxed structure was generated at its center. The wide equiaxed zone of oscillation welding increased solidification crack susceptibility. For an oscillation with an infinite-shaped scanning pattern at 100 Hz and 3.5 m/min welding speed, the bead width, solidification microstructure, and the width of the equiaxed zone at the center of fusion fluctuated. Furthermore, the equiaxed and columnar regions alternated periodically, which could reduce solidification cracking susceptibility.

  19. Centralized cement solidification technique for low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masami; Nishi, Takashi; Izumida, Tatsuo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki.

    1996-01-01

    A centralized cement solidification system has been developed to enable a single facility to solidify such low-level radioactive wastes as liquid waste, spent ion exchange resin, incineration ash, and miscellaneous solid wastes. Since the system uses newly developed high-performance cement, waste loading is raised and deterioration of waste forms after land burial prevented. This paper describes the centralized cement solidification system and the features of the high-performance cement. Results of full-scale pilot plant tests are also shown from the viewpoint of industrial applicability. (author)

  20. Solidification of low-level wastes by inorganic binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, M.T.; Shimojo, M.; Suzuki, K.; Kajikawa, A.; Karasawa, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The use of an alkali activated slag binder has been studied for solidification and stabilization of low-level wastes in nuclear power stations and spent fuel processing facilities. The activated slag effectively formed waste products having good physical properties with high waste loading for sodium sulfate, sodium nitrate, calcium pyrophosphate/phosphate and spent ion-exchange resins. Moreover, the results of the study suggest the slag has the ability to become a common inorganic binder for the solidification of various radioactive wastes. This paper also describes the fixation of radionuclides by the activated slag binder

  1. Solidification of radioactive waste in a cement/lime mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of a cement/lime mixture for use as a solidification agent for different types of wastes was investigated. This work includes studies directed towards determining the wasted/binder compositional field over which successful solidification occurs with various wastes and the measurement of some of the waste from properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment. In this study, four types of low-level radioactive wastes were simulated for incorporation into a cement/lime mixture. These were boric acid waste, sodium sulfate wastes, aion exchange resins and incinerator ash. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  2. Species redistribution during solidification of nuclear fuel waste metal castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naterer, G F; Schneider, G E [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    An enthalpy-based finite element model and a binary system species redistribution model are developed and applied to problems associated with solidification of nuclear fuel waste metal castings. Minimal casting defects such as inhomogeneous solute segregation and cracks are required to prevent container corrosion and radionuclide release. The control-volume-based model accounts for equilibrium solidification for low cooling rates and negligible solid state diffusion for high cooling rates as well as intermediate conditions. Test problems involving nuclear fuel waste castings are investigated and correct limiting cases of species redistribution are observed. (author). 11 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  3. Some techniques for the solidification of radioactive wastes in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Neilson, R. Jr.

    1976-06-01

    Some techniques for the solidification of radioactive wastes in concrete are discussed. The sources, storage, volume reduction, and solidification of liquid wastes at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using the cement-vermiculite process is described. Solid waste treatment, shipping containers, and off-site shipments of solid wastes at BNL are also considered. The properties of low-heat-generating, high-level wastes, simulating those in storage at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), solidified in concrete were determined. Polymer impregnation was found to further decrease the leachability and improve the durability of these concrete waste forms

  4. Formation of anomalous eutectic in Ni-Sn alloy by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhitai; Lin, Xin; Cao, Yongqing; Liu, Fencheng; Huang, Weidong

    2018-02-01

    Ni-Sn anomalous eutectic is obtained by single track laser cladding with the scanning velocity from 1 mm/s to 10 mm/s using the Ni-32.5 wt.%Sn eutectic powders. The microstructure of the cladding layer and the grain orientations of anomalous eutectic were investigated. It is found that the microstructure is transformed from primary α-Ni dendrites and the interdendritic (α-Ni + Ni3Sn) eutectic at the bottom of the cladding layer to α-Ni and β-Ni3Sn anomalous eutectic at the top of the cladding layer, whether for single layer or multilayer laser cladding. The EBSD maps and pole figures indicate that the spatially structure of α-Ni phase is discontinuous and the Ni3Sn phase is continuous in anomalous eutectic. The transformation from epitaxial growth columnar at bottom of cladding layer to free nucleation equiaxed at the top occurs, i.e., the columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) at the top of cladding layer during laser cladding processing leads to the generation of anomalous eutectic.

  5. Evaluation of damage induced by high irradiation levels on α-Ni-Ni3Si eutectic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho Olguin, Carlos Alberto; Garcia-Borquez, Arturo; González-Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Loran-Juanico, Jose Antonio; Cruz-Mejía, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Diluted alloys of the binary system Ni-Si have been used as target of beam of ions, electrons, neutrons and so on because in this kind of alloy occurs transformations order-disorder, when the temperature is raised. This fact has permitted to evaluate the phenomena associated with the damage induced by irradiation (DII). The results of these works have been employed to understand the behavior under irradiation of complex alloys and to evaluate the reliability of the results of mathematical simulation of the evolution of the DII. The interest in the alloy system Ni-Si has been reborn due to the necessity of developing materials, which have better resistance against the corrosion on more aggressive environments such as those generated on the nuclear power plants or those that exist out of the Earth's atmosphere. Now, a growing interest to use concentrated alloys of this binary system on diverse fields of the materials science has been taking place because up to determined concentration of silicon, a regular eutectic is formed, and this fact opens the possibility to develop lamellar composite material by directional solidification. However, nowadays, there is a lack of fundamental knowledge about the behavior of this type of lamellar structure under aggressive environments, like those mentioned before. Hence, the task of this work is to evaluate the effect that has the irradiation over the microstructure of the concentrated alloy Ni22at%Si. The dendritic region of the hypereutectic alloy consists of an intermetallic phase Ni3Si, whereas the interdendritic region is formed by the alternation of lamellas of solid solution α-Ni and intermetallic phase Ni3Si. Such kind of microstructure has the advantage to get information of the DII over different phases individually, and at the same time, about of the microstructure influence over the global damage in the alloy. The hypereutectic Ni22at%Si alloy was irradiated perpendicularly to its surface, with 3.66 MeV - Ni ions up

  6. Polymerisation of activated RNA in eutectic ice phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dörr, Mark; Maurer, Sarah Elisabeth; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    , metal catalyzed condensation reactions (s. micrograph, right). With a new, non-radioactive ex-perimental essay we are selectively monitoring the 5'-3' and 5'-2' elongation of 5'-fluorescence labeled RNA oligomers. At - 18.5 °C the polymerization reaction and its selectivity is expected to be much higher...... than at room temperature. In the case of a mixed dimer or oligomer experiment this might lead to a particular sequence distribution. The concurrence between polymerization and degradation seen in the previous work shall be further investigated, focusing on possible sequences stabilizing and increasing...... (“cooperative sequences”) or degrading (“parasitic sequences”) the RNA population. These eutectic phases in water-ice are plausible prebiotic micro-environments that should help to overcome the dilution problem in origin of life scenarios. They might have supported the production of libraries...

  7. The solvent extraction of ytterbium from a molten eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results which were obtained in measurements performed with different binary mixtures of solvents being capable of effectively extracting ytterbium from the molten eutectic lithium nitrate--ammonium nitrate. In the course of elaborating the possible ways of extractive separation of rare earths systematic investigations regarding the individual members of the group are required. The binary solvent mixtures consisted of thenoyl-trifluoracetone (TTA), β-isopropil-tropolone (IPT), tributyl phosphate (TBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP), 2,2'-bipyridyl (bipy), dibutyl phtalate (DBP) and Amberlite LA-2 (LA-2). The concentration of the central ion was kept at 5x10 -6 M by using Yb-169 of high specific activity as a tracer for the radiometric assay. (T.I.)

  8. Strongly nonlinear theory of rapid solidification near absolute stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Katarzyna N.; Altieri, Anthony L.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the nonlinear evolution of the morphological deformation of a solid-liquid interface of a binary melt under rapid solidification conditions near two absolute stability limits. The first of these involves the complete stabilization of the system to cellular instabilities as a result of large enough surface energy. We derive nonlinear evolution equations in several limits in this scenario and investigate the effect of interfacial disequilibrium on the nonlinear deformations that arise. In contrast to the morphological stability problem in equilibrium, in which only cellular instabilities appear and only one absolute stability boundary exists, in disequilibrium the system is prone to oscillatory instabilities and a second absolute stability boundary involving attachment kinetics arises. Large enough attachment kinetics stabilize the oscillatory instabilities. We derive a nonlinear evolution equation to describe the nonlinear development of the solid-liquid interface near this oscillatory absolute stability limit. We find that strong asymmetries develop with time. For uniform oscillations, the evolution equation for the interface reduces to the simple form f''+(βf')2+f =0 , where β is the disequilibrium parameter. Lastly, we investigate a distinguished limit near both absolute stability limits in which the system is prone to both cellular and oscillatory instabilities and derive a nonlinear evolution equation that captures the nonlinear deformations in this limit. Common to all these scenarios is the emergence of larger asymmetries in the resulting shapes of the solid-liquid interface with greater departures from equilibrium and larger morphological numbers. The disturbances additionally sharpen near the oscillatory absolute stability boundary, where the interface becomes deep-rooted. The oscillations are time-periodic only for small-enough initial amplitudes and their frequency depends on a single combination of physical parameters, including the

  9. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO(sub x)). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process

  10. Characterization of tin films synthesized from ethaline deep eutectic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Swatilekha; Roy, Sudipta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tin deposition was achieved by galvanostatic method on the basic substrates from ethaline deep eutectic solvent without use of any additives. • The current potential behaviour of tin system changes with increase in concentration of hydrated tin chloride in ethaline. • The deposition rate in ethaline display three times lower value compared to aqueous electrolytes. • Fine grained crystals of 62 ± 10 nm were obtained for tin deposits. • The deposition process is economical and can be adapted for industrial applications. - Abstract: Tin (Sn) films were electrodeposited by galvanostatic method from ethaline deep eutectic solvent (DES), without any additives. The effect of various deposition parameters on the microstructure was studied. With increase in metal salt concentration from 0.01 to 0.1 M, changes in current–potential behaviour were observed in the polarization scans. This might be due to the existence of [SnCl 3 ] − , [Sn 2 Cl 5 ] − complexes in ethaline DES. Smooth and homogeneous deposits were obtained on a steel substrate surface by applying current density of 1.57 × 10 −3 A/cm 2 at 25 °C. Under these conditions the deposition rate was found to be 0.1 ± 10% μm/min and current efficiency was obtained as 84 ± 3%. XRD analysis of the deposit confirmed the polycrystalline tetragonal structure with mostly (2 0 0) orientation having a crystallite size about 62 ± 16% nm along with an internal strain of 0.0031 ± 22%. The present deposition method is simple, economical and can be adapted for industrial applications

  11. CATALYTIC GASIFICATION OF COAL USING EUTECTIC SALT MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah; Dr. Yong Xu; Dr. Atul Sheth; Dr. Pradeep Agrawal

    2001-12-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) estimates that by the year 2010, 40% or more of U.S. gas supply will be provided by supplements including substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. These supplements must be cost competitive with other energy sources. The first generation technologies for coal gasification e.g. the Lurgi Pressure Gasification Process and the relatively newer technologies e.g. the KBW (Westinghouse) Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, U-Gas Ash Agglomerating Fluidized-Bed, British Gas Corporation/Lurgi Slagging Gasifier, Texaco Moving-Bed Gasifier, and Dow and Shell Gasification Processes, have several disadvantages. These disadvantages include high severities of gasification conditions, low methane production, high oxygen consumption, inability to handle caking coals, and unattractive economics. Another problem encountered in catalytic coal gasification is deactivation of hydroxide forms of alkali and alkaline earth metal catalysts by oxides of carbon (CO{sub x}). To seek solutions to these problems, a team consisting of Clark Atlanta University (CAU, a Historically Black College and University, HBCU), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) and Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) proposed to identify suitable low melting eutectic salt mixtures for improved coal gasification. The research objectives of this project were to: Identify appropriate eutectic salt mixture catalysts for coal gasification; Assess agglomeration tendency of catalyzed coal; Evaluate various catalyst impregnation techniques to improve initial catalyst dispersion; Determine catalyst dispersion at high carbon conversion levels; Evaluate effects of major process variables (such as temperature, system pressure, etc.) on coal gasification; Evaluate the recovery, regeneration and recycle of the spent catalysts; and Conduct an analysis and modeling of the gasification process to provide better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms and kinetics of the process.

  12. Rapid solidification for preparation of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavari, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    High Tc superconducting oxides are prepared in two different ways using rapid solidification: by oxidation of microcrystalline or amorphous tapes obtained by quenching the liquid alloy and via crystallisation of the amorphous oxide obtained by rapid quenching of the oxide melt. This technique is applied for the first time to the BiCaSrCuO family [fr

  13. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  14. Solidification technique of radioactive elements. Research using zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Susumu; Ito, Katsuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Proton type zirconium phosphates HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , NASICON type three-dimensional net work structure, is used for solidification of Cs in the high level radioactive waste. Two kinds of solidification methods such as the dry method and autoclave method are explained. Cs ion entered into 0.6nm space of HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , and formed ionic bonding, which made the difficult situation to remove. When mixture of HZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 and 23 kinds of M(NO 3 )n (M= Li, Na, K, Pb, Sr, Bi, Y, Mg, Ca, Sc, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, Ba, La, Ce, Tl, and Pb; n=1,2 or 3) was treated at 400-700degC by dry method, solidification of the subject metals was succeeded. Amount of solidification of Cs by autoclave at 250degC is almost same as the dry method and its leachability resistance increased 40 times than that of dry method after heat treatment in atmosphere at 700degC. (S.Y.)

  15. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Amelia J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Newman, Christopher Kyle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than it is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].

  16. Particle Trapping and Banding in Rapid Colloidal Solidification

    KAUST Repository

    Elliott, J. A. W.

    2011-10-11

    We derive an expression for the nonequilibrium segregation coefficient of colloidal particles near a moving solid-liquid interface. The resulting kinetic phase diagram has applications for the rapid solidification of clay soils, gels, and related colloidal systems. We use it to explain the formation of bandlike defects in rapidly solidified alumina suspensions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  17. Solidification of Waste Steel Foudry Dust with Portland Cement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škvára, F.; Kaštánek, František; Pavelková, I.; Šolcová, Olga; Maléterová, Ywetta; Schneider, Petr

    B89, č. 1 (2001), s. 67-81 ISSN 0304-3894 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/99/0440 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921; CEZ:MSM 223100002 Keywords : solidification, * foundry dust * cement Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.497, year: 2001

  18. Stabilization/solidification of synthetic Nigerian drill cuttings | Opete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization/solidification of synthetic Nigerian drill cuttings. SEO Opete, IA Mangibo, ET Iyagba. Abstract. In the Nigerian oil and gas industry, large quantities of oily and synthetic drill cuttings are produced annually. These drill cuttings are heterogeneous wastes which comprises of hydrocarbons, heavy metals and ...

  19. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended

  20. Origin of grain orientation during solidification of an aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, H.L.; Elmer, J.W.; DebRoy, T.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of grain morphology during solidification of a moving aluminum alloy pool is simulated by considering heat transfer, flow of liquid metal in the molten pool and solidification parameters. The computationally efficient model consists of a 3D coupled heat transfer and fluid flow simulation to predict the molten pool shape and temperature field, and a 2D model of grain formation in the molten pool. The results demonstrate that columnar grains grow in a curved pattern rather than along straight lines from the fusion boundary towards the center of the molten pool. The calculated results are validated with independent experimental data. The computed ratio of local temperature gradient to solidification rate, G/R, is used to model the columnar to equiaxed transition during solidification. The simulated results show that only curved columnar grains are formed when the scanning speed is low (2.0 mm/s). In contrast, a transition from curved columnar to equiaxed morphologies occurs at the higher scanning speeds of 8.0 mm/s and 11.5 mm/s, with higher equiaxed grain fraction at higher speed. The similarities between the physical processes governing fusion welding and additive manufacturing (AM) make the model capable of predicting grain orientation in both processes.

  1. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending

  2. A metastable Mg11Sm phase obtained by rapid solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budurov, S.

    1993-01-01

    Molten Mg-Sm alloys with a Sm concentration of 4.93, 6.86, and 8.35 at.% were rapidly soldified with the aid of a shock wave gun device. Investigations of the obtained splats were performed with the aid of DSC, X-ray analysis, and metallography. Rapid soldification of the eutectic MgSm 8.35 alloy forms a new Im3m-type phase. (orig.)

  3. Crystallization processes in Ni-Ti-B glassy alloys of near-ternary-eutectic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, N.; Morris, D.G.; Stadelmann, P.

    1987-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics and mechanisms of three Ni-Ti-B glasses have been examined with a view to elucidating the roles of chemical composition and quenched structure on behaviour. Alloys of composition near a ternary-eutectic point have been chosen because they represent a real and complex situation where several crystalline phases may form simultaneously. Crystallization processes are analysed in terms of nucleation and growth stages. Different nucleation mechanisms seem to be best explained in terms of the short range ordered structure of the quenched glass. Analysis of crystal glass interface energies indicates that it is not this energy term which controls the nucleation of crystals on annealing. Crystal growth may involve a eutectic mechanism or a single-phase mechanism controlled by interface or matrix-diffusion kinetics. Crystallization is fastest when eutectic nucleation and growth occurs. Formation of the eutectic colony requires the initial formation of the phase of complex structure followed by the phase of simpler structure

  4. Prospects for designing structural cast eutectic alloys on Al-Ce-Ni system base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.A.; Naumova, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The phase diagram of Al-Ce-Ni system is built for an aluminium corner at component concentration up to 16 mass %Ce and 8 mass%Ni. A ternary eutectic reaction is established at 12%Ce, 5%Ni and 626 deg C. The ternary eutectic alloy is similar in structure to rapidly cooled Al base alloys with transition metals. The possibility to design new cast alloys based on three-phase (Al)+NiAl 3 +CeAl 4 eutectics is under consideration. Al-Zn-Mg-Cu, Al-Sc and Al-Zr base alloys can be used as (Al) constituent of the eutectics. The new alloys may be considered as heat resistant ones due to the fact that no structural changes are observed in castings on heating up to 350 deg C. 18 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. Data supporting the prediction of the properties of eutectic organic phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Kahwaji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article include the molar masses, melting temperatures, latent heats of fusion and temperature-dependent heat capacities of fifteen fatty acid phase change materials (PCMs. The data are used in conjunction with the thermodynamic models discussed in Kahwaji and White (2018 [1] to develop a computational tool that calculates the eutectic compositions and thermal properties of eutectic mixtures of PCMs. The computational tool is part of this article and consists of a Microsoft Excel® file available in Mendeley Data repository [2]. A description of the computational tool along with the properties of nearly 100 binary mixtures of fatty acid PCMs calculated using this tool are also included in the present article. The Excel® file is designed such that it can be easily modified or expanded by users to calculate the properties of eutectic mixtures of other classes of PCMs. Keywords: Phase change materials, PCM, Eutectic, Thermal properties, Thermal energy storage

  6. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-01-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl 2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting

  7. Experimental investigation of thermophysical properties of eutectic Mo–C, graphite and tantalum at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senchenko, V N; Belikov, R S; Popov, V S

    2016-01-01

    An experimental technique based on fast electrical heating for investigation of thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressures and at high temperatures is considered. A set of thermophysical properties of refractory materials such as specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity, specific resistivity, melting heat of eutectic Mo-C and thermal expansion of graphite and tantalum were determined. The obtained temperature of eutectic melting of MoC 0.82 shows close agreement with equilibrium Mo-C phase diagram. (paper)

  8. Evaluation and modeling of the eutectic composition of various drug-polyethylene glycol solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Jared A; Taylor, Lynne S

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of which factors contribute to the eutectic composition of drug-polyethylene glycol (PEG) blends and to compare experimental values with predictions from the semi-empirical model developed by Lacoulonche et al. Eutectic compositions of various drug-PEG 3350 solid dispersions were predicted, assuming athermal mixing, and compared to experimentally determined eutectic points. The presence or absence of specific interactions between the drug and PEG 3350 were investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The eutectic composition for haloperidol-PEG and loratadine-PEG solid dispersions was accurately predicted using the model, while predictions for aceclofenac-PEG and chlorpropamide-PEG were very different from those experimentally observed. Deviations in the model prediction from ideal behavior for the systems evaluated were confirmed to be due to the presence of specific interactions between the drug and polymer, as demonstrated by IR spectroscopy. Detailed analysis showed that the eutectic composition prediction from the model is interdependent on the crystal lattice energy of the drug compound (evaluated from the melting temperature and the heat of fusion) as well as the nature of the drug-polymer interactions. In conclusion, for compounds with melting points less than 200°C, the model is ideally suited for predicting the eutectic composition of systems where there is an absence of drug-polymer interactions.

  9. The formation mechanism of eutectic microstructures in NiAl-Cr composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Cogswell, Daniel A; Xu, Guanglong; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Cui, Yuwen

    2016-07-20

    NiAl-based eutectic alloys, consisting of an ordered bcc matrix (B2) and disordered bcc fibers (A2), have been a subject of intensive efforts aimed at tailoring the properties of many of the currently used nickel-based superalloys. A thermodynamic phase field model was developed on a thermodynamic foundation and fully integrated with a thermo-kinetic database of the Ni-Al-Cr ternary system to elucidate the resulting peculiar eutectic microstructure. Invoking a variation of the liquid/solid interfacial thickness with temperature, we simulated the characteristic sunflower-like eutectic microstructures in the NiAl-Cr composites, consistent with experimental observations. The mechanism that governs the formation of the peculiar eutectic morphology was envisioned from the modeled evolutions associated with six sequential steps. Our calculations show that the conditional spinodal decomposition occurring in sequence could further trim and revise the microstructure of the eutectics by generating fine-domain structures, thereby providing an additional method to explore the novel NiAl-based eutectic composites with tunable properties at elevated temperatures.

  10. Mobile concrete solidification systems for power reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchemitcheff, E.; Bordas, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In late 1988 SGN received an order from Electricite de France (EDF) for the construction of a mobile concrete solidification system to process secondary system resins generated by the P'4 and N4 series PWR power plants in France. This order was placed in view of SGN's experience with low- and medium-level radioactive waste treatment and conditioning over a period of almost 20 years. In addition to the construction of fixed waste processing facilities using more conventional technologies, SGN has been involved in application of the mobile system concept to the bituminization process in the United States, which led to the construction and commissioning of two transportable systems in collaboration with its American licensee US Ecology. It has also conducted large-scale R ampersand D on LLW/MLW concrete solidification, particularly for ion exchange resins. 5 figs

  11. Remotely operated facility for in situ solidification of fissile uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Collins, E.D.; Patton, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    A heavily shielded, remotely operated facility, located within the Radiochemical processing Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been designed and is being operated to convert approx.1000 kg of fissile uranium (containing approx.75% 235 U, approx.10% 233 U, and approx.140 ppM 232 U) from a nitrate solution (130 g of uranium per L) to a solid oxide form. This project, the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Program (CEUSP), is being carried out in order to prepare a stable uranium form for longterm storage. This paper describes the solidification process selected, the equipment and facilities required, the experimental work performed to ensure successful operation, some problems that were solved, and the initial operations

  12. Study of plastic solidification process on solid radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Weiguan; Zhang Yinsheng; Qian Wenju

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons between the plastic solidification conditions of incinerated ash and waste cation resin by using thermosetting plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene (PE), and identified physico-chemical properties and irradiation resistance of solidified products were presented. These solidified products have passed through different tests as compression strength, leachability, durability, stability, permeability and irradiation resistance (10 6 Gy) etc. The result showed that the solidified products possessed stable properties and met the storage requirement. The waste tube of radioimmunoassay, being used as solidification medium to contain incinerated ash, had good mechanical properties and satisfactory volume reduction. This process may develop a new way for disposal solid radioactive waste by means of re-using waste

  13. Continuous Solidification of Immiscible Alloys and Microstructure Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongxiang; Zhao, Jiuzhou

    2018-05-01

    Immiscible alloys have aroused considerable interest in last few decades due to their excellent physical and mechanical characteristics as well as potential industrial applications. Up to date, plenty of researches have been carried out to investigate the solidification of immiscible alloys on the ground or in space and great progress has been made. It is demonstrated that the continuous solidification technique have great future in the manufacturing of immiscible alloys, it also indicates that the addition of surface active micro-alloying or inoculants for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets and proper application of external fields, e.g., static magnetic field, electric current, microgravity field, etc. may promote the formation of immiscible alloys with an expected microstructure. The objective of this article is to review the research work in this field.

  14. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  15. Glass-solidification method for high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Kometani, Masayuki; Sasage, Ken-ichi.

    1996-01-01

    High level liquid wastes are removed with precipitates mainly comprising Mo and Zr, thereafter, the high level liquid wastes are mixed with a glass raw material comprising a composition having a B 2 O 3 /SiO 2 ratio of not less than 0.41, a ZnO/Li 2 O ratio of not less than 1.00, and an Al 2 O 3 /Li 2 O ratio of not less than 2.58, and they are melted and solidified into glass-solidification products. The liquid waste content in the glass-solidification products can be increased up to about 45% by using the glass raw material having such a predetermined composition. In addition, deposition of a yellow phase does not occur, and a leaching rate identical with that in a conventional case can be maintained. (T.M.)

  16. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes in hydraulic cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Kalb, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Work has been conducted to investigate the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes with portland cements. These efforts have been directed toward the development of acceptable formulations for the solidification of ion exchange resin wastes and the characterization of the resultant waste forms. This paper describes formulation development work and defines acceptable formulations in terms of ternary phase compositional diagrams. The effects of cement type, resin type, resin loading, waste/cement ratio and water/cement ratio are described. The leachability of unsolidified and solidified resin waste forms and its relationship to full-scale waste form behavior is discussed. Gamma irradiation was found to improve waste form integrity, apparently as a result of increased resin crosslinking. Modifications to improve waste form integrity are described. 3 tables

  17. Method of processing radioactive liquid wastes by solidification with cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumura, Keijiro; Matsuura, Hiroyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To subject radioactive liquid wastes to a cement solidification treatment after heating and drying it by a thin film scrape-off drier to render it into the form of power, and then molding it into pellets for the treatment. Structure: Radioactive liquid wastes discharged from a nuclear power plant or nuclear reactor are supplied through a storage tank into a thin film scrape-off drier. In the drier, the radioactive liquid wastes are heated to separate the liquid, and the residue is taken out as dry powder from the scrape-off apparatus. The powder obtained in this way is molded into pellets of a desired form. These pellets are then packed in a drum can or similar container, into which cement paste is then poured for solidification. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Solidification and performance of cement doped with phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Krishnan, S.

    1991-01-01

    Treating mixed hazardous wastes using the solidification/stabilization technology is becoming a critical element in waste management planning. The effect of phenol, a primary constituent in many hazardous wastes, on the setting and solidification process of Type I Portland cement was evaluated. The leachability of phenol from solidified cement matrix (TCLP test) and changes in mechanical properties were studied after curing times up to 28 days. The changes in cement hydration products due to phenol were studied using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) powder technique. Results show that phenol interferes with initial cement hydration by reducing the formation of calcium hydroxide and also reduces the compressive strength of cement. A simple model has been proposed to quantify the phenol leached from the cement matrix during the leachate test

  19. Solidification of radioactive wastes with inorganic binders (literature survey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, G.; Koester, R.

    A survey is provided on solidification of radioactive waste solutions, sludges and tritium waste water through cement and other inorganic binders. A general survey of the possibilities described in the literature is followed by a somewhat more detailed description of the work carried on at four research establishments in the United States, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, supplemented by personal information. Additional sections describe the experiences with various types of cement and the possibilities for improvement of solidification products through preliminary fixation of the toxic nuclides (transformation into insoluble products or absorption); there is a further possibility of post-treatment through polymer impregnation. Finally, definition and determination of leachability are provided and some results compiled. 74 references, 7 figures, 5 tables

  20. Modeling of solidification of MMC composites during gravity casting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zagórski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with computer simulation of gravity casting of the metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramics (MMC into sand mold. The subject of our interest is aluminum matrix composite (AlMMC reinforced with ceramic particles i.e. silicon carbide SiC and glass carbon Cg. The created model describes the process taking into account solidification and its influence on the distribution of reinforcement particles. The computer calculation has been carried out in 2D system with the use of Navier-Stokes equations using ANSYS FLUENT 13. The Volume of Fluid approach (VOF and enthalpy method have been used to model the air-fluid free surface (and also volume fraction of particular continuous phases and the solidification of the cast, respectively.

  1. Techniques for the solidification of high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the long-term management of the high-level wastes from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel is receiving world-wide attention. While the majority of the waste solutions from the reprocessing of commercial fuels are currently being stored in stainless-steel tanks, increasing effort is being devoted to developing technology for the conversion of these wastes into solids. A number of full-scale solidification facilities are expected to come into operation in the next decade. The object of this report is to survey and compare all the work currently in progress on the techniques available for the solidification of high-level wastes. It will examine the high-level liquid wastes arising from the various processes currently under development or in operation, the advantages and disadvantages of each process for different types and quantities of waste solutions, the stages of development, the scale-up potential and flexibility of the processes

  2. Development of high-level waste solidification technology 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Hwan Young; Kim, In Tae [and others

    1999-02-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains useful nuclides as valuable resource materials for energy, heat and catalyst. High-level wastes (HLW) are expected to be generated from the R and D activities and reuse processes. It is necessary to develop vitrification or advanced solidification technologies for the safe long-term management of high level wastes. As a first step to establish HLW vitrification technology, characterization of HLWs that would arise at KAERI site, glass melting experiments with a lab-scale high frequency induction melter, and fabrication and property evaluation of base-glass made of used HEPA filter media and additives were performed. Basic study on the fabrication and characterization of candidate ceramic waste form (Synroc) was also carried out. These HLW solidification technologies would be directly useful for carrying out the R and Ds on the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. (author). 70 refs., 29 tabs., 35 figs.

  3. Metastable and unstable cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Sylvain; Maire, Eric; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Lasalle, Audrey; Bogner, Agnès; Gauthier, Catherine; Leloup, Jérôme; Guizard, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Colloidal particles are often seen as big atoms that can be directly observed in real space. They are therefore becoming increasingly important as model systems to study processes of interest in condensed-matter physics such as melting, freezing and glass transitions. The solidification of colloidal suspensions has long been a puzzling phenomenon with many unexplained features. Here, we demonstrate and rationalize the existence of instability and metastability domains in cellular solidification of colloidal suspensions, by direct in situ high-resolution X-ray radiography and tomography observations. We explain such interface instabilities by a partial Brownian diffusion of the particles leading to constitutional supercooling situations. Processing under unstable conditions leads to localized and global kinetic instabilities of the solid/liquid interface, affecting the crystal morphology and particle redistribution behaviour.

  4. Numerical model for dendritic solidification of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, S. D.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element model capable of simulating solidification of binary alloys and the formation of freckles is presented. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Numerical simulations are shown in which an NH4Cl-H2O mixture and a Pb-Sn alloy melt are cooled. The solidification process is followed in time. Instabilities in the process can be clearly observed and the final compositions obtained.

  5. Assessing the toxicity and biodegradability of deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Chen, Jing-Xin; Tang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Juan; Yang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have emerged as a new type of promising ionic solvents with a broad range of potential applications. Although their ecotoxicological profile is still poorly known, DESs are generally regarded as "green" because they are composed of ammonium salts and H-bond donors (HBDs) which are considered to be eco-friendly. In this work, cholinium-based DESs comprised of choline chloride (ChCl) and choline acetate (ChAc) as the salt and urea (U), acetamide (A), glycerol (G) and ethylene glycol (EG) as the HBD were evaluated for their toxic effects on different living organisms such as Escherichia coli (a bacterium), Allium sativum (garlic, a plant) and hydra (an invertebrate), and their biodegradabilities were assessed by means of closed bottle tests. These DESs possessed an anti-bacterial property and exhibited inhibitory effects on the test organisms adopted, depending on the composition and concentration of the DES. The mechanism for the impact of DESs and their components on different living organisms can be associated to their interactions with the cellular membranes. Not all DESs can be considered readily biodegradable. By extending the limited knowledge about the toxicity and biodegradation of this particular solvent family, this investigation on DESs provides insight into our structure-based understanding of their ecotoxicological behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    A panel on waste solidification was formed at the request of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to study the scientific and technological problems associated with the conversion of liquid and semiliquid high-level radioactive wastes into a stable form suitable for transportation and disposition. Conclusions reached and recommendations made are as follows. Many solid forms described in this report could meet standards as stringent as those currently applied to the handling, storage, and transportation of spent fuel assemblies. Solid waste forms should be selected only in the context of the total radioactive waste management system. Many solid forms are likely to be satisfactory for use in an appropriately designed system, The current United States policy of deferring the reprocessing of commercial reactor fuel provides additional time for R and D solidification technology for this class of wastes. Defense wastes which are relatively low in radioactivity and thermal power density can best be solidified by low-temperature processes. For solidification of fresh commercial wastes that are high in specific activity and thermal power density, the Panel recommends that, in addition to glass, the use of fully-crystalline ceramics and metal-matrix forms be actively considered. Preliminary analysis of the characteristics of spent fuel pins indicates that they may be eligible for consideration as a waste form. Because the differences in potential health hazards to the public resulting from the use of various solid form and disposal options are likely to be small, the Panel concludes that cost, reliability, and health hazards to operating personnel will be major considerations in choosing among the options that can meet safety requiremens. The Panel recommends that responsibility for all radioactive waste management operations (including solidification R and D) should be centralized

  7. Dynamics of liquid solidification thermal resistance of contact layer

    CERN Document Server

    Lipnicki, Zygmunt

    2017-01-01

    This monograph comprehensively describes phenomena of heat flow during phase change as well as the dynamics of liquid solidification, i.e. the development of a solidified layer. The book provides the reader with basic knowledge for practical designs, as well as with equations which describe processes of energy transformation. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of heat flow, but the book may also be beneficial for both practicing engineers and graduate students.

  8. Interface Pattern Selection Criterion for Cellular Structures in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, R.; Tewari, S. N.; Kurtze, D.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to establish key scientific concepts that govern the selection of cellular and dendritic patterns during the directional solidification of alloys. We shall first address scientific concepts that are crucial in the selection of interface patterns. Next, the results of ground-based experimental studies in the Al-4.0 wt % Cu system will be described. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations will be presented to establish the need for microgravity experiments.

  9. Remediation of SRS Basins by In Situ Stabilization/Solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the late summer of 1998, the Savannah River Site began remediation of two radiologically contaminated basins using in situ stabilization. These two high-risk, unlined basins contain radiological contaminants, which potentially pose significant risks to human health and the environment. The selected remedy involves in situ stabilization/solidification of the contaminated wastes (basin and pipeline soils, pipelines, vegetation, and other debris) followed by installation of a low permeability soil cover

  10. Formation of Nitrogen Bubbles During Solidification of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kaiju; Wang, Bo; Xue, Fei; Liu, Shanshan; Huang, Junkai; Zhang, Jieyu

    2018-04-01

    The nucleation and growth of nitrogen bubbles for duplex stainless steels are of great significance for the formation mechanism of bubbles during solidification. In the current study, numerical method and theoretical analysis of formula derivation were used to study the formation of nitrogen bubbles during solidification. The critical sizes of the bubble for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation at the solid-liquid interface during solidification were derived theoretically by the classical nucleation theory. The results show that the calculated values for the solubility of nitrogen in duplex stainless steel are in good agreement with the experimental values which are quoted by references: for example, when the temperature T = 1823 K and the nitrogen partial pressure P_{{N2 }} = 40P^{Θ} , the calculated value (0.8042 wt pct) for the solubility of Fe-12Cr alloy nitrogen in molten steel is close to the experimental value (0.780 wt pct). Moreover, the critical radii for homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation are identical during solidification. On the one hand, with the increasing temperature or the melt depth, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. On the other hand, with the decreasing initial content of nitrogen or the cooling rate, the critical nucleation radius of bubbles at the solid-liquid interface increases, but the bubble growth rate decreases. Furthermore, when the melt depth is greater than the critical depth, which is determined by the technological conditions, the change in the Gibbs free energy for the nucleation is not conducive enough to form new bubbles.

  11. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phaechamud T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Thawatchai Phaechamud,1 Sarun Tuntarawongsa2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Pharmaceutical Intelligence Unit Prachote Plengwittaya, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Abstract: Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and -31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. Keywords

  12. Eutectic and solid-state wafer bonding of silicon with gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouie, Maryam; Liu, Qi; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Eutectic and solid-state Au-Si bonding are compared for both a-Si and c-Si samples. ► Exchange of a-Si and Au layer was observed in both types of bonded samples. ► Use of c-Si for bonding resulted in formation of craters at the Au/c-Si interface. ► Solid-state Au-Si bonding produces better bonds in terms of microstructure. - Abstract: The simple Au-Si eutectic, which melts at 363 °C, can be used to bond Si wafers. However, faceted craters can form at the Au/Si interface as a result of anisotropic and non-uniform reaction between Au and crystalline silicon (c-Si). These craters may adversely affect active devices on the wafers. Two possible solutions to this problem were investigated in this study. One solution was to use an amorphous silicon layer (a-Si) that was deposited on the c-Si substrate to bond with the Au. The other solution was to use solid-state bonding instead of eutectic bonding, and the wafers were bonded at a temperature (350 °C) below the Au-Si eutectic temperature. The results showed that the a-Si layer prevented the formation of craters and solid-state bonding not only required a lower bonding temperature than eutectic bonding, but also prevented spill out of the solder resulting in strong bonds with high shear strength in comparison with eutectic bonding. Using amorphous silicon, the maximum shear strength for the solid-state Au-Si bond reached 15.2 MPa, whereas for the eutectic Au-Si bond it was 13.2 MPa.

  13. Improved cement solidification of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Cementation was the first and is still the most widely applied technique for the conditioning of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Compared with other solidification techniques, cementation is relatively simple and inexpensive. However, the quality of the final cemented waste forms depends very much on the composition of the waste and the type of cement used. Different kinds of cement are used for different kinds of waste and the compatibility of a specific waste with a specific cement type should always be carefully evaluated. Cementation technology is continuously being developed in order to improve the characteristics of cemented waste in accordance with the increasing requirements for quality of the final solidified waste. Various kinds of additives and chemicals are used to improve the cemented waste forms in order to meet all safety requirements. This report is meant mainly for engineers and designers, to provide an explanation of the chemistry of cementation systems and to facilitate the choice of solidification agents and processing equipment. It reviews recent developments in cementation technology for improving the quality of cemented waste forms and provides a brief description of the various cement solidification processes in use. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Non-Equilibrium Solidification of Undercooled Metallic Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter M. Herlach

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available If a liquid is undercooled below its equilibrium melting temperature an excess Gibbs free energy is created. This gives access to solidification of metastable solids under non-equilibrium conditions. In the present work, techniques of containerless processing are applied. Electromagnetic and electrostatic levitation enable to freely suspend a liquid drop of a few millimeters in diameter. Heterogeneous nucleation on container walls is completely avoided leading to large undercoolings. The freely suspended drop is accessible for direct observation of rapid solidification under conditions far away from equilibrium by applying proper diagnostic means. Nucleation of metastable crystalline phases is monitored by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation during non-equilibrium solidification. While nucleation preselects the crystallographic phase, subsequent crystal growth controls the microstructure evolution. Metastable microstructures are obtained from deeply undercooled melts as supersaturated solid solutions, disordered superlattice structures of intermetallics. Nucleation and crystal growth take place by heat and mass transport. Comparative experiments in reduced gravity allow for investigations on how forced convection can be used to alter the transport processes and design materials by using undercooling and convection as process parameters.

  15. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  16. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance Property of a Zn-AI-Mg Alloy with Different Solidification Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Guang-rui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Al-Mg alloy coating attracted much attention due to its high corrosion resistance properties, especially high anti-corrosion performance at the cut edge. As the Zn-Al-Mg alloy coating was usually produced by hot-dip galvanizing method, solidification process was considered to influence its microstructure and corrosion properties. In this work, a Zn-Al-Mg cast alloy was melted and cooled to room temperature with different solidification processes, including water quench, air cooling and furnace cooling. Microstructure of the alloy with different solidification processes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Result shows that the microstructure of the Zn-Al-Mg alloy are strongly influenced by solidification process. With increasing solidification rate, more Al is remained in the primary crystal. Electrochemical analysis indicates that with lowering solidification rate, the corrosion current density of the Zn-Al-Mg alloy decreases, which means higher corrosion resistance.

  17. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Yuntao; Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  18. Natural deep eutectic solvents as new potential media for green technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yuntao [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Spronsen, Jaap van; Witkamp, Geert-Jan [Laboratory for Process Equipment, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Verpoorte, Robert [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae, E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Natural Products Laboratory, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► Natural products were used as a source for deep eutectic solvents and ionic liquids. ► We define own chemical and physical properties of natural deep eutectic solvents. ► Interaction between natural deep eutectic solvents and solutes was confirmed by NMR. ► The developed natural deep eutectic solvents were applied as green media. - Abstract: Developing new green solvents is one of the key subjects in Green Chemistry. Ionic liquids (ILs) and deep eutectic solvents, thus, have been paid great attention to replace current harsh organic solvents and have been applied to many chemical processing such as extraction and synthesis. However, current ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents have still limitations to be applied to a real chemical industry due to toxicity against human and environment and high cost of ILs and solid state of most deep eutectic solvents at room temperature. Recently we discovered that many plant abundant primary metabolites changed their state from solid to liquid when they were mixed in proper ratio. This finding made us hypothesize that natural deep eutectic solvents (NADES) play a role as alternative media to water in living organisms and tested a wide range of natural products, which resulted in discovery of over 100 NADES from nature. In order to prove deep eutectic feature the interaction between the molecules was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All the tested NADES show clear hydrogen bonding between components. As next step physical properties of NADES such as water activity, density, viscosity, polarity and thermal properties were measured as well as the effect of water on the physical properties. In the last stage the novel NADES were applied to the solubilization of wide range of biomolecules such as non-water soluble bioactive natural products, gluten, starch, and DNA. In most cases the solubility of the biomolecules evaluated in this study was greatly higher than water. Based on the

  19. Formation of Al15Mn3Si2 Phase During Solidification of a Novel Al-12%Si-4%Cu-1.2%Mn Heat-Resistant Alloy and Its Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Xiaojing; Liao, Hengcheng; Hu, Yiyun; Dixit, Uday S.; Petrov, Pavel

    2018-02-01

    The formation of Al15Mn3Si2 phase in Al-12Si-4Cu-1.2Mn (wt.%) alloy during solidification was investigated by adopting CALPHAD method and microstructural observation by optical microscopy, SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS/SAD and XRD analysis; SEM fixed-point observation method was applied to evaluate its thermal stability. As-cast microstructural observation consistently demonstrates the solidification sequence of the studied alloy predicted by phase diagram calculation. Based on the phase diagram calculation, SEM-EDS, TEM-EDS/SAD and XRD analysis, as well as evidences on Al-Si-Mn-Fe compounds from the literature, the primary and eutectic Mn-rich phases with different morphologies in the studied alloy are identified to be Al15Mn3Si2 that has a body-centered cubic (BCC) structure with a lattice constant of a = 1.352 nm. SEM fixed-point observation and XRD analysis indicate that Al15Mn3Si2 phase has more excellent thermal stability at high temperature than that of CuAl2 phase and can serve as the major strengthening phase in heat-resistant aluminum alloy that has to face a high-temperature working environment. Results of tension test show that addition of Mn can improve the strength of Al-Si-Cu alloy, especially at elevated temperature.

  20. Molecular interactions in the betaine monohydrate-polyol deep eutectic solvents: Experimental and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrina, Ida; Mulia, Kamarza; Yanuar, Arry; Nasikin, Mohammad

    2018-04-01

    DES (deep eutectic solvents) are a new class of ionic liquids that have excellent properties. The strength of interaction between molecules in the DES affects their properties and applications. In this work, the strength of molecular interactions between components in the betaine monohydrate salt and polyol (glycerol or/and propylene glycol) eutectic mixtures was studied by experimental and computational studies. The melting point and fusion enthalpy of the mixtures were measured using STA (Simultaneous Thermal Analyzer). The nature and strength of intermolecular interactions were observed by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular dynamics simulation was used to determine the number of H-bonds, percent occupancy, and radial distribution functions in the eutectic mixtures. The interaction between betaine monohydrate and polyol is following order: betaine monohydrate-glycerol-propylene glycol > betaine monohydrate-glycerol > betaine monohydrate-propylene glycol, where the latter is the eutectic mixture with the lowest stability, strength and extent of the hydrogen bonding interactions between component molecules. The presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions, the inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions between betaine molecule and polyol, and also interactions between polyol and H2O of betaine monohydrate in the eutectic mixtures.

  1. Application of the Method of Direct Solidification for Obtaining New Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grankin, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of the method of direct solidification on the formation of the material structure has been considered. The main methods of single crystal growth have been described. A considerable influence of the crystal growth parameters (temperature gradient at the front of solidification and the speed of moving of the front of solidification) on the type of the structure and morphology of single crystals has been shown. The examples of application of the method of direct solidification in experimental and industrial production are showed: production of directly crystallized blades for turbines of nuclear power plants and gas-turbine engines

  2. Deep Eutectic Solvents pretreatment of agro-industrial food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procentese, Alessandra; Raganati, Francesca; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Russo, Maria Elena; Rehmann, Lars; Marzocchella, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Waste biomass from agro-food industries are a reliable and readily exploitable resource. From the circular economy point of view, direct residues from these industries exploited for production of fuel/chemicals is a winning issue, because it reduces the environmental/cost impact and improves the eco-sustainability of productions. The present paper reports recent results of deep eutectic solvent (DES) pretreatment on a selected group of the agro-industrial food wastes (AFWs) produced in Europe. In particular, apple residues, potato peels, coffee silverskin, and brewer's spent grains were pretreated with two DESs, (choline chloride-glycerol and choline chloride-ethylene glycol) for fermentable sugar production. Pretreated biomass was enzymatic digested by commercial enzymes to produce fermentable sugars. Operating conditions of the DES pretreatment were changed in wide intervals. The solid to solvent ratio ranged between 1:8 and 1:32, and the temperature between 60 and 150 °C. The DES reaction time was set at 3 h. Optimal operating conditions were: 3 h pretreatment with choline chloride-glycerol at 1:16 biomass to solvent ratio and 115 °C. Moreover, to assess the expected European amount of fermentable sugars from the investigated AFWs, a market analysis was carried out. The overall sugar production was about 217 kt yr -1 , whose main fraction was from the hydrolysis of BSGs pretreated with choline chloride-glycerol DES at the optimal conditions. The reported results boost deep investigation on lignocellulosic biomass using DES. This investigated new class of solvents is easy to prepare, biodegradable and cheaper than ionic liquid. Moreover, they reported good results in terms of sugars' release at mild operating conditions (time, temperature and pressure).

  3. Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic Spallation Neutron Source for Nuclear Transmuter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Herceg, J.; Krajtl, L.; Micklich, B.; Pointer, D.; Saiveau, J.; Sofu, T.; Finck, P.

    2002-01-01

    A lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target design concept has been developed for the subcritical multiplier (SCM) design of the accelerator-driven test facility (ADTF). The design is based on a coaxial geometrical configuration, which has been carefully analyzed and designed to achieve an optimum performance. The target design description, the results from the parametric studies, and the design analyses including neutronics, heat transfer, and hydraulics analyses are given in this paper. A detailed MCNPX geometrical model for the target has been developed to generate heating rates and nuclear responses in the structural material for the design process. The beam has a uniform distribution of 600 MeV protons and 5-MW total power. A small LBE buffer is optimized to reduce the irradiation damage in the SCM fuel elements from the scatter protons and the high-energy neutrons, to maximize the neutron yield to the SCM operation, and to provide inlet and outlet manifolds for the LBE coolant. A special attention has been given to the target window design to enhance its lifetime. The window volumetric heating is 766 W/cm 3 relative to 750 W/cm 3 in LBE for a 40-μA/cm 2 current density. The results show that the nuclear heating from the proton beam diminishes at about 32 cm along the beam axis in the LBE target material. The neutron contribution to the atomic displacement is in the range of 94 to ∼100% for the structure material outside the proton beam path. In the beam window, the neutron contribution is ∼74% and the proton beam is responsible for more than 95% of the total gas production. The proton contribution to the gas production vanishes outside the beam path. The LBE average velocity is ∼2 m/s. The heat transfer and the hydraulics analyses have been iterated to reduce the maximum temperature and the thermal stress level in the target window to enhance its operating life. (authors)

  4. Algorithm of calculation of multicomponent system eutectics using electronic digital computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posypajko, V.I.; Stratilatov, B.V.; Pervikova, V.I.; Volkov, V.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    A computer algorithm is proposed for determining low-temperature equilibrium regions for existing phases. The algorithm has been used in calculating nonvariant parameters (temperatures of melting of eutectics and the concentrations of their components) for a series of trinary systems, among which are Ksub(long)Cl, WO 4 , SO 4 (x 1 =K 2 WO 4 ; x 2 =K 2 SO 4 ), Ag, Cd, Pbsub(long)Cl(x 1 =CdCl 2 , x 2 =PbCl 2 ); Ksub(long)F, Cl, I (x 1 =KF, x 2 =KI). The proposed method of calculating eutectics permits the planning of the subsequent experiment in determining the parameters of the eutectics of multicomponent systems and the forecasting of chemical interaction in such systems. The algorithm can be used in calculating systems containing any number of components

  5. Data supporting the prediction of the properties of eutectic organic phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahwaji, Samer; White, Mary Anne

    2018-04-01

    The data presented in this article include the molar masses, melting temperatures, latent heats of fusion and temperature-dependent heat capacities of fifteen fatty acid phase change materials (PCMs). The data are used in conjunction with the thermodynamic models discussed in Kahwaji and White (2018) [1] to develop a computational tool that calculates the eutectic compositions and thermal properties of eutectic mixtures of PCMs. The computational tool is part of this article and consists of a Microsoft Excel® file available in Mendeley Data repository [2]. A description of the computational tool along with the properties of nearly 100 binary mixtures of fatty acid PCMs calculated using this tool are also included in the present article. The Excel® file is designed such that it can be easily modified or expanded by users to calculate the properties of eutectic mixtures of other classes of PCMs.

  6. Behavior of radioisotope in liquid neutron irradiated Pb-17Li eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebus, V.N.; Aksenov, B.S.; Klabukov, U.G.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of radioisotope 210 Po evaporation from liquid neutron irradiated Pb- 17 Li eutectic has been performed by Knudsen method. Equilibrium 210 Po vapor pressures at temperatures 250-700 degrees C were found about 3-4 orders of magnitude less than that for pure Po and were closed to equilibrium vapor pressures of Po-Pb compound. It was proposed Po forms stable Po-Pb compounds in eutectic at temperatures up to 750-800 degrees C. But disintegrates during long storage owing to self irradiation. It was determined Po aerosol transfer with radio gases takes place at the melting period. Contamination is happened also under irradiated eutectic storage at room temperature owing to aggregate recoil characteristic of Po

  7. Transformation of eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension fabricating with solvent evaporation and ultrasonication technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Tuntarawongsa, Sarun

    2016-01-01

    Eutectic solvent can solubilize high amount of some therapeutic compounds. Volatile eutectic solvent is interesting to be used as solvent in the preparation of nanosuspension with emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The mechanism of transformation from the eutectic emulsion to nanosuspension was investigated in this study. The 30% w/w ibuprofen eutectic solution was used as the internal phase, and the external phase is composed of Tween 80 as emulsifier. Ibuprofen nanosuspension was prepared by eutectic emulsion solvent evaporating method followed with ultrasonication. During evaporation process, the ibuprofen concentration in emulsion droplets was increased leading to a drug supersaturation but did not immediately recrystallize because of low glass transition temperature (Tg) of ibuprofen. The contact angle of the internal phase on ibuprofen was apparently lower than that of the external phase at all times of evaporation, indicating that the ibuprofen crystals were preferentially wetted by the internal phase than the external phase. From calculated dewetting value ibuprofen crystallization occurred in the droplet. Crystallization of the drug was initiated with external mechanical force, and the particle size of the drug was larger due to Ostwald ripening. Cavitation force from ultrasonication minimized the ibuprofen crystals to the nanoscale. Particle size and zeta potential of formulated ibuprofen nanosuspension were 330.87±51.49 nm and −31.1±1.6 mV, respectively, and exhibited a fast dissolution. Therefore, the combination of eutectic emulsion solvent evaporation method with ultrasonication was favorable for fabricating an ibuprofen nanosuspension, and the transformation mechanism was attained successfully. PMID:27366064

  8. A potentiostatic and galvanostatic study of the selective dissolution of Cd/Pb eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokharev, N.P.; Rabdel, A.A.; Zhadanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider the selective dissolution (SD) of the electronegative component of a two-phase, eutectic alloy (Cd/Pb) under galvanostatic conditions. Treating this process as the extraction of a solid substance from a porous matrix, the distribution of the concentration of EC ions, c(x, t), can be described by a differential equation (presented). Experimental data are presented in two equations which are applicable for the description of the selective dissolution process of the electronegative component of a eutectic alloy under conditions of concentration polarization

  9. Eutectic fusion used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savane, Y.S.; Katty, S.; Balde, M.L.; Cisse, S.; Rogov, V.I.

    1997-09-01

    The phenomenon of eutectic fusion could be used for the survey of transport of mass in metallic solutions, which allows to determine the part of the ionic conductibility in the solutions. The survey done in the system In 2 Bi Bi-In at a temperature of 72 deg. C with a current of 4A allowed to find a ionic current of 2,6.10 -3 which constitutes about 0,07% of the total current. So the part of ionic conductibility in the eutectic fusion of the system In 2 Bi Bi-In is of 0,07%. (author)

  10. Structure of liquid Au-Si alloys around the eutectic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-Mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Ropponmatsu Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouo Mikazuki-cho, Sayou-gun Hyogo 670-5198 (Japan)

    2007-03-25

    X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out for liquid Au-Si alloys around the eutectic region by the transmission method using high-energy X-ray to investigate the atomic arrangements in the liquid state. From the temperature dependence of the observed structure factors, the partial pair correlation and the detailed atomic arrangements will be discussed on the basis of a Reverse Monte Carlo analysis. The reproduced atomic arrangements around the eutectic region suggest the substitution structure and also rather dense liquid with decreasing temperature.

  11. Binary eutectic clusters and glass formation in ideal glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Shen, J.; Xing, D. W.; Sun, J. F.; Liu, C. T.

    2006-01-01

    In this letter, a physical concept of binary eutectic clusters in 'ideal' glass-forming liquids is proposed based on the characteristics of most well-known bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The authors approach also includes the treatment of binary eutectic clusters as basic units, which leads to the development of a simple but reliable method for designing BMGs more efficiently and effectively in these unique glass-forming liquids. As an example, bulk glass formers with superior glass-forming ability in the Zr-Ni-Cu-Al and Zr-Fe-Cu-Al systems were identified with the use of the strategy

  12. Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in masonry cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1987-03-01

    Portland cements are widely used as solidification agents for low-level radioactive wastes. However, it is known that boric acid wastes, as generated at pressurized water reactors (PWR's) are difficult to solidify using ordinary portland cements. Waste containing as little as 5 wt % boric acid inhibits the curing of the cement. For this purpose, the suitability of masonry cement was investigated. Masonry cement, in the US consists of 50 wt % slaked lime (CaOH 2 ) and 50 wt % of portland type I cement. Addition of boric acid in molar concentrations equal to or less than the molar concentration of the alkali in the cement eliminates any inhibiting effects. Accordingly, 15 wt % boric acid can be satisfactorily incorporated into masonry cement. The suitability of masonry cement for the solidification of sodium sulfate wastes produced at boiling water reactors (BWR's) was also investigated. It was observed that although sodium sulfate - masonry cement waste forms containing as much as 40 wt % Na 2 SO 4 can be prepared, waste forms with more than 7 wt % sodium sulfate undergo catastrophic failure when exposed to an aqueous environment. It was determined by x-ray diffraction that in the presence of water, the sulfate reacts with hydrated calcium aluminate to form calcium aluminum sulfate hydrate (ettringite). This reaction involves a volume increase resulting in failure of the waste form. Formulation data were identified to maximize volumetric efficiency for the solidification of boric acid and sodium sulfate wastes. Measurement of some of the waste form properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment included leachability, compression strengths and chemical interactions between the waste components and masonry cement. 15 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  13. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  14. Crystal Growth and Fluid Mechanics Problems in Directional Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Saleh A.; Baker, Gregory R.; Foster, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    Our work in directional solidification has been in the following areas: (1) Dynamics of dendrites including rigorous mathematical analysis of the resulting equations; (2) Examination of the near-structurally unstable features of the mathematically related Hele-Shaw dynamics; (3) Numerical studies of steady temperature distribution in a vertical Bridgman device; (4) Numerical study of transient effects in a vertical Bridgman device; (5) Asymptotic treatment of quasi-steady operation of a vertical Bridgman furnace for large Rayleigh numbers and small Biot number in 3D; and (6) Understanding of Mullins-Sererka transition in a Bridgman device with fluid dynamics is accounted for.

  15. Isothermal solidification based packaging of biosensors at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.P.; Khanna, P.K.; Kumar, D.

    2010-01-01

    Thick film Au printed square contact pads are interconnected to Cu substrates at constant pressure and temperature using the isothermal solidification of Bi-In alloy on the joining surfaces. The effect of reaction time on the mechanical strength of the package has been analyzed. Thermal stability of the fabricated specimens have been measured and discussed. The delaminated surfaces examined optically reveal the morphology of the metallization zones on the joining substrates. The scanning electron microscopy of these surfaces is reported in this paper. Tests for thermal shock, pH resistivity and shelf life have been carried out to predict the reliability of the packaging for long term applications.

  16. Solidification of HLLW by glass-ceramic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguino, N.; Masuda, S.; Tsunoda, N.; Yamanaka, T.; Ninomiya, M.; Sakane, T.; Nakamura, S.; Kawamura, S.

    1979-01-01

    The compositions of glass-ceramics for the solidification of HLLW were studied, and the glass-ceramics in the diopside system was concluded to be the most suitable. Compared with the properties of HLW borosilicate glasses, those of diopside glass-ceramic were thought to be almost equal in leach rate and superior in thermal stability and mechanical strength. It was also found that the glass in this system can be crystallized simply by pouring it into a thermally insulated canister and then allowing it to cool to room temperature. 2 figures, 5 tables

  17. Rapid Solidification of AB{sub 5} Hydrogen Storage Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulbrandsen-Dahl, Sverre

    2002-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with rapid solidification of AB{sub 5} materials suitable for electrochemical hydrogen storage. The primary objective of the work has been to characterise the microstructure and crystal structure of the produced AB{sub 5} materials as a function of the process parameters, e.g. the cooling rate during rapid solidification, the determination of which has been paid special attention to. The thesis is divided into 6 parts, of which Part I is a literature review, starting with a short presentation of energy storage alternatives. Then a general review of metal hydrides and their utilisation as energy carriers is presented. This part also includes more detailed descriptions of the crystal structure, the chemical composition and the hydrogen storage properties of AB{sub 5} materials. Furthermore, a description of the chill-block melt spinning process and the gas atomisation process is given. In Part II of the thesis a digital photo calorimetric technique has been developed and applied for obtaining in situ temperature measurements during chill-block melt spinning of a Mm(NiCoMnA1){sub 5} hydride forming alloy (Mm = Mischmetal of rare earths). Compared with conventional colour transmission temperature measurements, this technique offers a special advantage in terms of a high temperature resolutional and positional accuracy, which under the prevailing experimental conditions were found to be {+-}29 K and {+-} 0.1 mm, respectively. Moreover, it is shown that the cooling rate in solid state is approximately 2.5 times higher than that observed during solidification, indicating that the solid ribbon stayed in intimate contact with the wheel surface down to very low metal temperatures before the bond was broken. During this contact period the cooling regime shifted from near ideal in the melt puddle to near Newtonian towards the end, when the heat transfer from the solid ribbon to the wheel became the rate controlling step. In Part III of the

  18. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  19. In-situ solidification cleans up old gas plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, A.D.; Dennis, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    A manufactured gas plant site in Columbus, Georgia, was the location of an environmental cleanup in 1992. Manufactured gas was produced at this site from 1854 to 1931 with the availability of natural gas from a transmission pipeline causing its demise. However, waste products, primarily coal tar from the earlier years of plant operation, remained with the site. In-situ solidification was chosen as the cleanup method. Post monitoring activities show that the project was successful and the site is now a park and a leading part of river front development

  20. Solidification in direct metal deposition by LENS processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William; Griffith, Michelle

    2001-09-01

    Thermal imaging and metallographic analysis were used to study Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) processing of 316 stainless steel and H13 tool steel. The cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface were measured over a range of conduction conditions. The length scale of the molten zone controls cooling rates during solidification in direct metal deposition. In LENS processing, the molten zone ranges from 0.5 mm in length to 1.5 mm, resulting in cooling rates at the solid-liquid interface ranging from 200 6,000 Ks-1.

  1. Mixed and chelated waste test programs with bitumen solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, S.I.; Morris, M.; Vidal, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of bitumen solidification tests on mixed wastes and chelated wastes. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) performed demonstration tests on radioactive wastes contaminated with chelating agents for Associated Technologies, Inc. (ATI). The chelated wastes were produced and concentrated by Commonwealth Edison Co. as a result of reactor decontamination at Dresden Nuclear Station, Unit 1. Law Engineering in Charlotte, N. C. produced samples and performed tests on simulated heavy metal laden radioactive waste (mixed) to demonstrate the quality of the bituminous product. The simulation is intended to represent waste produced at Oak Ridge National Labs operated by Martin-Marietta

  2. Densities of Pb-Sn alloys during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, D. R.

    1988-01-01

    Data for the densities and expansion coefficients of solid and liquid alloys of the Pb-Sn system are consolidated in this paper. More importantly, the data are analyzed with the purpose of expressing either the density of the solid or of the liquid as a function of its composition and temperature. In particular, the densities of the solid and of the liquid during dendritic solidification are derived. Finally, the solutal and thermal coefficients of volume expansion for the liquid are given as functions of temperature and composition.

  3. Closed solutions to a differential-difference equation and an associated plate solidification problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layeni, Olawanle P; Akinola, Adegbola P; Johnson, Jesse V

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct and novel formalisms for deriving exact closed solutions of a class of variable-coefficient differential-difference equations arising from a plate solidification problem are introduced. Thereupon, exact closed traveling wave and similarity solutions to the plate solidification problem are obtained for some special cases of time-varying plate surface temperature.

  4. Nucleation and solidification of thin walled ductile iron - Experiments and numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron has been performed based on experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments were based on temperature and microstructure examination. Results of the experiments have been compared with a 1-D numerical solidification model...

  5. Effects Disposal Condition and Ground Water to Leaching Rate of Radionuclides from Solidification Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlan Martono; Wati

    2008-01-01

    Effects disposal condition and ground water to leaching rate of radionuclides from solidification products have been studied. The aims of leaching test at laboratory to get the best composition of solidified products for continuous process or handling. The leaching rate of radionuclides from the many kinds of matrix from smallest to bigger are glass, thermosetting plastic, urea formaldehyde, asphalt, and cement. Glass for solidification of high level waste, thermosetting plastic and urea formaldehyde for solidification of low and intermediate waste, asphalt and cement for solidification of low and intermediate level waste. In shallow land burial, ground water rate is fast, debit is high, and high permeability, so the probability contact between solidification products and ground water is occur. The pH of ground water increasing leaching rate, but cation in the ground water retard leaching rate. Effects temperature radiation and radiolysis to solidification products is not occur. In the deep repository, ground water rate is slow, debit is small, and low permeability, so the probability contact between solidification products and ground water is very small. There are effect cooling time and distance between pits to rock temperature. Alfa radiation effects can be occur, but there is no contact between solidification products and ground water, so that there is not radiolysis. (author)

  6. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  7. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  8. Modelling of solidification processing and continuous strip casting for copper-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Jafar [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Processing

    2000-04-01

    An experimental and numerical study was carried out to investigate the solidification process in a copper continuous strip casting process. Heat flow and solidification process has been experimentally studied. Cooling curves during solidification were registered using a thermocouple of type K connected to a data acquisition system. Temperature measurements in the mould and cooling water were also performed. The numerical model considers a generalized set of mass, momentum and heat equations that is valid for the solid, liquid and solidification interval in the cast. A k-{epsilon} turbulence model, produced with the commercial program CFX, is used to analyse the solidification process of pure copper in the mould region of the caster. The fluid flow, temperature and heat flux distributions in the mould region of the caster were computed. The shape and location of the solidification front were also determined. The effects of the parameters such as heat transfer coefficient, casting speed, casting temperature, heat of fusion and specific heat on the shape and location of the solidification front and the heat transport at the mould-cast interface were investigated. The predicted temperature and heat flux distributions were compared with experimental measurements, and reasonable agreement was obtained. The solidification behaviour of pure copper and different copper base alloys has been studied. A series of solidification experiments using DTA furnace, mirror furnace and levitation technique were performed on different copper-base alloys. The undercooling, cooling rates of the liquid and the solid states, solidification times and temperatures were evaluated from the curves. The cooling curves for different samples were simulated using a FEM solidification program. It was found that the calculated values of the heat of fusion were much lower than the tabulated ones. The fraction of solid formed before quenching, in the DTA experiments, has been observed to be much higher

  9. Heat transfer and solidification processes of alloy melt with undercooling: I. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hideaki; Tada, Yukio; Kunimine, Kanji; Furuichi, Taira; Hayashi, Yujiro

    2006-01-01

    The solidification process of Pb-Sn and Bi-Sn alloy melts is discussed to obtain a basic understanding of the essential phenomena of solidification with undercooling. First, from macroscopic observations, it is shown that the solidification process consists of the following three stages: (1) free growth with recalescence dissipation of thermal undercooling (2) expansion of crystals with the relaxation of constitutional undercooling or with the recovering process of interrupted quasi-steady heat conduction, and (3) equilibrium solidification. The specific features of free growth under non-uniform undercooling are also shown by comparison with the Lipton, Glicksman, and Kurz model. Next, from microscopic observations, the distribution of the solute concentration and the change of crystal morphology in the solidified materials were investigated quantitatively using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Finally, the solidification path during the above three fundamental processes is dynamically represented on phase diagrams

  10. Microstructural evolution in Mg-Zn alloys during solidification: An experimental and simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Manas; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive microstructural evolution of Mg-1.5, 4.0 and 5.5 wt% Zn alloys with respect to the solidification parameters such as thermal gradient (G), solidification velocity (V), cooling rate (GV) and solute (Zn) content were investigated in the present study. Solidification techniques such as directional solidification and wedge casting were employed in order to obtain cooling rates between 0.05 and 250 K/s. Microstructural features such as secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), microsegregration along the secondary dendrites and secondary phase fractions were experimentally determined. A solidification model that incorporates solute back diffusion, secondary arm coarsening, dendrite tip undercooling and dynamically linked with accurate thermodynamic databases is used to explain the experimental results.

  11. Choosing solidification or vitrification for low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450 000m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes how Fernald is choosing between solidification and vitrification as the primary waste treatment method

  12. Choosing solidification or vitrification for low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarized how Fernald is choosing between solidification and vitrification as the primary waste treatment method

  13. A Review of Permanent Magnet Stirring During Metal Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing; Yang, Yindong; Mclean, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Rather than using conventional electromagnetic stirring (EMS) with three-phase alternating current, permanent magnet stirring (PMS), based on the use of sintered NdFeB material which has excellent magnetic characteristics, can be employed to generate a magnetic field for the stirring of liquid metal during solidification. Recent experience with steel casting indicates that PMS requires less than 20 pct of the total energy compared with EMS. Despite the excellent magnetic density properties and low power consumption, this relatively new technology has received comparatively little attention by the metal casting community. This paper reviews simulation modeling, experimental studies, and industrial trials of PMS conducted during recent years. With the development of magnetic simulation software, the magnetic field and associated flow patterns generated by PMS have been evaluated. Based on the results obtained from laboratory experiments, the effects of PMS on metal solidification structures and typical defects such as surface pinholes and center cavities are summarized. The significance of findings obtained from trials of PMS within the metals processing sector, including the continuous casting of steel, are discussed with the aim of providing an overview of the relevant parameters that are of importance for further development and industrial application of this innovative technology.

  14. Solidification treatment of thiophene and BTEX contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlinski, S.J.; Kingham, N.W.; Blevins, J.

    1995-01-01

    Contamination at the McColl Superfund Site, located in Fullerton, California, is due to the disposal, in pits, of spent sulfuric acid sludge from the production of aviation fuel. A treatability study was performed to evaluate the electiveness of in situ solidification treatment of materials contaminated with high concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), as well as thiophene and other organic compounds. The contaminated materials were extremely acidic (pH<1) and had high organic and sulfur contents of greater than 70 percent and 10 percent, respectively. A total of 150 mixtures were screened to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 reagents. Based on the preliminary screening results, six mixtures were selected as being the most effective at treating the contaminated materials. Comprehensive evaluations of the candidate mixtures included (1) quantitative glovebag volatilization studies, (2) chemical characterization of the treated materials, (3) strength characterizations at multiple cure times of up to 60 days, (4) emissions monitoring of the treated materials at cure times of 7 and 14 days, and (5) the evaluation of oxidation reagents for treatment of the thiophene contamination. The treatability study demonstrated that solidification treatment is an effective alternative for remediation of the thiophene and BTEX contaminated materials

  15. Wax solidification of drying agents containing tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishikawa, M.; Kido, H.

    1984-01-01

    It is necessary to immobilize the tritium not to give any impact on the environmental biosphere because tritium may give profound effects in the metabolic pathway. One of the most probable methods of immobilizing tritium would be incorporation of tritiated water in solid forms. Any drying or dehydration technique would be effective in a tritium cleanup system for off-gas streams containing tritium or tritiated water. Commonly used drying agents such as activated alumina, silica gel, molecular sieves and calcium sulfate are of value for removal of water vapour from air or other gases. For long term tritium storage, however, these adsorptive materials should be enveloped to prevent contact with water or water vapour because the rate of leaching, evaporation or diffusion of tritium from these porous materials is so large. The beeswax solidification method of the packed bed of drying agents adsorbing tritiated water is developed in this study, where the wax solidification procedure is performed by pouring the melt of wax into the void space of the packed bed of the drying agents and successive gradual cooling. The observed values of diffusivity or permeability of tritium in the wax solidified materials are about one-thousandth of those obtained for the cement block. Effect of coating on the rate of leaching is also discussed

  16. Numerical Model for Solidification Zones Selection in the Large Ingots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołczyński W.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A vertical cut at the mid-depth of the 15-ton forging steel ingot has been performed by curtesy of the CELSA - Huta Ostrowiec plant. Some metallographic studies were able to reveal not only the chilled undersized grains under the ingot surface but columnar grains and large equiaxed grains as well. Additionally, the structural zone within which the competition between columnar and equiaxed structure formation was confirmed by metallography study, was also revealed. Therefore, it seemed justified to reproduce some of the observed structural zones by means of numerical calculation of the temperature field. The formation of the chilled grains zone is the result of unconstrained rapid solidification and was not subject of simulation. Contrary to the equiaxed structure formation, the columnar structure or columnar branched structure formation occurs under steep thermal gradient. Thus, the performed simulation is able to separate both discussed structural zones and indicate their localization along the ingot radius as well as their appearance in term of solidification time.

  17. Search for a solute-drag effect in dendritic solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckler, K.; Herlach, D.M.; Aziz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect experimental test for the solute-drag effect in alloy solidification by fitting the data of Eckler et.al. for Ni-B dendrite tip velocities vs undercooling to models in several ways. The unknown equilibrium partition coefficient, k e , was varied as a fitting parameter. When they combine the dendrite growth model of Boettinger et al. with the Continuous Growth Model (CGM) of Aziz and Kaplan with solute drag, they cannot fit the data for any value of k e . When they combine dendrite growth theory with the CGM without solute drag, they obtain a reasonable fit to the data for k e = 4 x 10 -6 . When they combine dendrite growth theory with a new partial-solute-drag interpolation between the with-solute-drag and the without-solute-drag versions of the CGM, they obtain a still better fit to the data for k e = 2.8 x 10 - 4. This result points out the possibility of partial solute-drag during solidification and the importance of an independent determination of k e in order to distinguish between models

  18. Simulation of spreading with solidification: assessment synthesis of Thema code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M. [CEA Grenoble, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Dept. de Technologie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes Thermohydrauliques et Technologiques, 38 (France)

    2004-07-01

    After a presentation of the models included in THEMA code, which simulates the spreading of a fluid with solidification, the whole assessment calculations are presented. The first series concerns the comparison with analytical or numerical solutions: dam break, conduction for the heat transfer in the substrate, crust growth. The second series concerns the comparison with the CORINE isothermal tests (simulating fluid at low temperature). The third series concerns the CORINE tests with heat transfer. The fourth series concerns the tests with simulating materials at medium or high temperature (RIT, KATS). The fifth series concerns the tests with prototypical materials (COMAS, FARO, VULCANO). Finally the blind simulations of the ECOKATS tests are presented. All the calculations are performed with the same physical models (THEMA version 2.5), without any variable tuning parameter according to the test under consideration. Sensitivity studies concern the influence of the viscosity model in the solidification interval, and for the tests with prototypical materials the inlet temperature and the solid fraction. The relative difference between the calculated and measured spreading areas is generally less than 20 % except for the test with prototypical materials, for which the assessment is not easy due to the large experimental uncertainties. The level of validation of THEMA is considered as satisfactory, taking into account the required accuracy. (authors)

  19. Crystallographic investigation of grain selection during initial solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, H; Shinozuka, K; Kataoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    Normally, macroscopic solidified structure consists of chill, columnar and equiaxed zones. In a chill zone, many fine grains nucleate on the mold surface and grow their own preferred growth direction. Only a few of them continue to grow because of grain selection. In order to understand the grain selection process, crystallographic investigation has been carried out in the zone of initial solidification in this study. 10 g of Al-6 wt%Si alloy was melted at 850 °C and poured on the thick copper plate. Longitudinal cross section of the solidified shell was observed by a SEM and analyzed by EBSD. The result of EBSD mapping reveals that crystallographic orientation was random in the range of initial solidification. Further, some grains are elongated along their <100> direction. Columnar grains, whose growth directions are almost parallel to the heat flow direction, develop via grain selection. Here, a dendrite whose growth direction is close to the heat flow direction overgrows the other dendrite whose growth direction is far from the heat flow direction. However, sometimes we observed that dendrite, whose zenith angle is large, overgrew the other dendrite. It can be deduced that the time of nucleation on the mold surface is not constant. (paper)

  20. Modeling of columnar and equiaxed solidification of binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.

    2005-12-01

    This work deals with the modelling of dendritic solidification in binary mixtures. Large scale phenomena are represented by volume averaging of the local conservation equations. This method allows to rigorously derive the partial differential equations of averaged fields and the closure problems associated to the deviations. Such problems can be resolved numerically on periodic cells, representative of dendritic structures, in order to give a precise evaluation of macroscopic transfer coefficients (Drag coefficients, exchange coefficients, diffusion-dispersion tensors...). The method had already been applied for a model of columnar dendritic mushy zone and it is extended to the case of equiaxed dendritic solidification, where solid grains can move. The two-phase flow is modelled with an Eulerian-Eulerian approach and the novelty is to account for the dispersion of solid velocity through the kinetic agitation of the particles. A coupling of the two models is proposed thanks to an original adaptation of the columnar model, allowing for undercooling calculation: a solid-liquid interfacial area density is introduced and calculated. At last, direct numerical simulations of crystal growth are proposed with a diffuse interface method for a representation of local phenomena. (author)

  1. Simulation of spreading with solidification: assessment synthesis of Thema code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindler, B.; Veteau, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    After a presentation of the models included in THEMA code, which simulates the spreading of a fluid with solidification, the whole assessment calculations are presented. The first series concerns the comparison with analytical or numerical solutions: dam break, conduction for the heat transfer in the substrate, crust growth. The second series concerns the comparison with the CORINE isothermal tests (simulating fluid at low temperature). The third series concerns the CORINE tests with heat transfer. The fourth series concerns the tests with simulating materials at medium or high temperature (RIT, KATS). The fifth series concerns the tests with prototypical materials (COMAS, FARO, VULCANO). Finally the blind simulations of the ECOKATS tests are presented. All the calculations are performed with the same physical models (THEMA version 2.5), without any variable tuning parameter according to the test under consideration. Sensitivity studies concern the influence of the viscosity model in the solidification interval, and for the tests with prototypical materials the inlet temperature and the solid fraction. The relative difference between the calculated and measured spreading areas is generally less than 20 % except for the test with prototypical materials, for which the assessment is not easy due to the large experimental uncertainties. The level of validation of THEMA is considered as satisfactory, taking into account the required accuracy. (authors)

  2. Mechanism of flow reversal during solidification of an anomalous liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Virkeshwar; Kumawat, Mitesh; Srivastava, Atul; Karagadde, Shyamprasad

    2017-12-01

    In a wide variety of fluidic systems involving thermal and compositional gradients, local density changes lead to the onset of natural convection that influences the process itself, for example, during phase-change phenomena and magmatic flows. Accurate knowledge of the flow characteristics is essential to quantify the impact of the flow of the processes. In this work, the first-ever demonstration of flow reversal during bottom-up solidification of water using full-field thermal and flow measurements and its direct impact on the solidifying interface is presented. Based on prior optical interferometric measurements of full-field temperature distribution in water during solidification, we use the particle image velocimetry technique to quantify and reveal the changing natural convection pattern arising solely due to the density anomaly of water between 0 °C and 4 °C. The independently captured thermal and flow fields show striking similarities and clearly elucidate the plausible mechanism explaining the formation of a curved interface at the stagnation point and the subsequent reversal of flow direction due to a changed interface morphology. A control volume analysis is further presented to estimate the energy invested in the formation of a perturbation and the resulting flip in the flow direction caused by this perturbation.

  3. Chemoenzymatic epoxidation of alkenes with Candida antarctica lipase B and hydrogen peroxide in deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Pengfei; Wang, Xuping; Yang, Bo; Hollmann, F.; Wang, Yonghua

    2017-01-01

    Epoxides are important synthetic intermediates for the synthesis of a broad range of industrial products. This study presents a promising solution to the current limitation of enzyme instability. By using simple deep eutectic solvents such as choline chloride/sorbitol, significant stabilization

  4. Al based ultra-fine eutectic with high room temperature plasticity and elevated temperature strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwary, C.S., E-mail: cst311@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kashyap, S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India); Kim, D.H. [Center for Non-Crystalline Materials, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chattopadhyay, K. [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-07-15

    Developments of aluminum alloys that can retain strength at and above 250 °C present a significant challenge. In this paper we report an ultrafine scale Al–Fe–Ni eutectic alloy with less than 3.5 at% transition metals that exhibits room temperature ultimate tensile strength of ~400 MPa with a tensile ductility of 6–8%. The yield stress under compression at 300 °C was found to be 150 MPa. We attribute it to the refinement of the microstructure that is achieved by suction casting in copper mold. The characterization using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) reveals an unique composite structure that contains the Al–Al{sub 3}Ni rod eutectic with spacing of ~90 nm enveloped by a lamellar eutectic of Al–Al{sub 9}FeNi (~140 nm). Observation of subsurface deformation under Vickers indentation using bonded interface technique reveals the presence of extensive shear banding during deformation that is responsible for the origin of ductility. The dislocation configuration in Al–Al{sub 3}Ni eutectic colony indicates accommodation of plasticity in α-Al with dislocation accumulation at the α-Al/Al{sub 3}Ni interface boundaries. In contrast the dislocation activities in the intermetallic lamellae are limited and contain set of planner dislocations across the plates. We present a detailed analysis of the fracture surface to rationalize the origin of the high strength and ductility in this class of potentially promising cast alloy.

  5. Thermophysical properties and solubility of different sugar-derived molecules in deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, C.H.J.T.; Kroon, M.C.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are designer solvents analogous to ionic liquids but with lower preparation cost. Most known DESs are water-miscible, but recently water-immiscible DESs have also been presented, which are a combination of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors with long hydrophobic alkyl

  6. Aliphatic-aromatic separation using deep eutectic solvents as extracting agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Nerea; Fernandez Requejo, Patricia; Kroon, Maaike

    2015-01-01

    The separation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds is a great challenge for chemical engineers. There is no efficient separation process for mixtures with compositions lower than 20 wt % in aromatics. In this work, the feasibility of two different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as novel extracting

  7. PC-SAFT modeling of CO2 solubilities in hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, C.H.J.T.; van Osch, D.J.G.P.; Kroon, M.C.; Sadowski, G.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.; Zubeir, L.F.; Held, C.

    2017-01-01

    The PC-SAFT 'pseudo-pure' approach was used for the modeling of CO2 solubilities in various hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) for the first time. Only liquid density data were used to obtain the segment number, the temperature-independent segment diameter and the dispersion-energy parameter,

  8. Carbon dioxide solubilities in decanoic acid-based hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubeir, Lawien F.; Van Osch, Dannie J.G.P.; Rocha, Marisa A.A.; Banat, Fawzi; Kroon, Maaike C.

    2018-01-01

    The solubility of CO2 in hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) has been measured for the first time. Six different hydrophobic DESs are studied in the temperature range from 298 to 323 K and at CO2 pressures up to 2 MPa. The results are evaluated by comparing the solubility data with existing

  9. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimethylurea/citric acid deep eutectic solvent was used as a dual catalyst and a green reaction medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and reusability of DES with high activity makes this method efficient and eco-friendly.

  10. Deep eutectic solvents for highly efficient separations in oil and gas industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warrag, S.E.E.; Peters, C.J.; Kroon, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have captured a great scientific attention as a new, ‘green’ and sustainable class of tailor-made solvents. DESs share many properties with ionic liquids (ILs) including low vapor pressure, wide liquid range, thermal stability, low flammability, and high solvation

  11. Estimation of the Critical Temperatures of Some More Deep Eutectic Solvents from Their Surface Tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhak Marcus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The critical temperatures of two dozen deep eutectic solvents, for only some of which these have been estimated previously, were estimated from the temperature dependences of their surface tensions and densities available in the literature according to the Eötvös and the Guggenheim expressions.

  12. Preparation, heat treatment, and mechanical properties of the uranium-5 weight percent chromium eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, A.B.

    1980-10-01

    The eutectic alloy of uranium-5 wt % chromium (U-5Cr) was prepared from high-purity materials and cast into 1-in.-thick ingots. This material was given several simple heat treatments, the mechanical properties of these heat-treated samples were determined; and the microstructure was examined. Some data on the melting point and transformation temperatures were obtained

  13. Establishment of the Co-C Eutectic Fixed-Point Cell for Thermocouple Calibrations at NIMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongrai, O.; Elliott, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    In 2015, NIMT first established a Co-C eutectic temperature reference (fixed-point) cell measurement capability for thermocouple calibration to support the requirements of Thailand's heavy industries and secondary laboratories. The Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell is a facility transferred from NPL, where the design was developed through European and UK national measurement system projects. In this paper, we describe the establishment of a Co-C eutectic fixed-point cell for thermocouple calibration at NIMT. This paper demonstrates achievement of the required furnace uniformity, the Co-C plateau realization and the comparison data between NIMT and NPL Co-C cells by using the same standard Pt/Pd thermocouple, demonstrating traceability. The NIMT measurement capability for noble metal type thermocouples at the new Co-C eutectic fixed point (1324.06°C) is estimated to be within ± 0.60 K (k=2). This meets the needs of Thailand's high-temperature thermocouple users—for which previously there has been no traceable calibration facility.

  14. Lauric and palmitic acids eutectic mixture as latent heat storage material for low temperature heating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncbilek, Kadir; Sari, Ahmet; Tarhan, Sefa; Erguenes, Gazanfer; Kaygusuz, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PA, 59.8 deg. C) and lauric acid (LA, 42.6 deg. C) are phase change materials (PCM) having quite high melting temperatures which can limit their use in low temperature solar applications such as solar space heating and greenhouse heating. However, their melting temperatures can be tailored to appropriate value by preparing a eutectic mixture of the lauric and the palmitic acids. In the present study, the thermal analysis based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique shows that the mixture of 69.0 wt% LA and 31 wt% PA forms a eutectic mixture having melting temperature of 35.2 deg. C and the latent heat of fusion of 166.3 J g -1 . This study also considers the experimental determination of the thermal characteristics of the eutectic mixture during the heat charging and discharging processes. Radial and axial temperature distribution, heat transfer coefficient between the heat transfer fluid (HTF) pipe and the PCM, heat recovery rate and heat charging and discharging fractions were experimentally established employing a vertical concentric pipe-in-pipe energy storage system. The changes of these characteristics were evaluated with respect to the effect of inlet HTF temperature and mass flow rate. The DSC thermal analysis and the experimental results indicate that the LA-PA eutectic mixture can be a potential material for low temperature thermal energy storage applications in terms of its thermo-physical and thermal characteristics

  15. Phase Evolution in and Creep Properties of Nb-Rich Nb-Si-Cr Eutectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Florian; Kauffmann, Alexander; Heilmaier, Martin

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the Nb-rich ternary eutectic in the Nb-Si-Cr system has been experimentally determined to be Nb-10.9Si-28.4Cr (in at. pct). The eutectic is composed of three main phases: Nb solid solution (Nbss), β-Cr2Nb, and Nb9(Si,Cr)5. The ternary eutectic microstructure remains stable for several hundred hours at a temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C). At 1573 K (1300 °C) and above, the silicide phase Nb9(Si,Cr)5 decomposes into α-Nb5Si3, Nbss, and β-Cr2Nb. Under creep conditions at 1473 K (1200 °C), the alloy deforms by dislocation creep while the major creep resistance is provided by the silicide matrix. If the silicide phase is fragmented and, thus, its matrix character is destroyed by prior heat treatment [ e.g., at 1773 K (1500 °C) for 100 hours], creep is mainly controlled by the Laves phase β-Cr2Nb, resulting in increased minimum strain rates. Compared to state of the art Ni-based superalloys, the creep resistance of this three-phase eutectic alloy is significantly higher.

  16. Eutectic cell and nodule count as the quality factors of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fraś

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the predictions based on a theoretical analysis aimed at elucidating of eutectic cell count or nodule counts N wereexperimentally verified. The experimental work was focused on processing flake graphite and ductile iron under various inoculationconditions in order to achieve various physicochemical states of the experimental melts. In addition, plates of various wall thicknesses, s were cast and the resultant eutectic cell or nodule counts were established. Moreover, thermal analysis was used to find out the degree of maximum undercooling for the graphite eutectic, Tm. A relationship was found between the eutectic cell or nodule count and the maximum undercooling Tm.. In addition it was also found that N can be related to the wall thickness of plate shaped castings. Finally, the present work provides a rational for the effect of technological factors such as the melt chemistry, inoculation practice, and holding temperature and time on the resultant cell count or nodule count of cast iron. In particular, good agreement was found between the predictions of the theoretical analysis and the experimental data.

  17. Pressure-induced structural change in liquid GaIn eutectic alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Q.; Ahmad, A. S.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction reveals a pressure induced crystallization at about 3.4 GPa and a polymorphic transition near 10.3 GPa when compressed a liquid GaIn eutectic alloy up to ~13 GPa at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell. Upon decompression, the high pressure crystalline phase...

  18. Thermodynamic and morphological analysis of eutectic formation of CBZ-L-Asp and L-PheOMe.HCl mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Youn, Sung Hun; Shin, Chul Soo

    2006-01-01

    The eutectic melting of a CBZ-L-Asp/L-PheOMe.HCl model mixture was investigated in kinetic, thermal, thermodynamic, rheological, and morphological aspects. From TX-phase diagrams, the eutectic composition was determined to be 0.55 M fraction of CBZ-L-Asp. The highest melting rate and the lowest apparent viscosity in the range of 55-75 deg. C were obtained at the eutectic composition. Using Arrhenius plots of melting rates and apparent viscosities, minimum activation energies in the range of 60-80 deg. C were obtained at the eutectic composition, whereas maximum values were attained below 60 deg. C. At the eutectic composition, the maximum heat of fusion, the lowest excess free energy, and the highest excess entropy values were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A highly homogeneous morphology due to rearrangement of molecules was observed in the eutectic mixture via scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. IR spectra revealed that hydrogen bonding in the mixture increases during eutectic melting

  19. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  20. Eutectic melting temperature of the lowermost Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrault, D.; Lo Nigro, G.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bouhifd, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mezouar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Partial melting of the Earth's deep mantle probably occurred at different stages of its formation as a consequence of meteoritic impacts and seismology suggests that it even continues today at the core-mantle boundary. Melts are important because they dominate the chemical evolution of the different Earth's reservoirs and more generally the dynamics of the whole planet. Unfortunately, the most critical parameter, that is the temperature profile inside the deep Earth, remains poorly constrained accross the planet history. Experimental investigations of the melting properties of materials representative of the deep Earth at relevant P-T conditions can provide anchor points to refine past and present temperature profiles and consequently determine the degree of melting at the different geological periods. Previous works report melting relations in the uppermost lower mantle region, using the multi-anvil press [1,2]. On the other hand, the pyrolite solidus was determined up to 65 GPa using optical observations in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LH-DAC) [3]. Finally, the melting temperature of (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine is documented at core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions by shock wave experiments [4]. Solely based on these reports, experimental data remain too sparse to draw a definite melting curve for the lower mantle in the relevant 25-135 GPa pressure range. We reinvestigated melting properties of lower mantle materials by means of in-situ angle dispersive X-ray diffraction measurements in the LH-DAC at the ESRF [5]. Experiments were performed in an extended P-T range for two starting materials: forsterite and a glass with chondrite composition. In both cases, the aim was to determine the onset of melting, and thus the eutectic melting temperatures as a function of pressure. Melting was evidenced from drastic changes of diffraction peak shape on the image plate, major changes in diffraction intensities in the integrated pattern, disappearance of diffraction rings

  1. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    KAUST Repository

    Isik, Mehmet; Zulfiqar, Sonia; Edhaim, Fatimah; Ruiperez, Fernando; Rothenberger, Alexander; Mecerreyes, David

    2016-01-01

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  2. Sustainable Poly(Ionic Liquids) for CO2 Capture Based on Deep Eutectic Monomers

    KAUST Repository

    Isik, Mehmet

    2016-10-05

    The design of high performance solid sorbent materials for CO2 capture is a technology which has been employed to mitigate global warming. However, the covalent incorporation of functionalities into polymeric supports usually involves multistep energy-intensive chemical processes. This fact makes the net CO2 balance of the materials negative even though they possess good properties as CO2 sorbents. Here we show a new family of polymers which are based on amines, amidoximes, and natural carboxylic acids and can be obtained using sustainable low energy processes. Thus, deep eutectic monomers based on natural carboxylic acids, amidoximes, and amines have been prepared by just mixing with cholinium type methacrylic ammonium monomer. The formation of deep eutectic monomers was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry measurements. In all cases, the monomers displayed glass transition temperatures well below room temperature. Computational studies revealed that the formation of eutectic complexes lengthens the distance between the cation and the anion causing charge delocalization. The liquid nature of the resulting deep eutectic monomers (DEMs) made it possible to conduct a fast photopolymerization process to obtain the corresponding poly(ionic liquids). Materials were characterized by means of nuclear magnetic resonance, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction to evaluate the properties of the polymers. The polymers were then used as solid sorbents for CO2 capture. It has been shown that the polymers prepared with citric acid displayed better performance both experimentally and computationally. The current endeavor showed that sustainable poly(ionic liquids) based on deep eutectic monomers can be easily prepared to produce low-energy-cost alternatives to the materials currently being researched for CO2 capture. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  3. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Modeling of columnar and equiaxed solidification of binary mixtures; Modelisation de la solidification colonnaire et equiaxe de melanges binaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, P

    2005-12-15

    This work deals with the modelling of dendritic solidification in binary mixtures. Large scale phenomena are represented by volume averaging of the local conservation equations. This method allows to rigorously derive the partial differential equations of averaged fields and the closure problems associated to the deviations. Such problems can be resolved numerically on periodic cells, representative of dendritic structures, in order to give a precise evaluation of macroscopic transfer coefficients (Drag coefficients, exchange coefficients, diffusion-dispersion tensors...). The method had already been applied for a model of columnar dendritic mushy zone and it is extended to the case of equiaxed dendritic solidification, where solid grains can move. The two-phase flow is modelled with an Eulerian-Eulerian approach and the novelty is to account for the dispersion of solid velocity through the kinetic agitation of the particles. A coupling of the two models is proposed thanks to an original adaptation of the columnar model, allowing for undercooling calculation: a solid-liquid interfacial area density is introduced and calculated. At last, direct numerical simulations of crystal growth are proposed with a diffuse interface method for a representation of local phenomena. (author)

  5. Theoretical modeling of cellular and dendritic solidification microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggil

    In this dissertation, we use three-dimensional (3D) phase-field (PF) modeling to investigate (i) 3D solid-liquid interface dynamics observed in microgravity experiments, and (ii) array patterns in a thin-sample geometry. In addition, using the two-dimensional (2D) dendritic-needle-network (DNN) model, we explore (iii) secondary sidebranching dynamics. Recently, solidification experiments are carried out in the DSI (Directional Solidification Insert) of the DECLIC (Device for the study of Critical LIquids and Crystallization) facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Thus, the directional solidification experiments are achieved under limited convective currents, and the experimental observations reveal unique dynamics of 3D microstructure in a purely diffusive growth regime. In this directional solidification setup, a temperature field between heat sources could evolve due to two main factors: (i) heat transfer within an adiabatic zone and (ii) latent heat rejection at the interface. These two thermal effects are phenomenologically characterized using a time-dependent thermal shift. In addition, we could quantitatively account for these thermal factors using a numerical calculation of the evolution of temperature field. We introduce these phenomenological and quantitative thermal representations into the PF model. The performed simulations using different thermal descriptions are compared to the experimental measurements from the initial planar interface dynamics to the final spacing selection. The DECLIC-DSI experimental observations exhibit complex grain boundary (GB) dynamics between large grains with a small misorientation. In the observations, several large grains with a small misorientation with respect to the temperature gradient are formed during solidification. Specifically, at a convergent GB, a localized group of misoriented cells penetrates into a nearby grain, which yields the morphological instability of grain boundaries. Remarkably, while

  6. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  7. Immobilisation/solidification of hazardous toxic waste in cement matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macías, A.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization and solidification of polluting waste, introduced into the industrial sector more than 20 years ago, and throughout last 10 years is being the object of a growing interest for engineers and environment scientists, has become a remarkable standardized process for treatment and management of toxic and hazardous liquid wastes, with special to those containing toxic metals. Experimental monitorization of the behaviour of immobilized waste by solidification and stabilisation in life time safe deposits is not possible, reason why it is essential to develop models predicting adequately the behaviour of structures that have to undergo a range of conditions simulating the environment where they are to be exposed. Such models can be developed only if the basic physical and chemical properties of the system matrix/solidifying-waste are known. In this work immobilization/solidification systems are analyzed stressing out the formulation systems based on Portland cement. Finally, some examples of the results obtained from the study of interaction of specific species of wastes and fixation systems are presented.

    La inmovilización y solidificación de residuos contaminantes, implantada en el sector comercial desde hace más de 20 años y que desde hace diez es objeto de creciente interés por parte de ingenieros y científicos medioambientales, se ha convertido en un proceso estandarizado único para el tratamiento y gestión de residuos tóxicos y peligrosos líquidos y, en especial, de los que contienen metales pesados. La monitorización experimental del comportamiento de un residuo inmovilizado por solidificación y estabilización en el tiempo de vida de un depósito de seguridad no es posible, por lo que es imprescindible desarrollar modelos que predigan satisfactoriamente el comportamiento del sistema bajo un rango representativo de condiciones del entorno de exposición. Tales modelos sólo pueden ser desarrollados si se

  8. Measuring device for weight of glass of glass solidification product to be charged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutake, Nobuhiro; Arai, Masaki; Akashi, Ken-ichi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a device for accurately calculating the weight of molten glass to be charged during manufacturing glass solidification products of radioactive liquid wastes. Namely, a discharge nozzle at the lower end of a glass melting furnace and an upper end of a vessel for glass solidification materials are connected by a connecting device extensible vertically in a cylindrical shape. Molten glasses are flown down by way of the connecting device and filled into the vessel for solidification products. A first scale is constituted so as to measure the weight of load, and the vessel for solidification products are loaded. A second scale is constituted so as to measure the own weight and a weight of load, and is interposed between a flange at the circumference of a charging port and the lower end of the connecting device, and has an opening for flowing down the molten glass at the central portion. With such a constitution, the first scale can weigh the total of the weight of molten glass charged to the vessel for solidification products, the weight of the vessel for solidification products, the counterforce from the connecting device and the weight of the second scale. If the measured value of the secondary scale and the weight of the vessel for solidification products are subtracted from the former value, the weight of the charged molten glass can be determined. (I.S.)

  9. Directional Solidification and Liquidus Projection of the Sn-Co-Cu System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sinn-Wen; Chang, Jui-Shen; Pan, Kevin; Hsu, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Che-Wei

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the Sn-Co-Cu ternary system, which is of interest to the electronics industry. Ternary Sn-Co-Cu alloys were prepared, their as-solidified microstructures were examined, and their primary solidification phases were determined. The primary solidification phases observed were Cu, Co, Co3Sn2, CoSn, CoSn2, Cu6Sn5, Co3Sn2, γ, and β phases. Although there are ternary compounds reported in this ternary system, no ternary compound was found as the primary solidification phase. The directional solidification technique was applied when difficulties were encountered using the conventional quenching method to distinguish the primary solidification phases, such as Cu6Sn5, Cu3Sn, and γ phases. Of all the primary solidification phases, the Co3Sn2 and Co phases have the largest compositional regimes in which alloys display them as the primary solidification phases. There are four class II reactions and four class III reactions. The reactions with the highest and lowest reaction temperatures are both class III reactions, and are L + CoSn2 + Cu6Sn5 = CoSn3 at 621.5 K (348.3 °C) and L + Co3Sn2 + CoSn = Cu6Sn5 at 1157.8 K (884.6 °C), respectively.

  10. Plasma Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  11. Polymer solidification of mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucette, A.M.; Logsdon, B.W.; Lucerna, J.J.; Yudnich, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant is pursuing polymer solidification as a viable treatment option for several mixed waste streams that are subject to land disposal restrictions within the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act provisions. Tests completed to date using both surrogate and actual wastes indicate that polyethylene microencapsulation is a viable treatment option for several mixed wastes at the Rocky Flats Plant, including nitrate salts, sludges, and secondary wastes such as ash. Treatability studies conducted on actual salt waste demonstrated that the process is capable of producing waste forms that comply with all applicable regulatory criteria, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Tests have also been conducted to evaluate the feasibility of macroencapsulating certain debris wastes in polymers. Several methods and plastics have been tested for macroencapsulation, including post-consumer recycle and regrind polyethylene

  12. Solidification/stabilization of dredged marine sediments for road construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong Xing; Abriak, Nor Edine; Zentar, Rachid; Xu, WeiYa

    2012-01-01

    Cement/lime-based solidification is an environmentally sound solution for the management of dredged marine sediments, instead of traditional solutions such as immersion. Based on the mineralogical composition and physical characteristics of Dunkirk sediments, the effects of cement and lime are assessed through Atterberg limits, modified Proctor compaction, unconfined compressive strength and indirect tensile strength tests. The variation of Atterberg limits and the improvement in strength are discussed at different binder contents. The potential of sediments solidified with cement or lime for road construction is evaluated through a proposed methodology from two aspects: I-CBR value and material classification. The test results show the feasibility of solidified dredged sediments for beneficial use as a material in road construction. Cement is superior to lime in terms of strength improvement, and adding 6% cement is an economic and reasonable method to stabilize fine sediments.

  13. Solidification/stabilization of technetium in cement-based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Bostick, W.D.; Spence, R.D.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically hazardous process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts have been shown to be effective for retention of hydrolyzable metals (e.g., lead, cadmium, uranium and nickel) but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive Tc-99, which is present in the waste as the highly mobile pertechnate anion. Addition of ground blast furnace slag to the grout is shown to reduce the leachability of technetium by several orders of magnitude. The selective effect of slag is believed to be due to its ability to reduce Tc(VII) to the less soluble Tc(IV) species. 12 refs., 4 tabs

  14. Solidification of metal oxide from electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination technology reduced 80% of the concentration of the uranium soil waste to below the concentration of self-disposal. After conducting electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination, more than 10% of the remainder of radioactive waste from the cathodes of electrokinectic-electrodialytic equipment were produced. To dispose of such waste, it is necessary to solidify second radioactive waste owing to the requirements of radioactive waste from public corporations. In this study, a solidification experiment was carried out using a polymer. At first, a sampling of second radioactive waste was conducted. Then, second radioactive waste and a polymer were mixed. Third, the solidified state between the second radioactive waste and polymer was checked. In our next study, an experiment for the requirements of a public radioactive waste corporation will be conducted.

  15. UJV line for research into radioactive wastes solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.; Feist, I.; Kepak, F.; Nachmilner, L.; Napravnik, J.; Novak, M.; Pecak, V.; Vojtech, O.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental line with a capacity of 0.01 m 3 /h was developed and built for research of the solidification of liquid radioactive wastes at the Nuclear Research Institute. The line allows the research and pilot plant testing of processes based on vitrification but also on other procedures including calcination. It consists of a horizontal calciner, a resistance melting unit, a homogenization device for research into cementation of the calcinate, and equipment for the disposal of gaseous emissions. The facility is provided with a control console which allows remote control and the control of all basic operating parameters. The design of the line allows its eventual completion with other equipment. (Z.M.)

  16. Solidification, processing and properties of ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2010-01-01

    Ductile cast iron has been an important engineering material in the past 50 years. In that time, it has evolved from a complicated material that required the foundry metallurgist's highest skill and strict process control to being a commonly used material that can easily be produced with modern...... of the latest years of research indicate that ductile cast iron in the future will become a highly engineered material in which strict control of a range of alloy elements combined with intelligent design and highly advanced processing allows us to target properties to specific applications to a much higher...... degree than we have seen previously. It is the aim of the present paper to present ductile iron as a modern engineering material and present the many different possibilities that the material hides. Focus will be on the latest research in solidification and melt treatment. But for completeness...

  17. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  18. Radwaste volume reduction and solidification by General Electric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, T.A.; Weech, M.E.; Miller, G.P.; Eberle, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1978 General Electric has been actively engaged in developing a volume reduction and solidifcation system or treatment of radwaste generated in commercial nuclear power plants. The studies have been aimed at defining an integrated system that would be directly responsive to the rapid evolving needs of the industry for the volume reduction and solidification of low-level radwaste. The resulting General Electric Volume Reduction System (GEVRS) is an integrated system based on two processes: the first uses azeotropic distillation technology and is called AZTECH, and the second is controlled-air incineration...called INCA. The AZTECH process serves to remove water from concentrated salt solutions, ion exchange resins and filter sludge slurries and then encapsulates the dried solids into a dense plastic product. The INCA unit serves to reduce combustible wastes to ashes suitable for encapsulation into the same plastic product produced by AZTECH

  19. Microprestress - solidification theory for aging and drying creep of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazant, Zdenek P.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Anders Boe; Baweja, Sandeep

    1996-01-01

    A new physical theory for the effects of long-term aging and drying on concrete creep is proposed. The previously proposed solidification theory, in which aging is explained and modeled by the volume growth (into the pores of hardened Portland cement paste) of a nonaging viscoelastic constituent...... external load or the macroscopic continuum deformation of concrete can cause only very small changes of the microprestress, such that the response to load is determined by tangential linearization. Relaxation of the microprestress causes the tangential viscosity to increase, which reduces long-term creep....... A decrease of relative humidity in the pores causes (due to changes of capillary tension, surface tension and disjoining pressure) a large increase in the microprestress, which in turn reduces tangential viscosity and thus increases the creep rate. This explains the drying effect (Pickett effect...

  20. Integral solution of equiaxed solidification with an interface kinetics model for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naterer, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional analysis of energy and species transport during binary dendritic solidification is presented and compared to experimental results. The paper's objective is a continuation of previous studies of solidification control for the waste management of nuclear materials in the underground disposal concept. In the present analysis, interface kinetics at the solid - liquid interface accounts for recalescent thermal behaviour during solidification. The theoretical results were compared to available experimental results and the agreement appears fair although some discrepancies have been attributed to uncertainties with thermophysical properties. (author)

  1. Numerical simulation of freckle formation in directional solidification of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Poirier, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification is presented which simulates the formation of segregation models known as 'freckles' during directional solidification of binary alloys. The growth of the two-phase or dendritic zone is calculated by solving the coupled equations of momentum, energy, and solute transport, as well as maintaining the thermodynamic constraints dictated by the phase diagram of the alloy. Calculations for lead-tin alloys show that the thermosolutal convection in the dendritic zone during solidification can produce heavily localized inhomogeneities in the composition of the final alloy.

  2. Multiscale modeling of alloy solidification using a database approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lijian; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2007-11-01

    A two-scale model based on a database approach is presented to investigate alloy solidification. Appropriate assumptions are introduced to describe the behavior of macroscopic temperature, macroscopic concentration, liquid volume fraction and microstructure features. These assumptions lead to a macroscale model with two unknown functions: liquid volume fraction and microstructure features. These functions are computed using information from microscale solutions of selected problems. This work addresses the selection of sample problems relevant to the interested problem and the utilization of data from the microscale solution of the selected sample problems. A computationally efficient model, which is different from the microscale and macroscale models, is utilized to find relevant sample problems. In this work, the computationally efficient model is a sharp interface solidification model of a pure material. Similarities between the sample problems and the problem of interest are explored by assuming that the liquid volume fraction and microstructure features are functions of solution features extracted from the solution of the computationally efficient model. The solution features of the computationally efficient model are selected as the interface velocity and thermal gradient in the liquid at the time the sharp solid-liquid interface passes through. An analytical solution of the computationally efficient model is utilized to select sample problems relevant to solution features obtained at any location of the domain of the problem of interest. The microscale solution of selected sample problems is then utilized to evaluate the two unknown functions (liquid volume fraction and microstructure features) in the macroscale model. The temperature solution of the macroscale model is further used to improve the estimation of the liquid volume fraction and microstructure features. Interpolation is utilized in the feature space to greatly reduce the number of required

  3. Propagative selection of tilted array patterns in directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggil; Akamatsu, Silvère; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Karma, Alain

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of tilted cellular/dendritic array patterns that form during directional solidification of a binary alloy when a preferred-growth crystal axis is misoriented with respect to the temperature gradient. In situ experimental observations and phase-field simulations in thin samples reveal the existence of a propagative source-sink mechanism of array spacing selection that operates on larger space and time scales than the competitive growth at play during the initial solidification transient. For tilted arrays, tertiary branching at the diverging edge of the sample acts as a source of new cells with a spacing that can be significantly larger than the initial average spacing. A spatial domain of large spacing then invades the sample propagatively. It thus yields a uniform spacing everywhere, selected independently of the initial conditions, except in a small region near the converging edge of the sample, which acts as a sink of cells. We propose a discrete geometrical model that describes the large-scale evolution of the spatial spacing profile based on the local dependence of the cell drift velocity on the spacing. We also derive a nonlinear advection equation that predicts the invasion velocity of the large-spacing domain, and sheds light on the fundamental nature of this process. The models also account for more complex spacing modulations produced by an irregular dynamics at the source, in good quantitative agreement with both phase-field simulations and experiments. This basic knowledge provides a theoretical basis to improve the processing of single crystals or textured polycrystals for advanced materials.

  4. Droplet solidification and the potential for steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, M.; Fauske, H.K.; Luangdilok, W.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that under certain circumstances a mixture of coarse-hot (molten) drops in water formed from pouring a hot melt into water explodes. This so-called 'steam explosion' is generally believed to involve steam-bubble-collapse-induced fine fragmentation of the melt drops and concomitant water vaporization on a timescale that is short compared with the steam pressure relief time. Motivated by the idea put forth by Okkonen and Sehgal that rapid solidification would render UO 2 -containing (Corium) melt drops stiff and resistant to the steam-bubble-collapse-induced fragmentation required to support an explosion, here we combine solidification theory with an available theory of the stability of thin, submerged crusts subject to acceleration to predict the 'cutoff time' beyond which melt-drop fragmentation is suppressed by crust cover rigidity. Illustration calculations show that the cutoff time for Corium melt drops in water is a fraction of a second and probably shorter than the time it takes to form the explosion-prerequisite-coarse-premixture configuration of melt drops in water, while the opposite is true for the molten aluminum oxide/water system for which the window of opportunity for an explosion is predicted to be several seconds. These theoretical findings are consistent with early experiments that revealed molten uranium oxide or Corium pours into water to be non-explosive and that produced steam explosions upon pouring molten aluminum oxide into water. Also in this paper, the recent TROI Corium/water interaction experiments are examined and it is concluded that they do not contravene the earlier experimental observations that the pouring of prototypical Corium mixtures into water does not result in steam explosions with destructive potential. (author)

  5. Microstructural and mechanical properties of binary Ni–Si eutectic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Musa, E-mail: gogebakan@ksu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Kursun, Celal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Kahramanmaras 46100 (Turkey); Gunduz, Kerem Ozgur; Tarakci, Mehmet; Gencer, Yucel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Gebze, 41400 Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} were prepared by arc melting method. • The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy. • The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. • Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} are paramagnetic. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Si eutectic alloys with nominal compositions of Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20}, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30}, Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} (Ni and Si with the purity of 99.99%) were prepared by arc melting method under vacuum/argon atmosphere. The effects of Si/Ni ratio on the microstructural properties, thermal transformation behavior, micro-hardness and magnetic properties of the Ni–Si eutectic alloys were investigated. These alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Vickers microhardness measurement and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The phases expected according to Ni–Si phase diagram for conventional solidified eutectic Ni–Si alloys are considerably consistent with phase detected by XRD in this study. The quantitative results confirm that the chemical composition of the alloys very close to eutectic compositions and the microstructures are in typical lamellar eutectic morphology. The maximum microhardness value of 1126 HV obtained for Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} alloy which has highest melting temperature amongst Ni–Si eutectics. The microhardness values decreases with increase of Si/Ni ratio. Ni{sub 80}Si{sub 20} and Ni{sub 55}Si{sub 45} alloys are soft ferromagnetic, Ni{sub 70}Si{sub 30} and Ni{sub 45}Si{sub 55} alloys are paramagnetic with no magnetic saturation.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT WITH THE LIQUID PHASE ON FORMATION OF A MICROSTRUCTURE OF EUTECTIC Al-Si-ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anikin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat treatment on the structure of the eutectic Al-Si-alloy, a theoretical substantiation process based on thermal analyzer and cooked microstructures was presented in this paper.

  7. On the performance of a novel grain refiner in hyper-eutectic Al-Si cast alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Bolzoni, L; Nowak, M; Hari Babu, N

    2014-01-01

    The stringent requirements for pollution reduction are pushing the automotive industry towards the employment of lightweight structures and, therefore, aluminium and its alloys play a remarkable role. Al-Si casting alloy with eutectic or hyper- eutectic compositions are, normally, employed for the production of high performance automotive products such as pistons and engine blocks which have to withstand critical loading conditions (i.e. high temperature, high pressure and corrosive exhaust g...

  8. Tacoma mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The name Tacoma refers to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge which collapsed on November 8, 1940 due to massive oscillations caused by high winds. One of the destructive modes was a torsion mode which was excited by transverse wind, a dipole force, and continued until the bridge collapsed. The name is used to refer to a coherent mode of oscillation of a spectrum of oscillators in which the amplitude vs frequency graph contains one node, where the node occurs near the driving frequency and a ω is not symmetric about zero. When this result is applied to vertical instabilities in coasting beams, it implies the existence of a coherent skew quadrupole moment, Q/sub xy/, whenever a coherent dipole oscillation exists

  9. Tacoma mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Wang, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The name Tacoma refers to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge which collapsed on November 8, 1940 due to massive oscillations caused by high winds. One of the destructive modes was a torsion mode which was excited by transverse wind, a dipole force, and continued until the bridge collapsed. The name is used to refer to a coherent mode of oscillation of a spectrum of oscillators in which the amplitude vs frequency graph contains one node, where the node occurs near the driving frequency and a(ω) is not symmetric about zero. When this result is applied to vertical instabilities in coasting beams, it implies the existence of a coherent skew quadrupole moment, whenever a coherent dipole oscillation exists

  10. Thermodynamic assessment of liquid composition change during solidification and its effect on freckle formation in superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Zhengdong; Liu Xingbo; Yang Wanhong; Chang, K.-M.; Barbero, Ever

    2004-01-01

    The solidification macrosegregation, i.e. freckle, becomes more and more concerned with ever increasing demand for the large ingot size of superalloys. The evaluation of freckle formation is very difficult because of the less understanding of freckle formation mechanism and complex solidification behaviors of multi-component superalloys. The macrostructure of typical Nb-bearing and Ti-bearing superalloys in horizontally directional solidification and vacuum arc remelting (VAR) ingots were investigated to clarify the freckle formation mechanism. The thermodynamic approach was proposed to simulate the solidification behaviors. The relative Ra numbers, a reliable criterion, of freckle formation for some alloys were obtained based on the results of thermodynamic calculations. This thermodynamic approach was evaluated through comparison of the calculations from semi-experimental results. The Ra numbers obtained by thermodynamic approach are in good agreement with the ingot size capability of the industry melting shops, which is limited mainly by freckle defects

  11. Toxic and hazardous waste disposal. Volume 1. Processes for stabilization/solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojasek, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Processes for the stabilization and/or solidification of toxic, hazardous, and radioactive wastes are reviewed. The types of wastes classified as hazardous are defined. The following processes for the solidification of hazardous wastes are described: lime-based techniques; thermoplastic techniques; organic polymer techniques; and encapsulation. The following processes for the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes are described: calcination; glassification; and ceramics. The solidification of low-level radioactive wastes with asphalt, cement, and polymeric materials is also discussed. Other topics covered include: the use of an extruder/evaporator to stabilize and solidify hazardous wastes; effect disposal of fine coal refuse and flue gas desulfurization slurries using Calcilox additive stabilization; the Terra-Tite Process; the Petrifix Process; the SFT Terra-Crete Process; Sealosafe Process; Chemfix Process; and options for disposal of sulfur oxide wastes

  12. Recent Advances in Study of Solid-Liquid Interfaces and Solidification of Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Asle Zaeem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Solidification occurs in several material processing methods, such as in casting, welding, and laser additive manufacturing of metals, and it controls the nano- and microstructures, as well as the overall properties of the products[...

  13. THE SITE DEMONSTRATION OF CHEMFIX SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS AT THE PORTABLE EQUIPMENT SALVAGE COMPANY SITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A demonstration of the GHEMFIX solidification/stabilization process was conducted under the United States Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The demonstration was conducted in March 1989, at the Portable Equipment Sa...

  14. Microstructural characterization of TiAl3 intermetallic obtained by the Fast solidification technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles C, C.; Rosas, G.; Perez C, R.

    1997-01-01

    In this work preliminary studies about the TiAl 3 characterization are reported which is obtained starting from the Fast solidification technique in an arc furnace using Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. (Author)

  15. SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION'S SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Applications Analysis Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization treatment process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The STC immobilization technology utilizes a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stab...

  16. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: BDAT FOR SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SUPERFUND SOILS (DRAFT FINAL REPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report evaluates the performance of solidification as a method for treating solids from Superfund sites. Tests were conducted on four different artificially contaminated soils which are representative of soils found at the sites. Contaminated soils were solidified us...

  17. EVALUATION OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION AS A BEST DEMONSTRATED AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTAMINATED SOILS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project involved the evaluation of solidification/stabilization technology as a BDAT for contaminated soil. Three binding agents were used on four different synthetically contaminated soils. Performance evaluation data included unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and the T...

  18. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP AND CREOSOTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA's NRMRL conducted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. Formulations developed during these studies wer...

  19. Macrosegregation and Grain Formation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification Through Cross-Section Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Masoud; Lauer, Mark; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David; Grugel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical Al-7 wt% Silicon, Al-19 wt% Copper and Lead-6 wt% Antimony alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS) with liquid above, solid below, and gravity pointing down, in graphite crucibles having an abrupt cross-sectional increase. These alloys have similar solidification shrinkage but are expected to have different degrees of thermosolutal convection during solidification. Microstructures in the DS samples in the vicinity of the section change have been studied in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal effects and solidification shrinkage. Extensive radial and axial macrosegregation associated with cross-section change is observed. It also appears that steepling and local primary alpha-phase remelting resulting from convection are responsible for stray grain formation at the reentrant corners. Preliminary results from a numerical model, which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone, indicate that these regions are prone to solutal remelting of dendrites.

  20. Elemental analysis of the Al-Fe intermetallic prepared by fast solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval J, R.A.; Lopez M, J.; Ramirez T, J.J.; Aspiazu F, J.; Villasenor S, P.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the PIXE technique samples of the Al-Fe intermetallic prepared by fast solidification, obtained starting from Al recycled were analyzed. The concentrations of the found elements are given. (Author)

  1. Solidification process for toxic and hazardous wastes. Second part: Cement solidification matrices; Inertizzazione di rifiuti tossici e nocivi (RTN). Parte seconda: Inertizzazione in matrici cementizie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato, A; Arcuri, L; Dotti, M; Pace, A; Pietrelli, L; Ricci, G [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Casaccia (Italy); Basta, M; Cali, V; Pagliai, V [ENEA - Dipartimento Ciclo del Combustibile, Centro Ricerche Energia, Saluggia (Italy)

    1989-05-15

    This paper reports the second part of a general study carried out at the Nuclear Fuel Division aiming at verifying the possible application of the radioactive waste solidification processes to industrial hazardous wastes (RTN). The cement solidification of several RTN types has been taken into consideration, both from the technical and from the economic point of view. After a short examination of the Italian juridical and economical situation in the field, which demonstrates the need of the RTN solidification, the origin and characteristics of the RTN considered in the study and directly provided by the producing industries are reviewed. The laboratory experimental results of the cementation of RTN produced by gold manufacturing industries and by galvanic industries are reported. The cementation process can be considered a very effective mean for reducing both the RTN management costs and the environmental impact of RTN disposal. (author)

  2. Studies on SiC(p) reinforced Al-Al sub 3 Ni eutectic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrom, A.K.; Foo, L.C.; Ismail, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation on processing of Al-5.69wt% Ni eutectic with SiC particulate composites is reported. The intermetallic composites are prepared by elemental powder metallurgy route and sintered at two different temperatures, i.e., 600 degree C and 620 degree C. Results show that the metal matrix was Al-Al sub 3 Ni eutectic. The phase analysis by XRD identified the presence of Al sub 3 Ni and Al as dominant phases together with silicon and Al sub 4 C sub 3 phase as minor phases. The Al sub 4 C sub 3 and Si phases are formed during sintering due to SiC-Al interface reaction. SEM micrographs also reveal the formation of microvoid surrounding the SiC particle

  3. Filtration of aluminum alloys and its influence on mechanical properties and shape of eutectical silicium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Brůna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Filtration during casting of high quality aluminum alloys belongs to main refining methods. Even when there are many years of experiences and experimental works on this subject, there are still some specific anomalies. While using ceramic filtration media during casting of aluminum alloys, almost in all experiments occurred increase of strength limit and atypical increase of extension. This anomaly was not explained with classical metallurgical methods, black-white contrast after surface etching neither with color surface etching. For that reason was used deep etching on REM. By using pressed ceramic filters, by studying morphology eutectical silicon was observed modification morphology of eutectical silicon, this explains increase extension after filtration. Pressed ceramic filters were used on experimental works. Casting was executed on hardenable alloy AlSi10MgMn.

  4. Chip bonding of low-melting eutectic alloys by transmitted laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Christian; Venkatesh, Arjun; Schneider, Friedrich; Hermsdorf, Jörg; Bengsch, Sebastian; Wurz, Marc C.; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2017-06-01

    Present-day thermode bond systems for the assembly of radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips are mechanically inflexible, difficult to control, and will not meet future manufacturing challenges sufficiently. Chip bonding, one of the key processes in the production of integrated circuits (ICs), has a high potential for optimization with respect to process duration and process flexibility. For this purpose, the technologies used, so far, are supposed to be replaced by a transmission laser-bonding process using low-melting eutectic alloys. In this study, successful bonding investigations of mock silicon chips and of RFID chips on flexible polymer substrates are presented using the low-melting eutectic alloy, 52In48Sn, and a laser with a wavelength of 2 μm.

  5. Metal-ion catalyzed polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Szostak, Jack W.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA world requires among other processes the non-enzymatic, template-directed replication of genetic polymers such as RNA or related nucleic acids, possibly catalyzed by metal ions. The absence of uridilate derivative polymerization on adenine containing templates has been...... the main issue preventing an efficient template-directed RNA polymerization. We report here the investigation of template-directed RNA polymerization in the eutectic phase in water-ice. In particular, it was found that activated Uridilate monomers in the presence of metal-ion catalysts could efficiently......-pairing opportunities. These results suggest that a template-directed RNA polymerization catalyzed by metal-ions could be carried out under eutectic phase in water-ice conditions....

  6. Phase-field-lattice Boltzmann study for lamellar eutectic growth in a natural convection melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the influence of natural convection on the lamellar eutectic growth is determined by a phase-field-lattice Boltzmann study for Al-Cu eutectic alloy. The mass difference resulting from concentration difference led to the fluid flow, and a robust parallel and adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was employed to improve the computational efficiency without any compromising accuracy. Results show that the existence of natural convection would affect the growth undercooling and thus control the interface shape by adjusting the lamellar width. In particular, by alternating the magnitude of the solute expansion coefficient, the strength of the natural convection is changed. Corresponding microstructure patterns are discussed and compared with those under no-convection conditions.

  7. Steady-state solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, S. S. L.; Huppert, Herbert E.; Worster, M. Grae

    We report on a series of experiments in which a Hele-Shaw cell containing aqueous solutions of NH4Cl was translated at prescribed rates through a steady temperature gradient. The salt formed the primary solid phase of a mushy layer as the solution solidified, with the salt-depleted residual fluid driving buoyancy-driven convection and the development of chimneys in the mushy layer. Depending on the operating conditions, several morphological transitions occurred. A regime diagram is presented quantifying these transitions as a function of freezing rate and the initial concentration of the solution. In general, for a given concentration, increasing the freezing rate caused the steady-state system to change from a convecting mushy layer with chimneys to a non-convecting mushy layer below a relatively quiescent liquid, and then to a much thinner mushy layer separated from the liquid by a region of active secondary nucleation. At higher initial concentrations the second of these states did not occur. At lower concentrations, but still above the eutectic, the mushy layer disappeared. A simple mathematical model of the system is developed which compares well with the experimental measurements of the intermediate, non-convecting state and serves as a benchmark against which to understand some of the effects of convection. Movies are available with the online version of the paper.

  8. Investigation of solidification behavior of the Sn-rich ternary Sn–Bi–Zn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mladenović

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solidification properties and microstructure of six as-cast Sn–Bi–Zn alloys with 80 at.% of Sn and variable contents of Bi and Zn were experimentally investigated using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The experimentally obtained results were compared with predicted phase equilibria according to the calculation of phase diagram (CALPHAD method and by the Scheil solidification simulation.

  9. Premature melt solidification during mold filling and its influence on the as-cast structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M.; Ahmadein, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2018-03-01

    Premature melt solidification is the solidification of a melt during mold filling. In this study, a numerical model is used to analyze the influence of the pouring process on the premature solidification. The numerical model considers three phases, namely, air, melt, and equiaxed crystals. The crystals are assumed to have originated from the heterogeneous nucleation in the undercooled melt resulting from the first contact of the melt with the cold mold during pouring. The transport of the crystals by the melt flow, in accordance with the socalled "big bang" theory, is considered. The crystals are assumed globular in morphology and capable of growing according to the local constitutional undercooling. These crystals can also be remelted by mixing with the superheated melt. As the modeling results, the evolutionary trends of the number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt during pouring are presented. The calculated number density of the crystals and the volume fraction of the solid crystals in the melt at the end of pouring are used as the initial conditions for the subsequent solidification simulation of the evolution of the as-cast structure. A five-phase volume-average model for mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification is used for the solidification simulation. An improved agreement between the simulation and experimental results is achieved by considering the effect of premature melt solidification during mold filling. Finally, the influences of pouring parameters, namely, pouring temperature, initial mold temperature, and pouring rate, on the premature melt solidification are discussed.

  10. Effect of blended materials on U(VI) retention characteristics for portland cement solidification product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Ma Xiaoling; Li Yuxiang

    2006-01-01

    Using the simulated groundwater as leaching liquid, the retention capability of U(VI) in solidification products with Portland cement, the Portland cement containing silica fume, the Portland cement containing metakaolin and the Portland cement containing fly ash was researched by leaching experiments at 25 degree C for 42 d. The results indicate silica fume and metakaolin as blended materials can improve the U(VI) retention capability of Portland cement solidification product, but fly ash can not. (authors)

  11. Application of the dual reciprocity boundary element method for numerical modelling of solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Majchrzak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The dual reciprocity boundary element method is applied for numerical modelling of solidification process. This variant of the BEM is connected with the transformation of the domain integral to the boundary integrals. In the paper the details of the dual reciprocity boundary element method are presented and the usefulness of this approach to solidification process modelling is demonstrated. In the final part of the paper the examples of computations are shown.

  12. Analysis of capital and operating costs associated with high level waste solidification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1978-03-01

    An analysis was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of annual operating costs and capital costs of waste solidification processes to various parameters defined by the requirements of a proposed Federal waste repository. Five process methods and waste forms examined were: salt cake, spray calcine, fluidized bed calcine, borosilicate glass, and supercalcine multibarrier. Differential cost estimates of the annual operating and maintenance costs and the capital costs for the five HLW solidification alternates were developed

  13. Mechanical properties of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    Tensile and high-cycle fatigue behavior of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials were studied. Through the repeated thermomechanical treatment (RTMT) which is a repeat of the multi steps cold-working followed by heat treatment, Si crystals and/or intermetallic compounds were broken into some fragments and dispersed in the aluminum matrix. Fine dispersion of the second phase particles exhibited good ductility, since early fracture was overcome. A few large Si cry...

  14. Stabilizing Effects of Deep Eutectic Solvents on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mediated Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima Zohra Ibn Majdoub Hassani; Ivan Lavandera; Joseph Kreit

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of different organic solvents, temperature, and the amount of glycerol on the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-catalysed stereoselective reduction of different ketones. These conversions were then analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that when the amount of deep eutectic solvents (DES) increases, it can improve the stereoselectivity of the enzyme although reducing its ability to convert the substrate into the corresponding alcohol. Moreover, glycerol was fou...

  15. The effect of the electrode material on the electrodeposition of zinc from deep eutectic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, L.; Schennach, R.; Gollas, B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mechanistic insight into zinc electrodeposition from deep eutectic solvents. • Overpotential for hydrogen evolution affects the electrodeposition of zinc. • Electrodeposited zinc forms surface alloys on Cu, Au, and Pt. • In situ PM-IRRAS of a ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent on glassy carbon. - Abstract: The voltammetric behaviour of the ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent choline chloride/ethylene glycol 1:2 was investigated on glassy carbon, stainless steel, Au, Pt, Cu, and Zn electrodes. While cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon and stainless steel showed a cathodic peak for zinc electrodeposition only in the anodic reverse sweep, a cathodic peak was found also in the cathodic forward sweep on Au, Pt, Cu, and Zn. This behaviour is in agreement with the proposed mechanism of zinc deposition from an intermediate species Z, whose formation depends on the cathodic reduction potential of the solvent. The voltammetric reduction of the electrolyte involves hydrogen evolution and as a result the formation of Z and its reduction to zinc depend on the hydrogen overpotential for each electrode material. On Au, Pt, and Cu also the anodic stripping was different from that on glassy carbon and steel due to the formation of surface zinc alloys with the three former metals. The morphology of the zinc layers on Cu has been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and focussed ion beam. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of crystalline zinc and a Cu_4Zn phase. Spectroelectrochemistry by means of polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) on a glassy carbon electrode in the ZnCl_2 containing deep eutectic solvent showed characteristic potential dependent changes. The variation of band intensities at different applied potentials correlate with the voltammetry and suggest the formation of a compact blocking layer on the electrode surface, which inhibits the electrodeposition of zinc at sufficiently negative

  16. Temperature-dependent viscosities of eutectic Al-Si alloys modified with Sr and P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Xigui [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China)], E-mail: sxglm@126.com; Bian Xiufang; Zhang Jingxiang; Zhang Jie [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan, 250061 (China)

    2009-06-24

    The viscosities of eutectic Al-12 wt.%Si alloy and those modified with Sr and P were investigated using high-temperature torsional oscillation viscometer. Strontium decreased melt's viscosity, while phosphorus increased viscosity. Both additional level and means of addition affected the variation of viscosity. The activation energy of viscous flow was strengthened after modification, but the influence of modification on the molar volume was perplexing.

  17. Experimental investigation of thermophysical properties of eutectic Re-C at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, R. S.; Senchenko, V. N.; Sulyanov, S. N.

    2018-01-01

    Using the previously described experimental setup for investigation of thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressures and temperatures a few experiments with samples of cast eutectic Re-C were carried out. The experimental technique was extended for millisecond electrical heating of the samples under the high static pressure of inert gas. First experimental data on the specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity and linear thermal expansion of ReC0.3 were obtained.

  18. Chemical and electrochemical properties in the molten lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delarue, G.

    1960-12-01

    We have studied the behaviour of several chemical species in the molten LiCI-KCI eutectic. The solubility of certain oxides and sulphides has made it possible for us to show the existence of O 2- and S 2- ions. We have been able to show the existence of a certain number of chemical reactions: oxido-reduction precipitation, complex formation; we have studied, amongst others, the oxidation of O 2- and of S 2- . (author) [fr

  19. Chemical interaction of the In-Ga eutectic with Al and Al-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenikhin, M.V.; Bubnov, A.V.; Duplyakin, V.K.; Nizovskij, A.I.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical interaction of the indium-gallium eutectic with Al and Al-base alloys is studied by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and electron microscopy. Experimental data are presented that shed light on the reaction mechanism and the diffusion processes responsible for the subsequent disintegration of the material and its dissolution in water. Mechanical tests show that the activation of aluminum leads to a transition from plastic to brittle fracture [ru

  20. New eutectic ionic liquids for lipase activation and enzymatic preparation of biodiesel†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2012-01-01

    The enzymatic preparation of biodiesel has been hampered by the lack of suitable solvents with desirable properties such as high lipase compatibility, low cost, low viscosity, high biodegradability, and ease of product separation. Recent interest in using ionic liquids (ILs) as advanced reaction media has led to fast reaction rates and high yields in the enzymatic synthesis of biodiesel. However, conventional (i.e., cation–anion paired) ILs based on imidazolium and other quaternary ammonium salts remain too expensive for wide application at industrial scales. In this study, we report on newly-synthesized eutectic ILs derived from choline acetate or choline chloride coupled with biocompatible hydrogen-bond donors, such as glycerol. These eutectic solvents have favorable properties including low viscosity, high biodegradability, and excellent compatibility with Novozym® 435, a commercial immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B. Furthermore, in a model biodiesel synthesis system, we demonstrate high reaction rates for the enzymatic transesterification of Miglyol® oil 812 with methanol, catalyzed by Novozym® 435 in choline acetate/glycerol (1 : 1.5 molar ratio). The high conversion (97%) of the triglyceride obtained within 3 h, under optimal conditions, suggests that these novel eutectic solvents warrant further exploration as potential media in the enzymatic production of biodiesel. PMID:21283901