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Sample records for euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium

  1. Unicellular cyanobacterium symbiotic with a single-celled eukaryotic alga.

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    Thompson, Anne W; Foster, Rachel A; Krupke, Andreas; Carter, Brandon J; Musat, Niculina; Vaulot, Daniel; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2012-09-21

    Symbioses between nitrogen (N)(2)-fixing prokaryotes and photosynthetic eukaryotes are important for nitrogen acquisition in N-limited environments. Recently, a widely distributed planktonic uncultured nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium (UCYN-A) was found to have unprecedented genome reduction, including the lack of oxygen-evolving photosystem II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which suggested partnership in a symbiosis. We showed that UCYN-A has a symbiotic association with a unicellular prymnesiophyte, closely related to calcifying taxa present in the fossil record. The partnership is mutualistic, because the prymnesiophyte receives fixed N in exchange for transferring fixed carbon to UCYN-A. This unusual partnership between a cyanobacterium and a unicellular alga is a model for symbiosis and is analogous to plastid and organismal evolution, and if calcifying, may have important implications for past and present oceanic N(2) fixation.

  2. Unique thylakoid membrane architecture of a unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium revealed by electron tomography.

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    Liberton, Michelle; Austin, Jotham R; Berg, R Howard; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria, descendants of the endosymbiont that gave rise to modern-day chloroplasts, are vital contributors to global biological energy conversion processes. A thorough understanding of the physiology of cyanobacteria requires detailed knowledge of these organisms at the level of cellular architecture and organization. In these prokaryotes, the large membrane protein complexes of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains function in the intracellular thylakoid membranes. Like plants, the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria has direct impact on cellular bioenergetics, protein transport, and molecular trafficking. However, whole-cell thylakoid organization in cyanobacteria is not well understood. Here we present, by using electron tomography, an in-depth analysis of the architecture of the thylakoid membranes in a unicellular cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. Based on the results of three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of near-entire cells, we determined that the thylakoids in Cyanothece 51142 form a dense and complex network that extends throughout the entire cell. This thylakoid membrane network is formed from the branching and splitting of membranes and encloses a single lumenal space. The entire thylakoid network spirals as a peripheral ring of membranes around the cell, an organization that has not previously been described in a cyanobacterium. Within the thylakoid membrane network are areas of quasi-helical arrangement with similarities to the thylakoid membrane system in chloroplasts. This cyanobacterial thylakoid arrangement is an efficient means of packing a large volume of membranes in the cell while optimizing intracellular transport and trafficking.

  3. The genome of Cyanothece 51142, a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium important in the marine nitrogen cycle

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    Welsh, Eric A.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Stockel, Jana; Loh, Thomas; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Wang, Chunyan; Wollam, Aye; Fulton, Robert S.; Clifton, Sandra W.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Aurora, Rajeev; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Sherman, Louis A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilson, Richard K.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-09-30

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that have significant roles in global biological carbon sequestration and oxygen production. They occupy a diverse range of habitats, from open ocean, to hot springs, deserts, and arctic waters. Cyanobacteria are known as the progenitors of the chloroplasts of plants and algae, and are the simplest known organisms to exhibit circadian behavior4. Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a unicellular marine cyanobacterium capable of N2-fixation, a process that is biochemically incompatible with oxygenic photosynthesis. To resolve this problem, Cyanothece performs photosynthesis during the day and nitrogen fixation at night, thus temporally separating these processes in the same cell. The genome of Cyanothece 51142 was completely sequenced and found to contain a unique arrangement of one large circular chromosome, four small plasmids, and one linear chromosome, the first report of such a linear element in a photosynthetic bacterium. Annotation of the Cyanothece genome was aided by the use of highthroughput proteomics data, enabling the reclassification of 25% of the proteins with no informative sequence homology. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that nitrogen fixation is an ancient process that arose early in evolution and has subsequently been lost in many cyanobacterial strains. In cyanobacterial cells, the circadian clock influences numerous processes, including carbohydrate synthesis, nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis, respiration, and the cell division cycle. During a diurnal period, Cyanothece cells actively accumulate and degrade different storage inclusion bodies for the products of photosynthesis and N2-fixation. This ability to utilize metabolic compartmentalization and energy storage makes Cyanothece an ideal system for bioenergy research, as well as studies of how a unicellular organism balances multiple, often incompatible, processes in the same cell.

  4. Photosynthetic poly-β-hydroxybutyrate accumulation in unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714.

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    Kamravamanesh, Donya; Pflügl, Stefan; Nischkauer, Winfried; Limbeck, Andreas; Lackner, Maximilian; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production from CO2 has the potential to reduce the production cost of this biodegradable polyesters, and also to make the material more sustainable compared to utilization of sugar feedstocks. In this study the unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714 has been identified as an unexplored potential organism for production of PHB. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714 was studied under various cultivation conditions and nutritional limitations. Combined effects of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency led to highest PHB accumulation under photoautotrophic conditions. Multivariate experimental design and quantitative bioprocess development methodologies were used to identify the key cultivation parameters for PHB accumulation. Biomass growth and PHB accumulation were studied under controlled defined conditions in a lab-scale photobioreactor. Specific growth rates were fourfold higher in photobioreactor experiments when cultivation conditions were controlled. After 14 days of cultivation in nitrogen and phosphorus, limited media intracellular PHB levels reached up to 16.4% from CO2. The highest volumetric production rate of PHB was 59 ± 6 mg L(-1) day(-1). Scanning electron microscopy of isolated PHB granules of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6714 cultivated under nitrogen and phosphorus limitations showed an average diameter of 0.7 µm. The results of this study might contribute towards a better understanding of photoautotrophic PHB production from cyanobacteria.

  5. Substrate Specificity and Allosteric Regulation of a D-Lactate Dehydrogenase from a Unicellular Cyanobacterium are Altered by an Amino Acid Substitution.

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    Ito, Shoki; Takeya, Masahiro; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-11-08

    Lactate/lactic acid is an important chemical compound for the manufacturing of bioplastics. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can produce lactate from carbon dioxide and possesses D-lactate dehydrogenase (Ddh). Here, we performed a biochemical analysis of the Ddh from this cyanobacterium (SyDdh) using recombinant proteins. SyDdh was classified into a cyanobacterial clade similar to those from Gram-negative bacteria, although it was distinct from them. SyDdh can use both pyruvate and oxaloacetate as a substrate and is activated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and repressed by divalent cations. An amino acid substitution based on multiple sequence alignment data revealed that the glutamine at position 14 and serine at position 234 are important for the allosteric regulation by Mg 2+ and substrate specificity of SyDdh, respectively. These results reveal the characteristic biochemical properties of Ddh in a unicellular cyanobacterium, which are different from those of other bacterial Ddhs.

  6. Transcriptional analysis of the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 grown under short day/night cycles

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    Toepel, Jorg; McDermott, Jason E.; Summerfield, Tina; Sherman, Louis A.

    2009-06-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is a unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that demonstrates extensive metabolic periodicities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogen fixation when grown under N2-fixing conditions. We have performed a global transcription analysis of this organism using 6 h light/dark cycles in order to determine the response of the cell to these conditions and to differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. In addition, we used a context-likelihood of relatedness (CLR) analysis with this data and those from two-day light/dark and light-dark plus continuous light experiments to better differentiate between diurnal and circadian regulated genes. Cyanothece sp. adapted in several ways to growth under short light/dark conditions. Nitrogen was fixed in every second dark period and only once in each 24 h period. Nitrogen fixation was strongly correlated to the energy status of the cells and glycogen breakdown and high respiration rates were necessary to provide appropriate energy and anoxic conditions for this process. We conclude that glycogen breakdown is a key regulatory step within these complex processes. Our results demonstrated that the main metabolic genes involved in photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen fixation and central carbohydrate metabolism have strong (or total) circadian-regulated components. The short light/dark cycles enable us to identify transcriptional differences among the family of psbA genes, as well as the differing patterns of the hup genes, which follow the same pattern as nitrogenase genes, relative to the hox genes which displayed a diurnal, dark-dependent gene expression.

  7. Coupling of Cellular Processes and Their Coordinated Oscillations under Continuous Light in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a Diazotrophic Unicellular Cyanobacterium.

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    S Krishnakumar

    Full Text Available Unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 (henceforth Cyanothece, temporally separate the oxygen sensitive nitrogen fixation from oxygen evolving photosynthesis not only under diurnal cycles (LD but also in continuous light (LL. However, recent reports demonstrate that the oscillations in LL occur with a shorter cycle time of ~11 h. We find that indeed, majority of the genes oscillate in LL with this cycle time. Genes that are upregulated at a particular time of day under diurnal cycle also get upregulated at an equivalent metabolic phase under LL suggesting tight coupling of various cellular events with each other and with the cell's metabolic status. A number of metabolic processes get upregulated in a coordinated fashion during the respiratory phase under LL including glycogen degradation, glycolysis, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle. These precede nitrogen fixation apparently to ensure sufficient energy and anoxic environment needed for the nitrogenase enzyme. Photosynthetic phase sees upregulation of photosystem II, carbonate transport, carbon concentrating mechanism, RuBisCO, glycogen synthesis and light harvesting antenna pigment biosynthesis. In Synechococcus elongates PCC 7942, a non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria, expression of a relatively smaller fraction of genes oscillates under LL condition with the major periodicity being 24 h. In contrast, the entire cellular machinery of Cyanothece orchestrates coordinated oscillation in anticipation of the ensuing metabolic phase in both LD and LL. These results may have important implications in understanding the timing of various cellular events and in engineering cyanobacteria for biofuel production.

  8. Genome-scale modeling of light-driven reductant partitioning and carbon fluxes in diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

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    Trang T Vu

    Full Text Available Genome-scale metabolic models have proven useful for answering fundamental questions about metabolic capabilities of a variety of microorganisms, as well as informing their metabolic engineering. However, only a few models are available for oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly in cyanobacteria in which photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains (ETC share components. We addressed the complexity of cyanobacterial ETC by developing a genome-scale model for the diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142. The resulting metabolic reconstruction, iCce806, consists of 806 genes associated with 667 metabolic reactions and includes a detailed representation of the ETC and a biomass equation based on experimental measurements. Both computational and experimental approaches were used to investigate light-driven metabolism in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, with a particular focus on reductant production and partitioning within the ETC. The simulation results suggest that growth and metabolic flux distributions are substantially impacted by the relative amounts of light going into the individual photosystems. When growth is limited by the flux through photosystem I, terminal respiratory oxidases are predicted to be an important mechanism for removing excess reductant. Similarly, under photosystem II flux limitation, excess electron carriers must be removed via cyclic electron transport. Furthermore, in silico calculations were in good quantitative agreement with the measured growth rates whereas predictions of reaction usage were qualitatively consistent with protein and mRNA expression data, which we used to further improve the resolution of intracellular flux values.

  9. Response of H{sub 2} production and Hox-hydrogenase activity to external factors in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803

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    Baebprasert, Wipawee [Program of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Lindblad, Peter [Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, The Aangstroem Laboratories, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Incharoensakdi, Aran [Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-07-15

    The effects of external factors on both H{sub 2} production and bidirectional Hox-hydrogenase activity were examined in the non-N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Exogenous glucose and increased osmolality both enhanced H{sub 2} production with optimal production observed at 0.4% and 20 mosmol kg{sup -1}, respectively. Anaerobic condition for 24 h induced significant higher H{sub 2}ase activity with cells in BG11{sub 0} showing highest activities. Increasing the pH resulted in an increased Hox-hydrogenase activity with an optimum at pH 7.5. The Hox-hydrogenase activity gradually increased with increasing temperature from 30 {sup circle} C to 60 {sup circle} C with the highest activity observed at 70 {sup circle} C. A low concentration at 100 {mu}M of either DTT or {beta}-mercaptoethanol resulted in a minor stimulation of H{sub 2} production. {beta}-Mercaptoethanol added to nitrogen- and sulfur-deprived cells stimulated H{sub 2} production significantly. The highest Hox-hydrogenase activity was observed in cells in BG11{sub 0}-S-deprived condition and 750 {mu}M {beta}-mercaptoethanol measured at a temperature of 70 C; 14.32 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg chl a{sup -1} min{sup -1}. (author)

  10. Euryhalinity in an evolutionary context

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    Schultz, Eric T.; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the evolutionary importance and taxonomic distribution of euryhalinity. Euryhalinity refers to broad halotolerance and broad halohabitat distribution. Salinity exposure experiments have demonstrated that species vary tenfold in their range of tolerable salinity levels, primarily because of differences in upper limits. Halotolerance breadth varies with the species’ evolutionary history, as represented by its ordinal classification, and with the species’ halohabitat. Freshwater and seawater species tolerate brackish water; their empirically-determined fundamental haloniche is broader than their realized haloniche, as revealed by the halohabitats they occupy. With respect to halohabitat distribution, a minority of species (<10%) are euryhaline. Habitat-euryhalinity is prevalent among basal actinopterygian fishes, is largely absent from orders arising from intermediate nodes, and reappears in the most derived taxa. There is pronounced family-level variability in the tendency to be halohabitat-euryhaline, which may have arisen during a burst of diversification following the Cretaceous-Palaeogene extinction. Low prevalence notwithstanding, euryhaline species are potent sources of evolutionary diversity. Euryhalinity is regarded as a key innovation trait whose evolution enables exploitation of new adaptive zone, triggering cladogenesis. We review phylogenetically-informed studies that demonstrate freshwater species diversifying from euryhaline ancestors through processes such as landlocking. These studies indicate that some euryhaline taxa are particularly susceptible to changes in halohabitat and subsequent diversification, and some geographic regions have been hotspots for transitions to freshwater. Comparative studies on mechanisms among multiple taxa and at multiple levels of biological integration are needed to clarify evolutionary pathways to, and from, euryhalinity.

  11. Autophagy in unicellular eukaryotes

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    Kiel, J.A.K.W.

    2010-01-01

    Cells need a constant supply of precursors to enable the production of macromolecules to sustain growth and survival. Unlike metazoans, unicellular eukaryotes depend exclusively on the extracellular medium for this supply. When environmental nutrients become depleted, existing cytoplasmic components

  12. Acclimation of the Global Transcriptome of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 to Nutrient Limitations and Different Nitrogen Sources.

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    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high-light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO(2), nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate, and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO(2) fixation, and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO(2) was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO(2) fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences.

  13. Acclimation of the global transcriptome of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 to nutrient limitations and different nitrogen sources

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    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a model organism for laboratory-based studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and is a potential platform for biotechnological applications. Two of its most notable properties are its exceptional tolerance of high light intensity and very rapid growth under optimal conditions. In this study, transcription profiling by RNAseq has been used to perform an integrated study of global changes in transcript levels in cells subjected to limitation for the major nutrients CO2, nitrogen, sulfate, phosphate and iron. Transcriptional patterns for cells grown on nitrate, ammonia, and urea were also studied. Nutrient limitation caused strong decreases of transcript levels of the genes encoding major metabolic pathways, especially for components of the photosynthetic apparatus, CO2 fixation and protein biosynthesis. Uptake mechanisms for the respective nutrients were strongly up-regulated. The transcription data further suggest that major changes in the composition of the NADH dehydrogenase complex occur upon nutrient limitation. Transcripts for flavoproteins increased strongly when CO2 was limiting. Genes involved in protection from oxidative stress generally showed high, constitutive transcript levels, which possibly explains the high-light tolerance of this organism. The transcriptomes of cells grown with ammonia or urea as nitrogen source showed increased transcript levels for components of the CO2 fixation machinery compared to cells grown with nitrate, but in general transcription differences in cells grown on different N-sources exhibited surprisingly minor differences.

  14. Trophic strategies of unicellular plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2017-01-01

    Unicellular plankton employ trophic strategies ranging from pure photoautotrophs over mixotrophy to obligate heterotrophs (phagotrophs), with cell sizes from 10-8 to 1 μg C. A full understanding of how trophic strategy and cell size depend on resource environment and predation is lacking. To this......Unicellular plankton employ trophic strategies ranging from pure photoautotrophs over mixotrophy to obligate heterotrophs (phagotrophs), with cell sizes from 10-8 to 1 μg C. A full understanding of how trophic strategy and cell size depend on resource environment and predation is lacking...... unicellulars are colimited by organic carbon and nutrients, and only large photoautotrophs and smaller mixotrophs are nutrient limited; (2) trophic strategy is bottom-up selected by the environment, while optimal size is top-down selected by predation. The focus on cell size and trophic strategies facilitates...

  15. Transcription profiling of the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 by NextGen (SOLiD™ Sequencing of cDNA

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    Marcus eLudwig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 encodes about 3200 proteins. Transcripts were detected for nearly all annotated open reading frames by a global transcriptomic analysis by Next-Generation (SOLiDTM sequencing of cDNA. In the cDNA samples sequenced, ~90% of the mapped sequences were derived from the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs and ~10% of the sequences were derived from mRNAs. In cells grown photoautotrophically under standard conditions (38 °C, 1% (v/v CO2 in air, 250 µmol photons m-2 s-1, the highest transcript levels (up to 2% of the total mRNA for the most abundantly transcribed genes (e. g., cpcAB, psbA, psaA were generally derived from genes encoding structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. High light exposure for one hour caused changes in transcript levels for genes encoding proteins of the photosynthetic apparatus, Type-1 NADH dehydrogenase complex and ATP synthase, whereas dark incubation for one hour resulted in a global decrease in transcript levels for photosynthesis-related genes and an increase in transcript levels for genes involved in carbohydrate degradation. Transcript levels for pyruvate kinase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex decreased sharply in cells incubated in the dark. Under dark anoxic (fermentative conditions, transcript changes indicated a global decrease in transcripts for respiratory proteins and suggested that cells employ an alternative phosphoenolpyruvate degradation pathway via phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (ppsA and the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (nifJ. Finally, the data suggested that an apparent operon involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and fatty acid desaturation, acsF2-ho2-hemN2-desF, may be regulated by oxygen concentration.

  16. Purification and primary structure of cytochrome c-552 from the cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC 6312.

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    Aitken, A

    1979-11-01

    Cytochrome c-552 (soluble 'cytochrome f') from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 6312 (ATCC 27167) was purified and the primary structure determined. The proposed sequence consists of one polypeptide chain of 87 residues. The sequence was determined by a combination of chemical and enzymatic cleavage, manual and automatic sequencing and mass spectroscopy. This is the first amino acid sequence of this cytochrome from a unicellular cyanobacterium to be determined in a study of the variation in primary structure between phylogenetically distant cyanobacteria. The sequence is compared to the primary structures of the cytochrome from filamentous cyanobacteria and from eukaryotic algae. The significance of these sequence comparisons to the current hypotheses concerning the origin of eukaryotic cells and their chloroplasts is discussed.

  17. Bystander effects in unicellular organisms

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    DeVeaux, Linda C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Campus Box 8263, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States) and Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)]. E-mail: develind@isu.edu; Durtschi, Lynn S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Campus Box 8007, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Case, Jonathan G. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States); Wells, Douglas P. [Department of Physics, Campus Box 8106, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2006-05-11

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have been seen in mammalian cells from diverse origins. These effects can be transmitted through the medium to cells not present at the time of irradiation. We have developed an assay for detecting bystander effects in the unicellular eukaryote, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This assay allows maximal exposure of unirradiated cells to cells that have received electron beam irradiation. S. pombe cells were irradiated with 16-18 MeV electrons from a pulsed electron LINAC. When survival of the irradiated cells decreased to approximately 50%, forward-mutation to 2-deoxy-D-glucose resistance increased in the unirradiated bystander cells. Further increase in dose had no additional effect on this increase. In order to detect this response, it was necessary for the irradiated cell/unirradiated cell ratio to be high. Other cellular stresses, such as heat treatment, UV irradiation, and bleomycin exposure, also caused a detectable response in untreated cells grown with the treated cells. We discuss evolutionary implications of these results.

  18. Serpins in unicellular Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Hejgaard, Jørn; Saunders, N.F.W

    2004-01-01

    in unicellular eukaryotes: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, and the human pathogens Entamoeba spp., Eimera tenella, Toxoplasma gondii, and Giardia lamblia. We compare these sequences to others, particularly those in the complete genome sequences of Archaea...

  19. Colony formation in the cyanobacterium Microcystis.

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    Xiao, Man; Li, Ming; Reynolds, Colin S

    2018-02-22

    Morphological evolution from a unicellular to multicellular state provides greater opportunities for organisms to attain larger and more complex living forms. As the most common freshwater cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis is a unicellular microorganism, with high phenotypic plasticity, which forms colonies and blooms in lakes and reservoirs worldwide. We conducted a systematic review of field studies from the 1990s to 2017 where Microcystis was dominant. Microcystis was detected as the dominant genus in waterbodies from temperate to subtropical and tropical zones. Unicellular Microcystis spp. can be induced to form colonies by adjusting biotic and abiotic factors in laboratory. Colony formation by cell division has been induced by zooplankton filtrate, high Pb 2+ concentration, the presence of another cyanobacterium (Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), heterotrophic bacteria, and by low temperature and light intensity. Colony formation by cell adhesion can be induced by zooplankton grazing, high Ca 2+ concentration, and microcystins. We hypothesise that single cells of all Microcystis morphospecies initially form colonies with a similar morphology to those found in the early spring. These colonies gradually change their morphology to that of M. ichthyoblabe, M. wesenbergii and M. aeruginosa with changing environmental conditions. Colony formation provides Microcystis with many ecological advantages, including adaption to varying light, sustained growth under poor nutrient supply, protection from chemical stressors and protection from grazing. These benefits represent passive tactics responding to environmental stress. Microcystis colonies form at the cost of decreased specific growth rates compared with a unicellular habit. Large colony size allows Microcystis to attain rapid floating velocities (maximum recorded for a single colony, ∼ 10.08 m h -1 ) that enable them to develop and maintain a large biomass near the surface of eutrophic lakes, where they may shade

  20. Low temperature delays timing and enhances the cost of nitrogen fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, Verena S.; Stomp, Maayke; Rosso, Camillo; van Beusekom, Sebastiaan A. M.; Emmerich, Barbara; Stal, Lucas J.; Huisman, Jef

    2013-01-01

    Marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are largely confined to the tropical and subtropical ocean. It has been argued that their global biogeographical distribution reflects the physiologically feasible temperature range at which they can perform nitrogen fixation. In this study we refine this line of

  1. Aging and immortality in unicellular species.

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    Florea, Michael

    2017-10-01

    It has been historically thought that in conditions that permit growth, most unicellular species do not to age. This was particularly thought to be the case for symmetrically dividing species, as such species lack a clear distinction between the soma and the germline. Despite this, studies of the symmetrically dividing species Escherichia coli and Schizosaccharomyces pombe have recently started to challenge this notion. They indicate that E. coli and S. pombe do age, but only when subjected to environmental stress. If true, this suggests that aging may be widespread among microbial species in general, and that studying aging in microbes may inform other long-standing questions in aging. This review examines the recent evidence for and against replicative aging in symmetrically dividing unicellular organisms, the mechanisms that underlie aging, why aging evolved in these species, and how microbial aging fits into the context of other questions in aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of aquaporins in the kidney of euryhaline teleosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Morten Buch; Madsen, Steffen S

    2011-01-01

    WATER BALANCE IN TELEOST FISH IS MAINTAINED WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MAJOR OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS: intestine, gills, and kidney. Overall water fluxes have been studied in all of these organs but not until recently has it become possible to approach the mechanisms of water transport at the molec......WATER BALANCE IN TELEOST FISH IS MAINTAINED WITH CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MAJOR OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS: intestine, gills, and kidney. Overall water fluxes have been studied in all of these organs but not until recently has it become possible to approach the mechanisms of water transport...... at the molecular level. This mini-review addresses the role of the kidney in osmoregulation with special emphasis on euryhaline teleosts. After a short review of current knowledge of renal functional morphology and regulation, we turn the focus to recent molecular investigations of the role of aquaporins in water...... and solute transport in the teleost kidney. We conclude that there is much to be achieved in understanding water transport and its regulation in the teleost kidney and that effort should be put into systematic mapping of aquaporins to their tubular as well as cellular localization....

  3. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

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    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

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    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antitumor activity of hierridin B, a cyanobacterial secondary metabolite found in both filamentous and unicellular marine strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro N Leão

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are widely recognized as a valuable source of bioactive metabolites. The majority of such compounds have been isolated from so-called complex cyanobacteria, such as filamentous or colonial forms, which usually display a larger number of biosynthetic gene clusters in their genomes, when compared to free-living unicellular forms. Nevertheless, picocyanobacteria are also known to have potential to produce bioactive natural products. Here, we report the isolation of hierridin B from the marine picocyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. LEGE 06113. This compound had previously been isolated from the filamentous epiphytic cyanobacterium Phormidium ectocarpi SAG 60.90, and had been shown to possess antiplasmodial activity. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from both strains confirmed that these cyanobacteria derive from different evolutionary lineages. We further investigated the biological activity of hierridin B, and tested its cytotoxicity towards a panel of human cancer cell lines; it showed selective cytotoxicity towards HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  6. Sucrose secreted by the engineered cyanobacterium and its fermentability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yangkai; Luo, Quan; Liang, Feiyan; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (Syn7942), synthesizes sucrose as the only compatible solute under salt stress. A series of engineered Syn7942 strains for sucrose production were constructed. The overexpression of the native sps (encoding a natively fused protein of sucrose phosphate synthase SPS and sucrose phosphate phosphatase SPP) in Syn7942 wild type caused a 93% improvement of sucrose productivity. The strain FL130 co-overexpressing sps and cscB (encoding a sucrose transporter) exhibited a 74% higher extracellular sucrose production than that overexpressing cscB only. Both results showed the significant improvement of sucrose productivity by the double functional protein SPS-SPP. Afterwards, FL130 was cultivated under a modified condition, and the cell-free culture medium containing 1.5 g L-1 sucrose was pre-treated with an acid hydrolysis technique. Cultivated with the neutralized hydrolysates as the starting media, two widely used microorganisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showed a comparable growth with that in the control media supplemented with glucose. These results clearly demonstrated that the cell-free culture of sucrose-secreting cyanobacteria can be applied as starting media in microbial cultivation.

  7. Colourful Cultures: Classroom Experiments with the Unicellular Alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes an investigation into the photosynthetic potential of the different developmental stages of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis. Reviews the biotechnological applications of astaxanthin, the red pigment which can be extracted from Haematococcus pluvialis. (Author/MM)

  8. Use of Unicellular Algae for Evaluation of Potential Aquatic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    role of these elements in the interactions between fuels and algae , each of the three elements Cr, Ti, and Pb were quantified in the algal assay medium...AFAMRL-TR-82-70 USE OF UNICELLULAR ALGAE FOR EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL AQUATIC CONTAMINANTS SECOND ANNUAL REPORT JAN SCHERFIG PETER DIXON MARC A. PETTY...70 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED USE OF UNICELLULAR ALGAE FOR EVALUATION OF Second Annual Re-ort POTENTIAL AQUATIC

  9. Phosphorus Physiology of the Marine Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Carribean ; Romans e al. 1994), the presence of high percentages of polyP in Trichodesmium from the Sargasso Sea is unlikely to be due to luxury uptake...2010-06 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION by Elizabeth Duncan Orchard February 2010 Phosphorus Physiology of the Marine Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium MIT/WHOI...2010-06 Phosphorus Physiology of the Marine Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium by Elizabeth Duncan Orchard Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge

  10. Pathway-Level Acceleration of Glycogen Catabolism by a Response Regulator in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis Species PCC 68031[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-01-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:24521880

  11. Pathway-level acceleration of glycogen catabolism by a response regulator in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Oikawa, Akira; Numata, Keiji; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2014-04-01

    Response regulators of two-component systems play pivotal roles in the transcriptional regulation of responses to environmental signals in bacteria. Rre37, an OmpR-type response regulator, is induced by nitrogen depletion in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis species PCC 6803. Microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that genes related to sugar catabolism and nitrogen metabolism were up-regulated by rre37 overexpression. Protein levels of GlgP(slr1367), one of the two glycogen phosphorylases, in the rre37-overexpressing strain were higher than those of the parental wild-type strain under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. Glycogen amounts decreased to less than one-tenth by rre37 overexpression under nitrogen-replete conditions. Metabolome analysis revealed that metabolites of the sugar catabolic pathway and amino acids were altered in the rre37-overexpressing strain after nitrogen depletion. These results demonstrate that Rre37 is a pathway-level regulator that activates the metabolic flow from glycogen to polyhydroxybutyrate and the hybrid tricarboxylic acid and ornithine cycle, unraveling the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of primary metabolism in this unicellular cyanobacterium.

  12. Diurnal Rhythms Result in Significant Changes in the Cellular Protein Complement in the Cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockel, Jana; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle L.; Welsh, Eric A.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2011-02-22

    Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 is a diazotrophic cyanobacterium notable for its ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and dinitrogen fixation in the same single cell. Previous transcriptional analysis revealed that the existence of these incompatible cellular processes largely depends on tightly synchronized expression programs involving ,30% of genes in the genome. To expand upon current knowledge, we have utilized sensitive proteomic approaches to examine the impact of diurnal rhythms on the protein complement in Cyanothece 51142. We found that 250 proteins accounting for,5% of the predicted ORFs from the Cyanothece 51142 genome and 20% of proteins detected under alternating light/dark conditions exhibited periodic oscillations in their abundances. Our results suggest that altered enzyme activities at different phases during the diurnal cycle can be attributed to changes in the abundance of related proteins and key compounds. The integration of global proteomics and transcriptomic data further revealed that post-transcriptional events are important for temporal regulation of processes such as photosynthesis in Cyanothece 51142. This analysis is the first comprehensive report on global quantitative proteomics in a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium and uncovers novel findings about diurnal rhythms.

  13. Homology of plasmids in strains of unicellular cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Keegstra, W.; Borrias, W.E.; Arkel, G.A. van

    Six strains of unicellular cyanobacteria were examined for the presence of plasmids. Analysis of lysates of these strains by CsCl-ethidium bromide density centrifugation yielded a major chromosomal DNA band and a minor band containing covalently closed circular plasmid DNA, as shown by electron

  14. Multiple nutrient limitation in unicellulars: reconstructing Liebig' law.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    Liebig's law of the Minimum is reformulated in terms of biomass composition dynamics. The doctrine of the single limiting nutrient is shown to be invalid generally. The nutritional status of a unicellular organism is expressed in terms of state variables; one which represents the subsistence

  15. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, Emma; Wierenga, Peter A.; Schrama, Johan W.; Gruppen, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation

  16. Chloride transport in mitochondrion-rich cells of euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Jiun-Lin; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Shih, Tin-Han; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Lin, Chan-Shing; Lin, Li-Yih

    2009-10-01

    A noninvasive scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) was applied to measure Cl- transport at individual mitochondrion-rich cells (MRCs) in the skin of euryhaline tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) larvae. In seawater (SW)-acclimated larvae, outward Cl- gradients (20-80 mM higher than the background) were measured at the surface, indicating a secretion of Cl- from the skin. By serial probing over the surface of MRCs and adjacent keratinocytes (KCs), a significant outward flux of Cl- was detected at the apical opening (membrane) of MRCs. Treatment with 100 microM ouabain or bumetanide inhibited the Cl- secretion by approximately 75%. In freshwater (FW)-acclimated larvae, a lower level of outward Cl- gradients (0.2-1 mM) was measured at the skin surface. Low-Cl- water (skin. An inward flux of Cl- was detected when probing the exterior surface of a group of MRCs (convex-MRCs) that express the NCC. An NCC inhibitor (100 microM metolazone) reduced the flux by approximately 90%. This study provides direct and convincing evidence for Cl- transport by MRCs of SW- and FW-acclimated euryhaline tilapia and the involvement of an apical NCC in Cl- uptake of MRCs of FW-acclimated fish.

  17. Dynamics of genomic innovation in the unicellular ancestry of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Torruella, Guifré; Donachie, Stuart; Suga, Hiroshi; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2017-07-20

    Which genomic innovations underpinned the origin of multicellular animals is still an open debate. Here, we investigate this question by reconstructing the genome architecture and gene family diversity of ancestral premetazoans, aiming to date the emergence of animal-like traits. Our comparative analysis involves genomes from animals and their closest unicellular relatives (the Holozoa), including four new genomes: three Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrium limacisporum. Here, we show that the earliest animals were shaped by dynamic changes in genome architecture before the emergence of multicellularity: an early burst of gene diversity in the ancestor of Holozoa, enriched in transcription factors and cell adhesion machinery, was followed by multiple and differently-timed episodes of synteny disruption, intron gain and genome expansions. Thus, the foundations of animal genome architecture were laid before the origin of complex multicellularity - highlighting the necessity of a unicellular perspective to understand early animal evolution.

  18. Use of Unicellular Algae for Evaluation of Potential Aquatic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    AFAMRL-TR-80-85 USE OF UNICELLUAR ALGAE FOR EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL AQUATIC CONTAMINANTS JAN SCHERFIG PETER S. DIXON CAROL A. JUSTICE ALBERTO ACEVEDO...NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFAMRL-TR-80-85 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED USE OF UNICELLULAR ALGAE FOR EVALUATION...Shale-derived JP-8 Dimethylhydrazine Selenastrum Morphological changes Bioassays Dunaliella Capricornutum Safe Concentration (SC) Jet Fuel JP-8 20

  19. Analytical approaches to photobiological hydrogen production in unicellular green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Melis, Anastasios; Happe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Several species of unicellular green algae, such as the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, can operate under either aerobic photosynthesis or anaerobic metabolism conditions. A particularly interesting metabolic condition is that of “anaerobic oxygenic photosynthesis”, whereby photosynthetically generated oxygen is consumed by the cell’s own respiration, causing anaerobiosis in the culture in the light, and induction of the cellular “hydrogen metabolism” process. The latter enta...

  20. Multimodal sensorimotor system in unicellular zoospores of a fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swafford, Andrew J M; Oakley, Todd H

    2017-11-23

    Complex sensory systems often underlie critical behaviors, including avoiding predators and locating prey, mates, and shelter. Multisensory systems that control motor behavior even appear in unicellular eukaryotes, such as Chlamydomonas, which are important laboratory models for sensory biology. However, we know of no unicellular opisthokonts that control motor behavior using a multimodal sensory system. Therefore, existing single-celled models for multimodal sensorimotor integration are very distantly related to animals. Here, we describe a multisensory system that controls the motor function of unicellular fungal zoospores. We find that zoospores of Allomyces arbusculus exhibit both phototaxis and chemotaxis. Furthermore, we report that closely related Allomyces species respond to either only the chemical or light stimuli presented in this study, and likely do not share this multisensory system. This diversity of sensory systems within Allomyces provides a rare example of a comparative framework that can be used to examine the evolution of sensory systems following gain/loss of available sensory modalities. The tractability of Allomyces and related fungi as laboratory organisms will facilitate detailed mechanistic investigations into the genetic underpinnings of novel photosensory systems, and how multisensory systems may have functioned in early opisthokonts before multicellularity allowed for the evolution of specialized cell types. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Metazoan-like signaling in a unicellular receptor tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultheiss Kira P

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are crucial components of signal transduction systems in multicellular animals. Surprisingly, numerous RTKs have been identified in the genomes of unicellular choanoflagellates and other protists. Here, we report the first biochemical study of a unicellular RTK, namely RTKB2 from Monosiga brevicollis. Results We cloned, expressed, and purified the RTKB2 kinase, and showed that it is enzymatically active. The activity of RTKB2 is controlled by autophosphorylation, as in metazoan RTKs. RTKB2 possesses six copies of a unique domain (designated RM2 in its C-terminal tail. An isolated RM2 domain (or a synthetic peptide derived from the RM2 sequence served as a substrate for RTKB2 kinase. When phosphorylated, the RM2 domain bound to the Src homology 2 domain of MbSrc1 from M. brevicollis. NMR structural studies of the RM2 domain indicated that it is disordered in solution. Conclusions Our results are consistent with a model in which RTKB2 activation stimulates receptor autophosphorylation within the RM2 domains. This leads to recruitment of Src-like kinases (and potentially other M. brevicollis proteins and further phosphorylation, which may serve to increase or dampen downstream signals. Thus, crucial features of signal transduction circuitry were established prior to the evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors.

  2. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  3. On the paradigm of altruistic suicide in the unicellular world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Aurora M; Driscoll, William W; Durand, Pierre M; Herron, Matthew D; Rashidi, Armin

    2011-01-01

    Altruistic suicide is best known in the context of programmed cell death (PCD) in multicellular individuals, which is understood as an adaptive process that contributes to the development and functionality of the organism. After the realization that PCD-like processes can also be induced in single-celled lineages, the paradigm of altruistic cell death has been extended to include these active cell death processes in unicellular organisms. Here, we critically evaluate the current conceptual framework and the experimental data used to support the notion of altruistic suicide in unicellular lineages, and propose new perspectives. We argue that importing the paradigm of altruistic cell death from multicellular organisms to explain active death in unicellular lineages has the potential to limit the types of questions we ask, thus biasing our understanding of the nature, origin, and maintenance of this trait. We also emphasize the need to distinguish between the benefits and the adaptive role of a trait. Lastly, we provide an alternative framework that allows for the possibility that active death in single-celled organisms is a maladaptive trait maintained as a byproduct of selection on pro-survival functions, but that could-under conditions in which kin/group selection can act-be co-opted into an altruistic trait. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Influence of mixotrophic growth on rhythmic oscillations in expression of metabolic pathways in diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, S; Gaudana, Sandeep B; Digmurti, Madhuri G; Viswanathan, Ganesh A; Chetty, Madhu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of mixotrophy on physiology and metabolism by analysis of global gene expression in unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 (henceforth Cyanothece 51142). It was found that Cyanothece 51142 continues to oscillate between photosynthesis and respiration in continuous light under mixotrophy with cycle time of ∼ 13 h. Mixotrophy is marked by an extended respiratory phase compared with photoautotrophy. It can be argued that glycerol provides supplementary energy for nitrogen fixation, which is derived primarily from the glycogen reserves during photoautotrophy. The genes of NDH complex, cytochrome c oxidase and ATP synthase are significantly overexpressed in mixotrophy during the day compared to autotrophy with synchronous expression of the bidirectional hydrogenase genes possibly to maintain redox balance. However, nitrogenase complex remains exclusive to nighttime metabolism concomitantly with uptake hydrogenase. This study throws light on interrelations between metabolic pathways with implications in design of hydrogen producer strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unicellular cyanobacteria Synechocystis accommodate heterotrophic bacteria with varied enzymatic and metal resistance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulaziz, Anas; Sageer, Saliha; Chekidhenkuzhiyil, Jasmin; Vijayan, Vijitha; Pavanan, Pratheesh; Athiyanathil, Sujith; Nair, Shanta

    2016-08-01

    The interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and primary producers have a profound impact on the functioning of marine ecosystem. We characterized the enzymatic and metal resistance properties of fourteen heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. that came from a heavy metal contaminated region of Cochin estuary, southwest coast of India. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the heterotrophic bacteria were grouped into three phyla: namely Actinobacteria, Firmicute, and Proteobacteria. Overall Proteobacteria showed a higher level of enzyme expression while Actinobacteria and Firmicutes showed higher tolerance to heavy metals. Among Proteobacteria, an isolate of Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus (MMRF-584) showed highest activities of β-glucosidase (1.58 ± 0.2 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) and laminarinase (1170.17 ± 95.4 μgml(-1)  min(-1) ), while other two isolates of M. hydrocarbonoclasticus, MMRF-578 and 581, showed highest phosphatase (44.71 ± 0.2 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) and aminopeptidase (33.22 ± 0 μMml(-1)  min(-1) ) activities respectively. Among Firmicutes, the Virgibacillus sp. MMRF-571 showed exceptional resistance against the toxic heavy metals Cd (180 mM), Pb (150 mM), and Hg (0.5 mM). Bacillus cereus, MMRF-575, showed resistance to the highest concentrations of Co (250 mM), Cd (150 mM), Pb (180 mM), Hg (0.5 mM), Ni (280 mM), and Zn (250 mM) tested. Our results show that heterotrophic bacteria with varied enzymatic and metal resistance properties are associated with Synechocystis sp. Further studies to delineate the role of these heterotrophic bacteria in protecting primary producers from toxic effects of heavy metals and their potential application in bioremediation will be appreciated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dynamics of genomic innovation in the unicellular ancestry of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Bové, Xavier; Torruella, Guifré; Donachie, Stuart; Suga, Hiroshi; Leonard, Guy; Richards, Thomas A; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2017-01-01

    Which genomic innovations underpinned the origin of multicellular animals is still an open debate. Here, we investigate this question by reconstructing the genome architecture and gene family diversity of ancestral premetazoans, aiming to date the emergence of animal-like traits. Our comparative analysis involves genomes from animals and their closest unicellular relatives (the Holozoa), including four new genomes: three Ichthyosporea and Corallochytrium limacisporum. Here, we show that the earliest animals were shaped by dynamic changes in genome architecture before the emergence of multicellularity: an early burst of gene diversity in the ancestor of Holozoa, enriched in transcription factors and cell adhesion machinery, was followed by multiple and differently-timed episodes of synteny disruption, intron gain and genome expansions. Thus, the foundations of animal genome architecture were laid before the origin of complex multicellularity – highlighting the necessity of a unicellular perspective to understand early animal evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26036.001 PMID:28726632

  7. Occurrence of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis among filamentous and unicellular cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlick, S; Oren, A; Padan, E

    1977-02-01

    Eleven of 21 cyanobacteria strains examined are capable of facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis, as shown by their ability to photoassimilate CO2 in the presence of Na2S, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and 703-nm light. These include different cyanobacterial types (filamentous and unicellular) of different growth histories (aerobic, anaerobic, and marine and freshwater). Oscillatoria limnetica, Aphanothece halophytica (7418), and Lyngbya (7104) have different optimal concentrations of Na2S permitting CO2 photoassimilation, above which the rate decreases: 3.5, 0.7, and 0.1 mM, respectively. In A. halophytica, for each CO2 molecule photoassimilated two sulfide molecules are oxidized to elemental sulfur, which is excreted from the cells. The ecological and evolutionary significance of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacteria is discussed.

  8. Using the marine unicellular algae in biological monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapkov V. I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using marine unicellular algae from natural plankton community in biomonitoring of pollution by heavy metals has been investigated. Algae of different taxa from the Mediterranean Sea have been allocated to culture. In the laboratory the culture conditions – i. e. growth medium, temperature, photoperiod, level of artificial light and initial density – have been selected for every species. The impact of heavy metals (Hg, Cd, Cu, Pb in the form of chloride salts on the growth of axenic algae culture has been studied in the modelling experiments. The unicellular marine algae have a very short life cycle, therefore it is possible to use them in the experiments of studying the effect of anthropogenic factors at cellular and population levels on the test-object. With biomonitoring pollution of marine environment by heavy metals and others dangerous toxicants, the major indicators of algae community condition are the cellular cycle and the condition of the photosynthetic apparatus of the cell. The subsequent lysis of cells under the influence of heavy metals leads to the excretion of secondary metabolites which can essentially affect the metal toxicity. The established scales of threshold and lethal concentration of heavy metals for algae of different taxon make it possible to use the ratio of sensitive and resistant species to heavy metals as biological markers when forecasting ecological consequences of pollution of the marine environment by heavy metals. Distinctions in the resistance of different taxon to heavy metals can result in implementing the strategy of selection of test-objects depending on the purposes of the research.

  9. Massive expansion of the calpain gene family in unicellular eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Sen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calpains are Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that participate in a range of crucial cellular processes. Dysfunction of these enzymes may cause, for instance, life-threatening diseases in humans, the loss of sex determination in nematodes and embryo lethality in plants. Although the calpain family is well characterized in animal and plant model organisms, there is a great lack of knowledge about these genes in unicellular eukaryote species (i.e. protists. Here, we study the distribution and evolution of calpain genes in a wide range of eukaryote genomes from major branches in the tree of life. Results Our investigations reveal 24 types of protein domains that are combined with the calpain-specific catalytic domain CysPc. In total we identify 41 different calpain domain architectures, 28 of these domain combinations have not been previously described. Based on our phylogenetic inferences, we propose that at least four calpain variants were established in the early evolution of eukaryotes, most likely before the radiation of all the major supergroups of eukaryotes. Many domains associated with eukaryotic calpain genes can be found among eubacteria or archaebacteria but never in combination with the CysPc domain. Conclusions The analyses presented here show that ancient modules present in prokaryotes, and a few de novo eukaryote domains, have been assembled into many novel domain combinations along the evolutionary history of eukaryotes. Some of the new calpain genes show a narrow distribution in a few branches in the tree of life, likely representing lineage-specific innovations. Hence, the functionally important classical calpain genes found among humans and vertebrates make up only a tiny fraction of the calpain family. In fact, a massive expansion of the calpain family occurred by domain shuffling among unicellular eukaryotes and contributed to a wealth of functionally different genes.

  10. Heterophysiasis, an intestinal fluke infection of man and vertebrates transmitted by euryhaline gastropods and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschewski, H.

    1984-03-01

    Heterophyes heterophyes, agent of human heterophyiasis in the Near East, is transmitted in marine lagoons and saline inland waters, where the euryhaline intermediate hosts are abundant. In Egypt, mullets, the predominant second intermediate hosts, are customarily consumed raw; thus man becomes infected easily. Symptoms of human infections are usually considered mild. Mullets do not seem to be affected by the metacercariae encysted in the muscles, whereas the growth of the snail host Pirenella conica was found to be enhanced due to the infestation by the trematodes. In laboratory experiments, the flukes were found to be well developed in dogs, foxes and cats, but failed to reach sexual maturity in several other potentially piscivorous mammals and birds. In nature, dogs probably serve as the major reservoir hosts. Heterophyiasis is most prevalent in the Nile Delta, a huge brackish water area which is densely populated by humans and, consequently, also by dogs and cats. In the Far East, besides Heterophyes nocens, several other heterophysids with marine or fresh-water life-cycles are known to infect humans.

  11. Functional characterization of neuroendocrine regulation of branchial carbonic anhydrase induction in the euryhaline crab Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Reed T; Henry, Raymond P

    2014-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays an essential role as a provider of counterions for Na(+)/H(+) and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in branchial ionic uptake processes in euryhaline crustaceans. CA activity and gene expression are low in crabs acclimated to full-strength seawater, with transfer to low salinity resulting in large-scale inductions of mRNA and subsequent enzyme activity in the posterior ion-regulating gills (e.g., G7). In the green crab Carcinus maenas, CA has been shown to be under inhibitory neuroendocrine control by a putative hormone in the x-organ-sinus gland complex (XOSG), located in the eyestalk. This study characterizes the neuroendocrine regulation of CA induction in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, a commonly used experimental organism for crustacean osmoregulation. In crabs acclimated to full-strength seawater, eyestalk ligation (ESL) triggered a 1.8- and 100-fold increase in CA activity and mRNA, respectively. Re-injection with eyestalk homogenates abolished increases in CA activity and fractionally reduced CA gene expression. ESL also enhanced CA induction by 33% after 96 h in crabs transferred to 15 ppt salinity. Injection of eyestalk homogenates into intact crabs transferred from 35 to 15 ppt diminished by 43% the CA induction stimulated by low salinity. These results point to the presence of a repressor hormone in the eyestalk. Separate injections of medullary tissue (MT) and sinus gland (SG), two components of the eyestalk, reduced salinity-stimulated CA activity by 22% and 49%, suggesting that the putative repressor is localized to the SG. Crabs injected with SG extract harvested from crabs acclimated to 5 ppt showed no decrease in CA activity, demonstrating that the hormone is down-regulated at low salinity. Our results show the presence in the XOSG of an inhibitory compound that regulates salinity-stimulated CA induction. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  12. Waterborne cadmium and zinc uptake in a euryhaline teleost Acanthopagrus schlegeli acclimated to different salinities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Li [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Wang Wenxiong [Department of Biology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: wwang@ust.hk

    2007-08-30

    Metal uptake and toxicity in marine fish are usually much lower than those in freshwater fish, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated Cd and Zn uptake by the euryhaline black sea bream (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) over a salinity range from 0 to 35 psu. Cd and Zn uptake increased as salinity decreased. The gills were the most sensitive organs in response to salinity change, and played a more important role in Cd and Zn uptake at a lower salinity. Cd and Zn uptake in the viscera contributed to 34-36% of the overall accumulation at full salinity (35 psu), but decreased to 13-16% in freshwater despite the increase of uptake rate. Water permeability, drinking, and major ion uptake (Ca) in the fish at different salinities were also concurrently examined. The overall water uptake was comparable, whereas the drinking rate decreased at lowered salinities. In contrast, the Ca uptake increased significantly with decreasing salinity. The responses of Cd and Zn uptake to salinity challenge were correlated with the Ca uptake, suggesting that they may be taken up through the Ca uptake pathway. At a constant salinity, Cd and Zn uptake increased with reducing Ca concentration, indicating the competitive effect of Ca on metal uptake. Ca channel blockers (verapamil and lanthanum) significantly reduced the uptake of Cd, Zn, and Ca when the fish were acclimated in freshwater, but had no impact on their uptake in marine water. Furthermore, the chloride cell number in the gills could not explain the lower Cd and Zn uptake in seawater. Our results indicated that both ambient physicochemical factors and the physiological responses of fish resulted in difference of metal uptake in marine and freshwater environments.

  13. Takifugu obscurus is a euryhaline fugu species very close to Takifugu rubripes and suitable for studying osmoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Harumi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome sequence of the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes is an enormously useful tool in the molecular physiology of fish. Euryhaline fish that can survive both in freshwater (FW and seawater (SW are also very useful for studying fish physiology, especially osmoregulation. Recently we learned that there is a pufferfish, Takifugu obscurus, common name "mefugu" that migrates into FW to spawn. If T. obscurus is indeed a euryhaline fish and shares a high sequence homology with T. rubripes, it will become a superior animal model for studying the mechanism of osmoregulation. We have therefore determined its euryhalinity and phylogenetic relationship to the members of the Takifugu family. Results The following six Takifugu species were used for the analyses: T. obscurus, T. rubripes, T. niphobles, T. pardalis, T. poecilonotus, and T. porphyreus. When transferred to FW, only T. obscurus could survive while the others could not survive more than ten days in FW. During this course of FW adaptation, serum Na+ concentration of T. obscurus decreased only slightly, but a rapid and large decrease occurred even in the case of T. niphobles, a peripheral fresh water species that is often seen in brackish river mouths. Phylogenetic analysis using nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of each species indicated that the six Takifugu species are very closely related with each other. Conclusion T. obscurus is capable of adapting to both FW and SW. Its genomic sequence shares a very high homology with those of the other Takifugu species such that the existing Takifugu genomic information resources can be utilized. These properties make "mefugu", which has drawn little attention from animal physiologists until this study, a useful model animal for studying the molecular mechanism of maintaining body fluid homeostasis.

  14. Salinity tolerance of Picochlorum atomus and the use of salinity for contamination control by the freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena limnetica.

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    Nicolas von Alvensleben

    Full Text Available Microalgae are ideal candidates for waste-gas and -water remediation. However, salinity often varies between different sites. A cosmopolitan microalga with large salinity tolerance and consistent biochemical profiles would be ideal for standardised cultivation across various remediation sites. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of salinity on Picochlorum atomus growth, biomass productivity, nutrient uptake and biochemical profiles. To determine if target end-products could be manipulated, the effects of 4-day nutrient limitation were also determined. Culture salinity had no effect on growth, biomass productivity, phosphate, nitrate and total nitrogen uptake at 2, 8, 18, 28 and 36 ppt. 11 ppt, however, initiated a significantly higher total nitrogen uptake. While salinity had only minor effects on biochemical composition, nutrient depletion was a major driver for changes in biomass quality, leading to significant increases in total lipid, fatty acid and carbohydrate quantities. Fatty acid composition was also significantly affected by nutrient depletion, with an increased proportion of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Having established that P. atomus is a euryhaline microalga, the effects of culture salinity on the development of the freshwater cyanobacterial contaminant Pseudanabaena limnetica were determined. Salinity at 28 and 36 ppt significantly inhibited establishment of P. limnetica in P. atomus cultures. In conclusion, P. atomus can be deployed for bioremediation at sites with highly variable salinities without effects on end-product potential. Nutrient status critically affected biochemical profiles--an important consideration for end-product development by microalgal industries. 28 and 36 ppt slow the establishment of the freshwater cyanobacterium P. limnetica, allowing for harvest of low contaminant containing biomass.

  15. Biodegradation of Dimethyl Phthalate by Freshwater Unicellular Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Lincong; Zhang, Siping; Pan, Yan; Li, Jing; Pan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation characteristics of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) by three freshwater unicellular organisms were investigated in this study. The findings revealed that all the organisms were capable of metabolizing DMP; among them, Cyanothece sp. PCC7822 achieved the highest degradation efficiency. Lower concentration of DMP supported the growth of the Cyanobacteria; however, with the increase of DMP concentration growth of Cyanobacteria was inhibited remarkably. Phthalic acid (PA) was detected to be an intermediate degradation product of DMP and accumulated in the culture solution. The optimal initial pH value for the degradation was detected to be 9.0, which mitigated the decrease of pH resulting from the production of PA. The optimum temperature for DMP degradation of the three species of organisms is 30°C. After 72 hours' incubation, no more than 11.8% of the residual of DMP aggregated in Cyanobacteria cells while majority of DMP remained in the medium. Moreover, esterase was induced by DMP and the activity kept increasing during the degradation process. This suggested that esterase could assist in the degradation of DMP. PMID:28078293

  16. Microenvironmental Ecology of the Chlorophyll b-containing Symbiotic Cyanobacterium Prochloron in the Didemnid Ascidian Lissoclinum patella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eKühl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the cyanobacterium Prochloron was the first finding of a bacterial oxyphototroph with chlorophyll (Chl b, in addition to Chl a. It was first described as Prochloron didemni but a number of clades have since been described. Prochloron is a conspicuously large (7-25 µm unicellular cyanobacterium living in a symbiotic relationship, primarily with (sub- tropical didemnid ascidians; it has resisted numerous cultivation attempts and appears truly obligatory symbiotic. Recently, a Prochloron draft genome was published, revealing no lack of metabolic genes that could explain the apparent inability to reproduce and sustain photosynthesis in a free-living stage. Possibly, the unsuccessful cultivation is partly due to a lack of knowledge about the microenvironmental conditions and ecophysiology of Prochloron in its natural habitat. We used microsensors, variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and imaging of O2 and pH to obtain a detailed insight to the microenvironmental ecology and photobiology of Prochloron in hospite in the didemnid ascidian Lissoclinum patella. The microenvironment within ascidians is characterized by steep gradients of light and chemical parameters that change rapidly with varying irradiances. The interior zone of the ascidians harboring Prochloron thus became anoxic and acidic within a few min of darkness, while the same zone exhibited O2 super-saturation and strongly alkaline pH after a few min of illumination. Photosynthesis showed lack of photoinhibition even at high irradiances equivalent to full sunlight, and photosynthesis recovered rapidly after periods of anoxia. We discuss these new insights on the ecological niche of Prochloron and possible interactions with its host and other microbes in light of its recently published genome and a recent study of the overall microbial diversity and metagenome of L. patella.

  17. Persistent phytoplankton bloom in Lake St. Lucia (iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa) caused by a cyanobacterium closely associated with the genus Cyanothece (Synechococcaceae, Chroococcales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, David G; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-09-01

    Lake St. Lucia, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, is the largest estuarine lake in Africa. Extensive use and manipulation of the rivers flowing into it have reduced freshwater inflow, and the lake has also been subject to a drought of 10 years. For much of this time, the estuary has been closed to the Indian Ocean, and salinities have progressively risen throughout the system, impacting the biotic components of the ecosystem, reducing zooplankton and macrobenthic biomass and diversity in particular. In June 2009, a bloom of a red/orange planktonic microorganism was noted throughout the upper reaches of Lake St. Lucia. The bloom persisted for at least 18 months, making it the longest such bloom on record. The causative organism was characterized by light and electron microscopy and by 16S rRNA sequencing and was shown to be a large, unicellular cyanobacterium most strongly associated with the genus Cyanothece. The extent and persistence of the bloom appears to be unique to Lake St. Lucia, and it is suggested that the organism's resistance to high temperatures, to intense insolation, and to hypersalinity as well as the absence of grazing pressure by salinity-sensitive zooplankton all contributed to its persistence as a bloom organism until a freshwater influx, due to exceptionally heavy summer rains in 2011, reduced the salinity for a sufficient length of time to produce a crash in the cyanobacterium population as a complex, low-salinity biota redeveloped.

  18. Persistent Phytoplankton Bloom in Lake St. Lucia (iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa) Caused by a Cyanobacterium Closely Associated with the Genus Cyanothece (Synechococcaceae, Chroococcales) ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, David G.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Lake St. Lucia, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, is the largest estuarine lake in Africa. Extensive use and manipulation of the rivers flowing into it have reduced freshwater inflow, and the lake has also been subject to a drought of 10 years. For much of this time, the estuary has been closed to the Indian Ocean, and salinities have progressively risen throughout the system, impacting the biotic components of the ecosystem, reducing zooplankton and macrobenthic biomass and diversity in particular. In June 2009, a bloom of a red/orange planktonic microorganism was noted throughout the upper reaches of Lake St. Lucia. The bloom persisted for at least 18 months, making it the longest such bloom on record. The causative organism was characterized by light and electron microscopy and by 16S rRNA sequencing and was shown to be a large, unicellular cyanobacterium most strongly associated with the genus Cyanothece. The extent and persistence of the bloom appears to be unique to Lake St. Lucia, and it is suggested that the organism's resistance to high temperatures, to intense insolation, and to hypersalinity as well as the absence of grazing pressure by salinity-sensitive zooplankton all contributed to its persistence as a bloom organism until a freshwater influx, due to exceptionally heavy summer rains in 2011, reduced the salinity for a sufficient length of time to produce a crash in the cyanobacterium population as a complex, low-salinity biota redeveloped. PMID:21742912

  19. A salt bath will keep you going? Euryhalinity tests and genetic structure of caridean shrimps from Iberian rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortegón, Enrique; Palero, Ferran; Lejeusne, Christophe; Drake, Pilar; Cuesta, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the role of euryhalinity and life-history traits on the population genetic structure of the four main caridean shrimp species from the Iberian Peninsula (Atyaephyra desmarestii, Dugastella valentina, Palaemon varians and Palaemon zariquieyi) able to complete their life cycle in freshwater/oligohaline habitats. Seawater exposure experiments indicated that A. desmarestii, D. valentina and P. zariquieyi are more sensitive to high salinity waters than P. varians and confirm the relationship between osmolality regulation and spatial distribution of species. The limited or no survival in seawater could explain the restricted distributions observed in D. valentina and P. zariquieyi, whereas the current A. desmarestii distribution could be due to either past river dynamics and/or human-mediated water transfers. Conversely, the high tolerance of P. varians to a large salinity range (euryhalinity) could explain its capacity to colonize geographically distant estuaries. In agreement with osmoregulation results, the phylogeography patterns of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox 1) gene fragment revealed significant genetic differentiation among river systems whatever the species considered. Atyidae species presented higher nucleotide diversity levels than Palaemonidae species, while isolation-by-distance patterns were only found for the latter. Our results have important implications for the management and conservation of freshwater species, since the inter-catchment connectivity may affect the speciation processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arsenate resistance in the unicellular marine diazotroph Crocosphaera watsonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya eDyhrman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The toxic arsenate ion can behave as a phosphate analog, and this can result in arsenate toxicity especially in areas with elevated arsenate to phosphate ratios like the surface waters of the ocean gyres. In these systems, cellular arsenate resistance strategies would allow phytoplankton to ameliorate the effects of arsenate transport into the cell. Despite the potential coupling between arsenate and phosphate cycling in oligotrophic marine waters, relatively little is known about arsenate resistance in the nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacteria that are key components of the microbial community in low nutrient systems. The unicellular diazotroph, Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501, was able to grow at reduced rates with arsenate additions up to 30 nM, and estimated arsenate to phosphate ratios of 6:1. The genome of strain WH8501 contains homologs for arsA, arsH, arsB and arsC, allowing for the reduction of arsenate to arsenite and the pumping of arsenite out of the cell. The short-term addition of arsenate to the growth medium had no effect on nitrogen fixation. However, arsenate addition did result in the up-regulation of the arsB gene with increasing arsenate concentrations, indicating the induction of the arsenate detoxification response. The arsB gene was also up-regulated by phosphorus stress in concert with a gene encoding the high-affinity phosphate binding protein pstS. Both genes were down-regulated when phosphate was re-fed to phosphorus-stressed cells. A field survey of surface water from the low phosphate western North Atlantic detected expression of C. watsonii arsB, suggestive of the potential importance of arsenate resistance strategies in this and perhaps other systems.

  1. Fluorescent analysis for bioindication of ozone on unicellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, Victoria V; Yashin, V A; Kuchin, A V

    2015-05-01

    Unicellular model plant systems (vegetative microspores of horsetail Equisetum arvense and pollen of six plant species Corylus avellana, Dolichothele albescens Populus balsamifera, Salix caprea, Saintpaulia ionantha, Tulipa hybridum, on which autofluorescence and fluorescence after histochemical treatment studied, have been represented as bioindicators of ozone. It has found that low doses of ozone 0.005 or 0.008 μl/l did not affect or stimulate the autofluorescence of the samples with the ability to germinate in an artificial medium. In higher ozone concentrations (0.032 μl/l) either the decrease in the intensity of the emission or changing in the position of the maxima in the fluorescence spectrum (new 515-520 nm maximum characteristic for the green-and yellow area has appeared) were observed. In dose of 0.2 μl/l, higher than above the threshold of danger to human health, autofluorescence in all samples fell down to up to zero, and there was no the ability to germinate. In this case the formation of lipofuscin-like compounds fluoresced in blue with maxima from 440 to 485 nm was observed. Stress metabolites, known as neurotransmitters biogenic amines, were found in treated cells as determined on the characteristic fluorescence at 460-480 nm in the samples after a specific histochemical reactions for catecholamines (with glyoxylic acid) or for histamine (with o-phthalic aldehyde). Increased intensity of the emission under the treatment with ozone (total doses from 0.012 to 0.032 μl/l) was associated with an increase in the concentrations of catecholamines and histamine. The fluorescent analysis on undamaged cells-possible bioindicators of ozone can be useful in ecomonitoring for earlier warning about health hazardous concentrations of this compound in the air.

  2. Facultative anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Y; Padan, E; Shilo, M

    1975-09-01

    An isolate from H2S-rich layers of the Solar Lake, the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica, exhibits both oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis. It can use Na2S as an electron donor for CO2 photoassimilation (photosystem I supplies the energy) in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or 700-nm light. A stoichiometric ratio of approximately 2 is observed between the Na2S consumed and the photoassimilated CO2. The anoxygenic phototrophic capability of this cyanobacterium explains its growth in nature in high sulfide concentrations and indicates a selective advantage.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF A FUNCTIONAL VANADIUM-DEPENDENT BROMOPEROXIDASE IN THE MARINE CYANOBACTERIUM SYNECHOCOCCUS SP. CC9311(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd L; Palenik, Brian; Brahamsha, Bianca

    2011-08-01

    Vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidases (VBPOs) are characterized by the ability to oxidize halides using hydrogen peroxide. These enzymes are well-studied in eukaryotic macroalgae and are known to produce a variety of brominated secondary metabolites. Though genes have been annotated as VBPO in multiple prokaryotic genomes, they remain uncharacterized. The genome of the coastal marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. CC9311 encodes a predicted VBPO (YP_731869.1, sync_2681), and in this study, we show that protein extracts from axenic cultures of Synechococcus possess bromoperoxidase activity, oxidizing bromide and iodide, but not chloride. In-gel activity assays of Synechococcus proteins separated using PAGE reveal a single band having VBPO activity. When sequenced via liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), peptides from the band aligned to the VBPO sequence predicted by the open reading frame (ORF) sync_2681. We show that a VBPO gene is present in a closely related strain, Synechococcus sp. WH8020, but not other clade I Synechococcus strains, consistent with recent horizontal transfer of the gene into Synechococcus. Diverse cyanobacterial-like VBPO genes were detected in a pelagic environment off the California coast using PCR. Investigation of functional VBPOs in unicellular cyanobacteria may lead to discovery of novel halogenated molecules and a better understanding of these organisms' chemical ecology and physiology. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  4. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eIijima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria.

  5. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hiroko; Nakaya, Yuka; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW) medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW) were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria.

  6. Photosystem I from the unusual cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangels, D.; Kruip, J.; Berry, S.; Rögner, M.; Boekema, E.J.; Koenig, F.

    2002-01-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) from the primitive cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus has been purified and characterised. Despite the fact that the isolated complexes have the same subunit composition as complexes from other cyanobacteria, the amplitude of flash-induced absorption difference spectra

  7. Lactate dehydrogenase in the cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moezelaar, R.; Teixeira, de M.J.; Stal, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806 was found to possess an NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) which catalyzes the reduction of pyruvate to l-lactate. The enzyme required fructose 1,6-bisphosphate for activity and displayed positive cooperativity towards pyruvate. Lactate was not

  8. fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae Fritsch under salt stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... Phosphorous (P) starved cells of the cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae showed higher phosphate uptake rates than P-sufficient cells. The P-uptake obeyed saturation kinetics. The Km value for P- deficient cells was lower (54.34 μM) than P-sufficient cells (82.64 μM) while Vmax was higher in P- deficient ...

  9. Enhanced hydrogen photoproduction by non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, A.K.; Pandey, K.D.; Sarkar, S. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany

    1996-02-01

    Nitrogenase activity was depressed in Plectonema boryanum following 18-24 h of microaerobic incubation. The cyanobacterium evolved hydrogen at a slow rate. Addition of reducing substances (sulfide, sulfite or dithionite) to the diazotrophic cultures resulted in an increase in nitrogenase activity or photoproduction of hydrogen. The reducing substances also restored phycocyanin degradation. (author)

  10. Biocidal spectrum of a rice field cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. | Jaiswal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial efficacy of hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts of a rice-field cyanobacterium, Nostoc sp., were evaluated against cyanobacteria and phytopathogenic fungi. The maximum production of biocidal compounds was observed in cultures grown for 20 days under optimized conditions (phosphate ...

  11. Ascorbic Acid Biosynthesis and Brackish Water Acclimation in the Euryhaline Freshwater White-Rimmed Stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Z H Wong

    Full Text Available L-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase (Gulo catalyzes the last step of ascorbic acid biosynthesis, which occurs in the kidney of elasmobranchs. This study aimed to clone and sequence gulonolactone oxidase (gulo from the kidney of the euryhaline freshwater stingray, Himantura signifer, and to determine the effects of acclimation from freshwater to brackish water (salinity 20 on its renal gulo mRNA expression and Gulo activity. We also examined the effects of brackish water acclimation on concentrations of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the kidney, brain and gill. The complete cDNA coding sequence of gulo from the kidney of H. signifer contained 1323 bp coding for 440 amino acids. The expression of gulo was kidney-specific, and renal gulo expression decreased significantly by 67% and 50% in fish acclimated to brackish water for 1 day and 6 days, respectively. There was also a significant decrease in renal Gulo activity after 6 days of acclimation to brackish water. Hence, brackish water acclimation led to a decrease in the ascorbic acid synthetic capacity in the kidney of H. signifer. However, there were significant increases in concentrations of ascorbate and ascorbate + dehydroascorbate in the gills (after 1 or 6 days, and a significant increase in the concentration of ascorbate and a significant decrease in the concentration of dehydroascorbate in the brain (after 1 day of fish acclimated to brackish water. Taken together, our results indicate that H. signifer might experience greater salinity-induced oxidative stress in freshwater than in brackish water, possibly related to its short history of freshwater invasion. These results also suggest for the first time a possible relationship between the successful invasion of the freshwater environment by some euryhaline marine elasmobranchs and the ability of these elasmobranchs to increase the capacity of ascorbic acid synthesis in response to hyposalinity stress.

  12. The Unicellular State as a Point Source in a Quantum Biological System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Torday

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A point source is the central and most important point or place for any group of cohering phenomena. Evolutionary development presumes that biological processes are sequentially linked, but neither directed from, nor centralized within, any specific biologic structure or stage. However, such an epigenomic entity exists and its transforming effects can be understood through the obligatory recapitulation of all eukaryotic lifeforms through a zygotic unicellular phase. This requisite biological conjunction can now be properly assessed as the focal point of reconciliation between biology and quantum phenomena, illustrated by deconvoluting complex physiologic traits back to their unicellular origins.

  13. The Unicellular State as a Point Source in a Quantum Biological System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-05-27

    A point source is the central and most important point or place for any group of cohering phenomena. Evolutionary development presumes that biological processes are sequentially linked, but neither directed from, nor centralized within, any specific biologic structure or stage. However, such an epigenomic entity exists and its transforming effects can be understood through the obligatory recapitulation of all eukaryotic lifeforms through a zygotic unicellular phase. This requisite biological conjunction can now be properly assessed as the focal point of reconciliation between biology and quantum phenomena, illustrated by deconvoluting complex physiologic traits back to their unicellular origins.

  14. Variation in growth rate in a natural assemblage of unicellular green soil algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelewijn, H.P.; De la Guerie, P.; Bell, G.

    2001-01-01

    Unicellular, motile, phototropic green algae were extracted from soil samples taken at metre intervals along a 25-m transect in a wheat field. The vegetative growth of 61 randomly selected isolates (henceforth called spores) was measured in dark and light conditions, and at high and low nutrient

  15. Switching from a unicellular to multicellular organization in an Aspergillus niger hypha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleichrodt, Robert-Jan; Hulsman, Marc; Wosten, H.A.B.; Reinders, Marcel J T

    UNLABELLED: Pores in fungal septa enable cytoplasmic streaming between hyphae and their compartments. Consequently, the mycelium can be considered unicellular. However, we show here that Woronin bodies close ~50% of the three most apical septa of growing hyphae of Aspergillus niger. The incidence of

  16. Complex multicellular functions at a unicellular eukaryote level: Learning, memory, and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, György

    2017-06-01

    According to experimental data, eukaryote unicellulars are able to learn, have immunity and memory. Learning is carried out in a very primitive form, and the memory is not neural but an epigenetic one. However, this epigenetic memory, which is well justified by the presence and manifestation of hormonal imprinting, is strong and permanent in the life of cell and also in its progenies. This memory is epigenetically executed by the alteration and fixation of methylation pattern of genes without changes in base sequences. The immunity of unicellulars is based on self/non-self discrimination, which leads to the destruction of non-self invaders and utilization of them as nourishment (by phagocytosis). The tools of learning, memory, and immunity of unicellulars are uniformly found in plasma membrane receptors, which formed under the effect of dynamic receptor pattern generation, suggested by Koch et al., and this is the basis of hormonal imprinting, by which the encounter between a chemical substance and the cell is specifically memorized. The receptors and imprinting are also used in the later steps of evolution up to mammals (including man) in each mentioned functions. This means that learning, memory, and immunity can be deduced to a unicellular eukaryote level.

  17. Dominance of unicellular cyanobacteria in the diazotrophic community in the Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agawin, N.S.R.; Benavides, M.; Busquets, A.; Ferriol, P.; Stal, L.J.; Aristegui, J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The horizontal and vertical distribution of representatives of diazotrophic unicellular cyanobacteria was investigated in the subtropical northeast Atlantic Ocean (28.87 to 42.00°N; 9.01 to 20.02°W). Samples from stations encompassing different water conditions (from oceanic oligotrophic

  18. An early-branching microbialite cyanobacterium forms intracellular carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couradeau, Estelle; Benzerara, Karim; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Moreira, David; Bernard, Sylvain; Brown, Gordon E; López-García, Purificación

    2012-04-27

    Cyanobacteria have affected major geochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) on Earth for billions of years. In particular, they have played a major role in the formation of calcium carbonates (i.e., calcification), which has been considered to be an extracellular process. We identified a cyanobacterium in modern microbialites in Lake Alchichica (Mexico) that forms intracellular amorphous calcium-magnesium-strontium-barium carbonate inclusions about 270 nanometers in average diameter, revealing an unexplored pathway for calcification. Phylogenetic analyses place this cyanobacterium within the deeply divergent order Gloeobacterales. The chemical composition and structure of the intracellular precipitates suggest some level of cellular control on the biomineralization process. This discovery expands the diversity of organisms capable of forming amorphous calcium carbonates.

  19. Ecology and Physiology of the Pathogenic Cyanobacterium Roseofilum reptotaenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie L. Richardson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Roseofilum reptotaenium is a gliding, filamentous, phycoerythrin-rich cyanobacterium that has been found only in the horizontally migrating, pathogenic microbial mat, black band disease (BBD on Caribbean corals. R. reptotaenium dominates the BBD mat in terms of biomass and motility, and the filaments form the mat fabric. This cyanobacterium produces the cyanotoxin microcystin, predominately MC-LR, and can tolerate high levels of sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB that are also associated with BBD. Laboratory cultures of R. reptotaenium infect coral fragments, suggesting that the cyanobacterium is the primary pathogen of BBD, but since this species cannot grow axenically and Koch’s Postulates cannot be fulfilled, it cannot be proposed as a primary pathogen. However, R. reptotaenium does play several major pathogenic roles in this polymicrobial disease. Here, we provide an overview of the ecology of this coral pathogen and present new information on R. reptotaenium ecophysiology, including roles in the infection process, chemotactic and other motility responses, and the effect of pH on growth and motility. Additionally, we show, using metabolomics, that exposure of the BBD microbial community to the cyanotoxin MC-LR affects community metabolite profiles, in particular those associated with nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  20. Electrical aspects of the osmorespiratory compromise: TEP responses to hypoxia in the euryhaline killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) in freshwater and seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The osmorespiratory compromise, the trade-off between the requirements for respiratory and ionoregulatory homeostasis at the gills, becomes more intense during environmental hypoxia. One aspect that has been previously overlooked is possible change in transepithelial potential (TEP) caused by hypoxia, which will influence branchial ionic fluxes. Using the euryhaline killifish, we show that acute hypoxia reduces the TEP across the gills by approximately 10 mV in animals acclimated to both freshwater (FW) and seawater (SW), with a higher PO2  threshold in the former. TEP becomes negative in FW, and less positive in SW. The effects are immediate, stable for at least 3 h, and reverse immediately upon return to normoxia. Hypoxia also blocks the normal increase in TEP that occurs upon transfer from FW to SW, but does not reduce the fall in TEP that occurs with transfer in the opposite direction. These effects may be beneficial in FW but not in SW. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Osmotic/ionic status of body fluids in the euryhaline cephalopod suggest possible parallel evolution of osmoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Yudai; Akada, Chiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Watanabe, Taro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2015-09-25

    Acclimation from marine to dilute environments constitutes among the dramatic evolutionary transitions in the history of life. Such adaptations have evolved in multiple lineages, but studies of the blood/hemolymph homeostasis mechanisms are limited to those using evolutionarily advanced Deuterostome (chordates) and Ecdysozoa (crustaceans). Here, we examined hemolymph homeostasis in the advanced Lophotrochozoa/mollusc, the other unexplored taxa, and its possible regulation by the vasopressin/oxytocin superfamily peptides known to be implicated in fluid homeostasis in Chordata and Arthropoda. The hemolymph osmotic and ionic status in the euryhaline cephalopod (Octopus ocellatus) following transfer from 30-ppt normal seawater to 20 ppt salinity indicate hyperosmo- and hyperionoregulatory abilities for more than 1 week, as in crustaceans and teleost fish. While ventilation frequency decreased by 1 day, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, which has been generally implicated in ion transport, was induced in two of the eight posterior gills after 1 week. In addition, the octopuses were intravenously injected with 1 or 100 ng/g octopressin or cephalotocin, which are Octopus vasopressin/oxytocin orthologs. After 1 day, octopressin, but not cephalotocin, decreased the hemolymph osmolality and Ca concentrations, as well as urinary Na concentrations. These data provide evidence for possible parallel evolution in hyperionoregulatory mechanisms and coordination by conserved peptides.

  2. Salinity fluctuation influencing biological adaptation: growth dynamics and Na+/K+-ATPase activity in a euryhaline bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Meng, Yang; Song, Youxin; Tan, Yalin; Warren, Alan; Li, Jiqiu; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2017-07-01

    Although salinity fluctuation is a prominent characteristic of many coastal ecosystems, its effects on biological adaptation have not yet been fully recognized. To test the salinity fluctuations on biological adaptation, population growth dynamics and Na + /K + -ATPase activity were investigated in the euryhaline bacterium Idiomarina sp. DYB, which was acclimated at different salinity exposure levels, exposure times, and shifts in direction of salinity. Results showed: (1) bacterial population growth dynamics and Na + /K + -ATPase activity changed significantly in response to salinity fluctuation; (2) patterns of variation in bacterial growth dynamics were related to exposure times, levels of salinity, and shifts in direction of salinity change; (3) significant tradeoffs were detected between growth rate (r) and carrying capacity (K) on the one hand, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity on the other; and (4) beneficial acclimation was confirmed in Idiomarina sp. DYB. In brief, this study demonstrated that salinity fluctuation can change the population growth dynamics, Na + /K + -ATPase activity, and tradeoffs between r, K, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity, thus facilitating bacterial adaption in a changing environment. These findings provide constructive information for determining biological response patterns to environmental change. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. WNK1 and p38-MAPK distribution in ionocytes and accessory cells of euryhaline teleost fish implies ionoregulatory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W S; Cozzi, R R F; Spieker, M

    2017-07-15

    Ionocytes of euryhaline teleost fish secrete NaCl, under regulation by serine and threonine kinases, including with-no-lysine kinase (WNK1) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus L.) were acclimated to freshwater (FW), full strength seawater (SW) and hypersaline conditions (2SW). Immunocytochemistry of ionocytes in opercular epithelia of fish acclimated to SW and 2SW revealed that WNK1-anti-pT58 phosphoantibody localized strongly to accessory cells and was present in the cytosol of ionocytes, close to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in the apical membrane and the sodium potassium 2 chloride cotransporter (NKCC) in the basolateral membrane. In FW acclimated fish, WNK1 localized to a sub-apical zone, did not colocalize with apical membrane-located sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC), and typically was present in one cell of paired ionocytes and in some single ionocytes. Forskolin treatment (10 μM, 30 min) increased WNK1 immunofluorescence in SW ionocytes only, while hypertonicity had little effect, compared to controls. Anti-p38-MAPK antibody localized to the cytosolic compartment. The distribution of WNK1 and p38MAPK is consistent with a proximal position in regulatory cascades, rather than directly affecting transporters. The strong staining of accessory cells by WNK1 phosphoantibody infers an osmoregulatory function for WNK. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Evolution of SET-domain protein families in the unicellular and multicellular Ascomycota fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Background The evolution of multicellularity is accompanied by the occurrence of differentiated tissues, of organismal developmental programs, and of mechanisms keeping the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Initially, the SET-domain proteins were associated exclusively with regulation of developmental genes in metazoa. However, finding of SET-domain genes in the unicellular yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe suggested that SET-domain proteins regulate a much broader variety of biological programs. Intuitively, it is expected that the numbers, types, and biochemical specificity of SET-domain proteins of multicellular versus unicellular forms would reflect the differences in their biology. However, comparisons across the unicellular and multicellular domains of life are complicated by the lack of knowledge of the ancestral SET-domain genes. Even within the crown group, different biological systems might use the epigenetic 'code' differently, adapting it to organism-specific needs. Simplifying the model, we undertook a systematic phylogenetic analysis of one monophyletic fungal group (Ascomycetes) containing unicellular yeasts, Saccharomycotina (hemiascomycetes), and a filamentous fungal group, Pezizomycotina (euascomycetes). Results Systematic analysis of the SET-domain genes across an entire eukaryotic phylum has outlined clear distinctions in the SET-domain gene collections in the unicellular and in the multicellular (filamentous) relatives; diversification of SET-domain gene families has increased further with the expansion and elaboration of multicellularity in animal and plant systems. We found several ascomycota-specific SET-domain gene groups; each was unique to either Saccharomycotina or Pezizomycotina fungi. Our analysis revealed that the numbers and types of SET-domain genes in the Saccharomycotina did not reflect the habitats, pathogenicity, mechanisms of sexuality, or the ability to undergo morphogenic

  5. High-Throughput Proteomics Reveals the Unicellular Roots of Animal Phosphosignaling and Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Peña, Marcia Ivonne; Capella-Gutiérrez, Salvador; Antó, Meritxell; Gabaldón, Toni; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Sabidó, Eduard

    2016-10-24

    Cell-specific regulation of protein levels and activity is essential for the distribution of functions among multiple cell types in animals. The finding that many genes involved in these regulatory processes have a premetazoan origin raises the intriguing possibility that the mechanisms required for spatially regulated cell differentiation evolved prior to the appearance of animals. Here, we use high-throughput proteomics in Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of animals, to characterize the dynamic proteome and phosphoproteome profiles of three temporally distinct cell types in this premetazoan species. We show that life-cycle transitions are linked to extensive proteome and phosphoproteome remodeling and that they affect key genes involved in animal multicellularity, such as transcription factors and tyrosine kinases. The observation of shared features between Capsaspora and metazoans indicates that elaborate and conserved phosphosignaling and proteome regulation supported temporal cell-type differentiation in the unicellular ancestor of animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative genomics reveals diversified CRISPR-Cas systems of globally distributed Microcystis aeruginosa, a freshwater bloom-forming cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen eYang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common and dominant bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwater lakes around the world. Microcystis cells can produce toxic secondary metabolites, such as microcystins, which are harmful to human health. Two M. aeruginosa strains were isolated from two highly eutrophic lakes in China and their genomes were sequenced. Comparative genomic analysis was performed with the 12 other available M. aeruginosa genomes and closely related unicellular cyanobacterium. Each genome of M. aeruginosa containing at least one clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR locus and total 71 loci were identified, suggesting it is ubiquitous in M. aeruginosa genomes. In addition to the previously reported subtype I-D cas gene sets, three CAS subtypes I-A, III-A and III-B were identified and characterized in this study. Seven types of CRISPR direct repeat have close association with CAS subtype, confirming that different and specific secondary structures of CRISPR repeats are important for the recognition, binding and process of corresponding cas gene sets. Homology search of the CRISPR spacer sequences provides a history of not only resistance to bacteriophages and plasmids known to be associated with M. aeruginosa, but also the ability to target much more exogenous genetic material in the natural environment. These adaptive and heritable defense mechanisms play a vital role in keeping genomic stability and self-maintenance by restriction of horizontal gene transfer. Maintaining genomic stability and modulating genomic plasticity are both important evolutionary strategies for M. aeruginosa in adaptation and survival in various habitats.

  7. Environmental Quality Research, Use of Unicellular Algae for Evaluation of Potential Aquatic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    volume. TABLE 1 SUMMARY OF TOXICITY OF HYDRAZINE COMPOUNDS TO ALGAE Type of Water Compound Test Organism Hydrazine MMH UDMH SC EC,50 SC EC50 Sc EC50...of toxic and/or biostimulatory effects of three hydrazine compounds to several species of unicellular green algae under different natural water ...agricultural or urban runoff. 6 TABLE 3 COMPOUNDS TESTED AND TEST CONDITIONS OF 1977/78 BIOASSAYS COMPOUND TEST CONDITIONS Type of Water Nutrient

  8. Contact Inhibition: Also a Control for Cell Proliferation in Unicellular Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, E; Aguilera, A; Gonzalez-Gil, S; López-Rodas, V

    1993-02-01

    According to traditional views, the proliferation of unicellular algae is controlled primarily by environmental conditions. But as in mammalian cells, other biological mechanisms, such as growth factors, cellular aging, and contact inhibition, might also control algal proliferation. Here we ask whether contact inhibition regulates growth in several species of unicellular algae as it does in mammalian cells. Laboratory cultures of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima (Ehrenberg) Dodge show contact inhibition at low cell density, so this would be an autocontrol mechanism of cell proliferation that could also act in natural populations of P. lima. But, Synechocystis spp., Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Bohlin), Skeletonema costatum (Greville), and Tetraselmis spp. do not exhibit contact inhibition in laboratory cultures because they are able to grow at high cellular density. Apparently their growth is limited by nutrient depletion or catabolite accumulation instead of contact inhibition. Spirogyra insignis (Hassall) Kutz, Prorocentrum triestinum Schiller, and Alexandrium tamarense (Halim) Balech show a complex response, as they are able to grow in both low and high cell density medium. These results suggest that contact inhibition is more adaptative in benthic unicellular algae.

  9. Sodium-coupled motility in a swimming cyanobacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Willey, J M; Waterbury, J B; Greenberg, E P

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of motility in Synechococcus strain WH8113 were studied to understand the unique nonflagellar swimming of this cyanobacterium. There was a specific sodium requirement for motility such that cells were immotile below 10 mM external sodium and cell speed increased with increasing sodium levels above 10 mM to a maximum of about 15 microns/s at 150 to 250 mM sodium. The sodium motive force increased similarly with increasing external sodium from -120 to -165 mV, but other energetic...

  10. Application of a benthic euryhaline amphipod, Corophium sp., as a sediment toxicity testing organism for both freshwater and estuarine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyne, R V; Everett, D A

    1998-01-01

    The use of an as-yet-undescribed euryhaline Corophium sp. amphipod as a sediment toxicity testing organism was assessed. The species was found to be ubiquitous in many tidal areas of the Hawkesbury River catchment. The salinity of habitat sites ranged from 0.1 to 24 ppt, sediment total organic carbon (TOC) ranged from 0.4% to 3.5%, and the fines content (Corophium sp. was assessed by using copper chloride and ammonium chloride as reference toxicants in a 96-h static water-only test and a 10-day static sediment test. The LC50 for copper in freshwater-only exposures was 80 to 86 microg/L, using adult animals collected from the field. In contrast, the LC50 for copper in freshwater sediment and the sediment pore water were 840 mg/kg (dry weight) and 99 microg/L, respectively. The LC50 for ammonia (total) in freshwater-only at pH 7 was 5.5 mg/L. In contrast, the LC50 for ammonia (total) in freshwater sediment and the sediment pore water were 110 mg/kg (dry weight) and 6 mg/L, respectively. Laboratory cultures of 5 per thousand to 15 per thousand salinity were optimal for supporting the release of juveniles. Juveniles collected from laboratory cultures had a LC50 for copper in 5 per thousand and 10 per thousand salinity of 9 microg/L and 28.5 microg/L, respectively, in water-only exposures. The juveniles would be suitable for use in the development of a chronic sediment toxicity test with growth as the endpoint.

  11. Claudin-6, -10d and -10e contribute to seawater acclimation in the euryhaline puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuong; Kelly, Scott P

    2014-05-15

    Expression profiles of claudin-6, -10d and -10e in the euryhaline teleost fish Tetraodon nigroviridis revealed claudin-6 in brain, eye, gill and skin tissue, while claudin-10d and -10e were found in brain, gill and skin only. In fishes, the gill and skin are important tissue barriers that interface directly with surrounding water, but these organs generally function differently in osmoregulation. Therefore, roles for gill and skin claudin-6, -10d and -10e in the osmoregulatory strategies of T. nigroviridis were investigated. In the gill epithelium, claudin-6, -10d and -10e co-localized with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase immunoreactive (NKA-ir) ionocytes, and differences in sub-cellular localization could be observed in hypoosmotic (freshwater, FW) versus hyperosmotic (seawater, SW) environments. Claudin-10d and -10e abundance increased in the gills of fish acclimated to SW versus FW, while claudin-6 abundance decreased in the gills of fish acclimated to SW. Taken together with our knowledge of claudin-6 and -10 function in other vertebrates, data support the idea that in SW-acclimated T. nigroviridis, these claudins are abundant in gill ionocytes, where they contribute to the formation of a Na(+) shunt and 'leaky' epithelium, both of which are characteristic of salt-secreting SW fish gills. Skin claudin-10d and -10e abundance also increased in fish acclimated to SW versus those in FW, but so did claudin-6. In skin, claudin-6 was found to co-localize with NKA-ir cells, but claudin-10d and -10e did not. This study provides direct evidence that the gill epithelium contains salinity-responsive tight junction proteins that are abundant primarily in ionocytes. These same proteins also appear to play a role in the osmoregulatory physiology of the epidermis. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Cloning, functional characterization and nutritional regulation of Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase in the herbivorous euryhaline teleost Scatophagus argus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dizhi Xie

    Full Text Available Marine fish are generally unable or have low ability for the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA from C18 PUFA precursors, with some notable exceptions including the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus in which such a capability was recently demonstrated. To determine whether this is a unique feature of S. canaliculatus or whether it is common to the herbivorous marine teleosts, LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways were investigated in the herbivorous euryhaline Scatophagus argus. A putative desaturase gene was cloned and functionally characterized, and tissue expression and nutritional regulation were investigated. The full-length cDNA was 1972 bp, containing a 1338 bp open-reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 445 amino acids, which possessed all the characteristic features of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad. Functional characterization by heterologous expression in yeast showed the protein product of the cDNA efficiently converted 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 to 18:4n-3 and 18:3n-6, respectively, indicating Δ6 desaturation activity. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that highest Δ6 fad mRNA expression was detected in liver followed by brain, with lower expression in other tissues including intestine, eye, muscle, adipose, heart kidney and gill, and lowest expression in stomach and spleen. The expression of Δ6 fad was significantly affected by dietary lipid and, especially, fatty acid composition, with highest expression of mRNA in liver of fish fed a diet with a ratio of 18:3n-3/18:2n-6 of 1.72:1. The results indicated that S. argus may have a different LC-PUFA biosynthetic system from S. canaliculatus despite possessing similar habitats and feeding habits suggesting that LC-PUFA biosynthesis may not be common to all marine herbivorous teleosts.

  13. Cloning, functional characterization and nutritional regulation of Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase in the herbivorous euryhaline teleost Scatophagus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dizhi; Chen, Fang; Lin, Siyuan; Wang, Shuqi; You, Cuihong; Monroig, Óscar; Tocher, Douglas R; Li, Yuanyou

    2014-01-01

    Marine fish are generally unable or have low ability for the biosynthesis of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from C18 PUFA precursors, with some notable exceptions including the herbivorous marine teleost Siganus canaliculatus in which such a capability was recently demonstrated. To determine whether this is a unique feature of S. canaliculatus or whether it is common to the herbivorous marine teleosts, LC-PUFA biosynthetic pathways were investigated in the herbivorous euryhaline Scatophagus argus. A putative desaturase gene was cloned and functionally characterized, and tissue expression and nutritional regulation were investigated. The full-length cDNA was 1972 bp, containing a 1338 bp open-reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 445 amino acids, which possessed all the characteristic features of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad). Functional characterization by heterologous expression in yeast showed the protein product of the cDNA efficiently converted 18:3n-3 and 18:2n-6 to 18:4n-3 and 18:3n-6, respectively, indicating Δ6 desaturation activity. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that highest Δ6 fad mRNA expression was detected in liver followed by brain, with lower expression in other tissues including intestine, eye, muscle, adipose, heart kidney and gill, and lowest expression in stomach and spleen. The expression of Δ6 fad was significantly affected by dietary lipid and, especially, fatty acid composition, with highest expression of mRNA in liver of fish fed a diet with a ratio of 18:3n-3/18:2n-6 of 1.72:1. The results indicated that S. argus may have a different LC-PUFA biosynthetic system from S. canaliculatus despite possessing similar habitats and feeding habits suggesting that LC-PUFA biosynthesis may not be common to all marine herbivorous teleosts.

  14. The effects of salinity on acute toxicity of zinc to two euryhaline species of fish, Fundulus heteroclitus and Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielmyer, Gretchen K; Bullington, Joseph B; Decarlo, Carri A; Chalk, Stuart J; Smith, Kelly

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that the toxicity of zinc (Zn) varies with water chemistry and that its bioavailability is controlled by ligand interactions and competing ions. Zn toxicity in freshwaters with varying water chemistry has been well characterized; however, far less attention has been paid to the toxicity of Zn in estuarine and marine systems. We performed experiments using two euryhaline species of killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus and Kryptolebias marmoratus, to investigate the effects of changing salinity on acute toxicity of Zn. Larvae (7- to 8-days old) of each species were exposed to various concentrations of Zn for 96 h at salinities ranging from 0 to 36 ppt and survival was monitored. As salinity increased, Zn toxicity decreased in both fish species, and at salinities above 10 ppt, K. marmoratus larvae were generally more sensitive to Zn than were those of F. heteroclitus. The protection of salinity against Zn toxicity in F. heteroclitus was further investigated to determine the role of Ca(2+). Increased Ca(2+) in freshwater protected against Zn toxicity to the same extent as did saline waters with an equal Ca(2+) concentration up to ∼200 mg/L Ca for F. heteroclitus and ∼400 mg/L Ca for K. marmoratus. These results suggest that these two species may have differing Ca(2+) requirements and/or rates of Ca(2+) uptake in water of intermediate to full-strength salinity (∼200-400 mg/L Ca(2+)) and thus differ in their sensitivity to Zn. The overall goal of this study was to better understand Zn toxicity in waters of different salinity and to generate data on acute Zn toxicity from multiple species over a range of salinities, ultimately for use in development of estuarine and marine biotic ligand models.

  15. The influence of salinity on acute nickel toxicity to the two euryhaline fish species, Fundulus heteroclitus and Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielmyer, Gretchen K; DeCarlo, Carri; Morris, Cameron; Carrigan, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a common pollutant found in aquatic environments and may be harmful at elevated concentrations. Increasing salinity has been shown to decrease the bioavailability and toxicity of other metals to aquatic organisms. In the present study, acute Ni toxicity experiments (96-h) were conducted at various salinities (0-36 ppt) to determine the effects of salinity on Ni toxicity to 2 euryhaline fish species, Kryptolebias marmoratus and Fundulus heteroclitus. Nickel concentrations causing lethality to 50% of the fish ranged from 2 mg/L in moderately hard freshwater to 66.6 mg/L in 36 ppt saltwater. Nickel toxicity to F. heteroclitus decreased linearly with increasing salinity; however, Ni toxicity to K. marmoratus was only lowered by salinities above 6 ppt, demonstrating potential physiological differences between the 2 species when they are functioning as freshwater fish. Furthermore, the authors investigated the influence of Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , Na(+) , and Cl(-) on Ni toxicity to F. heteroclitus. Freshwater with up to 120 mg/L Ca(2+) as CaSO4 , 250 mg/L Mg(2+) as MgSO4 , or 250 mg/L Na(+) as NaHCO3 did not provide protection against Ni toxicity. Alternatively, 250 mg/L Na(+) , as NaCl, was protective against Ni toxicity; and the extent of protection was similar to that demonstrated from salt water with the same Cl(-) concentration. These results suggest that Cl(-) is the predominant ion responsible for reducing Ni toxicity to K. marmoratus and F. heteroclitus in higher salinity waters. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  16. Verification of epigenetic inheritance in a unicellular model system: multigenerational effects of hormonal imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kőhidai, László; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva; Csaba, György

    2012-10-01

    The unicellular Tetrahymena has receptors for hormones of higher vertebrates, produces these hormones, and their signal pathways are similar. The first encounter with a hormone in higher dose provokes the phenomenon of hormonal imprinting, by which the reaction of the cell is quantitatively modified. This modification is transmitted to the progeny generations. The duration of the single imprinter effect of two representative signal molecules, insulin and 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine), in two concentrations (10(-6) and 10(-15) M) were studied. The effects of imprinting were followed in 5 physiological indices: (i) insulin binding, (ii) 5-HT synthesis, (iii) swimming behaviour, (iv) cell growth and (v) chemotaxis in progeny generations 500 and 1000. The result of each index was different from the non-imprinted control functions, growth rate, swimming behaviour and chemotactic activity to insulin being enhanced, while others, e.g. synthesis and chemotactic responsiveness of 5-HT and the binding of insulin were reduced. This means that a function-specific heritable epigenetic change during imprinting occurs, and generally a single encounter with a femtomolar hormone concentration is enough for provoking durable and heritable imprinting in Tetrahymena. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of epigenetic effects at a unicellular level and call attention to the possibility that the character of unicellular organisms has changed through to the present day due to an enormous amount of non-physiological imprinter substances in their environment. The results - together with results obtained earlier in mammals - point to the validity of epigenetic imprinting effects throughout the animal world.

  17. Some euryhalinity may be more common than expected in marine elasmobranchs: the example of the South American skate Zapteryx brevirostris (Elasmobranchii, Rajiformes, Rhinobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnick, Natascha; Freire, Carolina A

    2013-09-01

    Elasmobranchs are essentially marine, but ~15% of the species occur in brackish or freshwater. The Brazilian marine coastal skate Zapteryx brevirostris, non-reported in nearby estuaries, was submitted to 35, 25, 15, and 5 psu, for 6 or 12h (n=6). Plasma was assayed for osmolality, urea, and ions (Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), Mg(2+)). Muscle water content was determined, and the rectal gland, kidney and gills were removed for carbonic anhydrase (CA) and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activities. The skate survived to all treatments. Plasma osmolality and urea levels decreased respectively by 27% and 38% after 12h in 5 psu (with respect to levels when in seawater), but plasma Na(+), Cl(-), and Mg(2+) were well regulated. Plasma K(+) showed some conformation after 12h. Muscle hydration was maintained. Branchial CA and NKA did not respond to salinity. Rectal gland NKA decreased upon seawater dilution, while renal NKA increased. This skate was shown to be partially euryhaline. The analysis of plasma urea of elasmobranchs in brackish and freshwater versus salinity and time-allied to the widespread occurrence of some euryhalinity in the group-led us to revisit the hypothesis of a brackish water habitat for elasmobranch ancestors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation by the exogenous polyamine spermidine of Na,K-ATPase activity from the gills of the euryhaline swimming crab Callinectes danae (Brachyura, Portunidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E C C; Masui, D C; Furriel, R P M; Mantelatto, F L M; McNamara, J C; Barrabin, H; Leone, F A; Scofano, H M; Fontes, C F L

    2008-04-01

    Euryhaline crustaceans rarely hyporegulates and employ the driving force of the Na,K-ATPase, located at the basal surface of the gill epithelium, to maintain their hemolymph osmolality within a range compatible with cell function during hyper-regulation. Since polyamine levels increase during the adaptation of crustaceans to hyperosmotic media, we investigate the effect of exogenous polyamines on Na,K-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of Callinectes danae, a euryhaline swimming crab. Polyamine inhibition was dependent on cation concentration, charge and size in the following order: spermine>spermidine>putrescine. Spermidine affected K(0.5) values for Na(+) with minor alterations in K(0.5) values for K(+) and NH(4)(+), causing a decrease in maximal velocities under saturating Na(+), K(+) and NH(4)(+) concentrations. Phosphorylation measurements in the presence of 20 microM ATP revealed that the Na,K-ATPase possesses a high affinity site for this substrate. In the presence of 10 mM Na(+), both spermidine and spermine inhibited formation of the phosphoenzyme; however, in the presence of 100 mM Na(+), the addition of these polyamines allowed accumulation of the phosphoenzyme. The polyamines inhibited pumping activity, both by competing with Na(+) at the Na(+)-binding site, and by inhibiting enzyme dephosphorylation. These findings suggest that polyamine-induced inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity may be physiologically relevant during migration to fully marine environments.

  19. Effect of environmental salinity and dopamine injections on key digestive enzymes in hepatopancreas of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus (Decapoda: Brachyura: Varunidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Michiels

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the occurrence and characteristics of lipase activity and the response of lipase and proteolytic activity to salinity and dopamine injections in hepatopancreas of the euryhaline crab (Cyrtograpsus angulatus. Lipase activity was maximal at pH 8.5; it exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics (apparent Km=0.019 mM, was higher at 37°C and appeared to be cold tolerant, being also high at 4°C. In 10 psu (hyper-regulation conditions, lipase and proteolytic activity were about 3 and 5 times higher, respectively, than in 35 psu (osmoconformation. In 40 psu (hypo-regulation, lipase activity was about three times higher than in 35 psu, while proteolytic activity was similar. Lipase activity was inhibited in vivo by 10–4 M dopamine in 35 psu but not in 10 or 40 psu. Proteolytic activity was not affected by 10–4 M dopamine. The differential responses of lipase and proteolytic activity to salinity and dopamine suggest the occurrence of distinct digestive adjustments and mechanisms of regulation upon osmoregulatory conditions. This study contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of the biochemical adaptations to salinity in euryhaline crabs. The fact that higher digestive enzyme activities could be associated with a differential digestive capacity potentially leading to enhanced availability of energy substrates is discussed.

  20. Biochemical characteristics and modulation by external and internal factors of aminopeptidase-N activity in the hepatopancreas of a euryhaline burrowing crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, M S; del Valle, J C; López Mañanes, A A

    2015-07-01

    Strikingly, in spite of its physiological importance, information about occurrence, biochemical characteristics and mechanisms of regulation of aminopeptidase-N (APN) in the hepatopancreas of intertidal euryhaline crabs is still lacking. In this work, we determined the occurrence, biochemical characteristics, response to environmental salinity and dopamine of APN in the hepatopancreas of the euryhaline crab Neohelice granulata (Dana 1851) from the open mudflat of Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon (Buenos Aires province, Argentina). APN activity was maximal at pH and temperature range of 7.6-9.0 and 37-45 °C, respectively. APN activity exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics (apparent Km = 0.19 ± 0.10 mM) (pH 7.6, 37 °C) and appeared to be sensitive to bestatin (I 50 = 15 mM) and EDTA (I 50 = 9 mM). In crabs acclimated to 10 psu (hyper-regulation conditions) and 37 psu (hypo-regulation conditions), APN activity was about 45 and 160% higher, respectively, than in 35 psu (osmoconformation). APN activity in the hepatopancreas was stimulated in vitro (about 137%) by 10(-4) M dopamine. Higher dopamine concentrations produced a similar extent of increase. The responses of APN activity to salinity and dopamine in vitro suggest the role of APN in digestive adjustments upon hyper and hypo-regulatory conditions and its modulation via direct mechanisms on hepatopancreas by dopamine.

  1. Isolation, characterization and localization of extracellular polymeric substances from the cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Wijnholds, A.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrospira platensis is a cyanobacterium known for its nutritional value and secondary metabolites. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are an important trait of most cyanobacteria, including A. platensis. Here, we extracted and analysed different fractions of EPS from a locally isolated

  2. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  3. Heterologous expression of an algal hydrogenase in a heterocystous cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsten Heidorn; Peter Lindblad [Dept. of Physiological Botany, Uppsala University, Villavogen 6, SE-752 36 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    For the expression of an active algal [FeFe] hydrogenase in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase gene hydA1 and the accessory genes hydEF and hydG are to be introduced into the cyanobacteria cells. The genes were amplified by PCR from EST clones, cloned into the cloning vector pBluescript SK+ and sequenced. An expression vector for multi-cistronic cloning, based on pSCR202, was constructed and for a functional test GFP was inserted as a reporter gene. The GFP construct was transformed into Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 by electroporation and expression of GFP was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. (authors)

  4. Ultraviolet radiation effects on pigmentation in the cyanobacterium ``Phormidium uncinatum``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donkor, V.A.; Haeder, D.P. [Inst. fuer Botanik und Pharmaceutische Biologie, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The Baikal strain of the cyanobacterium Phormidium uncinatum was found to possess the photosynthetic pigments chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, while the Tuebingen strain of Phormidium contained, in addition to these, the biliprotein phycoerythrin. Sucrose gradient centrifugation of the pigment extracts resulted in a separation of the phycobiliproteins into several bands, which according to their absorption and fluorescence properties, were identified as monomers, trimers and hexamers. With increasing UV-B irradiation the heavier aggregates were broken down into smaller components. Photobleaching of these accessory pigments also occurred. FPLC gel filtration analyses of the pigments also showed loss of heavier aggregates of the phycobilins and bleaching of the pigments. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the sucrose gradient and FPLC fractions indicated loss of the biliproteins with increasing UV-B irradiation. The loss of the {beta}- were more rapid than that of the {alpha}- subunits. Increasing levels of ultraviolet irradiation is therefore deleterious to these organism. (author). 41 refs, 7 figs.

  5. Induction of anaerobic, photoautotrophic growth in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A; Padan, E

    1978-02-01

    Anaerobic photoautotrophic growth of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica was demonstrated under nitrogen in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (5micron), a constant concentration of Na2S (2.5 mM), and constant pH (7.3). The photoanaerobic growth rate (2 days doubling time) was similar to that obtained under oxygenic photoautotrophic growth conditions. The potential of oxygenic photosynthesis is constitutive in the cells; that of anoxygenic photosynthesis is rapidly (2 h) induced in the presence of Na2S in the light in a process requiring protein synthesis. The facultative anaerobic phototrophic growth physiology exhibited by O. limnetica would seem to represent an intermediate physiological pattern between the obligate anaerobic one of photosynthetic bacteria and the oxygenic one of eucaryotic algae.

  6. Characterization of the Polycomb-Group Mark H3K27me3 in Unicellular Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Pawel; Komarynets, Olga; Fachinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P M; Schubert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins mediate chromatin repression in plants and animals by catalyzing H3K27 methylation and H2AK118/119 mono-ubiquitination through the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC1, respectively. PcG proteins were extensively studied in higher plants, but their function and target genes in unicellular branches of the green lineage remain largely unknown. To shed light on PcG function and modus operandi in a broad evolutionary context, we demonstrate phylogenetic relationship of core PRC1 and PRC2 proteins and H3K27me3 biochemical presence in several unicellular algae of different phylogenetic subclades. We focus then on one of the species, the model red alga Cyanidioschizon merolae, and show that H3K27me3 occupies both, genes and repetitive elements, and mediates the strength of repression depending on the differential occupancy over gene bodies. Furthermore, we report that H3K27me3 in C. merolae is enriched in telomeric and subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes and has unique preferential binding toward intein-containing genes involved in protein splicing. Thus, our study gives important insight for Polycomb-mediated repression in lower eukaryotes, uncovering a previously unknown link between H3K27me3 targets and protein splicing.

  7. Effect of the SOS response on the mean fitness of unicellular populations: a quasispecies approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kama

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to develop a mathematical model that analyzes the selective advantage of the SOS response in unicellular organisms. To this end, this paper develops a quasispecies model that incorporates the SOS response. We consider a unicellular, asexually replicating population of organisms, whose genomes consist of a single, double-stranded DNA molecule, i.e. one chromosome. We assume that repair of post-replication mismatched base-pairs occurs with probability , and that the SOS response is triggered when the total number of mismatched base-pairs is at least . We further assume that the per-mismatch SOS elimination rate is characterized by a first-order rate constant . For a single fitness peak landscape where the master genome can sustain up to mismatches and remain viable, this model is analytically solvable in the limit of infinite sequence length. The results, which are confirmed by stochastic simulations, indicate that the SOS response does indeed confer a fitness advantage to a population, provided that it is only activated when DNA damage is so extensive that a cell will die if it does not attempt to repair its DNA.

  8. Characterization of the Polycomb-Group Mark H3K27me3 in Unicellular Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Pawel; Komarynets, Olga; Fachinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Schubert, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins mediate chromatin repression in plants and animals by catalyzing H3K27 methylation and H2AK118/119 mono-ubiquitination through the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC1, respectively. PcG proteins were extensively studied in higher plants, but their function and target genes in unicellular branches of the green lineage remain largely unknown. To shed light on PcG function and modus operandi in a broad evolutionary context, we demonstrate phylogenetic relationship of core PRC1 and PRC2 proteins and H3K27me3 biochemical presence in several unicellular algae of different phylogenetic subclades. We focus then on one of the species, the model red alga Cyanidioschizon merolae, and show that H3K27me3 occupies both, genes and repetitive elements, and mediates the strength of repression depending on the differential occupancy over gene bodies. Furthermore, we report that H3K27me3 in C. merolae is enriched in telomeric and subtelomeric regions of the chromosomes and has unique preferential binding toward intein-containing genes involved in protein splicing. Thus, our study gives important insight for Polycomb-mediated repression in lower eukaryotes, uncovering a previously unknown link between H3K27me3 targets and protein splicing. PMID:28491069

  9. Switching from a unicellular to multicellular organization in an Aspergillus niger hypha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichrodt, Robert-Jan; Hulsman, Marc; Wösten, Han A B; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2015-03-03

    Pores in fungal septa enable cytoplasmic streaming between hyphae and their compartments. Consequently, the mycelium can be considered unicellular. However, we show here that Woronin bodies close ~50% of the three most apical septa of growing hyphae of Aspergillus niger. The incidence of closure of the 9th and 10th septa was even ≥94%. Intercompartmental streaming of photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (PA-GFP) was not observed when the septa were closed, but open septa acted as a barrier, reducing the mobility rate of PA-GFP ~500 times. This mobility rate decreased with increasing septal age and under stress conditions, likely reflecting a regulatory mechanism affecting septal pore diameter. Modeling revealed that such regulation offers effective control of compound concentration between compartments. Modeling also showed that the incidence of septal closure in A. niger had an even stronger impact on cytoplasmic continuity. Cytoplasm of hyphal compartments was shown not to be in physical contact when separated by more than 4 septa. Together, data show that apical compartments of growing hyphae behave unicellularly, while older compartments have a multicellular organization. The hyphae of higher fungi are compartmentalized by porous septa that enable cytosolic streaming. Therefore, it is believed that the mycelium shares cytoplasm. However, it is shown here that the septa of Aspergillus niger are always closed in the oldest part of the hyphae, and therefore, these compartments are physically isolated from each other. In contrast, only part of the septa is closed in the youngest part of the hyphae. Still, compartments in this hyphal part are physically isolated when separated by more than 4 septa. Even open septa act as a barrier for cytoplasmic mixing. The mobility rate through such septa reduces with increasing septal age and under stress conditions. Modeling shows that the septal pore width is set such that its regulation offers maximal control of

  10. Trypsin and N-aminopeptidase (APN) activities in the hepatopancreas of an intertidal euryhaline crab: Biochemical characteristics and differential modulation by histamine and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Maria Soledad; Del Valle, Juana Cristina; López Mañanes, Alejandra A

    2017-02-01

    No studies are available about biochemical characteristics and modulation (i.e. by endogenous and/or environmental cues) of trypsin (a key digestive endoprotease) in hepatopancreas of intertidal euryhaline crabs neither on the possible concomitant modulation of key ectoproteases such as aminopeptidase-N (APN) involved in final steps of protein digestion. Furthermore, nothing is still known in decapods crustaceans about the role of histamine as primary chemical messenger for modulation of main components of digestive process (i.e. proteases). We determined biochemical characteristics and investigated the effect of histamine injections; of histamine in vitro and of acclimation of individuals to low and high salinity on trypsin and aminopeptidase-N (APN) activities in the hepatopancreas of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus (Dana 1851). Trypsin activity was maximal at pH7.4 and at 45°C. APN activity increased from pH6.6 to 7.6-9.0 and was maintained high at 37-45°C. Both activities exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics (apparent Km: trypsin=0.36mM; APN=0.07mM). The injection of 10-4M histamine decreased trypsin activity (about 40%) in hepatopancreas while did not affect APN activity. Similarly, in vitro 10-4M histamine decreased trypsin activity (about 52%) in hepatopancreas but not APN activity. Trypsin activity in the hepatopancreas was not affected by acclimation of crabs to low (10psu) or high (40psu) environmental salinity while APN activity was increased (about 200%) in 10psu. The results show the differential modulation of trypsin and APN by distinct cues and point to histamine as modulator of intracellular trypsin by direct action on the hepatopancreas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multimodal microfluidic platform for controlled culture and analysis of unicellular organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Tao; Smallwood, Chuck R.; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Baker, Scott E.; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2017-09-01

    Modern live-cell imaging approaches permit real-time visualization of biological processes, yet limitations exist for unicellular organism isolation, culturing and long-term imaging that preclude fully understanding how cells sense and respond to environmental perturbations and the link between single-cell variability and whole-population dynamics. Here we present a microfluidic platform that provides fine control over the local environment with the capacity to replace media components at any experimental time point, and provides both perfused and compartmentalized cultivation conditions depending on the valve configuration. The functionality and flexibility of the platform were validated using both bacteria and yeast having different sizes, motility and growth media. The demonstrated ability to track the growth and dynamics of both motile and non-motile prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms emphasizes the versatility of the devices, which with further scale-up should enable studies in bioenergy and environmental research.

  12. From Individual to Collective Behavior of Unicellular Organisms: Recent Results and Open Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Chuan

    2009-09-23

    The collective movements of unicellular organisms such as bacteria or amoeboid (crawling) cells are often modeled by partial differential equations (PDEs) that describe the time evolution of cell density. In particular, chemotaxis equations have been used to model the movement towards various kinds of extracellular cues. Well‐developed analytical and numerical methods for analyzing the time‐dependent and time‐independent properties of solutions make this approach attractive. However, these models are often based on phenomenological descriptions of cell fluxes with no direct correspondence to individual cell processes such signal transduction and cell movement. This leads to the question of how to justify these macroscopic PDEs from microscopic descriptions of cells, and how to relate the macroscopic quantities in these PDEs to individual‐level parameters. Here we summarize recent progress on this question in the context of bacterial and amoeboid chemotaxis, and formulate several open problems.

  13. Interfacing living unicellular algae cells with biocompatible polyelectrolyte-stabilised magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Shlykova, Lubov V; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Osin, Yuri N; García-Alonso, Javier; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2010-10-08

    Green algae are a promising platform for the development of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. Here we report a reliable single-step technique for the functionalisation of living unicellular green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa with biocompatible 15 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles stabilised with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). The magnetised algae cells can be manipulated and immobilised using external permanent magnets. The distribution of the nanoparticles on the cell walls of C. pyrenoidosa was studied by optical and fluorescence microscopy, TEM, SEM and EDX spectroscopy. The viability and the magnetic properties of the magnetised algae are studied in comparison with the native cells. The technique may find a number of potential applications in biotechnology and bioelectronics.

  14. Different tolerances to chemical contaminants between unicellular and colonial morph of Microcystis aeruginosa: excluding the differences among different strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Nkrumah, Philip Nti; Peng, Qiang

    2015-03-21

    In order to ascertain the different tolerances to chemical contaminants in one strain of Microcystis with different morphology, unicellular and colonial Microcystis in one strain was obtained from different conditions of light intensity and temperature. The samples were divided into 8 groups including control (no chemical addition), CuSO4, chloromycetin, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonatelas (LAS) treatments. The cell density, cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malonaldehyde of Microcystis were analyzed. It was observed that cell density of both unicellular and colonial Microcystis increased from the beginning to day-5 in the control and the CuSO4 treatments. However, the growth of Microcystis was significantly inhibited in the culture with chloromycetin and LAS treatments. Notably, the inhibition rate was significantly high in unicellular Microcystis relative to the colonial Microcystis. The esterase activity in all the treatments decreased dramatically relating to the control. In addition, the esterase activity in colonial Microcystis was significantly higher than that of the unicellular Microcystis in all the treatments. Although there were no significant differences in activities of SOD between the two morphologies in the control treatments, in all the other treatments, significant differences were observed. The results proved that colony formation of Microcystis could be considered as a strategy in response to chemical stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Export of Extracellular Polysaccharides Modulates Adherence of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, ML; Allen, R; Luo, YQ; Curtiss, R

    2013-09-10

    The field of cyanobacterial biofuel production is advancing rapidly, yet we know little of the basic biology of these organisms outside of their photosynthetic pathways. We aimed to gain a greater understanding of how the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (Synechocystis, hereafter) modulates its cell surface. Such understanding will allow for the creation of mutants that autoflocculate in a regulated way, thus avoiding energy intensive centrifugation in the creation of biofuels. We constructed mutant strains lacking genes predicted to function in carbohydrate transport or synthesis. Strains with gene deletions of slr0977 (predicted to encode a permease component of an ABC transporter), slr0982 (predicted to encode an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter) and slr1610 (predicted to encode a methyltransferase) demonstrated flocculent phenotypes and increased adherence to glass. Upon bioinformatic inspection, the gene products of slr0977, slr0982, and slr1610 appear to function in O-antigen (OAg) transport and synthesis. However, the analysis provided here demonstrated no differences between OAg purified from wild-type and mutants. However, exopolysaccharides (EPS) purified from mutants were altered in composition when compared to wild-type. Our data suggest that there are multiple means to modulate the cell surface of Synechocystis by disrupting different combinations of ABC transporters and/or glycosyl transferases. Further understanding of these mechanisms may allow for the development of industrially and ecologically useful strains of cyanobacteria. Additionally, these data imply that many cyanobacterial gene products may possess as-yet undiscovered functions, and are meritorious of further study.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Hongli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS. PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic

  17. Genome-wide analysis of putative peroxiredoxin in unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic prokaryotes with wide variations in genome sizes and ecological habitats. Peroxiredoxin (PRX) is an important protein that plays essential roles in protecting own cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS). PRXs have been identified from mammals, fungi and higher plants. However, knowledge on cyanobacterial PRXs still remains obscure. With the availability of 37 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of PRXs and explored their diversity, distribution, domain structure and evolution. Results Overall 244 putative prx genes were identified, which were abundant in filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina MBIC 11017, and unicellular cyanobacteria inhabiting freshwater and hot-springs, while poor in all Prochlorococcus and marine Synechococcus strains. Among these putative genes, 25 open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical proteins were identified as prx gene family members and the others were already annotated as prx genes. All 244 putative PRXs were classified into five major subfamilies (1-Cys, 2-Cys, BCP, PRX5_like, and PRX-like) according to their domain structures. The catalytic motifs of the cyanobacterial PRXs were similar to those of eukaryotic PRXs and highly conserved in all but the PRX-like subfamily. Classical motif (CXXC) of thioredoxin was detected in protein sequences from the PRX-like subfamily. Phylogenetic tree constructed of catalytic domains coincided well with the domain structures of PRXs and the phylogenies based on 16s rRNA. Conclusions The distribution of genes encoding PRXs in different unicellular and filamentous cyanobacteria especially those sub-families like PRX-like or 1-Cys PRX correlate with the genome size, eco-physiology, and physiological properties of the organisms. Cyanobacterial and eukaryotic PRXs share similar conserved motifs, indicating that cyanobacteria adopt similar catalytic mechanisms as eukaryotes. All

  18. Testing nanomaterial toxicity in unicellular eukaryotic algae and fish cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Alexandra; Kühnel, Dana; Schirmer, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoecotoxicology as a sub-discipline of ecotoxicology aims to identify and predict effects elicited on ecosystems by nano-sized materials (NM). Two key groups of model organisms in this context are algae and fish. In this chapter, we present considerations for testing NM with respect to their impact on unicellular algae and cell lines derived from various organs of fish.Based on currently available literature on NM effects in unicellular algae and fish cell lines, and our own experience, we provide guidance on test design, including principle test considerations, materials, NM presentation to cells, exposure, bioavailability, and effect assessment. Assessment needs to be based on a meaningful choice of exposure scenario(s) related to the research question. As a first step, one needs to address whether effects of NMs are to be investigated under environmentally relevant or probable conditions, which may include processes such as agglomeration, or whether NM effects from mono-dispersed particles are of interest, which may require special steps to ensure stable NM suspension. Moreover, whether effects on cells are to be studied in the short- or long-term is important with regard to experimental design. Preparation of NM suspensions, which can be done in aqueous media different from the exposure medium, is addressed with regard to energy input, sterility (as required for algae and fish cell exposure) and particle purity.Specified for the two model systems, algae and fish cell lines, availability and choice of culture media are presented and discussed with regard to impact on NM behavior. Light, temperature, and agitation, which are variables during exposure, are discussed. We further provide guidance on the characterization of the NM in the chosen aqueous exposure media regarding size, zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility. The state of NM in exposure media is decisive for their bioavailability and therefore for potential particle effects. Therefore, we present

  19. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Sarah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2 and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3 with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82 were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium and poor (carbon source absent in medium conditions. Findings F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action. The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc. The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Conclusions Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  20. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svercel, Miroslav; Saladin, Bianca; van Moorsel, Sofia J; Wolf, Sarah; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-09-13

    Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2) and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3) with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82) were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium) and poor (carbon source absent in medium) conditions. F. aestuarina BUZ 2 significantly reduced the cyanobacterial population whereas F. limi BUZ 3 did not. Physical contact between heterotrophs and autotroph was observed and the cyanobacterial cells showed some level of damage and lysis. Therefore, either contact lysis or entrapment with production of extracellular compounds in close vicinity of host cells could be considered as potential modes of action.The supernatants from pure heterotrophic cultures did not have an effect on Nostoc cultures. However, supernatant from mixed cultures of BUZ 2 and Nostoc had a negative effect on cyanobacterial growth, indicating that the lytic compounds were only produced in the presence of Nostoc.The growth and survival of tested heterotrophs was enhanced by the presence of Nostoc or its metabolites, suggesting that the heterotrophs could utilize the autotrophs and its products as a nutrient source. However, the autotroph could withstand and out-compete the heterotrophs under nutrient poor conditions. Our results suggest that the nutrients in cultivation media, which boost or reduce the number of heterotrophs, were the important factor influencing the outcome of the interplay between filamentous heterotrophs and autotrophs. For better understanding of these interactions, additional research is needed. In particular, it is necessary to elucidate the mode of action for lysis by heterotrophs, and the possible defense mechanisms of the autotrophs.

  1. Arsenic biotransformation by a cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xi-Mei; Yan, Yu; Xiong, Chan; Raber, Georg; Francesconi, Kevin; Pan, Ting; Ye, Jun; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-09-01

    Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 (Nostoc), a typical filamentous cyanobacterium ubiquitous in aquatic system, is recognized as a model organism to study prokaryotic cell differentiation and nitrogen fixation. In this study, Nostoc cells incubated with arsenite (As(III)) for two weeks were extracted with dichloromethane/methanol (DCM/MeOH) and the extract was partitioned between water and DCM. Arsenic species in aqueous and DCM layers were determined using high performance liquid chromatography - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS/ESIMSMS). In addition to inorganic arsenic (iAs), the aqueous layer also contained monomethylarsonate (MAs(V)), dimethylarsinate (DMAs(V)), and the two arsenosugars, namely a glycerol arsenosugar (Oxo-Gly) and a phosphate arsenosugar (Oxo-PO4). Two major arsenosugar phospholipids (AsSugPL982 and AsSugPL984) were detected in DCM fraction. Arsenic in the growth medium was also investigated by HPLC/ICPMS and shown to be present mainly as the inorganic forms As(III) and As(V) accounting for 29%-38% and 29%-57% of the total arsenic respectively. The total arsenic of methylated arsenic, arsenosugars, and arsenosugar phospholipids in Nostoc cells with increasing As(III) exposure were not markedly different, indicating that the transformation to organoarsenic in Nostoc was not dependent on As(III) concentration in the medium. Our results provide new insights into the role of cyanobacteria in the biogeochemical cycling of arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Binding characteristics of copper and cadmium by cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Linchuan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhou Chen; Cai Peng [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen Wenli [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Rong Xingmin; Dai Ke; Liang Wei [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Gu Jidong [Department of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Huang Qiaoyun, E-mail: qyhuang@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} The carboxyl groups play a vital role in the binding of Cu(II) and Cd(II) to S. platensis cells. {yields} Ion exchange and complexation are the dominating mechanism for Cu(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. {yields} XAFS analysis provided evidence for the inner-sphere complexation of Cu by carboxyl ligands and showed that Cu is complexed by two 5-membered chelate rings on S. platensis surface. - Abstract: Cyanobacteria are promising biosorbent for heavy metals in bioremediation. Although sequestration of metals by cyanobacteria is known, the actual mechanisms and ligands involved are not very well understood. The binding characteristics of Cu(II) and Cd(II) by the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis were investigated using a combination of chemical modifications, batch adsorption experiments, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. A significant increase in Cu(II) and Cd(II) binding was observed in the range of pH 3.5-5.0. Dramatical decrease in adsorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) was observed after methanol esterification of the nonliving cells demonstrating that carboxyl functional groups play an important role in the binding of metals by S. platensis. The desorption rate of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from S. platensis surface was 72.7-80.7% and 53.7-58.0% by EDTA and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, respectively, indicating that ion exchange and complexation are the dominating mechanisms for Cu(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. XAFS analysis provided further evidence on the inner-sphere complexation of Cu by carboxyl ligands and showed that Cu is complexed by two 5-membered chelate rings on S. platensis surface.

  3. Ionic Osmoregulation during Salt Adaptation of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumwald, E; Mehlhorn, R J; Packer, L

    1983-10-01

    The mechanisms of salt adaptation were studied in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6311. Intracellular volumes and ion concentrations were measured before and after abrupt increases of external NaCl concentrations up to 0.6 molar NaCl. Equilibrium volumes, measured with a rapid and accurate electron spin resonance spin probe method, showed that at low NaCl concentrations the cells did not shrink as expected for an impermeable solute. However, when the NaCl concentration exceeded a critical value, volume losses occurred. These losses were not fully reversed by hypoosmotic treatment, suggesting membrane damage. The critical value of irreversible volume loss paralleled the increase in salinity during cell growth. Rapid mixing experiments showed that exposure of Synechococcus 6311 to non-damaging NaCl concentrations caused water extrusion from the cells; the volume decreases were time resolved to about 200 milliseconds. Subsequently, volumes increased rapidly as NaCl moved into the cells. Controls recovered their volumes within 15 seconds, while salt-adapted cells grown at 0.6 molar NaCl required 1 minute for volume equilibration. This decrease in the rate of cell volume recovery indicates that salt adaptation is accompanied by changes in cell membrane properties. Subsequent to these initial rapid volume changes, a more gradual sequence of ion movement and sugar accumulation was observed. Under conditions for photoautotrophic growth, significant Na(+) extrusion was observed 30 min after salt shock. Sucrose accumulation reached a maximum value after 16 hours and K(+) accumulation reached equilibrium after 40 hours. The final concentrations of K(+) and Na(+) and sucrose and glucose inside the 0.6 molar NaCl-grown cells indicate that the inorganic ions and organic ;compatible' solutes are the major osmotic species which account for the adaptation of Synechococcus 6311 to salt.

  4. Bioenergetic Strategy for the Biodegradation of p-Cresol by the Unicellular Green Alga Scenedesmus obliquus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazi, Aikaterini; Assimakopoulos, Konstantinos; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-01-01

    Cultures from the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus obliquus biodegrade the toxic p-cresol (4-methylphenol) and use it as alternative carbon/energy source. The biodegradation procedure of p-cresol seems to be a two-step process. HPLC analyses indicate that the split of the methyl group (first step) that is possibly converted to methanol (increased methanol concentration in the growth medium), leading, according to our previous work, to changes in the molecular structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus and therefore to microalgal biomass increase. The second step is the fission of the intermediately produced phenol. A higher p-cresol concentration results in a higher p-cresol biodegradation rate and a lower total p-cresol biodegradability. The first biodegradation step seems to be the most decisive for the effectiveness of the process, because methanol offers energy for the further biodegradation reactions. The absence of LHCII from the Scenedesmus mutant wt-lhc stopped the methanol effect and significantly reduced the p-cresol biodegradation (only 9%). The present contribution deals with an energy distribution between microalgal growth and p-cresol biodegradation, activated by p-cresol concentration. The simultaneous biomass increase with the detoxification of a toxic phenolic compound (p-cresol) could be a significant biotechnological aspect for further applications. PMID:23251641

  5. Opposite GC skews at the 5' and 3' ends of genes in unicellular fungi

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    McLean Malcolm A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GC-skews have previously been linked to transcription in some eukaryotes. They have been associated with transcription start sites, with the coding strand G-biased in mammals and C-biased in fungi and invertebrates. Results We show a consistent and highly significant pattern of GC-skew within genes of almost all unicellular fungi. The pattern of GC-skew is asymmetrical: the coding strand of genes is typically C-biased at the 5' ends but G-biased at the 3' ends, with intermediate skews at the middle of genes. Thus, the initiation, elongation, and termination phases of transcription are associated with different skews. This pattern influences the encoded proteins by generating differential usage of amino acids at the 5' and 3' ends of genes. These biases also affect fourfold-degenerate positions and extend into promoters and 3' UTRs, indicating that skews cannot be accounted by selection for protein function or translation. Conclusions We propose two explanations, the mutational pressure hypothesis, and the adaptive hypothesis. The mutational pressure hypothesis is that different co-factors bind to RNA pol II at different phases of transcription, producing different mutational regimes. The adaptive hypothesis is that cytidine triphosphate deficiency may lead to C-avoidance at the 3' ends of transcripts to control the flow of RNA pol II molecules and reduce their frequency of collisions.

  6. General physiology, experimental psychology, and evolutionism. Unicellular organisms as objects of psychophysiological research, 1877-1918.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegel, Judy Johns; Schmidgen, Henning

    2002-12-01

    This essay aims to shed new light on the relations between physiology and psychology in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by focusing on the use of unicellular organisms as research objects during that period. Within the frameworks of evolutionism and monism advocated by Ernst Haeckel, protozoa were perceived as objects situated at the borders between organism and cell and individual and society. Scholars such as Max Verworn, Alfred Binet, and Herbert Spencer Jennings were provoked by these organisms to undertake experimental investigations situated between general physiology and psychology that differed from the physiological psychology advocated by Wilhelm Wundt. Some of these investigations sought to locate psychological properties in the molecular structure of protoplasm; others stressed the existence of organic and psychological individuality in protozoa. In the following decades, leading philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Henri Bergson, as well as psychological researchers like Sigmund Freud, integrated the results of these investigations into their reflections on such problems as the nature of the will, the structure of the ego, and the holistic nature of the reactions of organisms to their environment.

  7. Mussel biofiltration effects on attached bacteria and unicellular eukaryotes in fish-rearing seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Voudanta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mussel biofiltration is a widely used approach for the mitigation of aquaculture water. In this study, we investigated the effect of mussel biofiltration on the communities of particle-associated bacteria and unicellular eukaryotes in a sea bass aquaculture in southern North Sea. We assessed the planktonic community changes before and after biofiltration based on the diversity of the 16S and 18S rRNA genes by using next generation sequencing technologies. Although there was no overall reduction in the operational taxonomic units (OTU numbers between the control (no mussels and the test (with mussels tanks, a clear reduction in the relative abundance of the top three most dominant OTUs in every sampling time was observed, ranging between 2–28% and 16–82% for Bacteria and Eukarya, respectively. The bacterial community was dominated by OTUs related to phytoplankton blooms and/or high concentrations of detritus. Among the eukaryotes, several fungal and parasitic groups were found. Their relative abundance in most cases was also reduced from the control to the test tanks; a similar decreasing pattern was also observed for both major higher taxa and functional (trophic groups. Overall, this study showed the effectiveness of mussel biofiltration on the decrease of microbiota abundance and diversity in seawater fueling fish farms.

  8. Unravelling the cross-talk between iron starvation and oxidative stress responses highlights the key role of PerR (alr0957) in peroxide signalling in the cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingping, Fan; Lemeille, Sylvain; Talla, Emmanuel; Janicki, Annick; Denis, Yann; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Latifi, Amel

    2014-10-01

    The cyanobacterial phylum includes oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes of a wide variety of morphologies, metabolisms and ecologies. Their adaptation to their various ecological niches is mainly achieved by sophisticated regulatory mechanisms and depends on a fine cross-talk between them. We assessed the global transcriptomic response of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120 to iron starvation and oxidative stress. More than 20% of the differentially expressed genes in response to iron stress were also responsive to oxidative stress. These transcripts include antioxidant proteins-encoding genes that confirms that iron depletion leads to reactive oxygen accumulation. The activity of the Fe-superoxide dismutase was not significantly decreased under iron starvation, indicating that the oxidative stress generated under iron deficiency is not a consequence of (SOD) deficiency. The transcriptional data indicate that the adaptation of Nostoc to iron-depleted conditions displays important differences with what has been shown in unicellular cyanobacteria. While the FurA protein that regulates the response to iron deprivation has been well characterized in Nostoc, the regulators in charge of the oxidative stress response are unknown. Our study indicates that the alr0957 (perR) gene encodes the master regulator of the peroxide stress. PerR is a peroxide-sensor repressor that senses peroxide by metal-catalysed oxidation.

  9. Preliminary identification of unicellular algal genus by using combined confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with PCA and DPLS analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Shaoxi; Li, Zhe; Tang, Peng; Gao, Xia; Guo, Jinsong; Tlili, Chaker; Wang, Deqiang

    2018-02-01

    The analysis of algae and dominant alga plays important roles in ecological and environmental fields since it can be used to forecast water bloom and control its potential deleterious effects. Herein, we combine in vivo confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy with multivariate analysis methods to preliminary identify the three algal genera in water blooms at unicellular scale. Statistical analysis of characteristic Raman peaks demonstrates that certain shifts and different normalized intensities, resulting from composition of different carotenoids, exist in Raman spectra of three algal cells. Principal component analysis (PCA) scores and corresponding loading weights show some differences from Raman spectral characteristics which are caused by vibrations of carotenoids in unicellular algae. Then, discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification method is used to verify the effectiveness of algal identification with confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy combined with PCA and DPLS could handle the preliminary identification of dominant alga for forecasting and controlling of water blooms.

  10. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Michaël

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving

  11. Horizontal transfer of the nitrogen fixation gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, H.; Severin, I.; Confurius - Guns, Veronique; Wollenzien, U.I.A.; Stal, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes is a cosmopolitan organism, known to build microbial mats in a variety of different environments. Although most of these cyanobacterial mats are known for their capacity to fix dinitrogen, M. chthonoplastes has not been

  12. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.; Van Oosterhout, F.

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43. We tested these compounds under similar conditions to facilitate comparisons. We

  13. Nostoc PCC7524, a cyanobacterium which contains five sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reaston, J.; Duybesteyn, M.G.C.; Waard, Adrian de

    1982-01-01

    Five nucleotide sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases present in cell-free extracts of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC7524 have been purified and characterized. One of these enzymes, designated Nsp(7524)I cleaves at a new kind of nucleotide sequence i.e. 5'-PuCATG λ Py-3'. The other four

  14. Modeling the dynamic regulation of nitrogen fixation in the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouille, S.A.M.; Staal, M.J.; Stal, L.J.; Soetaert, K.E.R.

    2006-01-01

    A physiological, unbalanced model is presented that explicitly describes growth of the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. at the expense of N2 (diazotrophy). The model involves the dynamics of intracellular reserves of carbon and nitrogen and allows the uncoupling of the metabolism of these

  15. Insights into the Physiology and Ecology of the Brackish-Water-Adapted Cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voss, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.P.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft

  16. Production of indole-3-acetic acid by the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehboob, A.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9 was isolated from a rice field. The ability of this strain to synthesize the bioactive compound indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was demonstrated. IAA was extracted from the culture A. platensis strain MMG-9 and its identity was confirmed

  17. Production of indole-3-acetic acid by the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hasnain, S.

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis strain MMG-9 was isolated from a rice field. The ability of this strain to synthesize the bioactive compound indole- 3-acetic acid (IAA) was demonstrated. IAA was extracted from the culture of A. platensis strain MMG-9 and its identity was

  18. Nostoc PCC7524, a cyanobacterium which contains five sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reaston, J.; Duybesteyn, M.G.C.; Waard, Adrian de

    Five nucleotide sequence-specific deoxyribonucleases present in cell-free extracts of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC7524 have been purified and characterized. One of these enzymes, designated Nsp(7524)I cleaves at a new kind of nucleotide sequence i.e. 5'-PuCATG λ Py-3'. The other four

  19. Competition for Light between Toxic and Nontoxic Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, W.E.A.; Tonk, L.; Janse, I.; Hol, S.; Slot, P.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The cyanobacterium Microcystis can produce microcystins, a family of toxins that are of major concern in water management. In several lakes, the average microcystin content per cell gradually declines from high levels at the onset of Microcystis blooms to low levels at the height of the

  20. Competition for Light between Toxic and Nontoxic Strains of the Harmful Cyanobacterium Microcystis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, W.E.A.; Tonk, L.; Janse, I.; Hol, S.; Slot, P.; Huisman, J.; Visser, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis can produce microcystins, a family of toxins that are of major concern in water management. In several lakes, the average microcystin content per cell gradually declines from high levels at the onset of Microcystis blooms to low levels at the height of the bloom. Such

  1. Static allometry of unicellular green algae: scaling of cellular surface area and volume in the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustupa, J

    2016-02-01

    The surface area-to-volume ratio of cells is one of the key factors affecting fundamental biological processes and, thus, fitness of unicellular organisms. One of the general models for allometric increase in surface-to-volume scaling involves fractal-like elaboration of cellular surfaces. However, specific data illustrating this pattern in natural populations of the unicellular organisms have not previously been available. This study shows that unicellular green algae of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales) have positive allometric surface-to-volume scaling caused by changes in morphology of individual species, especially in the degree of cell lobulation. This allometric pattern was also detected within most of the cultured and natural populations analysed. Values of the allometric S:V scaling within individual populations were closely correlated to the phylogenetic structure of the clade. In addition, they were related to species-specific cellular morphology. Individual populations differed in their allometric patterns, and their position in the allometric space was strongly correlated with the degree of allometric S:V scaling. This result illustrates that allometric shape patterns are an important correlate of the capacity of individual populations to compensate for increases in their cell volumes by increasing the surface area. However, variation in allometric patterns was not associated with phylogenetic structure. This indicates that the position of the populations in the allometric space was not evolutionarily conserved and might be influenced by environmental factors. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Biofilm formation and indole-3-acetic acid production by two rhizospheric unicellular cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mehboob; Stal, Lucas J; Hasnain, Shahida

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms that live in the rhizosphere play a pivotal role in the functioning and maintenance of soil ecosystems. The study of rhizospheric cyanobacteria has been hampered by the difficulty to culture and maintain them in the laboratory. The present work investigated the production of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the potential of biofilm formation on the rhizoplane of pea plants by two cyanobacterial strains, isolated from rice rhizosphere. The unicellular cyanobacteria Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 that were isolated from a rice rhizosphere, were investigated. Production of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 was measured under experimental conditions (pH and light). The bioactivity of the cyanobacterial auxin was demonstrated through the alteration of the rooting pattern of Pisum sativum seedlings. The increase in the concentration of L-tryptophan and the time that this amino acid was present in the medium resulted in a significant enhancement of the synthesis of IAA (r > 0.900 at p = 0.01). There was also a significant correlation between the concentration of IAA in the supernatant of the cyanobacteria cultures and the root length and number of the pea seedlings. Observations made by confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of cyanobacteria on the surface of the roots and also provided evidence for the penetration of the cyanobacteria in the endorhizosphere. We show that the synthesis of IAA by Chroococcidiopsis sp. MMG-5 and Synechocystis sp. MMG-8 occurs under different environmental conditions and that the auxin is important for the development of the seedling roots and for establishing an intimate symbiosis between cyanobacteria and host plants.

  3. Phagosome maturation in unicellular eukaryote Paramecium: the presence of RILP, Rab7 and LAMP-2 homologues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wyroba

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Phagosome maturation is a complex process enabling degradation of internalised particles. Our data obtained at the gene, protein and cellular level indicate that the set of components involved in this process and known up to now in mammalian cells is functioning in unicellular eukaryote. Rab7-interacting partners: homologues of its effector RILP (Rab-interacting lysosomal protein and LAMP-2 (lysosomal membrane protein 2 as well as a7 subunit of the 26S proteasome were revealed in Paramecium phagolysosomal compartment. We identified the gene/transcript fragments encoding RILP-related proteins (RILP1 and RILP2 in Paramecium by PCR/RT-PCR and sequencing. The deduced amino acid sequences of RILP1 and RILP2 show 60.5% and 58.3% similarity, respectively, to the region involved in regulating of lysosomal morphology and dynein-dynactin recruitment of human RILP. RILP colocalised with Rab7 in Paramecium lysosomes and at phagolysosomal membrane during phagocytosis of both the latex beads and bacteria. In the same compartment LAMP-2 was present and its expression during latex internalisation was 2.5-fold higher than in the control when P2 protein fractions (100 000 x g of equal load were quantified by immunoblotting. LAMP-2 crossreacting polypeptide of ~106 kDa was glycosylated as shown by fluorescent and Western analysis of the same blot preceded by PNGase F treatment. The a7 subunit of 26S proteasome was detected close to the phagosomal membrane in the small vesicles, in some of which it colocalised with Rab7. Immunoblotting confirmed presence of RILPrelated polypeptide and a7 subunit of 26S proteasome in Paramecium protein fractions. These results suggest that Rab7, RILP and LAMP-2 may be involved in phagosome maturation in Paramecium.

  4. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in

  5. Phenotypic and genetic diversities are not correlated in strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa isolated in SW Spain

    OpenAIRE

    López Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo; Figueirido, Borja

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic and genetic diversities are not correlated in strains of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa isolated in SW Spain. The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (Kützing) Kützing is notorious for forming extensive and toxic blooms but the genetic structure of natural populations, and in particular during blooms, remains to be explored. In order to add more knowledge about the genetic structure of M. aeruginosa, we compared phenotypic and genetic variabilities in seventeen strains...

  6. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volland, Stefanie; Lütz, Cornelius; Michalke, Bernhard; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 μM Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron–oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  7. Intracellular chromium localization and cell physiological response in the unicellular alga Micrasterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volland, Stefanie, E-mail: Stefanie.Volland@stud.sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Luetz, Cornelius, E-mail: cornelius.luetz@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Michalke, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.michalke@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Luetz-Meindl, Ursula, E-mail: ursula.luetz-meindl@sbg.ac.at [Plant Physiology Division, Cell Biology Department, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Various contaminants like metals and heavy metals are constantly released into the environment by anthropogenic activities. The heavy metal chromium has a wide industrial use and exists in two stable oxidation states: trivalent and hexavalent. Chromium can cause harm to cell metabolism and development, when it is taken up by plants instead of necessary micronutrients such as for example iron. The uptake of Cr VI into plant cells has been reported to be an active process via carriers of essential anions, while the cation Cr III seems to be taken up inactively. Micrasterias denticulata, an unicellular green alga of the family Desmidiaceae is a well-studied cell biological model organism. Cr III and VI had inhibiting effects on its cell development, while cell division rates were only impaired by Cr VI. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural changes such as increased vacuolization, condensed cytoplasm and dark precipitations in the cell wall after 3 weeks of Cr VI treatment. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI) were applied to measure intracellular chromium distribution. Chromium was only detected after 3 weeks of 10 {mu}M Cr VI treatment in electron dense precipitations found in bag-like structures along the inner side of the cell walls together with iron and elevated levels of oxygen, pointing toward an accumulation respectively extrusion of chromium in form of an iron-oxygen compound. Atomic emission spectroscopy (EMS) revealed that Micrasterias cells are able to accumulate considerable amounts of chromium and iron. During chromium treatment the Cr:Fe ratio shifted in favor of chromium, which implied that chromium may be taken up instead of iron. Significant and rapid increase of ROS production within the first 5 min of treatment confirms an active Cr VI uptake. SOD and CAT activity after Cr VI treatment did not show a response, while the glutathione pool determined by immuno-TEM decreased

  8. The transferome of metabolic genes explored: analysis of the horizontal transfer of enzyme encoding genes in unicellular eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, John W; McConkey, Glenn A; Westhead, David R

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic networks are responsible for many essential cellular processes, and exhibit a high level of evolutionary conservation from bacteria to eukaryotes. If genes encoding metabolic enzymes are horizontally transferred and are advantageous, they are likely to become fixed. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a key role in prokaryotic evolution and its importance in eukaryotes is increasingly evident. High levels of endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) accompanied the establishment of plastids and mitochondria, and more recent events have allowed further acquisition of bacterial genes. Here, we present the first comprehensive multi-species analysis of E/HGT of genes encoding metabolic enzymes from bacteria to unicellular eukaryotes. The phylogenetic trees of 2,257 metabolic enzymes were used to make E/HGT assertions in ten groups of unicellular eukaryotes, revealing the sources and metabolic processes of the transferred genes. Analyses revealed a preference for enzymes encoded by genes gained through horizontal and endosymbiotic transfers to be connected in the metabolic network. Enrichment in particular functional classes was particularly revealing: alongside plastid related processes and carbohydrate metabolism, this highlighted a number of pathways in eukaryotic parasites that are rich in enzymes encoded by transferred genes, and potentially key to pathogenicity. The plant parasites Phytophthora were discovered to have a potential pathway for lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis of E/HGT origin not seen before in eukaryotes outside the Plantae. The number of enzymes encoded by genes gained through E/HGT has been established, providing insight into functional gain during the evolution of unicellular eukaryotes. In eukaryotic parasites, genes encoding enzymes that have been gained through horizontal transfer may be attractive drug targets if they are part of processes not present in the host, or are significantly diverged from equivalent host enzymes.

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of V-H(+) -ATPase, Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase, and carbonic anhydrase in gill lamellae of adult freshwater euryhaline shrimp Macrobrachium acanthurus (Decapoda, Palaemonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraschi, Anieli Cristina; Freire, Carolina Arruda; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2015-08-01

    Physiological (organismal), biochemical, and molecular biological contributions to the knowledge of the osmoregulatory plasticity of palaemonid freshwater shrimps has provided a fairly complete model of transporter localization in their branchial epithelium. Direct immunological demonstration of the main enzymes in the gill epithelia of adult palaemonids is, however, still incipient. The diadromous freshwater shrimp Macrobrachium acanthurus was exposed to increased salinity (25‰ for 24 hr), and its responses at the systemic level were evaluated through the assays of hemolymph osmolality and muscle hydration, and at cellular and subcellular levels through the activity and localization of the V-H(+) -ATPase, the Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase, and the carbonic anhydrase. Results showed an increase in hemolymph osmolality (629 ± 5.3 mOsm/kg H2 O) and a decrease in muscle hydration (73.8 ± 0.5%), comparing values after 24 hr in 25‰ with control shrimps in freshwater (respectively 409.5 ± 15.8 mOsm/kg H2 O and 77.5 ± 0.4%). V-H(+) -ATPase was localized in pillar cells, whereas Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase in the septal cells. The main novelty of this study was that carbonic anhydrase was localized in the whole branchial tissue, in pillar and septal cells. Exposure to high salinity for 24 hr led to no detectable changes in their localization or in vitro activity. Immunolocalization data corroborated the literature and current models of palaemonid gill ion transport. The absence of changes reinforces the need for the constant expression of these enzymes to account for the euryhalinity of these shrimps. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Expression of prolactin-releasing peptide and prolactin in the euryhaline mudskippers (Periophthalmus modestus): prolactin-releasing peptide as a primary regulator of prolactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T; Amano, M; Hyodo, S; Moriyama, S; Takahashi, A; Kawauchi, H; Ando, M

    2005-06-01

    Prolactin (PRL)-releasing peptide (PrRP) is a strong candidate stimulator of pituitary PRL transcription and secretion in teleosts. However, the role in control of extrapituitary PRL expression is unclear even in mammals. To study the possible presence of PrRP-PRL axes not only in the brain-pituitary but also in peripheral organs, the expression patterns of PrRP, PRL and growth hormone (GH) were characterized in amphibious euryhaline mudskippers (Periophthalmus modestus). PrRP mRNA is abundantly expressed not only in the brain but also in the liver, gut and ovary, while less abundant expression was also detected in the skin and kidney. Corresponding to the distribution of PrRP mRNA, PRL mRNA was also detectable in these organs. During adaptation to different environments, the changes in mRNA levels of PrRP paralleled those in PRL in the brain-pituitary, liver and gut in an organ-specific manner. Brain PrRP mRNA and the pituitary PRL mRNA increased under freshwater and terrestrial conditions (P < 0.05); expression of PrRP and PRL in the gut of freshwater fish was higher (P < 0.05) than those in sea-water fish although there were no changes in fish kept out of water; no significant change was seen in the liver. Expressions of GH were not correlated with PrRP. In the gut, PrRP and PRL appear to be co-localized in the mucosal layer, especially in the mucous cells. Thus, PrRP may also be a local modulator of extrapituitary PRL expression and the PrRP-PRL axes in various organs may play an organ-specific role during environmental adaptation.

  11. Engineering of photosynthetic mannitol biosynthesis from CO2 in a cyanobacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jacob Hedemand; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    d-Mannitol (hereafter denoted mannitol) is used in the medical and food industry and is currently produced commercially by chemical hydrogenation of fructose or by extraction from seaweed. Here, the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was genetically modified to photosynthetically...... produce mannitol from CO2 as the sole carbon source. Two codon-optimized genes, mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (mtlD) from Escherichia coli and mannitol-1-phosphatase (mlp) from the protozoan chicken parasite Eimeria tenella, in combination encoding a biosynthetic pathway from fructose-6-phosphate...... to mannitol, were expressed in the cyanobacterium resulting in accumulation of mannitol in the cells and in the culture medium. The mannitol biosynthetic genes were expressed from a single synthetic operon inserted into the cyanobacterial chromosome by homologous recombination. The mannitol biosynthesis...

  12. Antagonistic interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf Sarah; van Moorsel Sofia J; Saladin Bianca; Svercel Miroslav; Bagheri Homayoun C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about interactions between filamentous heterotrophs and filamentous cyanobacteria. Here, interactions between the filamentous heterotrophic bacteria Fibrella aestuarina (strain BUZ 2) and Fibrisoma limi (BUZ 3) with an axenic strain of the autotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum (SAG 25.82) were studied in mixed cultures under nutrient rich (carbon source present in medium) and poor (carbon source absent in medium) conditions. Findings F. aes...

  13. Regulation of Three Nitrogenase Gene Clusters in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Thiel; Pratte, Brenda S.

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 fixes nitrogen under aerobic conditions in specialized cells called heterocysts that form in response to an environmental deficiency in combined nitrogen. Nitrogen fixation is mediated by the enzyme nitrogenase, which is very sensitive to oxygen. Heterocysts are microxic cells that allow nitrogenase to function in a filament comprised primarily of vegetative cells that produce oxygen by photosynthesis. A. variabilis is unique among...

  14. Energy Supply System for the Gliding Movement of Hormogonia of the Cyanobacterium Nostoc cycadae

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki, HIROSE; Department of Biology, Faculty of Education, Okayama University

    1987-01-01

    The effects of selected metabolic inhibitors and light on the gliding movement of the hormogonia of the cyanobacterium Nostoc cycadae were examined. Respiratory poisons (sodium cyanide, sodium azide) stopped the movement in the dark, but not in light. DCMU had little effect on the movement in light. The inhibitory effect of monoiodoacetic acid (MIA) on the gliding movement in light was restored by adding DCMU, suggesting that the gliding movement in light is linked to a cyclic electron flow i...

  15. Oral toxicity of the microcystin-containing cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens in European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Bernhard; Höger, Stefan J.; O'Brien, Evelyn; Dietrich, Daniel R.

    2006-01-01

    The microcystin-producing cyanobacterium Planktothrix is one of the most widespread genera amongst toxin producing cyanobacteria in European lakes. In particular, the metalimnic blooms of Planktothrix rubescens have been associated with growing problems in the professional freshwater fishery as a decrease in yearly yields in the important coregonids fishery often coincides with the appearance of P. rubescens. P. rubescens is a cyanobacterial species known to produce toxic compounds, e.g. micr...

  16. A new UV-A/B protecting pigment in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, S.; Chen, T.W.; Boeger, P. (Universitaet Konstanz (West Germany))

    1988-12-01

    A new ultraviolet (UV)-A/B absorbing pigment with maxima at 312 and 330 nanometers from the cosmopolitan terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is described. The pigment is found in high amounts (up to 10% of dry weight) in colonies grown under solar UV radiation but only in low concentrations in laboratory cultures illuminated by artificial light without UV. Its experimental induction by UV as well as its capacity to efficiently protect Nostoc against UV radiation is reported.

  17. Reduction of Photoautotrophic Productivity in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 by Phycobilisome Antenna Truncation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Lawrence E.; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2012-06-15

    ABSTRACT

    Truncation of the algal light-harvesting antenna is expected to enhance photosynthetic productivity. The wild type and three mutant strains ofSynechocystissp. strain 6803 with a progressively smaller phycobilisome antenna were examined under different light and CO2conditions. Surprisingly, such antenna truncation resulted in decreased whole-culture productivity for this cyanobacterium.

  18. Cell Surface-Associated Proteins in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ohomori, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    The cell surface senses environmental changes first and transfers signals into the cell. To understand the response to environmental changes, it is necessary to analyze cell surface components, particularly cell surface-associated proteins. We therefore investigated cell surface-associated proteins from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The cell surface-associated proteins extracted by an acidic buffer were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Eighteen proteins were identified fro...

  19. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The extracellular-matrix-retaining cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum accumulates trehalose, but is sensitive to desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Toshio; Kumihashi, Keisuke; Kunita, Shinpei; Masaura, Takuya; Inoue-Sakamoto, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2011-08-01

    The aquatic cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum forms macroscopic colonies, which consist of both cellular filaments and massive extracellular matrix material. In this study, the physiological features of N. verrucosum were investigated and compared with those of the anhydrobiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nostoc verrucosum cells were sensitive to desiccation, but tolerant of freeze-thawing treatment in terms of both cell viability and photosynthetic O(2) evolution. Natural colonies of these cyanobacteria contained similar levels of chlorophyll a, carotenoids, the UV-absorbing pigments scytonemin and mycosporine-like amino acids, and uronic acid [a component of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS)]. EPS from both N. verrucosum and N. commune indicated low acidity and a high affinity for divalent cations, although their sugar compositions differed. The WspA protein, known to be a major component of the extracellular matrix of N. commune, was detected in N. verrucosum. Desiccation caused similarly high levels of trehalose accumulation in both cyanobacteria. Although previously considered relevant to anhydrobiosis in the terrestrial cyanobacterium N. commune, the data presented here suggest that extracellular matrix production and trehalose accumulation are not enough for standing extreme desiccation in N. verrucosum. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A simple viability analysis for unicellular cyanobacteria using a new autofluorescence assay, automated microscopy, and ImageJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Katja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently established methods to identify viable and non-viable cells of cyanobacteria are either time-consuming (eg. plating or preparation-intensive (eg. fluorescent staining. In this paper we present a new and fast viability assay for unicellular cyanobacteria, which uses red chlorophyll fluorescence and an unspecific green autofluorescence for the differentiation of viable and non-viable cells without the need of sample preparation. Results The viability assay for unicellular cyanobacteria using red and green autofluorescence was established and validated for the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Both autofluorescence signals could be observed simultaneously allowing a direct classification of viable and non-viable cells. The results were confirmed by plating/colony count, absorption spectra and chlorophyll measurements. The use of an automated fluorescence microscope and a novel ImageJ based image analysis plugin allow a semi-automated analysis. Conclusions The new method simplifies the process of viability analysis and allows a quick and accurate analysis. Furthermore results indicate that a combination of the new assay with absorption spectra or chlorophyll concentration measurements allows the estimation of the vitality of cells.

  2. Richness and distribution of unicellular eukaryotes in three streams under anthropic influence, Ivinhema City, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emílio Colzani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular eukaryotes are abundant in most aquatic environments and contribute in several ways to ecosystems. For example, they act as producers, as primary and secondary consumers, and they aid in the decrease and control of bacteria communities and in nutrient cycling. The aim of this study was to describe the abundance and distribution of unicellular eukaryotes in Ponta Porã stream and in its main tributary streams, as well as possible relationships between their presence and water quality on the sampled sites. We selected six sites (locals, considering headwaters (L1 and L2, downstreams (L5 and L6 and the main pollution source (L3. We used similarity and canonical correspondence analysis to evaluate relationships between microorganism abundance and distribution to abiotic variables (dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, turbidity and conductivity. Abundance was related to the increase of organic and inorganic sediment due to decomposition and erosion. We had a variation on the genera distribution, with slight predominance of ciliates, and some genera used as eutrophicated environmental indicators. The presence of Vorticella, Saprodinium, Paramecium, Metopus and Chilodonella suggests an environment ranging from polysaprobic to olygosaprobic. Urostyla, that has been used as water quality indicators, the flagellate Cercomonas, that has broad dispersion in aquatic environments, Didinium, a ciliate predator widely dispersed, Synura, a chrysophyte sensitive to basic pH and high temperatures, and Amoeba, frequently found in clean or in depuration process waters, may suggest a recuperating environment, since they are also found on lesser impacted sites.

  3. Expression of key ion transporters in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to fresh water, seawater and hypersaline water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Li

    Full Text Available The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na(+ and Cl(- in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt, seawater (30 ppt and hypersaline (70 ppt environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in

  4. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov, E-mail: atanastod@abv.bg [Department of Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, Trakia University, 11 Armeiska Str., 6000 Stara Zagora (Bulgaria)

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S{sup −1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup −1}): V×S{sup −1} = v{sub gr}×T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ρ (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program ‘Statistics’ is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S{sup −1} = 4.46⋅10{sup −11}×T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr} = 4.46×10{sup −11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×v{sub gr}>h/2π and T{sub dt}×M×v{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2π are valid, where h= 6.626×10{sup −34} J⋅s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  5. Genome erosion in a nitrogen-fixing vertically transmitted endosymbiotic multicellular cyanobacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An ancient cyanobacterial incorporation into a eukaryotic organism led to the evolution of plastids (chloroplasts and subsequently to the origin of the plant kingdom. The underlying mechanism and the identities of the partners in this monophyletic event remain elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To shed light on this evolutionary process, we sequenced the genome of a cyanobacterium residing extracellularly in an endosymbiosis with a plant, the water-fern Azolla filiculoides Lam. This symbiosis was selected as it has characters which make it unique among extant cyanobacterial plant symbioses: the cyanobacterium lacks autonomous growth and is vertically transmitted between plant generations. Our results reveal features of evolutionary significance. The genome is in an eroding state, evidenced by a large proportion of pseudogenes (31.2% and a high frequency of transposable elements (approximately 600 scattered throughout the genome. Pseudogenization is found in genes such as the replication initiator dnaA and DNA repair genes, considered essential to free-living cyanobacteria. For some functional categories of genes pseudogenes are more prevalent than functional genes. Loss of function is apparent even within the 'core' gene categories of bacteria, such as genes involved in glycolysis and nutrient uptake. In contrast, serving as a critical source of nitrogen for the host, genes related to metabolic processes such as cell differentiation and nitrogen-fixation are well preserved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first finding of genome degradation in a plant symbiont and phenotypically complex cyanobacterium and one of only a few extracellular endosymbionts described showing signs of reductive genome evolution. Our findings suggest an ongoing selective streamlining of this cyanobacterial genome which has resulted in an organism devoted to nitrogen fixation and devoid of autonomous growth. The cyanobacterial symbiont of Azolla

  6. The Effects of the Toxic Cyanobacterium Limnothrix (Strain AC0243) on Bufo marinus Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Olivia; Fabbro, Larelle; Makiela, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Limnothrix (strain AC0243) is a cyanobacterium, which has only recently been identified as toxin producing. Under laboratory conditions, Bufo marinus larvae were exposed to 100,000 cells mL−1 of Limnothrix (strain AC0243) live cultures for seven days. Histological examinations were conducted post mortem and revealed damage to the notochord, eyes, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The histopathological results highlight the toxicological impact of this strain, particularly during developmental stages. Toxicological similarities to β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine are discussed. PMID:24662524

  7. Macrolactone Nuiapolide, Isolated from a Hawaiian Marine Cyanobacterium, Exhibits Anti-Chemotactic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shogo; Williams, Howard; Cagle, Davey; Karanovich, Kristopher; Horgen, F. David; Smith, Roger; Watanabe, Coran M. H.

    2015-01-01

    A new bioactive macrolactone, nuiapolide (1) was identified from a marine cyanobacterium collected off the coast of Niihau, near Lehua Rock. The natural product exhibits anti-chemotactic activity at concentrations as low as 1.3 μM against Jurkat cells, cancerous T lymphocytes, and induces a G2/M phase cell cycle shift. Structural characterization of the natural product revealed the compound to be a 40-membered macrolactone with nine hydroxyl functional groups and a rare tert-butyl carbinol residue. PMID:26473885

  8. Sequential splicing of a group II twintron in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrike Pfreundt; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is unusual in its genomic architecture as 40% of the genome is occupied by non-coding DNA. Although the majority of it is transcribed into RNA, it is not well understood why such a large non-coding genome fraction is maintained. Mobile genetic elements can contribute to genome expansion. Many bacteria harbor introns whereas twintrons, introns-in-introns, are rare and not known to interrupt protein-coding genes in bacteria. Here we show the sequential in...

  9. Evaluation of the capacity of the cyanobacterium Microcystis novacekii to remove atrazine from a culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Marcela M C; Faria, Vanessa H F; Teodoro, Taciane S; Barbosa, Francisco A R; Magalhães, Sérgia M S

    2013-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of atrazine and its toxicity were evaluated for the cyanobacterium Microcystis novacekii. Cyanobacterial cultures were grown in WC culture medium with atrazine at 50, 250 and 500 μg L(-1). After 96 hours of exposure, 27.2% of the atrazine had been removed from the culture supernatant. Spontaneous degradation was found to be insignificant (remove atrazine combined with its tolerance of the pesticide toxicity showed in this study makes it a potential biological resource for the restoration of contaminated surface waters. These findings support continued studies of the role of M. novacekii in the bioremediation of fresh water environments polluted by atrazine.

  10. CHANGES IN CHLOROPHYLL A FLOURESCENCE AND PIGMENT RATIOS DURING DIFFERENT GROWTH PHASES OF A UNICELLULAR MARINE CHAETOCEROS (BACILLAROPHYCEAE) IN BATCH CULTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interpretations of chlorophyll a fluorescence data are based largely on application with green algae and higher plants. This study evaluated the interpretation of fluorescence data for a unicellular marine diatom. Chaetoceros sp. was grown in 4-liter batch cultures on a 16:8, L:D...

  11. Type 4 pili are dispensable for biofilm development in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Elad; Zilberman, Shaul; Sendersky, Eleonora; Simkovsky, Ryan; Shimoni, Eyal; Gershtein, Diana; Herzberg, Moshe; Golden, Susan S; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2017-07-01

    The hair-like cell appendages denoted as type IV pili are crucial for biofilm formation in diverse eubacteria. The protein complex responsible for type IV pilus assembly is homologous with the type II protein secretion complex. In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, the gene Synpcc7942_2071 encodes an ATPase homologue of type II/type IV systems. Here, we report that inactivation of Synpcc7942_2071 strongly affected the suite of proteins present in the extracellular milieu (exo-proteome) and eliminated pili observable by electron microscopy. These results support a role for this gene product in protein secretion as well as in pili formation. As we previously reported, inactivation of Synpcc7942_2071 enables biofilm formation and suppresses the planktonic growth of S. elongatus. Thus, pili are dispensable for biofilm development in this cyanobacterium, in contrast to their biofilm-promoting function in type IV pili-producing heterotrophic bacteria. Nevertheless, pili removal is not required for biofilm formation as evident by a piliated mutant of S. elongatus that develops biofilms. We show that adhesion and timing of biofilm development differ between the piliated and non-piliated strains. The study demonstrates key differences in the process of biofilm formation between cyanobacteria and well-studied type IV pili-producing heterotrophic bacteria. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Growth of Cyanobacterium aponinum influenced by increasing salt concentrations and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckelmann, Dominik; Bleeke, Franziska; Bergmann, Peter; Klöck, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    The increasing requirement of food neutral biofuels demands the detection of alternative sources. The use of non-arable land and waste water streams is widely discussed in this regard. A Cyanobacterium was isolated on the area of a possible algae production side near a water treatment plant in the arid desert region al-Wusta. It was identified as Cyanobacterium aponinum PB1 and is a possible lipid source. To determine its suitability of a production process using this organism, a set of laboratory experiments were performed. Its growth behavior was examined in regard to high temperatures and increasing NaCl concentrations. A productivity of 0.1 g L-1 per day was measured at an alga density below 0.75 g L-1. C. aponinum PB1 showed no sign of altered growth behavior in media containing 70 g L-1 NaCl or less. Detection of a negative effect of NaCl on the growth using Pulse-Amplitude-Modulation chlorophyll fluorescence analysis was not more sensitive than optical density measurement.

  13. Cellular and functional specificity among ferritin-like proteins in the multicellular cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Sandh, Gustaf; Nenninger, Anja; Oliveira, Paulo; Stensjö, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Ferritin-like proteins constitute a remarkably heterogeneous protein family, including ferritins, bacterioferritins and Dps proteins. The genome of the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme encodes five ferritin-like proteins. In the present paper, we report a multidimensional characterization of these proteins. Our phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses suggest both structural and physiological differences among the ferritin-like proteins. The expression of these five genes responded differently to hydrogen peroxide treatment, with a significantly higher rise in transcript level for Npun_F3730 as compared with the other four genes. A specific role for Npun_F3730 in the cells tolerance against hydrogen peroxide was also supported by the inactivation of Npun_F3730, Npun_R5701 and Npun_R6212; among these, only the ΔNpun_F3730 strain showed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with wild type. Analysis of promoter-GFP reporter fusions of the ferritin-like genes indicated that Npun_F3730 and Npun_R5701 were expressed in all cell types of a diazotrophic culture, while Npun_F6212 was expressed specifically in heterocysts. Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis combining functional differentiation and cellular specificity within this important group of proteins in a multicellular cyanobacterium. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. A Nostoc punctiforme sugar transporter necessary to establish a Cyanobacterium-plant symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L; Meeks, John C; Flores, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using (14)C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work.

  15. The Effect of Small Scale Turbulence on the Physiology of Microcystis aeruginosa cyanobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Anne; Hondzo, Miki; Guala, Michele

    2014-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a single-celled blue-green alga, or cyanobacterium, that is responsible for poor water quality and microcystin production, which in high concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals. These harmful effects arise during cyanobacterium blooms. Blooms occur mainly in the summer when the algae grow uncontrollably and bond together to form colonies which accumulate on the surface of freshwater ecosystems. The relationship between fluid motion generated by wind and internal waves in stratified aquatic ecosystems and Microcystis can help explain the mechanisms of such blooms. We investigated the effect of small scale fluid motion on the physiology of Microcystis in a reactor with two underwater speakers. Different turbulent intensities were achieved by systematically changing the input signal frequency (30-50 Hz) and magnitude (0.1-0.2V) to the speakers. The role of turbulence is quantified by relating energy dissipation rates with the cell number, chlorophyll amount, dissolved oxygen production/uptake, and pH. The results suggest that turbulence mediates the physiology of Microcystis. The findings could be instrumental in designing restoration strategies that can minimize Microcystis blooms. This work was supported by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship and University of Minnesota start-up funding.

  16. Quantum yields for oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A; Padan, E; Avron, M

    1977-05-01

    A comparison of the quantum yield spectra of the oxygenic (H(2)O as the electron donor) with the anoxygenic (H(2)S as the electron donor) photosynthesis of the cyanobacterium, Oscillatoria limnetica reveals that anoxygenic photosynthesis is driven by photosystem I only. The highest quantum yields of the latter (maximum; 0.059 CO(2) molecules/quantum of absorbed light) were obtained with wavelengths which preferentially excite photosystem I (650) in which chlorophyll a and carotenoids are the major pigments. The addition of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea had no effect on anoxygenic photosynthesis, and no enhancement in quantum efficiency was observed by a superimposition of light preferentially exciting photosystem II.Oxygenic photosynthesis efficiently utilizes only a narrow range of the absorption spectrum (550-650 nm) where light is provided in excess to photosystem II via phycocyanin. The quantum yield (0.033 CO(2) molecules/quantum of absorbed light) is lower than the theoretical yield by a factor of 3, possibly due to inefficient light transfer from photosystem II to I. Thus, 3-fold enhancement of oxygenic photosynthesis by superimposition of photosystem I light, and low quantum yields for anoxygenic photosynthesis, were obtained in this region. These results are consonant with the suggestion that such a cyanobacterium represents an intermediate stage in phototrophic evolution.

  17. Effects of benzophenone-3 on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feijian; He, Yiliang; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2017-12-01

    Effects of benzophenone-3 (BP-3) on the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, were investigated. The tested organisms were exposed to environmental levels of BP-3 for 10 days, at nominal concentrations from 0.01 to 5000μgL-1. Specific growth rate and photosynthetic pigments were employed to evaluate the toxic responses. The two tested algae had distinct toxic responses towards BP-3 stress, with the green alga C. reinhardtii being more sensitive than the cyanobacterium M. aeriginosa, based on EC20 and EC50 values. Uptake of BP-3 from the medium occurred in both species, with M. aeruginosa showing greater overall uptake (27.2-77.4%) compared to C. reinhardtii (1.1-58.4%). The effects of BP-3 on C. reinhardtii were variable at concentrations lower than 100μgL-1. At higher concentrations, the specific growth rate of C. reinhardtii decreased following a reduction in chlorophyll a (chl-a) content. Further experiments showed that BP-3 regulated the growth of C. reinhardtii by affecting the production of chl-a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids. In M. aeruginosa, specific growth rate was only moderately affected by BP-3. Additionally, the production of chl-a was significantly inhibited over the different exposure concentrations, while the production of carotenoids was stimulated. These results indicate a potential detrimental effect on prokaryotes and eukaryotes and that the mechanism of action varies with species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus produces compound(s toxic to photosynthetic organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Cohen

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton mortality allows effective nutrient cycling, and thus plays a pivotal role in driving biogeochemical cycles. A growing body of literature demonstrates the involvement of regulated death programs in the abrupt collapse of phytoplankton populations, and particularly implicates processes that exhibit characteristics of metazoan programmed cell death. Here, we report that the cell-free, extracellular fluid (conditioned medium of a collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is toxic to exponentially growing cells of this cyanobacterium, as well as to a large variety of photosynthetic organisms, but not to eubacteria. The toxic effect, which is light-dependent, involves oxidative stress, as suggested by damage alleviation by antioxidants, and the very high sensitivity of a catalase-mutant to the conditioned medium. At relatively high cell densities, S. elongatus cells survived the deleterious effect of conditioned medium in a process that required de novo protein synthesis. Application of conditioned medium from a collapsing culture caused severe pigment bleaching not only in S. elongatus cells, but also resulted in bleaching of pigments in a cell free extract. The latter observation indicates that the elicited damage is a direct effect that does not require an intact cell, and therefore, is mechanistically different from the metazoan-like programmed cell death described for phytoplankton. We suggest that S. elongatus in aged cultures are triggered to produce a toxic compound, and thus, this process may be envisaged as a novel regulated death program.

  19. Dynamics of the Toxin Cylindrospermopsin and the Cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum in a Mediterranean Eutrophic Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fadel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chrysosporum ovalisporum is a cylindrospermopsin toxin producing cyanobacterium that was reported in several lakes and reservoirs. Its growth dynamics and toxin distribution in field remain largely undocumented. Chrysosporum ovalisporum was reported in 2009 in Karaoun Reservoir, Lebanon. We investigated the factors controlling the occurrence of this cyanobacterium and vertical distribution of cylindrospermopsin in Karaoun Reservoir. We conducted bi-weekly sampling campaigns between May 2012 and August 2013. Results showed that Chrysosporum ovalisporum is an ecologically plastic species that was observed in all seasons. Unlike the high temperatures, above 26 °C, which is associated with blooms of Chrysosporum ovalisporum in Lakes Kinneret (Israel, Lisimachia and Trichonis (Greece and Arcos Reservoir (Spain, Chrysosporum ovalisporum in Karaoun Reservoir bloomed in October 2012 at a water temperature of 22 °C during weak stratification. Cylindrospermopsin was detected in almost all water samples even when Chrysosporum ovalisporum was not detected. Chrysosporum ovalisporum biovolumes and cylindrospermopsin concentrations were not correlated (n = 31, r2 = −0.05. Cylindrospermopsin reached a maximum concentration of 1.7 µg L−1. The vertical profiles of toxin concentrations suggested its possible degradation or sedimentation resulting in its disappearance from the water column. The field growth conditions of Chrysosporum ovalisporum in this study revealed that it can bloom at the subsurface water temperature of 22 °C increasing the risk of its development and expansion in lakes located in temperate climate regions.

  20. Discovery of an endosymbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A in Braarudosphaera bigelowii (Prymnesiophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Hagino

    Full Text Available Braarudosphaera bigelowii (Prymnesiophyceae is a coastal coccolithophore with a long fossil record, extending back to the late Cretaceous (ca. 100 Ma. A recent study revealed close phylogenetic relationships between B. bigelowii, Chrysochromulina parkeae (Prymnesiophyceae, and a prymnesiophyte that forms a symbiotic association with the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A. In order to further examine these relationships, we conducted transmission electron microscopic and molecular phylogenetic studies of B. bigelowii. TEM studies showed that, in addition to organelles, such as the nucleus, chloroplasts and mitochondria, B. bigelowii contains one or two spheroid bodies with internal lamellae. In the 18S rDNA tree of the Prymnesiophyceae, C. parkeae fell within the B. bigelowii clade, and was close to B. bigelowii Genotype III (99.89% similarity. Plastid 16S rDNA sequences obtained from B. bigelowii were close to the unidentified sequences from the oligotrophic SE Pacific Ocean (e.g. HM133411 (99.86% similarity. Bacterial16S rDNA sequences obtained from B. bigelowii were identical to the UCYN-A sequence AY621693 from Arabian Sea, and fell in the UCYN-A clade. From these results, we suggest that; 1 C. parkeae is the alternate life cycle stage of B. bigelowii sensu stricto or that of a sibling species of B. bigelowii, and 2 the spheroid body of B. bigelowii originated from endosymbiosis of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium UCYN-A.

  1. Diurnal expression of hetR and diazocyte development in the filamentous non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shehawy, R.; Lugomela, C.; Ernst, A.; Bergman, B.

    2003-01-01

    The marine non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium fixes atmospheric N2 aerobically in light. In situ immunolocalization/light microscopy of NifH revealed that lighter, non-granulated cell regions observed correspond to the nitrogenase-containing diazocyte clusters in Trichodesmium IMS101.

  2. Draft genome sequence of calothrix strain 336/3, a novel h2-producing cyanobacterium isolated from a finnish lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojärvi, Janne; Shunmugam, Sumathy; Sivonen, Kaarina; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari; Battchikova, Natalia

    2015-01-22

    We announce the draft genome sequence of Calothrix strain 336/3, an N2-fixing heterocystous filamentous cyanobacterium isolated from a natural habitat. Calothrix 336/3 produces higher levels of hydrogen than Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and Anabaena strain PCC 7120 and, therefore, is of interest for potential technological applications. Copyright © 2015 Isojärvi et al.

  3. Organization and sequences of genes for the subunits of ATP synthase in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6716

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Walraven, H. S.; Lutter, R.; Walker, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The sequences of the genes for the nine subunits of ATP synthase in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus 6716 have been determined. The genes were identified by comparison of the encoded proteins with sequences of ATP synthase subunits in other species, and confirmed for subunits alpha,

  4. Potassium sensitivity differs among strains of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis and correlates with the presence of salt tolerance genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandrini, G.; Huisman, J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is a ubiquitous harmful cyanobacterium that causes problems in eutrophic lakes. Potassium ion (K+) addition is one of the suggested methods to combat harmful cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the effectiveness of this method, we compared the potassium ion sensitivity of

  5. A comparison of fermentation in the cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806 grown under a light/dark cycle and continuous light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moezelaar, R.; Stal, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis PCC7806, grown under continuous light, fermented endogenously stored glycogen to equimolar amounts of acetate and ethanol when incubated anaerobically in the dark. In addition, H-2, CO2 and some L-lactate were produced. This fermentation pattern differed from that

  6. Inducible expression of heterologous genes targeted to a chromosomal platform in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, D.; Bovy, A.; de Vrieze, G.; Borrias, M.; Weisbeek, P.

    1995-01-01

    High-level, inducible expression of heterologous genes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was obtained using the Escherichia coli trc promoter and lacI repressor. The petE gene of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7937 encoding plastocyanin precursor protein and the E. coli uidA gene

  7. Time-series resolution of gradual nitrogen starvation and its impact on photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krasikov, V.; Aguirre von Wobeser, E.; Dekker, H.L.; Huisman, J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Sequential adaptation to nitrogen deprivation and ultimately to full starvation requires coordinated adjustment of cellular functions. We investigated changes in gene expression and cell physiology of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 during 96 h of nitrogen starvation. During the first 6 h,

  8. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  9. Unicellular eukaryotes as models in cell and molecular biology: critical appraisal of their past and future value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Martin; Plattner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes have been appreciated as model systems for the analysis of crucial questions in cell and molecular biology. This includes Dictyostelium (chemotaxis, amoeboid movement, phagocytosis), Tetrahymena (telomere structure, telomerase function), Paramecium (variant surface antigens, exocytosis, phagocytosis cycle) or both ciliates (ciliary beat regulation, surface pattern formation), Chlamydomonas (flagellar biogenesis and beat), and yeast (S. cerevisiae) for innumerable aspects. Nowadays many problems may be tackled with "higher" eukaryotic/metazoan cells for which full genomic information as well as domain databases, etc., were available long before protozoa. Established molecular tools, commercial antibodies, and established pharmacology are additional advantages available for higher eukaryotic cells. Moreover, an increasing number of inherited genetic disturbances in humans have become elucidated and can serve as new models. Among lower eukaryotes, yeast will remain a standard model because of its peculiarities, including its reduced genome and availability in the haploid form. But do protists still have a future as models? This touches not only the basic understanding of biology but also practical aspects of research, such as fund raising. As we try to scrutinize, due to specific advantages some protozoa should and will remain favorable models for analyzing novel genes or specific aspects of cell structure and function. Outstanding examples are epigenetic phenomena-a field of rising interest. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Selenite on Unicellular Green Microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa: Bioaccumulation of Selenium, Enhancement of Photosynthetic Pigments, and Amino Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Cheng, Jay J

    2017-12-20

    Microalgae were studied as function bioaccumulators of selenium (Se) for food and feed supplement. To investigate the bioaccumulation of Se and its effects on the unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the algal growth curve, fluorescence parameters, antioxidant enzyme activity, and fatty acid and amino acid profiles were examined. We found that Se at low concentrations (≤40 mg L-1) positively promoted algal growth and inhibited lipid peroxidation and intracellular reactive oxygen species. The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in the levels of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, linolenic acid, and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, a significant increase in amino acid and organic Se content was also detected in the microalgae. In contrast, we found opposite effects in C. pyrenoidosa exposed to >60 mg L-1 Se. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated with the bioaccumulation of excess Se. These results provide a better understanding of the effect of Se on green microalgae, which may help in the development of new technological applications for the production of Se-enriched biomass from microalgae.

  11. Characterization and heterologous expression of a new matrix attachment region binding protein from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyun; Hou, Guiqin; Wang, Yafeng; Xue, Lexun

    2010-12-01

    Although interactions between the nuclear matrix and special regions of chromosomal DNA called matrix attachment regions (MARs) are implicated in various nuclear functions, the understanding of the regulatory mechanism of MARs is still poor. A few MAR-binding proteins (MARBP) have been isolated from some plants and animals, but not from the unicellular algae. Here, we identify a novel MAR-binding protein, namely DMBP-1, from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina. The cDNA of DMBP-1 is 2322-bp long and contains a 1626 bp of an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 542 amino acids (59 kDa). The DMBP-1 expressed in Escherichia coli specifically binds A/T-rich MAR DNA. The DMBP-1 fused to green fluorescent protein appears only inside the nuclei of Chinese hamster ovarian cells transfected with the pEGFP-MBP, indicating that the protein is located in the nuclei. The findings mentioned above may contribute to better understanding of the nuclear matrix-MAR interactions.

  12. Diversification of unicellular eukaryotes: cryptomonad colonizations of marine and fresh waters inferred from revised 18S rRNA phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Bråte, Jon; Logares, Ramiro; Klaveness, Dag; Berney, Cédric; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2008-10-01

    The cryptomonads is a well-defined lineage of unicellular eukaryotes, composed of several marine and freshwater groups. However, the evolutionary relationships among these groups are unclear due to conflicting inferences between morphological and molecular phylogenies. Here, we have inferred the evolutionary relationships among marine and freshwater species in order to better understand the importance of the marine-freshwater boundary on the historical diversification patterns of cryptomonads. We have constructed improved molecular phylogenies by taking into account rate variation both across sites and across sequences (covarion substitutions), and by analysing the vast majority of publicly available cryptomonad 18S rRNA sequences and related environmental phylotypes. The resulting phylogenies included 55 sequences, and revealed two novel freshwater cryptomonad clades (CRY1 and CRY2) and a large hidden diversity of cryptomonads. CRY1 was placed deeply within the cryptomonad phylogeny together with all the major freshwater lineages (i.e. Goniomonas and Cryptomonas), while CRY2 was placed within a lineage of marine species identified as Plagioselmis-like with the aid of a new sequence generated from a cultured species. The inferred phylogenies suggest only few successful marine-freshwater transitions over the history of cryptomonads. Most of the transitions seem to have occurred from marine to fresh waters, but re-colonizations of marine habitats have also taken place. This implies that the differences in the biogeophysical conditions between marine and fresh waters constitute a substantial barrier for the cross-colonization of these environments by cryptomonads.

  13. Selenium Accumulation in Unicellular Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris and Its Effects on Antioxidant Enzymes and Content of Photosynthetic Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Huang, Zhi; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (≤75 mg L−1) positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L−1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L−1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health. PMID:25375113

  14. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 μg L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 μg L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 μg L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris.

  15. Selenium accumulation in unicellular green alga Chlorella vulgaris and its effects on antioxidant enzymes and content of photosynthetic pigments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Sun

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (≤ 75 mg L(-1 positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L-1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L-1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health.

  16. Macroevolution via secondary endosymbiosis: a Neo-Goldschmidtian view of unicellular hopeful monsters and Darwin's primordial intermediate form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutschera, U; Niklas, K J

    2008-08-01

    Seventy-five years ago, the geneticist Richard Goldschmidt hypothesized that single mutations affecting development could result in major phenotypic changes in a single generation to produce unique organisms within animal populations that he called "hopeful monsters". Three decades ago, Sarah P. Gibbs proposed that photosynthetic unicellular micro-organisms like euglenoids and dinoflagellates are the products of a process now called "secondary endosymbiosis" (i.e., the evolution of a chloroplast surrounded by three or four membranes resulting from the incorporation of a eukaryotic alga by a eukaryotic heterotrophic host cell). In this article, we explore the evidence for Goldschmidt's "hopeful monster" concept and expand the scope of this theory to include the macroevolutionary emergence of organisms like Euglena and Chlorarachnion from secondary endosymbiotic events. We argue that a Neo-Goldschmidtian perspective leads to the conclusion that cell chimeras such as euglenids and dinoflagellates, which are important groups of phytoplankton in freshwater and marine ecosystems, should be interpreted as "successful monsters". In addition, we argue that Charles Darwin had euglenoids (infusoria) in mind when he speculated on the "primordial intermediate form", although his Proto-Euglena-hypothesis for the origin of the last common ancestor of all forms of life is no longer acceptable.

  17. Cadmium-mediated resistance to metals and antibiotics in a cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Pandey, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium-resistant strains of the cyanobacterium Nostoc calcicola were isolated through the step-wise transfer of the organism to higher levels of the metal. One of the Cd-resistant strains (CDsup(r)-10) showed cross-resistance to antibiotics like neomycin (1 ..mu..g/ml), chloramphenicol (3 ..mu..g/ml) but not to streptomycin. The Cd-resistant strain also tolerated elevated levels of metals such as zinc 20 ppm) and mercury (1 ppm). The stability of the metal-resistance required the presence of Cd/sup 2 +/ ions in the growth medium. It is suggested that metal resistance may also be determined by gene(s) on the antibiotic resistance plasmids in cyanobacteria.

  18. The hmp chemotaxis cluster regulates gliding in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozy, Loralyn M; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-04-01

    Many bacteria are capable of movement over surfaces without flagella or pili; they glide. Nostoc punctiforme is a cyanobacterium that differentiates specialized gliding filaments called hormogonia, but the mechanism underlying their movement is currently unknown. Risser et al. characterize the hormogonia motility and polysaccharide (hmp) locus that encodes proteins homologous to well-studied chemotaxis systems. All but one of the genes in the locus were required for gliding motility and each protein localized as a ring near the cell junction. One protein, the CheA homologue HmpE, was capable of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to the CheY homologue HmpB. This study reveals the hmp locus as an important regulator of gliding and highlights N. punctiforme as a model for understanding gliding motility in a complex multicellular bacterium. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Bergman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA, proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay, even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms.

  20. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Oku

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1, as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  1. Genetic transformation of marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. CC9311 (Cyanophyceae) by electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaxin; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2013-03-01

    Synechococcus sp. CC9311 is a marine cyanobacterium characterized by type IV chromatic acclimation (CA). A genetic transformation system was developed as a first step to elucidate the molecular mechanism of CA. The results show that Synechococcus sp. CC9311 cells were sensitive to four commonly used antibiotics: ampicillin, kanamycin, spectinomycin, and chloramphenicol. An integrative plasmid to disrupt the putative phycoerythrin lyase gene mpeV, using a kanamycin resistance gene as selectable marker, was constructed by recombinant polymerase chain reaction. The plasmid was then transformed into Synechococcus sp. CC9311 via electroporation. High transformation efficiency was achieved at a field strength of 2 kV/cm. DNA analysis showed that mpeV was fully disrupted following challenge of the transformants with a high concentration of kanamycin. In addition, the transformants that displayed poor growth on agar SN medium could be successfully plated on agarose SN medium.

  2. Manganese acquisition is facilitated by PilA in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Jacob J; Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is an essential element required by cyanobacteria, as it is an essential part of the oxygen-evolving center of photosystem II. In the presence of atmospheric oxygen, manganese is present as manganese oxides, which have low solubility and consequently provide low bioavailability. It is unknown if cyanobacteria are able to utilize these manganese sources, and what mechanisms may be employed to do so. Recent evidence suggests that type IV pili in non-photosynthetic bacteria facilitate electron donation to extracellular electron acceptors, thereby enabling metal acquisition. Our present study investigates whether PilA1 (major pilin protein of type IV pili) enables the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6808 to access to Mn from manganese oxides. We present physiological and spectroscopic data, which indicate that the presence of PilA1 enhances the ability of cyanobacteria to grow on manganese oxides. These observations suggest a role of PilA1-containing pili in cyanobacterial manganese acquisition.

  3. Enhanced production of biomass, pigments and antioxidant capacity of a nutritionally important cyanobacterium Nostochopsis lobatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Usha; Pandey, J

    2008-07-01

    A diazotrophic cyanobacterium Nostochopsis lobatus was evaluated for enhanced production of biomass, pigments and antioxidant capacity. N. lobatus showed potentially high antioxidant capacity (46.12 microM AEAC) with significant improvement under immobilized cell cultures (87.05 microM AEAC). When a mixture of P and Fe was supplemented, biomass, pigments, nutritive value and antioxidant capacity increased substantially at pH 7.8. When considered separately, P appeared to be a better supplement than Fe for the production of biomass, chlorophyll and carotenoids. However, for phycocyanin, phycoerythrin, nutritive value and antioxidant capacity, Fe appeared more effective than P. Our study indicates N. lobatus to be a promising bioresource for enhanced production of nutritionally rich biomass, pigments and antioxidants. The study also suggests that P and Fe are potentially effective supplements for scale-up production for commercial application.

  4. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  5. Heterologous expression of an algal hydrogenase in a hetero-cystous cyanobacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorsten Heidorn; Peter Lindblad [Dept. of Physiological Botany, Uppsala University, V illavagen 6, SE-752 36 Uppsala, (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    For the expression of an active algal [FeFe] hydrogenase in the hetero-cystous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase gene hydA1 and the accessory genes hydEF and hydG are to be introduced into the cyano-bacterial cells. The genes were amplified by PCR from EST clones, cloned into the cloning vector pBluescript SK+ and sequenced. An expression vector for multi-cistronic cloning, based on pSCR202, was constructed and for a functional test GFP was inserted as a reporter gene. The GFP construct was transformed into Nostoc punctiforme A TCC 29133 by electroporation and expression of GFP was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. (authors)

  6. Phycobiliprotein accumulation in cyanobacterium Nostoc linckia and modification of antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana VALUTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with iron(III coordination compounds with Schiff bases as ligands and their impact on phycobiliprotein accumulation by cyanobacterium Nostoc linckia. Stimulatory effect depends on the applied dose and in case of three compounds, the concentration 20 mg/L was determined as one with moderate intensity. Lower concentrations resulted in an increase of the phycobiliprotein synthesis. There was found a significant positive correlation between phycobiliprotein content and ABTS (2.2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid assay values displayed by aqueous extracts from Nostoc linckia biomass cultivated in nutrient medium with these coordination compounds. Hence, it is possible to modify the antioxidant activity of Nostoc biomass by applying low concentrations of chemical stimuli.

  7. Composition and occurrence of lipid droplets in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peramuna, Anantha; Summers, Michael L

    2014-12-01

    Inclusions of neutral lipids termed lipid droplets (LDs) located throughout the cell were identified in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme by staining with lipophylic fluorescent dyes. LDs increased in number upon entry into stationary phase and addition of exogenous fructose indicating a role for carbon storage, whereas high-light stress did not increase LD numbers. LD accumulation increased when nitrate was used as the nitrogen source during exponential growth as compared to added ammonia or nitrogen-fixing conditions. Analysis of isolated LDs revealed enrichment of triacylglycerol (TAG), α-tocopherol, and C17 alkanes. LD TAG from exponential phase growth contained mainly saturated C16 and C18 fatty acids, whereas stationary phase LD TAG had additional unsaturated fatty acids characteristic of whole cells. This is the first characterization of cyanobacterial LD composition and conditions leading to their production. Based upon their abnormally large size and atypical location, these structures represent a novel sub-organelle in cyanobacteria.

  8. BMAA Inhibits Nitrogen Fixation in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntzon, Lotta; Erasmie, Sven; Celepli, Narin; Eriksson, Johan; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce a range of secondary metabolites, one being the neurotoxic non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), proposed to be a causative agent of human neurodegeneration. As for most cyanotoxins, the function of BMAA in cyanobacteria is unknown. Here, we examined the effects of BMAA on the physiology of the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. Our data show that exogenously applied BMAA rapidly inhibits nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), even at micromolar concentrations, and that the inhibition was considerably more severe than that induced by combined nitrogen sources and most other amino acids. BMAA also caused growth arrest and massive cellular glycogen accumulation, as observed by electron microscopy. With nitrogen fixation being a process highly sensitive to oxygen species we propose that the BMAA effects found here may be related to the production of reactive oxygen species, as reported for other organisms. PMID:23966039

  9. Anoxygenic photosynthetic hydrogen production and electron transport in the cyanobacterium oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, C; Schowanek, D; Slooten, L; Walravens, N

    1986-01-01

    The induction of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica by sulfide was shown to involve the synthesis of a "sulfide oxidizing factor"; this factor, partly adsorbed on the thylakoid membrane, can be recovered in the soluble phase and is active also on membranes from oxygenically grown cells. The factor is required for sulfide dependent light-induced hydrogen evolution. It accelerates electron transport from sulfide to the electron donor of photosystem I, P700, in membranes from cells in which anoxygenic photosynthesis is induced. The plastiquinone analogue DBMIB does not inhibit electron transport to P700 but accelerates it. The analogue might promote cyclic electron transport involving P700, thus preventing electrons to reach hydrogenase.

  10. Genetic Basis for Geosmin Production by the Water Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium, Anabaena ucrainica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geosmin is a common, musty-smelling sesquiterpene, principally produced by cyanobacteria. Anabaena ucrainica (Schhorb. Watanabe, a water bloom-forming cyanobacterium, is the geosmin producer responsible for odor problems in Dianchi and Erhai lakes in China. In this study, the geosmin synthase gene (geo of A. ucrainica and its flanking regions were identified and cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and genome walking. The geo gene was found to be located in a transcription unit with two cyclic nucleotide-binding protein genes (cnb. The two cnb genes were highly similar and were predicted members of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP receptor protein/fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Crp–Fnr family. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses implied that the evolution of the geosmin genes involved a horizontal gene transfer process in cyanobacteria. These genes showed a close relationship to 2-methylisoborneol genes in origin and evolution.

  11. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differences in energy transfer of a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, grown in different cultivation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Kenta; Aikawa, Shimpei; Yokono, Makio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Currently, cyanobacteria are regarded as potential biofuel sources. Large-scale cultivation of cyanobacteria in seawater is of particular interest because seawater is a low-cost medium. In the present study, we examined differences in light-harvesting and energy transfer processes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 grown in different cultivation media, namely modified A medium (the optimal growth medium for Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002) and f/2 (a seawater medium). The concentrations of nitrate and phosphate ions were varied in both media. Higher nitrate ion and/or phosphate ion concentrations yielded high relative content of phycobilisome. The cultivation medium influenced the energy transfers within phycobilisome, from phycobilisome to photosystems, within photosystem II, and from photosystem II to photosystem I. We suggest that the medium also affects charge recombination at the photosystem II reaction center and formation of a chlorophyll-containing complex.

  13. Trimethylated homoserine functions as the major compatible solute in the globally significant oceanic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pade, Nadin; Michalik, Dirk; Ruth, Wolfgang; Belkin, Natalia; Hess, Wolfgang R; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Hagemann, Martin

    2016-11-15

    The oceanic N2-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp. form extensive surface blooms and contribute significantly to marine carbon and nitrogen cycles in the oligotrophic subtropical and tropical oceans. Trichodesmium grows in salinities from 27 to 43 parts per thousand (ppt), yet its salt acclimation strategy remains enigmatic because the genome of Trichodesmium erythraeum strain IMS101 lacks all genes for the biosynthesis of any known compatible solute. Using NMR and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy, we identified the main compatible solute in T. erythraeum strain IMS101 as the quaternary ammonium compound N,N,N-trimethyl homoserine (or homoserine betaine) and elucidated its biosynthetic pathway. The identification of this compatible solute explains how Trichodesmium spp. can thrive in the marine system at varying salinities and provides further insight into the diversity of microbial salt acclimation.

  14. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanène Badri

    Full Text Available The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation

  15. Cellular responses and bioremoval of nonylphenol by the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii 1113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Nadezda; Zaytseva, Tatyana; Kuzikova, Irina

    2017-07-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is extensively used in agricultural, industrial and household applications. Moreover, NP is the major breakdown product of the nonionic surfactants, nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), the most widely used group of surfactants. Nonylphenol is persistent in the environment, highly toxic to aquatic organisms and is a potential endocrine disruptor. NP and NPEOs have been identified as priority hazardous substances under the Environmental Quality Standards Directive 2013/39/EU and are referred to in the list of substances of particular risk to the Baltic Sea. The toxicity of NP to the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii 1113 isolated from the eastern Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea and the bioremoval of NP by P. agardhii were studied. NP in concentrations > 0.4 mg L- 1 suppressed cyanobacterial growth. The median effective concentration of NP for P. agardhii after 4 days of treatment (EC50) was 1.5 mg L- 1. The removal of NP from the culture medium was primarily due to abiotic processes and biodegradation by the cyanobacterium rather than sorption by the cells. NP significantly increased the photosynthetic pigments, extracellular proteins and soluble exopolysaccharides content. The cyanobacterial growth inhibition was accompanied by the increased synthesis of microcystin dm-RR and of the odorous metabolites, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), by P. agardhii 1113. NP also notably increased the microcystin released into the environment. Increased levels of extracellular proteins, soluble exopolysaccharides, microcystins and odorous metabolites may affect the microbial loop in aquatic ecosystems. An increased level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was indicative of the formation of free radicals in P. agardhii under NP stress, whereas increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and proline indicated the occurrence of a scavenging mechanism.

  16. Sorption and desorption studies of chromium(VI) from nonviable cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, V.K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)], E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ernet.in; Rastogi, A. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2008-06-15

    This communication presents results pertaining to the sorptive and desorptive studies carried out on chromium(VI) removal onto nonviable freshwater cyanobacterium (Nostoc muscorum) biomass. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of chromium(VI), such as the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of biosorbent, the contact time with the biosorbent, the temperature for the removal of chromium, the effect of light metal ions and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of chromium on to cyanobacterial species obeyed both the first and the second-order rate equation and the experimental data showed good fit with both the Langmuir and freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity was 22.92 mg/g at 25 {sup o}C and pH 3.0. The adsorption process was endothermic and the values of thermodynamic parameters of the process were calculated. Various properties of the cyanobacterium, as adsorbent, explored in the characterization part were chemical composition of the adsorbent, surface area calculation by BET method and surface functionality by FTIR. Sorption-desorption of chromium into inorganic solutions and distilled water were observed and this indicated the biosorbent could be regenerated using 0.1 M HNO{sub 3} and EDTA with upto 80% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Thus, this study demonstrated that the cyanobacterial biomass N. muscorum could be used as an efficient biosorbent for the treatment of chromium(VI) bearing wastewater.

  17. Temporal Gene Expression of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira in Response to Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Nauts, Robin; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira is resistant to ionising radiation. The cellular mechanisms underlying this radiation resistance are, however, still largely unknown. Therefore, additional molecular analysis was performed to investigate how these cells can escape from, protect against, or repair the radiation damage. Arthrospira cells were shortly exposed to different doses of 60Co gamma rays and the dynamic response was investigated by monitoring its gene expression and cell physiology at different time points after irradiation. The results revealed a fast switch from an active growth state to a kind of 'survival modus' during which the cells put photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation on hold and activate pathways for cellular protection, detoxification, and repair. The higher the radiation dose, the more pronounced this global emergency response is expressed. Genes repressed during early response, suggested a reduction of photosystem II and I activity and reduced tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycles, combined with an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). For reactive oxygen species detoxification and restoration of the redox balance in Arthrospira cells, the results suggested a powerful contribution of the antioxidant molecule glutathione. The repair mechanisms of Arthrospira cells that were immediately switched on, involve mainly proteases for damaged protein removal, single strand DNA repair and restriction modification systems, while recA was not induced. Additionally, the exposed cells showed significant increased expression of arh genes, coding for a novel group of protein of unknown function, also seen in our previous irradiation studies. This observation confirms our hypothesis that arh genes are key elements in radiation resistance of Arthrospira, requiring further investigation. This study provides new insights into phasic response and the cellular pathways involved in the radiation resistance of

  18. Long-term adaptive response to high-frequency light signals in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Dunaliella salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Charlotte; Hartmann, Philipp; Rabouille, Sophie; Talec, Amelie; Bernard, Olivier; Sciandra, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Productivity of microalgal cultivation processes is tightly related to photosynthetic efficiency, and therefore to light availability at the cell scale. In an agitated, highly turbid suspension,the light signal received by a single phytoplankton cell moving in a dense culture is a succession of flashes. The growth characteristics of microalgae under such dynamic light conditions are thus fundamental information to understand nonlinear properties of the photosynthetic process and to improve cultivation process design and operation. Studies of the long term consequences of dynamic illumination regime on photosynthesis require a very specific experimental set-up where fast varying signals are applied on the long term. In order to investigate the growth response of the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Dunaliella salina (Chlorophyceae) to intermittent light exposure, different light regimes using LEDs with the same average total light dose were applied in continuous cultures. Flashing light with different durations of light flashes (△t of 30 s, 15 s, 2 s and 0.1 s) followed by dark periods of variable length (0.67 ≤ L:D ≤ 2) yielding flash frequencies in the range 0.017-5 Hz, were compared to continuous illumination. Specific growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, lipid productivity and elemental composition were measured on two duplicates for each irradiance condition. The different treatments of intermittent light led to specific growth rates ranging from 0.25 to 0.93 day(-1) . While photosynthetic efficiency was enhanced with increased flash frequency, no significant differences were observed in the particular carbon and chlorophyll content. Pigment analysis showed that within this range of flash frequency, cells progressively photoacclimated to the average light intensity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Identification of the n-1 fatty acid as an antibacterial constituent from the edible freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Naoya; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Sugawa, Takao; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Nostoc verrucosum occurs in cool, clear streams and its gelatinous colonies, called "ashitsuki," have been eaten in ancient Japan. Its ethanolic extract was found to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria and activity-guided fractionation yielded an unusual n-1 fatty acid, (9Z,12Z)-9,12,15-hexadecatrienoic acid (1), as one of the active principles. It inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus at MIC 64 μg/mL.

  20. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    OpenAIRE

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant micr...

  1. Diel Vertical Movements of the Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria terebriformis in a Sulfide-Rich Hot Spring Microbial Mat †

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a thermophilic cyanobacterium, carried out a diel vertical movement pattern in Hunter's Hot Springs, Oreg. Throughout most daylight hours, populations of O. terebriformis covered the surface of microbial mats in the hot spring outflows below an upper temperature limit of 54°C. Upon darkness trichomes moved downward by gliding motility into the substrate to a depth of 0.5 to 1.0 mm, where the population remained until dawn. At dawn the population rapidly returned to...

  2. Primary Structure and Carbohydrate Binding Specificity of a Potent Anti-HIV Lectin Isolated from the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii

    OpenAIRE

    SATO,Yuichiro; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2007-01-01

    The primary structure of a lectin,designated OAA, isolated from thefreshwater cyanobacterium, Oscillatoriaagardhii NIES-204, was determined by thecombination of Edman degradation andESI-mass spectrometry. OAA is apolypeptide (MW 13,925) consisting of twotandem repeats. Interestingly, each repeatsequence of OAA showed a high degree ofsimilarity to those of a myxobacterium,Myxococcus xanthus hemagglutinin(MBHA), and a marine red alga Eucheumaserra lectin (ESA-2). A systematic bindingassay with ...

  3. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória B-Béres

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrospermopsin (CYN is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control. Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds.

  4. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANJANA TRIPATHI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripathi R, Dhuldhaj UP, Singh S. 2012. Short Communication: Effects of temperature on growth, pigment composition and protein content of an Antarctic Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 134-137. Effect of temperature variation on biomass accumulation, pigment composition and protein content were studied for the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune, isolated from Antarctica. Results confirmed the psychrotrophic behavior (optimum growth temperature 25◦C of the cyanobacterium. Low temperature increased the duration of lag phase and exponential growth phase. Maximum increase in biomass was recorded on 24th day at 25◦C and on 12th day at 50C. The downshift from 25 to 5◦C had almost negligible effect on chl a content. Maximal protein content was recorded for cultures growing at 50C on 12th day. The carotenoids/chl a ratio was maximum (2.48 at 50C on 9th day. It remained almost constant for cultures growing at 5 and 350C. There was an induction in protein synthesis following downshift in temperature from 25 to 5◦C.

  5. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  6. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga-Competition or Allelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-10-30

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds.

  7. Temperature dependence of nitrate reductase in the psychrophilic unicellular alga Koliella antarctica and the mesophilic alga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rigano, Vittoria Martino; Vona, Vincenza; Lobosco, Ornella; Carillo, Petronia; Lunn, John E; Carfagna, Simona; Esposito, Sergio; Caiazzo, Marianna; Rigano, Carmelo

    2006-07-01

    Temperature responses of nitrate reductase (NR) were studied in the psychrophilic unicellular alga, Koliella antarctica, and in the mesophilic species, Chlorella sorokiniana. Enzymes from both species were purified to near homogeneity by Blue Sepharose (Pharmacia, Uppsala, Sweden) affinity chromatography and high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography (MonoQ; Pharmacia; Uppsala, Sweden). Both enzymes have a subunit molecular mass of 100 kDa, and K. antarctica NR has a native molecular mass of 367 kDa. NR from K. antarctica used both NADPH and NADH, whereas NR from C. sorokiniana used NADH only. Both NRs used reduced methyl viologen (MVH) or benzyl viologen (BVH). In crude extracts, maximal NADH and MVH-dependent activities of cryophilic NR were found at 15 and 35 degrees C, respectively, and retained 77 and 62% of maximal activity, respectively, at 10 degrees C. Maximal NADH and MVH-dependent activities of mesophilic NR, however, were found at 25 and 45 degrees C, respectively, with only 33 and 23% of maximal activities being retained at 10 degrees C. In presence of 2 microM flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), activities of cryophilic NADH:NR and mesophilic NADH:NR were stable up to 25 and 35 degrees C, respectively. Arrhenius plots constructed with cryophilic and mesophilic MVH:NR rate constants, in both presence or absence of FAD, showed break points at 15 and 25 degrees C, respectively. Essentially, similar results were obtained for purified enzymes and for activities measured in crude extracts. Factors by which the rate increases by raising temperature 10 degrees C (Q10) and apparent activation energy (E(a)) values for NADH and MVH activities measured in enzyme preparations without added FAD differed slightly from those measured with FAD. Overall thermal features of the NADH and MVH activities of the cryophilic NR, including optimal temperatures, heat inactivation (with/without added FAD) and break-point temperature in Arrhenius plots, are all shifted by about

  8. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  9. Molecular exploration of the highly radiation resistant cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium able to use sunlight to release oxygen from water and remove carbon dioxide and nitrate from water. In addition, it is suited for human consumption (edible). For these traits, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the life support system MELiSSA for recycling oxygen, water, and food during future long-haul space missions. However, during such extended missions, Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 will be exposed to continuous artificial illumination and harmful cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate how Arthrospira will react and behave when exposed to such stress environment. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was exposed to high gamma rays doses in order to unravel in details the response of this bacterium following such stress. Test results showed that after acute exposure to high doses of 60Co gamma radiation upto 3200 Gy, Arthrospira filaments were still able to restart photosynthesis and proliferate normally. Doses above 3200 Gy, did have a detrimental effect on the cells, and delayed post-irradiation proliferation. The photosystem activity, measured as the PSII quantum yield immediately after irradiation, decreased significantly at radiation doses above 3200 Gy. Likewise through pigment content analysis a significant decrease in phycocyanin was observed following exposure to 3200 Gy. The high tolerance of this bacterium to 60Co gamma rays (i.e. ca. 1000x more resistant than human cells for example) raised our interest to investigate in details the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this amazing resistance. Optimised DNA, RNA and protein extraction methods and a new microarray chip specific for Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were developed to identify the global cellular and molecular response following exposure to 3200 Gy and 5000 Gy A total of 15,29 % and 30,18 % genes were found differentially expressed in RNA

  10. Comment on “Mathematical modeling of unicellular microalgae and cyanobacteria metabolism for biofuel production” by Baroukh et al. [Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015, 33:198–205

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2016-04-01

    This letter concerns an article recently published in Current Opinion in Biotechnology by Baroukh et al. entitled "Mathematical modeling of unicellular microalgae and cyanobacteria metabolism for biofuel production" (2015 Mar 26; 33:198-205). The issue we wish to bring to light is the authors’ claim that dynamic metabolic models including Hybrid Cybernetic Model (HCM) (Kim et al., 2008; Song et al., 2009) and Lumped HCM (L-HCM) (Song and Ramkrishna, 2010; 2011) are based on the balanced growth hypothesis so that they are unable to simulate the accumulation of intracellular metabolites. This is a misrepresentation of these models due to the following reasons.

  11. Metabolomic approach to optimizing and evaluating antibiotic treatment in the axenic culture of cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pei-pei; Jia, Shi-ru; Sun, Ying; Tan, Zhi-lei; Zhong, Cheng; Dai, Yu-jie; Tan, Ning; Shen, Shi-gang

    2014-09-01

    The application of antibiotic treatment with assistance of metabolomic approach in axenic isolation of cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme was investigated. Seven antibiotics were tested at 1-100 mg L(-1), and order of tolerance of N. flagelliforme cells was obtained as kanamycin > ampicillin, tetracycline > chloromycetin, gentamicin > spectinomycin > streptomycin. Four antibiotics were selected based on differences in antibiotic sensitivity of N. flagelliforme and associated bacteria, and their effects on N. flagelliforme cells including the changes of metabolic activity with antibiotics and the metabolic recovery after removal were assessed by a metabolomic approach based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with multivariate analysis. The results showed that antibiotic treatment had affected cell metabolism as antibiotics treated cells were metabolically distinct from control cells, but the metabolic activity would be recovered via eliminating antibiotics and the sequence of metabolic recovery time needed was spectinomycin, gentamicin > ampicillin > kanamycin. The procedures of antibiotic treatment have been accordingly optimized as a consecutive treatment starting with spectinomycin, then gentamicin, ampicillin and lastly kanamycin, and proved to be highly effective in eliminating the bacteria as examined by agar plating method and light microscope examination. Our work presented a strategy to obtain axenic culture of N. flagelliforme and provided a method for evaluating and optimizing cyanobacteria purification process through diagnosing target species cellular state.

  12. Anti-Chikungunya Viral Activities of Aplysiatoxin-Related Compounds from the Marine Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical filamentous marine cyanobacteria have emerged as a viable source of novel bioactive natural products for drug discovery and development. In the present study, aplysiatoxin (1, debromoaplysiatoxin (2 and anhydrodebromoaplysiatoxin (3, as well as two new analogues, 3-methoxyaplysiatoxin (4 and 3-methoxydebromoaplysiatoxin (5, are reported for the first time from the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum. The identification of the bloom-forming cyanobacterial strain was confirmed based on phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA sequences. Structural determination of the new analogues was achieved by extensive NMR spectroscopic analysis and comparison with NMR spectral data of known compounds. In addition, the antiviral activities of these marine toxins were assessed using Chikungunya virus (CHIKV-infected cells. Post-treatment experiments using the debrominated analogues, namely compounds 2, 3 and 5, displayed dose-dependent inhibition of CHIKV when tested at concentrations ranging from 0.1 µM to 10.0 µM. Furthermore, debromoaplysiatoxin (2 and 3-methoxydebromoaplysiatoxin (5 exhibited significant anti-CHIKV activities with EC50 values of 1.3 μM and 2.7 μM, respectively, and selectivity indices of 10.9 and 9.2, respectively.

  13. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Lürling

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43. We tested these compounds under similar conditions to facilitate comparisons. We hypothesized that for each compound, relatively low concentrations—i.e., 5–50 mg L−1, would reduce M. aeruginosa biomass. At these low concentrations, only L-lysine caused a decline in M. aeruginosa biomass at ≥4.3 mg L−1. F. mume extract was effective to do so at high concentrations, i.e., at ≥240 mg L−1, but the others were virtually non-effective. Low pH caused by organic acids is a probable explanation for the effect of F. mume extract. No complete wipe-outs of the experimental population were achieved as Photosystem II efficiency showed a recovery after six days. L-lysine may be effective at low concentrations—meaning low material costs. However, the effect of L-lysine seems relatively short-lived. Overall, the results of our study did not support the use of the tested plant extracts and amino-acid as promising candidates for curative application in M. aeruginosa bloom control.

  14. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis Controls Oxygenic Photosynthesis in a Cyanobacterium from a Sulfidic Spring

    KAUST Repository

    Klatt, Judith M.

    2015-03-15

    Before the Earth\\'s complete oxygenation (0.58 to 0.55 billion years [Ga] ago), the photic zone of the Proterozoic oceans was probably redox stratified, with a slightly aerobic, nutrient-limited upper layer above a light-limited layer that tended toward euxinia. In such oceans, cyanobacteria capable of both oxygenic and sulfide-driven anoxygenic photosynthesis played a fundamental role in the global carbon, oxygen, and sulfur cycle. We have isolated a cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena strain FS39, in which this versatility is still conserved, and we show that the transition between the two photosynthetic modes follows a surprisingly simple kinetic regulation controlled by this organism\\'s affinity for H2S. Specifically, oxygenic photosynthesis is performed in addition to anoxygenic photosynthesis only when H2S becomes limiting and its concentration decreases below a threshold that increases predictably with the available ambient light. The carbon-based growth rates during oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were similar. However, Pseudanabaena FS39 additionally assimilated NO3 - during anoxygenic photosynthesis. Thus, the transition between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis was accompanied by a shift of the C/N ratio of the total bulk biomass. These mechanisms offer new insights into the way in which, despite nutrient limitation in the oxic photic zone in the mid-Proterozoic oceans, versatile cyanobacteria might have promoted oxygenic photosynthesis and total primary productivity, a key step that enabled the complete oxygenation of our planet and the subsequent diversification of life.

  15. Recent insights into physiological responses to nutrients by the cylindrospermopsin producing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Michele A.; Willis, Anusuya; Chuang, Ann; Man, Xiao; Orr, Phil

    2017-11-01

    The harmful cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is a widespread species increasingly being recorded in freshwater systems around the world. Studies have demonstrated some key attributes of this species which may explain its global dominance. It has a high level of flexibility with respect to light and nutrients, being capable of growth under low and variable light conditions. However, it is the strategy with respect to nutrient utilization that has received more attention. Unlike many bloom forming species, the dominance of this species is not simply linked to higher nutrient loads. In fact it appears that it is more competitive when phosphorus and nitrogen availability is low and/or variable. An important component of this flexibility appears to be the result of within-population strain variability in responses to nutrients, as well as key physiological adaptations. Strain variability also appears to have an effect on the population-level cell quota of toxins, specifically cylindrospermopsins (CYNs). Field studies in Australia showed that populations had the highest proportion of toxic strains when dissolved inorganic phosphorus was added, resulting in stoichiometrically balanced nitrogen and phosphorus within the cells. These strategies are part of an arsenal of responses to environmental conditions, making it a challenging species to manage. However, our ability to improve bloom prediction will rely on a more detailed understanding of the complex physiology and ecology of this species.

  16. Carbon dioxide regulation of autotrophy and diazotrophy in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Santosh; Chouhan, Shweta; Kaithwas, Vipin; Maithil, Rakesh

    2013-12-01

    To understand how carbon and nitrogen metabolism are regulated in diazotrophically and non-diazotrophically grown cultures of the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum, we investigated the role of bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) in regulating diazotrophy and autotrophy. Results showed that HCO₃⁻ concentration up to 12 mol m⁻³ enhanced growth, specific growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, photosynthetic O₂ evolution and nitrogenase activity under diazotrophic growth conditions. The co-existence of different nitrogen sources in the growth medium further accelerate the examined parameters in the order of NO₃⁻

  17. Response of photosynthetic systems to salinity stress in the desert cyanobacterium Scytonema javanicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinlu; Jin, Liang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Cai, Wenkai; Liu, Yongding; Wang, Gaohong

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the physiological and biochemical characteristics of Scytonema javanicum, a pioneer species isolated from desert biological crusts, under salinity stress. Pigment analysis showed that salinity decreased chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, while low salinity increased carotenoid concentration and high salinity decreased carotenoid concentration. Salinity also inhibited CO2 assimilation rate and photosynthetic oxygen evolution in this cyanobacterium. Chlorophyll a fluorescence transient parameters (φPo, φEo, ψO, RC/ABS, RC/CS, PIABS, and PICS) were decreased under salt stress, while dVo/dto(Mo), Vj and φDo were increased. The decrease of ETRmax and Yield and the change of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients showed that salt stress had an important influence on photosynthesis. These results indicated that the effects of salinity stress on photosynthesis in S. javanicum may depend on the inhibition of electron transport and the inactivation of the reaction centers, but this inhibition may occur in the electron transport pathway at the PSII donor and acceptor sites.

  18. Sequential splicing of a group II twintron in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-18

    The marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is unusual in its genomic architecture as 40% of the genome is occupied by non-coding DNA. Although the majority of it is transcribed into RNA, it is not well understood why such a large non-coding genome fraction is maintained. Mobile genetic elements can contribute to genome expansion. Many bacteria harbor introns whereas twintrons, introns-in-introns, are rare and not known to interrupt protein-coding genes in bacteria. Here we show the sequential in vivo splicing of a 5400 nt long group II twintron interrupting a highly conserved gene that is associated with RNase HI in some cyanobacteria, but free-standing in others, including Trichodesmium erythraeum. We show that twintron splicing results in a putatively functional mRNA. The full genetic arrangement was found conserved in two geospatially distinct metagenomic datasets supporting its functional relevance. We further show that splicing of the inner intron yields the free intron as a true circle. This reaction requires the spliced exon reopening (SER) reaction to provide a free 5' exon. The fact that Trichodesmium harbors a functional twintron fits in well with the high intron load of these genomes, and suggests peculiarities in its genetic machinery permitting such arrangements.

  19. Envelope structure of Synechococcus sp. WH8113, a nonflagellated swimming cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reese Thomas S

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagellar filaments [1]. Waterbury et al. [15] discovered an exception, strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus that swim without flagella or visible changes in shape. Other species of cyanobacteria glide on surfaces [2,7]. The hypothesis that Synechococcus might swim using traveling surface waves [6,13] prompted this investigation. Results Using quick-freeze electron microscopy, we have identified a crystalline surface layer that encloses the outer membrane of the motile strain Synechococcus sp. WH8113, the components of which are arranged in a rhomboid lattice. Spicules emerge in profusion from the layer and extend up to 150 nm into the surrounding fluid. These spicules also send extensions inwards to the inner cell membrane where motility is powered by an ion-motive force [17]. Conclusion The envelope structure of Synechococcus sp. WH8113 provides new constraints on its motile mechanism. The spicules are well positioned to transduce energy at the cell membrane into mechanical work at the cell surface. One model is that an unidentified motor embedded in the cell membrane utilizes the spicules as oars to generate a traveling wave external to the surface layer in the manner of ciliated eukaryotes.

  20. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  1. CRISPR/Cas9 mediated targeted mutagenesis of the fast growing cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Kristen E; Ungerer, Justin; Cobb, Ryan E; Zhao, Huimin; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-06-23

    As autotrophic prokaryotes, cyanobacteria are ideal chassis organisms for sustainable production of various useful compounds. The newly characterized cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973 is a promising candidate for serving as a microbial cell factory because of its unusually rapid growth rate. Here, we seek to develop a genetic toolkit that enables extensive genomic engineering of Synechococcus 2973 by implementing a CRISPR/Cas9 editing system. We targeted the nblA gene because of its important role in biological response to nitrogen deprivation conditions. First, we determined that the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 enzyme is toxic in cyanobacteria, and conjugational transfer of stable, replicating constructs containing the cas9 gene resulted in lethality. However, after switching to a vector that permitted transient expression of the cas9 gene, we achieved markerless editing in 100 % of cyanobacterial exconjugants after the first patch. Moreover, we could readily cure the organisms of antibiotic resistance, resulting in a markerless deletion strain. High expression levels of the Cas9 protein in Synechococcus 2973 appear to be toxic and result in cell death. However, introduction of a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system on a plasmid backbone that leads to transient cas9 expression allowed for efficient markerless genome editing in a wild type genetic background.

  2. A biliverdin-binding cyanobacteriochrome from the chlorophyll d-bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikawa, Rei; Nakajima, Takahiro; Aono, Yuki; Fushimi, Keiji; Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Itoh, Shigeru; Sato, Moritoshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-01-22

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are linear tetrapyrrole-binding photoreceptors in cyanobacteria that absorb visible and near-ultraviolet light. CBCRs are divided into two types based on the type of chromophore they contain: phycocyanobilin (PCB) or phycoviolobilin (PVB). PCB-binding CBCRs reversibly photoconvert at relatively long wavelengths, i.e., the blue-to-red region, whereas PVB-binding CBCRs reversibly photoconvert at shorter wavelengths, i.e., the near-ultraviolet to green region. Notably, prior to this report, CBCRs containing biliverdin (BV), which absorbs at longer wavelengths than do PCB and PVB, have not been found. Herein, we report that the typical red/green CBCR AM1_1557 from the chlorophyll d-bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina can bind BV almost comparable to PCB. This BV-bound holoprotein reversibly photoconverts between a far red light-absorbing form (Pfr, λmax = 697 nm) and an orange light-absorbing form (Po, λmax = 622 nm). At room temperature, Pfr fluoresces with a maximum at 730 nm. These spectral features are red-shifted by 48~77 nm compared with those of the PCB-bound domain. Because the absorbance of chlorophyll d is red-shifted compared with that of chlorophyll a, the BV-bound AM1_1557 may be a physiologically relevant feature of A. marina and is potentially useful as an optogenetic switch and/or fluorescence imager.

  3. Theoretical investigation of biomass productivities achievable in solar rectangular photobioreactors for the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruvost, Jeremy; Cornet, J F; Goetz, Vincent; Legrand, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Modeling was done to simulate whole-year running of solar rectangular photobioreactors (PBRs). Introducing the concept of ideal reactor, the maximal biomass productivity that could be achieved on Earth on nitrate as N-source was calculated. Two additional factors were also analyzed with respect to dynamic calculations over the whole year: the effect of PBR location and the effects of given operating conditions on the resulting decrease in productivity compared with the ideal one. Simulations were conducted for the cyanobacterium Arthospira platensis, giving an ideal productivity (upper limit) in the range 55-60 tX ha(-1) year(-1) for a sun tracking system (and around 35-40 tX ha(-1) year(-1) for a fixed horizontal PBR). For an implantation in France (Nantes, west coast), the modification in irradiation conditions resulted in a decrease in biomass productivity of 40%. Various parameters were investigated, with special emphasis on the influence of the incident angle of solar illumination on resulting productivities, affecting both light capture and light transfer inside the bulk culture. It was also found that with appropriate optimization of the residence time as permitted by the model, productivities close to maximal could be achieved for a given location. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. Regulation of the scp Genes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803--What is New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheregi, Otilia; Funk, Christiane

    2015-08-12

    In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there are five genes encoding small CAB-like (SCP) proteins, which have been shown to be up-regulated under stress. Analyses of the promoter sequences of the scp genes revealed the existence of an NtcA binding motif in two scp genes, scpB and scpE. Binding of NtcA, the key transcriptional regulator during nitrogen stress, to the promoter regions was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The metabolite 2-oxoglutarate did not increase the affinity of NtcA for binding to the promoters of scpB and scpE. A second motif, the HIP1 palindrome 5' GGCGATCGCC 3', was detected in the upstream regions of scpB and scpC. The transcription factor encoded by sll1130 has been suggested to recognize this motif to regulate heat-responsive genes. Our data suggest that HIP1 is not a regulatory element within the scp genes. Further, the presence of the high light regulatory (HLR1) motif was confirmed in scpB-E, in accordance to their induced transcriptions in cells exposed to high light. The HLR1 motif was newly discovered in eight additional genes.

  5. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  6. Bioprocess Engineering Aspects of Biopolymer Production by the Cyanobacterium Spirulina Strain LEB 18

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    Roberta Guimarães Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biopolymers can replace environmentally damaging plastics derived from petrochemicals. We investigated biopolymer synthesis by the cyanobacterium Spirulina strain LEB 18. Autotrophic culture used unmodified Zarrouk medium or modified Zarrouk medium in which the NaNO3 content was reduced to 0.25 g L−1 and the NaHCO3 content reduced to 8.4 g L−1 or increased to 25.2 g L−1. Heterotrophic culture used modified Zarrouk medium containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 with the NaHCO3 replaced by 0.2 g L−1, 0.4 g L−1, or 0.6 g L−1 of glucose (C6H12O6 or sodium acetate (CH3COONa. Mixotrophic culture used modified Zarrouk medium containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 plus 16.8 g L−1 NaHCO3 with the addition of 0.2 g L−1, 0.4 g L−1, or 0.6 g L−1 of glucose or sodium acetate. The highest biopolymer yield was 44% when LEB 18 was growing autotrophically in media containing 0.25 g L−1 NaNO3 and 8.4 g L−1 NaHCO3.

  7. Merocyclophanes C and D from the Cultured Freshwater Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. (UIC 10110).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Daniel S; Chen, Wei-Lun; Lantvit, Daniel D; Zhang, Xiaoli; Krunic, Aleksej; Burdette, Joanna E; Eustaquio, Alessandra; Orjala, Jimmy

    2017-04-28

    Merocyclophanes C and D (1 and 2) were isolated from the cell extract of the cultured cyanobacterium UIC 10110. The structures were determined by one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and confirmed by 2D NMR techniques. The absolute configurations were determined using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. Merocyclophanes C and D represent the first known analogues of the merocyclophane core structure, a recently discovered scaffold of [7,7] paracyclophanes characterized by an α-branched methyl at C-1/C-14; 1 and 2 showed antiproliferative activity against the MDA-MB-435 cell line with IC50 values of 1.6 and 0.9 μM, respectively. Partial 16S analysis determined UIC 10110 to be a Nostoc sp., and it was found to clade with UIC 10062 Nostoc sp., the only other strain known to produce merocyclophanes. The genome of UIC 10110 was sequenced, and a biosynthetic gene cluster was identified that is proposed to encode type I and type III polyketide synthases that are potentially responsible for production of the merocyclophanes; however, further experiments will be required to verify the true function of the gene cluster. The gene cluster provides a genetic basis for the observed structural differences of the [7,7] paracyclophane core structures.

  8. Anti-MRSA-acting carbamidocyclophanes H-L from the Vietnamese cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. CAVN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisitsch, Michael; Harmrolfs, Kirsten; Pham, Hang T L; Heiden, Stefan E; Füssel, Anna; Wiesner, Christoph; Pretsch, Alexander; Swiatecka-Hagenbruch, Monika; Niedermeyer, Timo H J; Müller, Rolf; Mundt, Sabine

    2015-03-01

    The methanol extract of the Vietnamese freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. CAVN2 exhibited cytotoxic effects against MCF-7 and 5637 cancer cell lines as well as against nontumorigenic FL and HaCaT cells and was active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis indicated the presence of over 60 putative cyclophane-like compounds in an antimicrobially active methanol extract fraction. A paracyclophanes-focusing extraction and separation methodology led to the isolation of 5 new carbamidocyclophanes (1-5) and 11 known paracyclophanes (6-16). The structures and their stereochemical configurations were elucidated by a combination of spectrometric and spectroscopic methods including HRMS, 1D and 2D NMR analyses and detailed comparative CD analysis. The newly described monocarbamoylated [7.7]paracyclophanes (1, 2, 4 and 5) differ by a varying degree of chlorination in the side chains. Carbamidocyclophane J (3) is the very first reported carbamidocyclophane bearing a single halogenation in both butyl residues. Based on previous studies a detailed phylogenetic examination of cyclophane-producing cyanobacteria was carried out. The biological evaluation of 1-16 against various clinical pathogens highlighted a remarkable antimicrobial activity against MRSA with MICs of 0.1-1.0 μM, and indicated that the level of antibacterial activity is related to the presence of carbamoyl moieties.

  9. Structural Elucidation and Molecular Docking of a Novel Antibiotic Compound from Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niveshika; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun K.; Singh, Angad K.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are rich source of array of bioactive compounds. The present study reports a novel antibacterial bioactive compound purified from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 using various chromatographic techniques viz. thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Further characterization was done using electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESIMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and predicted structure of bioactive compound was 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin - 4 - ylmethoxy) -5, 8, 13, 16–tetraaza–hexacene - 2, 3 dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA). Structure of EMTAHDCA clearly indicated that it is a novel compound that was not reported in literature or natural product database. The compound exhibited growth inhibiting effects mainly against the gram negative bacterial strains and produced maximum zone of inhibition at 150 μg/mL concentration. The compound was evaluated through in silico studies for its ability to bind 30S ribosomal fragment (PDB ID: 1YRJ, 1MWL, 1J7T, and 1LC4) and OmpF porin protein (4GCP, 4GCQ, and 4GCS) which are the common targets of various antibiotic drugs. Comparative molecular docking study revealed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for these selected targets in comparison to a number of most commonly used antibiotics. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind the active sites on the proteins and 30S ribosomal fragments where the antibiotic drugs generally bind indicated that it is functionally similar to the commercially available drugs. PMID:27965634

  10. Nostopeptolide plays a governing role during cellular differentiation of the symbiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaimer, Anton; Helfrich, Eric J N; Hinrichs, Katrin; Guljamow, Arthur; Ishida, Keishi; Hertweck, Christian; Dittmann, Elke

    2015-02-10

    Nostoc punctiforme is a versatile cyanobacterium that can live either independently or in symbiosis with plants from distinct taxa. Chemical cues from plants and N. punctiforme were shown to stimulate or repress, respectively, the differentiation of infectious motile filaments known as hormogonia. We have used a polyketide synthase mutant that accumulates an elevated amount of hormogonia as a tool to understand the effect of secondary metabolites on cellular differentiation of N. punctiforme. Applying MALDI imaging to illustrate the reprogramming of the secondary metabolome, nostopeptolides were identified as the predominant difference in the pks2(-) mutant secretome. Subsequent differentiation assays and visualization of cell-type-specific expression of nostopeptolides via a transcriptional reporter strain provided evidence for a multifaceted role of nostopeptolides, either as an autogenic hormogonium-repressing factor or as a chemoattractant, depending on its extracellular concentration. Although nostopeptolide is constitutively expressed in the free-living state, secreted levels dynamically change before, during, and after the hormogonium differentiation phase. The metabolite was found to be strictly down-regulated in symbiosis with Gunnera manicata and Blasia pusilla, whereas other metabolites are up-regulated, as demonstrated via MALDI imaging, suggesting plants modulate the fine-balanced cross-talk network of secondary metabolites within N. punctiforme.

  11. Structural elucidation and molecular docking of a novel antibiotic compound from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niveshika No Name

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are rich source of array of bioactive compounds. The present study reports a novel antibacterial bioactive compound purified from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 using various chromatographic techniques viz. thin layer chromatography (TLC and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Further characterization was done using electrospray ionisation mass spectroscopy (ESIMS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and predicted structure of bioactive compound was 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin - 4 - ylmethoxy -5, 8, 13, 16 – tetraaza – hexacene - 2, 3 dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA. Structure of EMTAHDCA clearly indicated that it is a novel compound that was not reported in literature or natural product database. The compound exhibited growth inhibiting effects mainly against the gram negative bacterial strains and produced maximum zone of inhibition at 150 μg/mL concentration. The compound was evaluated through in silico studies for its ability to bind 30S ribosomal fragment (PDB ID: 1YRJ, 1MWL, 1J7T and 1LC4 and OmpF porin protein (4GCP, 4GCQ and 4GCS which are the common targets of various antibiotic drugs. Comparative molecular docking study revealed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for these selected targets in comparison to a number of most commonly used antibiotics. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind the active sites on the proteins and 30S ribosomal fragments where the antibiotic drugs generally bind indicated that it is functionally similar to the commercially available drugs.

  12. A novel alpha-amylase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Sosa, Francisco M; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2010-03-01

    Little information is yet available on the alpha-amylases of cyanobacteria. Here, the presence of an alpha-amylase in the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119 is first demonstrated. A gene (amy1) encoding a cytoplasmic alpha-amylase (Amy1) protein has been identified, cloned, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells. The recombinant protein is a 56.7-kDa monomer, which has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The substrate specificity and end product analyses confirm that it is a calcium-dependent alpha-amylase enzyme, which exhibits its maximum activity at 31 degrees C and at pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Amy1 protein breaks down mainly starch, is also able to cleave glycogen and dextrin, and exhibits no activity against xylan or pullulan. So the enzyme cannot efficiently attack the maltodextrins with degrees of polymerization below that of maltooctaose. Maltotriose, maltose, and maltotetraose are the major products of the enzymatic reaction with starch as substrate. The enzyme shows a very high turnover number against soluble potato starch (3,420 +/- 270 s(-1)), as compared with other alpha-amylases reported in the literature. The high catalytic efficiency and relatively low optimum temperature of the Nostoc Amy1 protein make this previously unexplored group of cyanobacterial enzymes of great interest for further physiological studies and industrial applications.

  13. Anoxygenic photosynthesis controls oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from a sulfidic spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M; Al-Najjar, Mohammad A A; Yilmaz, Pelin; Lavik, Gaute; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-03-01

    Before the Earth's complete oxygenation (0.58 to 0.55 billion years [Ga] ago), the photic zone of the Proterozoic oceans was probably redox stratified, with a slightly aerobic, nutrient-limited upper layer above a light-limited layer that tended toward euxinia. In such oceans, cyanobacteria capable of both oxygenic and sulfide-driven anoxygenic photosynthesis played a fundamental role in the global carbon, oxygen, and sulfur cycle. We have isolated a cyanobacterium, Pseudanabaena strain FS39, in which this versatility is still conserved, and we show that the transition between the two photosynthetic modes follows a surprisingly simple kinetic regulation controlled by this organism's affinity for H2S. Specifically, oxygenic photosynthesis is performed in addition to anoxygenic photosynthesis only when H2S becomes limiting and its concentration decreases below a threshold that increases predictably with the available ambient light. The carbon-based growth rates during oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis were similar. However, Pseudanabaena FS39 additionally assimilated NO3 (-) during anoxygenic photosynthesis. Thus, the transition between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis was accompanied by a shift of the C/N ratio of the total bulk biomass. These mechanisms offer new insights into the way in which, despite nutrient limitation in the oxic photic zone in the mid-Proterozoic oceans, versatile cyanobacteria might have promoted oxygenic photosynthesis and total primary productivity, a key step that enabled the complete oxygenation of our planet and the subsequent diversification of life. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64.

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    D P Singh

    Full Text Available This study deals with anilofos tolerance and its mineralization by the common rice field cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PUPCCC 64. The organism tolerated anilofos up to 25 mg L(-1. The herbicide caused inhibitory effects on photosynthetic pigments of the test organism in a dose-dependent manner. The organism exhibited 60, 89, 96, 85 and 79% decrease in chlorophyll a, carotenoids, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, respectively, in 20 mg L(-1 anilofos on day six. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase increased by 1.04 to 1.80 times over control cultures in presence of 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. Glutathione content decreased by 26% while proline content was unaffected by 20 mg L(-1 anilofos. The test organism showed intracellular uptake and metabolized the herbicide. Uptake of herbicide by test organism was fast during initial six hours followed by slow uptake until 120 hours. The organism exhibited maximum anilofos removal at 100 mg protein L(-1, pH 8.0 and 30°C. Its growth in phosphate deficient basal medium in the presence of anilofos (2.5 mg L(-1 indicated that herbicide was used by the strain PUPCCC 64 as a source of phosphate.

  15. Crystal Structure of Allophycocyanin from Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. A09DM.

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    Ravi Raghav Sonani

    Full Text Available Isolated phycobilisome (PBS sub-assemblies have been widely subjected to X-ray crystallography analysis to obtain greater insights into the structure-function relationship of this light harvesting complex. Allophycocyanin (APC is the phycobiliprotein always found in the PBS core complex. Phycocyanobilin (PCB chromophores, covalently bound to conserved Cys residues of α- and β- subunits of APC, are responsible for solar energy absorption from phycocyanin and for transfer to photosynthetic apparatus. In the known APC structures, heterodimers of α- and β- subunits (known as αβ monomers assemble as trimer or hexamer. We here for the first time report the crystal structure of APC isolated from a marine cyanobacterium (Phormidium sp. A09DM. The crystal structure has been refined against all the observed data to the resolution of 2.51 Å to Rwork (Rfree of 0.158 (0.229 with good stereochemistry of the atomic model. The Phormidium protein exists as a trimer of αβ monomers in solution and in crystal lattice. The overall tertiary structures of α- and β- subunits, and trimeric quaternary fold of the Phormidium protein resemble the other known APC structures. Also, configuration and conformation of the two covalently bound PCB chromophores in the marine APC are same as those observed in fresh water cyanobacteria and marine red algae. More hydrophobic residues, however, constitute the environment of the chromophore bound to α-subunit of the Phormidium protein, owing mainly to amino acid substitutions in the marine protein.

  16. Characterization and evolution of tetrameric photosystem I from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp TS-821.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Boekema, Egbert J; Bruce, Barry D

    2014-03-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a reaction center associated with oxygenic photosynthesis. Unlike the monomeric reaction centers in green and purple bacteria, PSI forms trimeric complexes in most cyanobacteria with a 3-fold rotational symmetry that is primarily stabilized via adjacent PsaL subunits; however, in plants/algae, PSI is monomeric. In this study, we discovered a tetrameric form of PSI in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp TS-821 (TS-821). In TS-821, PSI forms tetrameric and dimeric species. We investigated these species by Blue Native PAGE, Suc density gradient centrifugation, 77K fluorescence, circular dichroism, and single-particle analysis. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of native membranes confirms the presence of the tetrameric PSI structure prior to detergent solubilization. To investigate why TS-821 forms tetramers instead of trimers, we cloned and analyzed its psaL gene. Interestingly, this gene product contains a short insert between the second and third predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenetic analysis based on PsaL protein sequences shows that TS-821 is closely related to heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, some of which also have a tetrameric form of PSI. These results are discussed in light of chloroplast evolution, and we propose that PSI evolved stepwise from a trimeric form to tetrameric oligomer en route to becoming monomeric in plants/algae.

  17. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

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    Sabine Matallana-Surget

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation.

  18. Nitrogen stress induced changes in the marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria willei BDU 130511.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Saha, Sushanta; Uma, Lakshmanan; Subramanian, Gopalakrishnan

    2003-08-01

    Exclusion of combined nitrogen (NaNO3) from the growth medium caused certain changes in metabolic processes leading to cessation in growth of the non-heterocystous, non nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium Oscillatoria willei BDU 130511. But antioxidative enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, helped the organism to survive the nitrogen stress. Prominent effects observed during nitrogen starvation/limitation were: (i) reduction of major and accessory photosynthetic pigments, (ii) impairment of photosynthesis due to loss of one major Rubisco isoenzyme, (iii) reduced synthesis of lipids and fatty acids, (iv) modifications of protein synthesis leading to the repression of three polypeptides and synthesis of two new polypeptides, (v) enhanced glutamine synthetase and reduced nitrate reductase activities, (vi) enhanced production of hydrogen peroxide and (vii) induced appearance of four new peroxidase isoenzymes. The observed metabolic changes were reversible, and the arrested growth under prolonged nitrogen deficiency could be fully restored upon subculturing in freshly prepared ASN III medium containing nitrogen (NaNO3). The present study demonstrates the capability of a non-nitrogen-fixer to withstand nitrogen stress making it an ecologically successful organism in the marine environment. The above pleiotropic effects of nitrogen deficiency also demonstrate that nitrogen plays a crucial role in growth and metabolism of marine cyanobacteria.

  19. Glycosylated Porphyra-334 and Palythine-Threonine from the Terrestrial Cyanobacterium Nostoc commune

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    Toshio Sakamoto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs are water-soluble UV-absorbing pigments, and structurally different MAAs have been identified in eukaryotic algae and cyanobacteria. In this study novel glycosylated MAAs were found in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune (N. commune. An MAA with an absorption maximum at 334 nm was identified as a hexose-bound porphyra-334 derivative with a molecular mass of 508 Da. Another MAA with an absorption maximum at 322 nm was identified as a two hexose-bound palythine-threonine derivative with a molecular mass of 612 Da. These purified MAAs have radical scavenging activities in vitro, which suggests multifunctional roles as sunscreens and antioxidants. The 612-Da MAA accounted for approximately 60% of the total MAAs and contributed approximately 20% of the total radical scavenging activities in a water extract, indicating that it is the major water-soluble UV-protectant and radical scavenger component. The hexose-bound porphyra-334 derivative and the glycosylated palythine-threonine derivatives were found in a specific genotype of N. commune, suggesting that glycosylated MAA patterns could be a chemotaxonomic marker for the characterization of the morphologically indistinguishable N. commune. The glycosylation of porphyra-334 and palythine-threonine in N. commune suggests a unique adaptation for terrestrial environments that are drastically fluctuating in comparison to stable aquatic environments.

  20. Far-red light promotes biofilm formation in the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A; Li, Yaqiong; Postier, Bradley L; Blankenship, Robert E; Chen, Min

    2017-10-20

    Light quantity and quality promotes ecological-niche differentiation of photosynthetic organisms. The existence of cyanobacteria capable of performing photosynthesis using red-shifted chlorophylls, chlorophyll d and f, reduces competition between species in light-limiting environments, and permits them to thrive in niches enriched in far-red light. We examined global transcriptome changes due to changing the culture light conditions in Acaryochloris marina, a chlorophyll d-containing cyanobacterium. We identified the functional category of 'photosynthesis' as the most down-regulated and the category of 'cell wall/membrane biogenesis' as the most up-regulated through a functional enrichment analysis of genes differentially expressed. Within the category of 'cell wall/membrane biogenesis', genes encoding glycosysltransferases accumulated the most in response to far-red light. Further experimental results confirmed that cells grown under far-red light form biofilms with a significantly increased adherence compared to cells grown under white light. Taken together, these results indicate that Acaryochloris marina shifts its lifestyle from a planktonic state under white light to an immobilized state under far-red light. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The stringent response regulates adaptation to darkness in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Rachel D; Higgins, Sean A; Flamholz, Avi; Nichols, Robert J; Savage, David F

    2016-08-16

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus relies upon photosynthesis to drive metabolism and growth. During darkness, Synechococcus stops growing, derives energy from its glycogen stores, and greatly decreases rates of macromolecular synthesis via unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that the stringent response, a stress response pathway whose genes are conserved across bacteria and plant plastids, contributes to this dark adaptation. Levels of the stringent response alarmone guanosine 3'-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate (ppGpp) rise after a shift from light to dark, indicating that darkness triggers the same response in cyanobacteria as starvation in heterotrophic bacteria. High levels of ppGpp are sufficient to stop growth and dramatically alter many aspects of cellular physiology, including levels of photosynthetic pigments and polyphosphate, DNA content, and the rate of translation. Cells unable to synthesize ppGpp display pronounced growth defects after exposure to darkness. The stringent response regulates expression of a number of genes in Synechococcus, including ribosomal hibernation promoting factor (hpf), which causes ribosomes to dimerize in the dark and may contribute to decreased translation. Although the metabolism of Synechococcus differentiates it from other model bacterial systems, the logic of the stringent response remains remarkably conserved, while at the same time having adapted to the unique stresses of the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  2. Serinolamides and Lyngbyabellins from an Okeania sp. Cyanobacterium Collected from the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitbois, Julie G; Casalme, Loida O; Lopez, Julius Adam V; Alarif, Walied M; Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Yoshimura, Erina; Nogata, Yasuyuki; Umezawa, Taiki; Matsuda, Fuyuhiko; Okino, Tatsufumi

    2017-10-27

    NMR- and MS-guided fractionation of an extract of an Okeania sp. marine cyanobacterium, collected from the Red Sea, led to the isolation of four new metabolites, including serinolamides C (1) and D (2) and lyngbyabellins O (3) and P (4), together with the three known substances lyngbyabellins F (5) and G (6) and dolastatin 16 (7). The planar structures of the new compounds were determined using NMR and MS analyses. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were determined by Marfey's analysis of their hydrolysates. The absolute configuration of 3 was ascertained by chiral-phase chromatography of degradation products, while that of 4 was determined by comparison to 3 and 5. The cytotoxic and antifouling activities of these compounds were evaluated using MCF7 breast cancer cells and Amphibalanus amphitrite larvae, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, and 7 exhibited strong antifouling activity, and 3 and 7 were not cytotoxic. A structure-activity relationship was observed for the cytotoxicity of the lyngbyabellins with the presence of a side chain (4 is more active than 3) leading to greater activity. For the antifouling activity, the acyclic form without a side chain (3) was the most active.

  3. Engineered xylose utilization enhances bio-products productivity in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Chi; Xiong, Wei; Paddock, Troy; Carrieri, Damian; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Ungerer, Justin; Hank Juo, Suh-Hang; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2015-06-12

    Hydrolysis of plant biomass generates a mixture of simple sugars that is particularly rich in glucose and xylose. Fermentation of the released sugars emits CO2 as byproduct due to metabolic inefficiencies. Therefore, the ability of a microbe to simultaneously convert biomass sugars and photosynthetically fix CO2 into target products is very desirable. In this work, the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803, was engineered to grow on xylose in addition to glucose. Both the xylA (xylose isomerase) and xylB (xylulokinase) genes from Escherichia coli were required to confer xylose utilization, but a xylose-specific transporter was not required. Introducing xylAB into an ethylene-producing strain increased the rate of ethylene production in the presence of xylose. Additionally, introduction of xylAB into a glycogen-synthesis mutant enhanced production of keto acids. Moreover, isotopic tracer studies found that nearly half of the carbon in the excreted keto acids was derived from the engineered xylose metabolism, while the remainder was derived from CO2 fixation.

  4. Feeding and filtration rates of zooplankton (rotifers and cladocerans) fed toxic cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Alfredo; Sarma, S S S; Nandini, S

    2014-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa is generally dominant in many Mexican freshwater ecosystems interacting with zooplankton species. Hence, feeding and filtration rates were quantified for three cladoceran (Daphnia pulex, Moina micrura and Ceriodaphnia dubia) and three rotifer species (Brachionus calyciflorus, Brachionus rubens and Plationus patulus) using sonicated M. aeruginosa alone or mixed with Scenedesmus acutus in different proportions (25, 50 and 75%, based on cell density), offering a combined initial density of 100,000 cells·ml(-1). All the three cladoceran species ingested M. aeruginosa (100-300 cells ind(-1) min(-1)) when fed exclusively with cyanobacterium. When green alga offered as exclusive diet, the number of cells ingested by the tested cladocerans varied from 80 to 400 cells ind(-1) min(-1). Compared to cladocerans, rotifers in general consumed much lower quantity (rotifer species, P. patulus filtered highest volume (100 μl ind(-1) min(-1) from mixed diets containing higher proportions (50 or 75%) of M. aeruginosa. Thus, there were species-specific differences in the filtration and feeding rates of zooplankton when offered mixed diets of green algae and toxic cyanobacteria. These probably explain the coexistence of different zooplankton species in Microcystis-dominant waterbodies.

  5. Semicontinuous cultivation of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis in a closed photobioreactor

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    C. C. Reichert

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of photosynthetic microorganisms such as the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis has been studied by researchers in many countries because these organisms can produce products with industrial potential. We studied the specific growth rate (µx, day-1 and productivity (Px, in mg/L/day of Spirulina platensis biomass, dry weight basis of two S. platensis strains (LEB-52 and Paracas growing in aerated semicontinuous culture in two-liter Erlenmeyer flasks for 90 days (2160 h at 30°C under 2500 lux of illumination in a 12 h photoperiod. Independent of the S. platensis strain used we found that low biomass concentrations (0.50 g/L and high renewal rates (50% v/v resulted in a high specific growth rate (µx = 0.111 day-1 and high productivity (Px = 42.3 mg/L/day. These values are two to four times higher than those obtained in simple batch cultivation and indicate that the semicontinuous cultivation of S. platensis is viable.

  6. Effect of growth conditions on the hydrogen production with cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CH3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Chung [Institute of Clinical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 34, Chung-Chie Road, Sha Lu, Taichung 433 (China); Fan, Shin-Huei; Chiang, Char-Lin; Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 402 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Cyanobacteria could use sugars as carbon source and reductant to produce hydrogen by nitrogenase. However, oxygen is also produced during photosynthesis and it is an inhibitor of the enzyme nitrogenase. Filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. CH{sub 3} could use sugars as substrate to produce molecular hydrogen anaerobically. The production activity was dependent on growth phases. It was found that the cells at sub-stage of late-log phase had better ability to produce hydrogen than at log phase. In such case, oxygen content was too low to be detected to inhibit hydrogen production. Among different kinds of sugar, fructose and glucose had the best performance for producing hydrogen. Hydrogen could be accumulated to 0.6 mmol (in 40 ml head space) in 100 h from 1000 ppm fructose. Increasing light intensities from 65 to 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} would enhance hydrogen production to 0.8 mmol. Under illumination of 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 2000 ppm fructose, 1.7 mmol of hydrogen could be accumulated. When fructose content was higher than 2000 ppm, cells could not produce more hydrogen at all. (author)

  7. Biosafety of biotechnologically important microalgae: intrinsic suicide switch implementation in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

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    Helena Čelešnik

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, photosynthetic autotrophic cyanobacteria have attracted interest for biotechnological applications for sustainable production of valuable metabolites. Although biosafety issues can have a great impact on public acceptance of cyanobacterial biotechnology, biosafety of genetically modified cyanobacteria has remained largely unexplored. We set out to incorporate biocontainment systems in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Plasmid-encoded safeguards were constructed using the nonspecific nuclease NucA from Anabaena combined with different metal-ion inducible promoters. In this manner, conditional lethality was dependent on intracellular DNA degradation for regulated autokilling as well as preclusion of horizontal gene transfer. In cells carrying the suicide switch comprising the nucA gene fused to a variant of the copM promoter, efficient inducible autokilling was elicited. Parallel to nuclease-based safeguards, cyanobacterial toxin/antitoxin (TA modules were examined in biosafety switches. Rewiring of Synechocystis TA pairs ssr1114/slr0664 and slr6101/slr6100 for conditional lethality using metal-ion responsive promoters resulted in reduced growth, rather than cell killing, suggesting cells could cope with elevated toxin levels. Overall, promoter properties and translation efficiency influenced the efficacy of biocontainment systems. Several metal-ion promoters were tested in the context of safeguards, and selected promoters, including a nrsB variant, were characterized by beta-galactosidase reporter assay.

  8. Changes in photosynthesis and pigmentation in an agp deletion mutant of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaoling; Wu, Qingyu; Wu, Guifang; Zhao, Nanming

    2003-03-01

    The agp gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in cyanobacterial glycogen synthesis. By in vitro DNA recombination technology, agp deletion mutant (agp-) of cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed. This mutation led to a complete absence of glycogen biosynthesis. As compared with WT (wild type), a 60% decrease in ratio of the c-phycocyanine/chlorophyll a and no significant change in the carotenoid/chlorophyll a were observed in agp- cells. The agp- mutant had 38% less photosynthetic capacity when grown in light over 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Under lower light intensity, the final biomass of the mutant strain was only 1.1 times of that of the WT strain under mixotrophic condition after 6 d culture. Under higher light intensity, however, the final biomass of the WT strain under mixotrophic conditions was 3 times that of the mutant strain after 6 d culture and 1.5 times under photoautotrophic conditions. The results indicate that there is a minimum requirement for glycogen synthesis for normal growth and development in cyanobacteria.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Judith M; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-09-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2 S: (i) H2 S accelerated the recovery of photosynthesis after prolonged exposure to darkness and anoxia. We suggest that this is possibly due to regulatory effects of H2 S on photosystem I components and/or on the Calvin cycle. (ii) H2 S concentrations of up to 210 μM temporarily enhanced the photosynthetic rates at low irradiance. Modelling showed that this enhancement is plausibly based on changes in the light-harvesting efficiency. (iii) Above a certain light-dependent concentration threshold H2 S also acted as an inhibitor. Intriguingly, this inhibition was not instant but occurred only after a specific time interval that decreased with increasing light intensity. That photosynthesis is most sensitive to inhibition at high light intensities suggests that H2 S inactivates an intermediate of the oxygen evolving complex that accumulates with increasing light intensity. We discuss the implications of these three effects of H2 S in the context of cyanobacterial photosynthesis under conditions with diurnally fluctuating light and H2 S concentrations, such as those occurring in microbial mats and biofilms. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Transcriptional analysis of cell growth and morphogenesis in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias (Streptophyta, with emphasis on the role of expansin

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    Leliaert Frederik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptophyte green algae share several characteristics of cell growth and cell wall formation with their relatives, the embryophytic land plants. The multilobed cell wall of Micrasterias denticulata that rebuilds symmetrically after cell division and consists of pectin and cellulose, makes this unicellular streptophyte alga an interesting model system to study the molecular controls on cell shape and cell wall formation in green plants. Results Genome-wide transcript expression profiling of synchronously growing cells identified 107 genes of which the expression correlated with the growth phase. Four transcripts showed high similarity to expansins that had not been examined previously in green algae. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that these genes are most closely related to the plant EXPANSIN A family, although their domain organization is very divergent. A GFP-tagged version of the expansin-resembling protein MdEXP2 localized to the cell wall and in Golgi-derived vesicles. Overexpression phenotypes ranged from lobe elongation to loss of growth polarity and planarity. These results indicate that MdEXP2 can alter the cell wall structure and, thus, might have a function related to that of land plant expansins during cell morphogenesis. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of M. denticulata as a unicellular model system, in which cell growth mechanisms have been discovered similar to those in land plants. Additionally, evidence is provided that the evolutionary origins of many cell wall components and regulatory genes in embryophytes precede the colonization of land.

  11. The success of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in freshwaters is enhanced by the combined effects of light intensity and temperature

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    Sylvia Bonilla

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters are thought to be a consequence of the combined effects of anthropogenic eutrophication and climate change. It is expected that climate change will affect water mixing regimes that alter the water transparency and ultimately the light environment for phytoplankton. Blooms of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii are expanding from tropical towards temperate regions. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this expansion, including an increase in water temperature due to climate change and the high phenotypic plasticity of the species that allows it to exploit different light environments. We performed an analysis based on eight lakes in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions to examine the distribution and abundance of C. raciborskii in relation to water temperature and transparency. We then conducted a series of short-term factorial experiments that combined three temperatures and two light intensity levels using C. raciborskii cultures alone and in interaction with another cyanobacterium to identify its growth capacity. Our results from the field, in contrast to predictions, showed no differences in dominance (>40% to the total biovolume of C. raciborskii between climate regions. C. raciborskii was able to dominate the phytoplankton in a wide range of light environments (euphotic zone = 1.5 to 5 m, euphotic zone/mixing zone ratio <0.5 to >1.5. Moreover, C. raciborskii was capable of dominating the phytoplankton at low temperatures (<15°C. Our experimental results showed that C. raciborskii growing in interaction was enhanced by the increase of the temperature and light intensity. C. raciborskii growth in high light intensities and at a wide range of temperatures, suggests that any advantage that this species may derive from climate change that favors its dominance in the phytoplankton is likely due to changes in the light environment rather than changes in

  12. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

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    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  13. Uptake of Pb(2+ )by a cyanobacterium belonging to the genus Synechocystis, isolated from East Kolkata Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanchita; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Thakur, Ashoke Ranjan

    2008-10-01

    East Kolkata Wetlands is a conserved wetland utilizing sewage and garbage, generated by Kolkata Municipal Corporation area for cultivation purpose. Cyanobacteria are the photosynthetic prokaryotes having bioremedial capacity. We have isolated a cyanobacterium from the sewage recycling fish-pond of East Kolkata Wetlands. Partial sequence of 16S rDNA gene of the isolated strain showed 100% similarity with that of genus Synechocystis. Isolated strain and Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 survived up to 300 mug ml(-1) Pb(2+ )and growth was completely inhibited at 400 mug ml(-1) Pb(2+). All experiments were carried out with 100 mug ml(-1) Pb(2+) in which growth was the maximum. 91.67% of the total Pb(2+) got adsorbed to the outer surface of the cell and 1% of the total Pb(2+) entered the cell of the isolated strain as estimated by atomic absorption spectrometry, but in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 72.72% adsorbed and 0.96% penetrated. Intracellular and periplasmic depositions of Pb(2+) were observed in both the strain. A filamentous structure developed outside the cell wall of the isolated cyanobacterium, but very little change was observed in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. ZiaR-SmtB like regulator gene was expressed in both the strains after Pb(2+) induction. The cDNA sequence of ZiaR of the isolated cyanobacterium shows 100% homology with that of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Upon Pb(2+) induction, expression of SOD gene increased. cDNA sequence of the SOD gene from the isolated strain showed 98% homology with that of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Enzymatic activity of catalase and SOD was also increased. No DNA damage was monitored upon induction with Pb(2+).

  14. Branchial Na+:K+:2Cl- cotransporter 1 and Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit in a brackish water-type ionocyte of the euryhaline freshwater white-rimmed stingray, Himantura signifer

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    Yuen K Ip

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Himantura signifer is a freshwater stingray which inhabits rivers in Southeast Asia. It can survive in brackish water but not seawater. In brackish water, it becomes partially ureosmotic, but how it maintains its plasma hypoionic to the external medium is enigmatic because of the lack of a rectal gland. Here, we report for the first time the expression of Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1 (nkcc1 in the gills of freshwater H. signifer, and its moderate up-regulation (~2-fold in response to brackish water (salinity 20 acclimation. The absence of the Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidation stress response kinase 1 interaction site from the N-terminus of H. signifer Nkcc1 suggested that it might not be effectively activated by stress kinases in response to salinity changes as in more euryhaline teleosts. The increased activity of Nkcc1 during salt excretion in brackish water would lead to an influx of Na+ into ionocytes, and the maintenance of intracellular Na+ homeostasis would need the cooperation of Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka. We demonstrated for the first time the expression of nkaα1, nkaα2 and nkaα3 in the gills of H. signifer, and the up-regulation of the mRNA expression of nkaα3 and the overall protein abundance of Nkaα in response to acclimation to brackish water. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of a sub-type of ionocyte, co-expressing Nkcc1 and Nkaα, near the base of the secondary lamellae in the gills of H. signifer acclimated to brackish water, but this type of ionocyte was absent from the gills of fish kept in fresh water. Hence, there could be a change in the function of the gills of H. signifer from salt absorption to salt excretion during brackish water acclimation in the absence of a functioning rectal gland.

  15. Branchial Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit in a brackish water-type ionocyte of the euryhaline freshwater white-rimmed stingray, Himantura signifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Yuen K; Hiong, Kum C; Wong, Samuel Z H; Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L; Soh, Melody M L; Chng, You R; Ong, Jasmine L Y; Wilson, Jonathan M; Chew, Shit F

    2013-01-01

    Himantura signifer is a freshwater stingray which inhabits rivers in Southeast Asia. It can survive in brackish water but not seawater. In brackish water, it becomes partially ureosmotic, but how it maintains its plasma hypoionic to the external medium is enigmatic because of the lack of a rectal gland. Here, we report for the first time the expression of Na(+):K(+):2Cl(-) cotransporter 1 (nkcc1) in the gills of freshwaterH. signifer, and its moderate up-regulation (~2-fold) in response to brackish water (salinity 20) acclimation. The absence of the Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidation stress response kinase 1 interaction site from the N-terminus of H. signifer Nkcc1 suggested that it might not be effectively activated by stress kinases in response to salinity changes as in more euryhaline teleosts. The increased activity of Nkcc1 during salt excretion in brackish water would lead to an influx of Na(+) into ionocytes, and the maintenance of intracellular Na(+) homeostasis would need the cooperation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (Nka). We demonstrated for the first time the expression of nkaα1, nkaα2 and nkaα3 in the gills of H. signifer, and the up-regulation of the mRNA expression of nkaα3 and the overall protein abundance of Nkaα in response to acclimation to brackish water. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of a sub-type of ionocyte, co-expressing Nkcc1 and Nkaα, near the base of the secondary lamellae in the gills of H. signifer acclimated to brackish water, but this type of ionocyte was absent from the gills of fish kept in fresh water. Hence, there could be a change in the function of the gills of H. signifer from salt absorption to salt excretion during brackish water acclimation in the absence of a functioning rectal gland.

  16. Branchial Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1 and Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit in a brackish water-type ionocyte of the euryhaline freshwater white-rimmed stingray, Himantura signifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Yuen K.; Hiong, Kum C.; Wong, Samuel Z. H.; Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L.; Soh, Melody M. L.; Chng, You R.; Ong, Jasmine L. Y.; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Chew, Shit F.

    2013-01-01

    Himantura signifer is a freshwater stingray which inhabits rivers in Southeast Asia. It can survive in brackish water but not seawater. In brackish water, it becomes partially ureosmotic, but how it maintains its plasma hypoionic to the external medium is enigmatic because of the lack of a rectal gland. Here, we report for the first time the expression of Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1 (nkcc1) in the gills of freshwaterH. signifer, and its moderate up-regulation (~2-fold) in response to brackish water (salinity 20) acclimation. The absence of the Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidation stress response kinase 1 interaction site from the N-terminus of H. signifer Nkcc1 suggested that it might not be effectively activated by stress kinases in response to salinity changes as in more euryhaline teleosts. The increased activity of Nkcc1 during salt excretion in brackish water would lead to an influx of Na+ into ionocytes, and the maintenance of intracellular Na+ homeostasis would need the cooperation of Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka). We demonstrated for the first time the expression of nkaα1, nkaα2 and nkaα3 in the gills of H. signifer, and the up-regulation of the mRNA expression of nkaα3 and the overall protein abundance of Nkaα in response to acclimation to brackish water. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of a sub-type of ionocyte, co-expressing Nkcc1 and Nkaα, near the base of the secondary lamellae in the gills of H. signifer acclimated to brackish water, but this type of ionocyte was absent from the gills of fish kept in fresh water. Hence, there could be a change in the function of the gills of H. signifer from salt absorption to salt excretion during brackish water acclimation in the absence of a functioning rectal gland. PMID:24339817

  17. Genome Sequence and Composition of a Tolyporphin-Producing Cyanobacterium-Microbial Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Rebecca-Ayme; Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Ran; Williams, Philip G.; Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Miller, Eric S.; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2017-07-28

    ABSTRACT

    The cyanobacterial culture HT-58-2 was originally described as a strain ofTolypothrix nodosawith the ability to produce tolyporphins, which comprise a family of distinct tetrapyrrole macrocycles with reported efflux pump inhibition properties. Upon reviving the culture from what was thought to be a nonextant collection, studies of culture conditions, strain characterization, phylogeny, and genomics have been undertaken. Here, HT-58-2 was shown by 16S rRNA analysis to closely align withBrasilonemastrains and not withTolypothrixisolates. Light, fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy revealed cyanobacterium filaments that are decorated with attached bacteria and associated with free bacteria. Metagenomic surveys of HT-58-2 cultures revealed a diversity of bacteria dominated byErythrobacteraceae, 97% of which arePorphyrobacterspecies. A dimethyl sulfoxide washing procedure was found to yield enriched cyanobacterial DNA (presumably by removing community bacteria) and sequence data sufficient for genome assembly. The finished, closed HT-58-2Cyano genome consists of 7.85 Mbp (42.6% G+C) and contains 6,581 genes. All genes for biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles (e.g., heme, chlorophylla, and phycocyanobilin) and almost all for cobalamin were identified dispersed throughout the chromosome. Among the 6,177 protein-encoding genes, coding sequences (CDSs) for all but two of the eight enzymes for conversion of glutamic acid to protoporphyrinogen IX also were found within one major gene cluster. The cluster also includes 10 putative genes (and one hypothetical gene) encoding proteins with

  18. Comparative genomic analyses of the cyanobacterium, Lyngbya aestuarii BL J, a powerful hydrogen producer.

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    Ankita eKothari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii is an important contributor to marine intertidal microbial mats system worldwide. The recent isolate L. aestuarii BL J, is an unusually powerful hydrogen producer. Here we report a morphological, ultrastructural and genomic characterization of this strain to set the basis for future systems studies and applications of this organism. The filaments contain circa 17 μm wide trichomes, composed of stacked disk-like short cells (2 μm long, encased in a prominent, laminated exopolysaccharide sheath. Cellular division occurs by transversal centripetal growth of cross-walls, where several rounds of division proceed simultaneously. Filament division occurs by cell self-immolation of one or groups of cells (necridial cells at the breakage point. Short, sheath-less, motile filaments (hormogonia are also formed. Morphologically and phylogenetically L. aestuarii belongs to a clade of important cyanobacteria that include members of the marine Trichodesmiun and Hydrocoleum genera, as well as terrestrial Microcoleus vaginatus strains, and alkalyphilic strains of Arthrospira. A draft genome of strain BL J was compared to those of other cyanobacteria in order to ascertain some of its ecological constraints and biotechnological potential. The genome had an average GC content of 41.1 %. Of the 6.87 Mb sequenced, 6.44 Mb was present as large contigs (>10,000 bp. It contained 6515 putative protein-encoding genes, of which, 43 % encode proteins of known functional role, 26 % corresponded to proteins with domain or family assignments, 19.6 % encode conserved hypothetical proteins, and 11.3 % encode apparently unique hypothetical proteins. The strain’s genome reveals its adaptations to a life of exposure to intense solar radiation and desiccation. It likely employs the storage compounds, glycogen and cyanophycin but no polyhydroxyalkanoates, and can produce the osmolytes, trehalose and glycine

  19. Arsenic Demethylation by a C·As Lyase in Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yu; Ye, Jun; Xue, Xi-Mei; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-12-15

    Arsenic, a ubiquitous toxic substance, exists mainly as inorganic forms in the environment. It is perceived that organoarsenicals can be demethylated and degraded into inorganic arsenic by microorganisms. Few studies have focused on the mechanism of arsenic demethylation in bacteria. Here, we investigated arsenic demethylation in a typical freshwater cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120. This bacterium was able to demethylate monomethylarsenite [MAs(III)] rapidly to arsenite [As(III)] and also had the ability to demethylate monomethylarsenate [MAs(V)] to As(III). The NsarsI encoding a C·As lyase responsible for MAs(III) demethylation was cloned from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and heterologously expressed in an As-hypersensitive strain Escherichia coli AW3110 (ΔarsRBC). Expression of NsarsI was shown to confer MAs(III) resistance through arsenic demethylation. The purified NsArsI was further identified and functionally characterized in vitro. NsArsI existed mainly as the trimeric state, and the kinetic data were well-fit to the Hill equation with K0.5 = 7.55 ± 0.33 μM for MAs(III), Vmax = 0.79 ± 0.02 μM min(-1), and h = 2.7. Both of the NsArsI truncated derivatives lacking the C-terminal 10 residues (ArsI10) or 23 residues (ArsI23) had a reduced ability of MAs(III) demethylation. These results provide new insights for understanding the important role of cyanobacteria in arsenic biogeochemical cycling in the environment.

  20. Highly plastic genome of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, a ubiquitous toxic freshwater cyanobacterium

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    Latifi Amel

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The colonial cyanobacterium Microcystis proliferates in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems and is exposed to changing environmental factors during its life cycle. Microcystis blooms are often toxic, potentially fatal to animals and humans, and may cause environmental problems. There has been little investigation of the genomics of these cyanobacteria. Results Deciphering the 5,172,804 bp sequence of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 has revealed the high plasticity of its genome: 11.7% DNA repeats containing more than 1,000 bases, 6.8% putative transposases and 21 putative restriction enzymes. Compared to the genomes of other cyanobacterial lineages, strain PCC 7806 contains a large number of atypical genes that may have been acquired by lateral transfers. Metabolic pathways, such as fermentation and a methionine salvage pathway, have been identified, as have genes for programmed cell death that may be related to the rapid disappearance of Microcystis blooms in nature. Analysis of the PCC 7806 genome also reveals striking novel biosynthetic features that might help to elucidate the ecological impact of secondary metabolites and lead to the discovery of novel metabolites for new biotechnological applications. M. aeruginosa and other large cyanobacterial genomes exhibit a rapid loss of synteny in contrast to other microbial genomes. Conclusion Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 appears to have adopted an evolutionary strategy relying on unusual genome plasticity to adapt to eutrophic freshwater ecosystems, a property shared by another strain of M. aeruginosa (NIES-843. Comparisons of the genomes of PCC 7806 and other cyanobacterial strains indicate that a similar strategy may have also been used by the marine strain Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 to adapt to other ecological niches, such as oligotrophic open oceans.

  1. Dependence of the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus on hydrogen peroxide scavenging microbes for growth at the ocean's surface.

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    J Jeffrey Morris

    Full Text Available The phytoplankton community in the oligotrophic open ocean is numerically dominated by the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, accounting for approximately half of all photosynthesis. In the illuminated euphotic zone where Prochlorococcus grows, reactive oxygen species are continuously generated via photochemical reactions with dissolved organic matter. However, Prochlorococcus genomes lack catalase and additional protective mechanisms common in other aerobes, and this genus is highly susceptible to oxidative damage from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH. In this study we showed that the extant microbial community plays a vital, previously unrecognized role in cross-protecting Prochlorococcus from oxidative damage in the surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean. Microbes are the primary HOOH sink in marine systems, and in the absence of the microbial community, surface waters in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean accumulated HOOH to concentrations that were lethal for Prochlorococcus cultures. In laboratory experiments with the marine heterotroph Alteromonas sp., serving as a proxy for the natural community of HOOH-degrading microbes, bacterial depletion of HOOH from the extracellular milieu prevented oxidative damage to the cell envelope and photosystems of co-cultured Prochlorococcus, and facilitated the growth of Prochlorococcus at ecologically-relevant cell concentrations. Curiously, the more recently evolved lineages of Prochlorococcus that exploit the surface mixed layer niche were also the most sensitive to HOOH. The genomic streamlining of these evolved lineages during adaptation to the high-light exposed upper euphotic zone thus appears to be coincident with an acquired dependency on the extant HOOH-consuming community. These results underscore the importance of (indirect biotic interactions in establishing niche boundaries, and highlight the impacts that community-level responses to stress may have in the ecological and evolutionary outcomes for co

  2. Water and CO₂ permeability of SsAqpZ, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 aquaporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaodong; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Gena, Patrizia; Liu, Chengwei; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Zhong, Shihua; Sun, Xiaoli; Zhu, Yanming; Katsuhara, Maki; Iwasaki, Ikuko; Kitagawa, Yoshichika; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Cyanobacteria possess Aquaporin-Z (AqpZ) membrane channels which have been suggested to mediate the water efflux underlying osmostress-inducible gene expression and to be essential for glucose metabolism under photomixotrophic growth. However, preliminary observations suggest that the biophy-sical properties of transport and physiological meaning of AqpZ in such photosynthetic microorganisms are not yet completely assessed. In this study, we used Xenopus laevis oocyte and proteoliposome systems to directly demonstrate the water permeability of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 aquaporin, SsAqpZ. By an in vitro assay of intracellular acidification in yeast cells, SsAqpZ was found to transport also CO2 . Consistent with this result, during the entire exponential phase of growth, Synechococcus SsAqpZ-null-mutant cells grew slower than the corresponding wild-type cells. This phenotype was stronger with higher levels of extracellular CO2 . In line with the conversion of CO2 gas into HCO3(-) ions under alkaline conditions, the impairment in growth of the SsAqpZ-null strain was weaker in more alkaline culture medium. Cyanobacterial SsAqpZ may exert a pleiotropic function in addition to the already reported roles in macronutrient homeostasis and osmotic-stress response as it appears to constitute an important pathway in CO2 uptake, a fundamental step in photosynthesis. Copyright © 2013 Soçiété Française des Microscopies and Soçiété de Biologie Cellulaire de France.

  3. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation.

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    Philipp eSpät

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth’s biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signalling, adaptation and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry towards the unbiased detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labelling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phosphoproteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2,382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2,111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 hours. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signalling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria.

  4. Isolation and characterization of the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleiras, Patrícia; Kellers, Petra; Lindblad, Peter; Styring, Stenbjörn; Magnuson, Ann

    2013-06-21

    In nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, hydrogen evolution is associated with hydrogenases and nitrogenase, making these enzymes interesting targets for genetic engineering aimed at increased hydrogen production. Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that expresses the uptake hydrogenase HupSL in heterocysts under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Little is known about the structural and biophysical properties of HupSL. The small subunit, HupS, has been postulated to contain three iron-sulfur clusters, but the details regarding their nature have been unclear due to unusual cluster binding motifs in the amino acid sequence. We now report the cloning and heterologous expression of Nostoc punctiforme HupS as a fusion protein, f-HupS. We have characterized the anaerobically purified protein by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. Our results show that f-HupS contains three iron-sulfur clusters. UV-visible absorption of f-HupS has bands ∼340 and 420 nm, typical for iron-sulfur clusters. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized f-HupS shows a narrow g = 2.023 resonance, characteristic of a low-spin (S = ½) [3Fe-4S] cluster. The reduced f-HupS presents complex EPR spectra with overlapping resonances centered on g = 1.94, g = 1.91, and g = 1.88, typical of low-spin (S = ½) [4Fe-4S] clusters. Analysis of the spectroscopic data allowed us to distinguish between two species attributable to two distinct [4Fe-4S] clusters, in addition to the [3Fe-4S] cluster. This indicates that f-HupS binds [4Fe-4S] clusters despite the presence of unusual coordinating amino acids. Furthermore, our expression and purification of what seems to be an intact HupS protein allows future studies on the significance of ligand nature on redox properties of the iron-sulfur clusters of HupS.

  5. Isolation and in silico analysis of Fe-superoxide dismutase in the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesheri, Minu; Kanchan, Swarna; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are known to endure various stress conditions due to the inbuilt potential for oxidative stress alleviation owing to the presence of an array of antioxidants. The present study shows that Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune possesses two antioxidative enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase that jointly cope with environmental stresses prevailing at its natural habitat. Native-PAGE analysis illustrates the presence of a single prominent isoform recognized as Fe-SOD and three distinct isoforms of catalase. The protein sequence of Fe-SOD in N. commune retrieved from NCBI protein sequence database was used for in silico analysis. 3D structure of N. commune was predicted by comparative modeling using MODELLER 9v11. Further, this model was validated for its quality by Ramachandran plot, ERRAT, Verify 3D and ProSA-web which revealed good structure quality of the model. Multiple sequence alignment showed high conservation in N and C-terminal domain regions along with all metal binding positions in Fe-SOD which were also found to be highly conserved in all 28 cyanobacterial species under study, including N. commune. In silico prediction of isoelectric point and molecular weight of Fe-SOD was found to be 5.48 and 22,342.98Da respectively. The phylogenetic tree revealed that among 28 cyanobacterial species, Fe-SOD in N. commune was the closest evolutionary homolog of Fe-SOD in Nostoc punctiforme as evident by strong bootstrap value. Thus, N. commune may serve as a good biological model for studies related to survival of life under extreme conditions prevailing at the Antarctic region. Moreover cyanobacteria may be exploited for biochemical and biotechnological applications of enzymatic antioxidants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced biohydrogen production by the N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis strain TISTR 8012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khetkorn, Wanthanee [Program of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-75120, Uppsala (Sweden); Lindblad, Peter [Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-75120, Uppsala (Sweden); Incharoensakdi, Aran [Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-12-15

    The efficiency of hydrogen production depends on several factors. We focused on external conditions leading to enhanced hydrogen production when using the N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from a rice paddy field in Thailand. In this study, we controlled key factors affecting hydrogen production such as cell age, light intensity, time of light incubation and source of carbon. Our results showed an enhanced hydrogen production when cells, at log phase, were adapted under N{sub 2}-fixing condition using 0.5% fructose as carbon source and a continuous illumination of 200 {mu}E m{sup -2} s{sup -1} for 12 h under anaerobic incubation. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 32 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg chl a{sup -1} h{sup -1}. This rate was higher than that observed in the model organisms Anabaena PCC 7120, Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Synechocystis PCC 6803. This higher production was likely caused by a higher nitrogenase activity since we observed an upregulation of nifD. The production did not increase after 12 h which was probably due to an increased activity of the uptake hydrogenase as evidenced by an increased hupL transcript level. Interestingly, a proper adjustment of light conditions such as intensity and duration is important to minimize both the photodamage of the cells and the uptake hydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that A. siamensis TISTR 8012 has a high potential for hydrogen production with the ability to utilize sugars as substrate to produce hydrogen. (author)

  7. Hopanoids play a role in stress tolerance and nutrient storage in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, J N; Morton, R; Kulkarni, G; Summers, M L; Newman, D K

    2017-01-01

    Hopanes are abundant in ancient sedimentary rocks at discrete intervals in Earth history, yet interpreting their significance in the geologic record is complicated by our incomplete knowledge of what their progenitors, hopanoids, do in modern cells. To date, few studies have addressed the breadth of diversity of physiological functions of these lipids and whether those functions are conserved across the hopanoid-producing bacterial phyla. Here, we generated mutants in the filamentous cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme, that are unable to make all hopanoids (shc) or 2-methylhopanoids (hpnP). While the absence of hopanoids impedes growth of vegetative cells at high temperature, the shc mutant grows faster at low temperature. This finding is consistent with hopanoids acting as membrane rigidifiers, a function shared by other hopanoid-producing phyla. Apart from impacting fitness under temperature stress, hopanoids are dispensable for vegetative cells under other stress conditions. However, hopanoids are required for stress tolerance in akinetes, a resting survival cell type. While 2-methylated hopanoids do not appear to contribute to any stress phenotype, total hopanoids and to a lesser extent 2-methylhopanoids were found to promote the formation of cyanophycin granules in akinetes. Finally, although hopanoids support symbiotic interactions between Alphaproteobacteria and plants, they do not appear to facilitate symbiosis between N. punctiforme and the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Collectively, these findings support interpreting hopanes as general environmental stress biomarkers. If hopanoid-mediated enhancement of nitrogen-rich storage products turns out to be a conserved phenomenon in other organisms, a better understanding of this relationship may help us parse the enrichment of 2-methylhopanes in the rock record during episodes of disrupted nutrient cycling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Lack of phylogeographic structure in the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa suggests global dispersal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke van Gremberghe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Free-living microorganisms have long been assumed to have ubiquitous distributions with little biogeographic signature because they typically exhibit high dispersal potential and large population sizes. However, molecular data provide contrasting results and it is far from clear to what extent dispersal limitation determines geographic structuring of microbial populations. We aimed to determine biogeographical patterns of the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. Being widely distributed on a global scale but patchily on a regional scale, this prokaryote is an ideal model organism to study microbial dispersal and biogeography. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phylogeography of M. aeruginosa was studied based on a dataset of 311 rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences sampled from six continents. Richness of ITS sequences was high (239 ITS types were detected. Genetic divergence among ITS types averaged 4% (maximum pairwise divergence was 13%. Preliminary analyses revealed nearly completely unresolved phylogenetic relationships and a lack of genetic structure among all sequences due to extensive homoplasy at multiple hypervariable sites. After correcting for this, still no clear phylogeographic structure was detected, and no pattern of isolation by distance was found on a global scale. Concomitantly, genetic differentiation among continents was marginal, whereas variation within continents was high and was mostly shared with all other continents. Similarly, no genetic structure across climate zones was detected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The high overall diversity and wide global distribution of common ITS types in combination with the lack of phylogeographic structure suggest that intercontinental dispersal of M. aeruginosa ITS types is not rare, and that this species might have a truly cosmopolitan distribution.

  9. Structural investigation of the antagonist LPS from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria planktothrix FP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillo, Sara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Bedini, Emiliano; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2014-03-31

    Cyanobacteria are aquatic and photosynthetic microorganisms, which contribute up to 30% of the yearly oxygen production on the earth. They have the distinction of being the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old, and are one of the largest and most important groups of bacteria on earth. Cyanobacteria are an emerging source of potentially pharmacologically active products and, among these, there are the lipopolysaccharides. Despite their significant and well documented activity, very little is known about the cyanobacteria lipopolysaccharides (LPS) structure. The aim of this work is to investigate the structure of the highly TLR4-antagonist lipopolysaccharide from the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria plankthotrix FP1. The LPS was purified and analysed by means of chemical analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The LPS was then degraded by Smith degradation, HF and acetic acid hydrolyses. All the obtained products were investigated in detail by chemical analysis, NMR spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The LPS consists of a high molecular mass and very complex molecule lacking Kdo and heptose residues, where the polysaccharide chain is mainly constituted by a backbone of 3-substituted α-l-rhamnose units. The core region is rich in galacturonic acid and mannose residues. Moreover a glycolipid portion, similar to Gram-negative lipid A, was identified. This was built up of a non phosphorylated (1'→6) linked glucosamine disaccharide, acylated with 3-hydroxylated fatty acids. In particular 3-hydroxypentadecanoic and 3-hydroxyesadecanoic acids were found, together with esadecanoic and tetradecanoic ones. Finally the presence of a galacturonic acid residue at 6-position of the distal glucosamine in place of the Kdo residue is suggested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Short RNA half-lives in the slow-growing marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA turnover plays an important role in the gene regulation of microorganisms and influences their speed of acclimation to environmental changes. We investigated whole-genome RNA stability of Prochlorococcus, a relatively slow-growing marine cyanobacterium doubling approximately once a day, which is extremely abundant in the oceans. Results Using a combination of microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR and a new fitting method for determining RNA decay rates, we found a median half-life of 2.4 minutes and a median decay rate of 2.6 minutes for expressed genes - twofold faster than that reported for any organism. The shortest transcript half-life (33 seconds) was for a gene of unknown function, while some of the longest (approximately 18 minutes) were for genes with high transcript levels. Genes organized in operons displayed intriguing mRNA decay patterns, such as increased stability, and delayed onset of decay with greater distance from the transcriptional start site. The same phenomenon was observed on a single probe resolution for genes greater than 2 kb. Conclusions We hypothesize that the fast turnover relative to the slow generation time in Prochlorococcus may enable a swift response to environmental changes through rapid recycling of nucleotides, which could be advantageous in nutrient poor oceans. Our growing understanding of RNA half-lives will help us interpret the growing bank of metatranscriptomic studies of wild populations of Prochlorococcus. The surprisingly complex decay patterns of large transcripts reported here, and the method developed to describe them, will open new avenues for the investigation and understanding of RNA decay for all organisms. PMID:20482874

  11. Overexpression of hlyB and mdh genes confers halotolerance in Fremyella diplosiphon, a freshwater cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, Behnam; Arumanayagam, AnithaChristy S; Enitan, Oluwatomisin; Mani, Arunmani; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Sitther, Viji

    2017-08-01

    Fremyella diplosiphon is a freshwater cyanobacterium that has great potential as a biofuel agent due to its ability to grow in low light intensity and acclimation to different wavelengths. To enhance its halotolerance for growth in 35gL-1 sodium chloride (NaCl), plasmids harboring hemolysin B (hlyB) and malate dehydrogenase (mdh) genes were transformed into wild type F. diplosiphon (WT-Fd33). Electroporation-mediated overexpression of the genes resulted in two transformants, HSF33-1 and HSF33-2, with 9- and 20-fold increases in hlyB and mdh transcript levels. In addition, up-regulation of proteins at the expected size ranges of 50-60kDa for HlyB and 40-50kDa for MDH was observed. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed a protein spot corresponding to HlyB in HSF33-1 with a significant MOWSE score of 164 and 3% sequence coverage, and a spot corresponding to MDH in HSF33-2 gave a significant MOWSE score of 124 with 10% sequence coverage. Physiological evaluation in BG11/HEPES medium and seawater adjusted to 35gL-1 NaCl confirmed that the transformants could thrive in high salinity with no loss of photosynthetic pigments. Results of the study indicate that overexpression of hlyB and mdh genes confer halotolerance in F. diplosiphon, thus maximizing its potential as a large-scale biofuel agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Using oxidized liquid and solid human waste as nutrients for Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Sergey V.; Kalacheva, Galina; Tirranen, Lyalya; Gribovskaya, Iliada

    At stationary terrestrial and space stations with closed and partially closed substance exchange not only plants, but also algae can regenerate atmosphere. Their biomass can be used for feeding Daphnia and Moina species, which, in their turn, serve as food for fish. In addition, it is possible to use algae for production of biological fuel. We suggested two methods of human waste mineralization: dry (evaporation with subsequent incineration in a muffle furnace) and wet (oxidation in a reactor using hydrogen peroxide). The research task was to prepare nutrient media for green alga Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Oscillatoria deflexa using liquid human waste mineralized by dry method, and to prepare media for chlorella on the basis of 1) liquid and 2) liquid and solid human waste mineralized by wet method. The algae were grown in batch culture in a climate chamber with the following parameters: illumination 7 klx, temperature 27-30 (°) C, culture density 1-2 g/l of dry weight. The control for chlorella was Tamiya medium, pH-5, and for oscillstoria — Zarrouk medium, pH-10. Maximum permissible concentrations of NaCl, Cl, urea (NH _{2}) _{2}CO, and native urine were established for algae. Missing ingredients (such as salts and acids) for experimental nutrient media were determined: their addition made it possible to obtain the biomass production not less than that in the control. The estimation was given of the mineral and biochemical composition of algae grown on experimental media. Microbiological test revealed absence of foreign microbial flora in experimental cultures.

  13. High Iron Requirement for Growth, Photosynthesis, and Low-light Acclimation in the Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, W. G.; Huntsman, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Iron is a critical nutrient in photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth in large regions of the ocean. Most of the iron in phytoplankton occurs in iron-containing proteins in the photosynthetic apparatus, and thus interactions among cellular iron, light, and growth rate are predicted. In agreement with this prediction, decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C) ratio needed to support a given growth rate by 2- to 3-fold in both a coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, and a coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris due to an increase in iron-containing photosynthetic units. However, although the light responses were similar, the cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher in the cyanobacterium than in the diatom, a pattern seen in other Syechococcus isolates and eukaryotic phytoplankton. Due to the high iron requirement for growth and low light acclimation, we might expect Synechococcus to be at a competitive disadvantage in many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean's deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM), where iron and light levels are low and lower-iron requiring eukaryotic algae typically dominate the phytoplankton biomass in the mid to lower DCM.

  14. Arabinogalactan proteins occur in the free-living cyanobacterium genus Nostoc and in plant-Nostoc symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Owen; Taylor, Oliver; Adams, David G; Knox, J Paul

    2012-10-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGP) are a diverse family of proteoglycans associated with the cell surfaces of plants. AGP have been implicated in a wide variety of plant cell processes, including signaling in symbioses. This study investigates the existence of putative AGP in free-living cyanobacterial cultures of the nitrogen-fixing, filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc punctiforme and Nostoc sp. strain LBG1 and at the symbiotic interface in the symbioses between Nostoc spp. and two host plants, the angiosperm Gunnera manicata (in which the cyanobacterium is intracellular) and the liverwort Blasia pusilla (in which the cyanobacterium is extracellular). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that three AGP glycan epitopes (recognized by monoclonal antibodies LM14, MAC207, and LM2) are present in free-living Nostoc cyanobacterial species. The same three AGP glycan epitopes are present at the Gunnera-Nostoc symbiotic interface and the LM2 epitope is detected during the establishment of the Blasia-Nostoc symbiosis. Bioinformatic analysis of the N. punctiforme genome identified five putative AGP core proteins that are representative of AGP classes found in plants. These results suggest a possible involvement of AGP in cyanobacterial-plant symbioses and are also suggestive of a cyanobacterial origin of AGP.

  15. The effects of the exopolysaccharide and growth rate on the morphogenesis of the terrestrial filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Cui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme, which contributes to carbon and nitrogen supplies in arid and semi-arid regions, adopts a filamentous colony form. Owing to its herbal and dietary values, this species has been overexploited. Largely due to the lack of understanding on its morphogenesis, artificial cultivation has not been achieved. Additionally, it may serve as a useful model for recognizing the morphological adaptation of colonial cyanobacteria in terrestrial niches. However, it shows very slow growth in native habitats and is easily disintegrated under laboratory conditions. Thus, a novel experimental system is necessary to explore its morphogenetic mechanism. Liquid-cultured N. flagelliforme has been well developed for exopolysaccharide (EPS production, in which microscopic colonies (micro-colonies are generally formed. In this study, we sought to gain some insight into the morphogenesis of N. flagelliforme by examining the effects of two external factors, the EPS and environmental stress-related growth rate, on the morphological shaping of micro-colonies. Our findings indicate that the EPS matrix could act as a basal barrier, leading to the bending of trichomes during their elongation, while very slow growth is conducive to their straight elongation. These findings will guide future cultivation and application of this cyanobacterium for ecological improvement.

  16. A Nostoc punctiforme Sugar Transporter Necessary to Establish a Cyanobacterium-Plant Symbiosis1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Martin; Picossi, Silvia; Campbell, Elsie L.; Meeks, John C.; Flores, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    In cyanobacteria-plant symbioses, the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium has low photosynthetic activity and is supplemented by sugars provided by the plant partner. Which sugars and cyanobacterial sugar uptake mechanism(s) are involved in the symbiosis, however, is unknown. Mutants of the symbiotically competent, facultatively heterotrophic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme were constructed bearing a neomycin resistance gene cassette replacing genes in a putative sugar transport gene cluster. Results of transport activity assays using 14C-labeled fructose and glucose and tests of heterotrophic growth with these sugars enabled the identification of an ATP-binding cassette-type transporter for fructose (Frt), a major facilitator permease for glucose (GlcP), and a porin needed for the optimal uptake of both fructose and glucose. Analysis of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in strains of N. punctiforme bearing frt::gfp fusions showed high expression in vegetative cells and akinetes, variable expression in hormogonia, and no expression in heterocysts. The symbiotic efficiency of N. punctiforme sugar transport mutants was investigated by testing their ability to infect a nonvascular plant partner, the hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. Strains that were specifically unable to transport glucose did not infect the plant. These results imply a role for GlcP in establishing symbiosis under the conditions used in this work. PMID:23463784

  17. Characterization of the coccoid cyanobacterium Myxosarcina sp. KIOST-1 isolated from mangrove forest in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Lee, JunMo; Affan, Md-Abu; Lee, Dae-Won; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2017-09-01

    Mangrove forests are known to be inhabited by diverse symbiotic cyanobacterial communities that are capable of N2 fixation. To investigate its biodiversity, root sediments were collected from a mangrove forest in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), and an entangled yellow-brown coccoid cyanobacterium was isolated. The isolated cyanobacterium was reproduced by multiple fission and eventually produced baeocytes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate was most similar to the genera Myxosarcina and Chroococcidiopsis in the order Pleurocapsales. Compositions of protein, lipid and carbohydrate in the cyanobacterial cells were estimated to be 19.4 ± 0.1%, 18.8 ± 0.4% and 31.5 ± 0.1%, respectively. Interestingly, total fatty acids in the isolate were mainly composed of saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids, whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids were not detected. Based on the molecular and biochemical characteristics, the isolate was finally classified in the genus Myxosarcina, and designated as Myxosarcina sp. KIOST-1. These results will contribute to better understanding of cyanobacterial biodiversity in the mangrove forest in FSM as well as the genus Myxosarcina, and also will allow further exploitation of its biotechnological potential on the basis of its cellular characteristics.

  18. Analysis of carbohydrate storage granules in the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welkie, David G. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sherman, Debra M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Chrisler, William B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orr, Galya [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sherman, Louis A. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2013-10-19

    The unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria of the genus Cyanothece demonstrate oscillations in nitrogenase activity and H2 production when grown under 12h light-12h dark cycles. We established that Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 allows for the construction of knock-out mutants and our objective was to improve the growth characteristics of this strain and to identify the nature of the intracellular storage granules. We report the physiological and morphological effects of reduction in nitrate and phosphate concentrations in BG-11 media on this strain. We developed a series of BG-11-derived growth media and monitored batch culture growth, nitrogenase activity and nitrogenase-mediated hydrogen production, culture synchronicity, and intracellular storage content. Reduction in NaNO3 and K2HPO4 concentrations from 17.6 and 0.23 mM to 4.41 and 0.06 mM, respectively, improved growth characteristics such as cell size and uniformity, and enhanced the rate of cell division. Cells grown in this low NP BG-11 were less complex, a parameter that related to the composition of the intracellular storage granules. Cells grown in low NP BG-11 had less polyphosphate, fewer polyhydroxybutyrate granules and many smaller granules became evident. Biochemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy using the histocytochemical PATO technique demonstrated that these small granules contained glycogen. The glycogen levels and the number of granules per cell correlated nicely with a 2.3 to 3.3-fold change from the minimum at L0 to the maximum at D0. The differences in granule morphology and enzymes between Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and Cyanothece PCC 7822 provide insights into the formation of large starch-like granules in some cyanobacteria.

  19. The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is the structural gene for delta 12 desaturase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, H; Avelange-Macherel, M H; Murata, N

    1993-09-01

    The desA gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was expressed in Escherichia coli, which does not contain any fatty acid desaturase. The product of the desA gene catalyzed the desaturation of fatty acids at the delta 12 position. This result demonstrates that desA is the structural gene for a delta 12 desaturase.

  20. Changes in photosynthetic properties measured by oxygen evolution and variable chlorophyll fluorescence in a simulated entrainment experiment with the cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromkamp, J.C.; Domin, A.; Dubinsky, Z.; Lehmann, C.; Schanz, F.

    2001-01-01

    The metalimnion of lake Zurich is dominated by the red coloured cyanobacterium Planktotrix rubescens, where it lives in an extremely low light environment. Photosynthesis of the organism was studied using oxygen evolution and variable fluorescence. After transfer to 2 in depth in the epilimnion.

  1. Enhancement of human adaptive immune responses by administration of a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner, Morten; Walsted, Anette; Larsen, Rune

    2008-01-01

    The effect of consumption of Immulina, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis, on adaptive immune responses was investigated by evaluation of changes in leukocyte responsiveness to two foreign recall antigens, Candida albicans (CA) and tetanus...

  2. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena sp. CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voß, B.; Bolhuis, H.; Fewer, D.; Kopf, M.; Möke, F.; Haas, F.; El-Shehawy, R.; Hayes, P.; Bergman, B.; Sivonen, K.; Dittmann, E.; Scanlan, D.J.; Hagemann, M.; Stal, L.J.; Hess, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft

  3. Concerted changes in gene expression and cell physiology of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 during transitions between nitrogen and light-limited growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aquirre von Wobeser, E.; Ibelings, B.W.; Bok, J.M.; Krasikov, V.; Huisman, J.; Matthijs, H.C.P.

    2011-01-01

    Physiological adaptation and genome-wide expression profiles of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in response to gradual transitions between nitrogen-limited and light-limited growth conditions were measured in continuous cultures. Transitions induced changes in pigment

  4. HupW Protease Specifically Required for Processing of the Catalytic Subunit of the Uptake Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Pia; Devine, Ellenor; Stensjö, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The maturation process of [NiFe] hydrogenases includes a proteolytic cleavage of the large subunit. We constructed a mutant of Nostoc strain PCC 7120 in which hupW, encoding a putative hydrogenase-specific protease, is inactivated. Our results indicate that the protein product of hupW selectively cleaves the uptake hydrogenase in this cyanobacterium. PMID:22020512

  5. The blue-colored linker polypeptide L-55 is a fusion protein of phycobiliproteins in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp strain BO 8402

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuschaefer-Rube, O.; Westermann, M.; Bluggel, M.; Meyer, H.E.; Ernst, A.

    2000-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain BO 8402, isolated from Lake Constance, lacks phycobilisomes but instead forms inclusion bodies containing remnants of phycobiliproteins. The inclusion bodies are surrounded by a proteinaceous capsule and contain alpha-phycocyanin and beta-phycocyanin, the

  6. Biotic factors in induced defence revisited: cell aggregate formation in the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 is triggered by spent Daphnia medium and disrupted cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, S.

    2010-01-01

    Bioassays with the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, its non-toxic mutant ΔmcyB, and Daphnia magna as grazer were used to evaluate biotic factors in induced defence, in particular cyanobacterial and grazer-released info-chemicals. Three main questions were addressed in this

  7. The Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. PCC 6506 Reveals Several Gene Clusters Responsible for the Biosynthesis of Toxins and Secondary Metabolites▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méjean, Annick; Mazmouz, Rabia; Mann, Stéphane; Calteau, Alexandra; Médigue, Claudine; Ploux, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    We report a draft sequence of the genome of Oscillatoria sp. PCC 6506, a cyanobacterium that produces anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a, two neurotoxins, and cylindrospermopsin, a cytotoxin. Beside the clusters of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of these toxins, we have found other clusters of genes likely involved in the biosynthesis of not-yet-identified secondary metabolites. PMID:20675499

  8. Growth inhibition of bloom forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa by green route fabricated copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Prasath, Barathan Balaji; Nandakumar, Ravichandran; Santhanam, Perumal; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-12-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa can potentially proliferate in a wide range of freshwater bionetworks and create extensive secondary metabolites which are harmful to human and animal health. The M. aeruginosa release toxic microcystins that can create a wide range of health-related issues to aquatic animals and humans. It is essential to eliminate them from the ecosystem with convenient method. It has been reported that engineered metal nanoparticles are potentially toxic to pathogenic organisms. In the present study, we examined the growth inhibition effect of green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles against M. aeruginosa. The green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles exhibit an excitation of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at 270 nm confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are colloidal in nature and having a particle size of 551 nm with high stability at -26.6 mV. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis shows that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical, rod and irregular in shape, and consistently distributed throughout the solution. The elemental copper and oxide peak were confirmed using energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX). Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy indicates the presence of functional groups which is mandatory for the reduction of copper ions. Besides, green synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles shows growth inhibition against M. aeruginosa. The inhibition efficiency was 31.8 % at lower concentration and 89.7 % at higher concentration of copper oxide nanoparticles, respectively. The chlorophyll (a and b) and carotenoid content of M. aeruginosa declined in dose-dependent manner with respect to induction of copper oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, we analyzed the mechanism behind the cytotoxicity of M. aeruginosa induced by copper oxide nanoparticles through evaluating membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species (ROS

  9. Transcription and Regulation of the Bidirectional Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120) possesses an uptake hydrogenase and a bidirectional enzyme, the latter being capable of catalyzing both H2 production and evolution. The completely sequenced genome of Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 reveals that the five structural genes encoding the bidirectional hydrogenase (hoxEFUYH) are separated in two clusters at a distance of approximately 8.8 kb. The transcription of the hox genes was examined under nitrogen-fixing conditions, and the results demonstrate that the cluster containing hoxE and hoxF can be transcribed as one polycistronic unit together with the open reading frame alr0750. The second cluster, containing hoxU, hoxY, and hoxH, is transcribed together with alr0763 and alr0765, located between the hox genes. Moreover, alr0760 and alr0761 form an additional larger operon. Nevertheless, Northern blot hybridizations revealed a rather complex transcription pattern in which the different hox genes are expressed differently. Transcriptional start points (TSPs) were identified 66 and 57 bp upstream from the start codon of alr0750 and hoxU, respectively. The transcriptions of the two clusters containing the hox genes are both induced under anaerobic conditions concomitantly with the induction of a higher level of hydrogenase activity. An additional TSP, within the annotated alr0760, 244 bp downstream from the suggested translation start codon, was identified. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified LexA from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 demonstrated specific interactions between the transcriptional regulator and both hox promoter regions. However, when LexA from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 was used, the purified protein interacted only with the promoter region of the alr0750-hoxE-hoxF operon. A search of the whole Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 genome demonstrated the presence of 216 putative LexA binding sites in total, including recA and rec

  10. Transcriptional organization of the phycocyanin subunit gene clusters of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans UTEX 625.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, S R; Lind, L K; Lidholm, J; Gustafsson, P

    1988-01-01

    The phycocyanin subunit gene cluster is duplicated on the chromosome of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans UTEX 625. The two gene clusters cpcB1A1 (left) and cpcB2A2 (right) are separated by about 2,500 base pairs, and in each cluster the beta-subunit gene is located upstream from the alpha-subunit gene. Filter hybridizations with phycocyanin-specific probes to total RNA detected at least two major transcripts that were 1,300 to 1,400 nucleotides long. Besides these major mRNA species, two minor transcripts of 3,400 and 3,700 nucleotides covering one of the gene clusters and the region between the clusters were found. No additional minor transcripts were found in the intergenic region between the two phycocyanin gene clusters. The lengths of the major mRNAs indicated that the beta- and alpha-subunit genes were cotranscribed. No apparent homologies were found when the DNA sequences located upstream from the proposed ribosome-binding site of the two phycocyanin beta-subunit genes were compared. Northern hybridizations with gene cluster-specific probes from the regions 5' of the beta-subunit genes, as well as S1 nuclease mapping and mRNA primer extension experiments, showed that both gene clusters were transcribed. The minor transcripts were found to initiate upstream from the left gene cluster. Two mRNA 5' ends were mapped upstream from the cpcB1A1 gene cluster, while only one 5' end was mapped in front of the cpcB2A2 gene cluster. All transcripts were present in RNA preparations from cultures grown under high levels of white light as well as under low levels of red light. The level of phycocyanin-specific mRNA, measured as part of the total RNA, was lower under low levels of red light compared with that under high levels of white light. Conserved sequence motifs were found when the promoter region of the cpcB1A1 gene cluster and promoter regions from other cyanobacterial photosynthesis genes were compared. The DNA sequences covering the proposed transcriptional

  11. Systems analysis of ethanol production in the genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopka, Joachim; Schmidt, Stefanie; Dethloff, Frederik; Pade, Nadin; Berendt, Susanne; Schottkowski, Marco; Martin, Nico; Dühring, Ulf; Kuchmina, Ekaterina; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan; Wilde, Annegret; Hagemann, Martin; Friedrich, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Future sustainable energy production can be achieved using mass cultures of photoautotrophic microorganisms, which are engineered to synthesize valuable products directly from CO2 and sunlight. As cyanobacteria can be cultivated in large scale on non-arable land, these phototrophic bacteria have become attractive organisms for production of biofuels. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, one of the cyanobacterial model organisms, provides many attractive properties for biofuel production such as tolerance of seawater and high light intensities. Here, we performed a systems analysis of an engineered ethanol-producing strain of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, which was grown in artificial seawater medium over 30 days applying a 12:12 h day-night cycle. Biosynthesis of ethanol resulted in a final accumulation of 0.25% (v/v) ethanol, including ethanol lost due to evaporation. The cultivation experiment revealed three production phases. The highest production rate was observed in the initial phase when cells were actively growing. In phase II growth of the producer strain stopped, but ethanol production rate was still high. Phase III was characterized by a decrease of both ethanol production and optical density of the culture. Metabolomics revealed that the carbon drain due to ethanol diffusion from the cell resulted in the expected reduction of pyruvate-based intermediates. Carbon-saving strategies successfully compensated the decrease of central intermediates of carbon metabolism during the first phase of fermentation. However, during long-term ethanol production the producer strain showed clear indications of intracellular carbon limitation. Despite the decreased levels of glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, soluble sugars and even glycogen accumulated in the producer strain. The changes in carbon assimilation patterns are partly supported by proteome analysis, which detected decreased levels of many enzymes and also revealed the stress

  12. The accumulation of cylindrospermopsin from the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in tissues of the Redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, M L; Eaglesham, G K

    1999-07-01

    Redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus harvested from an aquaculture pond infested by a bloom of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (order: Nostocales), were shown to accumulate the toxic alkaloid cylindrospermopsin. Pond water samples collected during the bloom contained 589 microg l(-1) of the toxin (93% in the cyanobacterial cells, 7% in the water). Crayfish from the pond contained cylindrospermopsin at concentrations of 4.3 microg g freeze dried hepatopancreas tissue and 0.9 microg g freeze dried muscle tissue. Trichomes of C. raciborskii were observed in gut contents of crayfish harvested during the cyanobacterial bloom, indicating that the most likely mechanism for accumulation of the toxin was by ingestion of cyanobacterial cells. Crayfish subjected to an extract of harvested bloom material under laboratory conditions for a period of 14 days were also found to accumulate cylindrospermopsin, indicating that this toxin is also absorbed into the tissues by direct uptake of the toxin in solution.

  13. Investigation of in vitro digestibility of dietary microalga Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis as a nutritional supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Ayse; Ozen, Mehmet O; Elibol, Murat; Oncel, Suphi S

    2017-07-01

    Microalgal proteins are promising sources for functional nutrition and a sustainable candidate for nutraceutical formulations. They also gain importance due to emerging focus on a healthy nutrition and increase in the number of chronic diseases. In this study, dried dietary species of microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, and cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis were hydrolyzed with pancreatin enzyme to obtain protein hydrolysates. The hydrolysis yield of biomass was 55.1 ± 0.1 and 64.8 ± 3.6% for C. vulgaris and S. platensis; respectively. Digestibility, as an indicator for dietary utilization, was also investigated. In vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) values depicted that cell wall structure due to the taxonomical differences affected both hydrolysis and digestibility yield of the crude biomass (p microalgae, which shows elevated digestibility values as a sustainable and reliable source.

  14. Evidence for an ultraviolet sunscreen role of the extracellular pigment scytonemin in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Sherry, N.D.; Castenholz, R.W. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Biology)

    1992-07-01

    The proposed photoprotective role of the UV-A absorbing, extracellular pigment scytonemin was studied in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Chlorogloeopsis sp. strain O-89-Cgs(1). UV-A (315-400 nm) caused growth delay, cell growth restarting only when scytonemin had accumulated in the extracellular envelopes. Cultures with scytonemin were more resistant to photoinhibition of photosynthesis than cultures without scytonemin the differential resistance being much greater to UV-A-caused photoinhibition than to photoinhibition caused by visible light. The presence of scytonemin in the extracellular envelopes was correlated with the inability of UV-A radiation to induce strong photopigment fluorescence (685 nm emission), regardless of the specific content of photosynthetic pigments. (author).

  15. Photosystem Trap Energies and Spectrally-Dependent Energy-Storage Efficiencies in the Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris Marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Mauzerall, David

    2012-01-01

    Acaryochloris marina is the only species known to utilize chlorophyll (Chl) d as a principal photopigment. The peak absorption wavelength of Chl d is redshifted approx. 40 nm in vivo relative to Chl a, enabling this cyanobacterium to perform oxygenic phototrophy in niche environments enhanced in far-red light. We present measurements of the in vivo energy-storage (E-S) efficiency of photosynthesis in A. marina, obtained using pulsed photoacoustics (PA) over a 90-nm range of excitation wavelengths in the red and far-red. Together with modeling results, these measurements provide the first direct observation of the trap energies of PSI and PSII, and also the photosystem-specific contributions to the total E-S efficiency. We find the maximum observed efficiency in A. marina (40+/-1% at 735 nm) is higher than in the Chl a cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis (35+/-1% at 690 nm). The efficiency at peak absorption wavelength is also higher in A. marina (36+/-1% at 710 nm vs. 31+/-1% at 670 nm). In both species, the trap efficiencies are approx. 40% (PSI) and approx. 30% (PSII). The PSI trap in A. marina is found to lie at 740+/-5 nm, in agreement with the value inferred from spectroscopic methods. The best fit of the model to the PA data identifies the PSII trap at 723+/-3 nm, supporting the view that the primary electron-donor is Chl d, probably at the accessory (ChlD1) site. A decrease in efficiency beyond the trap wavelength, consistent with uphill energy transfer, is clearly observed and fit by the model. These results demonstrate that the E-S efficiency in A. marina is not thermodynamically limited, suggesting that oxygenic photosynthesis is viable in even redder light environments.

  16. High iron requirement for growth, photosynthesis, and low-light acclimation in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eSunda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron limits carbon fixation in much of the modern ocean due to the very low solubility of ferric iron in oxygenated ocean waters. We examined iron limitation of growth rate under varying light intensities in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris, a descendent of the oxygenic phototrophs that evolved ca. 3 billion years ago when the ocean was reducing and iron was present at much higher concentrations as soluble Fe(II. Decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C ratio needed to support a given growth rate, indicating that iron and light may co-limit the growth of Synechococcus in the ocean, as shown previously for eukaryotic phytoplankton. The cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher than ratios for coastal eukaryotic algae growing under the same light conditions. The higher iron requirements for growth in the coastal cyanobacterium may be largely caused by the high demand for iron in photosynthesis, and to higher ratios of iron-rich photosystem I to iron-poor photosystem II in Synechococcus than in eukaryotic algae. This high iron requirement may also be vestigial and represent an adaptation to the much higher iron levels in the ancient reducing ocean. Due to the high cellular iron requirement for photosynthesis and growth, and for low light acclimation, Synechococcus may be excluded from many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean’s deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM where iron and light levels are low, and lower-iron requiring picoeukaryotes typically dominate the biomass of phytoplankton community within the mid to lower DCM.

  17. High iron requirement for growth, photosynthesis, and low-light acclimation in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunda, William G; Huntsman, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Iron limits carbon fixation in much of the modern ocean due to the very low solubility of ferric iron in oxygenated ocean waters. We examined iron-limitation of growth rate under varying light intensities in the coastal cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris, a descendent of the oxygenic phototrophs that evolved ca. 3 billion years ago when the ocean was reducing and iron was present at much higher concentrations as soluble Fe(II). Decreasing light intensity increased the cellular iron:carbon (Fe:C) ratio needed to support a given growth rate, indicating that iron and light may co-limit the growth of Synechococcus in the ocean, as shown previously for eukaryotic phytoplankton. The cellular Fe:C ratios needed to support a given growth rate were 5- to 8-fold higher than ratios for coastal eukaryotic algae growing under the same light conditions. The higher iron requirements for growth in the coastal cyanobacterium may be largely caused by the high demand for iron in photosynthesis, and to higher ratios of iron-rich photosystem I to iron-poor photosystem II in Synechococcus than in eukaryotic algae. This high iron requirement may also be vestigial and represent an adaptation to the much higher iron levels in the ancient reducing ocean. Due to the high cellular iron requirement for photosynthesis and growth, and for low light acclimation, Synechococcus may be excluded from many low-iron and low-light environments. Indeed, it decreases rapidly with depth within the ocean's deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) where iron and light levels are low, and lower-iron requiring picoeukaryotes typically dominate the biomass of phytoplankton community within the mid to lower DCM.

  18. Optimization and effects of different culture conditions on growth of Halomicronema hongdechloris – a filamentous cyanobacterium containing chlorophyll f

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqiong eLi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A chlorophyll f containing cyanobacterium, Halomicronema hongdechloris (H. hongdechloris was isolated from a stromatolite cyanobacterial community. However, the extremely slower growth rate of H. hongdechloris culture became a critical factor, hindering the research on this newly isolated cyanobacterium and the investigation of chlorophyll f-photosynthesis. Therefore, optimizing H. hongdechloris culture conditions has become an essential requirement for future research. This work investigated the effects of various culture conditions, essential nutrients and light environments to determine the optimal growth conditions for H. hongdechloris and the biosynthetic rate of chlorophyll f. Based on the total chlorophyll concentration, an optimal growth rate of 0.22 ± 0.02 day-1 (doubling time: 3.1 ± 0.3 days was observed when cells were grown under continuous illumination with far-red light with an intensity of 20 µE at 32°C in modified K+ES seawater (pH 8.0 with additional supplements of 11.75 mM NaNO3 and 0.15 mM K2HPO4. High performance liquid chromatography on H. hongdechloris pigments confirmed that chlorophyll a is the major chlorophyll and chlorophyll f constitutes approximately 10% of the total chlorophyll from cells grown under far-red light. Fluorescence confocal image analysis demonstrated changes of photosynthetic membranes and the distribution of photopigments in response to different light conditions. The total photosynthetic oxygen evolution yield per cell showed no changes under different light conditions, which confirms the involvement of chlorophyll f in oxygenic photosynthesis. The implications of the presence of chlorophyll f in H. hongdechloris and its relationship to light environment are discussed.

  19. Proteomic strategy for the analysis of the polychlorobiphenyl-degrading cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1 exposed to Aroclor 1254.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Zhang

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1, which was originally isolated from polychlorobiphenyl (PCB-contaminated paddy soils, has capabilities for dechlorinatin and for degrading the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254. In this study, 25 upregulated proteins were identified using 2D electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. These proteins were involved in (i PCB degradation (i.e., 3-chlorobenzoate-3,4-dioxygenase; (ii transport processes [e.g., ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, peptide ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, putrescine-binding protein, periplasmic solute-binding protein, branched-chain amino acid uptake periplasmic solute-binding protein, periplasmic phosphate-binding protein, phosphonate ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, and xylose ABC transporter substrate-binding protein]; (iii energetic metabolism (e.g., methanol/ethanol family pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ-dependent dehydrogenase, malate-CoA ligase subunit beta, enolase, ATP synthase β subunit, FOF1 ATP synthase subunit beta, ATP synthase α subunit, and IMP cyclohydrolase; (iv electron transport (cytochrome b6f complex Fe-S protein; (v general stress response (e.g., molecular chaperone DnaK, elongation factor G, and translation elongation factor thermostable; (vi carbon metabolism (methanol dehydrogenase and malate-CoA ligase subunit beta; and (vii nitrogen reductase (nitrous oxide reductase. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the genes encoding for dioxygenase, ABC transporters, transmembrane proteins, electron transporter, and energetic metabolism proteins were significantly upregulated during PCB degradation. These genes upregulated by 1.26- to 8.98-fold. These findings reveal the resistance and adaptation of cyanobacterium to the presence of PCBs, shedding light on the

  20. Global transcriptional responses of the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, to nitrogen stress, phosphorus stress, and growth on organic matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Harke

    Full Text Available Whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq was used to assess the transcriptomic response of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa during growth with low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (low N, low levels of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (low P, and in the presence of high levels of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM. Under low N, one third of the genome was differentially expressed, with significant increases in transcripts observed among genes within the nir operon, urea transport genes (urtBCDE, and amino acid transporters while significant decreases in transcripts were observed in genes related to photosynthesis. There was also a significant decrease in the transcription of the microcystin synthetase gene set under low N and a significant decrease in microcystin content per Microcystis cell demonstrating that N supply influences cellular toxicity. Under low P, 27% of the genome was differentially expressed. The Pho regulon was induced leading to large increases in transcript levels of the alkaline phosphatase phoX, the Pst transport system (pstABC, and the sphX gene, and transcripts of multiple sulfate transporter were also significantly more abundant. While the transcriptional response to growth on HMWDOM was smaller (5-22% of genes differentially expressed, transcripts of multiple genes specifically associated with the transport and degradation of organic compounds were significantly more abundant within HMWDOM treatments and thus may be recruited by Microcystis to utilize these substrates. Collectively, these findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the nutritional physiology of this toxic, bloom-forming cyanobacterium and the role of N in controlling microcystin synthesis.

  1. Changes in gene expression, cell physiology and toxicity of the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa at elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eSandrini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising CO2 concentrations may have large effects on aquatic microorganisms. In this study, we investigated how elevated pCO2 affects the harmful freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. This species is capable of producing dense blooms and hepatotoxins called microcystins. Strain PCC 7806 was cultured in chemostats that were shifted from low to high pCO2 conditions. This resulted in a transition from a C-limited to a light-limited steady state, with a ~2.7 fold increase of the cyanobacterial biomass and ~2.5 fold more microcystin per cell. Cells increased their chlorophyll a and phycocyanin content, and raised their PSI/PSII ratio at high pCO2. Surprisingly, cells had a lower dry weight and contained less carbohydrates, which might be an adaptation to improve the buoyancy of Microcystis when light becomes more limiting at high pCO2. Only 234 of the 4,691 genes responded to elevated pCO2. For instance, expression of the carboxysome, RuBisCO, photosystem and C metabolism genes did not change significantly, and only a few N assimilation genes were expressed differently. The lack of large-scale changes in the transcriptome could suit a buoyant species that lives in eutrophic lakes with strong CO2 fluctuations very well. However, we found major responses in inorganic carbon uptake. At low pCO2, cells were mainly dependent on bicarbonate uptake, whereas at high pCO2 gene expression of the bicarbonate uptake systems was down-regulated and cells shifted to CO2 and low-affinity bicarbonate uptake. These results show that the need for high-affinity bicarbonate uptake systems ceases at elevated CO2. Moreover, the combination of an increased cyanobacterial abundance, improved buoyancy, and higher toxin content per cell indicates that rising atmospheric CO2 levels may increase the problems associated with the harmful cyanobacterium Microcystis in eutrophic lakes.

  2. The Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (CYRF-01 Responds to Environmental Stresses with Increased Vesiculation Detected at Single-Cell Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Zarantonello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of membrane-limited vesicles, collectively termed extracellular vesicles (EVs, is an important biological process of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. This process has been observed in bacteria, but remains to be better characterized at high resolution in cyanobacteria. In the present work, we address the release of EVs by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (CYRF-01, a filamentous bloom-forming cyanobacterium, exposed to environmental stressors. First, non-axenic cultures of C. raciborskii (CYRF-01 were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVA + UVB over a 6 h period, which is known to induce structural damage to this species. Second, C. raciborskii was co-cultured in interaction with another cyanobacterium species, Microcystis aeruginosa (MIRF-01, over a 24 h period. After the incubation times, cell density and viability were analyzed, and samples were processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Our ultrastructural analyses revealed that C. raciborskii constitutively releases EVs from the outer membrane during its normal growth and amplifies such ability in response to environmental stressors. Both situations induced significant formation of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs by C. raciborskii compared to control cells. Quantitative TEM revealed an increase of 48% (UV and 60% (interaction in the OMV numbers compared to control groups. Considering all groups, the OMVs ranged in size from 20 to 300 nm in diameter, with most OMVs showing diameters between 20 and 140 nm. Additionally, we detected that OMV formation is accompanied by phosphatidylserine exposure, a molecular event also observed in EV-secreting eukaryotic cells. Altogether, we identified for the first time that C. raciborskii has the competence to secrete OMVs and that under different stress situations the genesis of these vesicles is increased. The amplified ability of cyanobacteria to release OMVs may be associated with adaptive responses to changes in environmental

  3. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both long- and short-term studies of cell development. Quantitative analysis of surface area covered by cell wall polymers is also easily performed. We show that significant cell expansion caused by incubation of cells in low levels of osmotically active agents like mannitol, glucose, or sucrose results from the inability of cells to undergo cytokinesis but does not result in significant changes to the amount of new cell wall. We also demonstrate that cells can be maintained for long periods of time in culture medium supplemented with specific cell wall-degrading enzymes where notable changes to wall infrastructure occur. These results demonstrate the great potential value of Penium in elucidating fundamental events during cell wall synthesis and modulation in plant cells.

  4. Characterization of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. isolated from extreme sulphureous water from Los Baños de la Hedionda (S Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Martín-Clemente, Elena; Melero Jiménez, Ignacio José; Reul, Andreas; Hernández-López, Miguel; Salvo, Enrique; Bañares-España, Elena; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Los Baños de la Hedionda (Málaga, S Spain) is a natural sulphureous spa (150-200 µM sulphide). Although this high sulphide levels can affect the photosynthetic process, there are numerous photosynthetic microorganisms inhabiting the spa. Among them, we isolated a strain of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp., a genus well known by its tolerance to sulphide. Objectives Firstly, to analyze the photosynthetic characteristics and growth rate of the isolated strain, as well as the effect of...

  5. Enhancement of human adaptive immune responses by administration of a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Walsted, Anette; Larsen, Rune

    2008-01-01

    The effect of consumption of Immulina, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis, on adaptive immune responses was investigated by evaluation of changes in leukocyte responsiveness to two foreign recall antigens, Candida albicans (CA) and tetanus......beta, and IL-6 responses, indicating that it acts by inducing a pro-inflammatory state. Taken together, the data suggest that Immulina causes an age-dependent, temporary enhancement of adaptive immune responses....

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain HL-69, Isolated from a Benthic Microbial Mat from a Magnesium Sulfate-Dominated Hypersaline Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobberley, J. M.; Romine, M. F.; Cole, J. K.; Maezato, Y.; Lindemann, S. R.; Nelson, W. C.

    2018-02-08

    ABSTRACT

    The complete genome sequence ofCyanobacteriumsp. strain HL-69 consists of 3,155,247 bp and contains 2,897 predicted genes comprising a chromosome and two plasmids. The genome is consistent with a halophilic nondiazotrophic phototrophic lifestyle, and this organism is able to synthesize most B vitamins and produces several secondary metabolites.

  7. The freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum transformed with ApGSMT-DMT exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity, but became halophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Sharma, Naveen K; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2013-03-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmolyte synthesized in response to different abiotic stresses, including salinity. The two known pathways of GB synthesis involve: 1) two step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → GB), generally found in plants, microbes and animals; and 2) three step methylation of glycine (glycine → sarcosine → dimethylglycine → GB), mainly found in halophilic archaea, sulphur bacteria and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece (Ap.) halophytica. Here, we transformed a salt-sensitive freshwater diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (An.) doliolum with N-methyltransferase genes (ApGSMT-DMT) from Ap. halophytica using the triparental conjugation method. The transformed An. doliolum synthesized and accumulated GB in cells, and showed increased salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity. The salt responsiveness of the transformant was also apparent as GB synthesis increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl in the nutrient solution, and maximal [12.92 µmol (g dry weight)(-1)] in cells growing at 0.5 M NaCl. Therefore, the transformed cyanobacterium has changed its behaviour from preferring freshwater to halophily. This study may have important biotechnological implications for the development of stress tolerant nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture.

  8. Theophylline-dependent riboswitch as a novel genetic tool for strict regulation of protein expression in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Yoichi; Ogawa, Atsushi; Asano, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Tokitaka; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2013-10-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a major model species for studies of photosynthesis. It is are also a potential cell factory for the production of renewable biofuels and valuable chemicals. We employed engineered riboswitches to control translational initiation of target genes in this cyanobacterium. A firefly luciferase reporter assay revealed that three theophylline riboswitches performed as expected in the cyanobacterium. Riboswitch-E* exhibited very low leaky expression of luciferase and superior and dose-dependent on/off regulation of protein expression by theophylline. The maximum magnitude of the induction vs. basal level was ∼190-fold. Furthermore, the induction level was responsive to a wide range of theophylline concentrations in the medium, from 0 to 2 mM, facilitating the fine-tuning of luciferase expression. We adapted this riboswitch to another gene regulation system, in which expression of the circadian clock kaiC gene product is controlled by the theophylline concentration in the culture medium. The results demonstrated that the adequately adjusted expression level of KaiC restored complete circadian rhythm in the kaiC-deficient arrhythmic mutant. This theophylline-dependent riboswitch system has potential for various applications as a useful genetic tool in cyanobacteria.

  9. Effects of sonication and advanced chemical oxidants on the unicellular green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta and cysts, larvae and adults of the brine shrimp Artemia salina: a prospective treatment to eradicate invasive organisms from ballast water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavand, Meghana R; McClintock, James B; Amsler, Charles D; Peters, Robert W; Angus, Robert A

    2007-11-01

    Uptake and release of ship-borne ballast water is a major factor contributing to introductions of aquatic phytoplankton and invasive macroinvertebrates. Some invasive unicellular algae can cause harmful algal blooms and produce toxins that build up in food chains. Moreover, to date, few studies have compared the efficacy of ballast water treatments against different life history phases of aquatic macroinvertebrates. In the present study, the unicellular green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta, and three discrete life history phases of the brine shrimp Artemia salina, were independently used as model organisms to study the efficacy of sonication as well as the advanced oxidants, hydrogen peroxide and ozone, as potential ballast water treatments. Algal cells and brine shrimp cysts, nauplii, and adults were subjected to individual and combined treatments of sonication and advanced oxidants. Combined rather than individual treatments consistently yielded the highest levels of mortality in algal cells (100% over a 2 min exposure) and in brine shrimp (100% and 95% for larvae and adults, respectively, over a 2 min exposure). In contrast, mortality levels in brine shrimp cysts (66% over 2 min; increased to 92% over a 20 min exposure) were moderately high but consistently lower than that detected for larval or adult shrimp. Our results indicate that a combination of sonication and advanced chemical oxidants may be a promising method to eradicate aquatic unicellular algae and macroinvertebrates in ballast water.

  10. Inference of Interactions in Cyanobacterial-Heterotrophic Co-Cultures via Transcriptome Sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliaev, Alex S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Serres, Margaret; Bernstein, Hans C.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Isern, Nancy G.; Chrisler, William B.; Kucek, Leo A.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Bryant, Donald A.; Wiley, H. S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2014-04-29

    We employed deep sequencing technology to identify transcriptional adaptation of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the marine facultative aerobe Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 to growth in a co-culture and infer the effect of carbon flux distributions on photoautotroph-heterotroph interactions. The overall transcriptome response of both organisms to co-cultivation was shaped by their respective physiologies and growth constraints. Carbon limitation resulted in the expansion of metabolic capacities which was manifested through the transcriptional upregulation of transport and catabolic pathways. While growth coupling occurred via lactate oxidation or secretion of photosynthetically fixed carbon, there was evidence of specific metabolic interactions between the two organisms. On one hand, the production and excretion of specific amino acids (methionine and alanine) by the cyanobacterium correlated with the putative downregulation of the corresponding biosynthetic machinery of Shewanella W3-18-1. On the other hand, the broad and consistent decrease of mRNA levels for many Fe-regulated Synechococcus 7002 genes during co-cultivation suggested increased Fe availability as well as more facile and energy-efficient mechanisms for Fe acquisition by the cyanobacterium. Furthermore, evidence pointed at potentially novel interactions between oxygenic photoautotrophs and heterotrophs related to the oxidative stress response as transcriptional patterns suggested that Synechococcus 7002 rather than Shewanella W3-18-1 provided scavenging functions for reactive oxygen species under co-culture conditions. This study provides an initial insight into the complexity of photoautotrophic-heterotrophic interactions and brings new perspectives of their role in the robustness and stability of the association.

  11. Xenobiotic biotransformation in unicellular green algae. Involvement of cytochrome P450 in the activation and selectivity of the pyridazinone pro-herbicide metflurazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, F; Backhaus, T; Bossmann, B; Grimme, L H

    1996-09-01

    The N-demethylation of the pyridazinone pro-herbicide metflurazon into norflurazon implies a toxification in photosynthetic organisms. This is confirmed by quantitative structure activity relationships determined for two unicellular green algae, Chlorella sorokiniana and Chlorella fusca; however, the latter is 25 to 80 times more sensitive to metflurazon. This sensitivity is linked to differences in the N-demethylase activity of both algae, as determined by an optimized in vivo biotransformation assay. Apparent K(m) values of the metflurazon-N-demethylase indicate a 10-fold higher affinity for this xenobiotic substrate for Chlorella fusca. Furthermore, algal metflurazon-N-demethylation is characterized by distinct variations in activity, depending on the stage of cell development within the cell cycle. Several well-established inhibitors of cytochrome P450-mediated reactions, including piperonylbutoxide, 1-aminobenzotriazole, 1-phenoxy-3-(1H-1,2,4-triol-1yl)-4-hydroxy-5,5-dimethylhexane++ +, and tetcyclacis, as well as cinnamic acid, a potential endogenous substrate, inhibited the N-demethylation of metflurazon. The results suggest that the N-demethylation of metflurazon by both algae is mediated by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase. The determination of antigenic cross-reactivity of algal proteins with heterologous polyclonal antibodies originally raised against plant P450s, anti-cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (CYP73A1), anti-ethoxycoumarin-O-dealkylase, anti-tulip allene oxidase (CYP74), and an avocado P450 (CYP71A1) or those of bacterial origin, CYP105A1 and CYP105B1, suggests the presence of distinct P450 isoforms in both algae.

  12. Evidence of a M1-muscarinic GPCR homolog in unicellular eukaryotes: featuring Acanthamoeba spp bioinformatics 3D-modelling and experimentations.

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    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Ahmad, H R

    2017-06-01

    Acetylcholine affects the target cellular function via muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors that are seen to exist in humans. Both the cholinergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that perform cardinal functions in humans. Anti-muscarinic drugs, particularly the ones that target M1 subtype (mAChR1), have consistently shown to kill unicellular pathogenic eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba spp. As the M1 receptor subtype has not been reported to be expressed in the above protist, the presence of an ancient form of the M1 muscarinic receptor was inferred. Bioinformatic tools and experimental assays were performed to establish the presence of a ligand-binding site. A search for sequence homology of amino acids of human M1 receptor failed to uncover an equivalent ligand-binding site on Acanthamoeba, but structural bioinformatics showed a hypothetical protein L8HIA6 to be a receptor homolog of the human mAChR1. Immunostaining with an anti-mAChR1 antibody showed cellular staining. Growth assays showed proliferation and lethal effects of exposure to mAChR1 agonist and antagonist respectively. With the recent authentication of human mAChR1 structure and its addition to the database, it was possible to discover its structural analog in Acanthamoeba; which could explain the effects of anticholinergics observed in the past on Acanthamoeba spp. The discovery of a receptor homolog of human mAChR1 on Acanthamoeba with future studies planned to show its expression and binding to cholinergic agonist and antagonist would help clarify its role in the biology of this protist pathogen.

  13. Box H/ACA snoRNAs are preferred substrates for the trimethylguanosine synthase in the divergent unicellular eukaryote Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes-Barbosa, Augusto; Chakrabarti, Kausik; Pearson, Michael; Benarroch, Delphine; Shuman, Stewart; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    The 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine caps of eukaryal snRNAs and snoRNA are formed by the enzyme Tgs1, which catalyzes sequential guanine-N2 methylations of m7G caps. Atypically, in the divergent unicellular eukaryote Trichomonas vaginalis, spliceosomal snRNAs lack a guanosine cap and the recombinant T. vaginalis trimethylguanosine synthase (TvTgs) produces only m2,7G in vitro. Here, we show by direct metabolic labeling that endogenous T. vaginalis RNAs contain m7G, m2,7G, and m2,2,7G caps. Immunodepletion of TvTgs from cell extracts and TvTgs add-back experiments demonstrate that TvTgs produces m2,7G and m2,2,7G caps. Expression of TvTgs in yeast tgs1Δ cells leads to the formation of m2,7G and m2,2,7G caps and complementation of the lethality of a tgs1Δ mud2Δ strain. Whereas TvTgs is present in the nucleus and cytosol of T. vaginalis cells, TMG-containing RNAs are localized primarily in the nucleolus. Molecular cloning of anti-TMG affinity-purified T. vaginalis RNAs identified 16 box H/ACA snoRNAs, which are implicated in guiding RNA pseudouridylation. The ensemble of new T. vaginalis H/ACA snoRNAs allowed us to predict and partially validate an extensive map of pseudouridines in T. vaginalis rRNA. PMID:22847815

  14. Importance of N2-Fixation on the Productivity at the North-Western Azores Current/Front System, and the Abundance of Diazotrophic Unicellular Cyanobacteria.

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    Virginie Riou

    Full Text Available To understand the impact of the northwestern Azores Current Front (NW-AzC/AzF system on HCO3--and N2-fixation activities and unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria (UCYN distribution, we combined geochemical and biological approaches from the oligotrophic surface to upper mesopelagic waters. N2-fixation was observed to sustain 45-85% of the HCO3--fixation in the picoplanktonic fraction performing 47% of the total C-fixation at the deep chlorophyll maximum north and south of the AzF. N2-fixation rates as high as 10.9 μmol N m-3 d-1 and surface nitrate δ15N as low as 2.7‰ were found in the warm (18-24°C, most saline (36.5-37.0 and least productive waters south of the AzF, where UCYN were the least abundant. However, picoplanktonic UCYN abundances up to 55 cells mL-1 were found at 45-200m depths in the coolest nutrient-rich waters north of the AzF. In this area, N2-fixation rates up to 4.5 μmol N m-3 d-1 were detected, associated with depth-integrated H13CO3--fixation rates at least 50% higher than observed south of the AzF. The numerous eddies generated at the NW-AzC/AzF seem to enhance exchanges of plankton between water masses, as well as vertical and horizontal diapycnal diffusion of nutrients, whose increase probably enhances the growth of diazotrophs and the productivity of C-fixers.

  15. Traced on the Timeline: Discovery of Acetylcholine and the Components of the Human Cholinergic System in a Primitive Unicellular Eukaryote Acanthamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Rana, Zohaib; Tariq, Sumayya; Lalani, Salima; Ahmad, H R

    2017-11-13

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the neurotransmitter of cholinergic signal transduction that affects the target cells via muscarinic (mAChR) and nicotinic (nAChR) cholinergic receptors embedded in the cell membrane. Of the cholinergic receptors that bind to ACh, the mAChRs execute several cognitive and metabolic functions in the human central nervous system (CNS). Very little is known about the origins and autocrine/paracrine roles of the ACh in primitive life forms. With the recent report of the evidence of an ACh binding mAChR1 like receptor in Acanthamoeba spp., it was tempting to investigate the origin and functional roles of cholinergic G-Protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the biology of eukaryotes. We inferred the presence of ACh, its synthetic, degradation system, and a signal transduction pathway in an approximately ∼2.0 billion year old primitive eukaryotic cell Acanthamoeba castellanii. Bioinformatics analysis, ligand binding prediction, and docking methods were used to establish the origins of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of ACh. Notably, we provide evidence of the presence of ACh in A. castellanii by colorimetric analysis, which to date is the only report of its presence in this primitive unicellular eukaryote. We show the evidence for the presence of homology of evolutionary conserved key enzymes of the cholinergic system like choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in A. castellanii spp., which were found to be near identical to their human counterparts. Tracing the origin, functions of ACh, and primeval mAChRs in primitive eukaryotic cells has the potential of uncovering covert cholinergic pathways that can be extended to humans in order to understand the states of cholinergic deficiency in neurodegenerative diseases (ND).

  16. Inhibition of hydrogen uptake in Escherichia coli by expressing the hydrogenase from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

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    Wood Thomas K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular hydrogen is an environmentally-clean fuel and the reversible (bi-directional hydrogenase of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 as well as the native Escherichia coli hydrogenase 3 hold great promise for hydrogen generation. These enzymes perform the simple reaction 2H+ + 2e- ↔ H2 (g. Results Hydrogen yields were enhanced up to 41-fold by cloning the bidirectional hydrogenase (encoded by hoxEFUYH from the cyanobacterium into E. coli. Using an optimized medium, E. coli cells expressing hoxEFUYH also produced twice as much hydrogen as the well-studied Enterobacter aerogenes HU-101, and hydrogen gas bubbles are clearly visible from the cultures. Overexpression of HoxU alone (small diaphorase subunit accounts for 43% of the additional hydrogen produced by HoxEFUYH. In addition, hydrogen production in E. coli mutants with defects in the native formate hydrogenlyase system show that the cyanobacterial hydrogenase depends on both the native E. coli hydrogenase 3 as well as on its maturation proteins. Hydrogen absorption by cells expressing hoxEFUYH was up to 10 times lower than cells which lack the cloned cyanobacterial hydrogenase; hence, the enhanced hydrogen production in the presence of hoxEFUYH is due to inhibition of hydrogen uptake activity in E. coli. Hydrogen uptake by cells expressing hoxEFUYH was suppressed in three wild-type strains and in two hycE mutants but not in a double mutant defective in hydrogenase 1 and hydrogenase 2; hence, the active cyanobacterial locus suppresses hydrogen uptake by hydrogenase 1 and hydrogenase 2 but not by hydrogenase 3. Differential gene expression indicated that overexpression of HoxEFUYH does not alter expression of the native E. coli hydrogenase system; instead, biofilm-related genes are differentially regulated by expression of the cyanobacterial enzymes which resulted in 2-fold elevated biofilm formation. This appears to be the first enhanced hydrogen production

  17. Genomic mechanisms for cold tolerance and production of exopolysaccharides in the Arctic cyanobacterium Phormidesmis priestleyi BC1401.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrismas, Nathan A M; Barker, Gary; Anesio, Alexandre M; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2016-08-02

    Cyanobacteria are major primary producers in extreme cold ecosystems. Many lineages of cyanobacteria thrive in these harsh environments, but it is not fully understood how they survive in these conditions and whether they have evolved specific mechanisms of cold adaptation. Phormidesmis priestleyi is a cyanobacterium found throughout the cold biosphere (Arctic, Antarctic and alpine habitats). Genome sequencing of P. priestleyi BC1401, an isolate from a cryoconite hole on the Greenland Ice Sheet, has allowed for the examination of genes involved in cold shock response and production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPSs likely enable cyanobacteria to buffer the effects of extreme cold and by identifying mechanisms for EPS production in P. priestleyi BC1401 this study lays the way for investigating transcription and regulation of EPS production in an ecologically important cold tolerant cyanobacterium. We sequenced the draft genome of P. priestleyi BC1401 and implemented a new de Bruijn graph visualisation approach combined with BLAST analysis to separate cyanobacterial contigs from a simple metagenome generated from non-axenic cultures. Comparison of known cold adaptation genes in P. priestleyi BC1401 with three relatives from other environments revealed no clear differences between lineages. Genes involved in EPS biosynthesis were identified from the Wzy- and ABC-dependent pathways. The numbers of genes involved in cell wall and membrane biogenesis in P. priestleyi BC1401 were typical relative to the genome size. A gene cluster implicated in biofilm formation was found homologous to the Wps system, although the intracellular signalling pathways by which this could be regulated remain unclear. Results show that the genomic characteristics and complement of known cold shock genes in P. priestleyi BC1401 are comparable to related lineages from a wide variety of habitats, although as yet uncharacterised cold shock genes in this organism may still exist. EPS

  18. Homologous expression of a bacterial phytochrome. The cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon incorporates biliverdin as a genuine, functional chromophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quest, Benjamin; Hübschmann, Thomas; Sharda, Shivani; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2007-04-01

    Bacteriophytochromes constitute a light-sensing subgroup of sensory kinases with a chromophore-binding motif in the N-terminal half and a C-terminally located histidine kinase activity. The cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon (also designated Calothrix sp.) expresses two sequentially very similar bacteriophytochromes, cyanobacterial phytochrome A (CphA) and cyanobacterial phytochrome B (CphB). Cyanobacterial phytochrome A has the canonical cysteine residue, by which covalent chromophore attachment is accomplished in the same manner as in plant phytochromes; however, its paralog cyanobacterial phytochrome B carries a leucine residue at that position. On the basis of in vitro experiments that showed, for both cyanobacterial phytochrome A and cyanobacterial phytochrome B, light-induced autophosphorylation and phosphate transfer to their cognate response regulator proteins RcpA and RcpB [Hübschmann T, Jorissen HJMM, Börner T, Gärtner W & deMarsac NT (2001) Eur J Biochem268, 3383-3389], we aimed at the identification of a chromophore that is incorporated in vivo into cyanobacterial phytochrome B within the cyanobacterial cell. The approach was based on the introduction of a copy of cphB into the cyanobacterium via triparental conjugation. The His-tagged purified, recombinant protein (CphBcy) showed photoreversible absorption bands similar to those of plant and bacterial phytochromes, but with remarkably red-shifted maxima [lambda(max) 700 and 748 nm, red-absorbing (P(r)) and far red-absorbing (P(fr)) forms of phytochrome, respectively]. A comparison of the absorption maxima with those of the heterologously generated apoprotein, assembled with phycocyanobilin (lambda(max) 686 and 734 nm) or with biliverdin IXalpha (lambda(max) 700 and 750 +/- 2 nm), shows biliverdin IXalpha to be a genuine chromophore. The kinase activity of CphBcy and phosphotransfer to its cognate response regulator was found to be strictly P(r)-dependent. As an N-terminally located cysteine was

  19. Probit Analysis of Carbamate-Pesticide-Toxicity at Soil-Water Interface to N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp

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    Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity-data of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, and three fungicides, ziram, zineb and mancozeb with rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp., obtained by in vitro growth and at soil-water interface, were analyzed by the probit method. Growth enhancing concentration, no-observed effective concentration, minimum inhibitory concentration, the highest permissive concentration and lethal concentration100 (LC100 were determined experimentally. The LC50 values of carbaryl, carbofuran, ziram, zineb and mancozeb in N2-fixing liquid medium were 56.2, 588.8, 0.07, 4.2 and 3.4 μg/mL, respectively, whereas the corresponding LC100 values were 100.0, 1500.0, 0.17, 25.0 and 9.0 μg/mL, respectively. The LC50 values of these pesticides in succession in N2-fixing agar medium were 44.7, 239.9, 0.07, 1.8 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively, whereas the corresponding LC100 values were 100.0, 600.0, 0.17, 10.0 and 7.0 μg/mL, respectively. Similar results with nitrate supplemented liquid and agar media indicated that nitrate supplementation had toxicity reducing effect. The LC50 and LC100 values of toxicity in the N2-fixing liquid medium at soil-water interface were 91.2 and 200.0 μg/mL for carbaryl, 2 317 and 6 000 μg/mL for carbofuran, 0.15 and 0.50 μg/mL for ziram, 16.4 and 50.0 μg/mL for zineb, and 7.2 and 25.0 μg/mL for mancozeb, respectively. Each LC100 value at soil-water interface with a pesticide was significantly higher than its corresponding LC100 value at liquid/agar media. It can be concluded that, under the N2-fixing conditions, the cyanobacterium tolerated higher levels of each pesticide at soil-water interface.

  20. Engineering a cyanobacterium as the catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-propanediol

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    Li Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern society primarily relies on petroleum and natural gas for the production of fuels and chemicals. One of the major commodity chemicals 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO, which has an annual production of more than 0.5 million tons in the United States, is currently produced by chemical processes from petroleum derived propylene oxide, which is energy intensive and not sustainable. In this study, we sought to achieve photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Compared to the previously reported biological 1,2-PDO production processes which used sugar or glycerol as the substrates, direct chemical production from CO2 in photosynthetic organisms recycles the atmospheric CO2 and will not compete with food crops for arable land. Results In this study, we reported photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Introduction of the genes encoding methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA, glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA, and aldehyde reductase (yqhD resulted in the production of ~22mg/L 1,2-PDO from CO2. However, a comparable amount of the pathway intermediate acetol was also produced, especially during the stationary phase. The production of 1,2-PDO requires a robust input of reducing equivalents from cellular metabolism. To take advantage of cyanobacteria’s NADPH pool, the synthetic pathway of 1,2-PDO was engineered to be NADPH-dependent by exploiting the NADPH-specific secondary alcohol dehydrogenases which have not been reported for 1,2-PDO production previously. This optimization strategy resulted in the production of ~150mg/L 1,2-PDO and minimized the accumulation of the incomplete reduction product, acetol. Conclusion This work demonstrated that cyanobacteria can be engineered as a catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-PDO. This work also characterized two NADPH

  1. An assessment of the usefulness of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus subsalsus as a source of biomass for biofuel production

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    Bruno R.S. Setta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays algal biofuels are considered one of the most promising solutions of global energy crisis and climate change for the years to come. By manipulation of the culture conditions, many algal species can be induced to accumulate high concentrations of particular biomolecules and can be directed to the desired output for each fuel. In this context, the present study involved the assessment of the effects of CO2 availability and nitrogen starvation on growth and chemical composition of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus subsalsus, testing a fast-growing native strain. The control experiments were performed with Conway culture medium in 12-day batch cultures, in 6-liter flasks and 12 h photoperiod, with addition of 2 L min-1 filtered air to each flask. Other two experimental conditions were also tested: (i the placement into the cultures of additional dissolved nutrients except nitrogen, one week after the start of growth (N-, and (ii the input of pure CO2 into the flasks from the 5th day of growth (C+. In all cultures, daily cell counts were done throughout the cultivation, as well as measurements of pH and cell biovolumes. Maximum cell yield were found in N-experiments, while cell yields of C+ and control were similar. Dissolved nitrogen was exhausted before the end of the experiments, but dissolved phosphorus was not totally consumed. Protein and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased from the exponential to the stationary growth phase of all experiments, except for protein in the control. In all experiments, carbohydrate, lipid and total carotenoid increased from the exponential to the stationary growth phase, as an effect of nitrogen limitation. Increments in carbohydrate concentrations were remarkable, achieving more than 42% of the dry weight (dw, but concentrations of lipid were always lower than 13% dw. The addition of pure CO2 did not cause a significant increase in biomass of S. subsalsus nor generated more lipid and carbohydrate than

  2. Two-stage (photoautotrophy and heterotrophy) cultivation enables efficient production of bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in auto-sedimenting cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshupanee, Tanakarn; Nimdach, Palida; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2016-11-15

    Sustainable production of bioplastics by heterotrophic microbes has been restricted by the limited resources of organic substrates and the energy required for biomass harvest. Here, the easy-to-harvest cyanobacterium (Chlorogloea fritschii TISTR 8527), from which the biomass instantaneously settled to the bottom of liquid culture, was utilized to produce poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) using a two-stage cultivation strategy. The cells were first pre-grown under normal photoautotrophy to increase their biomass and then recultivated under a heterotrophic condition with a single organic substrate to produce the product. Through optimization of this two-stage cultivation, the mass conversion efficiency of acetate substrate to PHB was obtained at 51 ± 7% (w/w), the comparable level to the theoretical biochemical conversion efficiency of acetate to PHB. This two-stage cultivation that efficiently converted the substrate to the product, concurrent with a reduced culture biomass, may be applicable for the production of other biopolymers by cyanobacteria.

  3. Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Warming Stimulates Growth and Nitrogen Fixation in a Common Forest Floor Cyanobacterium under Axenic Conditions

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    Zoë Lindo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The predominant input of available nitrogen (N in boreal forest ecosystems originates from moss-associated cyanobacteria, which fix unavailable atmospheric N2, contribute to the soil N pool, and thereby support forest productivity. Alongside climate warming, increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations are expected in Canada’s boreal region over the next century, yet little is known about the combined effects of these factors on N fixation by forest floor cyanobacteria. Here we assess changes in N fixation in a common forest floor, moss-associated cyanobacterium, Nostoc punctiforme Hariot, under elevated CO2 conditions over 30 days and warming combined with elevated CO2 over 90 days. We measured rates of growth and changes in the number of specialized N2 fixing heterocyst cells, as well as the overall N fixing activity of the cultures. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth and N fixation overall, but this result was influenced by the growth stage of the cyanobacteria, which in turn was influenced by our temperature treatments. Taken together, climate change factors of warming and elevated CO2 are expected to stimulate N2 fixation by moss-associated cyanobacteria in boreal forest systems.

  4. Degradative crystal–chemical transformations of clay minerals under the influence of cyanobacterium-actinomycetal symbiotic associations

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    Ekaterina Ivanova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and actinomycetes are essential components of soil microbial community and play an active role in ash elements leaching from minerals of the parent rock. Content and composition of clay minerals in soil determine the sorption properties of the soil horizons, water-holding capacity of the soil, stickiness, plasticity, etc. The transformative effect of cyanobacterial–actinomycetes associations on the structure of clay minerals – kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite, biotite and muscovite – was observed, with the greatest structural lattice transformation revealed under the influence of association in comparison with monocultures of cyanobacterium and actinomycete. The range of the transformative effect depended both on the type of biota (component composition of association and on the crystal–chemical parameters of the mineral itself (trioctahedral mica – biotite, was more prone to microbial degradation than the dioctahedral – muscovite. The formation of the swelling phase – the product of biotite transformation into the mica–vermicullite mixed-layered formation was revealed as a result of association cultivation. Crystal chemical transformation of vermiculite was accompanied by the removal of potassium (К, magnesium (Mg and aluminum (Al from the crystal lattice. The study of such prokaryotic communities existed even in the early stages of the Earth's history helps to understand the causes and nature of the transformations undergone by the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere of the planet.contribution of treatments on structure induces and model parameters are discussed in the paper.

  5. Effect of nitrogen on cellular production and release of the neurotoxin anatoxin-a in a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium

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    Alexis eGagnon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anatoxin-a (ANTX is a neurotoxin produced by several freshwater cyanobacteria and implicated in lethal poisonings of domesticated animals and wildlife. The factors leading to its production in nature and in culture are not well understood. Resource availability may influence its cellular production as suggested by the carbon-nutrient hypothesis, which links the amount of secondary metabolites produced by plants or microbes to the relative abundance of nutrients. We tested the effects of nitrogen supply on ANTX production and release in a toxic strain of the cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon issatschenkoi (Nostocales. We hypothesized that nitrogen deficiency might constrain the production of ANTX. However, the total concentration and more significantly the cellular content of anatoxin-a peaked (max. 146 µg/L and 1683 µg•g-1 dry weight at intermediate levels of nitrogen supply when N-deficiency was evident based on phycocyanin to chlorophyll a and carbon to nitrogen ratios. The results suggest that the cellular production of anatoxin-a may be stimulated by moderate nutrient stress as described recently for another cyanotoxin (microcystin.

  6. Exopolymer production as a function of cell permeability and death in a diatom (Thalassiosira weissflogii) and a cyanobacterium (Synechococcus elongatus).

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    Thornton, Daniel C O; Chen, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Exopolymer particles are found throughout the ocean and play a significant biogeochemical role in carbon cycling. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) are composed of acid polysaccharides, and Coomassie staining particles (CSP) are proteins. TEPs have been extensively studied in the ocean, while CSP have been largely overlooked. The objective of this research was to determine the role of stress and cell permeability in the formation of TEP and CSP. The diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus were grown in batch cultures and exposed to hydrogen peroxide (0, 10, and 100 μM) as an environmental stressor. There was no correlation between TEP and CSP concentrations, indicating that they are different populations of particles rather than different chemical components of the same particles. CSP concentrations were not affected by hydrogen peroxide concentration and did not correlate with indicators of stress and cell death. In contrast, TEP concentrations in both taxa were correlated with a decrease in the effective quantum yield of photosystem II, increased activity of caspase-like enzymes, and an increase in the proportion of the population with permeable cell membranes, indicating that TEP production was associated with the process of cell death. These data show that different environmental factors and physiological processes affected the production of TEP and CSP by phytoplankton. TEP and CSP are separate populations of exopolymer particles with potentially different biogeochemical roles in the ocean. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  7. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultrasound on Biomass Reduction and Toxin Release in the Cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa

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    Miquel Lürling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are expected to increase, and the toxins they produce threaten human health and impair ecosystem services. The reduction of the nutrient load of surface waters is the preferred way to prevent these blooms; however, this is not always feasible. Quick curative measures are therefore preferred in some cases. Two of these proposed measures, peroxide and ultrasound, were tested for their efficiency in reducing cyanobacterial biomass and potential release of cyanotoxins. Hereto, laboratory assays with a microcystin (MC-producing cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa were conducted. Peroxide effectively reduced M. aeruginosa biomass when dosed at 4 or 8 mg L−1, but not at 1 and 2 mg L−1. Peroxide dosed at 4 or 8 mg L−1 lowered total MC concentrations by 23%, yet led to a significant release of MCs into the water. Dissolved MC concentrations were nine-times (4 mg L−1 and 12-times (8 mg L−1 H2O2 higher than in the control. Cell lysis moreover increased the proportion of the dissolved hydrophobic variants, MC-LW and MC-LF (where L = Leucine, W = tryptophan, F = phenylalanine. Ultrasound treatment with commercial transducers sold for clearing ponds and lakes only caused minimal growth inhibition and some release of MCs into the water. Commercial ultrasound transducers are therefore ineffective at controlling cyanobacteria.

  8. Decoupling of ammonium regulation and ntcA transcription in the diazotrophic marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. IMS101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Anton F; Rihtman, Branko; Wang, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) physiology in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium IMS101 was studied along with transcript accumulation of the N-regulatory gene ntcA and of two of its target genes: napA (nitrate assimilation) and nifH (N2 fixation). N2 fixation was impaired in the presence of nitrite, nitrate and urea. Strain IMS101 was capable of growth on these combined N sources at nitrate and urea was impaired in the presence of ammonium. Whereas ecologically relevant N concentrations (2–20 μ) suppressed growth and assimilation, much higher concentrations were required to affect transcript levels. Transcripts of nifH accumulated under nitrogen-fixing conditions; these transcript levels were maintained in the presence of nitrate (100 μ) and ammonium (20 μ). However, nifH transcript levels were below detection at ammonium concentrations >20 μ. napA mRNA was found at low levels in both N2-fixing and ammonium-utilizing filaments, and it accumulated in filaments grown with nitrate. The positive effect of nitrate on napA transcription was abolished by ammonium additions of >200 μ. This effect was restored upon addition of the glutamine synthetase inhibitor -methionin--sulfoximine. Surprisingly, ntcA transcript levels remained high in the presence of ammonium, even at elevated concentrations. These findings indicate that ammonium repression is decoupled from transcriptional activation of ntcA in Trichodesmium IMS101. PMID:21938021

  9. Decoupling of ammonium regulation and ntcA transcription in the diazotrophic marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium sp. IMS101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Anton F; Rihtman, Branko; Wang, Qingfeng

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) physiology in the marine cyanobacterium Trichodesmium IMS101 was studied along with transcript accumulation of the N-regulatory gene ntcA and of two of its target genes: napA (nitrate assimilation) and nifH (N(2) fixation). N(2) fixation was impaired in the presence of nitrite, nitrate and urea. Strain IMS101 was capable of growth on these combined N sources at nitrate and urea was impaired in the presence of ammonium. Whereas ecologically relevant N concentrations (2-20 μM) suppressed growth and assimilation, much higher concentrations were required to affect transcript levels. Transcripts of nifH accumulated under nitrogen-fixing conditions; these transcript levels were maintained in the presence of nitrate (100 μM) and ammonium (20 μM). However, nifH transcript levels were below detection at ammonium concentrations >20 μM. napA mRNA was found at low levels in both N(2)-fixing and ammonium-utilizing filaments, and it accumulated in filaments grown with nitrate. The positive effect of nitrate on napA transcription was abolished by ammonium additions of >200 μM. This effect was restored upon addition of the glutamine synthetase inhibitor L-methionin-DL-sulfoximine. Surprisingly, ntcA transcript levels remained high in the presence of ammonium, even at elevated concentrations. These findings indicate that ammonium repression is decoupled from transcriptional activation of ntcA in Trichodesmium IMS101.

  10. Creation of glyphosate-resistant Brassica napus L. plants expressing DesC desaturase of cyanobacterium Synechococcus vulcanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldenkova-Pavlova I. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Creation of glyphosate-resistant canola plants expressing bifunctional hybrid desC::licBM3 gene. In the hybrid gene the sequence of DesC desaturase of cyanobacterium S. vulcanus without plastid targeting was fused with the sequence of thermostable lichenase reporter LicBM3 gene. Methods. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, PCR, quantitative and qualitative determination of lichenase activity, genetic analysis. Results. Transgenic canola plants, carring the enolpyruvat shikimat phosphate syntase gene (epsps, conferring on plants resistance to phosphonomethyl glycine herbicides (Roundup, as well as the desC::licBM3 gene, were selected. The presence of transgenes was confimed by multiplex PCR. The epsps gene expression in canola was shown at the transcription level, during in vitro growth and after greenhouse herbicide treatment. Activity of the licBM3 gene product as a part of hybrid protein allowed quantitative and qualitative estimation of the desaturase gene expression. Inheritance of heterologous genes and their expression in the first generation were investigated. Conclusions. Transgenic canola plants were obtained, the presence of trangenes in plant genome was proved and expression of the target genes was detected.

  11. Alcohol dehydrogenase AdhA plays a role in ethanol tolerance in model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rebeca

    2017-04-01

    The protein AdhA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has been previously reported to show alcohol dehydrogenase activity towards ethanol and both NAD and NADP. This protein is currently being used in genetically modified strains of Synechocystis capable of synthesizing ethanol showing the highest ethanol productivities. In the present work, mutant strains of Synechocystis lacking AdhA have been constructed and tested for tolerance to ethanol. The lack of AdhA in the wild-type strain reduces survival to externally added ethanol at lethal concentration of 4% (v/v). On the other hand, the lack of AdhA in an ethanologenic strain diminishes tolerance of cells to internally produced ethanol. It is also shown that light-activated heterotrophic growth (LAHG) of the wild-type strain is impaired in the mutant strain lacking AdhA (∆adhA strain). Photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and photoheterotrophic growth are not affected in the mutant strain. Based on phenotypic characterization of ∆adhA mutants, the possible physiological function of AdhA in Synechocystis is discussed.

  12. A comparison of the character of algal extracellular versus cellular organic matter produced by cyanobacterium, diatom and green alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivokonsky, Martin; Safarikova, Jana; Baresova, Magdalena; Pivokonska, Lenka; Kopecka, Ivana

    2014-03-15

    This study investigated characteristics of algal organic matter (AOM) derived from three species (cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, diatom Fragilaria crotonensis and green alga Chlamydomonas geitleri) which dominate phytoplanktonic populations in reservoirs supplying drinking water treatment plants. Algal growth was monitored by cell counting, optical density and dissolved organic carbon concentration measurements. Extracellular organic matter (EOM) released at exponential and stationary growth phases and cellular organic matter (COM) were characterised in terms of specific UV absorbance (SUVA), peptide/protein and non-peptide content, hydrophobicity and molecular weight (MW). It was found that both EOM and COM were predominantly hydrophilic with low SUVA. COM was richer in peptides/proteins, more hydrophilic (with about 89% of hydrophilic fraction for all three species) and had lower SUVA than EOM. MW fractionation showed that both EOM and COM of all three species contain large portions of low-MW (100 kDa) polysaccharides. Peptides/proteins exhibited narrower MW distribution than non-peptide fraction and it widened as the cultures grew. The highest amount of peptides/proteins with a significant portion of high-MW ones (22%) was observed in COM of M. aeruginosa. The results imply that the knowledge of AOM composition and characteristics predetermine which processes would be effective in the treatment of AOM laden water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  14. Screening the toxicity and toxin content of blooms of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum (Ehrenberg in northeast Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAO Proença

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium occur in massive colored patches over large areas of tropical and subtropical oceans. Recently, the interest in such events has increased given their role in major nitrogen and carbon dioxide oceanic fluxes. Trichodesmium occurs all along the Brazilian coast and patches frequently migrate towards the coast. In this paper we screen the toxicity and toxin content of Trichodesmium blooms off the coast of Bahia state. Four samples, collected from February to April 2007, were analyzed. Organisms were identified and assessed for toxicity by means of several methods. Analogues of microcystins, cylindrospermopsins and saxitoxins were analyzed using HPLC. Microcystins were also assayed through ELISA. Results showed dominance of T. erythraeum, which makes up as much as 99% of cell counts. Other organisms found in smaller quantities include the dinoflagellates Prorocentrum minimum and P. rhathymum. Extracts from all samples delayed or interrupted sea urchin larval development, but presented no acute toxicity during a mouse bioassay. Saxitoxin congeners and microcystins were present at low concentrations in all samples, occurrences that had not previously been reported in the literature. Despite our finding of saxitoxin analogues and microcystins in Trichodesmium blooms, these toxins do not represent a potential harm to human health by primary contact. We conclude, based on our results and those reported in the recent literature, which differ from results published in 1963, that although toxins are present, there is no evidence that T. erythraeum blooms represent a threat to humans.

  15. Culture temperature affects gene expression and metabolic pathways in the 2-methylisoborneol-producing cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Miyagi, Atsuko; Saito, Kazuaki; Miyazaki, Motonobu; Asaeda, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Uchimiya, Hirofumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki

    2014-02-15

    A volatile metabolite, 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), causes an unpleasant taste and odor in tap water. Some filamentous cyanobacteria produce 2-MIB via a two-step biosynthetic pathway: methylation of geranyl diphosphate (GPP) by methyl transferase (GPPMT), followed by the cyclization of methyl-GPP by monoterpene cyclase (MIBS). We isolated the genes encoding GPPMT and MIBS from Pseudanabaena galeata, a filamentous cyanobacterium known to be a major causal organism of 2-MIB production in Japanese lakes. The predicted amino acid sequence showed high similarity with that of Pseudanabaena limnetica (96% identity in GPPMT and 97% identity in MIBS). P. galeata was cultured at different temperatures to examine the effect of growth conditions on the production of 2-MIB and major metabolites. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurements showed higher accumulation of 2-MIB at 30 °C than at 4 °C or 20 °C after 24 h of culture. Real-time-RT PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of the genes encoding GPPMT and MIBS decreased at 4 °C and increased at 30 °C, compared with at 20 °C. Furthermore, metabolite analysis showed dramatic changes in primary metabolite concentrations in cyanobacteria grown at different temperatures. The data indicate that changes in carbon flow in the TCA cycle affect 2-MIB biosynthesis at higher temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. A Genetic Toolbox for Modulating the Expression of Heterologous Genes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianping [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Bo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eckert, Carrie A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maness, Pin-Ching [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-12

    Cyanobacteria, genetic models for photosynthesis research for decades, have recently become attractive hosts for producing renewable fuels and chemicals, owing to their genetic tractability, relatively fast growth, and their ability to utilize sunlight, fix carbon dioxide, and in some cases, fix nitrogen. Despite significant advances, there is still an urgent demand for synthetic biology tools in order to effectively manipulate genetic circuits in cyanobacteria. In this study, we have compared a total of 17 natural and chimeric promoters, focusing on expression of the ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We report the finding that the E. coli s70 promoter Ptrc is superior compared to the previously reported strong promoters, such as PcpcB and PpsbA, for the expression of EFE. In addition, we found that the EFE expression level was very sensitive to the 5'-untranslated region upstream of the open reading frame. A library of ribosome binding sites (RBSs) was rationally designed and was built and systematically characterized. We demonstrate a strategy complementary to the RBS prediction software to facilitate the rational design of an RBS library to optimize the gene expression in cyanobacteria. Our results show that the EFE expression level is dramatically enhanced through these synthetic biology tools and is no longer the rate-limiting step for cyanobacterial ethylene production. These systematically characterized promoters and the RBS design strategy can serve as useful tools to tune gene expression levels and to identify and mitigate metabolic bottlenecks in cyanobacteria.

  17. Regulation of the scp Genes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803—What is New?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia Cheregi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 there are five genes encoding small CAB-like (SCP proteins, which have been shown to be up-regulated under stress. Analyses of the promoter sequences of the scp genes revealed the existence of an NtcA binding motif in two scp genes, scpB and scpE. Binding of NtcA, the key transcriptional regulator during nitrogen stress, to the promoter regions was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The metabolite 2-oxoglutarate did not increase the affinity of NtcA for binding to the promoters of scpB and scpE. A second motif, the HIP1 palindrome 5ʹ GGCGATCGCC 3ʹ, was detected in the upstream regions of scpB and scpC. The transcription factor encoded by sll1130 has been suggested to recognize this motif to regulate heat-responsive genes. Our data suggest that HIP1 is not a regulatory element within the scp genes. Further, the presence of the high light regulatory (HLR1 motif was confirmed in scpB-E, in accordance to their induced transcriptions in cells exposed to high light. The HLR1 motif was newly discovered in eight additional genes.

  18. Discovery of Rare and Highly Toxic Microcystins from Lichen-Associated Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain IO-102-I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Ilona; Jokela, Jouni; Fewer, David P.; Wahlsten, Matti; Rikkinen, Jouko; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2004-01-01

    The production of hepatotoxic cyclic heptapeptides, microcystins, is almost exclusively reported from planktonic cyanobacteria. Here we show that a terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I isolated from a lichen association produces six different microcystins. Microcystins were identified with liquid chromatography-UV mass spectrometry by their retention times, UV spectra, mass fragmentation, and comparison to microcystins from the aquatic Nostoc sp. strain 152. The dominant microcystin produced by Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I was the highly toxic [ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR, which accounted for ca. 80% of the total microcystins. We assigned a structure of [DMAdda5]microcystin-LR and [d-Asp3,ADMAdda5]microcystin-LR and a partial structure of three new [ADMAdda5]-XR type of microcystin variants. Interestingly, Nostoc spp. strains IO-102-I and 152 synthesized only the rare ADMAdda and DMAdda subfamilies of microcystin variants. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated congruence between genes involved directly in microcystin biosynthesis and the 16S rRNA and rpoC1 genes of Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I. Nostoc sp. strain 152 and the Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I are distantly related, revealing a sporadic distribution of toxin production in the genus Nostoc. Nostoc sp. strain IO-102-I is closely related to Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 and other symbiotic Nostoc strains and most likely belongs to this species. Together, this suggests that other terrestrial and aquatic strains of the genus Nostoc may have retained the genes necessary for microcystin biosynthesis. PMID:15466511

  19. Gene expression of a two-component regulatory system associated with sunscreen biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jacob; Soule, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Long-wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA) can damage cells through photooxidative stress, leading to harmful photosensitized proteins and pigments in cyanobacteria. To mitigate damage, some cyanobacteria secrete the UVA-absorbing pigment scytonemin into their extracellular sheath. Comparative genomic analyses suggest that scytonemin biosynthesis is regulated by the two-component regulatory system (TCRS) proteins encoded by Npun_F1277 and Npun_F1278 in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133. To understand the dynamics of these genes, their expression was measured following exposure to UVA, UVB, high visible (VIS) irradiance and oxidative stress for 20, 40 and 60 min. Overall, both genes had statistically similar patterns of expression for all four conditions and were generally upregulated, except for those exposed to UVB by 60 min and for the cells under oxidative stress. The greatest UVA response was an upregulation by 20 min, while the response to UVB was the most dramatic and persisted through 40 min. High VIS irradiance resulted in a modest upregulation, while oxidative stress caused a slight downregulation. Both genes were also found to occur on the same transcript. These results demonstrate that these genes are positively responding to several light-associated conditions, which suggests that this TCRS may regulate more than just scytonemin biosynthesis under UVA stress. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Dark hydrogen production in nitrogen atmosphere - An approach for sustainability by marine cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabaharan, D.; Arun Kumar, D.; Uma, L.; Subramanian, G. [National Facility for Marine Cyanobacteria (Sponsored by DBT, Govt. of India), Department of Marine Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirapalli 620 024 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Biological hydrogen production is an ideal system for three main reasons i) forms a renewable energy source, ii) gives clean fuel and iii) serves as a good supplement to oil reserves. The major challenges faced in biological hydrogen production are the presence of uptake hydrogenase and lack of sustainability in the cyanobacterial hydrogen production system. Three different marine cyanobacterial species viz. Leptolyngbya valderiana BDU 20041, Dichothrix baueriana BDU 40481 and Nostoc calcicola BDU 40302 were studied for their potential use in hydrogen production. Among these, L. valderiana BDU 20041, was found to produce hydrogen even in 100% nitrogen atmosphere which was 85% of the hydrogen produced in argon atmosphere. This is the first report of such a high rate of production of hydrogen in a nitrogen atmosphere by a cyanobacterium, which makes it possible to develop sustained hydrogen production systems. L. valderiana BDU 20041, a dark hydrogen producer uses the reductant essentially supplied by the respiratory pathway for hydrogen production. Using inhibitors, this organism was found to produce hydrogen due to the activities of both nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase, while it had no 'uptake' hydrogenase activity. The other two organisms though had low levels of bidirectional hydrogenase, possessed considerable 'uptake' hydrogenase activity and hence could not release much hydrogen either in argon or nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  1. [NiFe]-hydrogenase is essential for cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 aerobic growth in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Edith; Checchetto, Vanessa; Franchin, Cinzia; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Berto, Paola; Szabò, Ildikò; Giacometti, Giorgio M; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Costantini, Paola

    2015-07-28

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has a bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase (Hox hydrogenase) which reversibly reduces protons to H2. This enzyme is composed of a hydrogenase domain and a diaphorase moiety, which is distinctly homologous to the NADH input module of mitochondrial respiratory Complex I. Hox hydrogenase physiological function is still unclear, since it is not required for Synechocystis fitness under standard growth conditions. We analyzed the phenotype under prolonged darkness of three Synechocystis knock-out strains, lacking either Hox hydrogenase (ΔHoxE-H) or one of the proteins responsible for the assembly of its NiFe active site (ΔHypA1 and ΔHypB1). We found that Hox hydrogenase is required for Synechocystis growth under this condition, regardless of the functional status of its catalytic site, suggesting an additional role beside hydrogen metabolism. Moreover, quantitative proteomic analyses revealed that the expression levels of several subunits of the respiratory NADPH/plastoquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) are reduced when Synechocystis is grown in the dark. Our findings suggest that the Hox hydrogenase could contribute to electron transport regulation when both photosynthetic and respiratory pathways are down-regulated, and provide a possible explanation for the close evolutionary relationship between mitochondrial respiratory Complex I and cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenases.

  2. The non-metabolizable sucrose analog sucralose is a potent inhibitor of hormogonium differentiation in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splitt, Samantha D; Risser, Douglas D

    2016-03-01

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium which forms nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several different plants and fungi. Establishment of these symbioses requires the formation of motile hormogonium filaments. Once infected, the plant partner is thought to supply a hormogonium-repressing factor (HRF) to maintain the cyanobacteria in a vegetative, nitrogen-fixing state. Evidence implies that sucrose may serve as a HRF. Here, we tested the effects of sucralose, a non-metabolizable sucrose analog, on hormogonium differentiation. Sucralose inhibited hormogonium differentiation at a concentration approximately one-tenth that of sucrose. This result implies that: (1) sucrose, not a sucrose catabolite, is perceived by the cell and (2) inhibition is not due to a more general osmolarity-dependent effect. Additionally, both sucrose and sucralose induced the accrual of a polysaccharide sheath which bound specifically to the lectin ConA, indicating the presence of α-D-mannose and/or α-D-glucose. A ConA-specific polysaccharide was also found to be expressed in N. punctiforme colonies from tissue sections of the symbiotically grown hornwort Anthoceros punctatus. These findings imply that plant-derived sucrose or sucrose analogs may have multiple effects on N. punctiforme, including both repression of hormogonia and the induction of a polysaccharide sheath that may be essential to establish and maintain the symbiotic state.

  3. Characterization and Evolution of Tetrameric Photosystem I from the Thermophilic Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp TS-821[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Bruce, Barry D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a reaction center associated with oxygenic photosynthesis. Unlike the monomeric reaction centers in green and purple bacteria, PSI forms trimeric complexes in most cyanobacteria with a 3-fold rotational symmetry that is primarily stabilized via adjacent PsaL subunits; however, in plants/algae, PSI is monomeric. In this study, we discovered a tetrameric form of PSI in the thermophilic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp TS-821 (TS-821). In TS-821, PSI forms tetrameric and dimeric species. We investigated these species by Blue Native PAGE, Suc density gradient centrifugation, 77K fluorescence, circular dichroism, and single-particle analysis. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of native membranes confirms the presence of the tetrameric PSI structure prior to detergent solubilization. To investigate why TS-821 forms tetramers instead of trimers, we cloned and analyzed its psaL gene. Interestingly, this gene product contains a short insert between the second and third predicted transmembrane helices. Phylogenetic analysis based on PsaL protein sequences shows that TS-821 is closely related to heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, some of which also have a tetrameric form of PSI. These results are discussed in light of chloroplast evolution, and we propose that PSI evolved stepwise from a trimeric form to tetrameric oligomer en route to becoming monomeric in plants/algae. PMID:24681621

  4. Diel Vertical Movements of the Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria terebriformis in a Sulfide-Rich Hot Spring Microbial Mat †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a thermophilic cyanobacterium, carried out a diel vertical movement pattern in Hunter's Hot Springs, Oreg. Throughout most daylight hours, populations of O. terebriformis covered the surface of microbial mats in the hot spring outflows below an upper temperature limit of 54°C. Upon darkness trichomes moved downward by gliding motility into the substrate to a depth of 0.5 to 1.0 mm, where the population remained until dawn. At dawn the population rapidly returned to the top of the mats. Field studies with microelectrodes showed that the dense population of O. terebriformis moved each night across an oxygen-sulfide interface, entering a microenvironment which was anaerobic and reducing, a dramatic contrast to the daytime environment at the mat surface where oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in supersaturated O2. Laboratory experiments on motility with the use of sulfide gradients produced in agar revealed a negative response to sulfide at concentrations similar to those found in the natural mats. The motility response may help explain the presence of O. terebriformis below the mat surface at night. The movement back to the surface at dawn appears to be due to a combination of phototaxis, photokinesis, and the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis which consumes sulfide. Images PMID:16347435

  5. Sulfide and pH effects on variable fluorescence of photosystem II in two strains of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria amphigranulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W K; Castenholz, R W

    1990-06-01

    Changes in fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II) chlorophyll were used to monitor the in vivo effects of sulfide and pH on photosynthesis by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria amphigranulata. O. amphigranulata is capable of both oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis. A genetic variant of O. amphigranulata which photosynthesizes oxygenically at normal rates, but is incapable of anoxygenic photosynthesis and cannot tolerate sulfide, was also used to explore the mode of action of sulfide. In vivo fluorescence responses of PS II chlorophyll in the first few seconds of exposure to light (Kautsky transients) reflected the electrochemical states of PS II and associated electron donors and acceptors. Kautsky transients showed a distinct difference between PS II of the wild type and the variant, but sulfide lowered fluorescence in both. Kautsky transients with sulfide were similar to transients with addition of NH2OH, NH4 (+) or HCN, indicating sulfide interacts with a protein on the donor side of PS II. The fluorescence steady-state (after 2 min) was measured in the presence of sulfide, cyanide and ammonium with pH ranging from 7.2-8.7. Sulfide and cyanide had the most impact at pH 7.2, ammonium at pH 8.7. This suggests that the uncharged forms (HCN, NH3 and H2S) had the strongest effect on PS II, possibly because of increased membrane permeability.

  6. Diel Vertical Movements of the Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria terebriformis in a Sulfide-Rich Hot Spring Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, L L; Castenholz, R W

    1987-09-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a thermophilic cyanobacterium, carried out a diel vertical movement pattern in Hunter's Hot Springs, Oreg. Throughout most daylight hours, populations of O. terebriformis covered the surface of microbial mats in the hot spring outflows below an upper temperature limit of 54 degrees C. Upon darkness trichomes moved downward by gliding motility into the substrate to a depth of 0.5 to 1.0 mm, where the population remained until dawn. At dawn the population rapidly returned to the top of the mats. Field studies with microelectrodes showed that the dense population of O. terebriformis moved each night across an oxygen-sulfide interface, entering a microenvironment which was anaerobic and reducing, a dramatic contrast to the daytime environment at the mat surface where oxygenic photosynthesis resulted in supersaturated O(2). Laboratory experiments on motility with the use of sulfide gradients produced in agar revealed a negative response to sulfide at concentrations similar to those found in the natural mats. The motility response may help explain the presence of O. terebriformis below the mat surface at night. The movement back to the surface at dawn appears to be due to a combination of phototaxis, photokinesis, and the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis which consumes sulfide.

  7. Alterations in cell pigmentation, protein expression, and photosynthetic capacity of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria tenuis grown under low iron conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, C G; Wilhelm, S W; Brown, C M

    1995-12-01

    To better describe the iron-limited nutrient status of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms, we examined the effects of iron limitation on pigment content, maximum rates of photosynthetic oxygen evolution, and respiratory oxygen consumption in the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria tenuis Ag. Within the range of iron (4.2 x 10(-5)-5.1 x 10(-9) M FeCl3), growth rates were not limited by photosynthetic capacity but rather by another, as of yet undetermined, iron-requiring cellular function. We have also investigated membrane proteins that are induced when the cells are grown in low iron medium. Using membrane fractionation techniques we were able to recognize specific proteins localized in the outer membrane and periplasmic space of O. tenuis. The recovery of growth rates at low iron levels occurred in parallel with the induction of these proteins and the production of extracellular siderophores. The additional iron acquired by this high affinity transport system did not reestablish photosynthesis in O. tenuis to the iron-satiated level but did reestablish growth to iron-replete levels. Oscillatoria tenuis appears to invoke an alternate physiology to compensate for iron deficiency.

  8. Genetic diversity along the life cycle of the cyanobacterium Microcystis: highlight on the complexity of benthic and planktonic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabart, Marion; Misson, Benjamin; Jobard, Marlène; Bronner, Gisèle; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Duffaud, Emilie; Salençon, Marie-José; Amblard, Christian; Latour, Delphine

    2015-03-01

    Microcystis is a toxic freshwater cyanobacterium with an annual life cycle characterized by the alternation of a planktonic proliferation stage in summer and a benthic resting stage in winter. Given the importance of both stages for the development and the survival of the population, we investigated the genotypic composition of the planktonic and benthic Microcystis subpopulations from the Grangent reservoir (France) during two distinct proliferation periods. Our results showed a succession of different dominant genotypes in the sediment as well as in the water all along the study periods with some common genotypes to both compartments. Analysis of molecular variance and UniFrac analysis confirmed the similarity between some benthic and planktonic samples, thus evidencing exchanges of genotypes between water and sediment. Thanks to these data, recruitment and sedimentation were proven not to be restricted to spring and autumn, contrary to what was previously thought. Finally, genetic diversity was significantly higher in the sediment than in the water (P < 0.01; Student's t-test). Taken together, our results shed light on the hidden contribution of the benthic compartment in maintaining the genetic diversity of Microcystis populations throughout their annual cycle, which could explain their ecological success in aquatic ecosystems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Soft x-ray imaging of intracellular granules of filamentous cyanobacterium generating musty smell in Lake Biwa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, K.; Mizuta, G.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimura, M.; Ichise, S.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2013-10-01

    A planktonic blue-green algae, which are currently identified as Phormidium tenue, was observed by a soft x-ray microscopy (XM) for comparing a musty smell generating green strain (PTG) and a non-smell brown strain (PTB). By XM, cells were clearly imaged, and several intracellular granules which could not be observed under a light microscope were visualized. The diameter of granules was about 0.5-1 μm, and one or a few granules were seen in a cell. XM analyses showed that width of cells and sizes of intracellular granules were quite different between PTG and PTB strains. To study the granules observed by XM, transmission in more detail, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and indirect fluorescent-antibody technique (IFA) were applied. By TEM, carboxysomes, thylakoids and polyphosphate granules were observed. IFA showed the presence of carboxysomes. Results lead to the conclusion that intracellular granules observed under XM are carboxysomes or polyphosphate granules. These results demonstrate that soft XM is effective for analyzing fine structures of small organisms such as cyanobacterium, and for discriminating the strains which generates musty smells from others.

  10. PilB localization correlates with the direction of twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuergers, Nils; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Wallner, Thomas; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wilde, Annegret

    2015-05-01

    Twitching motility depends on the adhesion of type IV pili (T4P) to a substrate, with cell movement driven by extension and retraction of the pili. The mechanism of twitching motility, and the events that lead to a reversal of direction, are best understood in rod-shaped bacteria such as Myxococcus xanthus. In M. xanthus, the direction of movement depends on the unipolar localization of the pilus extension and retraction motors PilB and PilT to opposite cell poles. Reversal of direction results from relocalization of PilB and PilT. Some cyanobacteria utilize twitching motility for phototaxis. Here, we examine twitching motility in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which has a spherical cell shape without obvious polarity. We use a motile Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain expressing a functional GFP-tagged PilB1 protein to show that PilB1 tends to localize in 'crescents' adjacent to a specific region of the cytoplasmic membrane. Crescents are more prevalent under the low-light conditions that favour phototactic motility, and the direction of motility strongly correlates with the orientation of the crescent. We conclude that the direction of twitching motility in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is controlled by the localization of the T4P apparatus, as it is in M. xanthus. The PilB1 crescents in the spherical cells of Synechocystis can be regarded as being equivalent to the leading pole in the rod-shaped cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Evidence regarding the UV sunscreen role of a mycosporine-like compound in the cyanobacterium Gloeocapsa sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pichel, F.; Wingard, C.E.; Castenholz, R.W. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) have been thought to serve a UV sunscreen role in organisms that produce or contain them because MAAs present strong absorbance in the UV region and because there is no other apparent biological function. The researchers used the cyanobacterium Gloeocapsa sp. to assess the possible sunscreen role of MAAs. Five conditions are evaluated: (1) absorption of radiation high enough to provide benefit to the organisms; (2) correlation of presence of the compound with enhansed fitness under UV; (3) concentration of the compound and resistance to UV still present under physiological inactivity; (4) effect maximal at wavelengths of maximal absorption; (5) loss of protection after artificial removal of compound. The results indicate that only a small sunscreen effect can be ascribed to the MAA in the Gloecapsa sp. under these experimental conditions. It is possible however, that in the typical undisturbed colonial growth form, MAAs and their screening action may become major factors in resistance to UV radiation. 25 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Primary structure of allophycocyanin from the unicellular rhodophyte, Cyanidium caldarium. The complete amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, G D; Troxler, R F

    1983-08-25

    The complete amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits of allophycocyanin from the unicellular rhodophyte, Cyanidium caldarium, were determined by automated Edman degradation of the proteins and peptides derived from them by chemical and enzymatic cleavages. The sequence of the alpha subunit was determined from the sequences of tryptic, endoproteinase lysine-C, and cyanogen bromide peptides and carboxypeptidase A and Y digestion of the protein. The sequence of the beta subunit was determined from the sequences of tryptic, endoproteinase lysine-C, Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and cyanogen bromide peptides and in addition, a peptide derived from acid cleavage of an aspartyl-prolyl bond. The carboxyl-terminal sequence of the protein was determined by digestion with carboxypeptidase A. The alpha subunit contains 160 amino acids, one phycocyanobilin chromophore attached at residue 80 by a cysteinyl-thioether linkage, and the Mr calculated from the sequence is 18,160. The beta subunit contains 161 amino acids, one phycocyanobilin chromophore attached at residue 81 by a cysteinyl-thioether linkage, and the Mr calculated from the sequence is 18,125. The amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits of allophycocyanin from C. caldarium are the first complete amino acid sequences of an allophycocyanin from a eukaryotic red alga. A matrix comparison of the alpha and beta subunits of C. caldarium allophycocyanin and phycocyanin (Offner, G.D., Brown-Mason, A.S., Ehrhardt, M. M., and Troxler, R. F. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 12167-12175; Troxler, R. F., Ehrhardt, M. M., Brown-Mason, A. S., and Offner, G. D. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 12176-12184) shows homology ranging from 26 to 39%. Comparison of the sequences of alpha and beta subunits of C. caldarium allophycocyanin with the sequences of the corresponding subunits of allophycocyanin from two prokaryotic cyanobacteria (Sidler, W., Gysi, J., Isker, E., and Zuber, H. (1981) Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem

  13. The predicted secretomes of Monosiga brevicollis and Capsaspora owczarzaki, close unicellular relatives of metazoans, reveal new insights into the evolution of the metazoan extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frederike; Tew, Hannah A; Paul, Catherine E; Adams, Josephine C

    2014-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a major mediator of multi-cellularity in the metazoa. Multiple ECM proteins are conserved from sponges to human, raising questions about the evolutionary origin of ECM. Choanoflagellates are the closest unicellular relatives of the metazoa and proteins with domains characteristic of metazoan ECM proteins have been identified from the genome-predicted proteome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis. However, a systematic analysis of M. brevicollis secretory signal peptide-containing proteins with ECM domains has been lacking. We analysed all predicted secretory signal-peptide-containing proteins of M. brevicollis for ECM domains. Nine domains that are widespread in metazoan ECM proteins are represented, with EGF, fibronectin III, laminin G, and von Willebrand Factor_A domains being the most numerous. Three proteins contain more than one category of ECM domain, however, no proteins correspond to the domain architecture of metazoan ECM proteins. The fibronectin III domains are all present within glycoside hydrolases and none contain an integrin-binding motif. Glycosaminoglycan-binding motifs identified in animal thrombospondin type 1 domains are conserved in some M. brevicollis representatives of this domain, whereas there is little evidence of conservation of glycosaminoglycan-binding motifs in the laminin G domains. The identified proteins were compared with the predicted secretory ECM domain-containing proteins of the integrin-expressing filasterean, Capsaspora owczarzaki. C. owczarzaki encodes a smaller number of secretory, ECM domain-containing proteins and only EGF, fibronectin type III and laminin G domains are represented. The M. brevicollis and C. owczarzaki proteins have distinct domain architectures and all proteins differ in their domain architecture to metazoan ECM proteins. These identifications provide a basis for future experiments to validate the extracellular location of these proteins and uncover their

  14. Impacts of diurnal variation of ultraviolet-B and photosynthetically active radiation on phycobiliproteins of the hot-spring cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain HKAR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaujiya, Vinod K; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2017-01-01

    The effects of diurnal variation of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) and ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-315 nm) radiation on phycobiliproteins (PBPs) and photosynthetic pigments (PP) have been studied in the hot-spring cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain HKAR-2. The variations in PBPs and PP were monitored by alternating light and dark under PAR, UV-B, and PAR + UV-B radiations over a period of 25 h. There was a decline in the amount of Chl a and PBPs during light periods of UV-B and PAR + UV-B and an increase during dark periods showing a circadian rhythm by destruction and resynthesis of pigment-protein complex. However, a marked induction in carotenoids was recorded during light periods of the same radiations. Moreover, the ratio of Chl a/PE and Chl a/PC was increased in dark periods showing the resynthesis of bleached Chl a. The wavelength shift in emission fluorescence of PBPs toward shorter wavelengths further indicated the bleaching and destruction of PBPs during light periods. Oxidative damage upon exposure to PAR, UV-B, and PAR + UV-B was alleviated by induction of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The studied cyanobacterium exhibits a significant increase in the activities of SOD, CAT, and APX upon exposure to UV-B and PAR + UV-B radiations. The results indicate that pigment-protein composition of Nostoc sp. stain HKAR-2 was significantly altered during diurnal variation of light/radiation, which might play an important role in optimization for their productivity in a particular cyanobacterium.

  15. The complete amino acid sequence of both subunits of allophycocyanin, a light harvesting protein-pigment complex from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, W; Gysi, J; Isker, E; Zuber, H

    1981-06-01

    The amino acid sequences of the alpha- and beta-subunit of allophycocyanin, a water-soluble light-harvesting protein-pigment complex from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus have been determined. The alpha-chain consists of 160 amino acid residues and the beta-chain of 161 amino acid residues. The homology of the alpha- and beta-chains is 37%. A comparison with C-phycocyanin reveals that the second chromophore of the C-phycocyanin beta-subunit is attached to an inserted peptide of 10 amino acid residues at position 151-160.

  16. High radiation and desiccation tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 emanates from genome/proteome repair capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Anurag, Kirti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-10-12

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was found to tolerate very high doses of 60Co-gamma radiation or prolonged desiccation. Post-stress, cells remained intact and revived all the vital functions. A remarkable capacity to repair highly disintegrated genome and recycle the damaged proteome appeared to underlie such high radioresistance and desiccation tolerance. The close similarity observed between the cellular response to irradiation or desiccation stress lends strong support to the notion that tolerance to these stresses may involve similar mechanisms.

  17. Gene Inactivation in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the Green Sulfur Bacterium Chlorobium tepidum Using In Vitro-Made DNA Constructs and Natural Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Bryant, Donald A

    2004-01-01

    Inactivation of a chromosomal gene is a useful approach to study the function of the gene in question and can be used to produce a desired phenotype in the organism. This chapter describes how to generate such mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and the green sulfur bacterium...... Chlorobium tepidum by natural transformation with synthetic DNA constructs. Two alternative methods to generate the DNA constructs, both performed entirely in vitro and based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are also presented. These methods are ligation of DNA fragments with T4 DNA ligase...

  18. Global Proteomics Reveal An Atypical Strategy for Carbon/Nitrogen Assimilation by a Cyanobacterium Under Diverse Environmental Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, Kimberly M.; Singh, Abhay K.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Welsh, Eric A.; Keren, Nir S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Ghosh, Bijoy K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2010-12-01

    Cyanobacteria, the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis, are present in diverse ecological niches and play crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. To proliferate in nature, cyanobacteria utilize a host of stress responses to accommodate periodic changes in environmental conditions. A detailed knowledge of the composition of, as well as the dynamic changes in, the proteome is necessary to gain fundamental insights into such stress responses. Toward this goal, we have performed a largescale proteomic analysis of the widely studied model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under 33 different environmental conditions. The resulting high-quality dataset consists of 22,318 unique peptides corresponding to 1,955 proteins, a coverage of 53% of the predicted proteome. Quantitative determination of protein abundances has led to the identification of 1,198 differentially regulated proteins. Notably, our analysis revealed that a common stress response under various environmental perturbations, irrespective of amplitude and duration, is the activation of atypical pathways for the acquisition of carbon and nitrogen from urea and arginine. In particular, arginine is catabolized via putrescine to produce succinate and glutamate, sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. This study provides the most comprehensive functional and quantitative analysis of the Synechocystis proteome to date, and shows that a significant stress response of cyanobacteria involves an uncommon mode of acquisition of carbon and nitrogen. Oxygenic phototrophic prokaryotes, the progenitors of the chloroplast, are crucial to global oxygen production and worldwide carbon and nitrogen cycles. These microalgae are robust organisms capable carbon neutral biofuel production. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has historically been a model cyanobacterium for photosynthetic research and is emerging as a promising biofuel platform. Cellular responses are severely modified by environmental

  19. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Iron Isotope Fractionation during Fe(II) Oxidation Mediated by the Oxygen-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we couple iron isotope analysis to microscopic and mineralogical investigation of iron speciation during circumneutral Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation with photosynthetically produced oxygen. In the presence of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) is oxidized and precipitated as amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals (iron precipitates, Feppt), with distinct isotopic fractionation (ε56Fe) values determined from fitting the δ56Fe(II)aq (1.79‰ and 2.15‰) and the δ56Feppt (2.44‰ and 2.98‰) data trends from two replicate experiments. Additional Fe(II) and Fe(III) phases were detected using microscopy and chemical extractions and likely represent Fe(II) and Fe(III) sorbed to minerals and cells. The iron desorbed with sodium acetate (FeNaAc) yielded heavier δ56Fe compositions than Fe(II)aq. Modeling of the fractionation during Fe(III) sorption to cells and Fe(II) sorption to Feppt, combined with equilibration of sorbed iron and with Fe(II)aq using published fractionation factors, is consistent with our resulting δ56FeNaAc. The δ56Feppt data trend is inconsistent with complete equilibrium exchange with Fe(II)aq. Because of this and our detection of microbially excreted organics (e.g., exopolysaccharides) coating Feppt in our microscopic analysis, we suggest that electron and atom exchange is partially suppressed in this system by biologically produced organics. These results indicate that cyanobacteria influence the fate and composition of iron in sunlit environments via their role in Fe(II) oxidation through O2 production, the capacity of their cell surfaces to sorb iron, and the interaction of secreted organics with Fe(III) minerals. PMID:28402123

  1. Primary irritant and delayed-contact hypersensitivity reactions to the freshwater cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and its associated toxin cylindrospermopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seawright Alan A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater cyanobacteria are common inhabitants of recreational waterbodies throughout the world; some cyanobacteria can dominate the phytoplankton and form blooms, many of which are toxic. Numerous reports in the literature describe pruritic skin rashes after recreational or occupational exposure to cyanobacteria, but there has been little research conducted on the cutaneous effects of cyanobacteria. Using the mouse ear swelling test (MEST, we sought to determine whether three toxin-producing cyanobacteria isolates and the purified cyanotoxin cylindrospermopsin produced delayed-contact hypersensitivity reactions. Methods Between 8 and 10 female Balb/c mice in each experiment had test material applied to depilated abdominal skin during the induction phase and 10 or 11 control mice had vehicle only applied to abdominal skin. For challenge (day 10 and rechallenge (day 17, test material was applied to a randomly-allocated test ear; vehicle was applied to the other ear as a control. Ear thickness in anaesthetised mice was measured with a micrometer gauge at 24 and 48 hours after challenge and rechallenge. Ear swelling greater than 20% in one or more test mice is considered a positive response. Histopathology examination of ear tissues was conducted by independent examiners. Results Purified cylindrospermopsin (2 of 9 test mice vs. 0 of 5 control mice; p = 0.51 and the cylindrospermopsin-producing cyanobacterium C. raciborskii (8 of 10 test mice vs. 0 of 10 control mice; p = 0.001 were both shown to produce hypersensitivity reactions. Irritant reactions were seen on abdominal skin at induction. Two other toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena circinalis did not generate any responses using this model. Histopathology examinations to determine positive and negative reactions in ear tissues showed excellent agreement beyond chance between both examiners (κ = 0.83. Conclusion The irritant properties and cutaneous

  2. Iron Isotope Fractionation during Fe(II) Oxidation Mediated by the Oxygen-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, E D; Bayer, T; Wu, W; Hao, L; Obst, M; Sundman, A; Byrne, J M; Michel, F M; Kleinhanns, I C; Kappler, A; Schoenberg, R

    2017-05-02

    In this study, we couple iron isotope analysis to microscopic and mineralogical investigation of iron speciation during circumneutral Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation with photosynthetically produced oxygen. In the presence of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) is oxidized and precipitated as amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals (iron precipitates, Feppt), with distinct isotopic fractionation (ε56Fe) values determined from fitting the δ56Fe(II)aq (1.79‰ and 2.15‰) and the δ56Feppt (2.44‰ and 2.98‰) data trends from two replicate experiments. Additional Fe(II) and Fe(III) phases were detected using microscopy and chemical extractions and likely represent Fe(II) and Fe(III) sorbed to minerals and cells. The iron desorbed with sodium acetate (FeNaAc) yielded heavier δ56Fe compositions than Fe(II)aq. Modeling of the fractionation during Fe(III) sorption to cells and Fe(II) sorption to Feppt, combined with equilibration of sorbed iron and with Fe(II)aq using published fractionation factors, is consistent with our resulting δ56FeNaAc. The δ56Feppt data trend is inconsistent with complete equilibrium exchange with Fe(II)aq. Because of this and our detection of microbially excreted organics (e.g., exopolysaccharides) coating Feppt in our microscopic analysis, we suggest that electron and atom exchange is partially suppressed in this system by biologically produced organics. These results indicate that cyanobacteria influence the fate and composition of iron in sunlit environments via their role in Fe(II) oxidation through O2 production, the capacity of their cell surfaces to sorb iron, and the interaction of secreted organics with Fe(III) minerals.

  3. Effects of UV-B radiation and periodic desiccation on the morphogenesis of the edible terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan-Na; Zhang, Zhong-Chun; Feng, Jun-Li; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    The terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc flagelliforme Berk. et M. A. Curtis has been a popular food and herbal ingredient for hundreds of years. To meet great market demand and protect the local ecosystem, for decades researchers have tried to cultivate N. flagelliforme but have failed to get macroscopic filamentous thalli. In this study, single trichomes with 50 to 200 vegetative cells were induced from free-living cells by low light and used to investigate the morphogenesis of N. flagelliforme under low UV-B radiation and periodic desiccation. Low-fluence-rate UV-B (0.1 W m(-2)) did not inhibit trichome growth; however, it significantly increased the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides and mycosporine-like amino acids and promoted sheath formation outside the trichomes. Under low UV-B radiation, single trichomes developed into filamentous thalli more than 1 cm long after 28 days of cultivation, most of which grew separately in liquid BG11 medium. With periodic desiccation treatment, the single trichomes formed flat or banded thalli that grew up to 2 cm long after 3 months on solid BG11 medium. When trichomes were cultivated on solid BG11 medium with alternate treatments of low UV-B and periodic desiccation, dark and scraggly filamentous thalli that grew up to about 3 cm in length after 40 days were obtained. In addition, the cultivation of trichomes on nitrogen-deficient solid BG11 medium (BG11(0)) suggested that nitrogen availability could affect the color and lubricity of newly developed thalli. This study provides promising techniques for artificial cultivation of N. flagelliforme in the future.

  4. Changes in N:P Supply Ratios Affect the Ecological Stoichiometry of a Toxic Cyanobacterium and Its Fungal Parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Frenken

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human activities have dramatically altered nutrient fluxes from the landscape into receiving waters. As a result, not only the concentration of nutrients in surface waters has increased, but also their elemental ratios have changed. Such shifts in resource supply ratios will alter autotroph stoichiometry, which may in turn have consequences for higher trophic levels, including parasites. Here, we hypothesize that parasite elemental composition will follow changes in the stoichiometry of its host, and that its reproductive success will decrease with host nutrient limitation. We tested this hypothesis by following the response of a host–parasite system to changes in nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P supply in a controlled laboratory experiment. To this end, we exposed a fungal parasite (the chytrid Rhizophydium megarrhizum to its host (the freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens under control, low N:P and high N:P conditions. Host N:P followed treatment conditions, with a decreased N:P ratio under low N:P supply, and an increased N:P ratio under high N:P supply, as compared to the control. Shifts in host N:P stoichiometry were reflected in the parasite stoichiometry. Furthermore, at low N:P supply, host intracellular microcystin concentration was lowered as compared to high N:P supply. In contrast to our hypothesis, zoospore production decreased at low N:P and increased at high N:P ratio as compared to the control. These findings suggest that fungal parasites have a relatively high N, but low P requirement. Furthermore, zoospore elemental content, and thereby presumably their size, decreased at high N:P ratios. From these results we hypothesize that fungal parasites may exhibit a trade-off between zoospore size and production. Since zooplankton can graze on chytrid zoospores, changes in parasite production, stoichiometry and cell size may have implications for aquatic food web dynamics.

  5. Changes in N:P Supply Ratios Affect the Ecological Stoichiometry of a Toxic Cyanobacterium and Its Fungal Parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenken, Thijs; Wierenga, Joren; Gsell, Alena S; van Donk, Ellen; Rohrlack, Thomas; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2017-01-01

    Human activities have dramatically altered nutrient fluxes from the landscape into receiving waters. As a result, not only the concentration of nutrients in surface waters has increased, but also their elemental ratios have changed. Such shifts in resource supply ratios will alter autotroph stoichiometry, which may in turn have consequences for higher trophic levels, including parasites. Here, we hypothesize that parasite elemental composition will follow changes in the stoichiometry of its host, and that its reproductive success will decrease with host nutrient limitation. We tested this hypothesis by following the response of a host-parasite system to changes in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) supply in a controlled laboratory experiment. To this end, we exposed a fungal parasite (the chytrid Rhizophydium megarrhizum) to its host (the freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens) under control, low N:P and high N:P conditions. Host N:P followed treatment conditions, with a decreased N:P ratio under low N:P supply, and an increased N:P ratio under high N:P supply, as compared to the control. Shifts in host N:P stoichiometry were reflected in the parasite stoichiometry. Furthermore, at low N:P supply, host intracellular microcystin concentration was lowered as compared to high N:P supply. In contrast to our hypothesis, zoospore production decreased at low N:P and increased at high N:P ratio as compared to the control. These findings suggest that fungal parasites have a relatively high N, but low P requirement. Furthermore, zoospore elemental content, and thereby presumably their size, decreased at high N:P ratios. From these results we hypothesize that fungal parasites may exhibit a trade-off between zoospore size and production. Since zooplankton can graze on chytrid zoospores, changes in parasite production, stoichiometry and cell size may have implications for aquatic food web dynamics.

  6. Sulfide-dependent photosynthetic electron flow coupled to proton translocation in thylakoids of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahak, Y; Arieli, B; Binder, B; Padan, E

    1987-12-01

    Light-induced proton translocation coupled to sulfide-dependent electron transport has been studied in isolated thylakoids of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica. The thylakoids are obtained by osmotic shock of washed spheroplasts, prepared with glycine-betaine as the osmotic stabilizer. 13C NMR studies suggests that betaine is the major osmoregulator in O. limnetica. Thylakoid preparations obtained from both sulfide-induced anoxygenic cells and noninduced oxygenic cells are capable of proton pumping coupled to phenazinemethosulfate-mediated cyclic electron flow. However, only in the induced thylakoids can sulfide-dependent proton gradient (delta pH) formation be measured, using either NADP or methyl viologen as the terminal acceptor. Sulfide-dependent delta pH formation correlates with a high-affinity electron donation site (apparent Km 44 microM at pH 7.9). This site is not lost upon washing of the thylakoids. In addition, both sulfide-dependent electron transport and delta pH formation are sensitive to inhibitors of the cytochrome b6f complex such as 2-n-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, 2,4-dinitrophenyl ether of 2-iodo-4-nitrothymol, or stigmatellin. Sulfide-dependent NADP photoreduction of low affinity (which does not saturate by as much as 7 mM sulfide) is detected in both induced and noninduced thylakoids, but this activity is insensitive to the inhibitors and is not coupled to proton transport. It is suggested that the adaptation of O. limnetica to anoxygenic photosynthesis involves the induction of a thylakoid factor(s) which creates a high-affinity site for sulfide, and the transfer of its electrons via the cytochrome b6f complex, coupled to proton translocation.

  7. Detection of microcystin synthetase genes in health food supplements containing the freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, M L; Jungblut, A-D; Neilan, B A; Rawn, D F K; Vasconcelos, V M

    2005-10-01

    In this study we investigated the presence of toxin-producing cyanobacterial contaminants in food supplements manufactured from blooms of the non-toxic freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Previous reports investigating the contamination of health food supplements with toxin-producing cyanobacteria have used chemical and or biochemical methods such as HPLC, ELISA and protein phosphatase assays. Whilst these studies have drawn attention to the presence of hepatotoxic microcystins in some commercially available food supplements, the methods used do not provide any information on the source of the contaminant. Such information would be useful for the quality control of food supplements produced for human consumption. In this study we applied a molecular technique, involving the amplification of the 16s rRNA gene, the phycocyanin operon, and two genes of the microcystin synthetase gene cluster to show that all 12 food supplement samples, sourced from various internet distributors and containing non-toxic A. flos-aquae, also contained toxigenic cyanobacteria. Sequencing of the microcystin synthetase genes detected in all of the food supplements showed that M. aeruginosa was the organism responsible for the production of microcystins in the samples. The presence of microcystins in the food supplements was confirmed by ELISA, with concentrations within the range of 0.1--4.72 microgg(-1) (microcystin-LR equivalents). Given that the molecular methods applied here are highly sensitive, and show good agreement with the results obtained from ELISA, we believe that they could potentially be used as a quality control technique for food products that contain cyanobacteria.

  8. Reversal in competitive dominance of a toxic versus non-toxic cyanobacterium in response to rising CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Verspagen, Jolanda M H; Finke, Jan F; Vournazou, Vasiliki; Immers, Anne K; Kardinaal, W Edwin A; Tonk, Linda; Becker, Sven; Van Donk, Ellen; Visser, Petra M; Huisman, Jef

    2011-09-01

    Climate change scenarios predict a doubling of the atmospheric CO(2) concentration by the end of this century. Yet, how rising CO(2) will affect the species composition of aquatic microbial communities is still largely an open question. In this study, we develop a resource competition model to investigate competition for dissolved inorganic carbon in dense algal blooms. The model predicts how dynamic changes in carbon chemistry, pH and light conditions during bloom development feed back on competing phytoplankton species. We test the model predictions in chemostat experiments with monocultures and mixtures of a toxic and non-toxic strain of the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. The toxic strain was able to reduce dissolved CO(2) to lower concentrations than the non-toxic strain, and became dominant in competition at low CO(2) levels. Conversely, the non-toxic strain could grow at lower light levels, and became dominant in competition at high CO(2) levels but low light availability. The model captured the observed reversal in competitive dominance, and was quantitatively in good agreement with the results of the competition experiments. To assess whether microcystins might have a role in this reversal of competitive dominance, we performed further competition experiments with the wild-type strain M. aeruginosa PCC 7806 and its mcyB mutant impaired in microcystin production. The microcystin-producing wild type had a strong selective advantage at low CO(2) levels but not at high CO(2) levels. Our results thus demonstrate both in theory and experiment that rising CO(2) levels can alter the community composition and toxicity of harmful algal blooms.

  9. CO2Removal from Biogas by Cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. CChF1 Isolated from the Lake Chapala, Mexico: Optimization of the Temperature and Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choix, Francisco J; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Carbajal-López, Alberto; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, the capacity of the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. CChF1 to remove CO 2 from real and synthetic biogas was evaluated. The identification of the cyanobacterium, isolated from the lake Chapala, was carried out by means of morphological and molecular analyses, while its potential for CO 2 removal from biogas streams was evaluated by kinetic experiments and optimized by a central composite design coupled to a response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that Leptolyngbya sp. CChF1 is able to remove CO 2 and grow indistinctly in real or synthetic biogas streams, showing tolerance to high concentrations of CO 2 and CH 4 , 25 and 75%, respectively. The characterization of the biomass composition at the end of the kinetic assays revealed that the main accumulated by-products under both biogas streams were lipids, followed by proteins and carbohydrates. Regarding the optimization experiments, light intensity and temperature were the studied variables, while synthetic biogas was the carbon source. Results showed that light intensity was significant for CO 2 capture efficiency (p = 0.0290), while temperature was significant for biomass production (p = 0.0024). The predicted CO 2 capture efficiency under optimal conditions (27.1 °C and 920 lx) was 93.48%. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that Leptolyngbya sp. CChF1 is a suitable candidate for biogas upgrading.

  10. A high constitutive catalase activity confers resistance to methyl viologen-promoted oxidative stress in a mutant of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2014-04-01

    A spontaneous methyl viologen (MV)-resistant mutant of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 was isolated and the major enzymatic antioxidants involved in combating MV-induced oxidative stress were evaluated. The mutant displayed a high constitutive catalase activity as a consequence of which, the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in the mutant was lower than the wild type (N. punctiforme) in the presence of MV. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity that consisted of a SodA (manganese-SOD) and a SodB (iron-SOD) was not suppressed in the mutant following MV treatment. The mutant was, however, characterised by a lower peroxidase activity compared with its wild type, and its improved tolerance to externally added H₂O₂ could only be attributed to enhanced catalase activity. Furthermore, MV-induced toxic effects on the wild type such as (1) loss of photosynthetic performance assessed as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, (2) nitrogenase inactivation, and (3) filament fragmentation and cell lysis were not observed in the mutant. These findings highlight the importance of catalase in preventing MV-promoted oxidative damage and cell death in the cyanobacterium N. punctiforme. Such oxidative stress resistant mutants of cyanobacteria are likely to be a better source of biofertilisers, as they can grow and fix nitrogen in an unhindered manner in agricultural fields that are often contaminated with the herbicide MV, also commonly known as paraquat.

  11. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhy Rabindra N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp.

  12. Ciliate Nassula sp. grazing on a microcystin-producing cyanobacterium (Planktothrix agardhii): impact on cell growth and in the microcystin fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Audrey; Dellinger, Marc; Cadel-six, Sabrina; Amand, Severine; Comte, Katia

    2013-01-15

    The proliferation of microcystins (MCs)-producing cyanobacteria (MCs) can have detrimental effects on the food chain in aquatic environments. Until recently, few studies had focused on the fate of MCs in exposed organisms, such as primary consumers of cyanobacteria. In this study, we investigate the impact of an MC-producing strain of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii on the growth and physiology of a Nassula sp. ciliate isolated from a non-toxic cyanobacterial bloom. We show that this Nassula sp. strain was able to consume and grow while feeding exclusively on an MC-producing cyanobacterium over a prolonged period of time (8 months). In short-term exposure experiments (8 days), ciliates consuming an MC-producing cyanobacterial strain displayed slower growth rate and higher levels of antioxidant enzymes than ciliates feeding on two non-MC-producing strains. Three high-performance methods (LC/MS, LC/MS-MS and ELISA) were used to quantify the free and bound MCs in the culture medium and in the cells. We show that ciliate grazing led to a marked decrease in free MCs (methanol extractable) in cells, the MCs were therefore no longer found in the surrounding culture medium. These findings suggest that MCs may have undergone redistribution (free vs bound MCs) or chemical degradation within the ciliates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ciliate Nassula sp. grazing on a microcystin-producing cyanobacterium (Planktothrix agardhii): impact on cell growth and in the microcystin fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combes, Audrey; Dellinger, Marc [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Cadel-six, Sabrina [' Unite Caracterisation des Toxines' - Laboratoire de securite des aliments de Maisons-Alfort - ANSES, F-94701 Maisons Alfort Cedex (France); Amand, Severine [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Comte, Katia, E-mail: kcomte@mnhn.fr [' Molecules de communication et adaptation des microorganismes' , UMR 7245 CNRS-MNHN, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, CP 39, 57 rue Cuvier, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-01-15

    The proliferation of microcystins (MCs)-producing cyanobacteria (MCs) can have detrimental effects on the food chain in aquatic environments. Until recently, few studies had focused on the fate of MCs in exposed organisms, such as primary consumers of cyanobacteria. In this study, we investigate the impact of an MC-producing strain of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix agardhii on the growth and physiology of a Nassula sp. ciliate isolated from a non-toxic cyanobacterial bloom. We show that this Nassula sp. strain was able to consume and grow while feeding exclusively on an MC-producing cyanobacterium over a prolonged period of time (8 months). In short-term exposure experiments (8 days), ciliates consuming an MC-producing cyanobacterial strain displayed slower growth rate and higher levels of antioxidant enzymes than ciliates feeding on two non-MC-producing strains. Three high-performance methods (LC/MS, LC/MS-MS and ELISA) were used to quantify the free and bound MCs in the culture medium and in the cells. We show that ciliate grazing led to a marked decrease in free MCs (methanol extractable) in cells, the MCs were therefore no longer found in the surrounding culture medium. These findings suggest that MCs may have undergone redistribution (free vs bound MCs) or chemical degradation within the ciliates.

  14. Unlocking the Constraints of Cyanobacterial Productivity: Acclimations Enabling Ultrafast Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans C. Bernstein

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the metabolic potential of photosynthetic microbes for next-generation biotechnology objectives requires detailed scientific understanding of the physiological constraints and regulatory controls affecting carbon partitioning between biomass, metabolite storage pools, and bioproduct synthesis. We dissected the cellular mechanisms underlying the remarkable physiological robustness of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 (Synechococcus 7002 and identify key mechanisms that allow cyanobacteria to achieve unprecedented photoautotrophic productivities (~2.5-h doubling time. Ultrafast growth of Synechococcus 7002 was supported by high rates of photosynthetic electron transfer and linked to significantly elevated transcription of precursor biosynthesis and protein translation machinery. Notably, no growth or photosynthesis inhibition signatures were observed under any of the tested experimental conditions. Finally, the ultrafast growth in Synechococcus 7002 was also linked to a 300% expansion of average cell volume. We hypothesize that this cellular adaptation is required at high irradiances to support higher cell division rates and reduce deleterious effects, corresponding to high light, through increased carbon and reductant sequestration.

  15. Combined Effects of CO2 and Light on the N2-Fixing Cyanobacterium Trichodesmium IMS101: Physiological Responses1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Sven A.; Levitan, Orly; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Prášil, Ondřej; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Rost, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum (IMS101) showed that increasing CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) enhances N2 fixation and growth. Significant uncertainties remain as to the degree of the sensitivity to pCO2, its modification by other environmental factors, and underlying processes causing these responses. To address these questions, we examined the responses of Trichodesmium IMS101 grown under a matrix of low and high levels of pCO2 (150 and 900 μatm) and irradiance (50 and 200 μmol photons m−2 s−1). Growth rates as well as cellular carbon and nitrogen contents increased with increasing pCO2 and light levels in the cultures. The pCO2-dependent stimulation in organic carbon and nitrogen production was highest under low light. High pCO2 stimulated rates of N2 fixation and prolonged the duration, while high light affected maximum rates only. Gross photosynthesis increased with light but did not change with pCO2. HCO3− was identified as the predominant carbon source taken up in all treatments. Inorganic carbon uptake increased with light, but only gross CO2 uptake was enhanced under high pCO2. A comparison between carbon fluxes in vivo and those derived from 13C fractionation indicates high internal carbon cycling, especially in the low-pCO2 treatment under high light. Light-dependent oxygen uptake was only detected under low pCO2 combined with high light or when low-light-acclimated cells were exposed to high light, indicating that the Mehler reaction functions also as a photoprotective mechanism in Trichodesmium. Our data confirm the pronounced pCO2 effect on N2 fixation and growth in Trichodesmium and further show a strong modulation of these effects by light intensity. We attribute these responses to changes in the allocation of photosynthetic energy between carbon acquisition and the assimilation of carbon and nitrogen under elevated pCO2. These findings are supported by a complementary study looking at photosynthetic

  16. Identification and characterization of a carboxysomal γ-carbonic anhydrase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Charlotte; Arefeen, Dewan; Tadesse, Yohannes; Long, Benedict M; Price, G Dean; Rowlett, Roger S; Kimber, Matthew S; Espie, George S

    2014-09-01

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous microcompartments that encapsulate carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco); carboxysomes, therefore, catalyze reversible HCO3 (-) dehydration and the subsequent fixation of CO2. The N- and C-terminal domains of the β-carboxysome scaffold protein CcmM participate in a network of protein-protein interactions that are essential for carboxysome biogenesis, organization, and function. The N-terminal domain of CcmM in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 is also a catalytically active, redox regulated γ-CA. To experimentally determine if CcmM from a mesophilic cyanobacterium is active, we cloned, expressed and purified recombinant, full-length CcmM from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 as well as the N-terminal 209 amino acid γ-CA-like domain. Both recombinant proteins displayed ethoxyzolamide-sensitive CA activity in mass spectrometric assays, as did the carboxysome-enriched TP fraction. NstCcmM209 was characterized as a moderately active and efficient γ-CA with a k cat of 2.0 × 10(4) s(-1) and k cat/K m of 4.1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and pH 8, a pH optimum between 8 and 9.5 and a temperature optimum spanning 25-35 °C. NstCcmM209 also catalyzed the hydrolysis of the CO2 analog carbonyl sulfide. Circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis demonstrated that NstCcmM209 was progressively and irreversibly denatured above 50 °C. NstCcmM209 activity was inhibited by the reducing agent tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine, an effect that was fully reversed by a molar excess of diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, consistent with oxidative activation being a universal regulatory mechanism of CcmM orthologs. Immunogold electron microscopy and Western blot analysis of TP pellets indicated that Rubisco and CcmM co-localize and are concentrated in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 carboxysomes.

  17. Photosynthetic Versatility in the Genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (Formerly Oscillatoria limnetica 'Solar Lake'), a Model Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Sharon L; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth's biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica 'Solar Lake', a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP). Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR) used in cyanobacterial AP and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential cyanobacterial strategies to cope with fluctuating

  18. Photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under process engineering aspects; Photobiologische Wasserstoffproduktion mit der einzelligen Gruenalge Chlamydomonas reinhardtii unter verfahrenstechnischen Aspekten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen is of high interest as a clean and environmentally friendly energy source as its combustion only emits water and energy. However, currently hydrogen is produced in energy demanding processes by the consumption of fossil fuels. An alternative way of sustainable and non-polluting hydrogen production could be provided by use of photosynthetic active microalgae. Within this work, the photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is investigated under the aspects of bioprocess-engineering and economics. Objectives are, besides the increase of the photochemical efficiency, the cultivation of the algae and subsequent hydrogen production under cost-free sunlight. It could be demonstrated that outdoor cultivation of C. reinhardtii is possible in Central Europe throughout the year by using e.g. waste heat. Similar cell numbers in the range from 1,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} to 1,7.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved in closed photobioreactors of the type Photobioreactor Screening Module under controlled laboratory conditions and both continuous illumination (200 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}) and simulated outdoor conditions according to the light intensity of idealized summer day as well as in outdoor experiments (up to 2000 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}).The use of 10 % CO{sub 2} corresponding to the CO{sub 2} content in flue gas led to a doubling of cell numbers under continuous illumination to 4,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1}, compared to the reference culture bubbled with 3 % CO{sub 2}. A significant increase of cell numbers under the light profiles of an idealized summer day could not be achieved. The cultivation under the light profile of a winter day at 25 C reduced cell growth to 54 %, compared to the summer simulation. In open 30 L outdoor ponds, only 0,26.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved under photoheterotrophic conditions during the summer months, which corresponds to 20 % of the cell

  19. Laboratory Simulation of Biogeochemical Interactions Between Cyanobacterium-Growth and CaCO3 Deposition: Implications for Carbon Accumulation Under Extreme Atmospheric Conditions of Precambrian Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Chen, L.; Chen, G.; Yang, H.

    2004-05-01

    The atmosphere of Precambrian Earth was characterized by high PCO2, low PO2, and high violent UV radiation. To better understand the interaction between cyanobacterium-growth and CaCO3 deposition in such extreme environments, we grew Oscillatoria tenuis, a prokaryotic alga that is morphologically similar to micro-fossils found in Precambrian chert, in the laboratory under controlled temperature and patial presure of CO2. During algal cell growth, oxygen was absorbed continously by chromous chloride oxygen-absorbent and the levels of PCO2 were controlled by adding different amounts of HCO3- (NaHCO3) in culture medium with initial pH 7.4. Our observation indicates that PCO2 excerises the first order of control on the accumulation of cyanobaterium biomass. Under 100,000 Pa of PCO2, the growth rate of cyanobaterium increases along with the elevation of CO2 partial pressure; however, when PCO2 is higher than 100,000 Pa, the increase of PCO2 results in the decrease of cyanobacterium biomass. On the other hand, photosynthesis of cyanobacteria controls CaCO3 deposition via the function of adjusting pH in the solution. In a 5 day cell growth experiment with PCO2 controlled at about 50,000 Pa and additional 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 M Ca2+ input separately at speed of 2.5 ml/h, the largest total biomass of cyanobacterium (896 mg/L) including living suspension cells and deposited cells was obtained when Ca2+ input was maintained at 0.01 M with 2.5 ml/h. Otherwise, less Ca2+ input resulted in more living suspension cells and less deposited cells. More Ca2+ input resulted in less living suspension cells and more deposited cells. At last both conditions were not good for cell growth and accumulation of organic matter in carbonate deposition in long term. Our laboratory simulation illustrates that the Ca2+ input is critical to CaCO3 deposition and such controls are indirectly enforced through the accumulation of cyanobacteria biomass under a warm, anoxic and high pCO2

  20. Determination of damage and In vivo DNA repairing through the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique; Determinacion del dano y la reparacion del ADN In vivo mediante la tecnica de electroforesis unicelular en gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendiola C, M.T.; Morales R, P. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The experimental conditions were standardized for the unicellular in gel electrophoresis technique setting up (EUG) at the Cellular Radiobiology laboratory. Preliminary experiments were realized with human cells and mouse which were exposed to ionizing radiation or hydroxide peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to induce DNA damage and to verify the technique performance. It was analysed the In vivo repairing kinetics of induced damage by gamma radiation in mouse leukocytes which were exposed to {sup 137} Cs source and taking samples of peripheric blood of the tail of each mouse at different exposure times and processing them for EUG. In function of the cells proportion with damage in each time it was determined the existence of fast repairing mechanism at the first 15 minutes followed by a slight increase in the damage and a late repairing stage between 30 and 90 minutes. It was analysed this behavior and the potentiality of this In vivo system. (Author)

  1. Efficiency of Photosynthesis in a Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium is Comparable to or Higher than that in Chl a-Utilizing Oxygenic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, S. P.; Kiang, N. Y.; Blankenship, R. E.; Gunner, M. R.; Mauzerall, D.

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina uses chlorophyll d to carry out oxygenic photosynthesis in environments depleted in visible and enhanced in lower-energy, far-red light. However, the extent to which low photon energies limit the efficiency of oxygenic photochemistry in A. marina is not known. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the energy-storage efficiency of the photosynthetic light reactions in A. marina whole cells,and find it is comparable to or higher than that in typical, chlorophyll a-utilizing oxygenic species. This finding indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis is not fundamentally limited at the photon energies employed by A. marina, and therefore is potentially viable in even longer-wavelength light environments.

  2. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauw, Pasqual; Mashiba, Tomohiro; Kopczak, Marta; Wiegand, Katrin; Muraki, Norifumi; Kubota, Hisako; Kawano, Yusuke; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Hase, Toshiharu; Rögner, Matthias; Kurisu, Genji

    2012-09-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) is a flavoenzyme that catalyses the reduction of NADP(+) in the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (TeFNR) contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its N-terminus relative to chloroplastic FNRs and is more thermostable than those from mesophilic cyanobacteria. With the aim of understanding the structural basis of the thermostability of TeFNR and assigning a structural role to the small additional domain, the gene encoding TeFNR with and without an additional domain was engineered for heterologous expression and the recombinant proteins were purified and crystallized. Crystals of TeFNR without the additional domain belonged to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 55.05, b = 71.66, c = 89.73 Å, α = 90, β = 98.21, γ = 90°.

  3. Production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) under photoautotrophy and heterotrophy by non-heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taepucharoen, Keerati; Tarawat, Somchai; Puangcharoen, Monthira; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Monshupanee, Tanakarn

    2017-09-01

    The photoautotrophically grown cyanobacterium Oscillatoria okeni TISTR 8549 was found to produce bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV). This PHBV production occurred under nitrogen deprivation (-N) that yielded PHBV accumulation of 14±4% (w/w DW) in which 3-hydroxyvalerate accounted for 5.5mol%. The heterotrophically grown (-N condition with acetate supplementation) cells under light showed no increase of PHBV storage, but under dark condition these cells increased PHBV accumulation to 42±8% (w/w DW) with 6.5mol% of 3-hydroxyvalerate. Compared to poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), the PHBV from O. okeni had a lower melting temperature by 5-7°C, a higher % elongation at break by 4-7times and a greater Young's elastic modulus by 2.3-2.5times. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted Cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Voss

    Full Text Available Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft genome analysis of N. spumigena sp. CCY9414 yielded a single scaffold of 5,462,271 nucleotides in length on which genes for 5,294 proteins were annotated. A subsequent strand-specific transcriptome analysis identified more than 6,000 putative transcriptional start sites (TSS. Orphan TSSs located in intergenic regions led us to predict 764 non-coding RNAs, among them 70 copies of a possible retrotransposon and several potential RNA regulators, some of which are also present in other N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Approximately 4% of the total coding capacity is devoted to the production of secondary metabolites, among them the potent hepatotoxin nodularin, the linear spumigin and the cyclic nodulapeptin. The transcriptional complexity associated with genes involved in nitrogen fixation and heterocyst differentiation is considerably smaller compared to other Nostocales. In contrast, sophisticated systems exist for the uptake and assimilation of iron and phosphorus compounds, for the synthesis of compatible solutes, and for the formation of gas vesicles, required for the active control of buoyancy. Hence, the annotation and interpretation of this sequence provides a vast array of clues into the genomic underpinnings of the physiology of this cyanobacterium and indicates in particular a competitive edge of N. spumigena in nutrient-limited brackish water ecosystems.

  5. Acetylome analysis reveals the involvement of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Yang, Mingkun; Chen, Zhuo; Cheng, Zhongyi; Yi, Xingling; Li, Chongyang; He, Chenliu; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Ge, Feng

    2015-02-06

    Cyanobacteria are the oldest known life form inhabiting Earth and the only prokaryotes capable of performing oxygenic photosynthesis. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) is a model cyanobacterium used extensively in research on photosynthesis and environmental adaptation. Posttranslational protein modification by lysine acetylation plays a critical regulatory role in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes; however, its extent and function in cyanobacteria remain unexplored. Herein, we performed a global acetylome analysis on Synechocystis through peptide prefractionation, antibody enrichment, and high accuracy LC-MS/MS analysis; identified 776 acetylation sites on 513 acetylated proteins; and functionally categorized them into an interaction map showing their involvement in various biological processes. Consistent with previous reports, a large fraction of the acetylation sites are present on proteins involved in cellular metabolism. Interestingly, for the first time, many proteins involved in photosynthesis, including the subunits of phycocyanin (CpcA, CpcB, CpcC, and CpcG) and allophycocyanin (ApcA, ApcB, ApcD, ApcE, and ApcF), were found to be lysine acetylated, suggesting that lysine acetylation may play regulatory roles in the photosynthesis process. Six identified acetylated proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon metabolism were further validated by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our data provide the first global survey of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and reveal previously unappreciated roles of lysine acetylation in the regulation of photosynthesis. The provided data set may serve as an important resource for the functional analysis of lysine acetylation in cyanobacteria and facilitate the elucidation of the entire metabolic networks and photosynthesis process in this model cyanobacterium.

  6. Influence of Extractive Solvents on Lipid and Fatty Acids Content of Edible Freshwater Algal and Seaweed Products, the Green Microalga Chlorella kessleri and the Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Vavra Ambrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Total lipid contents of green (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, C, red (Porphyra tenera, N; Palmaria palmata, D, and brown (Laminaria japonica, K; Eisenia bicyclis, A; Undaria pinnatifida, W, WI; Hizikia fusiformis, H commercial edible algal and cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis, S products, and autotrophically cultivated samples of the green microalga Chlorella kessleri (CK and the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (SP were determined using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform/water (1:2:1, v/v/v, solvent I and n-hexane (solvent II. Total lipid contents ranged from 0.64% (II to 18.02% (I by dry weight and the highest total lipid content was observed in the autotrophically cultivated cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis. Solvent mixture I was found to be more effective than solvent II. Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography of their methyl esters (% of total FAMEs. Generally, the predominant fatty acids (all results for extractions with solvent mixture I were saturated palmitic acid (C16:0; 24.64%–65.49%, monounsaturated oleic acid (C18:1(n-9; 2.79%–26.45%, polyunsaturated linoleic acid (C18:2(n-6; 0.71%–36.38%, α-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-3; 0.00%–21.29%, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-6; 1.94%–17.36%, and arachidonic acid (C20:4(n-6; 0.00%–15.37%. The highest content of ω-3 fatty acids (21.29% was determined in Chlorella pyrenoidosa using solvent I, while conversely, the highest content of ω-6 fatty acids (41.42% was observed in Chlorella kessleri using the same solvent.

  7. Unlocking the Constraints of Cyanobacterial Productivity: Acclimations Enabling Ultrafast Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; McClure, Ryan S.; Hill, Eric A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Chrisler, William B.; Romine, Margie F.; McDermott, Jason E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Konopka, Allan E.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-26

    ABSTRACT

    Harnessing the metabolic potential of photosynthetic microbes for next-generation biotechnology objectives requires detailed scientific understanding of the physiological constraints and regulatory controls affecting carbon partitioning between biomass, metabolite storage pools, and bioproduct synthesis. We dissected the cellular mechanisms underlying the remarkable physiological robustness of the euryhaline unicellular cyanobacteriumSynechococcussp. strain PCC 7002 (Synechococcus7002) and identify key mechanisms that allow cyanobacteria to achieve unprecedented photoautotrophic productivities (~2.5-h doubling time). Ultrafast growth ofSynechococcus7002 was supported by high rates of photosynthetic electron transfer and linked to significantly elevated transcription of precursor biosynthesis and protein translation machinery. Notably, no growth or photosynthesis inhibition signatures were observed under any of the tested experimental conditions. Finally, the ultrafast growth inSynechococcus7002 was also linked to a 300% expansion of average cell volume. We hypothesize that this cellular adaptation is required at high irradiances to support higher cell division rates and reduce deleterious effects, corresponding to high light, through increased carbon and reductant sequestration.

    IMPORTANCEEfficient coupling between photosynthesis and productivity is central to the development of biotechnology based on solar energy. Therefore, understanding the factors constraining maximum rates of carbon processing is necessary to identify regulatory mechanisms and devise strategies to overcome productivity constraints. Here, we interrogate the molecular mechanisms that operate at a systems level to allow cyanobacteria to achieve ultrafast growth. This was done by considering growth and photosynthetic kinetics with global transcription patterns. We have delineated

  8. The marine cyanobacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pade, N.; Compaoré, J.; Klähn, S.; Stal, L.J.; Hagemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    Compatible solutes are small organic molecules that are involved in the acclimation to various stresses such as temperature and salinity. Marine or moderate halotolerant cyanobacteria accumulate glucosylglycerol, while cyanobacteria with low salt tolerance (freshwater strains) usually accumulate

  9. Effects of lindane on the photosynthetic apparatus of the cyanobacterium Anabaena: fluorescence induction studies and immunolocalization of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Marta; Fillat, Maria F; Strasser, Reto J; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Ronald; Marina, Nerea; Smienk, Henry; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Barja, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have the natural ability to degrade moderate amounts of organic pollutants. However, when pollutant concentration exceeds the level of tolerance, bleaching of the cells and death occur within 24 hours. Under stress conditions, cyanobacterial response includes the short-term adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light quality, named state transitions. Moreover, prolonged stresses produce changes in the functional organization of phycobilisomes and in the core-complexes of both photosystems, which can result in large changes in the PS II fluorescence yield. The localization of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) at the ends of some peripheral rods of the cyanobacterial phycobilisomes, makes this protein a useful marker to check phycobilisome integrity. The goal of this work is to improve the knowledge of the mechanism of action of a very potent pesticide, lindane (gamma-hexaclorociclohexane), in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp., which can be considered a potential candidate for bioremediation of pesticides. We have studied the effect of lindane on the photosynthetic apparatus of Anabaena using fluorescence induction studies. As ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase plays a key role in the response to oxidative stress in several systems, changes in synthesis, degradation and activity of FNR were analyzed. Immunolocalization of this enzyme was used as a marker of phycobilisome integrity. The knowledge of the changes caused by lindane in the photosynthetic apparatus is essential for rational further design of genetically-modified cyanobacteria with improved biorremediation abilities. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence rise measurements (OJIP) have been used to evaluate the vitality and stress adaptation of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7119 in the presence of increasing concentrations of lindane. Effects of the pesticide on the ultrastructure have been investigated by electron microscopy, and FNR has been used as a marker of phycobilisome

  10. Therapeutic properties in Tunisian hot springs: first evidence of phenolic compounds in the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. biomass, capsular polysaccharides and releasing polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Lamia; Mnari, Amira; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M; Abid-Essafi, Salwa; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-12-13

    In Tunisia, the use of hot spring waters for both health and recreation is a tradition dating back to Roman times. In fact, thermal baths, usually called "Hammam" are recommended as a therapeutic and prophylactic measure against many types of illness and toxicity. While the chemical concentration of thermal water is admittedly associated with its therapeutic effects, the inclusion in spa waters of efficient bioproduct additives produced by photosynthetic microorganisms and that act against oxidative stress may comprise a significant supplementary value for thermal centers. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant potential of the Tunisian thermophilic cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. and to determine its phytochemical constituents and phenolic profile. BME (Biomass Methanolic Extract), CME (Capsular polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) and RME (Releasing polysaccharides Methanolic Extract) of Leptolyngbya sp. were examined for their antioxidant activities by means of DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging and ferrous ion chelating assays. Their total phenols, flavonoids, carotenoids, Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and vitamin C contents, as well as their phenolic profiles were also determined. BME has the highest content of phenols (139 ± 1.2 mg/g), flavonoids (34.9 ± 0.32 mg CEQ/g), carotenoids (2.03 ± 0.56 mg/g) and vitamin C (15.7 ± 1.55 mg/g), while the highest MAAs content (0.42 ± 0.03 mg/g) was observed in CME. BME presented both the highest DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging ability with an IC50 of 0.07 and 0.38 mg/ml, respectively. The highest ferrous chelating capacity was detected in CME with an IC50 = 0.59 mg/ml. Phenolic profiles revealed the presence of 25 phenolic compounds with the existence of hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, resveratrol and pinoresinol. The study demonstrated that the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya sp. possesses abundant natural antioxidant products which may have prophylactic and

  11. Biochemical and Molecular Phylogenetic Study of Agriculturally Useful Association of a Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium and Nodule Sinorhizobium with Medicago sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Karaushu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed inoculation with bacterial consortium was found to increase legume yield, providing a higher growth than the standard nitrogen treatment methods. Alfalfa plants were inoculated by mono- and binary compositions of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. Their physiological and biochemical properties were estimated. Inoculation by microbial consortium of Sinorhizobium meliloti T17 together with a new cyanobacterial isolate Nostoc PTV was more efficient than the single-rhizobium strain inoculation. This treatment provides an intensification of the processes of biological nitrogen fixation by rhizobia bacteria in the root nodules and an intensification of plant photosynthesis. Inoculation by bacterial consortium stimulates growth of plant mass and rhizogenesis and leads to increased productivity of alfalfa and to improving the amino acid composition of plant leaves. The full nucleotide sequence of the rRNA gene cluster and partial sequence of the dinitrogenase reductase (nifH gene of Nostoc PTV were deposited to GenBank (JQ259185.1, JQ259186.1. Comparison of these gene sequences of Nostoc PTV with all sequences present at the GenBank shows that this cyanobacterial strain does not have 100% identity with any organisms investigated previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this cyanobacterium clustered with high credibility values with Nostoc muscorum.

  12. Impact of different group 2 sigma factors on light use efficiency and high salt stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taina Tyystjärvi

    Full Text Available Sigma factors of RNA polymerase recognize promoters and have a central role in controlling transcription initiation and acclimation to changing environmental conditions. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encodes four non-essential group 2 sigma factors, SigB, SigC, SigD and SigE that closely resemble the essential SigA factor. Three out of four group 2 sigma factors were simultaneously inactivated and acclimation responses of the triple inactivation strains were studied. All triple inactivation strains grew slowly in low light, and our analysis suggests that the reason is a reduced capacity to adjust the perception of light. Simultaneous inactivation of SigB and SigD hampered growth also in high light. SigB is the most important group 2 sigma factor for salt acclimation, and elimination of all the other group 2 sigma factors slightly improved the salt tolerance of Synechocystis. Presence of only SigE allowed full salt acclimation including up-regulation of hspA and ggpS genes, but more slowly than SigB. Cells with only SigD acclimated to high salt but the acclimation processes differed from those of the control strain. Presence of only SigC prevented salt acclimation.

  13. Biochemical and Molecular Phylogenetic Study of Agriculturally Useful Association of a Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium and Nodule Sinorhizobium with Medicago sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaushu, E V; Lazebnaya, I V; Kravzova, T R; Vorobey, N A; Lazebny, O E; Kiriziy, D A; Olkhovich, O P; Taran, N Yu; Kots, S Ya; Popova, A A; Omarova, E; Koksharova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Seed inoculation with bacterial consortium was found to increase legume yield, providing a higher growth than the standard nitrogen treatment methods. Alfalfa plants were inoculated by mono- and binary compositions of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms. Their physiological and biochemical properties were estimated. Inoculation by microbial consortium of Sinorhizobium meliloti T17 together with a new cyanobacterial isolate Nostoc PTV was more efficient than the single-rhizobium strain inoculation. This treatment provides an intensification of the processes of biological nitrogen fixation by rhizobia bacteria in the root nodules and an intensification of plant photosynthesis. Inoculation by bacterial consortium stimulates growth of plant mass and rhizogenesis and leads to increased productivity of alfalfa and to improving the amino acid composition of plant leaves. The full nucleotide sequence of the rRNA gene cluster and partial sequence of the dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) gene of Nostoc PTV were deposited to GenBank (JQ259185.1, JQ259186.1). Comparison of these gene sequences of Nostoc PTV with all sequences present at the GenBank shows that this cyanobacterial strain does not have 100% identity with any organisms investigated previously. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this cyanobacterium clustered with high credibility values with Nostoc muscorum.

  14. The AplI restriction-modification system in an edible cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis NIES-39, recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-CTGCAG-3'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Hideaki; Tabuse, Yosuke

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of foreign DNAs by restriction enzymes in an edible cyanobacterium, Arthrospira platensis, is a potential barrier for gene-transfer experiments in this economically valuable organism. We overproduced in Escherichia coli the proteins involved in a putative restriction-modification system of A. platensis NIES-39. The protein produced from the putative type II restriction enzyme gene NIES39_K04640 exhibited an endonuclease activity that cleaved DNA within the sequence 5'-CTGCAG-3' between the A at the fifth position and the G at the sixth position. We designated this enzyme AplI. The protein from the adjacent gene NIES39_K04650, which encodes a putative DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase, rendered DNA molecules resistant to AplI by modifying the C at the fourth position (but not the C at the first position) in the recognition sequence. This modification enzyme, M.AplI, should be useful for converting DNA molecules into AplI-resistant forms for use in gene-transfer experiments. A summary of restriction enzymes in various Arthrospira strains is also presented in this paper.

  15. The small CAB-like proteins of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: their involvement in chlorophyll biogenesis for Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Prieto, Miguel A; Tibiletti, Tania; Abasova, Leyla; Kirilovsky, Diana; Vass, Imre; Funk, Christiane

    2011-09-01

    The five small CAB-like proteins (ScpA-E) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 belong to the family of stress-induced light-harvesting-like proteins, but are constitutively expressed in a mutant deficient of Photosystem I (PSI). Using absorption, fluorescence and thermoluminescence measurements this PSI-less strain was compared with a mutant, in which all SCPs were additionally deleted. Depletion of SCPs led to structural rearrangements in Photosystem II (PSII): less photosystems were assembled; and in these, the Q(B) site was modified. Despite the lower amount of PSII, the SCP-deficient cells contained the same amount of phycobilisomes (PBS) as the control. Although the excess PBS were functionally disconnected, their fluorescence was quenched under high irradiance by the activated Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Additionally the amount of OCP, but not of the iron-stress induced protein (isiA), was higher in this SCP-depleted mutant compared with the control. As previously described, the lack of SCPs affects the chlorophyll biosynthesis (Vavilin, D., Brune, D. C., Vermaas, W. (2005) Biochim Biophys Acta 1708, 91-101). We demonstrate that chlorophyll synthesis is required for efficient PSII repair and that it is partly impaired in the absence of SCPs. At the same time, the amount of chlorophyll also seems to influence the expression of ScpC and ScpD. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactive effects of cadmium and Microcystis aeruginosa (cyanobacterium) on the growth, antioxidative responses and accumulation of cadmium and microcystins in rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiaolin; Gu, Ji-Dong; Tie, BaiQing; Yao, Bangsong; Shao, Jihai

    2016-10-01

    Cadmium pollution and harmful cyanobacterial blooms are two prominent environmental problems. The interactive effects of cadmium(II) and harmful cyanobacteria on rice seedlings remain unknown. In order to elucidate this issue, the interactive effects of cadmium(II) and Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB905 on the growth and antioxidant responses of rice seedling were investigated in this study, as well as the accumulation of cadmium(II) and microcystins. The results showed that the growth of rice seedlings was inhibited by cadmium(II) stress but promoted by inoculation of M. aeruginosa FACHB905. cadmium(II) stress induced oxidative damage on rice seedlings. Inoculation of M. aeruginosa FACHB905 alleviated the toxicity of cadmium(II) on rice seedlings. The accumulation of cadmium(II) in rice seedlings was decreased by M. aeruginosa FACHB905, but the translocation of cadmium(II) from root to shoot was increased by this cyanobacterium. The accumulation of microcystins in rice seedlings was decreased by cadmium(II). Results presented in this study indicated that cadmium(II) and M. aeruginosa had antagonistic toxicity on rice seedlings. The findings of this study throw new light on evaluation of ecological- and public health-risks for the co-contamination of cadmium(II) and harmful cyanobacteria.

  17. Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization of the Iron Superoxide Dismutase from the Cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Its Response to Methyl Viologen-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Vanlalsangi, Rebecca; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) detoxifies cell-toxic superoxide radicals and constitutes an important component of antioxidant machinery in aerobic organisms, including cyanobacteria. The iron-containing SOD (SodB) is one of the most abundant soluble proteins in the cytosol of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133, and therefore, we investigated its biochemical properties and response to oxidative stress. The putative SodB-encoding open reading frame Npun_R6491 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged protein. The purified recombinant protein had a SodB specific activity of 2560 ± 48 U/mg protein at pH 7.8 and was highly thermostable. The presence of a characteristic iron absorption peak at 350 nm, and its sensitivity to H2O2 and azide, confirmed that the SodB is an iron-containing SOD. Transcript level of SodB in nitrogen-fixing cultures of N. punctiforme decreased considerably (threefold) after exposure to an oxidative stress-generating herbicide methyl viologen for 4 h. Furthermore, in-gel SOD activity analysis of such cultures grown at increasing concentrations of methyl viologen also showed a loss of SodB activity. These results suggest that SodB is not the primary scavenger of superoxide radicals induced by methyl viologen in N. punctiforme.

  18. Zn(II) and Cu(II) removal by Nostoc muscorum: a cyanobacterium isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Smita; Diengdoh, Omega L; Syiem, Mayashree B; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Kiran, Mothe Gopi

    2015-03-01

    Nostoc muscorum was isolated from a coal mining pit in Chiehruphi, Meghalaya, India, and its potential to remove Zn(II) and Cu(II) from media and the various biochemical alterations it undergoes during metal stress were studied. Metal uptake measured as a function of the ions removed by N. muscorum from media supplemented independently with 20 μmol/L ZnSO4 and CuSO4 established the ability of this cyanobacterium to remove 66% of Zn(2+) and 71% of Cu(2+) within 24 h of contact time. Metal binding on the cell surface was found to be the primary mode of uptake, followed by internalization. Within 7 days of contact, Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) mediated dissimilar effects on the organism. For instance, although chlorophyll a synthesis was increased by 12% in Zn(2+)-treated cells, it was reduced by 26% in Cu(2+)-treated cells. Total protein content remained unaltered in Zn(2+)-supplemented medium; however, a 15% reduction was noticed upon Cu(2+) exposure. Copper enhanced both photosynthesis and respiration by 15% and 19%, respectively; in contrast, photosynthesis was unchanged and respiration dropped by 11% upon Zn(2+) treatment. Inoculum age also influenced metal removal ability. Experiments in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (a photosynthetic inhibitor), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (an uncoupler), and exogenous ATP established that metal uptake was energy dependent, and photosynthesis contributed significantly towards the energy pool required to mediate metal removals.

  19. Contribution of a Sodium Ion Gradient to Energy Conservation during Fermentation in the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima CS-328 ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Damian; Ananyev, Gennady; Lenz, Oliver; Bryant, Donald A.; Dismukes, G. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Sodium gradients in cyanobacteria play an important role in energy storage under photoautotrophic conditions but have not been well studied during autofermentative metabolism under the dark, anoxic conditions widely used to produce precursors to fuels. Here we demonstrate significant stress-induced acceleration of autofermentation of photosynthetically generated carbohydrates (glycogen and sugars) to form excreted organic acids, alcohols, and hydrogen gas by the halophilic, alkalophilic cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima CS-328. When suspended in potassium versus sodium phosphate buffers at the start of autofermentation to remove the sodium ion gradient, photoautotrophically grown cells catabolized more intracellular carbohydrates while producing 67% higher yields of hydrogen, acetate, and ethanol (and significant amounts of lactate) as fermentative products. A comparable acceleration of fermentative carbohydrate catabolism occurred upon dissipating the sodium gradient via addition of the sodium-channel blocker quinidine or the sodium-ionophore monensin but not upon dissipating the proton gradient with the proton-ionophore dinitrophenol (DNP). The data demonstrate that intracellular energy is stored via a sodium gradient during autofermentative metabolism and that, when this gradient is blocked, the blockage is compensated by increased energy conversion via carbohydrate catabolism. PMID:21890670

  20. Intricate interactions between the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and foreign genetic elements, revealed by diversified clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Sotaro; Yoshida, Takashi; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2012-08-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) confer sequence-dependent, adaptive resistance in prokaryotes against viruses and plasmids via incorporation of short sequences, called spacers, derived from foreign genetic elements. CRISPR loci are thus considered to provide records of past infections. To describe the host-parasite (i.e., cyanophages and plasmids) interactions involving the bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, we investigated CRISPR in four M. aeruginosa strains and in two previously sequenced genomes. The number of spacers in each locus was larger than the average among prokaryotes. All spacers were strain specific, except for a string of 11 spacers shared in two closely related strains, suggesting diversification of the loci. Using CRISPR repeat-based PCR, 24 CRISPR genotypes were identified in a natural cyanobacterial community. Among 995 unique spacers obtained, only 10 sequences showed similarity to M. aeruginosa phage Ma-LMM01. Of these, six spacers showed only silent or conservative nucleotide mutations compared to Ma-LMM01 sequences, suggesting a strategy by the cyanophage to avert CRISPR immunity dependent on nucleotide identity. These results imply that host-phage interactions can be divided into M. aeruginosa-cyanophage combinations rather than pandemics of population-wide infectious cyanophages. Spacer similarity also showed frequent exposure of M. aeruginosa to small cryptic plasmids that were observed only in a few strains. Thus, the diversification of CRISPR implies that M. aeruginosa has been challenged by diverse communities (almost entirely uncharacterized) of cyanophages and plasmids.

  1. Analysis of the action of X-rays on the multiplication of a unicellular chlorophyllous organism: the chlorophycee scenesdesmus crassus chod (1961); Analyse de l'action des rayons X sur la multiplication d'un organisme chlorophyllien unicellulaire: la chlorophycee scenesdesmus crassus chod (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilet, R.; Ozenda, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The technique of growing cultures on agar-agar has made it possible to obtain on single cultures results which had previously been acquired on populations of unicellular algae in a liquid medium. (authors) [French] La technique de culture sur gelose a permis une analyse a l'echelle individuelle des resultats precedemment acquis sur des populations d'algues unicellulaires en milieu liquide. (auteurs)

  2. Characterization of nifB, nifS, and nifU genes in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: NifB is required for the vanadium-dependent nitrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, E M; Thiel, T

    1995-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium containing both a Mo-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the nif genes and V-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the vnf genes. The nifB, nifS, and nifU genes of A. variabilis were cloned, mapped, and partially sequenced. The fdxN gene was between nifB and nifS. Growth and acetylene reduction assays using wild-type and mutant strains indicated that the nifB product (NifB) was required for nitrogen fixation not only by...

  3. Population Genomics of the Euryhaline Teleost Poecilia latipinna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J C B Nunez

    Full Text Available Global climate change and increases in sea levels will affect coastal marine communities. The conservation of these ecologically important areas will be a challenge because of their wide geographic distribution, ecological diversity and species richness. To address this problem, we need to better understand how the genetic variation of the species in these communities is distributed within local populations, among populations and between distant regions. In this study we apply genotyping by sequencing (GBS and examine 955 SNPs to determine Sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna genetic diversity among three geographically close mangrove salt marsh flats in the Florida Keys compared to populations in southern and northern Florida. The questions we are asking are whether there is sufficient genetic variation among isolated estuarine fish within populations and whether there are significant divergences among populations. Additionally, we want to know if GBS approaches agree with previous studies using more traditional molecular approaches. We are able to identify large genetic diversity within each saltmarsh community (π ≈ 36%. Additionally, among the Florida Key populations and the mainland or between southern and northern Florida regions, there are significant differences in allele frequencies seen in population structure and evolutionary relationships among individuals. Surprisingly, even though the cumulative FST value using all 955 SNPs within the three Florida Key populations is small, there are 29 loci with significant FST values, and 11 of these were outliers suggestive of adaptive divergence. These data suggest that among the salt marsh flats surveyed here, there is significant genetic diversity within each population and small but significant differences among populations. Much of the genetic variation within and among populations found here with GBS is very similar to previous studies using allozymes and microsatellites. However, the meaningful difference between GBS and these previous measures of genetic diversity is the number of loci examined, which allows more precise delineations of population structure as well as facilitates identifying loci with excessive FST values that could indicate adaptive divergence.

  4. Kidney structure of a euryhaline mammal, the Cape clawless otter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) is one of the few species of mammals that occur in both freshwater and marine habitats, and it therefore must be able to tolerate the high rates of water flux typical of aquatic animals as well as the desiccating effects of seawater. The clawless otter has paired, discrete multirenculate ...

  5. The tryptophan-rich sensory protein (TSPO is involved in stress-related and light-dependent processes in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBusch

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tryptophan-rich sensory protein (TSPO is a membrane protein, which is a member of the 18 kilodalton translocator protein/peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (MBR family of proteins that is present in most organisms and is also referred to as Translocator protein 18 kDa. Although TSPO is associated with stress- and disease-related processes in organisms from bacteria to mammals, full elucidation of the functional role of the TSPO protein is lacking for most organisms in which it is found. In this study, we describe the regulation and function of a TSPO homolog in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, designated FdTSPO. Accumulation of the FdTSPO transcript is upregulated by green light and in response to nutrient deficiency and stress. A F. diplosiphon TSPO deletion mutant (i.e., ΔFdTSPO showed altered responses compared to the wild type strain under stress conditions, including salt treatment, osmotic stress and induced oxidative stress. Under salt stress, the FdTSPO transcript is upregulated and a ΔFdTSPO mutant accumulates lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and displays increased growth compared to WT. In response to osmotic stress, FdTSPO transcript levels are upregulated and ΔFdTSPO mutant cells exhibit impaired growth compared to the wild type. By comparison, methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress results in higher ROS levels in the ΔFdTSPO mutant compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, our results provide support for the involvement of membrane-localized FdTSPO in mediating cellular responses to stress in F. diplosiphon and represent detailed functional analysis of a cyanobacterial TSPO. This study advances our understanding of the functional roles of TSPO homologs in vivo.

  6. Essential Role of Acyl-ACP Synthetase in Acclimation of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus Strain PCC 7942 to High-Light Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Nobuyuki; Use, Kazuhide; Kato, Akihiro; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Kojima, Kouji; Aichi, Makiko; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Omata, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    Most organisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis have an aas gene encoding an acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (Aas), which activates free fatty acids (FFAs) via esterification to acyl carrier protein. Cyanobacterial aas mutants are often used for studies aimed at photosynthetic production of biofuels because the mutation leads to intracellular accumulation of FFAs and their secretion into the external medium, but the physiological significance of the production of FFAs and their recycling involving Aas has remained unclear. Using an aas-deficient mutant of Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, we show here that remodeling of membrane lipids is activated by high-intensity light and that the recycling of FFAs is essential for acclimation to high-light conditions. Unlike wild-type cells, the mutant cells could not increase their growth rate as the light intensity was increased from 50 to 400 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1), and the high-light-grown mutant cells accumulated FFAs and the lysolipids derived from all the four major classes of membrane lipids, revealing high-light-induced lipid deacylation. The high-light-grown mutant cells showed much lower PSII activity and Chl contents as compared with the wild-type cells or low-light-grown mutant cells. The loss of Aas accelerated photodamage of PSII but did not affect the repair process of PSII, indicating that PSII is destabilized in the mutant. Thus, Aas is essential for acclimation of the cyanobacterium to high-light conditions. The relevance of the present finding s to biofuel production using cyanobacteria is discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Metabolic engineering of the Chl d-dominated cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina: production of a novel Chl species by the introduction of the chlorophyllide a oxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Tohru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Akimoto, Seiji; Tomo, Tatsuya; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2012-03-01

    In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, the properties of photosynthetic reaction systems primarily depend on the Chl species used. Acquisition of new Chl species with unique optical properties may have enabled photosynthetic organisms to adapt to various light environments. The artificial production of a new Chl species in an existing photosynthetic organism by metabolic engineering provides a model system to investigate how an organism responds to a newly acquired pigment. In the current study, we established a transformation system for a Chl d-dominated cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris marina, for the first time. The expression vector (constructed from a broad-host-range plasmid) was introduced into A. marina by conjugal gene transfer. The introduction of a gene for chlorophyllide a oxygenase, which is responsible for Chl b biosynthesis, into A. marina resulted in a transformant that synthesized a novel Chl species instead of Chl b. The content of the novel Chl in the transformant was approximately 10% of the total Chl, but the level of Chl a, another Chl in A. marina, did not change. The chemical structure of the novel Chl was determined to be [7-formyl]-Chl d(P) by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. [7-Formyl]-Chl d(P) is hypothesized to be produced by the combined action of chlorophyllide a oxygenase and enzyme(s) involved in Chl d biosynthesis. These results demonstrate the flexibility of the Chl biosynthetic pathway for the production of novel Chl species, indicating that a new organism with a novel Chl might be discovered in the future.

  8. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  9. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Den Uyl

    Full Text Available Black band disease (BBD is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria, revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes

  10. Growth phase-dependent activation of nitrogen-related genes by a control network of group 1 and group 2 sigma factors in a cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Sousuke; Tanaka, Kan; Shirai, Makoto; Asayama, Munehiko

    2006-02-03

    It has been reported that an RNA polymerase sigma factor, SigC, mainly contributes to specific transcription from the promoter PglnB-54,-53 under nitrogen-deprived conditions during the stationary phase of cell growth in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (Asayama, M., Imamura, S., Yoshihara, S., Miyazaki, A., Yoshida, N., Sazuka, T., Kaneko, T., Ohara, O., Tabata, S., Osanai, T., Tanaka, K., Takahashi, H., and Shirai, M. (2004) Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. 68, 477-487). In this study, we further examined the functions of group 2 sigma factors of RNA polymerase in NtcA-dependent nitrogen-related gene expression in PCC 6803. Results indicated that SigB and SigC contribute to the transcription from PglnB-54,-53 with a sigma factor replaced in a growth phase-dependent manner. We also confirmed the contribution of SigB and SigC to the transcription of other NtcA-dependent genes, glnA, sigE, and amt1, as in the case of glnB. On the other hand, the transcription of glnN was dependent on SigB and SigE. In the SigB and SigC-based regulation, the level of SigB increased, but that of SigC was constant under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Furthermore, it was found that SigC negatively and positively regulates the level of SigB in the log and stationary phase, respectively. SigC also had a positive effect on the level of sigB transcript during the stationary phase. In contrast, SigB acts positively on SigC levels in both growth phases. These results and previous findings indicated that multiple group 2 sigma factors take part in the control of NtcA-dependent nitrogen-related gene expression in cooperation with a group 1 sigma factor, SigA.

  11. Regulation of the carbon-concentrating mechanism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in response to changing light intensity and inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnap, Robert L; Nambudiri, Rehka; Holland, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthetic organisms possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the various inputs of photosynthesis in a manner that minimizes over-excitation of the light-driven electron transfer apparatus, while maximizing the reductive assimilation of inorganic nutrients, most importantly inorganic carbon (Ci). Accordingly, the regulatory interactions coordinating responses to fluctuating light and responses to Ci availability are of fundamental significance. The inducible high affinity carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 has been studied in order to understand how it is integrated with the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. To probe genetic regulatory mechanisms, genomic DNA microarrays were used to survey for differences in the expression of genes in response to a shift to high light conditions under conditions of either high or low Ci availability. Discrepancies in published experiments exist regarding the extent to which genes for the CCM are upregulated in response to high light treatment. These discrepancies may be due to critical differences in Ci availability existing during the different high light experiments. The present microarray experiments reexamine this by comparing high light treatment under two different Ci regimes: bubbling with air and bubbling with air enriched with CO2. While some transcriptional responses such as the downregulation of antenna proteins are quite similar, pronounced differences exist with respect to the differential expression of CCM and affiliated genes. The results are discussed in the context of a recent analysis revealing that small molecules that are intermediates of the light and dark reaction photosynthetic metabolism act as allosteric effectors of the DNA-binding proteins which modulate the expression of the CCM genes.

  12. Characterization of thylakoid membrane in a heterocystous cyanobacterium and green alga with dual-detector fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a systematic change of incident laser power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Shuho; Mukuno, Akira; Tsuda, Yumi; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been applied to plants, algae and cyanobacteria, in which excitation laser conditions affect the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime due to several mechanisms. However, the dependence of FLIM data on input laser power has not been quantitatively explained by absolute excitation probabilities under actual imaging conditions. In an effort to distinguish between photosystem I and photosystem II (PSI and PSII) in microscopic images, we have obtained dependence of FLIM data on input laser power from a filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis and single cellular green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Nitrogen-fixing cells in A. variabilis, heterocysts, are mostly visualized as cells in which short-lived fluorescence (≤0.1 ns) characteristic of PSI is predominant. The other cells in A. variabilis (vegetative cells) and P. kessleri cells show a transition in the status of PSII from an open state with the maximal charge separation rate at a weak excitation limit to a closed state in which charge separation is temporarily prohibited by previous excitation(s) at a relatively high laser power. This transition is successfully reproduced by a computer simulation with a high fidelity to the actual imaging conditions. More details in the fluorescence from heterocysts were examined to assess possible functions of PSII in the anaerobic environment inside the heterocysts for the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, nitrogenase. Photochemically active PSII:PSI ratio in heterocysts is tentatively estimated to be typically below our detection limit or at most about 5% in limited heterocysts in comparison with that in vegetative cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of crude extracts of a saxitoxin-producer strain of the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii on the swimming behavior of wild and laboratory reared guppy Poecilia vivipara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Karina C; Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio da S; Dos Santos, Everton G N; Cunha, Rodolfo A; Santos, Cláudia P

    2017-04-01

    The cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is an invasive species in water supply reservoirs worldwide, which can produces cylindrospermopsins and saxitoxins. In the wild, guppy (Poecilia vivipara) can be exposed to cyanotoxins, but those born and reared in laboratory are free of this contact. The aim of this paper was to comparatively measure the locomotor activity of 'wild' and 'lab' P. vivipara before and after exposure to crude extracts of two different cultures of C. raciborskii (CYRF-01), a saxitoxin-procucer strain. The movement of each fish was recorded using an image monitoring system (Videomex V(®)) before and after 48 h exposure to cyanobacterial extracts. Each experiment was performed during 4 h, with 1 h acclimation and 3 h recording period of the parameters Distance performed (DP), Swimming time (SwT), Stereotypic time (StT), Resting time (RT) and Average speed (AS). The quantification of saxitoxin in the solutions was performed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The weight or the total length did not influence the locomotor activity of fish in any of the experiments. The saxitoxin value was similar for both cultures (Culture 1: 7.3 μg L(-1) and Culture 2: 8.6 μg L(-1)). However, in experiments with Culture 1 an increased activity in most parameters was observed, while in Culture 2, a decreased activity was observed only in 'lab' fish. Wild fish was less affected, showing higher resistance to both cyanobacterial crude extracts. This study showed that different cultures of the same strain of C. raciborskii and with similar contents of saxitoxin are able to change the locomotor activity of P. vivipara, contributing to the validation of the use of behavioral parameters to the evaluation of sublethal effects of toxic cyanobacteria on fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Uyl, Paul A.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Jain, Sunit

    2016-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes) and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria), revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes for detoxification

  15. Single-cell confocal spectrometry of a filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc at room and cryogenic temperature. Diversity and differentiation of pigment systems in 311 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Kana; Itoh, Shigeru

    2012-08-01

    The fluorescence spectrum at 298 and 40 K and the absorption spectrum at 298 K of each cell of the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. was measured by single-cell confocal laser spectroscopy to study the differentiation of cell pigments. The fluorescence spectra of vegetative (veg) and heterocyst (het) cells of Nostoc formed separate groups with low and high PSII to PSI ratios, respectively. The fluorescence spectra of het cells at 40 K still contained typical PSII bands. The PSII/PSI ratio estimated for the veg cells varied between 0.4 and 1.2, while that of het cells varied between 0 and 0.22 even in the same culture. The PSII/PSI ratios of veg cells resembled each other more closely in the same filament. 'pro-het' cells, which started to differentiate into het cells, were identified from the small but specific difference in the PSII/PSI ratio. The allophycocyanin (APC)/PSII ratio was almost constant in both veg and het cells, indicating their tight couplings. Phycocyanin (PC) showed higher fluorescence in most het cells, suggesting the uncoupling from PSII. Veg cells seem to vary their PSI contents to give different PSII/PSI ratios even in the same culture, and to suppress the synthesis of PSII, APC and PC to differentiate into het cells. APC and PC are gradually liberated from membranes in het cells with the uncoupling from PSII. Single-cell spectrometry will be useful to study the differentiation of intrinsic pigments of cells and chloroplasts, and to select microbes from natural environments.

  16. Construction of a novel d-lactate producing pathway from dihydroxyacetone phosphate of the Calvin cycle in cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Goto, Ryota; Umetani, Yoshitaka; Hanai, Taizo

    2017-07-01

    Using engineered cyanobacteria to produce various chemicals from carbon dioxide is a promising technology for a sustainable future. Lactate is a valuable commodity that can be used for the biodegradable plastic, polylactic acid. Typically, lactate production using engineered cyanobacteria was via the conversion of pyruvate in glycolysis by lactate dehydrogenase. In cyanobacteria, the metabolic flux in the Calvin cycle is higher than that in glycolysis under photoautotrophic conditions. The construction of a novel lactate producing pathway that uses metabolites from the Calvin cycle could potentially increase lactate productivity in cyanobacteria. In order to develop such a novel lactate production pathway, we engineered a cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 strain that produced lactate directly from carbon dioxide using dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) via methylglyoxal. We confirmed that wild-type strain of S. elongatus PCC 7942 could produce lactate using exogenous methylglyoxal. A methylglyoxal synthase gene, mgsA, from Escherichia coli was introduced into Synechococcus elongates PCC 7942 for conversion of DHAP to methylglyoxal. This engineered strain produced lactate directly from carbon dioxide. Genes encoding intrinsic putative glyoxalase I, II (Synpcc7942_0638, 1403) and the lactate/H+ symporter from E. coli (lldP) were additionally introduced to enhance the production. For higher lactate production, it was important to maintain elevated extracellular pH due to the characteristics of lactate exporting system. In this study, the highest lactate titer of 13.7 mM (1.23 g/l) was achieved during a 24-day incubation with the engineered S. elongatus PCC 7942 strain possessing the novel lactate producing pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stability of toxin gene proportion in red-pigmented populations of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix during 29 years of re-oligotrophication of Lake Zürich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermaier, Veronika; Schanz, Ferdinand; Köster, Oliver; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2012-12-07

    Harmful algal blooms deteriorate the services of aquatic ecosystems. They are often formed by cyanobacteria composed of genotypes able to produce a certain toxin, for example, the hepatotoxin microcystin (MC), but also of nontoxic genotypes that either carry mutations in the genes encoding toxin synthesis or that lost those genes during evolution. In general, cyanobacterial blooms are favored by eutrophication. Very little is known about the stability of the toxic/nontoxic genotype composition during trophic change. Archived samples of preserved phytoplankton on filters from aquatic ecosystems that underwent changes in the trophic state provide a so far unrealized possibility to analyze the response of toxic/nontoxic genotype composition to the environment. During a period of 29 years of re-oligotrophication of the deep, physically stratified Lake Zürich (1980 to 2008), the population of the stratifying cyanobacterium Planktothrix was at a minimum during the most eutrophic years (1980 to 1984), but increased and dominated the phytoplankton during the past two decades. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that during the whole observation period the proportion of the toxic genotype was strikingly stable, that is, close to 100%. Inactive MC genotypes carrying mutations within the MC synthesis genes never became abundant. Unexpectedly, a nontoxic genotype, which lost its MC genes during evolution, and which could be shown to be dominant under eutrophic conditions in shallow polymictic lakes, also co-occurred in Lake Zürich but was never abundant. As it is most likely that this nontoxic genotype contains relatively weak gas vesicles unable to withstand the high water pressure in deep lakes, it is concluded that regular deep mixing selectively reduced its abundance through the destruction of gas vesicles. The stability in toxic genotype dominance gives evidence for the adaptation to deep mixing of a genotype that retained the MC gene cluster during

  18. Enhanced toxicity to the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa by low-dosage repeated exposure to the allelochemical N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y N; Ge, F J; Zhang, L P; He, Y; Lu, Z Y; Zhang, Y Y; Liu, B Y; Zhou, Q H; Wu, Z B

    2017-05-01

    It has been puzzling whether and how a plant could exert a strong allelopathic inhibition to the target organisms by releasing low concentrations of allelochemicals. Plant allelochemicals have been proposed to be released continuously, however, direct evidence from specific allelochemicals is urgently required. In the present study, the toxicity of allelochemical N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) towards the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa by two different exposure patterns was compared. One was low-dosage repeated exposure (LRE), in which 50  μg L -1 NPN was repeatedly dosed to simulate the continual release of allelochemicals, and the other one was high-dosage single exposure (HSE) as per the routine toxicity assay. The results showed a significant growth inhibition to M. aeruginosa in the LRE group, where the inhibition rate reached above 90% from day 6 to day 9. The cell-membrane damage ratio increased from 64.05% on day 5 up to 96.60% on day 9. PSII photosynthesis activity expressed as Fv/Fm, Φ PSII , NPQ and ETRmax was also thoroughly inhibited in this group. Whereas the growth and PSII photosynthesis activity of M. aeruginosa in the HSE group were inhibited initially, but recovered gradually from day 4 or 5, which was accompanied by a continuous reduction of NPN content in culture solutions. Although NPN content in the LRE group was relatively lower, it remained at a more stable level throughout the experiment. These results indicate that continual release of low-dosage allelochemicals by aquatic plants plays crucial roles in their potent inhibition against cyanobacteria. Low-dosage continual exposure pattern needs to be investigated further. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein expressed by the ho2 gene of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a true heme oxygenase. Properties of the heme and enzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuhong; Migita, Catharina T; Sato, Michihiko; Sasahara, Masanao; Yoshida, Tadashi

    2005-02-01

    Two isoforms of a heme oxygenase gene, ho1 and ho2, with 51% identity in amino acid sequence have been identified in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Isoform-1, Syn HO-1, has been characterized, while isoform-2, Syn HO-2, has not. In this study, a full-length ho2 gene was cloned using synthetic DNA and Syn HO-2 was demonstrated to be highly expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble, catalytically active protein. Like Syn HO-1, the purified Syn HO-2 bound hemin stoichiometrically to form a heme-enzyme complex and degraded heme to biliverdin IXalpha, CO and iron in the presence of reducing systems such as NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin and sodium ascorbate. The activity of Syn HO-2 was found to be comparable to that of Syn HO-1 by measuring the amount of bilirubin formed. In the reaction with hydrogen peroxide, Syn HO-2 converted heme to verdoheme. This shows that during the conversion of hemin to alpha-meso-hydroxyhemin, hydroperoxo species is the activated oxygen species as in other heme oxygenase reactions. The absorption spectrum of the hemin-Syn HO-2 complex at neutral pH showed a Soret band at 412 nm and two peaks at 540 nm and 575 nm, features observed in the hemin-Syn HO-1 complex at alkaline pH, suggesting that the major species of iron(III) heme iron at neutral pH is a hexa-coordinate low spin species. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) revealed that the iron(III) complex was in dynamic equilibrium between low spin and high spin states, which might be caused by the hydrogen bonding interaction between the distal water ligand and distal helix components. These observations suggest that the structure of the heme pocket of the Syn HO-2 is different from that of Syn HO-1.

  20. Inactivation of uptake hydrogenase leads to enhanced and sustained hydrogen production with high nitrogenase activity under high light exposure in the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetkorn Wanthanee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biohydrogen from cyanobacteria has attracted public interest due to its potential as a renewable energy carrier produced from solar energy and water. Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from rice paddy field in Thailand, has been identified as a promising cyanobacterial strain for use as a high-yield hydrogen producer attributed to the activities of two enzymes, nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase. One main obstacle for high hydrogen production by A. siamensis is a light-driven hydrogen consumption catalyzed by the uptake hydrogenase. To overcome this and in order to enhance the potential for nitrogenase based hydrogen production, we engineered a hydrogen uptake deficient strain by interrupting hupS encoding the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase. Results An engineered strain lacking a functional uptake hydrogenase (∆hupS produced about 4-folds more hydrogen than the wild type strain. Moreover, the ∆hupS strain showed long term, sustained hydrogen production under light exposure with 2–3 folds higher nitrogenase activity compared to the wild type. In addition, HupS inactivation had no major effects on cell growth and heterocyst differentiation. Gene expression analysis using RT-PCR indicates that electrons and ATP molecules required for hydrogen production in the ∆hupS strain may be obtained from the electron transport chain associated with the photosynthetic oxidation of water in the vegetative cells. The ∆hupS strain was found to compete well with the wild type up to 50 h in a mixed culture, thereafter the wild type started to grow on the relative expense of the ∆hupS strain. Conclusions Inactivation of hupS is an effective strategy for improving biohydrogen production, in rates and specifically in total yield, in nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012.

  1. Respiration in Heterotrophic Unicellular Eukaryotic Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Surface:volume quotient, mitochondrial volume fraction, and their distribution within cells were investigated and oxygen gradients within and outside cells were modelled. Cell surface increases allometrically with cell size. Mitochondrial volume fraction is invariant with cell size and constitute...

  2. Mechanism behind autoflocculation of unicellular green microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salim, S.; Kosterink, N.; Tchetkoua Wacka, N.D.; Vermue, M.H.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    The oleaginous Ettlia texensis is an autoflocculating green microalga that can be used for bio-flocculation of other microalgae species to facilitate harvesting. In this study the mechanism behind autoflocculation of E. texensis was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and by

  3. Photosynthetic versatility in the genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a model anoxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Grim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth’s biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis. Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR used in cyanobacterial anoxygenic photosynthesis and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential

  4. The Combined Use of in Silico, in Vitro, and in Vivo Analyses to Assess Anti-cancerous Potential of a Bioactive Compound from Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niveshika

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Escalating incidences of cancer, especially in developed and developing countries, demand evaluation of potential unexplored natural drug resources. Here, anticancer potential of 9-Ethyliminomethyl-12-(morpholin-4-ylmethoxy-5,8,13,16-tetraaza -hexacene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (EMTAHDCA isolated from fresh water cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. MGL001 was screened through in silico, in vitro, and in vivo studies. For in silico analysis, EMTAHDCA was selected as ligand and 11 cancer related proteins (Protein Data Bank ID: 1BIX, 1NOW, 1TE6, 2RCW, 2UVL, 2VCJ, 3CRY, 3HQU, 3NMQ, 5P21, and 4B7P which are common targets of various anticancer drugs were selected as receptors. The results obtained from in silico analysis showed that EMTAHDCA has strong binding affinity for all the 11 target protein receptors. The ability of EMTAHDCA to bind active sites of cancer protein targets indicated that it is functionally similar to commercially available anticancer drugs. For assessing cellular metabolic activities, in vitro studies were performed by using calorimetric assay viz. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT. Results showed that EMTAHDCA induced significant cytotoxic response against Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA cells in a dose and time dependent manner with an inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of 372.4 ng/mL after 24 h of incubation. However, in case of normal bone marrow cells, the EMTAHDCA did not induce cytotoxicity as the IC50 value was not obtained even with higher dose of 1,000 ng/mL EMTAHDCA. Further, in vivo studies revealed that the median life span/survival days of tumor bearing mice treated with EMTAHDCA increased significantly with a fold change of ~1.9 and 1.81 corresponding to doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight (B.W. of EMTAHDCA respectively, as compared to the DL group. Our results suggest that 5 mg/kg B.W. is effective since the dose of 10 mg/kg B.W. did not show any significant difference as compared to 5 mg/kg B

  5. Cell surface acid-base properties of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus: Influences of nitrogen source, growth phase and N:P ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxia; Alessi, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Kenney, J. P. L.; Zhou, Qixing; Lalonde, S. V.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2016-08-01

    The distribution of many trace metals in the oceans is controlled by biological uptake. Recently, Liu et al. (2015) demonstrated the propensity for a marine cyanobacterium to adsorb cadmium from seawater, suggesting that cell surface reactivity might also play an important role in the cycling of metals in the oceans. However, it remains unclear how variations in cyanobacterial growth rates and nutrient supply might affect the chemical properties of their cellular surfaces. In this study we used potentiometric titrations and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry to profile the key metabolic changes and surface chemical responses of a Synechococcus strain, PCC 7002, during different growth regimes. This included testing various nitrogen (N) to phosphorous (P) ratios (both nitrogen and phosphorous dependent), nitrogen sources (nitrate, ammonium and urea) and growth stages (exponential, stationary, and death phase). FT-IR spectroscopy showed that varying the growth substrates on which Synechococcus cells were cultured resulted in differences in either the type or abundance of cellular exudates produced or a change in the cell wall components. Potentiometric titration data were modeled using three distinct proton binding sites, with resulting pKa values for cells of the various growth conditions in the ranges of 4.96-5.51 (pKa1), 6.67-7.42 (pKa2) and 8.13-9.95 (pKa3). According to previous spectroscopic studies, these pKa ranges are consistent with carboxyl, phosphoryl, and amine groups, respectively. Comparisons between the titration data (for the cell surface) and FT-IR spectra (for the average cellular changes) generally indicate (1) that the nitrogen source is a greater determinant of ligand concentration than growth phase, and (2) that phosphorus limitation has a greater impact on Synechococcus cellular and extracellular properties than does nitrogen limitation. Taken together, these techniques indicate that nutritional quality during cell growth can

  6. Synthesis of chlorophyll-binding proteins in a fully-segregated ∆ycf54 strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eHollingshead

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the chlorophyll (Chl biosynthesis pathway the formation of protochlorophyllide is catalyzed by Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyl ester (MgPME cyclase. The Ycf54 protein was recently shown to form a complex with another component of the oxidative cyclase, Sll1214 (CycI, and partial inactivation of the ycf54 gene leads to Chl deficiency in cyanobacteria and plants. The exact function of the Ycf54 is not known, however, and further progress depends on construction and characterisation of a mutant cyanobacterial strain with a fully inactivated ycf54 gene. Here, we report the complete deletion of the ycf54 gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803; the resulting ycf54 strain accumulates huge concentrations of the cyclase substrate MgPME together with another pigment, which we identified using nuclear magnetic resonance as 3-formyl MgPME. The detection of a small amount (~13% of Chl in the ycf54 mutant provides clear evidence that the Ycf54 protein is important, but not essential, for activity of the oxidative cyclase. The greatly reduced formation of protochlorophyllide in the ycf54 strain provided an opportunity to use 35S protein labelling combined with 2D electrophoresis to examine the synthesis of all known Chl-binding protein complexes under drastically restricted de novo Chl biosynthesis. We show that although the ycf54 strain synthesizes very limited amounts of photosystem I and the CP47 and CP43 subunits of photosystem II (PSII, the synthesis of PSII D1 and D2 subunits and their assembly into the reaction centre (RCII assembly intermediate were not affected. Furthermore, the levels of other Chl complexes such as cytochrome b6f and the HliD– Chl synthase remained comparable to wild-type. These data demonstrate that the requirement for de novo Chl molecules differs completely for each Chl-binding protein. Chl traffic and recycling in the cyanobacterial cell as well as the function of Ycf54 are discussed.

  7. Synthesis of Chlorophyll-Binding Proteins in a Fully Segregated Δycf54 Strain of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingshead, Sarah; Kopečná, Jana; Armstrong, David R.; Bučinská, Lenka; Jackson, Philip J.; Chen, Guangyu E.; Dickman, Mark J.; Williamson, Michael P.; Sobotka, Roman; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    In the chlorophyll (Chl) biosynthesis pathway the formation of protochlorophyllide is catalyzed by Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyl ester (MgPME) cyclase. The Ycf54 protein was recently shown to form a complex with another component of the oxidative cyclase, Sll1214 (CycI), and partial inactivation of the ycf54 gene leads to Chl deficiency in cyanobacteria and plants. The exact function of the Ycf54 is not known, however, and further progress depends on construction and characterization of a mutant cyanobacterial strain with a fully inactivated ycf54 gene. Here, we report the complete deletion of the ycf54 gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803; the resulting Δycf54 strain accumulates huge concentrations of the cyclase substrate MgPME together with another pigment, which we identified using nuclear magnetic resonance as 3-formyl MgPME. The detection of a small amount (~13%) of Chl in the Δycf54 mutant provides clear evidence that the Ycf54 protein is important, but not essential, for activity of the oxidative cyclase. The greatly reduced formation of protochlorophyllide in the Δycf54 strain provided an opportunity to use 35S protein labeling combined with 2D electrophoresis to examine the synthesis of all known Chl-binding protein complexes under drastically restricted de novo Chl biosynthesis. We show that although the Δycf54 strain synthesizes very limited amounts of photosystem I and the CP47 and CP43 subunits of photosystem II (PSII), the synthesis of PSII D1 and D2 subunits and their assembly into the reaction centre (RCII) assembly intermediate were not affected. Furthermore, the levels of other Chl complexes such as cytochrome b6f and the HliD– Chl synthase remained comparable to wild-type. These data demonstrate that the requirement for de novo Chl molecules differs completely for each Chl-binding protein. Chl traffic and recycling in the cyanobacterial cell as well as the function of Ycf54 are discussed. PMID:27014315

  8. Analysis of the early heterocyst Cys-proteome in the multicellular cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme reveals novel insights into the division of labor within diazotrophic filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandh, Gustaf; Ramström, Margareta; Stensjö, Karin

    2014-12-04

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133, removal of combined nitrogen induces the differentiation of heterocysts, a cell-type specialized in N2 fixation. The differentiation involves genomic, structural and metabolic adaptations. In cyanobacteria, changes in the availability of carbon and nitrogen have also been linked to redox regulated posttranslational modifications of protein bound thiol groups. We have here employed a thiol targeting strategy to relatively quantify the putative redox proteome in heterocysts as compared to N2-fixing filaments, 24 hours after combined nitrogen depletion. The aim of the study was to expand the coverage of the cell-type specific proteome and metabolic landscape of heterocysts. Here we report the first cell-type specific proteome of newly formed heterocysts, compared to N2-fixing filaments, using the cysteine-specific selective ICAT methodology. The data set defined a good quantitative accuracy of the ICAT reagent in complex protein samples. The relative abundance levels of 511 proteins were determined and 74% showed a cell-type specific differential abundance. The majority of the identified proteins have not previously been quantified at the cell-type specific level. We have in addition analyzed the cell-type specific differential abundance of a large section of proteins quantified in both newly formed and steady-state diazotrophic cultures in N. punctiforme. The results describe a wide distribution of members of the putative redox regulated Cys-proteome in the central metabolism of both vegetative cells and heterocysts of N. punctiforme. The data set broadens our understanding of heterocysts and describes novel proteins involved in heterocyst physiology, including signaling and regulatory proteins as well as a large number of proteins with unknown function. Significant differences in cell-type specific abundance levels were present in the cell-type specific proteomes of newly formed diazotrophic filaments

  9. Full subunit coverage liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LCMS+) of an oligomeric membrane protein: cytochrome b(6)f complex from spinach and the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelegge, Julian P; Zhang, Huamin; Aguilera, Rodrigo; Taylor, Ross M; Cramer, William A

    2002-10-01

    Highly active cytochrome b(6)f complexes from spinach and the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus have been analyzed by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LCMS+). Both size-exclusion and reverse-phase separations were used to separate protein subunits allowing measurement of their molecular masses to an accuracy exceeding 0.01% (+/-3 Da at 30,000 Da). The products of petA, petB, petC, petD, petG, petL, petM, and petN were detected in complexes from both spinach and M. laminosus, while the spinach complex also contained ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Zhang, H., Whitelegge, J. P., and Cramer, W. A. (2001) Flavonucleotide:ferredoxin reductase is a subunit of the plant cytochrome b(6)f complex. J. Biol. Chem. 276, 38159-38165). While the measured masses of PetC and PetD (18935.8 and 17311.8 Da, respectively) from spinach are consistent with the published primary structure, the measured masses of cytochrome f (31934.7 Da, PetA) and cytochrome b (24886.9 Da, PetB) modestly deviate from values calculated based upon genomic sequence and known post-translational modifications. The low molecular weight protein subunits have been sequenced using tandem mass spectrometry (MSMS) without prior cleavage. Sequences derived from the MSMS spectra of these intact membrane proteins in the range of 3.2-4.2 kDa were compared with translations of genomic DNA sequence where available. Products of the spinach chloroplast genome, PetG, PetL, and PetN, all retained their initiating formylmethionine, while the nuclear encoded PetM was cleaved after import from the cytoplasm. While the sequences of PetG and PetN revealed no discrepancy with translations of the spinach chloroplast genome, Phe was detected at position 2 of PetL. The spinach chloroplast genome reports a codon for Ser at position 2 implying the presence of a DNA sequencing error or a previously undiscovered RNA editing event. Clearly, complete annotation of genomic data requires detailed

  10. Iron Isotope Fractionation during Fe(II) Oxidation Mediated by the Oxygen-Producing Marine Cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanner, E. D.; Bayer, T.; Wu, W.; Hao, L.; Obst, M.; Sundman, A.; Byrne, J. M.; Michel, F. M.; Kleinhanns, I. C.; Kappler, A.; Schoenberg, R.

    2017-04-11

    In this study, we couple iron isotope analysis to microscopic and mineralogical investigation of iron speciation during circumneutral Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) precipitation with photosynthetically produced oxygen. In the presence of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002, aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) is oxidized and precipitated as amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide minerals (iron precipitates, Feppt), with distinct isotopic fractionation (ε56Fe) values determined from fitting the δ56Fe(II)aq (1.79‰ and 2.15‰) and the δ56Feppt (2.44‰ and 2.98‰) data trends from two replicate experiments. Additional Fe(II) and Fe(III) phases were detected using microscopy and chemical extractions and likely represent Fe(II) and Fe(III) sorbed to minerals and cells. The iron desorbed with sodium acetate (FeNaAc) yielded heavier δ56Fe compositions than Fe(II)aq. Modeling of the fractionation during Fe(III) sorption to cells and Fe(II) sorption to Feppt, combined with equilibration of sorbed iron and with Fe(II)aq using published fractionation factors, is consistent with our resulting δ56FeNaAc. The δ56Feppt data trend is inconsistent with complete equilibrium exchange with Fe(II)aq. Because of this and our detection of microbially excreted organics (e.g., exopolysaccharides) coating Feppt in our microscopic analysis, we suggest that electron and atom exchange is partially suppressed in this system by biologically produced organics. These results indicate that cyanobacteria influence the fate and composition of iron in sunlit environments via their role in Fe(II) oxidation through O2 production, the capacity of their cell surfaces to sorb iron, and the interaction of secreted organics with Fe(III) minerals.

  11. Differential sensitivity of five cyanobacterial strains to ammonium toxicity and its inhibitory mechanism on the photosynthesis of rice-field cyanobacterium Ge-Xian-Mi (Nostoc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Guozheng [College of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Deblois, Charles P. [Department des Sciences Biologiques, TOXEN, Canada Research Chair on Ecotoxicology of Aquatic Microorganisms, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Succursale Centre-ville, C.P. 8888 Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Liu Shuwen [College of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Juneau, Philippe [Department des Sciences Biologiques, TOXEN, Canada Research Chair on Ecotoxicology of Aquatic Microorganisms, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Succursale Centre-ville, C.P. 8888 Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Qiu Baosheng [College of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Genetic Regulation and Integrative Biology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)], E-mail: bsqiu@public.wh.hb.cn

    2008-08-29

    Effects of two fertilizers, NH{sub 4}Cl and KCl, on the growth of the edible cyanobacterium Ge-Xian-Mi (Nostoc) and four other cyanobacterial strains were compared at pH 8.3 {+-} 0.2 and 25 deg. C. Their growth was decreased by at least 65% at 10 mmol L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}Cl but no inhibitory effect was observed at the same level of KCl. Meanwhile, the strains exhibited a great variation of sensitivity to NH{sub 4}{sup +} toxicity in the order: Ge-Xian-Mi > Anabaena azotica FACHB 118 > Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB 905 > M. aeruginosa FACHB 315 > Synechococcus FACHB 805. The 96-h EC{sub 50} value for relative growth rate with regard to NH{sub 4}{sup +} for Ge-Xian-Mi was 1.105 mmol L{sup -1}, which was much less than the NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration in many agricultural soils (2-20 mmol L{sup -1}). This indicated that the use of ammonium as nitrogen fertilizer was responsible for the reduced resource of Ge-Xian-Mi in the paddy field. After 96 h exposure to 1 mmol L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}Cl, the photosynthetic rate, F{sub v}/F{sub m} value, saturating irradiance for photosynthesis and PSII activity of Ge-Xian-Mi colonies were remarkably decreased. The chlorophyll synthesis of Ge-Xian-Mi was more sensitive to NH{sub 4}{sup +} toxicity than phycobiliproteins. Thus, the functional absorption cross section of Ge-Xian-Mi PSII was increased markedly at NH{sub 4}Cl levels {>=}1 mmol L{sup -1} and the electron transport on the acceptor side of PSII was significantly accelerated by NH{sub 4}Cl addition {>=}3 mmol L{sup -1}. Dark respiration of Ge-Xian-Mi was significantly increased by 246% and 384% at 5 and 10 mmol L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}Cl, respectively. The rapid fluorescence rise kinetics indicated that the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII was the inhibitory site of NH{sub 4}{sup +}.

  12. Photosynthetic Versatility in the Genome of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 (Formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’), a Model Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Sharon L.; Dick, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Anoxygenic cyanobacteria that use sulfide as the electron donor for photosynthesis are a potentially influential but poorly constrained force on Earth’s biogeochemistry. Their versatile metabolism may have boosted primary production and nitrogen cycling in euxinic coastal margins in the Proterozoic. In addition, they represent a biological mechanism for limiting the accumulation of atmospheric oxygen, especially before the Great Oxidation Event and in the low-oxygen conditions of the Proterozoic. In this study, we describe the draft genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228, formerly Oscillatoria limnetica ‘Solar Lake’, a mat-forming diazotrophic cyanobacterium that can switch between oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide-based anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP). Geitlerinema possesses three variants of psbA, which encodes protein D1, a core component of the photosystem II reaction center. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that one variant is closely affiliated with cyanobacterial psbA genes that code for a D1 protein used for oxygen-sensitive processes. Another version is phylogenetically similar to cyanobacterial psbA genes that encode D1 proteins used under microaerobic conditions, and the third variant may be cued to high light and/or elevated oxygen concentrations. Geitlerinema has the canonical gene for sulfide quinone reductase (SQR) used in cyanobacterial AP and a putative transcriptional regulatory gene in the same operon. Another operon with a second, distinct sqr and regulatory gene is present, and is phylogenetically related to sqr genes used for high sulfide concentrations. The genome has a comprehensive nif gene suite for nitrogen fixation, supporting previous observations of nitrogenase activity. Geitlerinema possesses a bidirectional hydrogenase rather than the uptake hydrogenase typically used by cyanobacteria in diazotrophy. Overall, the genome sequence of Geitlerinema sp. PCC 9228 highlights potential cyanobacterial strategies to cope with

  13. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION BY THE CYANOBACTERIUM PLECTONEMA BORYANUM: EFFECTS OF INITIAL NITRATE CONCENTRATION, LIGHT INTENSITY, AND INHIBITION OF PHOTOSYSTEM II BY DCMU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, B.; Huesemann, M.

    2008-01-01

    The alarming rate at which atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are increasing due to the burning of fossil fuels will have incalculable consequences if disregarded. Fuel cells, a source of energy that does not add to carbon dioxide emissions, have become an important topic of study. Although signifi cant advances have been made related to fuel cells, the problem of cheap and renewable hydrogen production still remains. The cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum has demonstrated potential as a resolution to this problem by producing hydrogen under nitrogen defi cient growing conditions. Plectonema boryanum cultures were tested in a series of experiments to determine the effects of light intensity, initial nitrate concentration, and photosystem II inhibitor DCMU (3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) upon hydrogen production. Cultures were grown in sterile Chu. No. 10 medium within photobioreactors constantly illuminated by halogen lights. Because the enzyme responsible for hydrogen production is sensitive to oxygen, the medium was continuously sparged with argon/CO2 (99.7%/0.3% vol/vol) by gas dispersion tubes immersed in the culture. Hydrogen production was monitored by using a gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. In the initial experiment, the effects of initial nitrate concentration were tested and results revealed cumulative hydrogen production was maximum at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM. A second experiment was then conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 1 mM to determine the effects of light intensity at 50, 100, and 200 μmole m-2 s-1. Cumulative hydrogen production increased with increasing light intensity. A fi nal experiment, conducted at an initial nitrate concentration of 2 mM, tested the effects of high light intensity at 200 and 400 μmole m-2 s-1. Excessive light at 400 μmole m-2 s-1 decreased cumulative hydrogen production. Based upon all experiments, cumulative hydrogen production rates were optimal

  14. Stability of toxin gene proportion in red-pigmented populations of the cyanobacterium Planktothrix during 29 years of re-oligotrophication of Lake Zürich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostermaier Veronika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Harmful algal blooms deteriorate the services of aquatic ecosystems. They are often formed by cyanobacteria composed of genotypes able to produce a certain toxin, for example, the hepatotoxin microcystin (MC, but also of nontoxic genotypes that either carry mutations in the genes encoding toxin synthesis or that lost those genes during evolution. In general, cyanobacterial blooms are favored by eutrophication. Very little is known about the stability of the toxic/nontoxic genotype composition during trophic change. Results Archived samples of preserved phytoplankton on filters from aquatic ecosystems that underwent changes in the trophic state provide a so far unrealized possibility to analyze the response of toxic/nontoxic genotype composition to the environment. During a period of 29 years of re-oligotrophication of the deep, physically stratified Lake Zürich (1980 to 2008, the population of the stratifying cyanobacterium Planktothrix was at a minimum during the most eutrophic years (1980 to 1984, but increased and dominated the phytoplankton during the past two decades. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that during the whole observation period the proportion of the toxic genotype was strikingly stable, that is, close to 100%. Inactive MC genotypes carrying mutations within the MC synthesis genes never became abundant. Unexpectedly, a nontoxic genotype, which lost its MC genes during evolution, and which could be shown to be dominant under eutrophic conditions in shallow polymictic lakes, also co-occurred in Lake Zürich but was never abundant. As it is most likely that this nontoxic genotype contains relatively weak gas vesicles unable to withstand the high water pressure in deep lakes, it is concluded that regular deep mixing selectively reduced its abundance through the destruction of gas vesicles. Conclusions The stability in toxic genotype dominance gives evidence for the adaptation to deep mixing of a

  15. Extracellular polymeric substances buffer against the biocidal effect of H2O2 on the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong; Mu, Shuyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Halik, Umut

    2015-02-01

    H2O2 is an emerging biocide for bloom-forming cyanobacteria. It is important to investigate the H2O2 scavenging ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of cyanobacteria because EPS with strong antioxidant activity may "waste" considerable amounts of H2O2 before it kills the cells. In this study, the buffering capacity against H2O2 of EPS from the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated. IC50 values for the ability of EPS and vitamin C (VC) to scavenge 50% of the initial H2O2 concentration were 0.097 and 0.28 mg mL(-1), respectively, indicating the higher H2O2 scavenging activity of EPS than VC. Both proteins and polysaccharides are significantly decomposed by H2O2 and the polysaccharides were more readily decomposed than proteins. H2O2 consumed by the EPS accounted for 50% of the total amount of H2O2 consumed by the cells. Cell growth and photosynthesis were reduced more for EPS-free cells than EPS coated cells when the cells were treated with 0.1 or 0.2 mg mL(-1) H2O2, and the maximum photochemical efficiency Fv/Fm of EPS coated cells recovered to higher values than EPS-free cells. Concentrations of H2O2 above 0.3 mg mL(-1) completely inhibited photosynthesis and no recovery was observed for both EPS-free and EPS coated cells. This shows that EPS has some buffering capacity against the killing effect of H2O2 on cyanobacterial cells. Such a strong H2O2 scavenging ability of EPS is not favorable for killing bloom-forming cyanobacteria. The high H2O2 scavenging capacity means considerable amounts of H2O2 have to be used to break through the EPS barrier before H2O2 exerts any killing effects on the cells. It is therefore necessary to determine the H2O2 scavenging capacity of the EPS of various bloom-forming cyanobacteria so that the cost-effective amount of H2O2 needed to be used for killing the cyanobacteria can be estimated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 transcriptome: acclimation to temperature, salinity, oxidative stress and mixotrophic growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C

  17. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present.

  18. Engineering limonene and bisabolene production in wild type and a glycogen-deficient mutant of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, Fiona K.; Work, Victoria H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-06-19

    The plant terpenoids limonene (C10H16) and α-bisabolene (C15H24) are hydrocarbon precursors to a range of industrially-relevant chemicals. High-titer microbial synthesis of limonene and α- bisabolene could pave the way for advances in in vivo engineering of tailor-made hydrocarbons, and production at commercial scale. We have engineered the fast-growing unicellular euryhaline cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to produce yields of 4 mg L-1 limonene and 0.6 mg L-1 α-bisabolene through heterologous expression of the Mentha spicata L-limonene synthase or the Abies grandis (E)-α-bisabolene synthase genes, respectively. Titers were significantly higher when a dodecane overlay was applied during culturing, suggesting either that dodecane traps large quantities of volatile limonene and α-bisabolene that would otherwise be lost to evaporation, and/or that continuous product removal in dodecane alleviates product feedback inhibition to promote higher rates of synthesis. We also investigate limonene and bisabolene production in the ΔglgC genetic background, where carbon partitioning is redirected at the expense of glycogen biosynthesis. The Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 ΔglgC mutant excreted a suite of overflow metabolites (α-ketoisocaproate, pyruvate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate and acetate) during nitrogen deprivation, and also at the onset of stationary growth in nutrient-replete media. None of the excreted metabolites, however, appeared to be effectively utilized for terpenoid metabolism. Interestingly, we observed a 1.6 to 2.5-fold increase in the extracellular concentration of most excreted organic acids when the ΔglgC mutant was conferred with the ability to produce limonene. Overall, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 provides a highly promising platform for terpenoid biosynthetic and metabolic engineering efforts.

  19. Transcriptomic and proteomic dynamics in the metabolism of a diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 during a diurnal light-dark cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welkie, David; Zhang, Xiaohui; Markillie, Meng Lye; Taylor, Ronald; Orr, Galya; Jacobs, Jon; Bhide, Ketaki; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gritsenko, Marina; Mitchell, Hugh; Smith, Richard D; Sherman, Louis A

    2014-12-29

    Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 is an excellent cyanobacterial model organism with great potential to be applied as a biocatalyst for the production of high value compounds. Like other unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterial species, it has a tightly regulated metabolism synchronized to the light-dark cycle. Utilizing transcriptomic and proteomic methods, we quantified the relationships between transcription and translation underlying central and secondary metabolism in response to nitrogen free, 12 hour light and 12 hour dark conditions. By combining mass-spectrometry based proteomics and RNA-sequencing transcriptomics, we quantitatively measured a total of 6766 mRNAs and 1322 proteins at four time points across a 24 hour light-dark cycle. Photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and carbon storage relevant genes were expressed during the preceding light or dark period, concurrent with measured nitrogenase activity in the late light period. We describe many instances of disparity in peak mRNA and protein abundances, and strong correlation of light dependent expression of both antisense and CRISPR-related gene expression. The proteins for nitrogenase and the pentose phosphate pathway were highest in the dark, whereas those for glycolysis and the TCA cycle were more prominent in the light. Interestingly, one copy of the psbA gene encoding the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein D1 (psbA4) was highly upregulated only in the dark. This protein likely cannot catalyze O2 evolution and so may be used by the cell to keep PSII intact during N2 fixation. The CRISPR elements were found exclusively at the ends of the large plasmid and we speculate that their presence is crucial to the maintenance of this plasmid. This investigation of parallel transcriptional and translational activity within Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 provided quantitative information on expression levels of metabolic pathways relevant to engineering efforts. The identification of expression patterns for both m

  20. A Short-Term Advantage for Syngamy in the Origin of Eukaryotic Sex: Effects of Cell Fusion on Cell Cycle Duration and Other Effects Related to the Duration of the Cell Cycle—Relationship between Cell Growth Curve and the Optimal Size of the Species, and Circadian Cell Cycle in Photosynthetic Unicellular Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Mancebo Quintana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of sex is becoming a vexatious issue for Evolutionary Biology. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed, based on the genetic effects of sex, on trophic effects or on the formation of cysts and syncytia. Our approach addresses the change in cell cycle duration which would cause cell fusion. Several results are obtained through graphical and mathematical analysis and computer simulations. (1 In poor environments, cell fusion would be an advantageous strategy, as fusion between cells of different size shortens the cycle of the smaller cell (relative to the asexual cycle, and the majority of mergers would occur between cells of different sizes. (2 The easiest-to-evolve regulation of cell proliferation (sexual/asexual would be by modifying the checkpoints of the cell cycle. (3 A regulation of this kind would have required the existence of the G2 phase, and sex could thus be the cause of the appearance of this phase. Regarding cell cycle, (4 the exponential curve is the only cell growth curve that has no effect on the optimal cell size in unicellular species; (5 the existence of a plateau with no growth at the end of the cell cycle explains the circadian cell cycle observed in unicellular algae.

  1. A Putative O-Linked β-N-Acetylglucosamine Transferase Is Essential for Hormogonium Development and Motility in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatan, Behzad; Bains, Divleen K; Cheng, Monica H; Cho, Ye Won; Huynh, Jessica; Kim, Rachelle; Omoruyi, Osagie H; Pantoja, Adriana P; Park, Jun Sang; Peng, Julia K; Splitt, Samantha D; Tian, Mason Y; Risser, Douglas D

    2017-05-01

    Most species of filamentous cyanobacteria are capable of gliding motility, likely via a conserved type IV pilus-like system that may also secrete a motility-associated polysaccharide. In a subset of these organisms, motility is achieved only after the transient differentiation of hormogonia, which are specialized filaments that enter a nongrowth state dedicated to motility. Despite the fundamental importance of hormogonia to the life cycles of many filamentous cyanobacteria, the molecular regulation of hormogonium development is largely undefined. To systematically identify genes essential for hormogonium development and motility in the model heterocyst-forming filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme, a forward genetic screen was employed. The first gene identified using this screen, designated ogtA, encodes a putative O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT). The deletion of ogtA abolished motility, while ectopic expression of ogtA induced hormogonium development even under hormogonium-repressing conditions. Transcription of ogtA is rapidly upregulated (1 h) following hormogonium induction, and an OgtA-GFPuv fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm. In developing hormogonia, accumulation of PilA but not HmpD is dependent on ogtA Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis indicated equivalent levels of pilA transcript in the wild-type and ΔogtA mutant strains, while a reporter construct consisting of the intergenic region in the 5' direction of pilA fused to gfp produced lower levels of fluorescence in the ΔogtA mutant strain than in the wild type. The production of hormogonium polysaccharide in the ΔogtA mutant strain is reduced compared to that in the wild type but comparable to that in a pilA deletion strain. Collectively, these results imply that O-GlcNAc protein modification regulates the accumulation of PilA via a posttranscriptional mechanism in developing hormogonia.IMPORTANCE Filamentous cyanobacteria are among the most

  2. Genetically modified cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    Osmoadaptable organisms, like bacteria and plants, respond to varying levels of inorganic/organic osmotica by .... ted and maintained on nutrient slant containing the proline analog. 2.4 Growth, chlorophyll a and protein .... (Brown and Hellebust 1980), fungi (Jennings and Burke. 1990) and higher plants (Bartels and Nelson ...

  3. N and C control of ABC-type bicarbonate transporter Cmp and its LysR-type transcriptional regulator CmpR in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Igual, Rocío; Picossi, Silvia; López-Garrido, Javier; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2012-04-01

    In the model, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, gene cluster alr2877-alr2880, which encodes an ABC-type transport system, was induced under conditions of carbon limitation and its inactivation impaired the uptake of bicarbonate. Thus, this gene cluster encodes a Cmp bicarbonate transporter. ORF all0862, encoding a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, was expressed under carbon limitation and at higher levels in the absence than in the presence of combined nitrogen, with a positive effect of the N-control transcription factor NtcA. all0862 was expressed from two putative transcription start sites located 164 and 64 bp upstream from the gene respectively. The latter was induced under carbon limitation and was dependent on positive autoregulation by All0862. All0862 was required for the induction of the Cmp bicarbonate transporter, thus representing a CmpR regulator of Anabaena sp. These results show a novel mode of co-regulation by C and N availability through the concerted action of N- and C-responsive transcription factors. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The two Dps proteins, NpDps2 and NpDps5, are involved in light-induced oxidative stress tolerance in the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Vamsi K; Li, Xin; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Dzhygyr, Ievgen; Sandh, Gustaf; Magnuson, Ann; Stensjö, Karin

    2016-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that are considered biotechnologically prominent organisms for production of high-value compounds. Cyanobacteria are subject to high-light intensities, which is a challenge that needs to be addressed in design of efficient bio-engineered photosynthetic organisms. Dps proteins are members of the ferritin superfamily and are omnipresent in prokaryotes. They play a major role in oxidative stress protection and iron homeostasis. The filamentous, heterocyst-forming Nostoc punctiforme, has five Dps proteins. In this study we elucidated the role of these Dps proteins in acclimation to high light intensity, the gene loci organization and the transcriptional regulation of all five dps genes in N. punctiforme was revealed, and dps-deletion mutant strains were used in physiological characterization. Two mutants defective in Dps2 and Dps5 activity displayed a reduced fitness under increased illumination, as well as a differential Photosystem (PS) stoichiometry, with an elevated Photosystem II to Photosystem I ratio in the dps5 deletion strain. This work establishes a Dps-mediated link between light tolerance, H2O2 detoxification, and iron homeostasis, and provides further evidence on the non-redundant role of multiple Dps proteins in this multicellular cyanobacterium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CalA, a Cyanobacterial AbrB Protein, Interacts with the Upstream Region of hypC and Acts as a Repressor of Its Transcription in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agervald, Åsa; Zhang, Xiaohui; Stensjö, Karin; Devine, Ellenor; Lindblad, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain, depending on growth conditions, up to two hydrogenases directly involved in hydrogen metabolism. HypC is one out of at least seven auxiliary gene products required for synthesis of a functional hydrogenase, specifically involved in the maturation of the large subunit. In this study we present a protein, CalA (Alr0946 in the genome), belonging to the transcription regulator family AbrB, which in protein-DNA assays was found to interact with the upstream region of hypC. Transcriptional investigations showed that calA is cotranscribed with the downstream gene alr0947, which encodes a putative protease from the abortive infection superfamily, Abi. CalA was shown to interact specifically not only with the upstream region of hypC but also with its own upstream region, acting as a repressor on hypC. The bidirectional hydrogenase activity was significantly downregulated when CalA was overexpressed, demonstrating a correlation with the transcription factor, either direct or indirect. In silico studies showed that homologues to both CalA and Alr0947 are highly conserved proteins within cyanobacteria with very similar physical organizations of the corresponding structural genes. Possible functions of the cotranscribed downstream protein Alr0947 are presented. In addition, we present a three-dimensional (3D) model of the DNA binding domain of CalA and putative DNA binding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:20023111

  6. The use of NH4+rather than NO3-affects cell stoichiometry, C allocation, photosynthesis and growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. UTEX LB 2380, only when energy is limiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zuoxi; Giordano, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The assimilation of N-NO 3 - requires more energy than that of N-NH 4 + . This becomes relevant when energy is limiting and may impinge differently on cell energy budget depending on depth, time of the day and season. We hypothesize that N-limited and energy-limited cells of the oceanic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. differ in their response to the N source with respect to growth, elemental stoichiometry and carbon allocation. Under N limitation, cells retained almost absolute homeostasis of elemental and organic composition, and the use of NH 4 + did not stimulate growth. When energy was limiting, however, Synechococcus grew faster in NH 4 + than in NO 3 - and had higher C (20%), N (38%) and S (30%) cell quotas. Furthermore, more C was allocated to protein, whereas the carbohydrate and lipid pool size did not change appreciably. Energy limitation also led to a higher photosynthetic rate relative to N limitation. We interpret these results as an indication that, under energy limitation, the use of the least expensive N source allowed a spillover of the energy saved from N assimilation to the assimilation of other nutrients. The change in elemental stoichiometry influenced C allocation, inducing an increase in cell protein, which resulted in a stimulation of photosynthesis and growth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Enhancement of human adaptive immune responses by administration of a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensisTumor necrosis factor-alpha binding capacity and anti-infliximab antibodies measured by fluid-phase radioimmunoassays as predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobner, M.; Walsted, A.; Larsen, R.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of consumption of Immulina, a high-molecular-weight polysaccharide extract from the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis, on adaptive immune responses was investigated by evaluation of changes in leukocyte responsiveness to two foreign recall antigens, Candida albicans (CA) and tetanus...... toxoid (TT), in vitro. Consumption of Immulina by 11 healthy male volunteers caused an immediate, but temporary, increase of CA-induced CD4+ T-helper (Th) cell proliferation (P ...) and fell below baseline levels after 14 days (P effects on IL-10 responses were observed. Upon addition to normal mononuclear cells in vitro, Immulina elicited strong TNF...

  8. Quantitative analysis of UV-A shock and short term stress using iTRAQ, pseudo selective reaction monitoring (pSRM) and GC-MS based metabolite analysis of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wase, Nishikant; Pham, Trong Khoa; Ow, Saw Yen; Wright, Phillip C

    2014-09-23

    A quantitative proteomics and metabolomics analysis was performed using iTRAQ, HPLC and GC-MS in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 to understand the effect of short and long term UV-A exposure. Changes in the proteome were measured for short-term stress (4-24h) using iTRAQ. Changes in the photosynthetic pigments and intracellular metabolites were observed at exposures of up to 7days (pigments) and up to 11days (intracellular metabolites). To assess iTRAQ measurement quality, pseudo selected reaction monitoring (pSRM) was used, with this confirming underestimation of protein abundance levels by iTRAQ. Our results suggest that short term UV-A radiation lowers the abundance of PS-I and PS-II proteins. We also observed an increase in abundance of intracellular redox homeostasis proteins and plastocyanin. Additionally, we observed statistically significant changes in scytonemin, Chlorophyll A, astaxanthin, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene. Assessment of intracellular metabolites showed significant changes in several, suggesting their potential role in the Nostoc's stress mitigation strategy. Cyanobacteria under UV-A radiation have reduced growth due to intensive damage to essential functions, but the organism shows a defense response by remodeling bioenergetics pathway, induction of the UV protection compound scytonemin and increased levels of proline and tyrosine as a mitigation response. The effect of UV-A radiation on the proteome and intracellular metabolites of N. punctiforme ATCC 29133 including photosynthetic pigments has been described. We also verify the expression of 13 iTRAQ quantified protein using LC-pSRM. Overall we observed that UV-A radiation has a drastic effect on the photosynthetic machinery, photosynthetic pigments and intracellular amino acids. As a mitigation strategy against UV-A radiation, proline, glycine, and tyrosine were accumulated. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Novel glycosylated mycosporine-like amino acid, 13-O-(β-galactosyl)-porphyra-334, from the edible cyanobacterium Nostoc sphaericum-protective activity on human keratinocytes from UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Uchida, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yamashita, Michiaki; Takenaka, Hiroyuki; Nazifi, Ehsan; Matsugo, Seiichi; Yamaba, Minami; Sakamoto, Toshio

    2017-07-01

    A UV-absorbing compound was purified and identified as a novel glycosylated mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA), 13-O-β-galactosyl-porphyra-334 (β-Gal-P334) from the edible cyanobacterium Nostoc sphaericum, known as "ge xian mi" in China and "cushuro" in Peru. Occurrence of the hexosylated derivative of shinorine (hexosyl-shinorine) was also supported by LC-MS/MS analysis. β-Gal-P334 accounted for about 86.5% of total MAA in N. sphaericum, followed by hexosyl-shinorine (13.2%) and porphyra-334 (0.2%). β-Gal-P334 had an absorption maximum at 334nm and molecular absorption coefficient was 46,700 at 334nm. Protection activity of β-Gal-P334 from UVB and UVA+8-methoxypsoralen induced cell damage on human keratinocytes (HaCaT) was assayed in comparison with other MAA (porphyra-334, shinorine, palythine and mycosporine-glycine). The UVB protection activity was highest in mycosporine-glycine, followed by palythine, β-Gal-P334, porphyra-334 and shinorine in order. β-Gal-P334 had highest protection activity from UVA+8-methoxypsoralen induced cell damage followed by porphyra-334, shinorine, mycosporine-glycine and palythine. We also found an antioxidant (radical-scavenging) activity of β-Gal-P334 by colorimetric and ESR methods. From these findings, β-Gal-P334 was suggested to play important roles in stress tolerant mechanisms such as UV and oxidative stress in N. sphaericum as a major MAA. We also consider that the newly identified MAA, β-Gal-P334 has a potential for use as an ingredient of cosmetics and toiletries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations of Cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC Site in Photosystem II Influence the Regulation of Short-Term Light Response and Photosynthetic Growth of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jine-Yung; Chiu, Yi-Fang; Ortega, José M; Wang, Hsing-Ting; Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Roncel, Mercedes; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2016-04-19

    The characteristic features of two types of short-term light adaptations of the photosynthetic apparatus of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, state transition and blue-green light-induced fluorescence quenching, were compared in wild-type and cytochrome b559 and PsbJ mutant cells with mutations on and near the QC site in photosystem II (PSII). All mutant cells grew photoautotrophically and assembled stable PSII. Thermoluminescence emission experiments showed a decrease in the stability of the S3QB(-)/S2QB(-) charge pairs in the A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells. When dark-adapted wild-type and mutant cells were illuminated by medium-intensity blue light, the increase in the PSII fluorescence yield (indicating a transition to state 1) was more prominent in mutant than wild-type cells. Strong blue-light conditions induced a quenching of fluorescence corresponding to nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ). The extension of NPQ decreased significantly in the mutants, and the kinetics appeared to be affected. When similar measures were repeated on an orange carotenoid protein (OCP)-deficient background, little or no quenching was observed, which confirms that the decrease in fluorescence under strong blue light corresponded to the OCP-dependent NPQ. Immunoblot results showed that the attenuated effect of blue light-induced NPQ in mutant cells was not due to a lack of OCP. Photosynthetic growth and biomass production were greater for A16FJ, S28Aβ, and V32Fβ mutant cells than for wild-type cells under normal growth conditions. Our results suggest that mutations of cytochrome b559 and PsbJ on and near the QC site of PSII may modulate the short-term light response in cyanobacteria.

  11. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  12. A line-scanning semi-confocal multi-photon fluorescence microscope with a simultaneous broadband spectral acquisition and its application to the study of the thylakoid membrane of a cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ghoneim, Mohammad; Shimizu, Yugo; Okamoto, Kenji; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Oh-Oka, Hirozo; Terazima, Masahide

    2007-11-01

    We describe the construction and characterization of a laser-line-scanning microscope capable of detection of broad fluorescence spectra with a resolution of 1 nm. A near-infrared femtosecond pulse train at 800 nm was illuminated on a line (one lateral axis, denoted as X axis) in a specimen by a resonant scanning mirror oscillating at 7.9 kHz, and total multi-photon-induced fluorescence from the linear region was focused on the slit of an imaging polychromator. An electron-multiplying CCD camera was used to resolve fluorescence of different colours at different horizontal pixels and fluorescence of different spatial positions in a specimen at different vertical pixels. Scanning on the other two axes (Y and Z) was achieved by a closed-loop controlled sample scanning stage and a piezo-driven objective actuator. The full widths at half maximum of the point-spread function of the system were estimated to be 0.39-0.40, 0.33 and 0.56-0.59 mum for the X (lateral axis along the line-scan), Y (the other lateral axis) and Z axes (the axial direction), respectively, at fluorescence wavelengths between 644 and 690 nm. A biological application of this microscope was demonstrated in a study of the sub-cellular fluorescence spectra of thylakoid membranes in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120. It was found that the fluorescence intensity ratio between chlorophyll molecules mainly of photosystem II and phycobilin molecules of phycobilisome (chlorophyll/phycobilin), in the thylakoid membranes, became lower as one probed deeper inside the cells. This was attributable not to position dependence of re-absorption or scattering effects, but to an intrinsic change in the local physiological state of the thylakoid membrane, with the help of a transmission spectral measurement of sub-cellular domains. The efficiency of the new line-scanning spectromicroscope was estimated in comparison with our own point-by-point scanning spectromicroscope. Under typical conditions of observing

  13. Achieving temperature-size changes in a unicellular organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Jack; Hirst, Andrew G; Esteban, Genoveva F

    2013-01-01

    The temperature-size rule (TSR) is an intraspecific phenomenon describing the phenotypic plastic response of an organism size to the temperature: individuals reared at cooler temperatures mature to be larger adults than those reared at warmer temperatures. The TSR is ubiquitous, affecting >80% species including uni- and multicellular groups. How the TSR is established has received attention in multicellular organisms, but not in unicells. Further, conceptual models suggest the mechanism of size change to be different in these two groups. Here, we test these theories using the protist Cyclidium glaucoma. We measure cell sizes, along with population growth during temperature acclimation, to determine how and when the temperature-size changes are achieved. We show that mother and daughter sizes become temporarily decoupled from the ratio 2:1 during acclimation, but these return to their coupled state (where daughter cells are half the size of the mother cell) once acclimated. Thermal acclimation is rapid, being completed within approximately a single generation. Further, we examine the impact of increased temperatures on carrying capacity and total biomass, to investigate potential adaptive strategies of size change. We demonstrate no temperature effect on carrying capacity, but maximum supported biomass to decrease with increasing temperature. PMID:22832346

  14. Persistence and proliferation of some unicellular algae in drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drinking water systems have a complex structure and are characterised by the absence of light, the presence of disinfectants and by low levels of nutrients. Several kinds of bacteria, protozoa, algae and fungi can be found in tap water. Little is known about the ecology of algae in drinking water systems, although their ...

  15. Naphthenic acid biodegradation by the unicellular alga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Dean M; Bhaskar, Iyswarya M; Gieg, Lisa M; Chua, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a major contributor to toxicity in tailings waste generated from bitumen production in the Athabasca Oil Sands region. While investigations have shown that bacteria can biodegrade NAs and reduce tailings toxicity, the potential of algae to biodegrade NAs and the biochemical mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here, we discovered that the marine alga Dunaliella tertiolecta is able to tolerate five model NAs (cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, cyclohexaneacetic acid, cyclohexanepropionic acid, cyclohexanebutyric acid and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acid) at 300mgL(-1), a level which exceeds that of any single or combination of NAs typically found in tailings ponds. Moreover, we show that D. tertiolecta can metabolize four of the model NAs. Analysis of NA-amended cultures of D. tertiolecta via low resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed us to quantify decreasing NA levels, identify metabolites, and formulate putative mechanisms of biodegradation. Degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid and cyclohexanepropionic acid proceeded via β-oxidation and resulted in the transient accumulation of cyclohexaneacetic acid and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, respectively. Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was metabolized via 1-cyclohexenecarboxylic acid suggesting that further degradation may occur by step-wise β-oxidation. When D. tertiolecta was inoculated in the presence of oil sands tailings water from the Athabasca region, biodegradation of single-ring NAs was observed relative to controls. This result corroborates the trend we observed with the single-ring model NAs. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High-throughput cultivation and screening platform for unicellular phototrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillich, Ulrich M; Wolter, Nick; Schulze, Katja; Kramer, Dan; Brödel, Oliver; Frohme, Marcus

    2014-09-16

    High-throughput cultivation and screening methods allow a parallel, miniaturized and cost efficient processing of many samples. These methods however, have not been generally established for phototrophic organisms such as microalgae or cyanobacteria. In this work we describe and test high-throughput methods with the model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The required technical automation for these processes was achieved with a Tecan Freedom Evo 200 pipetting robot. The cultivation was performed in 2.2 ml deepwell microtiter plates within a cultivation chamber outfitted with programmable shaking conditions, variable illumination, variable temperature, and an adjustable CO2 atmosphere. Each microtiter-well within the chamber functions as a separate cultivation vessel with reproducible conditions. The automated measurement of various parameters such as growth, full absorption spectrum, chlorophyll concentration, MALDI-TOF-MS, as well as a novel vitality measurement protocol, have already been established and can be monitored during cultivation. Measurement of growth parameters can be used as inputs for the system to allow for periodic automatic dilutions and therefore a semi-continuous cultivation of hundreds of cultures in parallel. The system also allows the automatic generation of mid and long term backups of cultures to repeat experiments or to retrieve strains of interest. The presented platform allows for high-throughput cultivation and screening of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The platform should be usable for many phototrophic microorganisms as is, and be adaptable for even more. A variety of analyses are already established and the platform is easily expandable both in quality, i.e. with further parameters to screen for additional targets and in quantity, i.e. size or number of processed samples.

  17. Tracking and mapping of spatiotemporal quantities using unicellular swarm intelligence visualisation of invisible hazardous substances using unicellular swarm intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Oyekan, John Oluwagbemiga

    2016-01-01

    The book discusses new algorithms capable of searching for, tracking, mapping and providing a visualization of invisible substances. It reports on the realization of a bacterium-inspired robotic controller that can be used by an agent to search for any environmental spatial function such as temperature or pollution. Using the parameters of a mathematical model, the book shows that it is possible to control the exploration, exploitation and sensitivity of the agent. This feature sets the work apart from the usual method of applying the bacterium behavior to robotic agents. The book also discusses how a computationally tractable multi-agent robotic controller was developed and used to