WorldWideScience

Sample records for euscepes postfasciatus fairmaire

  1. Illustrated guide to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire and related species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Lourdes Chamorro; Eduard Jendek; Robert A. Haack; Toby Petrice; Norman E. Woodley; Alexander S. Konstantinov; Mark G. Volkovitsh; Xing-Ke Yang; Vasily V. Grebennikov

    2015-01-01

    The 33 species of Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) hypothesized to be most closely related or most similar to Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (the emerald ash borer), are described and illustrated. Morphology (adults and immatures), biology, distribution, detailed taxonomic history and systematics are presented for each species,...

  2. Heat treatment of Firewood for Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Richard D. Bergman; Brian K. Brashaw; Scott W. Myers

    2014-01-01

    The movement of firewood within emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB)-infested states and into adjoining areas has been a contributor to its spread throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to prevent further human-aided spread of EAB and to facilitate interstate commerce, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and cooperating...

  3. Genetic analysis of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) populations in Asia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland; Robert A. Haack; Anthony I. Cognato; James J. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees first discovered outside of its native range of northeastern Asia in 2002. EAB spread from its initial zone of discovery in the Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario metropolitan areas,...

  4. Gut microbiota of an invasive subcortical beetle, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, across various life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana Vasanthakumar; Jo Handelsman; Patrick D. Schloss; Leah S. Bauer; Kenneth F. Raffa

    2008-01-01

    We characterized gut microbial communities in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive phloem-feeding and wood-boring beetle that has caused extensive mortality to urban and forest ash trees. Analyses included both 16S rRNA gene-based and culture-based approaches. We estimated that the emerald ash borer gut harbors 44, 71,...

  5. Description of three new species related to Themus (Haplothemus) coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889) (Coleoptera: Cantharidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junyan; Yang, Yuxia; Yang, Xingke

    2015-10-29

    The male of Themus (Haplothemus) coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889) is discovered and described for the first time. Three new species related to this species are described from China: T. (H.) rectus sp. nov., T. (H.) bimaculaticollis sp. nov. and T. (H.) licentimimus sp. nov., which are provided with the illustrations of habitus and genitalia of both sexes and abdominal sternites VIII of female. A key to the species related to T. (H.) coriaceipennis is also provided.

  6. Limited mobility of target pests crucially lowers controllability when sterile insect releases are spatiotemporally biased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegawa, Yusuke; Himuro, Chihiro

    2017-05-21

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a genetic pest control method wherein mass-reared sterile insects are periodically released into the wild, thereby impeding the successful reproduction of fertile pests. In Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, the SIT has been implemented to eradicate the West Indian sweet potato weevil Euscepes postfasciatus (Fairmaire), which is a flightless agricultural pest of sweet potatoes. It is known that E. postfasciatus is much less mobile than other insects to which the SIT has been applied. However, previous theoretical studies have rarely examined effects of low mobility of target pests and variation in the spatiotemporal evenness of sterile insect releases. To theoretically examine the effects of spatiotemporal evenness on the regional eradication of less mobile pests, we constructed a simple two-patch population model comprised of a pest and sterile insect moving between two habitats, and numerically simulated different release strategies (varying the number of released sterile insects and release intervals). We found that spatially biased releases allowed the pest to spatially escape from the sterile insect, and thus intensively lowered its controllability. However, we showed that the temporally counterbalancing spatially biased releases by swapping the number of released insects in the two habitats at every release (called temporal balancing) could greatly mitigate this negative effect and promote the controllability. We also showed that the negative effect of spatiotemporally biased releases was a result of the limited mobility of the target insect. Although directed dispersal of the insects in response to habitats of differing quality could lower the controllability in the more productive habitat, the temporal balancing could promote and eventually maximize the controllability as released insects increased. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of temperature and diet on the development of Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Diaperinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato C. Marinoni

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 develops in stored food products (peanuts, maize, oats, rice, sorghum, etc. and breeds successfully in the laboratory. To determine the best conditions for development, experiments were set up in different temperatures and diets, similar to storage conditions of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.. The higher viability of individuals and the shorter developmental time were observed in the diet composed of hulls and seeds of fruits at 21 and 24°C.Ulomoides dermestoides (Fairmaire, 1893 é um coleóptero que se desenvolve em produtos armazenados (amendoim, milho, aveia, arroz, sorgo, etc. e é facilmente criado em laboratório. Para avaliar as melhores condições de desenvolvimento foram estabelecidos experimentos em diferentes temperaturas e em dietas definidas por três diferentes condições de armazenamento de amendoim (Arachis hypogaea L.. A maior viabilidade de indivíduos e o menor tempo de desenvolvimento foram verificados na dieta constituída por frutos abertos (vagens e grãos e em temperaturas de 21 e 24°C. É discutida a possível influência da umidade relativa nos resultados.

  8. Microsatellite population genetics of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire): comparisons between Asian and North American populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson C. Keever; Christal Nieman; Larissa Ramsay; Carol E. Ritland; Leah S. Bauer; D. Barry Lyons; Jenny S. Cory

    2013-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera; Buprestidae), is an invasive wood-boring beetle native to northeast Asia. This species was first detected in Michigan USA in 2002, and is a significant threat to native and ornamental ash tree species (Fraxinus spp.) throughout North America. We...

  9. A contact sex pheromone component of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Peter J.; Ryall, Krista; Barry Lyons, D.; Sweeney, Jon; Wu, Junping

    2009-05-01

    Analyses of the elytral hydrocarbons from male and female emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, that were freshly emerged vs. sexually mature (>10 days old) revealed a female-specific compound, 9-methyl-pentacosane (9-Me-C25), only present in sexually mature females. This material was synthesized by the Wittig reaction of 2-decanone with ( n-hexadecyl)-triphenylphosphonium bromide followed by catalytic reduction to yield racemic 9-Me C25, which matched the natural compound by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (retention time and EI mass spectrum). In field bioassays with freeze-killed sexually mature A. planipennis females, feral males spent significantly more time in contact and attempting copulation with unwashed females than with females that had been washed in n-hexane to remove the cuticular lipids. Hexane-washed females to which 9-Me-C25 had been reapplied elicited similar contact time and percentage of time attempting copulation as unwashed females, indicating that 9-methyl-pentacosane is a contact sex pheromone component of A. planipennis. This is the first contact sex pheromone identified in the Buprestidae.

  10. Lethal trap trees: a potential option for emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Lewis, Phillip A

    2016-05-01

    Economic and ecological impacts of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality resulting from emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) invasion are severe in forested, residential and urban areas. Management options include girdling ash trees to attract ovipositing adult beetles and then destroying infested trees before larvae develop or protecting ash with a highly effective, systemic emamectin benzoate insecticide. Injecting this insecticide and then girdling injected trees a few weeks later could effectively create lethal trap trees, similar to a bait-and-kill tactic, if girdling does not interfere with insecticide translocation. We compared EAB larval densities on girdled trees, trees injected with the emamectin benzoate insecticide, trees injected with the insecticide and then girdled 18-21 days later and untreated controls at multiple sites. Pretreatment larval densities did not differ among treatments. Current-year larval densities were higher on girdled and control trees than on any trees treated with insecticide at all sites. Foliar residue analysis and adult EAB bioassays showed that girdling trees after insecticide injections did not reduce insecticide translocation. Girdling ash trees to attract adult EAB did not reduce efficacy of emamectin benzoate trunk injections applied ≥ 18 days earlier and could potentially be used in integrated management programs to slow EAB population growth. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Impacts of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) induced ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality on forest carbon cycling and successional dynamics in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Kathleen S. Knight; Miquel. Gonzalez-Meler

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are widely recognized as altering species and community dynamics, but their impacts on biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem processes are less understood. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is a phloem feeding beetle that was inadvertently introduced to the US in the 1990s and relies solely on ash trees (...

  12. Effects of visual silhouette, leaf size and host species on feeding preference by adult emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive species recently established in North America. In large arena bioassays, when given a choice among live green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh and artificial ash saplings that were hidden or exposed from view, beetles preferred live...

  13. Preimaginal stages of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae: an invasive pest on ash trees (Fraxinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lourdes Chamorro

    Full Text Available This study provides the most detailed description of the immature stages of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire to date and illustrates suites of larval characters useful in distinguishing among Agrilus Curtis species and instars. Immature stages of eight species of Agrilus were examined and imaged using light and scanning electron microscopy. For A. planipennis all preimaginal stages (egg, instars I-IV, prepupa and pupa were described. A combination of 14 character states were identified that serve to identify larvae of A. planipennis. Our results support the segregation of Agrilus larvae into two informal assemblages based on characters of the mouthparts, prothorax, and abdomen: the A. viridis and A. ater assemblages, with A. planipennis being more similar to the former. Additional evidence is provided in favor of excluding A. planipennis from the subgenus Uragrilus.

  14. Energy storage and C:N:P variation in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) larva across a climate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Zhou, Xuan; Small, Gaston E; Sterner, Robert; Kang, HongZhang; Liu, Chungjiang

    2013-04-01

    Increasing empirical evidence has documented variability in elemental composition within species. However, the extent, causes, and pattern of variability in consumer stoichiometry across a large geographical scale are not well understood. Here, we investigated this issue using a holometabolous insect, weevils (Curculio davidi Fairmaire). Larvae of this species store energy needed for diapause, and variable energy requirements across the geographic range of this species could lead to differences in body elemental composition. Our results showed that variability was high (assessed as the coefficient of variation (CV)) in larval body nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) (CV, 10% for N and 13% for P) compared to emerging adults (CV, 5% for N and 8% for P). Temperature-related factors explained more variation than other climatic factors and food for carbon (C), N and P in weevil. In warmer regions, larval C concentration was higher, while N and P were lower. The high C content of weevil larvae relative to both their food source and their adult stage was attributed to energy storage. Across the climatic gradient of its geographic range, larval body C content increased with mean annual temperature and decreased with average diurnal temperature range. This finding implies that temperature-related C storage drives the high variability in elemental composition of larvae across the climate gradient, and also effectively dampens the stoichiometric imbalance between consumers and food resources while serving as an energy reservoir for overwintering and metamorphosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Avaliação de acessos de batata-doce para resistência à broca-da-raiz, crisomelídeos e elaterídeos Screening of sweet potato accessions for resistance to the West Indian sweet potato weevil, chrysomelids and elaterids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Humberto França

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliados para resistência a danos causados por insetos nas folhas e raízes, no campo, 366 acessos do Banco Ativo de Germoplasma de batata-doce da Embrapa Hortaliças. Os insetos de interesse foram Diabrotica spp., Conoderus sp., Epitrix sp., e a broca-da-raiz da batata-doce, Euscepes postfasciatus. Considerando o estrato raízes, aproximadamente 21% dos acessos avaliados mostraram-se resistentes a crisomelídeos e elaterídeos, tendo sido identificados pelo menos sete clones melhores que a referência padrão de resistência àqueles insetos, a cultivar Brazlândia Roxa. Sete acessos, entre esses o CNPH 005, CNPH 026 e CNPH 258 mostraram-se bastante homogêneos e consistentes em três avaliações. Esses mesmos clones, além dos clones CNPH 088, CNPH 295, CNPH 314 e CNPH 318 mostraram-se entre os mais resistentes à broca-da-raiz, porque tiveram 7% ou menos das suas raízes tuberosas danificadas por Euscepes postfasciatus enquanto as cultivares Brazlândia Branca e Princesa obtiveram, respectivamente, 23,3% e 53,3% de danos. Outros nove acessos foram classificados como mais suscetíveis que essas cultivares. A aplicação desses resultados no manejo integrado de pragas em batata-doce é discutido.Three hundred sixty six sweet potato plant accessions of the Sweet potato Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Hortali��as (Brazil were evaluated in the field for resistance to the Wireworm-Diabrotica-Systena (WDS pest complex: Diabrotica spp., Conoderus sp., Epitrix sp., and West Indian sweet potato weevil, Euscepes postfaciatus. About 21% of all plant accessions showed high resistance to chrysomelids and elaterids. Seven clones, among them CNPH 005, CNPH 026 and CNPH 258 were more resistant than the standard resistant commercial cultivar Brazlândia Roxa. These sweet potato accessions and CNPH 088, CNPH 295, CNPH 314 and CNPH 318, were the most promising sources of resistance against the West Indian sweet potato weevil because they had 7% or less

  16. Efeito de quatro tipos de mel na longevidade e reprodução de Catolaccus grandis (Hymenoptera:pteromalidae Effect of four types of honey on longevity and reproduction of Catolaccus grandis (Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alves Wanderley

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo conhecer o melhor tipo de mel em relação à longevidade e fertilidade do parasitóide do bicudo-do-algodoeiro Catolaccus grandis. Adultos recém-emergidos foram transferidos para recipientes plásticos de 500mL, adaptados com tubo para fornecer água e umidade para os insetos. Um casal do parasitóide foi mantido em cada recipiente em câmara climatizada a 25±1°C, UR = 70±10% e fotoperíodo de 14h. O trabalho constou de 4 tratamentos: mel de flor de laranjeira; mel de flores de plantas silvestres; mel de cana-de-açúcar (todos produzidos por Apis mellifera e mel de flores silvestres produzido por abelha Jataí (Tetragonistica angustula, com 15 repetições cada. Adultos recém-emergidos do parasitóide receberam cinco larvas de Euscepes postfasciatus encapsuladas em parafilm. Três gotículas de mel foram colocadas sobre o parafilm. Calculou-se a longevidade de machos e fêmeas, número de ovos dia-1 fêmea-1 e número total de ovos fêmea-1 e construíram-se as tabelas de fertilidade. As melhores dietas para alimentar adultos de C. grandis foram o mel silvestre e o de laranjeira. A melhor fecundidade foi observada na dieta de mel de laranjeira (101,60 ovos fêmea-1 e os melhores resultados para aumento reprodutivo e populacional deste parasitóide foram obtidos com mel de laranja e com mel silvestre.The aim of this work was to investigate the best type of honey in relation to longevity and life fertility of Catolaccus grandis. Recent emerged adults were transferred to 500ml plastic recipients adapted to supply water and moisture to insects. A couple of parasite was kept for each recipient in climatic chamber at 25±1°C, RH = 70±10% and photofase 14h. The work had four treatments: orange, wild plant species honey, Jatai Tetragonistica angustula and sugar cane honey with fifteen replications each. Recent emerged adults received five Euscepes postfasciatus larvae, which were encapsulated in parafilm. Three

  17. Biological role of Nardonella endosymbiont in its weevil host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kuriwada

    Full Text Available Weevils constitute the most species-rich animal group with over 60,000 described species, many of which possess specialized symbiotic organs and harbor bacterial endosymbionts. Among the diverse microbial associates of weevils, Nardonella spp. represent the most ancient and widespread endosymbiont lineage, having co-speciated with the host weevils for over 125 million years. Thus far, however, no empirical work on the role of Nardonella for weevil biology has been reported. Here we investigated the biological role of the Nardonella endosymbiont for the West Indian sweet potato weevil, Euscepes postfasciatus. This insect is an experimentally tractable pest insect that can easily be reared on a natural diet of sweet potato root as well as on an agar-based artificial diet. By larval feeding on an antibiotic-containing artificial diet, Nardonella infection was effectively eliminated from the treated insects. The antibiotic-treated insects exhibited significantly lighter body weight and lower growth rate than the control insects. Then, the antibiotic-treated insects and the control insects were respectively allowed to mate and oviposit on fresh sweet potatoes without the antibiotic. The offspring of the antibiotic-treated insects, which were all Nardonella-negative, exhibited significantly lighter body weight, smaller body size, lower growth rate and paler body color in comparison with the offspring of the control insects, which were all Nardonella-positive. In conclusion, the Nardonella endosymbiont is involved in normal growth and development of the host weevil. The biological role of the endosymbiont probably underlies the long-lasting host-symbiont co-speciation in the evolutionary course of weevils.

  18. Invasion Genetics of Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis FAIRMAIRE) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia M. Bray; Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Therese Poland; James J. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) was first detected in Michigan and Canada in 2002. Efforts by federal and state regulatory agencies to control this destructive pest have been challenged by the biology of the pest and the speed in which it has spread. Invasion dynamics of the beetle and identifying source populations from Asia may help identify geographic localities of...

  19. Native bark-foraging birds preferentially forage in infected ash (Fraxinus spp.) and prove effective predators of the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Lawrence C. Long; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Joel S. Brown; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler; Christopher J. Whelan

    2014-01-01

    Inadvertently introduced into North America in the 1990s, the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) has been spreading across the Great Lakes Region resulting in widespread ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Native woodpeckers and other bark-foraging insectivores represent one of the few potential natural predators...

  20. Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae Membracidos de Colombia - I. Revisión parcial de las especies del género Alchisme Kirkaldy (Homoptera: Membracidae: Hoplophorioninae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Mejía Ruben

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available Se revisó el género Alchisme Kirkaldy. De las diecinueve especies anotadas por Metcalf (1965 no se obtuvieron especímenes de A. apicalis (Walker, A. costaricensis Goding, A. elevata Goding, A. laticornis Funkhouser, A. pinguicornisFunkhouser, A. recurva (Stäl, A. spinosa Funkhouser y A. truncaticornis (Germar. Se incluyen las descripciones originales de estas especies y tentativamente se localizan en la clave presentada. Se redescriben: A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, para la cual se usa su combinación original A. tridentata (Fairmaire. Se sinonimizóa A. projecta Funkhouser en favor de A. bos (Fairmaire.Se ilustran las principales características del pronoto y de los genitales de los machos; se observaron y se obtuvieron fotografías de los edeagos en un microscopio electrónico "rastreador" (Scanning Electro Microscope, las cualesse incluyen como parte de las ilustraciones. Se analizó la distribución geográfica del género y se ilustró por medio de mapas.The genus Alchisme Kirkaldy was revised. From nineteen species listed by Metcalf (1965 not specimens were obtained of eight of them. Original descriptions of these species are included and tentatively are localized in the key.  A redescription is given for the species A. bos (Fairmaire, A. fastidiosa (Fairmaire, A. grossa (Fairmaire, A. inermis (Fairmaire, A. nigrocarinata (Fairmaire, A. rubrocostata (Spinola, A. turrita (Germar, A. ustulata (Fairmaire, A. virescens (Fairmaire y A. nigrocarinata var. tridentata (Fairmaire, for which was used the original combination A. tridentata (Fairmaire. A. projecta Funkhouser was synonymized in A. bos (Fairmaire. The main pronotum characters and male genitalia are illustred; Scanning Electro Microscope pictures of the

  1. Classification, Natural History, and Evolution of Tarsosteninae (Coleoptera: Cleridae—Part I: Generic Composition of the Subfamily and Key and Phylogeny of Genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weston Opitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Four new genera and one new species of the subfamily Tarsosteninae (Coleoptera: Cleridae are described. The new genera are: Agapetilus Opitz, gen. nov., Fallopylus Opitz, gen., nov, Globoclava Opitz, gen. nov., and Pseudopylus Opitz, gen. nov. The new species involves Agapetilus vietus Opitz. sp. nov. Liostylus Fairmaire is synonymized with Rhophaloclerus Fairmaire. New combinations, Fallopylus pallipes (MacLeay, 1872, comb. nov., Globoclava quadrimaculata (Chevrolat, 1876, comb. nov., Parapylus sedlaceki (Kolibáč, 2003, comb. nov., Pseudopylus okei (Elston, 1929, comb. nov., and Rhophaloclerus pictus (Fairmaire, 1902, comb. nov., are established. A key and phylogeny of the genera of Tarsosteninae is provided.

  2. Parasitoids attacking emerald ash borers in western Pennsylvania and their potential use in biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Duan; R.W. Fuester; J. Wildonger; P.B. Taylor; S. Barth; S-E. Spichiger

    2009-01-01

    Current biological control programs against the emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) have primarily focused on the introduction and releases of exotic parasitoids from China, home of the pest origin....

  3. Emerald ash borer dispersal in Maryland: go forth young pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Sargent; Dick Bean; Michael Raupp; Alan J. Sawyer

    2009-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an exotic invasive pest from Asia, was introduced into Maryland in April 2003 via infested nursery stock shipped from Michigan to a nursery in southern...

  4. Slowing ash mortality: a potential strategy to slam emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; John Bedford

    2009-01-01

    Several isolated outlier populations of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) were discovered in 2008 and additional outliers will likely be found as detection surveys and public outreach activities...

  5. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  6. Comparison of emerald ash borer preference for ash of different species, sun exposure, age, and stress treatments in relation to foliar volatiles and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Yigen Chen

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on six different species of ash including Manchurian ash (F...

  7. Parasitism and olfactory responses of Dastarcus helophoroides (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) to different Cerambycid hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Rong Wei; Zhong-Qi Yang; Therese M. Poland; Jia-Wei. Du

    2009-01-01

    Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) is an important natural enemy of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It is distributed throughout most Provinces in China. We investigated whether there were differences among D. helophoroides populations collected from different hosts in different...

  8. A synopsis of the tribe Micrutalini Haupt (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M. Sakakibara

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Micrutalini and its two genera, Trachytalis Fowler and Micrutalis Fowler, are redescribed. The following species are treated and, in some cases, nomenclatura! changes introduced: Trachytalis isabellina Fowler, 1895; T. distinguenda Fowler, 1895; T. retrofasciata (Lethierry, 1890, comb.n.; Micrutalis alrovena Goding, 1930; M. balteata (Fairmaire, 1846 = Aculalis lucidus Buckton, 1902, syn.n.; M. bella Goding, 1929; M. biguttula (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n.; M. binaria (Fairmaire, 1846 = Acutalis flavivenlris Lethierry, 1890, syn.n.; M. callan-gensis Goding, 1930; M. calva (Say, 1830; M. discalis (Walker, 1858; M. dorsalis (Fitch, 1851; M. dubia Fowler, 1895 = M. zeteki Goding, 1928, syn.n.; M. flava Goding, 1929; M. flavozonala (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n. = Acutalis geniculata Stál, 1862, syn.n. = Acutalis modesta Stál, 1862, syn.n.; M. godfreyi Sakakibara, 1976; M. incerla Sakakibara, 1976; M. lata Goding, 1930; M. litlerala (Fairmaire, 1846, comb.n.;M lugubrina(Stál, 1862;M malleiferaFovj]er, 1895 = M binariamutabilis Fowler, 1895, syn.n.; M. minutus Buckton, 1902; M. nigrolineata (Stál, 1864; M. nigromarginata Funkhouser, 1940; M. notalipennis Fowler, 1895; M. occidentalis (Goding, 1893; M. pollens Fowler, 1895; M. parva (Goding, 1893; M. plagíala (Stál, l&62 = AcutalisvariabiIisBerg, 1879,syn.n. =M. chapadensisGoding, 1930,syn.n.; M. punctifera (Walker, 1858; M. semialba (Stál, 1862; M. stipulipennis Buckton, 1902; M. tau Goding, 1930; M. trifurcala Goding, 1893; M. tripunctata (Fairmaire, 1846 = Acutalis moesta Stál, 1859, syn.n. = M. tartaredoides Goding, 1930, syn.n.. New species: Micrutalis diminuta sp.n. (Ecuador, Pichincha; Micrutalis divisa sp.n. (Brazil, Mato Grosso; Micrutalis henki sp.n. (Panama, Canal Zone; Micrutalis infúscala sp.n. (Venezuela, Portuguesa; Micrutalis margínala sp.n. (Brazil, Mato Grosso; Micrutalis meridana sp.n. (Venezuela, Mérida; Micrutalis mucuya sp.n. (Venezuela, Mérida; Micrutalis robustula

  9. Taxonomic and nomenclatural notes on the genera Themus Motschulsky and Lycocerus Gorham (Coleoptera, Cantharidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxia; Kopetz, Andreas; Yang, Xingke

    2013-01-01

    Themus (s.str.) regalis (Gorham, 1889), nom. rest.; Themus (s.str.) scutulatus Wittmer, 1983 = Themus (s.str.) hmong Kazantsev, 2007, syn. n.; Themus (Telephorops) coelestis (Gorham, 1889) = Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992, syn. n.; Themus (Telephorops) uniformis Wittmer, 1983, stat. n. = Themus (Telephorops) cribripennis Wittmer, 1983, syn. n.; Themus (Haplothemus) licenti Pic, 1938, stat. rev., resurrected from synonymy with Themus coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889); Lycocerus aenescens (Fairmaire, 1889) = Lycocerus tcheonanus (Pic, 1922), syn. n.; Lycocerus asperipennis (Fairmaire, 1891) = Lycocerus wangi (Švihla, 2004), syn. n.; Lycocerus borneoensis nom. n. for Athemellus atricolor (Wittmer, 1972); Lycocerus bilineatus (Wittmer, 1995) = Lycocerus amplus (Wittmer, 1995), syn. n.; Lycocerus fairmairei nom. n. et stat. rev. for Athemus dimidiaticrus (Fairmaire, 1889), originally in Telephorus, resurrected from synonymy with Lycocerus orientalis (Gorham, 1889); Lycocerus confossicollis (Fairmaire, 1891), comb. n. hereby transferred from Cantharis = Lycocerus multiimpressus (Wittmer, 1997), syn. n.; Lycocerus inopaciceps (Pic, 1926) = Athemus (Athemellus) bimaculicollis (Švihla, 2005), syn. n.; Lycocerus nigratus nom. n. for Lycocerus nigricolor (Wittmer, 1972), originally in Podabrinus; Lycocerus plebejus (Kiesenwetter, 1874) = Lycocerus brunneonotaticeps (Pic, 1922), syn. n. = Cantharis rufonotaticeps Pic, 1921 syn. n.; Lycocerus swampingatus (Pic, 1916), comb. n., hereby transferred from Cantharis. The neotypes of Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992 and Athemus (s.str.) maculithorax Wang & Yang, 1992 are designated respectively.

  10. Taxonomic and nomenclatural notes on the genera Themus Motschulsky and Lycocerus Gorham (Coleoptera, Cantharidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxia Yang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following taxonomic or nomenclatural changes are proposed: Themus (s.str. regalis (Gorham, 1889 nom. rest.; T. (s.str. scutulatus Wittmer, 1983 = T. (s.str. hmong Kazantsev, 2007, syn. n.; T. (Telephorops coelestis (Gorham, 1889 = T. violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992, syn. n.; T. (Telephorops uniformis Wittmer, 1983, stat. n. = T. (Telephorops cribripennis Wittmer, 1983, syn. n.; T. (Haplothemus licenti Pic, 1938, stat.rev., resurrected from synonymy with T. coriaceipennis (Fairmaire, 1889; Lycocerus aenescens (Fairmaire, 1889 = L. tcheonanus (Pic, 1922, syn. n.; L. asperipennis (Fairmaire, 1891 = L. wangi (Švihla,2004, syn. n.; L. borneoensis nom. n. for Athemellus atricolor (Wittmer, 1972; L. bilineatus (Wittmer, 1995 = L. amplus (Wittmer, 1995, syn. n.; L. fairmairei nom. n. et stat. rev. for Athemus dimidiaticrus (Fairmaire, 1889, originally in Telephorus, resurrected from synonymy with L. orientalis (Gorham,1889; L. confossicollis (Fairmaire, 1891, comb. n. hereby transferred from Cantharis = L. multiimpressus (Wittmer, 1997, syn. n.; L. inopaciceps (Pic, 1926 = Athemus (Athemellus bimaculicollis (Švihla, 2005, syn. n.; L. nigratus nom. n. for L. nigricolor (Wittmer, 1972, originally in Podabrinus; L. plebejus (Kiesenwetter, 1874 = L. brunneonotaticeps (Pic, 1922, syn. n. = Cantharis rufonotaticeps Pic, 1921, syn. n.; L. swampingatus (Pic, 1916, comb. n., hereby transferred from Cantharis. The neotypes of Themus violetipennis Wang & Yang, 1992 and Athemus (s.str. maculithorax Wang & Yang, 1992 are designated respectively.

  11. A checklist of comb-clawed beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Alleculinae) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Vladimir; Ghahari, Hassan

    2015-10-01

    The fauna of Iranian Alleculinae is summarized in this paper. Seventy species from 12 genera are reported: the subtribe Alleculina Laporte with 4 genera and 18 species: Hymenalia Mulsant (7 species), Hymenophorus Mulsant (3 species), Mycetocharina Seidlitz (6 species), Prionychus Solier (2 species); the subtribe Gonoderina Seidlitz with 3 genera and 6 species: Gonodera Mulsant (1 species), Isomira Mulsant (4 species), Pseudocistela Crotch (1 species), the subtribe Mycetocharina Gistel with a single genus and 3 species: Mycetochara Berthold (3 species) and the tribe Cteniopodini Solier with 4 genera and 43 species: Cteniopus Solier (5 species), Omophlina Reitter (2 species), Omophlus Dejean (32 species) and Podonta Solier (4 species). Nine species are newly recorded for the fauna of Iran: Hymenalia atronitens (Fairmaire, 1892), Mycetocharina rufotestacea Reitter, 1898, Prionychus asiatica (Fairmaire, 1892), Isomira nitidula (Kiesenwetter, 1861), Mycetochara ocularis Reitter, 1884, Cteniopus impressicolis Fairmaire, 1892, Omophlus afghanus Muche, 1965, Omophlus schmidi Muche, 1965 and Podonta elongata Ménétriés, 1832.

  12. Review of the genus Saprinus Erichson, 1834 from Madagascar and adjacent islands with description of a new species (Coleoptera: Histeridae: Saprininae) Third contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2016-02-19

    Clown beetles belonging to the genus Saprinus Erichson, 1834 from Madagascar and adjacent islands are reviewed. The Malagasy fauna of Saprinus consists of seven species: Saprinus (Saprinus) erichsonii Marseul, 1855; Saprinus (Saprinus) fulgidicollis Marseul, 1855; Saprinus (Saprinus) basalis Fairmaire, 1898; Saprinus (Saprinus) cupreus Erichson, 1834; Saprinus (Saprinus) chalcites (Illiger, 1807); Saprinus (Saprinus) splendens (Paykull, 1811); one species S. (Saprinus) labordei sp. nov., is described as new. Saprinus erichsonii Marseul, 1855 is transferred from the subgenus Phaonius Reichardt, 1941 into the nominotypical subgenus based on the morphological evidence. Lectotypes of the following species are designated: Saprinus erichsonii Marseul, 1855; Saprinus basalis Fairmaire, 1898 and Saprinus fulgidicollis Marseul, 1855. Saprinus (Saprinus) cupreus Erichson, 1834 is newly reported from Madagascar and Saprinus (Saprinus) basalis Fairmaire, 1898 is newly reported from the following countries: Congo, Gambia, Central African Republic, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Republic of South Africa.

  13. Use of unwounded ash trees for the detection of emerald ash borer adults: EAB landing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan M. Marshall; Melissa J. Porter; Andrew J. Storer

    2011-01-01

    Incorporation of multiple trapping techniques and sites within a survey program is essential to adequately identify the range of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestation. Within natural forests, EAB lands on stick band traps wrapped around girdled ash trees at a rate similar to that on unwounded ash trees. The objective of...

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of trunk-injected 14C-Imidacloprid in Fraxinus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara R. Tanis; Bert M. Cregg; David Mota-Sanchez; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer) in 2002, researchers have tested several methods of chemical control. Soil drench or trunk injection products containing imidacloprid are commonly used to control adults. However, efficacy can be highly variable andmay be due to uneven translocation of systemic...

  15. Evaluation of Perma Guard D-20 and imidacloprid to control emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice

    2003-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Buprestidae), a native of Asia, was discovered in the USA and Canada in 2002. Drs. Deborah McCullough (Michigan State University) and Therese Poland (USDA-FS) tested several systemic and topical insecticides for EAB control, which they reported elsewhere. One additional insecticide that we...

  16. Emerald ash borer biology and invasion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Yuri Baranchikov; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to eastern Asia and is primarily a pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees (Fig. 1). Established populations of EAB were first detected in the United States and Canada in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002), and based on a dendrochronology study by Siegert...

  17. Life table evaluation of change in emerald ash borer populations due to biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    David E. Jennings; Jian J. Duan; Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Juli R. Gould; Paula M. Shrewsbury; Roy G. Van Driesche

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB), is an invasive buprestid native to northeastern Asia that feeds on ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). First detected in North America (in Michigan, United States and Ontario, Canada) in 2002, EAB has spread rapidly, in part because of movement of infested nursery stock and untreated...

  18. High spatial resolution spectral unmixing for mapping ash species across a complex urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Pontius; Ryan P. Hanavan; Richard A. Hallett; Bruce D. Cook; Lawrence A. Corp

    2017-01-01

    Ash (Fraxinus L.) species are currently threatened by the emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) across a growing area in the eastern US. Accurate mapping of ash species is required to monitor the host resource, predict EAB spread and better understand the short- and long-term effects of EAB on the ash resource...

  19. Population biology of emerald ash borer and its natural enemies in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Tonghai Zhao; Ruitong Gao

    2008-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), also known as emerald ash borer (EAB), was first discovered in Michigan and Ontario, Canada, in 2002 following investigations of declining and dying ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Agrilus planipennis has also spread to Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, Virginia,...

  20. Two New Species of Egg Parasitoids (Hymenoptera:Encyrtidae) of Wood-Boring Beetle Pests from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanzhou Zhang; Dawei Huang; Tonghai Zhao; Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer

    2005-01-01

    Oobius agrili sp.n. and Avetianella xystrocerae sp.n. (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) are described from China. Morphological characters of the new species are illustrated. O. agrili is an egg parasitoid of the emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and A....

  1. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on the reproductive biology and diapause of oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), an egg parasitoid of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang is a solitary egg parasitoid of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and has been introduced to the United States for biological control. We characterized the weekly survivorship, fecundity, and diapause patterns of bo...

  2. A new species of Pediobius (hymenoptera: eulophidae) parasitizing Chyliza apicalis (Diptera: Psilidae) in ash trees attacked by Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael W. Gates; Houping Liu; Leah S. Bauer; Michael E. Schauff

    2005-01-01

    Pediobius chylizae, spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), is described as new and illustrated. This parasitoid has been reared from the puparia of Chyliza apicalis Loew (Diptera: Psilidae) collected from under the bark of ash trees (Oleaceae: Fraxinus spp.) dying after attack by the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleptera: Buprestidae), an invasive...

  3. EAB induced tree mortality impacts ecosystem respiration and tree water use in an experimental forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Douglas J. Lynch; Kathleen S. Knight; Miquel A. Gonzales-Meler

    2011-01-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) has been spreading across the forest landscape of the Midwest resulting in the rapid decline of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Ash trees represent a dominant riparian species in temperate deciduous forests of the Eastern United States (USDA FIA Database). Prior...

  4. Imidacloprid concentration effects on adult emerald ash borer: a greenhouse study

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cappaert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Phil Lewis; John Molongoski

    2008-01-01

    Imidacloprid is the active ingredient of many widely used products applied to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, in valuable urban trees. Systemic treatment with imidacloprid is typically made in the spring to reduce the number of larvae that would otherwise be generated by oviposition during the summer. Substantial...

  5. The relationship between the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) and ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline: Using visual canopy condition assessments and leaf isotope measurements to assess pest damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles E. Flower; Kathleen S. Knight; Joanne Rebbeck; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler

    2013-01-01

    Ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America are being severely impacted by the invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) which was inadvertently introduced to the US in the 1990s from Asia. The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a phloem boring beetle which relies exclusively on ash trees to complete its life cycle. Larvae...

  6. Evaluation of double-decker traps for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera:Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrea C. Anulewicz

    2011-01-01

    Improved detection tools are needed for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive forest insect from Asia that has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America since its discovery in Michigan in 2002.We evaluated attraction of adult A. planipennis...

  7. SLAM: A multi-agency pilot project to SL.ow A.sh M.ortality caused by emerald ash borer in outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in southeast Michigan in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has continued to spread and kill ash (Fraxinus) trees at an alarming rate. As of February 2010, EAB has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Michigan, at least 12 additional U.S. states, and the...

  8. Emerald ash borer trap trees: evaluation of stress agents and trap height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an Asian buprestid discovered in June 2002, has killed an estimated 15 million ash trees (Fraxinus sp.) in southeast Michigan. Larvae feed in serpentine galleries in the phloem, disrupting translocation of water and nutrients. At least 16 Fraxinus species in...

  9. Double-deckers and towers: emerald ash borer traps in 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Andrea C. Anulewicz; David L. Cappaert

    2008-01-01

    Effective and efficient methods to detect and monitor emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, have been a high priority for scientists since this invasive pest was identified in 2002. In 2006, our objectives included development of a practical trap design suitable for operational programs and evaluation of lures. In 2007, we continued...

  10. Emerald Ash Borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Steven A. Katovich

    2004-01-01

    An exotic beetle from Asia was discovered in July 2002 feeding on ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeastern Michigan. It was identified as Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Larvae feed in the cambium between the bark and wood, producing galleries that eventually girdle and kill branches and entire trees. Evidence suggests that A. planipennis has...

  11. Reconstructing the temporal and spatial dynamics of emerald ash borer adults through dendrochronological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold; Frank W. Telewski

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae) was identified in June 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern lower Michigan and Windsor, Ontario. Localized outlier populations have since been discovered across much of lower Michigan and in areas of Indiana, Ohio and...

  12. Dispersal of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, in newly-colonized sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo J. Mercader; Andrew M. Siegert; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough

    2009-01-01

    Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive forest insect pest threatening more than 8 billion ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America. Development of effective survey methods and strategies to slow the spread of A. planipennis requires an understanding of dispersal...

  13. The '06 trap trees in '07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert

    2008-01-01

    To date, use of girdled trap trees remain the most effective method employed by regulatory and resource management agencies for detecting low-density populations of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Locating suitable trees can be difficult, and felling and debarking trap trees is expensive. Alternative options for EAB detection...

  14. Reconstructing the temporal and spatial dynamics of emerald ash borer in black ash: a case study of an outlier site in Roscommon County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold; Frank W. Telewski

    2005-01-01

    The temporal and spatial dynamics of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in an outlier site in Roscommon County, Michigan, were reconstructed using dendrochronological analyses. The site was characterized by pockets of black ash, Fraxinus nigra Marsh., located in swampy areas surrounded...

  15. Predicting the ability to produce emerald ash borer: a comparison of riparian and upland ash forests in southern lower Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert

    2009-01-01

    Concern for the future of ash trees in the United States has risen since the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in southeastern Michigan. The ability of ash forests in the Southern Lower Peninsula of Michigan to produce EAB was compared by physiographic class and stand size. Results showed that EAB production...

  16. Oviposition and development of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on hosts and potential hosts in no-choice bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea C. Anulewicz; Deborah G. McCullough; Deborah L. Miller

    2006-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is an invasive phloem-feeding pest native to Asia. It was first identified in North America in 2002 and has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in southeast Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Since then, additional populations have been discovered...

  17. Simulating the effectiveness of three potential management options to slow the spread of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) populations in localized outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo J. Mercader; Nathan W. Siegert; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a devastating, invasive insect pest of ash trees, Fraxinus spp., in North America. Using a simulation model, we evaluated three potential management options to slow the spread of A. planipennis in discrete outlier sites: (i)...

  18. Evaluation of trunk injections for control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David L. Cappaert; Phillip Lewis; John Molongowski

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, we evaluated trunk injections of imidacloprid for control of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (EAB). Results were variable and indicated that efficacy could be affected by injection timing and method and by tree size and vigor. In 2004, we continued studies to assess the optimal timing for imidacloprid trunk injections and...

  19. Evaluation of non-invasive trunk sprays and trunk-injected emamectic benzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; D.L. Cappaert; T.M. Poland; A.C. Anulewicz; P. Lewis; J. Molongoski

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, we continued to evaluate two neo-nicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuron, applied as non-invasive trunk sprays to control emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. Neo-nicotinoid products are widely used to protect landscape ash trees because they are relatively safe for humans and non-target species. These...

  20. Toward the development of survey trapping technology for the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese Poland; Damon Crook; Joseph Francese; Jason Oliver; Gard Otis; Peter De Groot; Gary Grant; Linda MacDonald; Deborah McCullough; Ivich Fraser; David Lance; Victor Mastro; Nadeer Youssef; Tanya Turk; Melodie Youngs

    2007-01-01

    Improved survey tools are essential for accurately delimiting the infestation of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and for detecting new infestations. Current survey methods including visual surveys for damage, girdled trap trees, and trunk dissections are less than ideal because newly infested trees...

  1. Dispersal of emerald ash borer at outlier sites: three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; Therese M. Poland; David L. Cappaert; Ivich Fraser; David Williams

    2005-01-01

    We worked with cooperators from several state and federal agencies in 2003 and 2004 to assess dispersal of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, from known source points in three outlier sites. In February 2003, we felled and sampled more than 200 ash trees at an outlier site near Tipton, Michigan, where one generation of adult...

  2. Effects of chipping, grinding, and heat on survival of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert; Erin L. Clark; Ivich Fraser; Victor Mastro; Sarah Smith; Christopher Pell

    2007-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem-feeding insect from Asia, was identi?ed in 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus sp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and Essex County, Ontario. Most larvae overwinter as nonfeeding prepupae in the outer sapwood or thick bark of...

  3. Developing attractants and trapping techniques for the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Peter de Groot; Gary Grant; Linda MacDonald; Deborah G. McCullough

    2003-01-01

    Shortly after the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, quarantines regulating the movement of ash logs, firewood, and nursery stock were established to reduce the risk of human-assisted spread of this exotic forest insect pest. Accurate...

  4. Cost of potential emerald ash borer damage in U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Robert G. Haight; Andrew M. Liebhold; Deborah G. McCullough; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Nathan W. Siegert

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), a phloem-feeding beetle native to Asia, was discovered near Detroit, MI, and Windsor, ON, in 2002. As of March 2009, isolated populations of EAB have been detected in nine additional states and Quebec. EAB is a highly invasive forest pest that has the potential to spread and kill native ash...

  5. Survival of emerald ash borer in wood chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David Cappaert

    2003-01-01

    Tremendous numbers of infested ash trees are being removed for control and ultimate eradication of the exotic emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) which was discovered in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario in 2002. Quarantine regulations have been imposed which restrict movement of all life stages...

  6. Emerald Ash Borer Pest Alert, (English version)El barrenador del fresno, el barrenador verde esmeralda del fresno o (Spanish version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Steven Katovich

    2008-01-01

    A beetle from Asia, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), was identified in July 2002 as the cause of widespread ash (Fraxinus spp.) tree decline and mortality in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, Canada. Larval feeding in the tissue between the bark and sapwood disrupts transport of nutrients and...

  7. Progress toward developing trapping techniques for the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. McCullough; Peter dr Groot; Gary Grant; Linda MacDonald; David L. Cappaert

    2005-01-01

    Since the 2002 discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in southeastern Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, the distribution of this exotic insect has continued to expand. The primary infestation in Michigan currently includes 13 counties, with small isolated pockets in at least 13 other counties....

  8. Potential production of emerald ash borer adults: tree, site and landscape-level applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert

    2007-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), an Asian phloem-feeding pest discovered in 2002, is established across southeast Michigan and parts of southern Ontario. More than 35 outlier populations have been identified in other areas of Michigan, Ohio and Indiana. An estimated 12 to 15 million ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees in...

  9. Dispersal of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from discrete epicenters in two outlier sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.W. Siegert; D.G. McCullough; D.W. Williams; I. Fraser; T.M. Poland; S.J. Pierce

    2010-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloem- feeding beetle native to Asia, has become one of the most destructive forest pests in North America. Since it was Þrst identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, dozens of isolated A. planipennis populations have been...

  10. Detection and monitoring of emerald ash borer populations: trap trees and the factors that may influence their effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Storer; Jessica A. Metzger; Ivich Fraser; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert L. Heyd

    2007-01-01

    The exotic emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, was first identified in Michigan in 2002, though it had likely been established there for a number of years prior to detection. A key to management of EAB populations is the ability to detect this insect in order to accurately describe its distribution and to locate new outlier...

  11. Survival of emerald ash borer in chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; David L. Cappaert

    2005-01-01

    The ability of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, to survive following chipping or grinding of infested ash trees remains a critical question for regulatory officials. In October 2002, we felled eight infested ash trees and sampled sections of the trunk and large branches from each tree to estimate EAB density.

  12. Abundance of volatile organic compounds in white ash phloem and emerald ash borer larval frass does not attract Tetrastichus planipennisi in a Y-tube olfactometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Michael D. Ulyshen; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    Many natural enemies employ plant- and/or herbivore-derived signals for host/prey location. The larval parasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is 1 of 3 biocontrol agents currently being released in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coloeptera:...

  13. Comparison Of trap types and colors for capturing emerald ash borer adults at different population densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Deborah G. Mccullough

    2014-01-01

    Results of numerous trials to evaluate artificial trap designs and lures for detection of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, the emerald ash borer, have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because of different A. planipennis population densities in the field sites. In 2010 and 2011, we compared 1) green canopy traps, 2) purple...

  14. Optimizing use of girdled ash trees for management of low-density emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Robert L. Heyd

    2017-01-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of...

  15. Observations on adult Agrilus planipennis on ash in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Lance; I. Fraser; V. C. Mastro

    2007-01-01

    Observations were carried out on adult emerald ash borers, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, on ash trees, Fraxinus spp., in park-like and field-edge settings in South Lyon, MI. Observations consisted of (1) counting beetles in various microhabitats; and (2) tracking behavior of individual beetles for periods of up to 15 min....

  16. Annotated checklist of Buprestidae (Coleoptera) from Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report 106 species of Buprestidae from the state of Louisiana, 97 species based on 4879 specimens examined and nine from previous literature records. Seven new state records are reported, including the first published record of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer), which is now estab...

  17. Laboratory Evaluation of the Toxicity of Systemic Insecticides to Emerald Ash Borer Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Ciaramitaro; Deborah G. McCullough

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive phloem-feeding insect native to Asia, threatens at least 16 North American ash (Fraxinus) species and has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in landscapes and forests. We conducted laboratory bioassays to assess the relative efficacy...

  18. Failure to phytosanitize ash firewood infested with emerald ash borer in a small dry kiln using ISPM-15 standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Charles Goebel; Matthew S. Bumgardner; Daniel A. Herms; Andrew. Sabula

    2010-01-01

    Although current USDA-APHIS standards suggest that a core temperature of 71.1°C (160°F) for 75 min is needed to adequately sanitize emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire-infested firewood, it is unclear whether more moderate (and economical) treatment regimes will adequately eradicate emerald ash borer larvae and prepupae...

  19. Incidence of bark- and wood-boring insects in firewood: a survey at Michigan's Mackinac Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2010-01-01

    Firewood is a major pathway for the inadvertent movement of bark- and wood-infesting insects. After discovery of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in southeastern Michigan in 2002, quarantines were enacted including prohibition of transporting firewood across the Mackinac Bridge between Michigan's Lower and Upper peninsulas...

  20. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T....

  1. Population dynamics of an invasive forest insect and associated natural enemies in the aftermath of invasion: implications for biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the population dynamics of exotic pests and associated natural enemies is important in developing sound management strategies in invaded forest ecosystems. The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive phloem-feeding beetle that h...

  2. Natural enemies implicated in the regulation of an invasive pest: a life table analysis of the population dynamics of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Juli Gould; Roy. Van Driesche

    2014-01-01

    The emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a serious invasive forest pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees in North America. Life tables were constructed for both experimentally established cohorts and wild populations of A. planipennis on healthy host trees from 2008 to 2011 in six forests in central Michigan...

  3. Evaluation of recovery and monitoring methods for parasitoids released against emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Parisio; Juli R. Gould; John D. Vandenberg; Leah S. Bauer; Melissa K. Fierke

    2017-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) is an invasive forest pest and the target of an extensive biological control program designed to mitigate EAB-caused ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Since 2007, hymenopteran parasitoids of EAB from northeastern Asia have been released as biological control agents in North...

  4. Nutritional and defensive chemistry of three North American ash species: possible roles in host performance and preference by emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Therese M. Poland

    2010-01-01

    Black ash (Fraxinus nigra), green ash (F. pennsylvanica), and white ash (F. americana) are the three most abundant ash species in the northeastern USA. We compared emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), adult performance and preference among seedlings...

  5. Modeling potential movements of the emerald ash borer: the model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad; Jonathan Bossenbroek; Davis Sydnor; Mark W. Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is threatening to decimate native ashes (Fraxinus spp.) across North America and, so far, has devastated ash populations across sections of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario. We are attempting to develop a computer model that will predict EAB future movement by adapting...

  6. An assessment of the relationship between emerald ash borer presence and landscape pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2009-01-01

    Six years after its 2002 detection near Detroit, MI, the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has spread hundreds of miles across the Upper Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. Human-assisted transportation of infested ash materials is the primary mechanism of EAB dispersal over long distances. Natural spread...

  7. Biology of emerald ash borer parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Jonathan P. Lelito; Houping Liu; Juli R. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle introduced from China (Bray et al., 2011), was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002; Federal Register, 2003; Cappaert et al., 2005)....

  8. Evaluation of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) control provided by emamectin benzoate and two neonicotinoid insecticides, one and two seasons after treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Therese M. Poland; Andrea C. Anulewicz; Phillip Lewis; David. Cappaert

    2011-01-01

    Effective methods are needed to protect ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) from emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive buprestid that has killed millions of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. We randomly assigned 175 ash trees (11.5-48.1 cm in diameter) in 25 blocks...

  9. Attraction of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and other buprestids to sticky traps of various colors and shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack; Therese M. Poland

    2013-01-01

    The family Buprestidae (Coleoptera) contains numerous economically significant species, including the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, first discovered in North America in 2002. Effective traps for monitoring spread and population densities of EAB and other buprestids are needed. Studies were conducted in 2008 to test different...

  10. Establishment and abundance of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Michigan: potential for success in classical biocontrol of the invasive emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Kristopher J. Abell; Jonathan P. Lelito; Roy. Van Driesche

    2013-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid native to China and has been introduced to the United States since 2007 for classical biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an exotic beetle responsible for widespread ash mortality. Between 2007-2010, T....

  11. Overstory treatment and planting season affect survival of replacement tree species in emerald ash borer threatened Fraxinus nigra forests in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2015-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash) wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, are threatened by the invasive insect, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (EAB)). A potential management option is promoting regeneration of tree species that are not EAB hosts to maintain ecosystem functions. Using an operational-scale...

  12. Canopy treatment influences growth of replacement tree species in Fraxinus nigra forests threatened by the emerald ash borer in Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher E. Looney; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Robert A. Slesak

    2017-01-01

    Fraxinus nigra Marsh. (black ash), a dominant tree species of wetland forests in northern Minnesota, USA, is imperiled by the invasive insect emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888). Regeneration of associated tree species is generally low in F. nigra forests and could be impacted...

  13. Flanged Bombardier beetles from Shanghai, China, with description of a new species in the genus Eustra Schmidt-Goebel (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Paussinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bin Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Four paussine species belonging to three different genera are discovered in Shanghai. A new species, Eustra shanghaiensis Song, sp. n., is described, illustrated, and distinguished from the treated congeners. New distributional data or biological notes on Eustra chinensis Bänninger, 1949, Itamus castaneus Schmidt-Goebel, 1846, and Platyrhopalus davidis Fairmaire, 1886 are provided.

  14. Attraction of the emerald ash borer to ash trees stressed by girdling, herbicide treatment, or wounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah McCullough; Therese Poland; David. Cappaert

    2009-01-01

    New infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive pest native to Asia, are difficult to detect until densities build and symptoms appear on affected ash (Fraxinus spp). We compared the attraction of A. planipennis to ash trees stressed by girdling (bark and phloem removed...

  15. Evaluating the use of plastic bags to prevent escape of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) from firewood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Ciaramitaro; Deepa S. Pureswaran; Andrea Diss-Torrance

    2008-01-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a highly destructive exotic pest of ash (Fraxinus) in North America. Human movement of infested logs, primarily pieces of firewood, is a major pathway for long distance spread of the beetle. Firewood may be confiscated at campgrounds, rest-areas, and...

  16. Review of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), life history, mating behaviours, host plant selection, and host resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Yigen Chen; Jennifer Koch; Deepa. Pureswaran

    2015-01-01

    As of summer 2014, the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has become established in 24 states in the United States of America and has killed tens of millions of ash trees since its introduction into Michigan in the 1990s. Considerable research has been conducted on many aspects of EAB life...

  17. Host selection and feeding preference of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on ash (Fraxinus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa S. Pureswaran; Therese M. Poland

    2009-01-01

    We studied the host selection behavior and feeding preference of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). A. planipennis is an exotic forest insect pest native to Asia that was discovered in North America in 2002 and is causing widespread mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp...

  18. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in northeast China, with notes on two species of parasitic Coleoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Yi Wang; Liang-Ming Cao; Zhong-Qi Yang; Jian J. Duan; Juli R. Gould; Leah S. Bauer

    2016-01-01

    To investigate natural enemies of emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in northeastern China, we conducted field surveys of ash (Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae)) trees in semi-natural forests and plantations at variable EAB densities from 2008 to 2013. Our surveys revealed a complex of...

  19. Regional assessment of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, impacts in forests of the Eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Morin; Andrew M. Liebhold; Scott A. Pugh; Susan J. Crocker

    2017-01-01

    Native to Asia, the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has caused extensive mortality of ash tree species (Fraxinus spp.) in the eastern United States. As of 2013, the pest was documented in 18 % of counties within the natural range of ash in the eastern United States. Regional forest inventory data from the U.S...

  20. Estimating local spread of recently established emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, infestations and the potential to influence it with a systemic insecticide and girdled ash trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew J. Storer; John M. Bedford; Robert Heyd; Nathan W. Siegert; Steven Katovich; Therese M. Poland

    2016-01-01

    Information on the pattern and rate of spread for invasive wood- and phloem-feeding insects, including the emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire), is relatively limited, largely because of the difficulty of detecting subcortical insects at low densities. From 2008 to 2011, grids of girdled and subsequently debarked ash (...

  1. Evaluation of the potential use of a systematic insecticide and girdled trees in area wide management of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo J. Mercader; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew J. Storer; Robert Heyd; Therese M. Poland; Steven. Katovich; John M Bedford

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, has become the most destructive forest insect to invade North America. Unfortunately, tactics to manage A. planipennis are limited and difficult to evaluate, primarily because of the difficulty of detecting and delineating new infestations. Here we use data from a unique...

  2. Effects of trap type, placement and ash distribution on emerald ash borer captures in a low density site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah G. McCullough; Nathan W. Siegert; Therese M. Poland; Steven J. Pierce; Su Zie. Ahn

    2011-01-01

    Effective methods for early detection of newly established, low density emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) infestations are critically needed in North America. We assessed adult A. planipennis captures on four types of traps in a 16-ha site in central Michigan. The site was divided into 16 blocks, each comprised of...

  3. Flight potential of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Deborah L. Miller; Robin A.J. Taylor; Robert A. Haack

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America. Native to several Asian countries, EAB was discovered in six southeastern Michigan counties and southwestern Ontario in 2002. EAB presumably emerged from infested solid wood...

  4. Developing rearing methods for Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Mike Ulyshen; Leah Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yong, a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid, is one of three hymenopteran parasitoids being released in the U.S. for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmair, EAB), an invasive beetle from Asia causing mortality of the ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North...

  5. The influence of satellite populations of emerald ash borer on projected economic damage in U.S. communities, 2010-2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent F. Kovacs; Rodrigo J. Mercader; Robert G. Haight; Nathan W. Siegert; Deborah G. McCullough; Andrew M. Liebhold

    2011-01-01

    The invasion spread of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is characterized by the formation of satellite populations that expand and coalesce with the continuously invading population front. As of January 2010, satellite infestations have been detected in 13 states and two Canadian provinces. Understanding...

  6. Long-term monitoring of the introduced emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) egg parasitoid, Oobius agrili (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), in Michigan, USA and evaluation of a newly developed monitoring technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristopher J. Abell; Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Roy. Van Driesche

    2014-01-01

    Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in North America from China. The egg parasitoid Oobius agrili Zhang and Huang (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) was introduced from China as a biological control agent for this pest in...

  7. Effects of cutting time, stump height, and herbicide application on ash (Fraxinus spp.) stump sprouting and colonization by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby R. Petrice; Robert A. Haack

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to eradicate or slow the spread of emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire [Coleoptera: Buprestidae]) include cutting infested and nearby uninfested ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. However, ash trees readily sprout after they have been cut, providing potential host material for EAB. In 2004-2005, we conducted...

  8. Physiological responses of emerald ash borer larvae to feeding on different ash species reveal putative resistance mechanisms and insect counter-adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.M. Rigsby; D.N. Showalter; D.A. Herms; J.L. Koch; P. Bonello; D. Cipollini

    2015-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an Asian wood-boring beetle, has devastated ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North American forests and landscapes since its discovery there in 2002. In this study, we collected living larvae from EAB-resistant Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandschurica), and susceptible...

  9. Differential response in foliar chemistry of three ash species to emerald ash borer adult feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigen Chen; Justin G.A. Whitehill; Pierluigi Bonello; Therese M. Poland

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an exotic wood-boring beetle that has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources since its discovery in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. In this study, we investigated the phytochemical responses of the three most common North...

  10. Laboratory rearing of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Houping Liu; Toby Petrice

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was identified in 2002 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality throughout southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario. More isolated infestations continue to be found throughout Lower Michigan, northern...

  11. Natural enemies of emerald ash borer in southeastern Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), the emerald ash borer (EAB), is native to China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russian Far East, and Taiwan. In 2002, EAB was identified as the causative agent of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and nearby southwestern Ontario. EAB was inadvertently...

  12. Host range of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Toby R. Petrice; Deborah L. Miller; Leah S. Bauer; Nathan M. Schiff

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is native to China, Korea, Japan, Mongolia, Russia, and Taiwan (Haack et al. 2002). Established populations of EAB were first discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. Smaller populations, which resulted from human assisted movement of infested host material, were found in Ohio, Maryland,...

  13. Microbial control of the emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Houping Liu; Deborah L. Miller

    2004-01-01

    In June 2002, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, a buprestid native to several Asian countries, was identified as the causative agent of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeastern Michigan and southwestern Ontario. Currently, the only method known to control EAB is limited to identifying and destroying...

  14. Emerald ash borer life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Robert A. Haack; Deborah L. Miller; Toby R. Petrice; Houping Liu

    2004-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), native to several Asian countries, was discovered in southeastern Michigan and nearby Ontario in June of 2002. EAB was identified as the cause of extensive ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in approximately 2,500 mi2, and...

  15. Influence of host stress on emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) adult density, development, and distribution in Fraxinus pennsylvanica trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. R. Tluczek; D. G. Mccullough; Therese M. Poland

    2011-01-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), a phloemfeeding beetle native to East Asia, was first discovered in southeast Michigan and Essex County, Ontario, in June 2002 and has since killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in North America. Initial studies in southeast Michigan indicated...

  16. Effects of trap design and placement on capture of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. Francese; Jason B. Oliver; Ivich Fraser; Nadeer Youssef; David R. Lance; Damon J. Crook; Victor C. Mastro

    2007-01-01

    The ongoing objective of this research is to develop a trap that can improve the sensitivity and efficiency of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Fairmaire (EAB) survey and aid the overall program in achieving its goals. As part of this work, we sought to determine the optimal location for trap placement. First we placed...

  17. Evaluation of firewood bagging and vacuum treatment for regulatory control of emerald ash borer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therese M. Poland; Tina M. Kuhn; Chen Zhangjing; Andrea Diss-Torrance; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery in Detroit, Michigan, in 2002, the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has caused extensive mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) as it has spread across southeast Michigan, Ohio, and Ontario, Canada (Haack et al. 2002, Poland and McCullough 2006). In addition to this core...

  18. Evaluation of vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhangjing Chen; Marshall S. White; Melody A. Keena; Therese M. Poland; Erin L. Clark

    2008-01-01

    The potential for using vacuum technology to kill larvae of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), and emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), in solid-wood packing materials (SWPM) and other wood products was assessed. Current...

  19. Comparison of male and female emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) responses to phoebe oil and (Z)-3-hexanol lures in light green prism traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary G. Grant; Therese M. Poland; Tina Ciaramitaro; D. Barry Lyons; Gene C. Jones

    2011-01-01

    We conducted trapping experiments for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, USA, and Ontario, Canada, to compare unbaited light green sticky prism traps with traps baited with phoebe oil, (Z)-3-hexenol (Z3-6:OH), or blends of other green leaf volatiles (GLVs) with Z3-6:OH. Traps were placed in the...

  20. Vegetation responses to simulated emerald ash borer infestation in Fraxinus nigra dominated wetlands of Upper Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua C. Davis; Joseph P. Shannon; Nicholas W. Bolton; Randall K. Kolka; Thomas G. Pypker

    2017-01-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)) is a significant threat to biodiversity and ecosystem processes in North American forests. Of particular concern is the fate of Fraxinus nigra (black ash), which is frequently a dominant canopy species across much of its range. To...

  1. Changes in ash tree demography associated with emerld ash borer invasion, indicated by regional forest inventory data from the Great Lakes States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott A. Pugh; Andrew M. Liebhold; Randall S. Morin

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is a nonnative phloem-feeding beetle that was accidentally introduced near Detroit, Michigan, two to three decades ago. North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) exhibit little or no resistance, and as this insect species expands its range, extensive mortality results. Previous...

  2. Taxonomy and natural history of the myrmecophilous genus Clinterocera Motschulsky, 1858 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae) from China and adjacent regions: definition of species group and revision of the C. discipennis species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian-Yue; Xu, Hao

    2016-06-22

    The Asian genus Clinterocera Motschulsky, 1858 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae: Cremastocheilini) is redescribed and divided into four species groups based on adult external characters. The definition of species groups and an identification key to these species groups are provided. The C. discipennis species group is revised, and two species are recognized: C. discipennis Fairmaire, 1889 and C. trimaculata Ma, 1993. Callynomes rufiventris Fairmaire, 1904, Callynomes rufithorax Moser, 1901, Callynomes cruciatus Moser, 1901, Callynomes vitalisi (Bourgoin, 1924), and Clinterocera rubra Ma, 1992 are placed as junior synonyms of Clinterocera discipennis. The male of Clinterocera trimaculata is described for the first time and newly recorded from Vietnam. Diagnoses and illustrations of Clinterocera discipennis and Clinterocera trimaculata are provided, with comments on the intraspecific variations. New distribution records of the two species are presented on a map. Brief natural history notes and host ant Liometopum sinense Wheeler, 1921 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) record of Clinterocera trimaculata are also given.

  3. A Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Contamination in Aviation Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Schloss, P. D., Bauer, L. S., & Raffa, K. F. (2008). Gut Microbiota of an Invasive Subcortical Beetle, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, Across Various... composition , degradation pathways and microbial interactions have yet to be fully researched (Rauch, 2008). Some hydrocarbon environments have been studied... composite ) cultures (Hedrick et al., 1963). However, the ability to culture a microorganism in a lab (in vitro) does not necessarily divulge its

  4. A new species of Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906 (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae) from the Mae Chaem District, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel K

    2014-04-02

    A new species of the fire-colored beetle genus Pseudopyrochroa Pic, 1906, is described from the Mae Chaem District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. The new species, Pseudopyrochroa inthanonensis sp. nov., is superficially similar to Pseudopyrochroa basalis (Pic), Pseudopyrochroa cardoni (Fairmaire) and Pseudopyrochroa fainanensis (Pic) by virtue of body color, antennal form and prothoracic shape. It is the second species of the genus known from Thailand, the other being Pseudopyrochroa diversicornis (Blair).

  5. Measuring the impact of biotic factors on populations of immature Emerald Ash Borers (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian Duan; Michael Ulyshen; Leah Bauer; Juli Gould; Roy Van Driesche

    2010-01-01

    Cohorts of emerald ash borer larvae, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, were experimentally established in July of 2008 on healthy green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) trees in two wooded plots at each of three sites near Lansing, MI, by caging gravid emerald ash borer females or placing laboratory-reared eggs on trunks (0.5Ð2 m above the ground) of selected trees. One plot...

  6. Eryphus Perty, 1832 e Tacyba, um novo gênero de Heteropsini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilma Solange Napp

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Eryphus Perty, 1832 and Tacyba, a new genus of Heteropsini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. Some species, up to now, included in Callideriphus Blanchard, 1851 are rearranged in: a those congeneric with Callideriphus grossipes Blanchard, 1851 and b not congeneric. The first set of species will be treated in a future paper; the second one, on the other hand, is subdivided into Eryphus Perty, 1832 and Tacyba gen. nov. Eryphus Perty, 1832 (type species: Eryphus bipunctatus Perty, 1832, a valid genus, is redescribed and a key for the species is also provided. The following species are transferred to Eryphus: E. bivittatus (Melzer, 1934 comb. nov., E. carinatus (Zajciw, 1970 comb. nov., E. flavicollis (Fisher, 1938 comb. nov., E. laetus (Blanchard, 1851 comb. nov., E. marginatus (Zajciw, 1970 comb. nov., E. picticollis (Gounelle, 1911 comb. nov., E. transversalis (Fairmaire & Germain, 1864 comb. nov. New synonym proposed: Eryphus bipunctatus Perty, 1832 = Callideriphus atricollis Melzer, 1931. New taxa described: Eryphus tacuarembo sp. nov. (Uruguay, Tacuarembó, E. carioca sp. nov. (Brazil, Rio de Janeiro; Tacyba gen. nov. (type species: Callideriphus maculatus Cerda, 1988. Species transferred to Tacyba and synonyms: T. maculata (Cerda, 1988 comb. nov., T. tenuis (Blanchard, 1851 comb. nov. = Callideriphus testaceicornis Fairmaire & Germain, 1859 syn. nov. = Callideriphus clathratus Fairmaire & Germain, 1860 syn. nov. = Callideriphus niger Philippi & Philippi, 1864 syn. nov. Callideriphus flavicollis m. quadripunctatus Fuchs, 1961 and Callideriphus flavicollis m. reductus Fuchs, 1961, both names of infrasubspecific category (not available under the rules of ICZN, are herein treated as intraspecific variation of Eryphus picticollis (Gounelle, 1911 which occur in southern Brazil and Argentina.

  7. Diversidade de membracídeos (Hemiptera, Membracidae e sobreposição de recursos tróficos em área do semi-árido Diversity and trophic niche overlap of membracids (Hemiptera, Membracidae in a semi-arid area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Creão-Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram examinados 1.069 indivíduos de 13 espécies de membracídeos coletados em suas plantas hospedeiras, entre agosto de 2004 e setembro de 2005, em uma região do semi-árido da Paraíba, Nordeste do Brasil. Enchenopa concolor (Fairmaire, 1846 (31,6% e E. euniceae Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 (24,8% foram as espécies mais abundantes. Cinco famílias de plantas hospedeiras abrigaram esses insetos. Entre essas famílias, Fabaceae apresentou maior riqueza (12 e abundância (70,3% de membracídeos. Darnis olivacea Fabricius, 1803, Hygris beckeri Sakakibara, 1998 e Sundarion flavum (Fairmaire, 1846 apresentaram os maiores valores de amplitude de nicho. Entre as espécies mais abundantes, E. minuta Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 e Micrutalis binaria (Faimaire, 1846 mostraram a maior sobreposição de nicho trófico, mas a sobreposição temporal entre elas foi relativamente baixa. Os resultados revelaram possíveis estratégias desenvolvidas pelas espécies para coexistência e exploração de recursos na Caatinga.We examined 1,069 individuals of 13 species of membracids collected on their host plants, between August 2004 and September 2005, in a semi-arid region, State of Paraíba, Northeastern Brazil. Enchenopa concolor (Fairmaire, 1846 (31.6% and E. euniceae Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 (24.8% were the most abundant species. Five families of host plants harbored these insects. Amongst these families, Fabaceae showed the highest richness (12 and abundance (70.3% of membracids. Darnis olivacea Fabricius, 1803, Hygris beckeri Sakakibara, 1998 and Sundarion flavum (Fairmaire, 1846 showed the highest values of niche breadth. Amongst the most abundant species, E. minuta Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 and Micrutalis binaria (Faimaire, 1846 showed the highest trophic niche overlap, but the temporal overlap between them was relatively low. The results revealed possible strategies developed by the species for coexistence and utilization of resources in

  8. Taxonomy of Fissocantharis Pic (Coleoptera, Cantharidae) from Guangxi, China, with descriptions of six new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxia; Li, Limei; Guan, Kaile; Yang, Xingke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 17 species of Fissocantharis Pic is recorded from Guangxi, China. Six species are described new to science, Fissocantharissinensomima sp. n., Fissocantharissexcostata sp. n., Fissocantharisbasilaris sp. n., Fissocanthariseschara sp. n., Fissocantharislatipalpa sp. n. and Fissocantharisbiprojicientis sp. n., and two previously known species are redescribed, Fissocantharisgracilipes (Pic, 1927) and Fissocantharissinensis (Wittmer, 1988). These species are presented with habitus of males, abdominal sternites VIII of females and genitalia of both sexes. Fissocantharisflavofacialis (Pic, 1926) is synonymized with Fissocantharisangusta (Fairmaire, 1900); both were originally described in the genus Podabrus Westwood. Additionally, a key and a checklist of all the species of Fissocantharis from Guangxi are provided.

  9. A checklist of the Cleridae of Iran with new data (Coleoptera: Cleroidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappi, Iuri; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-08-05

    Species diversity of Iranian Cleridae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) is summarized in this paper. A total of 48 species and 1 subspecies in 14 genera belonging to 4 subfamilies of Cleridae are recorded. Eight species, Thaneroclerus buqueti (Lefebvre, 1835), Denops albofasciatus (Charpentier, 1825), Flabellotilloidea palaestina (Pic, 1900), Clerus mutillaroides Reitter, 1894, Opilo cilicicus Hintz, 1902, Opilo longipilis Fairmaire, 1892, Trichodes alberi Escherich, 1894 and Trichodes inermis Reitter, 1894 are recorded from Iran for the first time. Synonymies and distribution data are given. The checklist is based on examination of the literature and also includes records from specimens examined in many collections. Taxa are arranged hierarchically under the categories of subfamily, genus, species and subspecies.

  10. Notas e novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas do Brasil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro e Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; do Equador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; da Bolívia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. e Alexera secunda sp. nov. Transfere-se Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 para o gênero Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 é considerada sinônima de H. miniata Thomson, 1868. Novo registro (Trinidad e figura são dados para Trachysomus surdus.Notes and new species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. New species described from Brazil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro and Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; from Ecuador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; from Bolivia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. and Alexera secunda sp. nov. Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 is transferred to the genus Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 is considered a synonym of H. miniata Thomson, 1868. New record (Trinidad and figure for Trachysomus surdus Dillon & Dillon, 1946 are given.

  11. The tribe Acutalini Fowler (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae: new genera, new species and some nomenclatural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M Sakakibara

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Acutalini Fowler is redescribed as well as the genera Acutalis Fairmaire, Euritea Stål, and Thrasymedes Kirkaldy. The following new taxa and nomenclatural changes are presented: Thrasymedes mexicana sp.n. (from Mexico, Oaxaca; Bordonia gen.n., with B. venezuelana sp.n. (type-species (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, B. clypeata sp.n. (from Colombia, Cuesta Boba, B. majuscula sp.n. (from Venezuela, Portachuelo, and Cornutalis gen.n., with C. cauca sp.n. (type-species (from Colombia, Cauca, and C. validu sp.n. (from Ecuador, Sto. Domingo. Acutalis fusconervosa Fairmaire, 1846 = Horiola venosa Walker, 1858, syn.n.; Euritea munda (Walker, 1858 = Stictolobus nitidus Funkhouser, 1940, syn.n.; Bordonia nigricosta (Goding, 1926, comb.n.; Bordonia virescens (Funkhouser, 1940, comb.n.. One species is transferred to Smiliinae-Ceresini: Tapinolobus curvispina (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Thrasymedes = Tapinolobus fasciatus Sakakibara, 1969, syn.n.; another one is transferred to Darninae-Cymbomorphini: Eumela darnioides (Walker, 1858, comb.n. (formerly in Euritea.

  12. Diversidade de membracídeos (Hemiptera, Membracidae e sobreposição de recursos tróficos em área do semi-árido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio J. Creão-Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram examinados 1.069 indivíduos de 13 espécies de membracídeos coletados em suas plantas hospedeiras, entre agosto de 2004 e setembro de 2005, em uma região do semi-árido da Paraíba, Nordeste do Brasil. Enchenopa concolor (Fairmaire, 1846 (31,6% e E. euniceae Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 (24,8% foram as espécies mais abundantes. Cinco famílias de plantas hospedeiras abrigaram esses insetos. Entre essas famílias, Fabaceae apresentou maior riqueza (12 e abundância (70,3% de membracídeos. Darnis olivacea Fabricius, 1803, Hygris beckeri Sakakibara, 1998 e Sundarion flavum (Fairmaire, 1846 apresentaram os maiores valores de amplitude de nicho. Entre as espécies mais abundantes, E. minuta Creão-Duarte & Rothéa, 2006 e Micrutalis binaria (Faimaire, 1846 mostraram a maior sobreposição de nicho trófico, mas a sobreposição temporal entre elas foi relativamente baixa. Os resultados revelaram possíveis estratégias desenvolvidas pelas espécies para coexistência e exploração de recursos na Caatinga.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of the Trechus brucki group, with description of two new species from the Pyreneo-Cantabrian area (France, Spain (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Faille

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A molecular phylogeny of the species from the Trechus brucki clade (previously T. uhagoni group based on fragments of four mitochondrial genes and one nuclear gene is given. We describe Trechus (Trechus bouilloni sp. n. from the western pre–Pyrenees: Sierras de Urbasa–Andía, Navarra, Spain. The species was collected in mesovoid shallow substratum (mss, a subterranean environment. Molecular as well as morphological evidences demonstrate that the new species belongs to the Trechus brucki clade. A narrow endemic species of high altitude in western French Pyrenees merged with T. brucki Fairmaire, 1862a, T. bruckoides sp. n., is described. A lectotype is designated for T. brucki and T. planiusculus Fairmaire, 1862b (junior synonym of T. brucki. The species group is redefined based on molecular and morphological characters, and renamed as the brucki group, as T. brucki was the first described species of the clade. A unique synapomorphy of the male genitalia, a characteristic secondary sclerotization of the sperm duct, which is shared by all the species of the brucki group sensu novo, is described and illustrated. The T. brucki group sensu novo is composed of Trechus beusti (Schaufuss, 1863, T. bouilloni sp. n., T. brucki, T. bruckoides sp. n., T. grenieri Pandellé, 1867, T. uhagoni uhagoni Crotch, 1869, T. uhagoni ruteri Colas, 1935 and T. pieltaini Jeannel, 1920. We discuss the taxonomy of the group and provide illustrations of structures showing the differences between the species, along with distribution data and biogeographical comments.

  14. Una especie nueva de Tillus Olivier, 1790 (Coleoptera, Cleridae de la Península Ibérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Colón, José Ignacio

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Tillus ibericus sp. nov. is described from the Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain and it is compared to the western Palaearctic species of the genus Tillus Olivier, 1790. Tillus ibericus is easily distinguished from all other species of the genus by the structure of the elytral sculpture and its characteristic coloration. This new species shares a general habitus and characters from the antennae, and general body stucture with T. flabellicornis Fairmaire, 1866, a species from northern Africa. All preexisting records of T. flabellicornis in the Iberian Peninsula correspond to T. ibericus sp. nov..Se describe Tillus ibericus sp. nov. de la Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (España y se compara con las otras especies del género Tillus Olivier, 1790 de la región Paleártica occidental. Tillus ibericus se distingue con facilidad de las especies próximas por la estructura del punteado elitral y por su coloración característica. La especie nueva comparte un aspecto general y caracteres de la estructura del cuerpo y de las antenas con T. flabellicornis Fairmaire, 1866 del Norte de África. Todas las citas anteriores de T. flabellicornis de la Península Ibérica corresponden a T. ibericus sp. nov.

  15. Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini: descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M. Sakakibara

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic notes on some Polyglyptini; descriptions of new genus and new species (Homoptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae. The genera Hemiptycha Germar, Metheisa Fowler, Maturnaria Metcalf, Aphetea Fowler, Dioclophara Kirkaldy, and Phormophora Stål, are redescribed; Creonus, gen.n. (type species: Maturna lloydi Funkhouser, 1914, and Aphetea robustula, sp.n. (from Bolivia, are described. Some nomenclatural changes are introduced, as follow: - Hemiptycha Germar, 1833 = Polyrhyssa Stål, 1869, syn.n.: - Hemiptycha cultrata (Coquebert, 1801, comb.n., = Polyglyptodes flavocostatus Haviland, 1925, syn.n., = Polyrhyssa cultrata maculata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Hemiptycha obtecta (Fabricius, 1803 = Hille herbicola Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Maturnaria ephippigera (Fairmaire, 1846 = Publilia tumulata Buckton, 1903, syn.n., = Metheisa fowleri Funkhouser, 1927, syn.n. - Creonus lloydi (Funkhouser, 1914, comb.n. - Aphetea parvula (Fabricius, 1803, comb.n., = Aphetea affinis Haviland, 1925, syn.n. - Dioclophara Kirkaldy, 1904 = lncolea Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Dioclophara viridula (Fairmaire, 1846 = Maturna multilineata Fonseca, 1942, syn.n. - Dioclophara variegata (Goding, 1926, comb.n. = lncolea viridis Goding, 1926, syn.n. - Phormophora maura (Fabricius, 1803 = Darnis dorsata Fabricius, 1803, syn.n.

  16. Review of the Madagascan Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) with a revision of the genus Triodontus Westwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Andrey V; Montreuil, Olivier; Akhmetova, Lilia A

    2016-12-13

    The subfamily Orphninae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is reviewed from Madagascar. A total of four genera and 39 species were found, all being endemic to the island. The following five new species are described: Triodontus ankarafantsikae, Triodontus lemoulti, Triodontus viettei, Triodontus fairmairei, and Triodontus inexpectatus. The following new synonymies are proposed: Orphnus nigrita Brancsik, 1893 is synonym of Triodontus hova (Fairmaire, 1868); Triodontus occidentalis Paulian, 1977 and Orphnus obsoletus Brancsik, 1893 are synonyms of Triodontus nitidulus (Guérin-Méneville, 1844); Triodontus vadoni Paulian, 1977 and Triodontus perrotorum Paulian, 1977 are synonyms of Triodontus owas Westwood, 1852. Lectotypes are designated for the following names: Orphnus nitidulus Guérin-Méneville, 1844 and Orphnidius modestus Benderitter, 1914. Keys, descriptions, illustrations of habitus and male genitalia, and distributional records maps are given for all species.

  17. Definition and Revision of the Orthrius-group of genera (Coleoptera, Cleridae, Clerinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gerstmeier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An “Orthrius-group” of genera is proposed, and defined to include Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Caridopus Schenkling, 1908; Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; Gyponyx Gorham, 1883; Languropilus Pic, 1940; Orthrius Gorham, 1876; Pieleus Pic, 1940; Xenorthrius Gorham, 1892; plus three new genera Neorthrius gen. n., Nonalatus gen. n. and Pseudoastigmus gen. n. A phylogeny of the 11 constituent Orthrius-group genera (analysis of 22 morphological characters using Clerus Geoffroy as the out-group taxon was performed with TNT v1.1 is proposed. Four genera are synonymised: Burgeonus Pic, 1950, syn. n. (with Aphelochroa Quedenfeldt, 1885; Brinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. and Quasibrinckodes Winkler, 1960, syn. n. (both with Dozocolletus Chevrolat, 1842; and Dedana Fairmaire, 1888, syn. n. (with Orthrius Gorham, 1876. The genera Falsoorthrius Pic, 1940 and Mimorthrius Pic, 1940 are transferred from Clerinae to the subfamily Tillinae.

  18. Phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the subgenus Velleius Leach (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylininae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zong-Yi; Zhou, Hong-Zhang

    2015-05-15

    The subgenus Velleius Leach, 1819 of the genus Quedius Stephens, 1829 is a small and very distinctive group in the subtribe Quediina (Staphylinidae: Staphylininae) with pectinate antennal segments and larvae living in nests of Vespa species. This paper reviews the taxonomy of all Velleius species and analyzes the phylogeny of this group. Two new species, Quedius (Velleius) sagittalis sp. nov. from Shaanxi, China and Q. (V.) rectilatus sp. nov. from Guangdong, China, are described. Q. (V.) simillimus (Fairmaire,1891) syn. nov. is proposed as a new synonym of Q. (V.) pectinatus (Sharp, 1874). Phylogenetic result shows that all nine Velleius species can be divided into two clades and both have strong tree supports of Bremer/Bootstrap/Jackknife values.

  19. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-01

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p organisms and provide possible stoichiometric responses of both plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  20. The genus Bathysciola Jeannel, 1910 in the Iberian Peninsula and Pyrenees. Taxonomic revision of the Sections IV, VI and VII (Jeannel, 1924 (Coleoptera, Cholevide, Leptodirinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresneda, J.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of the Iberian and Pyrenean species of Bathysciola Jeannel, 1910 (sections IV, VI and VII of Jeannel, 1924 is revised. The proposed ordenation is based on the study of the genital structures of both sexes, in particular the sclerotised shield of the internal sac of the aedeagus. According to the different models of internal sac were identified the following species groups in the genus Bathysciola Jeannel, section IV: aubei group of Peyerimhoff (1 taxon: B. aubei (Kiesenwetter; madoni new group (2 taxa: B. madoni Jeannel and B. penicillata Jeannel; zariquieyi new group (2 taxa: B. zariquieyi zariquieyi Bolívar and B. zariquieyi serratensis Coiffait; section VII or ovata group of Perreau (8 taxa: B. asperula asperula (Fairmaire, B. asperula subasperata (Saulcy (= intermedia Jeannel, B. ovata ovata (Kiesenwetter, B. ovata aragonica Coiffait, B. ovata catalana Coiffait, B. ovata gabasensis Hustache, B. simonis (Abeille de Perrin and B. talpa (Normand; section VI: lapidicola new group (4 taxa: B. arcuatipes Jeannel, B. lapidicola lapidicola (Saulcy, B. lapidicola rectipes Coiffait and B. lapidicola simplex Coiffait; meridionalis new group (3 taxa: B. finismillennii sp. n., B. grenieri (Saulcy and B. meridionalis (J. Du Val (= nitidula Normand; larcennei new group (2 taxa: B. convena Jeannel new rank and B. larcennei (Abeille de Perrin; schiodtei group of Perreau (9 taxa: B. bigerrica Jeannel new rank (= convexa Coiffait n. syn., B. breuili Bolívar (= azuai Bolívar n. syn., B. diegoi Salgado & Fresneda, B. fauveli Jeannel, B. grandis (Fairmaire, B. obermaieri Bolívar, B. parallela (Jeannel, B. rugosa (Sharp and B. schiodtei (Kiesenwetter (= navarica Coiffait. Incertae sedis: Bathysciola aranensis Coiffait and Bathysciola minuscule (Abeille de Perrin.Se realiza una revisión taxonómica de las secciones IV, VI y VII (Jeannel, 1924 con las especies Ibéricas y de los Pirineos del género Bathysciola. Esta propuesta de ordenación tiene

  1. Feeding and Development of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on Cultivated Olive, Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Don; Rigsby, Chad M; Peterson, Donnie L

    2017-08-01

    We examined the suitability of cultivated olive, Olea europaea L., as a host for emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire. In a bioassay using cut stems from a field-grown olive tree (cv. 'Manzanilla') we found that 45% of larvae that had emerged from eggs used to inoculate stems, were recovered alive, many as larvae or prepupae, during periodic debarking of a subset of stems. Three intact stems that 19 larvae successfully entered were exposed to a simulated overwintering treatment. Four live adults emerged afterwards, and an additional pupa and several prepupae were discovered after debarking these stems. Cultivated olive joins white fringetree as one of the two species outside of the genus Fraxinus capable of supporting the development of emerald ash borer from neonate to adult. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Undetected for a century: Palaearctic Agrilus ribesi Schaefer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) on currant in North America, with adult morphology, larval biology and DNA barcode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendek, Eduard; Grebennikov, Vasily V; Bocak, Ladislav

    2015-10-28

    We report the Eurasian species Agrilus ribesi Schaefer, 1946, for the first time from North America and propose that the damage to currants (Ribes spp.) in Ontario prior to 1940 and ascribed to A. cuprescens were caused by this species. We provide morphological diagnostic characters for A. ribesi and closely related A. cuprescens and we complement this information with DNA barcodes from four alien Agrilus species established in North America (i.e., A. ribesi Schaefer, A. cuprescens (Ménétriés), A. planipennis Fairmaire and A. sulcicollis Lacordaire) to enable DNA-based identification of these invasive species. Additionally, published information on A. ribesi is summarized and new data are provided on the host plants and biology of larva in North America. The distribution of A. ribesi is mapped, both in its native Palaearctic region and in Canada and the USA, together with the range of its potential host plants in North America. A. ribesi was recovered as a sister-species of A. cuprescens on the neighbor joining DNA barcoding tree and low genetic variability of North American populations may indicate a single introduction to North America for each of these species.

  3. Tree Stress and Mortality from Emerald Ash Borer Does Not Systematically Alter Short-Term Soil Carbon Flux in a Mixed Northeastern U.S. Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Hatala Matthes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive insect pests are a common disturbance in temperate forests, but their effects on belowground processes in these ecosystems are poorly understood. This study examined how aboveground disturbance might impact short-term soil carbon flux in a forest impacted by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire in central New Hampshire, USA. We anticipated changes to soil moisture and temperature resulting from tree mortality caused by emerald ash borer, with subsequent effects on rates of soil respiration and methane oxidation. We measured carbon dioxide emissions and methane uptake beneath trees before, during, and after infestation by emerald ash borer. In our study, emerald ash borer damage to nearby trees did not alter soil microclimate nor soil carbon fluxes. While surprising, the lack of change in soil microclimate conditions may have been a result of the sandy, well-drained soil in our study area and the diffuse spatial distribution of canopy ash trees and subsequent canopy light gaps after tree mortality. Overall, our results indicate that short-term changes in soil carbon flux following insect disturbances may be minimal, particularly in forests with well-drained soils and a mixed-species canopy.

  4. Taxonomic review of the genera Micridium Motschulsky, 1869 and Micridina Johnson, 1969 (Coleoptera: Ptiliidae) with eleven new species including the first records from South America and Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, Michael

    2017-03-10

    The six recognised species of the genus Micridium Motschulsky, 1869: M. vittatum (Motschulsky, 1845) M. halidaii (Matthews, 1868), M. angulicolle (Fairmaire, 1858), M. lineatum (Le Conte, 1863). M. rhodeanum (Casey, 1924) and M. groehni Polilov & Perkovsky, 2004 are reviewed and eleven new species: M. attenboroughi sp.n., M. boliviense sp.n., M. elegans sp. n., M. foveatum sp.n., M. inornatum sp.n., M. johnsoni sp.n., M. newtoni sp.n., M. oweni sp.n., M. proprium sp.n., M. quadridens sp.n. and M. thayerae sp.n. are added. The new species are the first records of the genus from South America and Madagascar. The morphological characteristics separating Micridium from other genera in the tribe Ptiliini are discussed and the genus synonymised with the closely related monotypic genus Micridina Johnson, 1969 with its single species M. hilli Johnson, 1969. The synonymy of Dilinium Casey, 1924 with Micridium is confirmed and the type species D. rhodeanum Casey, 1924 re-described. Micridium groehni, described from a single specimen in Baltic amber, does not appear to belong to Micridium as defined here. A key to the new species is provided.

  5. A new genus of the subfamily Cillaeinae (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae) from the Philippines and New Guinea with notes on the taxonomy and phylogeny of the subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirejtshuk, Alexander G; Kovalev, Alexey V

    2016-12-06

    Allenipeplus gen. nov. represented by A. philippinensis sp. nov., type species (Philippines, Luzon), A. alius sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindoro), A. harmonicus sp. nov. (Philippines, Mindanao) and A. vitellinus sp. nov. (Indonesian New Guinea), is described. This new genus combines characters with a mosaic spread among other cillaeine genera. We present a wide comparison of genera among the subfamily Cillaeinae, making it possible to elaborate a detailed diagnosis of the new genus and trace some order in character patterns and propose a hypothesis on the relationship of this genus to other groups known from the Indo-Malayan and Australian Regions. A detailed diagnosis of the new genus and key to the new species are given. The Adocimus-complex of the related genera including Allenipeplus gen. nov., Adocimus Murray, 1864, Ithyphenes Murray, 1864, Platynema Ritsema, 1885 and probably Brittonema Kirejtshuk, 2011 is defined. Some notes on the taxonomy of the genera Liparopeplus Murray, 1864 and Xanthopeplus Fairmaire, 1880, stat. nov. are given. Additionally, designation of a lectotype for Liparopeplus colastoides Murray, 1864 is made.

  6. Taxonomic reassessment of the treehopper tribe Talipedini with nomenclatural changes and descriptions of new taxa (Hemiptera: Membracidae: Membracinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino M. Sakakibara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The tribe Talipedini Deitz is redefined and its boundaries are expanded with the inclusion of the following taxa: Erechtia Walker, 1858 (formerly placed in Membracini, Pseuderechtia gen. nov. (type species: Leioscyta neivai Fonseca, 1941, and Talipes Deitz, 1975 gen. reval. (formerly junior synonym of Trinarea Goding, 1926, the latter herein considered new synonym of Erechtia. Along with these taxonomic rearrangements, some nomenclatural changes are also introduced. The species treated in this paper are: Erechtia gibbosa (DeGeer, 1773, E. carinata (Funkhouser, 1922 comb. nov., E. cristalta sp. nov. (type locality: French Guyana, Saül, E. diminuta sp. nov. (type locality: Brazil, Pará, Marituba, E. elongatula sp. nov. (type locality: French Guyana, Montagne des Chevaux, E. sallaei (Fowler, 1894, and E. sanguinolenta (Fairmaire, 1846; Pseuderechtia neivai (Fonseca, 1941 comb. nov. = Leioscyta similis Fonseca & Diringshofen, 1969 syn. nov.; Talipes appendiculatus (Fonseca, 1936 comb. rest. and T. fenestratus (Strümpel, 1974 comb. nov. Due to the inclusion of Erechtia in Talipedini, Tropidoscyta Stål, 1869 is reinstated (in Membracini, and 24 species previously included in Erechtia are considered as incertae sedis within Membracini. A key to genera and new distribution records of the treated taxa are also provided.

  7. Thermal constraints on the emerald ash borer invasion of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, R.; Moser, W. K.; Gormanson, D. D.; Bartlett, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire; EAB), a non-native invasive beetle, has caused substantial damage to green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.), white (Fraxinus americana L.), and black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.), the major ash species of North America. In the absence of effective methods for controlling or eradicating the beetle, EAB continues to spread unimpeded across North America. Evidence indicates the mortality rate for EAB-infested trees near the epicenter of the infestation in southeast Michigan exceeds 99 percent for the major ash species. One possible climatic limitation on the spread of the infestation is suggested by recent work indicating that beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -35.3 degrees Celsius. We considered whether this thermal constraint will limit the spread and distribution of EAB in North America. Historical climatic data for the United States and Canada were employed along with thermal models of the conditions beneath likely winter snowpack and beneath tree bark to predict the potential geographic distribution of the invasion. Results suggested the thermal mortality constraint will not lead to the protection of ash stands across most of North America. However, recent work indicates the majority of beetles cannot survive exposure to temperatures below -30 degrees Celsius. Along with our results, this suggests thermal constraints near the northern and western edges of the ranges of ash might limit EAB survival to some extent, thereby reducing the EAB population, the likelihood of EAB infestation, and subsequent ash mortality.

  8. Ash Decline Assessment in Emerald Ash Borer Infested Natural Forests Using High Spatial Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Murfitt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire infects and eventually kills endemic ash trees and is currently spreading across the Great Lakes region of North America. The need for early detection of EAB infestation is critical to managing the spread of this pest. Using WorldView-2 (WV2 imagery, the goal of this study was to establish a remote sensing-based method for mapping ash trees undergoing various infestation stages. Based on field data collected in Southeastern Ontario, Canada, an ash health score with an interval scale ranging from 0 to 10 was established and further related to multiple spectral indices. The WV2 image was segmented using multi-band watershed and multiresolution algorithms to identify individual tree crowns, with watershed achieving higher segmentation accuracy. Ash trees were classified using the random forest classifier, resulting in a user’s accuracy of 67.6% and a producer’s accuracy of 71.4% when watershed segmentation was utilized. The best ash health score-spectral index model was then applied to the ash tree crowns to map the ash health for the entire area. The ash health prediction map, with an overall accuracy of 70%, suggests that remote sensing has potential to provide a semi-automated and large-scale monitoring of EAB infestation.

  9. Key to Holarctic species of Epitrix flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) with review of their distribution, host plants and history of invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieńkowski, Andrzej O; Orlova-Bienkowskaja, Marina J

    2016-10-17

    The genus Epitrix Foudras, 1860a has a worldwide distribution. Some species of Epitrix are major pests of potato, tomato, eggplant, tobacco and other plants in North America and Europe. Some pest species have been inadvertently introduced from North America to Europe, from Europe to North America and from both continents to some islands in Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Therefore, a key for the identification of all Holarctic species is necessary for plant quarantine and protection services. We have compiled the key for distinguishing Epitrix from genera that could be confused with it and a key for all Holarctic species of Epitrix with the figures of spermathecae and aedeagi and the checklist with a review of the geographical distribution, host plants and history of invasions. The following species are included: E. abeillei (Bauduer), E. allardii (Wollaston), E. atropae Foudras, E. brevis Schwarz, E. caucasica (Heikertinger), E. cucumeris (Harris), E. dieckmanni (Mohr), E. ermischi (Mohr), E. fasciata Blatchley, E. flavotestacea Horn, E. fuscula Crotch, E. hirtipennis (Melsheimer), E. humeralis Dury, E. intermedia Foudras, E. krali Döberl, E. lobata Crotch, E. muehlei Döberl, E. priesneri (Heikertinger), E. pubescens (Koch), E. ogloblini (Iablokov-Khnzorian), E. robusta Jacoby, E. setosella (Fairmaire), E. similaris Gentner, E. solani (Blatchley), E. subcrinita (LeConte), E. tuberis Gentner, E. warchalowskii (Mohr) and E. papa Orlova-Bienkowskaja.

  10. Taxonomic revision of Madagascan Rhantus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae) with an emphasis on Manjakatompo as a conservation priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Anna Emilia; Bukontaite, Rasa; Ranarilalatiana, Tolotra; Randriamihaja, Jacquelin Herisahala; Bergsten, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    We review the diving-beetle genus Rhantus Dejean of Madagascar (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae) based on museum collection holdings and recently collected expedition material. Both morphology and DNA is used to test species boundaries, in particular whether newly collected material from the Tsaratanana mountains in the north represent a new species or are conspecific with Rhantus manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi 2009, described based on a single male specimen from the central Ankaratra mountains. DNA of the holotype of R. manjakatompo was successfully extracted in a non-destructive way and sequenced. The general mixed Yule coalescent model applied to an ultrametric tree constructed from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence data delimited three species. Morphological characters supported the same species unambiguously. We therefore recognise three species of Rhantus to occur in Madagascar: R. latus (Fairmaire, 1869), R. bouvieri Régimbart, 1900 and R. manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi, 2009. All three species are endemic to Madagascar and restricted to the highlands of the island. Rhantusstenonychus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., is considered a junior synonym of R. latus. We designate lectotypes for R. bouvieri and R. goudoti Sharp, 1882, the latter a junior synonym of R. latus. We provide descriptions, a determination key, SEM-images of fine pronotal and elytral structures, distribution maps, habitus photos, and illustrations of male genitalia and pro- and mesotarsal claws. We discuss the role of the Manjakatompo forest as a refugium for Madagascan Rhantus diversity and other endemics of the montane central high plateau.

  11. [Comparison of mtDNA extracting methods for common sarcosaphagous insects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Qing; Guo, Ya-Dong; Li, Mao-Zhi; Xiong, Feng; Li, Jian-Bo; Cai, Ji-Feng

    2011-08-01

    To compare effects of three different methods for mtDNA extraction from common sarcosaphagous insects including cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method, sodium dodecyl sulfate-potassium acetate (SDS-KAc) method and sodium dodecyl sulfate-proteinase K (SDS-PK) method. Seventy-two insects from four species [Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1784), Eusilpha bicolor (Fairmaire, 1896), Paraeutrichopus pecoudi (Mateu, 1954), Vespa velutina (Lepeletier, 1836)] were collected from the corpses of the rabbits in Changsha district. The total DNA of above samples was extracted by CTAB, SDS-Kac and SDS-PK methods. The purity and concentration of DNA were examined by protein-nucleic acid spectrophotometry, and mtDNA were amplified by specific primers and PCR products were detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Then PCR products were sequenced and subsequently up-loaded to GenBank. mtDNA was successfully extracted with three methods from most of the samples. The SDS-PK method was better in DNA purity compared to other methods and the CTAB method was superior in extracting DNA from old samples, while SDS-KAc method showed no significant difference for extraction effects of different samples. The most appropriate method should be chosen depending on different situations. SDS-PK method is expected to obtain high-quality DNA, while CTAB method is preferred in extracting obsolete samples. SDS-KAc method is low cost and can be used in various kinds of preliminary experiments.

  12. Variation in C:N:S stoichiometry and nutrient storage related to body size in a holometabolous insect (Curculio davidi) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Small, Gaston E; Zhou, Xuan; Wang, Donger; Li, Hongwang; Liu, Chunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Body size can be an important factor controlling consumer stoichiometry. In holometabolous insects, body size is typically associated with nutrient storage. Consumer stoichiometry is known to vary within species across a range of body sizes; however, the contribution of nutrient storage to this variation is not well understood. We used the fifth-instar larvae of the oak weevil (Coleoptera: Curculio davidi Fairmaire), which is characterized by a high capacity for nutrient storage, to investigate the effect of shifts in nutrient storage with body mass on variations in larva stoichiometry. Our results showed that weevil larvae with larger body mass had a lower carbon (C) content, reflecting decreases in the sequestration rate of C-rich lipids. Larger larvae had elevated concentrations of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), and protein. The similar patterns of variation in elemental composition and macromolecule storage with body weight indicate that the shift in nutrient storage is the main factor causing the variation in larval stoichiometry with body weight. This finding was further supported by the low variation in residual larval biomass C, N, and S concentrations after lipid extraction. These results help decipher the physiological mechanism of stoichiometric regulation in growing organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  13. Biology and life history of Balcha indica, an ectoparasitoid attacking the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis, in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Taylor, Philip B; Fuester, Roger W

    2011-01-01

    Balcha indica Mani and Kaul (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) is a solitary ectoparasitoid attacking larvae, prepupae, and pupae of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae). Its fecundity, oviposition rate, longevity, and development time were determined in the laboratory under standard rearing conditions (25 ± 2° C, 65 ± 10% relative humidity, and 14:10 L:D). Adults lived a mean of 59 days with a maximum of 117 days. Lifetime adult fecundity averaged 36 eggs with a maximum 94 eggs per female. The egg stage lasted for a maximum of four days with ~ 50% eggs hatched within two days. The development time of the first instars lasted for a maximum of nine days; 50% of the first instars completed their development (i.e., molted to the next instar) within five days. Instars of the intermediate and final stage larvae (after molting of the first instars occurred) could not be distinguished until they reached the pupal stage, and 50% of those larvae pupated ~ 62 days after adult oviposition. Under the standard rearing conditions, 50% of B. indica took ~ 83 days to complete the life cycle (from egg to adult emergence) ranging from 47 to 129 days. These results suggest that B. indica may not have more than two generations in the mid-Atlantic and Midwest regions of United States, where normal growing seasons--with average temperature above 25° C--are normally less than six months (May-October). Because of the long life span and oviposition period of adults, however, B. indica is likely to have overlapping generations.

  14. Bryanites graeffii sp. n. (Coleoptera, Carabidae: museum rediscovery of a relict species from Samoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Liebherr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bryanites graeffii sp. n. is described from Samoa based on a single male specimen collected between 1862–1870 that was recently discovered in the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris. Cladistic analysis based on 127 morphological characters from 49 exemplars of the carabid beetle tribe Platynini in the Austral-Pacific region, places the new species as adelphotaxon to Bryanites samoaensis Valentine, type species of the genus Bryanites Valentine, 1987. Bryanites comprises, along with Vitagonum Moore, 1998 of Fiji and Ctenognathus Fairmaire, 1843 of New Zealand, a clade that diverged early in the evolutionary history of Pacific platynine Carabidae. Bryanites graeffii exhibits very large body size among taxa of Platynini—16.2 mm standardized body length—with the genus characterized by vestigial flight wings and metathoracic apomorphies that are associated with flight-wing loss. Along with Blackburnia Sharp, 1878 of Hawaii, the origins of Bryanites, Vitagonum, and Ctenognathus are hypothesized to date to the Miocene, with their radiations beginning long before the origins of the geographically widespread, flight-capable species of Metacolpodes Jeannel, 1948 that colonized numerous island systems across the western Pacific. Given the numerous platynine taxa collected by extensive biotic surveys of Samoa during the first quarter of the 20th Century, the absence of any specimens of B. graeffii since the initial collection of the unique holotype prior to 1871 suggests that this species may be extinct. Such extirpation of large platynine carabid beetles has also been documented for Hawaii, where the time of extinction of seven Blackburnia species represented only by subfossil fragments coincides with the time of human colonization and attendant introduction of the Pacific rat, Rattus exulans (Peale.

  15. Rove beetle subtribes Quediina, Amblyopinina and Tanygnathinina: systematic changes affecting Central European fauna (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Staphylinini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Solodovnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for the new edition of the identification keys of rove beetles of Central Europe (Volume 4 of the “Die Käfer Mitteleuropas”, the following systematic problems affecting the Central European fauna of the tribe Staphylinini are addressed: phylogeny-based, new concepts for the subtribes Quediina and Amblyopinina; status of the subtribe Tanygnathinina; systematic position of the genus Astrapaeus; status of Quedionuchus, the subgenus of Quedius; identity of some species of Quedius and Heterothops. As a result, new wordwide and Central Europe-based diagnoses are given for the subtribes Quediina and Amblyopinina; earlier recognized but not widely accepted synonymies of the genera Quedius and Velleius, and of the species Heterothops praevius and H. niger, are justified; new synonyms are established for: Quedius pseudonigriceps Reitter, 1909 (= Quedius noricus Bernhauer, 1927, syn. n.; Quedius maurorufus (Gravenhorst, 1806 (= Quedius richteri Korge, 1966, syn. n.; Quedius suturalis Kiesenwetter, 1845 (= Quedius merlini Drugmand et Bruge 1991, syn. n.; lectotypes are designated for Quedius meridiocarpathicus Smetana, 1958, Quedius noricus Bernhauer, 1927, and Quedius pseudonigriceps Reitter, 1909. As a result of synonymy of Quedius and Velleius, the following new combinations are proposed: Quedius amamiensis (Watanabe, 1990, comb. n.; Quedius circumipectus (Cho, 1996, comb. n.; Quedius elongatus (Naomi, 1986, comb. n.; Quedius japonicus (Watanabe, 1990, comb. n.; Quedius pectinatus (Sharp, 1874, comb. n.; Quedius setosus (Sharp, 1889, comb. n.; Quedius simillimus (Fairmaire, 1891, comb. n. As a result of new combinations, Quedius japonicus (Watanabe, 1990 (non Quedius japonicus Sharp, 1874 is replaced with the new name Quedius watanabei Solodovnikov, nom. n., while Quedius pectinatus Lea, 1908 (non Quedius pectinatus (Sharp, 1874 is replaced with the new name Quedius arthuri Solodovnikov, nom. n.

  16. What does "local" firewood buy you? Managing the risk of invasive species introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Patrick C; Diss-Torrance, Andrea; Blackburn, Laura M; Brown, Brian D

    2010-10-01

    Firewood can serve as a vector in the transport of non-native species, including wood-boring insects that feed within the wood and thus can be transported accidentally. Governments have enacted limitations on the movement of firewood in an effort to limit the anthropogenic movement of non-native species through, for example, recreational camping. Although the movement of invasive species through firewood is a documented invasion pathway, it is not trivial for governments to determine a "safe" allowable distance for moving firewood. We were motivated by this challenge and developed a theoretical simulation to determine the campgrounds that could be potentially exposed to infested firewood based upon the hypothetical distribution of an invasive species and the allowable distance for moving firewood. We extend this concept to the known distributions of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). We illustrate, based upon theoretical and empirical observations, that as the distribution of an invasive species increases, more rigid constraints on the movement of firewood would be required relative to those species that are distributed over a smaller scale. Also, on the level of management within a state, smaller states have far less margin for error than larger ones, as even extremely rigid restrictions on the movement of firewood could have little management effect unless the infested area is spatially limited. These results collectively suggest the potential for a dynamic management strategy that adjusts allowable distances for firewood movement based upon the distribution of the non-native species.

  17. Rove beetle subtribes Quediina, Amblyopinina and Tanygnathinina: systematic changes affecting Central European fauna (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Staphylinini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodovnikov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for the new edition of the identification keys of rove beetles of Central Europe (Volume 4 of the "Die Käfer Mitteleuropas"), the following systematic problems affecting the Central European fauna of the tribe Staphylinini are addressed: phylogeny-based, new concepts for the subtribes Quediina and Amblyopinina; status of the subtribe Tanygnathinina; systematic position of the genus Astrapaeus; status of Quedionuchus, the subgenus of Quedius; identity of some species of Quedius and Heterothops. As a result, new wordwide and Central Europe-based diagnoses are given for the subtribes Quediina and Amblyopinina; earlier recognized but not widely accepted synonymies of the genera Quedius and Velleius, and of the species Heterothops praevius and Heterothops niger, are justified; new synonyms are established for: Quedius pseudonigriceps Reitter, 1909 (= Quediusnoricus Bernhauer, 1927, syn. n.); Quedius maurorufus (Gravenhorst, 1806) (= Quedius richteri Korge, 1966, syn. n.); Quedius suturalis Kiesenwetter, 1845 (= Quedius merlini Drugmand & Bruge 1991, syn. n.); lectotypes are designated for Quedius meridiocarpathicus Smetana, 1958, Quedius noricus Bernhauer, 1927, and Quedius pseudonigriceps Reitter, 1909. As a result of synonymy of Quedius and Velleius, the following new combinations are proposed: Quedius amamiensis (Watanabe, 1990), comb. n.; Quedius circumipectus (Cho, 1996), comb. n.; Quedius elongatus (Naomi, 1986), comb. n.; Quedius japonicus (Watanabe, 1990), comb. n.; Quedius pectinatus (Sharp, 1874), comb. n.; Quedius setosus (Sharp, 1889), comb. n.; Quedius simillimus (Fairmaire, 1891), comb. n. As a result of new combinations, Quedius japonicus (Watanabe, 1990) (non Quedius japonicus Sharp, 1874) is replaced with the new name Quedius watanabei Solodovnikov, nom. n., while Quedius pectinatus Lea, 1908 (non Quedius pectinatus (Sharp, 1874)) is replaced with the new name Quedius arthuri Solodovnikov, nom. n.

  18. Comparison of male and female emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) responses to phoebe oil and (Z)-3-hexenol lures in light green prism traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gary G; Poland, Therese M; Ciaramitaro, Tina; Lyons, D Barry; Jones, Gene C

    2011-02-01

    We conducted trapping experiments for the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Michigan, U.S.A., and Ontario, Canada, to compare unbaited light green sticky prism traps with traps baited with phoebe oil, (Z)-3-hexenol (Z3-6:OH), or blends of other green leaf volatiles (GLVs) with Z3-6:OH. Traps were placed in the lower canopy of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.). Catches with Z3-6:OH-baited traps showed a significant male bias and these traps caught significantly more males than the unbaited controls at both sites. They were also superior to phoebe oil-baited traps and those baited with GLV blends. Catches with phoebe oil showed a significant female bias but there was no difference in the number of females captured between traps baited with phoebe oil or Z3-6:OH lures. Catches were analyzed at regular time intervals to examine the response of A. planipennis to the lures over the course of the flight season. Z3-6:OH-baited traps consistently caught more males than the controls at each interval throughout the flight season. Catches of females with Z3-6:OH and phoebe oil were significantly better than the controls early in the flight season but declined to control levels by midseason. Our results suggest that Z3-6:OH-baited green traps placed in the ash canopy would be a superior lure for detecting and monitoring A. planipennis throughout the flight season.

  19. Optimizing Use of Girdled Ash Trees for Management of Low-Density Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Nathan W; McCullough, Deborah G; Poland, Therese M; Heyd, Robert L

    2017-06-01

    Effective survey methods to detect and monitor recently established, low-density infestations of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), remain a high priority because they provide land managers and property owners with time to implement tactics to slow emerald ash borer population growth and the progression of ash mortality. We evaluated options for using girdled ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees for emerald ash borer detection and management in a low-density infestation in a forested area with abundant green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Across replicated 4-ha plots, we compared detection efficiency of 4 versus 16 evenly distributed girdled ash trees and between clusters of 3 versus 12 girdled trees. We also examined within-tree larval distribution in 208 girdled and nongirdled trees and assessed adult emerald ash borer emergence from detection trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site. Overall, current-year larvae were present in 85-97% of girdled trees and 57-72% of nongirdled trees, and larval density was 2-5 times greater on girdled than nongirdled trees. Low-density emerald ash borer infestations were readily detected with four girdled trees per 4-ha, and 3-tree clusters were as effective as 12-tree clusters. Larval densities were greatest 0.5 ± 0.4 m below the base of the canopy in girdled trees and 1.3 ± 0.7 m above the canopy base in nongirdled trees. Relatively few adult emerald ash borer emerged from trees felled 11 mo after girdling and left on site through the following summer, suggesting removal or destruction of girdled ash trees may be unnecessary. This could potentially reduce survey costs, particularly in forested areas with poor accessibility. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  20. Sulfuryl fluoride as a quarantine treatment for Chlorophorus annularis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Chinese bamboo poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daojian; Barak, Alan V; Jiao, Yi; Chen, Zhinan; Zhang, Guiming; Chen, Zhilin; Kang, Lin; Yang, Weidong

    2010-04-01

    Bamboo (genera Bambusa and Phyllstachys) is one of the fastest growing and economically important plants in the world, and it is cultivated widely throughout southern China. China annually exports to the United States significant quantities of bamboo garden stakes (Bambusa spp.). In recent years, Plant Protection and Quarantine officers of the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service have made numerous interceptions of the bamboo borer, Chlorophorus annularis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in bamboo products from China. This species is considered to have high pest risk potential in the trade of bamboo products. As a fumigant, sulfuryl fluoride (SF) would be a practical alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) fumigation. Here, we report the results of SF fumigation tests for C. annularis in bamboo poles at three doses--96 g/m3 at 15.9 degrees C, 80 g/m3 at 21.5 degrees C, and 64 g/m3 at 26.0 degrees C--in glass test chambers. Commercial standard fumigations were also conducted in a standard 6.1-m-long, 33.2-m3 (standard height, 20-feet) marine general cargo container loaded to 80% (vol:vol) with similar bamboo poles, and sufficient levels of SF were obtained during the 24-h fumigations. During the course of these tests, 2424 larvae, 90 pupae, and 23 adults in total were killed, with no survivors. A treatment schedule using SF is proposed for bamboo as an alternative to MeBr at several temperatures tested.

  1. Effectiveness of differing trap types for the detection of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jordan M; Storer, Andrew J; Fraser, Ivich; Beachy, Jessica A; Mastro, Victor C

    2009-08-01

    The early detection of populations of a forest pest is important to begin initial control efforts, minimizing the risk of further spread and impact. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an introduced pestiferous insect of ash (Fraxinus spp. L.) in North America. The effectiveness of trapping techniques, including girdled trap trees with sticky bands and purple prism traps, was tested in areas with low- and high-density populations of emerald ash borer. At both densities, large girdled trap trees (>30 cm diameter at breast height [dbh], 1.37 m in height) captured a higher rate of adult beetles per day than smaller trees. However, the odds of detecting emerald ash borer increased as the dbh of the tree increased by 1 cm for trap trees 15-25 cm dbh. Ash species used for the traps differed in the number of larvae per cubic centimeter of phloem. Emerald ash borer larvae were more likely to be detected below, compared with above, the crown base of the trap tree. While larval densities within a trap tree were related to the species of ash, adult capture rates were not. These results provide support for focusing state and regional detection programs on the detection of emerald ash borer adults. If bark peeling for larvae is incorporated into these programs, peeling efforts focused below the crown base may increase likelihood of identifying new infestations while reducing labor costs. Associating traps with larger trees ( approximately 25 cm dbh) may increase the odds of detecting low-density populations of emerald ash borer, possibly reducing the time between infestation establishment and implementing management strategies.

  2. A karyosystematic analysis of some water beetles related to Deronectes Sharp (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of five species and one additional subspecies of Deronectes Sharp, 1882, three species of Stictotarsus Zimmermann, 1919, one species of Trichonectes Guignot, 1941, four species of Scarodytes Gozis, 1914 and 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart, 1906. Deronectes species are characterised by a neo-Xy system of sex chromosomes and autosome numbers ranging from 60 (D. ferrugineus Fery et Brancucci, 1987 and D. wewalkai Fery et Fresneda, 1988 through 48 (D. latus (Stephens, 1829, D. angusi Fery et Brancucci, 1990 to 28 (D. costipennis Brancucci, 1983, D. costipennis gignouxi Fery et Brancucci, 1989 and D. platynotus (Germar, 1834. The three species of Stictotarsus, S. duodecimpustulatus (Fabricius, 1792, S. procerus (Aubé, 1838 and S. bertrandi (Legros, 1956, all belonging to the S. duodecimpustulatus group of species, have karyotypes comprising 54 autosomes and neo-Xy sex chromosomes. Trichonectes otini Guignot, 1941 has 48 autosomes and an X0 system of sex chromosomes, an arrangement shared with the 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart. The four Scarodytes species, S. halensis (Fabricius, 1787, S. nigriventris (Zimmermann, 1919, S. fuscitarsis (Aubé, 1838 and S. malickyi Wewalka, 1997, all have 54 autosomes and X0 sex chromosomes. The karyotypes of the various species are found to be distinctive and to support separation of these species from one another. In two cases (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858 and N. sardus (Gemminger et Harold, 1868, and Scarodytes halensis and S. fuscitarsis the karyotypes require the recognition of the taxa as full species, not subspecies. The implications of these data for the generic classification are considered. The data are found to be compatible with the DNA-based phylogeny proposed by Ribera (2003, where the enlarged Stictotarsus proposed by Nilsson and Angus (1992 is found to be unsatisfactory.

  3. A karyosystematic analysis of some water beetles related to Deronectes Sharp (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, R B; Tatton, A G

    2011-01-01

    An account is given of the karyotypes of five species and one additional subspecies of Deronectes Sharp, 1882, three species of Stictotarsus Zimmermann, 1919, one species of Trichonectes Guignot, 1941, four species of Scarodytes Gozis, 1914 and 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart, 1906. Deronectes species are characterised by a neo-Xy system of sex chromosomes and autosome numbers ranging from 60 (Deronectes ferrugineus Fery et Brancucci, 1987 and Deronectes wewalkai Fery et Fresneda, 1988) through 48 (Deronectes latus (Stephens, 1829), Deronectes angusi Fery et Brancucci, 1990) to 28 (Deronectes costipennis Brancucci, 1983, Deronectes costipennis gignouxi Fery et Brancucci, 1989 and Deronectes platynotus (Germar, 1834)). The three species of Stictotarsus, Stictotarsus duodecimpustulatus (Fabricius, 1792), Stictotarsus procerus (Aubé, 1838) and Stictotarsus bertrandi (Legros, 1956), all belonging to the Stictotarsus duodecimpustulatus group of species, have karyotypes comprising 54 autosomes and neo-Xy sex chromosomes. Trichonectes otini Guignot, 1941 has 48 autosomes and an X0 system of sex chromosomes, an arrangement shared with the 17 species of Nebrioporus Régimbart. The four Scarodytes species, Scarodytes halensis (Fabricius, 1787), Scarodytes nigriventris (Zimmermann, 1919), Scarodytes fuscitarsis (Aubé, 1838) and Scarodytes malickyi Wewalka, 1997, all have 54 autosomes and X0 sex chromosomes. The karyotypes of the various species are found to be distinctive and to support separation of these species from one another. In two cases (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858) and Nebrioporus sardus (Gemminger et Harold, 1868), and Scarodytes halensis and Scarodytes fuscitarsis) the karyotypes require the recognition of the taxa as full species, not subspecies. The implications of these data for the generic classification are considered. The data are found to be compatible with the DNA-based phylogeny proposed by Ribera (2003), where the enlarged Stictotarsus

  4. Influence of Mortality Factors and Host Resistance on the Population Dynamics of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in Urban Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquarrie, Chris J K; Scharbach, Roger

    2015-02-01

    The success of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) in North America is hypothesized to be due to both the lack of significant natural enemies permitting easy establishment and a population of trees that lack the ability to defend themselves, which allows populations to grow unchecked. Since its discovery in 2002, a number of studies have examined mortality factors of the insect in forests, but none have examined the role of natural enemies and other mortality agents in the urban forest. This is significant because it is in the urban forest where the emerald ash borer has had the most significant economic impacts. We studied populations in urban forests in three municipalities in Ontario, Canada, between 2010 and 2012 using life tables and stage-specific survivorship to analyze data from a split-rearing manipulative experiment. We found that there was little overall mortality caused by natural enemies; most mortality we did observe was caused by disease. Stage-specific survivorship was lowest in small and large larvae, supporting previous observations of high mortality in these two stages. We also used our data to test the hypothesis that mortality and density in emerald ash borer are linked. Our results support the prediction of a negative relationship between mortality and density. However, the relationship varies between insects developing in the crown and those in the trunk of the tree. This relationship was significant because when incorporated with previous findings, it suggests a mechanism and hypothesis to explain the outbreak dynamics of the emerald ash borer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Taxonomic revision of Madagascan Rhantus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae with an emphasis on Manjakatompo as a conservation priority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hjalmarsson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the diving-beetle genus Rhantus Dejean of Madagascar (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae based on museum collection holdings and recently collected expedition material. Both morphology and DNA is used to test species boundaries, in particular whether newly collected material from the Tsaratanana mountains in the north represent a new species or are conspecific with Rhantus manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi 2009, described based on a single male specimen from the central Ankaratra mountains. DNA of the holotype of R. manjakatompo was successfully extracted in a non-destructive way and sequenced. The general mixed Yule coalescent model applied to an ultrametric tree constructed from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequence data delimited three species. Morphological characters supported the same species unambiguously. We therefore recognise three species of Rhantus to occur in Madagascar: R. latus (Fairmaire, 1869, R. bouvieri Régimbart, 1900 and R. manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi, 2009. All three species are endemic to Madagascar and restricted to the highlands of the island. Rhantus stenonychus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., is considered a junior synonym of R. latus. We designate lectotypes for R. bouvieri and R. goudoti Sharp, 1882, the latter a junior synonym of R. latus. We provide descriptions, a determination key, SEM-images of fine pronotal and elytral structures, distribution maps, habitus photos, and illustrations of male genitalia and pro- and mesotarsal claws. We discuss the role of the Manjakatompo forest as a refugium for Madagascan Rhantus diversity and other endemics of the montane central high plateau.

  6. A REVISION OF THE PACHNEPHORUS FROM THE AFROTROPICAL REGION (COLEOPTERA, CHRYSOMELIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Zoia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available A revision of the genus Pachnephorus Chevrolat, 1837 from the Afrotropical Region is given and a key to the species is provided. Types of all the previously known taxa have been studied and redescribed; 40 new taxa are described and illustrated: P. achardi n. sp. (Mali, P. aequatorianus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. aethiopicus n. sp. (Etiopia, P. baehri n. sp. (Namibia, P. balyi n. sp. (Angola, P. beharui n. sp. (Etiopia, P. bertiae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. bezdeki n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bracarumvestitus n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. bryanti n. sp. (Mali, P. burgeoni n. sp. (Natal, P. camerun­ensis n. sp. (Camerun, P. cristiani n. sp. (Namibia, P. crocodilinus n. sp. (Zambia, P. daccordii n. sp. (Yemen, P. danielssoni n. sp. (Sierra Leone, P. danielssoni congoanus n. ssp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. demeyeri n. sp. (Rep. Pop. Congo, P. episternalis n. sp. (Madagascar, P. fabianae n. sp. (Congo, P. fasciatus occidentalis n. ssp. (Nigeria, P. gardinii n. sp. (Etiopia, P. gerstaeckeri n. sp. (Namibia, P. grobbelaarae n. sp. (South Africa, P. hajeki n. sp. (Madagascar, P. lopatini n. sp. (Senegal, P. malicus n. sp. (Mali, P. maroantsetranus n. sp. (Madagascar, P. medvedevi n. sp. (Zambia, P. mo­seykoi n. sp. (Chad, P. pacificus n. sp. (Central Afr. Rep., P. parentorum n. sp. (Ghana, P. poggii n. sp. (Somalia, P. regalini n. sp. (Zambia, P. rigatoi n. sp. (Kenya, P. sas­sii n. sp. (Guinea Bissau, P. shuteae n. sp. (Rep. South Africa, P. sprecherae n. sp. (Madagascar, P. uhligi n. sp. (Namibia, P. willersi n. sp. (Namibia. The lectoypes of P. conspersus Gerstaecker, 1871, P. senegalensis Achard, 1914, P. latior Pic, 1921 and P. testaceipes Fairmaire, 1880 are designated. A new synonymy (P. costatus Achard, 1914 n. syn. of P. torridus Baly, 1878 and a nomenclatural change (Mecistes lineatus (Pic, 1921 n. comb. for Pachnephorus lineatus Pic, 1921 are proposed; the Lectotypes of M. lineatus and of M. flavipes (Gerstaecker, 1855 are designated.

  7. World reclassification of the Cardiophorinae (Coleoptera, Elateridae, based on phylogenetic analyses of morphological characters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hume B. Douglas

    2017-02-01

    ; Teslasena Fleutiaux, 1892 (Physodactylinae is syn. n. of Globothorax Fleutiaux, 1891. The following new genera are described: Austrocardiophorus (type species: Cardiophorus humeralis Fairmaire and Germain, 1860; Chileaphricus (type species: Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940; Floridelater (type species: Coptostethus americanus Horn, 1871, transferred from Negastriinae to Cardiophorinae. Paradicronychus (nomen nudum, is syn. n. of Cardiophorus Eschscholtz, 1829. Generic reassignments to make Cardiodontulus, Cardiophorus, Cardiotarsus, Paracardiophorus consistent with phylogenetically revised genus concepts resulted in 84 new combinations. Lectotypes are designated for 29 type species to fix generic concepts: Anelastes femoralis Lucas, 1857; Aphricus chilensis Fleutiaux, 1940; Athous argentatus Abeille de Perrin, 1894; Cardiophorus adjutor Candèze, 1875; Cardiophorus florentini Fleutiaux, 1895; Cardiophorus inflatus Candèze, 1882; Cardiophorus luridipes Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus mirabilis Candèze, 1860; Cardiophorus musculus Erichson, 1840; Cardiotarsus capensis Candèze, 1860; Cardiotarsus vitalisi Fleutiaux, 1918; Craspedostethus rufiventris Schwarz, 1898; Elater cinereus Herbst, 1784; Elater minutissimus Germar, 1817; Elater sputator Linnaeus, 1758; Elater thoracicus Fabricius, 1801; Eniconyx pullatus Horn, 1884; Esthesopus castaneus Eschscholtz, 1829; Gastrimargus schneideri Schwarz, 1902; Globothorax chevrolati Fleutiaux, 1891; Horistonotus flavidus Candèze, 1860; Horistonotus simplex LeConte, 1863; Lesnelater madagascariensis Fleutiaux, 1935; Oedostethus femoralis LeConte, 1853; Phorocardius solitarius Fleutiaux, 1931; Platynychus indicus Motschulsky, 1858; Platynychus mixtus Fleutiaux, 1931; Triplonychus acuminatus Candèze, 1860; Tropidiplus tellinii Fleutiaux, 1903. A key to genera and diagnoses are provided for all genera and subgenera. A bibliographic synonymy includes references for all taxonomic changes to genera and new species through 2015.

  8. Taxonomic, nomenclatural, distributional and biological study of the genus Agrilus (Coleoptera: Buprestidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Jendek

    2016-01-01

    . (synonym of A. transversesulcatus Reitter, 1890; tetrastichus Obenberger, 1924 syn. nov. (synonym of A. fissifrons Fairmaire, 1849 and tifliscus Obenberger, 1936 syn. nov. (synonym of A. transversesulcatus Reitter, 1890. Agrilus grandiceps Kiesenwetter, 1857 is a dubious name of unknown taxonomic concept due to lack of the primary type. The following twenty-seven lectotypes of nominal taxa are designated: A. affectans Obenberger, 1923; A. alacris Kerremans, 1896; A. fidjiensis Obenberger, 1924; A. grusinus Obenberger, 1917; A. hassani Théry, 1930; A. hermineus Abeille de Perrin, 1907; A. hypericicola Abeille de Perrin, 1893; A. ieiunulus Obenberger, 1936; A. limoniastri Bedel, 1886; A. mephistopheles Abeille de Perrin, 1897; A. morio Kerremans, 1895; A. beauprei mourguesi Schaefer, 1954; A. nigrivestis Abeille de Perrin, 1897; A. niveosignatus Obenberger, 1914; A. panchlorus Abeille de Perrin, 1897; A. perparvus Obenberger, 1918; A. proteus Abeille de Perrin, 1893; A. roscidus Kiesenwetter, 1857; A. rumanicus Obenberger, 1924; A. shamyl Obenberger, 1922; A. subroscidus Obenberger, 1924; A. suturisignatus Obenberger, 1924; A. suvorovi Obenberger, 1935; A. fidjiensis tetrastichus Obenberger, 1924; A. tifliscus Obenberger, 1936; A. transversesulcatus Reitter, 1890 and A. validiusculus Semenov, 1891. Additionally, the geographical range or host plant data are updated or revised for many taxa. The North American Agrilus bilineatus (Weber, 1801 is recorded from a single record from Turkey which is the first introduction of a Nearctic Agrilus to the Palearctic fauna.

  9. A monograph of the Australopacific Saprininae (Coleoptera, Histeridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Lackner

    2017-08-01

    , 1888, Saprinus communis Marseul, 1862, Saprinus cupreus Erichson, 1834, Saprinus cyanellus Marseul, 1855, Hister cyaneus Fabricius, 1775, Saprinus dentipes Marseul, 1855, Saprinus desbordesi Auzat, 1916, Saprinus gayndahensis MacLeay, 1871, Saprinus hyla Marseul, 1864, Saprinus incisisternus Marseul, 1862, Saprinus incisus Erichson, 1842, Saprinus irinus Marseul, 1862, Saprinus laetus Erichson, 1834, Saprinus lepidulus Broun, 1881, Saprinus mastersii MacLeay, 1871, Saprinus nitiduloides Fairmaire, 1883, Saprinus pedator Sharp, 1876, Saprinus pseudocyaneus White, 1846, Saprinus rubriculus Marseul, 1855, Saprinus sinae Marseul, 1862, Saprinus tasmanicus Marseul, 1855, Saprinus tyrrhenus Blackburn, 1903, Saprinus varians Schmidt, 1890, Saprinus vernulus Blackburn, 1903, Saprinus viridanus Lewis, 1899, Saprinus viridipennis Lewis, 1901, and Saprinus westraliensis Blackburn, 1903. The synonymy of Saprinus tyrrhenus Blackburn, 1903 is revoked and the species is considered as valid (stat. n.. Seven new synonymies are proposed: Saprinus gayndahensis MacLeay, 1871 = Saprinus laetus Erichson, 1834 syn. n., Saprinus pseudocyaneus White, 1846 = Saprinus laetus Erichson, 1834 syn. n., Saprinus mastersii MacLeay, 1871 = Saprinus laetus Erichson, 1834 syn. n., Saprinus dentipes Marseul, 1855 = Hypocaccus (Baeckmanniolus gaudens (J.L. LeConte, 1851 syn. n., Hypocaccus (Hypocaccus vernulus (Blackburn, 1903 = Hypocaccus (Hypocaccus sinae (Marseul, 1862 syn. n., Saprinus (Saprinus lindrothi Dahlgren, 1968 = Saprinus (Saprinus prasinus Erichson, 1834 syn. n., and Saprinus (Saprinus certus Lewis, 1888 = Saprinus (Saprinus frontistrius Marseul, 1855 syn. n. The following new records are: Euspilotus (Neosaprinus rubriculus (Marseul, 1855 (= Saprinus gnathoncoides Bickhardt, 1909 (Australia, Saprinus (Saprinus laetus Erichson, 1834 (Lord Howe Island and Saprinus (Saprinus cyaneus cyaneus (Fabricius, 1775 (Lord Howe Island and Fiji.

  10. Are Iberian endemics Iberian? A case-study using water beetles of family Dytiscidae (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribera, Ignacio

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic relationships and the geographical origin of 27 of the 34 species and of 3 of the 9 subspecies of Iberian endemic Dytiscidae are studied, based on species level phylogenies constructed with two mitochondrial gene fragments (16S rRNA and Cytochrome Oxidase I. All Iberian endemic species for which more than one specimen was included were monophyletic with the exception of the complex Deronectes aubei sanfilippoi Fery & Brancucci, 1997-D. delarouzei (Jac. Du Val, 1857. The genus Stictotarsus as presently defined is polyphyletic, containing three different lineages: the S. duodecimpustulatus group —including the Iberian endemic S. bertrandi (Legros, 1956—, Trichonectes otini (Guignot, 1941 (new combination and the S. griseostriatus and S. roffii groups, which are in need of a new generic name. The genus Oreodytes is found to be paraphyletic, although with low bootstrap support. The species Nebrioporus (Nebrioporus martinii (Fairmaire, 1858 (new combination is transferred from the subgenus Zimmermannius to Nebrioporus. The Iberian populations of Stictotarsus griseostriatus (De Geer, 1774 and the endemic subspecies Oreodytes davisii rhianae Carr, 2001, O. sanmarkii alienus (Sharp, 1872 and Hydroporus normandi normandi Régimbart, 1903 do not form well characterised lineages, as measured with the mitochondrial markers used in this study. The Iberian endemic species of Dytiscidae are divided in three groups according to the type of vicariant origin: 1 within-Iberian species, when the sister species (or clade of the Iberian endemic is also and Iberian endemic; 2 Iberian/European, when the sister occurs in Europe north of the Pyrenees; and 3 Iberian/North African, when the sister occurs in North Africa. Within-Iberian endemics are found to be on average older than Iberian/European and Iberian/North African species, they have