WorldWideScience

Sample records for european works councils

  1. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  2. Variation in Approaches to European Works Councils in Multinational Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Marginson; Jonathan Lavelle; Javier Quintanilla; Duncan Adam; Roc'o S?nchez-Mangas

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on a unique international data set of multinational companies' employment practices, the authors use logistic regression analysis to address variation in the existence of and management practice toward transnational social dialogue through European Works Councils (EWCs). Adopting a contingency perspective, they find that the degree of internationalization of companies' operations and management organization, international HR structure, and the presence of workforce organization exerci...

  3. Comparing German and Danish industrial relations actors on European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bicknell, Helen; Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs).......The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs)....

  4. EPERC: The European Pressure Equipment Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, J.; McAllister, S.

    1998-01-01

    The European Pressure Equipment Research Council (EPERC) is a European Network of industries, research laboratories, inspection bodies and governmental institutions set up to foster co-operative research for the greater benefit of the European industry. The concept of a European Research Council originated at the PVRC meeting in Cannes in 1989 and since this time volunteers from the industry, research laboratories and of the European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten have worked together to create a Statute for EPERC. In the context of the pressure equipment industry, the creation of EPERC is extremely pertinent, since in the near future, a Council directive on pressure equipment will replace the existing national regulations. In parallel to this, work is in progress for the elaboration of European Standards. It is useful to recall that ''Harmonised Standards'' will be the privileged means of complying with the Essential Safety Requirements of the directive. (author)

  5. SEVERAL ASPECTS REGARDING ORPHAN WORKS AFTER THE ADOPTION OF EU DIRECTIVE 2012/28/EU OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL OF 25 OCTOBER 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Seucan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at presenting the new legal provisions at EU level regarding orphan works (Directive 2012/28/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 on certain permitted uses of orphan works and their transposition into national law. The study explains the content of the Directive and raises some issues regarding the transposition into national law. It also highlights several problems which can occur in this process because of errors in translation.

  6. Agenda Responsiveness in the European Council

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrova, Petya; Rasmussen, Anne; Toshkov, Dimiter

    2016-01-01

    The existence of political responsiveness in multi-level systems like the EU remains an open question despite significant recent research on the topic. This article studies whether the European Council responds to the shifting policy priorities of European citizens. More specifically, it explores......, a detailed examination of the shifts in prioritisation of single issues over time reveals little evidence for dynamic issue responsiveness. Recently the European Council has paid more attention to the issues that the public considered the most pressing problems but the convergence could possibly be driven...

  7. Transparency in the Council of the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    with information and thereby act as day-to-day facilitators of transparency of the Council’s activities. Although these communicators see themselves as contributing substantially to the transparency of the Council’s work and thereby as enabling the media to provide EU citizens with information about one......The Council of the European Union is often described as the least transparent of the three big EU institutions although steps have been taken to improve the transparency of its activities during the last couple of decades. This article focuses on the Council’s press officers who provide journalists...... of the most powerful political forums in Europe, transparency in the Council has its limits. This study explores institutional factors which hinder Council press officers from being as transparent as journalists would like them to be. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with Council press officers...

  8. The Council of Europe's Work on Sport, 1994-1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This document presents a collection of official texts from the Council of Europe regarding European sports cooperation. Part 1 presents two Recommendations and Resolutions on Sport adopted by the Committee of Ministers concerning young people and sport and the significance of sport for society. Part 2, covering the works of the Anti-Doping…

  9. 76 FR 54216 - Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Fishery Management Council (Council); Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology Changes AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) Salmon Subcommittee, and Model Evaluation...

  10. Energy markets and European Integration: The World Energy Council role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.

    2002-01-01

    Energy market reform brings many benefits. Central and East Europe's challenge is to establish such markets when, at list in the case of electricity, the established market economies are still wrestling with how to apply competitive principles to this market. Design challenges include the natural monopoly elements within the electricity supply chain and the fact that it is, in practical terms, as essential social service. There is no one single model suitable to all markets at all stages of development. At the same time, there is a need for sustainable energy pricing, which means prices should cover all costs, with transparent and time-limited subsidies bringing the afford ability gap. Cross-border integration extends the benefits available from market reform by overcoming constraints at the national level and by broadening the geographical limits of a market. The World Energy Council works with its Central and East European members to analyse, understand and meet these challenges. (author)

  11. What Triggers the Establishment of a Works Council?

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Mohrenweiser; Paul Marginson; Uschi Backes-Gellner

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses events that trigger the establishment of a works council and the actor or agent who triggers it. The paper extends previous research in two dimensions. First, we examine specific events that motivate workers to establish a works council, such as a change of owner, founding a spin-off, a firm-acquisition or a radical restructuring. These events express risk protection as workers’ primary motivation for establishing a works council. Second, we analyse the actor or agent who ...

  12. Challenges, Changes, and Impact of the Council on Social Work Education Women's Council: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Lazzari, Marceline M.; Faul, Anna C.; Alvarez, Ann Rosegrant

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights the contributions of the Council on the Role and Status of Women in Social Work Education (Women's Council) as well as the role and status of women in social work education. For this historical analysis update, the authors drew on several primary and secondary data sources. The first major theme was organizational…

  13. What direction for the European Council? Institutional reforms and counter-reforms in EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Ciascai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the political and institutional impact of the juridical consecration of the European Council that official institution of European Union by the Lisbon Treaty. Until 1 December 2009, the European Council was a political body with a strong informal role within the european decision making process, but with ambiguous institutional and legal powers. After entry in force of the Lisbon Treaty, European Council becomes an institution that try to exercise a collective leadership in EU.

  14. Gender equality observations and actions by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; Penny, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Women have historically been underrepresented in science. Much positive progress in attracting women to research careers has been achieved in recent years; however, the most influential and high profile positions in most countries are still predominantly occupied by men. The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views gender equality as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle gender imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected from ERC's internationally recognised funding schemes are presented.

  15. Utilization of European Funds in the Public Administration. Study case - Galati County Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Panaitescu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper are to reveal some aspects regarding European funds‟ utilization, starting with the comprehension of EU philosophy regarding cohesion policy and emphasizing the important role played by Structural and Cohesion Funds for public administration, especially in times of economic downturn when the financial resources are difficult to access. Prior Work: this work continues prior research carried out for the “European Programs and Projects Management” MA thesis. Approach: The main methods employed for capturing the research evidence consists in management strategies analysis in the public administration, especially in studying the capacity of absorption of European funds in the case Galati County Council. The main results of this paper show that the risks of absorption capacity decrease of EU funds are linked to a number of factors, such as financial problems, poor information, lack of managerial experience, etc.

  16. The role of a Works Council in implementing radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigenwillig, G.G.; Zinke, E.

    2005-01-01

    In Germany, a works council has the right of co-determination concerning the concrete forms of occupational health and safety in the company according to the Labour-Management Relations Act. In practice coordination is needed between radiation protection and occupational health and safety. This makes a qualified cooperation between workers council, employer and other parties in the company necessary. (orig.)

  17. Report of the ITER Council's Ways and Means Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Beginning in 1988 and continuing through 1990, the four Parties involved, under the auspices of the IAEA, have been cooperating in the ITER Conceptual Design Activities. In order to develop ways and means to comply with the objective of the cooperation, a Working Party was chartered by the Council in July, 1989. This report contains the outcome of the Working Party's effort to fulfil the Council's charge and subsequent additional guidance, which are also given in this document. 2 figs, 13 tabs

  18. The Security Council's Methods of Work: The Borderlines of Legality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cullen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The first section outlines the Security Council’s rules of procedure (or lack thereof) and working methods. Examples are used to illustrate that the Council's methods of work have, paradoxically, become increasingly opaque at the same time as its direct involvement in international justice has...... escalated. The paper concludes by positing that a lack of procedural fairness in the Council’s methods of work at least undermines the justice imperative that the Council so espouses and at most violates an ancillary legal obligation....

  19. European Union Council Directive 2009/71/Euratom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Directive 2009/71, approved by the European Union on June 25th last. This text establishes a new Community framework for the safety of nuclear facilities and includes an analysis of issues such as the reactivation of nuclear programmes, the extension of the operating lifetime of the plants beyond their theoretical period of service and the need for safety requirements accepted by all the Member States. (Author)

  20. 77 FR 58526 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Work Session To Review Proposed Salmon Methodology Changes...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Pacific Fishery Management Council's Salmon Technical Team (STT), Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) Salmon Subcommittee, and Model Evaluation...

  1. THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL AND ITS ROLE IN PROMOTING AND DEFENDING HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE EUROPEAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion, POPESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Council of Europe advocates freedom of expression and of the media, freedom of assembly, equality, and the protection of minorities. It has launched campaigns on issues such as child protection, online hate speech, and the rights of the Roma, Europe's largest minority. The Council of Europe helps member states fight corruption and terrorism and undertake necessary judicial reforms. Its group of constitutional experts, known as the Venice Commission, offers legal advice to countries throughout the world. The Council of Europe promotes human rights through international conventions, such as the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and the Convention on Cybercrime. It monitors member states' progress in these areas and makes recommendations through independent expert monitoring bodies. All Council of Europe member states have abolished the death penalty.

  2. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steckelings, U. Muscha; de Mey, Jo G. R.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or

  3. The Important Step for European Integration: “Council of Europe” and the Matter of Turkey’s Membership to Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Servet Öncü

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is not a new idea that European states gather and form a union. This idea had been discussed since the nineteenth century. However, it was not until the end of World War II that Europeans realized their idea. The most important reason is the struggle for power and dominance that great powers on the continent were engaged in with each other. After World War II, Europeans set up several organizations both not to suffer similar disasters anymore and to become more powerful against the Soviet Union making its power felt in Europe day by day. The Council of Europe is one of the most important of such organizations founded around the idea of the European Union. This organization which stipulates cooperation in such areas human rights, social affairs, education, culture, sports, youth, public health, environmental, architectural heritage, urban planning, local and regional authorities, and law as well as defence and security was founded on 5 May 1949 by ten European states. The Republic of Turkey was invited to the Council of Europe about three months after its foundation and by accepting this invitation participated in the Council as a founding member. The Statute of the Council of Europe was adopted on 12 December 1949 by the Grand National Assembly of Turkey

  4. European Resuscitation Council (ERC) - the Network to fight against cardiac arrest in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Violetta

    2013-09-01

    The ideas of collaboration and formation of scientific societies and registries for cardiac arrest were developed in the 18th century. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) was formed in 1990. Nowadays, the ERC network consists of 30 National Resuscitation Councils (NRCs), which have an obligation to ensure that effective resuscitation services are provided and to promote education, training, and research in all aspects of resuscitation science. The central role of NRCs in decreasing the incidence of cardiac arrest may be highlighted and enhanced by the incorporation and implementation of the following suggestions. NRCs should emphasize and actively participate in acute care training of healthcare professionals and of lay rescuers. Implementation of current resuscitation guidelines should be a priority of each NRC and identification of the weakest link in the chain of survival should be a priority. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementing the Provision of the European Council Convention on Cybercrime în the Romanian Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Iulian IONITA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The European concerns with respect to preventing and fighting cybercrime materialized in the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime. As a reflection of such concerns, the Draft onpreventing and fighting cybercrime was included in Title III of Romanian Law no. 161/2003. In the same context, most recommendations which incriminate cybercrimes were also entered in the futureRomanian Criminal Code as well. As in other countries, the implementation in the Romanian legislation of the convention provisions generated a number of problems which have been more orless noted and solved. This study attempts to pinpoint such problems.

  6. Observations and actions to ensure equal treatment of all candidates by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; El Mjiyad, Nadia; Kota, Jhansi; Thelen, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views equality of opportunities as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected in running highly competitive and internationally recognised funding schemes are presented. Recent initiatives to tackle geographical imbalances will also be presented.

  7. Toward a behavioural theory of cooperation between managers and employee representatives in works councils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Brempt, O.; Boone, C.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072825855; van den Berg, Annette|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079405169

    This article builds a comprehensive behavioural framework of cooperation between management and employee representatives in a works council setting. The authors do so by applying insights from organizational behaviour in the works council setting in the belief that this discipline’s long-standing

  8. Toward a behavioral theory of cooperation between managers and employee representatives in works councils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Brempt, O.; Boone, C.; van Witteloostuijn, A.; Van den Berg, A.

    2017-01-01

    This article builds a comprehensive behavioural framework of cooperation between management and employee representatives in a works council setting. The authors do so by applying insights from organizational behaviour in the works council setting in the belief that this discipline’s long-standing

  9. 75 FR 57520 - NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (10-112)] NASA Advisory Council; Planetary Science Subcommittee; Supporting Research and Technology Working Group; Meeting AGENCY: National... announces a meeting of the Supporting Research and Technology Working Group of the Planetary Science...

  10. European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) accreditation of forensic pathology services in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, P; Bonbled, F; Väli, M; Luna, A; Bajanowski, T; Hougen, H P; Ludes, B; Ferrara, D; Cusack, D; Keller, E; Vieira, N

    2015-03-01

    Forensic experts play a major role in the legal process as they offer professional expert opinion and evidence within the criminal justice system adjudicating on the innocence or alleged guilt of an accused person. In this respect, medico-legal examination is an essential part of the investigation process, determining in a scientific way the cause(s) and manner of unexpected and/or unnatural death or bringing clinical evidence in case of physical, psychological, or sexual abuse in living people. From a legal perspective, these types of investigation must meet international standards, i.e., it should be independent, effective, and prompt. Ideally, the investigations should be conducted by board-certified experts in forensic medicine, endowed with a solid experience in this field, without any hierarchical relationship with the prosecuting authorities and having access to appropriate facilities in order to provide forensic reports of high quality. In this respect, there is a need for any private or public national or international authority including non-governmental organizations seeking experts qualified in forensic medicine to have at disposal a list of specialists working in accordance with high standards of professional performance within forensic pathology services that have been successfully submitted to an official accreditation/certification process using valid and acceptable criteria. To reach this goal, the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) has elaborated an accreditation/certification checklist which should be served as decision-making support to assist inspectors appointed to evaluate applicants. In the same spirit than NAME Accreditation Standards, European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) board decided to set up an ad hoc working group with the mission to elaborate an accreditation/certification procedure similar to the NAME's one but taking into account the realities of forensic medicine practices in Europe and restricted to post

  11. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  12. European Court of Justice Secures Fundamental Rights from UN Security Council Resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Recker

    2009-02-01

    ]. For example, the Court of First Instance restricted the supervision of Security Council resolutions to jus cogens[7]. Conversely Germany[8], the French Republic, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the Council demanded exemption from all review arising from measures adopted by the Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter[9]. In contrast, the European Court of Justice and the appellants in the given cases have seen the necessity of effective judicial review if fundamental rights are infringed[10]. However, how can international law work if there is no consent regarding the principle of supremacy?

    Without question this judgment has decimated the basis of tribute in international law and increased the standard of the European Communities as guardians of their general principles in international law.

  13. The Council of Europe's "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" (CEFR): Approach, Status, Function and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    The Council of Europe's "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" is rapidly becoming a powerful instrument for shaping language education policies in Europe and beyond. The task of relating language policies, language curricula, teacher education and training, textbook and course design and content, examinations and…

  14. Council regulation of the European dual use regulation. A never ending story?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmann, Ulrike

    2018-01-01

    For the first time, the EC Council Regulation of 19 December 1994 established a Community regime for the control of exports of dual-use items. In 2000, the first major revision of the dual-use regime came into force, subjecting not only sensitive material, i.e. plutonium and highly enriched uranium, but also the entire category 0 (nuclear material, installations, equipment) to a licensing requirement for intra-Community shipments. This revision was revised a few months later due to inappropriate content by removing a small proportion of nuclear goods. A further comprehensive new revision was published in 2009. However, the EU Commission's current proposal to revise Annex IV of the regulation does not do justice to the objective of free trade of goods and the maintenance of the competitiveness of European industry from the point of view of the European nuclear industry, as well as from the point of view of the non-nuclear industry in the EU.

  15. 77 FR 17569 - United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC)-Transportation-Dangerous Goods Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... identified in the Joint Action Plan, the Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group led by senior...)-- Transportation--Dangerous Goods Working Group AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...--Dangerous Goods Working Group, of the United States-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC). Comments...

  16. 75 FR 20352 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9139-3] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION...-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water...

  17. 75 FR 54871 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9198-8] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... final in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National...

  18. 75 FR 35458 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9165-6] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... fourth in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National...

  19. 75 FR 1380 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9101-9] National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting Announcement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory...

  20. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckelings, U Muscha; De Mey, Jo G R; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or development of new treatments was communicated in 101 presentations, 35 of them as a part of five on-topic oral sessions and three workshops. Three keynote lectures reviewed current knowledge and the latest data about mechanosensitive channels in pressure regulation, cell therapy in cardiovascular disease and mechanisms of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetic nephropathy. This article summarizes highlights of the oral sessions, workshops and keynote lectures.

  1. Codetermination of the works council in matterss of a security screening of personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    If the licensing authority issues a licence to the operator of a nuclear installation subject to the obligation to have personnel to be employed or to be kept on screened for security purposes by the licensing authority, the works council of the nuclear installation is not in the position to demand refrainment from screening activities unless the works council has given consent. (BAGE 58, 297 = NZA 1988, 811 = AP Paragraph 87 BetrVG 1972 - Ordnung des Betriebes - Nr. 14). Decision of the Federal Labour Court of July 9, 1991 - 1 ABR 57/90 (lower instance: LAG Koeln, decision dated June 12, 1990 - 4 TaBV 2/90). (orig.) [de

  2. European Research Council supports an extensive study of the astrophysical p-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuerky, Gy.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The astrophysical p-process, the production mechanism of the heavy proton rich isotopes (the so-called p-nuclei) is still one of the least understood processes of nucleosynthesis. The modeling of the process requires a huge network of thousands of reactions where the rates of the involved reactions represent one of the biggest uncertainty in the resulting abundances of p-nuclei. In lack of experimental data the required reaction rates are taken from statistical model calculations which proved to be inaccurate in the mass and energy range relevant for the p-process. The systematic experimental study of the relevant reactions is therefore crucial to test the calculated reaction rates, to select the best input parameters for the calculations and, consequently, to contribute to a better understanding of the astrophysical p-process. The European Research Council (ERC) has acknowledged this need for experimental data when they decided to support a project devoted to this subject. In 2007 the first call of the ERC Frontier Research Scheme (Starting Grants) has been launched within the FP7 Specific Programme 'IDEAS'. From the very high number of applications, the peer reviewers of the ERC Scientific Council has recommended for funding the proposal entitled 'Nuclear reaction studies relevant to the astrophysical p-process nucleosynthesis'. An amount of 750,000 Euro has been allocated to the project for a 5 year duration. The starting date of the project was 1st July, 2008. With the ERC support, an extensive experimental study of the p-process is being carried out. The experiments will be carried out almost exclusively with the accelerators of the ATOMKI. The financial support allows to largely improve the available experimental technique. The purchase of two large volume HPGe detectors is in progress as a result of a public procurement. The upgrade of the nuclear electronics and data acquisition system used for p-process related

  3. Colorectal cancer screening in countries of European Council outside of the EU-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emma; D'Aloisio, Francesco; Angeletti, Paolo Matteo

    2016-05-28

    To provide an update on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes in non-European Union (EU)-28 Council of Europe member states as of December 2015. The mission of the Council of Europe is to protect and promote human rights in its 47 member countries. Its 19 non-EU member states are Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Georgia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Republic of Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Switzerland, FYR of Macedonia, Turkey, and Ukraine (EU-19). The main data source were GLOBOCAN, IARC, WHO, EUCAN, NORDCAN, ENCR, volume X of the CI5, the ministerial and Public Health Agency websites of the individual countries, PubMed, EMBASE, registries of some websites and the www.cochranelibrary.com, Scopus, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, Research gate, Google and data extracted from screening programme results. Our results show that epidemiological data quality varies broadly between EU-28 and EU-19 countries. In terms of incidence, only 30% of EU-19 countries rank high in data quality as opposed to 86% of EU-28 states. The same applies to mortality data, since 52% of EU-19 countries as against all EU-28 countries are found in the high ranks. Assessment of the method of collection of incidence data showed that only 32% of EU-19 countries are found in the top three quality classes as against 89% of EU-28 countries. For the mortality data, 63% of EU-19 countries are found in the highest ranks as opposed to all EU-28 member states. Interestingly, comparison of neighbouring countries offering regional screening shows, for instance, that incidence and mortality rates are respectively 38.9 and 13.0 in Norway and 29.2 and 10.9 in Sweden, whereas in Finland, where a national organised programme is available, they are respectively 23.5 and 9.3. Cancer screening should be viewed as a key health care tool, also because investing in screening protects the weakest in

  4. School culture and class council: aspects of the democratic management of the pedagogical work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gomes Nadal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to discuss the pedagogical work culture in the scope of the class council. Several studies have shown that often the class council acts in a bureaucratic way and against a project able to align the educational practices of theschool with the social interests. Therefore, we seek to question what are the ritualized forms, meanings and beliefs implied in the pedagogical work of the class council and whether or not they are related to the permanence of the diffi culties encountered. This work is part of larger research in which, by means of a qualitative approach along with an interpretive methodology, from the perspective of the cultural studies, we have investigated two public schools in the city of Ponta Grossa, State of Paraná, in order to reveal and understand their school culture and, consequently, unveil the methods of evaluation employed and how the pedagogical work was managed. To perform our analysis, we rely on the contributions of Viñao Frago (1998, Dalben (1992, 2004, Mattos (2005 and Oliveira (2002, 2004, 2009. We were able to perceive that in the surveyed schools there is a shared sense of classifi catory evaluation, of the school council as a bureaucratic step to be fulfi lled, and not as a process inherent to the pedagogical work.

  5. Boxing and dancing: Dutch trade union and works council experiences revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, M.; Sprenger, W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper contains a quantitative analysis of approaches and results of 67 projects of Dutch company union groups and Works Councils to influence technological and organisational change, in three generations between 1975 and 1996. The effectiveness of problem-solving activities jointly undertaken

  6. Working towards a European Geological Data Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Krogt, Rob; Hughes, Richard; Pedersen, Mikael; Serrano, Jean-Jacques; Lee, Kathryn A.; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Robida, François

    2013-04-01

    The increasing importance of geological information for policy, regulation and business needs at European and international level has been recognized by the European Parliament and the European Commission, who have called for the development of a common European geological knowledge base. The societal relevance of geoscience data/information is clear from many current issues such as shale gas exploration (including environmental impacts), the availability of critical mineral resources in a global economy, management and security with regard to geohazards (seismic, droughts, floods, ground stability), quality of (ground-)water and soil and societal responses to the impacts of climate change. The EGDI-Scope project responds to this, aiming to prepare an implementation plan for a pan-European Geological Data Infrastructure (EGDI), under the umbrella of the FP7 e- Infrastructures program. It is envisaged that the EGDI will build on geological datasets and models currently held by the European Geological Surveys at national and regional levels, and will also provide a platform for datasets generated by the large number of relevant past, ongoing and future European projects which have geological components. With European policy makers and decision makers from (international) industry as the main target groups (followed by research communities and the general public) stakeholder involvement is imperative to the successful realization and continuity of the EGDI. With these ambitions in mind, the presentation will focus on the following issues, also based on the first results and experiences of the EGDI-Scope project that started mid-2012: • The organization of stakeholder input and commitment connected to relevant 'use cases' within different thematic domains; a number of stakeholder representatives is currently involved, but the project is open to more extensive participation; • A large number of European projects relevant for data delivery to EGDI has been reviewed

  7. Communication of 19 May 2004 from the Council of the European Union concerning EU strategy for the fight against proliferation of weapons of mass destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-27

    The Director General has received a letter from Mr. Javier Solana, Secretary General/High Representative of the Council of the European Union, dated 19 May 2004, attaching a copy of the 'Council Joint Action on support for IAEA activities under its Nuclear Security Programme and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction' of 12 May 2004, which was adopted by the Council on 17 May 2004. The Council document is attached herewith for the information of Member States.

  8. Where Human Rights Meet Administrative Law: Essential Elements and Limits to Delegation: European Court of Justice, Grand Chamber C-355/10: European Parliament v. Council of the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, M.; Tauschinsky, E.

    2013-01-01

    Case C-355/10 deals with institutional questions and with the delicate issue of intercepting migrants at sea, and thus with fundamental rights. The European Parliament had sought the annulment of a decision of the Council, adopted under the regulatory procedure with scrutiny (PRAC), on the grounds

  9. [Chest compression without ventilation during basic life support? Confirmation of the validity of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) guidelines 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimeier, U; Dirks, B; Arntz, R; Bahr, J; Goldschmidt, P; Roessler, M; Sasse, M; Toursarkissian, M

    2008-08-01

    Basic life support (BLS) refers to maintaining airway patency and supporting breathing and the circulation, without the use of equipment other than infection protection measures. The scientific advisory committee of the American Heart Association (AHA) published recommendations (online-first) on March 31 2008, which promote a call to action for bystanders who are not or not sufficiently trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and witness an adult out-of-hospital sudden collapse probably of cardiac origin. These bystanders should provide chest compression without ventilation (so-called compression-only CPR). If bystanders were previously trained and thus confident with CPR, they should decide between conventional CPR (chest compression plus ventilation at a ratio of 30:2) and chest compression alone. However, considering current evidence-based medicine and latest scientific data both the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the German Resuscitation Council (GRC) do not at present intend to change or supplement the current resuscitation guidelines "Basic life support for adults". Both organisations do not see any need for change or amendments in central European practice and continue to recommend that only those lay rescuers that are not willing or unable to give mouth-to-mouth ventilation should provide CPR solely by uninterrupted chest compressions until professional help arrives. It is also stressed that the training of young people especially teenagers as lay rescuers should be promoted and the establishment of training programs through emergency medical organizations and in schools should be encouraged.

  10. Working time, satisfaction and work life balance: A European perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Humpert, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses gender-specific differences in working time mismatches by using three different measures for representing satisfaction and work life balance. Results show that, while male satisfaction with life or work is in general not affected by working for more or less hours, over-time is found to significantly lower male work life balance. Women are more sensitive to the amount of working hours as they prefer part-time employment and they are dissatisfied with changes ...

  11. Initial report of the ITER Council's Ways and Means Working Party

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, the ITER Conceptual Design Activities began in April, 1988, and are scheduled to be completed in December, 1990. As part of the Terms of Reference of the ITER Conceptual Design Activities, the ITER Council chartered a Working Party which plans to define needed elements to conduct an Engineering Design of ITER, should the members wish to go on with such design. This document is an initial report of the Working Party on Ways and Means; it seeks to define the Engineering Design Activities, and to list the practical topics to be considered by the ITER EDA. 2 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Time constraints and autonomy at work in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.

    1998-01-01

    Time constraints and job autonomy are seen as two major dimensions of work content. These two dimensions play a major role in controlling psychosocial stress at work. The European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions (EFILWC) has asked NIA TNO to prepare a report on time

  13. Work-life balance of Eastern European migrants in Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Flenova, Vera

    2017-01-01

    his study is devoted to the balance between work and life the Eastern European migrants manage to obtain. Work and life balance is considered as one of the core factors for the quality of life of the individual. Processes of migration and integration of migrants make the attainment of the work-life balance even more complicated and involve more resources. In this work the work and personal life balance of migrants is being analysed from the following perspectives: occupation, f...

  14. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Artan Çela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. I...

  15. Exposure to psychosocial work factors in 31 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedhammer, I; Sultan-Taïeb, H; Chastang, J-F; Vermeylen, G; Parent-Thirion, A

    2012-04-01

    Although psychosocial work factors are recognized as major occupational risk factors, little information is available regarding the prevalence of exposure to these factors and the differences in exposure between countries. To explore the differences in various psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries. The study was based on a sample of 14,881 male and 14,799 female workers from the 2005 European Working Conditions Survey. Eighteen psychosocial work factors were studied: low decision latitude (skill discretion and decision authority), high psychological demands, job strain, low social support, iso-strain, physical violence, sexual harassment, bullying, discrimination, work-family imbalance, long working hours, high effort, job insecurity, low job promotion, low reward and effort-reward imbalance. Covariates were age, number of workers in household, occupation, economic activity, self-employed/employee, public/private sector and part/full time work. Statistical analysis was performed using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Significant differences in all psychosocial work factors were observed between countries. The rank of the countries varied according to the exposure considered. However, some countries, especially Denmark, Netherlands and Norway, displayed a significantly lower prevalence of exposure to four factors or more, while some Southern and Eastern countries, especially Czech Republic, Greece, Lithuania and Turkey, had a higher prevalence. Differences in psychosocial work exposures were found between countries. This study is the first to compare a large set of psychosocial work exposures between 31 European countries. These findings may be useful to guide prevention policies at European level.

  16. Guidelines for radioprotection of the Council of the European Communities, dating from 1-1-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the guidelines for radiation protection of the european communities are treated. The guidelines refer to radiotherapy, radiodiagnostics and nuclear medicine. The guidelines are divided in eight articles and an appendix. (Auth.)

  17. Health at Work and Low-pay:a European Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Cottini; Claudio Lucifora

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between health, working conditions and pay in Europe. In particular, we measure health at work using self-assessed indicators for overall, as well as physical and mental health, using the 2005 wave of the EWCS (European Working Conditions Survey) for 15 EU countries. We find that, controlling for personal characteristics, (adverse) working conditions are associated with poor health status – both physical and mental. Low pay plays a role, mainly for men...

  18. Sexual Harassment at Work: A European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artan Çela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Unwelcome sexual advances, proposition or pressure for sexual activity, offensive flirtations, leering, whistling, making sexually suggestive gestures, sexual jokes, unwanted sexual looks, unwanted letters, telephone call, or materials of a sexual nature, unwanted physical contact, actual or attempting rape or sexual assault, this and more of this conduct if took place in the workplace would amount to a sexual harassment. The sexual harassment at work has become a serious issue of our time. It is an unjustified interference of integrity, dignity and well-being of workers, causing problems from headaches to depression, loss of confidence, panic attacks and perhaps suicide as the only way appearing to be the sole possible relief from the unremitting and frightening behavior. This article presents information concerning the sexual harassment at workplace, covering topics such as, the definitions for sexual harassment in both international and national context, a short history of sexual harassment, types of sexual harassment, effect of sexual harassment, measure to combat and prevent sexual harassment. It offers a short overview in sexual harassment legislation of some industrialized EU Member States and the legal remedies available against sexual harassment. The main purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding and prevention concerning the issue of sexual harassment in workplace.

  19. Working conditions in hospitals in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, R.; Groot, B. de; Nossent, S.

    1995-01-01

    This study reflects the main results of one part of the study 'Monitoring the work environment at sectorial level'. This part regards the hospital sector in Europe. In this study, which was a project of the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working conditions, ten member states

  20. Working conditions in the European meat processing industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nossent, S.; Groot, B. de; Verschuren, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report reflects the main results of one part of the study 'Monitoring the work environment at sectorial level'. This part regards the meat processing industry in Europe. In this study, which was a project of the European Foundation for Living and Working Conditions, ten member states of the

  1. Physical working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tynes, T.; Aagestad, C.; Vester Thorsen, S.; Andersen, L.L.; Perkio-Makela, M.; García, F.J.P.; Blanco, L..; Vermeylen, G.; Parent-Thirion, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Liebers, F.; Burr, H.; Formazin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of workers with demanding physical working conditions in the European work force remains high, and occupational physical exposures are considered important risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD), a major burden for both workers and society. Exposures to physical

  2. Major Differences in Implementation Strategies of the European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2015 in Danish Hospitals - A Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Mygind-Klausen, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of guidelines into clinical practice is important to provide quality of care. Implementation of clinical guidelines is known to be poor. This study aimed to investigate awareness, expected time frame and strategy for implementation of the European Resuscitation Council...... 2015 and time frame and strategy for implementation.Results: In total, 41 hospitals replied (response rate: 87%) between October 22nd and December 22nd 2015. Overall, 37% of hospital resuscitation committees were unaware of the content of the guidelines. The majority of hospitals (80%) expected...... completion of guideline implementation within 6 months and 93% of hospitals expected the staff to act according to the ERC Guidelines 2015 within 6 months. In contrast, 78% of hospitals expected it would take between 6 months to 3 years for all staff to have completed a resuscitation course based on ERC...

  3. British Council Project in Romania the South-East European Network of Creative Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Victor IONESCU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A Guidebook to Creative Industries in Iasi, Romania, 2006 is a project initiated by the British Council Centre Iasi concerning “creativeindustries”. After the conferences and workshops – in Plovdiv with the regional partners, in Iasi and Bucharest with the British and the localconsultants, the team has managed to put into practice one of the key projects it set out to achieve: publishing a unified inventory of the main actorsof the industrial-creative sector in Iasi. The purpose of this project is to bring to the attention of the potential partners and supporters the city‘spotential for economic and image “re-invention”, which “unify” Iasi through its creative energies and resources and to facilitate the creation of newcreative/ profitable partnership projects – in Romania, in the UK and in South-East Europe. This guidebook is the tangible sign of the beginning ofthe journey.

  4. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  5. Communication from the commission to the council and the European parliament. Final report on the green paper: towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The Green Paper on the security of energy supply, adopted by the Commission more than a year ago, opened up a debate on energy policy unprecedented in 30 years. In most of the Member States this debate revived discussion on national options in the energy field. Looking ahead to the next twenty to thirty years, the Green Paper drew attention to the structural weaknesses and geopolitical, social and environmental shortcomings of the EU energy supply, notably as regards European commitments in the Kyoto Protocol. The European economy, steadily demanding more and more energy, is essentially based on fossil fuels. The Green Paper offers a clear strategy based on demand management. It has the merit of pointing out that the EU has little room for manoeuvre with regard to energy supply notably due to its low, or in certain cases less competitive (e.g. coal), energy resources. Therefore it is appropriate for the Union to concentrate on guiding and steering demand, unlike the United States which, in the energy plan it announced in May 2001, seeks to meet demand by constantly boosting supply. The Green Paper put 13 questions as a framework for the general debate. The conclusion is that there is virtually unanimous agreement on the strategic axis of demand management: energy consumption must be guided and steered. The conclusions of the Barcelona European Council, stressing in particular the need for better energy efficiency by 2010 and rapid adoption of energy taxation proposals, clearly give political backing to this priority. Without waiting for the debate to end, the Commission made some very well received proposals along these lines, involving actual legislation and not just encouraging words or exchange of good practice, some of which have already been adopted by the Council and the European Parliament. One of these proposals in particular was the Directive on electricity production from renewable sources, adopted in 2001. Another was the proposal for a Directive on

  6. Communication from the commission to the council and the European parliament. Final report on the green paper: towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-15

    The Green Paper on the security of energy supply, adopted by the Commission more than a year ago, opened up a debate on energy policy unprecedented in 30 years. In most of the Member States this debate revived discussion on national options in the energy field. Looking ahead to the next twenty to thirty years, the Green Paper drew attention to the structural weaknesses and geopolitical, social and environmental shortcomings of the EU energy supply, notably as regards European commitments in the Kyoto Protocol. The European economy, steadily demanding more and more energy, is essentially based on fossil fuels. The Green Paper offers a clear strategy based on demand management. It has the merit of pointing out that the EU has little room for manoeuvre with regard to energy supply notably due to its low, or in certain cases less competitive (e.g. coal), energy resources. Therefore it is appropriate for the Union to concentrate on guiding and steering demand, unlike the United States which, in the energy plan it announced in May 2001, seeks to meet demand by constantly boosting supply. The Green Paper put 13 questions as a framework for the general debate. The conclusion is that there is virtually unanimous agreement on the strategic axis of demand management: energy consumption must be guided and steered. The conclusions of the Barcelona European Council, stressing in particular the need for better energy efficiency by 2010 and rapid adoption of energy taxation proposals, clearly give political backing to this priority. Without waiting for the debate to end, the Commission made some very well received proposals along these lines, involving actual legislation and not just encouraging words or exchange of good practice, some of which have already been adopted by the Council and the European Parliament. One of these proposals in particular was the Directive on electricity production from renewable sources, adopted in 2001. Another was the proposal for a Directive on

  7. European top managers’ support for work-life arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, Wike M.; van der Lippe, Tanja; den Dulk, Laura; Das Dores Horta Guerreiro, Maria; Kanjuo Mrčela, Aleksandra; Niemistö, Charlotta

    2017-01-01

    Top managers—defined as CEOs, CFOs and members of boards of directors—decide to what degree their organization offers employees work-life arrangements. This study focuses on the conditions under which they support such arrangements. A factorial survey of 202 top managers in five European countries

  8. Comparing Different European Income Tax Policies Making Work Pay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H.J.M. Gradus (Raymond); J.M. Julsing

    2003-01-01

    textabstractRaising the participation at the lower end of the labour market abstract is hindered by the high burden of taxation. Therefore, recently, in some European countries serious efforts have been made to make work pay. In this paper an overview of these current efforts is given. With the

  9. BRITISH COUNCIL PROJECT IN ROMANIA THE SOUTHEAST EUROPEAN NETWORK OF CREATIVE CITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Victor Ionescu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A Guidebook to Creative Industries in Iasi, Romania, 2006 is a project initiated by the BritishCouncil Centre Iaşi concerning “creative industries”.After the conferences and workshops – in Plovdiv with the regional partners, in Iaşi and Bucharest withthe British and the local consultants, the team has managed to put into practice one of the key projects it set outto achieve: publishing a unified inventory of the main actors of the industrial-creative sector in Iaşi.The purpose of this project is to bring to the attention of the potential partners and supporters the city‘spotential for economic and image “re-invention”, which “unify” Iaşi through its creative energies andresources and to facilitate the creation of new creative/ profitable partnership projects – in Romania, in the UKand in South-East Europe.This guidebook is the tangible sign of the beginning of the journey.

  10. Gender and the Intensification of Work: Evidence from the European Working Conditions Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Brendan Burchell; Colette Fagan

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses the European Working Conditions Surveys to examine the intensity of work for male and female employees. The first section gives an overview of the usefulness of the survey for examining European Union (EU) working conditions and shows how women's intensity of work has been increasing faster than that of men, so that by the year 2000 there was little gender difference in the speed of work. Section two demonstrates that the intensity of work has a negative effect on health and w...

  11. Conclusions of the presidency. European council of Barcelona, March 15 and 16 2002; Conclusions de la presidence. Conseil europeen de Barcelone 15 et 16 mars 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document summarizes the conclusions of the European Council held in Barcelona (Spain) on March 15 and 16, 2002. Among the priority actions listed by the council figure the integration of energy, transportation and communication networks at the European scale. In particular, the council commits the Parliament and itself to start the final phase of opening of gas and electricity markets: free choice of a supplier, obligation of public utility, security of supplies, separation between transmission and distribution and between production and supply, non-discriminatory access of consumers and suppliers to networks with transparent tariffs, establishment of a regulatory agency in each member state, agreement for a tariffing system for the international electricity trades etc.. Concerning the sustainable development strategy of the European union, the council is pressing the member states for the completion of the national procedures of ratification of the Kyoto protocol. However, new measures need to be taken to develop technologies respectful for the environment, in particular in the domain of energy and transports. (J.S.)

  12. Nurses’ Shift Length and Overtime Working in 12 European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Ora, Chiara; Simon, Michael; Ball, Jane; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rafferty, Anne-Marie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tishelman, Carol; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. Objectives: To describe shift patterns of European nurses and investigate whether shift length and working beyond contracted hours (overtime) is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 31,627 registered nurses in general medical/surgical units within 488 hospitals across 12 European countries. Results: A total of 50% of nurses worked shifts of ≤8 hours, but 15% worked ≥12 hours. Typical shift length varied between countries and within some countries. Nurses working for ≥12 hours were more likely to report poor or failing patient safety [odds ratio (OR)=1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13–1.76], poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.10–1.53), and more care activities left undone (RR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.09–1.16). Working overtime was also associated with reports of poor or failing patient safety (OR=1.67; 95% CI, 1.51–1.86), poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.23–1.42), and more care left undone (RR=1.29; 95% CI, 1.27–1.31). Conclusions: European registered nurses working shifts of ≥12 hours and those working overtime report lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to mitigate staffing shortages or increase flexibility may also incur additional risk to quality. PMID:25226543

  13. Physical working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Tynes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of workers with demanding physical working conditions in the European work force remains high, and occupational physical exposures are considered important risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD, a major burden for both workers and society. Exposures to physical workloads are therefore part of the European nationwide surveys to monitor working conditions and health. An interesting question is to what extent the same domains, dimensions and items referring to the physical workloads are covered in the surveys. The purpose of this paper is to determine 1 which domains and dimensions of the physical workloads are monitored in surveys at the national level and the EU level and 2 the degree of European consensus among these surveys regarding coverage of individual domains and dimensions. Method Items on physical workloads used in one European wide/Spanish and five other European nationwide work environment surveys were classified into the domains and dimensions they cover, using a taxonomy agreed upon among all participating partners. Results The taxonomy reveals that there is a modest overlap between the domains covered in the surveys, but when considering dimensions, the results indicate a lower agreement. The phrasing of items and answering categories differs between the surveys. Among the domains, the three domains covered by all surveys are “lifting, holding & carrying of loads/pushing & pulling of loads”, “awkward body postures” and “vibrations”. The three domains covered less well, that is only by three surveys or less, are “physical work effort”, “working sitting”, and “mixed exposure”. Conclusions This is the fırst thorough overview to evaluate the coverage of domains and dimensions of self-reported physical workloads in a selection of European nationwide surveys. We hope the overview will provide input to the revisions and updates of the individual countries’ surveys in

  14. European Working Time Directive: implications for surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donohoe, C L

    2010-02-01

    The forthcoming implementation of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) for non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) poses a number of challenges in the areas of patient care, training, service provision and quality of life for workers. Surgery, as a craft-based speciality, will face a greater impact on training of future surgeons as operating time could be lost to service provision. The EWTD acts a stimulus for reform of current working practices and re-configuration of services. It will necessitate transformation of the way in which surgeons are trained, if current standards are to be maintained.

  15. The economic effects of works councils: channels and conditions. Using secondary data to test a new theoretical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigboldus, Jan Ekke; Grift, Yolanda; van den Berg, Annette; Looise, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    German studies already have supported the existing positive economic effects of works councils, but failed to explain how these effects are produced. New case study based research from the Netherlands has provided a theory consisting of three channels to create economic impact, also including a set

  16. Industrial relations and works councils in the Netherlands—Results from interviews and a survey among HR managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, A.; Euwema, M.; Muduate, L.; Elgoibar, P.; Pender, E.; Belén García, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands has highly institutionalized industrial and employment relations, as is illustrated by the so-called Dutch ‘Building of employment relations’, in which the works council plays an important role. Although Dutch industrial and employment relations are quite peaceful—very few strikes—a

  17. European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) accreditation of forensic pathology services in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangin, P; Bonbled, F; Väli, M

    2015-01-01

    in order to provide forensic reports of high quality. In this respect, there is a need for any private or public national or international authority including non-governmental organizations seeking experts qualified in forensic medicine to have at disposal a list of specialists working in accordance...... process, determining in a scientific way the cause(s) and manner of unexpected and/or unnatural death or bringing clinical evidence in case of physical, psychological, or sexual abuse in living people. From a legal perspective, these types of investigation must meet international standards, i...

  18. Communication dated 8 August 2006 from the Permanent Mission of Finland to the Agency concerning a Joint Action adopted by the Council of the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a Note Verbale dated 8 August 2006 from the Permanent Mission of Finland, attaching a new Joint Action adopted by the Council of the European Union on 12 June 2006 on support for IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification as part of the EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. As requested in the Note Verbale, the Note and its attachment are herewith circulated as an Information Circular

  19. The Question Of Balance Work - Family And Reconciliation Regime Work - Family At European Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Cimpeanu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the conditions of the continuous change of the work patterns and of the alert liferhythm, there is a real challenge to keep a favourable equilibrium between work and family life. Oneof the value orientations manifested on a major scale on the whole European continent, is the humanorientation able to give substance to the European social politics, oriented to permanent improvementof his life quality by the increasing of the life level, the improvement of the work conditions, the workflexibility support qt the European level, national and organizational by the elaboration etimplementation of the politics of the work conciliation with family, or of the family/friendly politics,in order to keep an optimal equilibrium between family life as well as in the professional one.According to the European Commission, the reconciliation politics represent key responses to thelong term economic and demographic challenges. A better family life reconciliation is supported bythe objectives of the European strategy for the economical growth and of the workforce occupationwork and family life represents the building stone of the modern familypolitics

  20. Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1960-01-01

    Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

  1. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  2. Limitation of right of codetermination of the works council in case of an administrative order for security controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    BetrVG section 87, sub-sec. (1), No. 1 and 7, first sentence; Atomic Energy Act section 7, sub-sec. (2), No. 5; section 17, sub-sec. (1), sentence 2. On the basis of a right of codetermination, the works council may only claim an arrangement that could be decided upon by the employer alone outside the Works Constitution Act. In case the employer is obliged by an administrative act binding upon him, to take certain measures, the works council may not claim an arrangement deviating from this directive by referring to the right of codetermination. Federal Labour Court, decision of May 26, 1988 - 1 ABR 9/87 - concerning the execution of security controls on the personnel entering the WAK. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Harmonization of nuclear codes and standards, pacific nuclear council working and task group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The codes and standards, both at the national and international level, have had a major impact on the industry worldwide and served it well in maintaining the performance and safety of the nuclear reactors and facilities. The codes and standards, in general, are consensus documents and do seek public input at various levels before they are finalized and rolled out for use by the nuclear vendors, consultants, utilities and regulatory bodies. However, the extensive development of prescriptive national standards if unchecked against the global environment and trade agreements (NAFTA, WTO, etc.) can also become barriers and cause difficulties to compete in the world market. During the last decade, the national and international writing standards writing bodies have recognized these issues and are moving more towards the rationalization and harmonization of their standards with the more widely accepted generic standards. The Pacific Nuclear Council (PNC) recognized the need for harmonization of the nuclear codes and standards for its member countries and formed a Task Group to achieve its objectives. The Task Group has a number of members from the PNC member countries. In 2005 PNC further raised the importance of this activity and formed a Working Group to cover a broader scope. The Working Group (WG) mandate is to identify and analyze the different codes and standards introduced to the Pacific Basin region, in order to achieve mutual understanding, harmonization and application in each country. This o requires the WG to develop and encourage the use of reasonably consistent criteria for the design and development, engineering, procurement, fabrication, construction, testing, operations, maintenance, waste management, decommissioning and the management of the commercial nuclear power plants in the Pacific Basin so as to: Promote consistent safety, quality, environmental and management standards for nuclear energy and other peaceful applications of nuclear

  4. European Society of Cardiology Council for Cardiology Practice worldwide survey of transcatheter aortic valve implantation beliefs and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asteggiano, Riccardo; Bramlage, Peter; Richter, Dimitrios J

    2018-04-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) continues to gain popularity in the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis (SAS). Distribution of resources to maximise appropriate use remains a priority. Design & methods To determine the current perceptions and behaviours regarding SAS patient management, an 18-point multiple-choice questionnaire was distributed to European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council for Cardiology Practice (CCP) e-journal and/or electronic newsletter subscribers. Respondents to all questions were considered. Sub-analyses based on respondent age, practice setting and geographical location were performed. Results Of 1245 full respondents, 41.5% were aged ≥ 51 years, 22.7% were aged 41-50 years and 35.8% were aged ≤ 40 years. The majority were located in Europe (77.5%), followed by Asia/Oceania (11.6%), America (7.6%) and Africa (3.4%). In-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiologists accounted for 57.4% of and 28.5% of the sample, respectively, with the remainder being general practitioners/other. The majority of respondents (70.1%) claimed to diagnose between one and five cases of SAS per month. Free access to TAVI was reported by 41.2%, being less common for those aged ≤ 40 years (32.7%; p < 0.001), those located in Asia/Oceania, America and Africa (20.1%, 18.1% and 2.4%, respectively; p < 0.01 in each case) and in-hospital compared to out-of-hospital cardiologists (35.7% vs. 54.5%, respectively; p < 0.001). The most common reason for not referring a patient for an aortic valve intervention was assessment that the patient was high risk/non-operable (55.5%), followed by short life expectancy (30.5%). The most common reason for referring a patient for TAVI over surgical replacement was surgical risk score (56.9%). The most commonly perceived main complication of TAVI was stroke (28.9%), while the most frequently selected main benefit was improvement in quality of life (37.2%). A high

  5. National Safety Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. NSC Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter! Like Us on Facebook National Safety Council © National Safety Council. All rights reserved. Contact ...

  6. Harmonization of nuclear codes and standards. Pacific nuclear council working and task group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, Shami

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear codes and standards have been an integral part of the nuclear industry since its inception. As the industry came into the main stream over the 2nd half of the 20th century, a number of national and international standards were developed to support a specific nuclear reactor concept. These codes and standards have been a key component of the industry to maintain its focus on nuclear safety, reliability and quality. Both national and international standards have served the industry well in obtaining public, shareholder and regulatory acceptance. The existing suite of national and international standards is required to support the emerging nuclear renaissance. However as noted above under Pacific Nuclear Council (PNC), Manufacturing Design Evaluation Program (MDEP) and SMiRT discussions, the time has come now for the codes and standards writing bodies and the industry to take the next step to examine the relevance of existing suite in view of current needs and challenges. This review must account for the changing global environment including global supply chain and regulatory framework, resources, deregulation, free trade, and industry need for competitiveness and performance excellence. The Task Group (TG) has made limited progress in this review period as no additional information on the listing of codes and standards have been received from the members. However, TG Chair has been successful in obtaining considerable interest from some additional individuals from the member countries. It is important that PNC management seek additional participation from the member countries and asks for their active engagement in the Working Group (WG) TG activities to achieve its mandate and deliverables. The harmonization of codes and standards is a key area for the emerging nuclear renaissance and as noted by a number of international organizations (refer to MDEP action noted above) that these tasks can not be completed unless we have the right level of resources and

  7. A busy week for Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This has been a busy week for the CERN Council, and there is much to report. Firstly, I’m pleased to say that Council approved the Organization’s Medium Term Plan, and with it the budget for financial year 2010. In a time of global recession, this is a strong vote of confidence from the Member States. This meeting of Council provided an opportunity for the working group on the scientific and geographical enlargement of CERN to set out a roadmap towards its final report, which is to be made at Council’s December session this year. One part of the process over the coming months is to bring the major players in particle physics from beyond the European region into the discussion, ensuring that the working group’s recommendations lead to an optimum position for CERN and European particle physics in the global context. An indicator of the continuing attractiveness of CERN is the fact that Council has received four new applications...

  8. [Chartered specialist training in gerontology and geriatrics. Dissertation Council no. 601.001.01 working practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozina, L S

    2014-01-01

    The article highlights basic facts about the foundation and activity of the Gerontology and Geriatrics Dissertation Council of St. Petersburg Institute of Bioregulation and Gerontology, which took invaluable part in chartered specialist training in this field of science that has actively developed in Russia in recent decades. Over the period from June, 2001 to December, 2013, a total of 41 doctoral dissertations were defended, of which 32 dissertations were on Medicine and 9 on Biological Sciences. Likewise, over the same period, a total of 186 candidate's dissertations were defended, of which 152 dissertations were on Medicine and 34 on Biological Sciences, the defenders coming from various regions of Russia and other countries. The defence-representative trend data acquired over the period of the Dissertation Council activities shows that the number of defended doctoral dissertations was relatively small within the period from 2002 to 2008, but it increased significantly in the years 2009 to 2013. The number of defended candidate's dissertations increased significantly over the same period, too. Among many others considered by the Dissertation Council, there were dissertations dedicated to basic research in the field of gerontology and geriatrics. The priority topics of a large number of dissertations performed in St. Petersburg and other Russian towns are age pathology mechanisms, geroprotective effects of regulatory peptides and effectiveness of their use in clinic.

  9. The Consequences of “Options” in the Directive 2013/34/Eu of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Financial Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hýblová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 13/34/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 on the annual financial statements, consolidated financial statements and related reports of certain types of undertakings is an instrument of the harmonisation of accounting in member states of the European Union. The Directive contains a number of various ways for recognition and measurement of financial statements, alternative forms of statements or simplifications for small and medium sized enterprises, worded as “permit or require”. On the one hand, these differing ways can facilitate application of the Directive in national legislations; on the other hand, they can significantly reduce the comparability of information published in financial statements. The aim of the paper is to verify the relation between the options to be chosen and the variability of the resulting values of the financial statement items. Based on the findings, the results are evaluated in relation to the informative function of financial reporting.

  10. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  11. 75 FR 80470 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a working... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  12. Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnay, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Economists have traditionally been very cautious when studying the interaction between employment and health because of the two-way causal relationship between these two variables: health status influences the probability of being employed and, at the same time, working affects the health status. Because these two variables are determined simultaneously, researchers control endogeneity skews (e.g., reverse causality, omitted variables) when conducting empirical analysis. With these caveats in mind, the literature finds that a favourable work environment and high job security lead to better health conditions. Being employed with appropriate working conditions plays a protective role on physical health and psychiatric disorders. By contrast, non-employment and retirement are generally worse for mental health than employment, and overemployment has a negative effect on health. These findings stress the importance of employment and of adequate working conditions for the health of workers. In this context, it is a concern that a significant proportion of European workers (29 %) would like to work fewer hours because unwanted long hours are likely to signal a poor level of job satisfaction and inadequate working conditions, with detrimental effects on health. Thus, in Europe, labour-market policy has increasingly paid attention to job sustainability and job satisfaction. The literature clearly invites employers to take better account of the worker preferences when setting the number of hours worked. Overall, a specific "flexicurity" (combination of high employment protection, job satisfaction and active labour-market policies) is likely to have a positive effect on health.

  13. European working environment in figures : availability and quality of occupational health and safety data in sixteen European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nossent, S.; Groot, B. de; Verboom, F.; Pantry, S.

    1996-01-01

    This report by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions shows that information is essential to pinpoint risk factors in the workplace, and is a crucial starting point for the preparation of efficient measures to improve the working environment. To this end, most

  14. An energy policy for Europe. Part 2 taken from the Presidency's conclusions. European council of March 23-24, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The European community has to face several challenges in the domain of energy like the increasing dependence of fossil fuel imports, the volatility of energy prices, the increasing world energy demand, the threats of climatic changes and the slowness of energy efficiency improvements. This situation has led the European commission to preconize a consistent common European energy policy based on three main goals: reinforcing the security of supplies, warranting the competitiveness of European economies and an affordable energy supplies cost both for companies and consumers and in a stable regulatory framework, and promoting the environmental viability through the improvement of energy efficiency, the development of renewable energy sources and the reexamination of the carbon trading system. The measures to be implemented for the realization of these goals are detailed. (J.S.)

  15. Employment of personnel of a security service company does not require the consent of the works council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    If a company or institution hires personnel of a security service company to protect its premises, this kind of employment does not mean the company carries on temporary employment business. Within the purview of section 99, sub-section 1 of the BetrVG (Works Constitution Act), the security service personnel is not 'employed' in the proper sense even if the security tasks fulfilled by them are done at other times by regular employees of the company or institution. The court decision also decided that the Works Council need not give consent to employment of foreign security personnel. Federal Labour Court, decision dated May 5, 1992 - 1 ABR 78/91. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Employment of security personnel of a security service company does not need approval by the works council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    If a company or institution hires personnel of a security service company to protect its premises, this kind of employment does not mean the company carries on temporary employment business. Within the purview of section 99, sub-secion 1 of the BetrVG (Works Constitution Act), the security service personnel is not 'employed' in the proper sense even if the security tasks fulfilled by them are done at other times by regular employees of the company or institution. The court decision also decided that the Works Council need not give consent to employment of foreign security personnel. The court decision was taken for settlement of court proceedings commenced by Institute of Plasma Physics in Garching. (Federal Labour Court, decision dated November 28, 1989 - 1 ABR 90/88). (orig./HP) [de

  17. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guludec, D.; Lautamaeki, R.; Bengel, F.M.; Knuuti, J.; Bax, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  18. Attitudes toward working conditions: are European Union workers satisfied with their working hours and work-life balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Santander, Nuria; Lidón-Moyano, Cristina; González-Marrón, Adrián; Bunch, Kailey; Martín-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sánchez, José M

    2017-12-23

    To describe the satisfaction with working hours and satisfaction with work-life balance and their association in the European Union (EU-28). This is a cross-sectional study based on data from the Flash Eurobarometer 398 among workers of the EU-28 from 2014 (n=13,683). We calculated percentages and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). We also applied a multi-level generalised linear model using the Poisson family, to calculate the adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) of satisfaction with work-life balance based on working hours. All analyses were stratified by individual, employment and welfare regime country classification. The satisfaction with working hours and work-life balance was 80.62% and 74.48%, respectively, and was significantly higher among women. The highest percentages of satisfaction were found in the Nordic welfare regime countries (90.2% and 85.3%, respectively). There was a statistically significant association between satisfaction with working hours and work-life balance (aPR: 2.63; 95%CI: 2.28-3.04), and the magnitude of the association differed in individual, employment and welfare regime country classifications. The main reasons declared for dissatisfaction were "excessive working hours" (48.7%), "shift work" (27.9%), and "inability to influence the work schedule" (28.3%). Differences were observed according to sex and type of welfare regime. The differences found in the association between satisfaction with work-life balance and working hours according to sociodemographic characteristics and welfare regime show that there are inequalities in the working conditions in the EU countries. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Initial Career and Work Meanings in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Rita; Quintanilla, S. Antonio R.

    1994-01-01

    Explores initial careers of two target groups of young adults in seven European countries. Career patterns were constructed through cluster analysis on data gathered via self-report. Six career patterns were identified. Offers suggestions for further research and implications for career counseling, career education, and organizational career…

  20. 26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

  1. Maximizing time from the constraining European Working Time Directive (EWTD): The Heidelberg New Working Time Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmack, Simon; Hinz, Ulf; Wagner, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas; Strothmann, Hendrik; Büchler, Markus W; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) has greatly reduced training hours of surgical residents, which translates into 30% less surgical and clinical experience. Such a dramatic drop in attendance has serious implications such compromised quality of medical care. As the surgical department of the University of Heidelberg, our goal was to establish a model that was compliant with the EWTD while avoiding reduction in quality of patient care and surgical training. We first performed workload analyses and performance statistics for all working areas of our department (operation theater, emergency room, specialized consultations, surgical wards and on-call duties) using personal interviews, time cards, medical documentation software as well as data of the financial- and personnel-controlling sector of our administration. Using that information, we specifically designed an EWTD-compatible work model and implemented it. Surgical wards and operating rooms (ORs) were not compliant with the EWTD. Between 5 pm and 8 pm, three ORs were still operating two-thirds of the time. By creating an extended work shift (7:30 am-7:30 pm), we effectively reduced the workload to less than 49% from 4 pm and 8 am, allowing the combination of an eight-hour working day with a 16-hour on call duty; thus, maximizing surgical resident training and ensuring patient continuity of care while maintaining EDTW guidelines. A precise workload analysis is the key to success. The Heidelberg New Working Time Model provides a legal model, which, by avoiding rotating work shifts, assures quality of patient care and surgical training.

  2. Tableau de Bord, 1996. Follow-up to the Conclusions of the Essen European Council on Employment Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This document presents an overview of the principal labor market measures taken by the 15 member states of the European Union since the publication of the 1995 overview. In each section, individual countries' actions are discussed separately, with code letters indicating the country name. The following topics are among those discussed in the…

  3. Current neurosurgical trainees' perception of the European Working Time Directive and shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, M J; Fellows, G A; Pushpananthan, S; Sergides, Y; Papadopoulos, M C; Bell, B A

    2008-02-01

    The introduction of the shift system in response to the European Working Time Directive has had an enormous impact on the running of neurosurgical units in the UK. This study seeks to establish what provisions are currently in place for out of hours cover and what has been the effect of the introduction of shifts in three main areas: patient safety, training and 'work/life balance'. The on-call registrar at each UK neurosurgical unit was contacted by telephone. Data regarding current emergency provision were sought. Registrars who had worked both on-calls and the shift system during their career as a neurosurgical registrar were asked to make a comparison. Data were collected from all 33 UK units. Twenty-two still use a traditional 24-h on-call system. Twenty-one on-call rotas were classed as non-resident although 12/21 of those officially on non-resident rotas were in fact resident whilst on call. Twenty-two registrars had worked both systems as a neurosurgical registrar. Twenty-one (95.45%) felt that traditional on-calls gave better clinical exposure. Twenty-one (95.45%) felt that on-calls allowed the provision of better patient care. Nineteen (86.36%) felt that on-calls were safer. Thirteen (59.09%) reported that they were more tired when doing shift work than on-calls. Fourteen (63.63%) found that the on-call system gives more useful spare time and more time to deal with family commitments. Current neurosurgery registrars feel the shift system is less safe, harmful to training and worse in terms of work/life balance. More than one-third of units are claiming to have non-resident on-call systems in order to appear compliant with EWTD when registrars are in fact resident.

  4. The Public Administration Accounting in the Light Public Finance Managements Reform and Changes of the New Accounting Directive of the European Parliament and the European Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košovská Iveta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of public administration accounting is to secure a database of relevant information essential for the management of public finances and need for presenting of operations results of our country within the European Union (EU. The accounting of public administration entities should provide a true and fair view on the assets and liabilities, as well as the financial situation and the use of public appropriations. After the entry of the Slovak Republic (SR to the European Union (EU the International Public Sector Accounting Standards began to be applied in our legislation. They provide a uniform basis for the data consolidation as well as more efficient information for the economic decisions of individual users

  5. Council regulation of the European dual use regulation. A never ending story?; Die Novellierung der europaeischen Dual-Use Verordnung. Eine unendliche Geschichte?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, Ulrike

    2018-01-15

    For the first time, the EC Council Regulation of 19 December 1994 established a Community regime for the control of exports of dual-use items. In 2000, the first major revision of the dual-use regime came into force, subjecting not only sensitive material, i.e. plutonium and highly enriched uranium, but also the entire category 0 (nuclear material, installations, equipment) to a licensing requirement for intra-Community shipments. This revision was revised a few months later due to inappropriate content by removing a small proportion of nuclear goods. A further comprehensive new revision was published in 2009. However, the EU Commission's current proposal to revise Annex IV of the regulation does not do justice to the objective of free trade of goods and the maintenance of the competitiveness of European industry from the point of view of the European nuclear industry, as well as from the point of view of the non-nuclear industry in the EU.

  6. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  7. [Aging of the working population in the European Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmarinen, J; Costa, G

    2000-01-01

    The working population over 50 years of age will grow considerably during the next 15 years. After 2010, the number of retired people over 65 years of age will be almost double that of 1995, with a strong impact also on working conditions and the labour market. Work ability is a dynamic process that changes, through its components, throughout life and is the result of the interaction between individual resources (including health, functional capacity, education and skills), working conditions, and the surrounding society. Work ability creates the basis for the employability of an individual, which can be supported by a number of actions (e.g. legislation on work and retirement) and social attitudes (e.g. age discrimination). Consequently, the prevalence of limitations in work ability varies significantly according to how it is evaluated and the frequency of work disability can vary considerably in different times, locations and populations. The Work Ability Index, created and used in a Finnish 11-year longitudinal study, has been proved a useful practical tool for the assessment of workers' fitness and a good predictor of work disability. Measures able to restore, maintain or promote work ability depend on the current work status and the needs of the target groups, and must concentrate on work content, physical work environment and the work community. The actions targeted towards the individual, on the other hand, concentrate on strengthening the health status and functional resources of the workers and developing professional expertise and skills. Correctly targeted and integrated measures improve work ability of ageing workers and therefore lead to improved work quality, increased productivity and also improved quality of life and well-being. They also have positive long-term effects on the "third age", when the worker retires.

  8. European social citizenship and gender: the part-time work directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; de Bruijn, J.G.M.; Bussemaker, M.

    2004-01-01

    This article considers whether the development of European rights for workers implies a European social citizenship. It analyses the debate during the preparation and adoption of the EU Directive on part-time work in 1997, which guarantees part-time workers (who are primarily women) the same pay and

  9. Indicators of working conditions in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Dhondt, S.; Houtman, I.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the report is to develop social indicators for the working environment in Europe on the basis of existing working environment statistics. Social indicators (chapter 2) contain information about the social situation in a country or international community. They give information about policy and about policy effects. It shows also what the level is of certain fundamental social needs develop over the time. Indicators on the working environment (chapter 3) give information about the ...

  10. The future of work hours--the European view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Kecklund, Göran

    2005-01-01

    In Europe the way work hours are handled varies between different countries. However, there are some issues that dominate the discussion in Europe and seem representative for what is happening. One such is the reduction of working hours--which was attempted in several countries but which now seems to be backfiring--probably related to the competition from countries outside Europe. Another area is compressed work hours--the drive towards maximizing the hours per work day in order to increase the number of days off. The health effects are debated--some find clear positive effects. A third area is company oriented flexible work hours, permitting the employer to make moderate changes in work hours when needed. The health impacts have not been evaluated but the loss of individual influence at work is obvious. In some parts of Europe self-determined work hours have been tried with very positive effects. The EU work hour directive is intended to provide uniformity but permits a counterproductive "opting out", creating problems of imbalance.

  11. European top managers' support for work-life arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, W.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357424662

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, work-life arrangements increasingly became an integral part of the organization of work. Arrangements such as telecommuting, flextime, part-time hours, and various types of leave arrangements are available to employees in many organizations. Top managers, such as CEOs, CFOs and

  12. Indicators of working conditions in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Houtman, I.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the report is to develop social indicators for the working environment in Europe on the basis of existing working environment statistics. Social indicators (chapter 2) contain information about the social situation in a country or international community. They give information about

  13. 31{sup st} conference of the European Working Group on Acoustic Emission (EWGAE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-11-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures and posters which were held on the conference of the European Working Group on Acoustic Emission in Dresden (Germany). Six of the contributions are separately analyzed for the INIS database.

  14. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme. Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P.; Buenger, U.

    2000-07-01

    Looking at some of the national and international developments in hydrogen technology it becomes clear which important contributions the hydrogen technology oriented activities of the EU have helped to prepare and trigger: (a) Transport Energy Strategy (TES): This initiative of 7 major German automobile and mineral oilcompanies is aimed at an industrial consensus on one or two gasoline alternative fuels, which are to be presented to the German Ministry of Transport. An intermediate trend is that hydrogen may become the fuel of choice. (b) BMW: The Bayerischen Motorenwerke have already very early exposed themselves to the vehicle and component development of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, focussing on a strategy from CNG to LNG and LH{sub 2}. (c) Opel and GM: Opel has recently announced they have chosen hydrogen as the primary long term fuel for their fuel cell vehicles to be commercialized starting in 2004. (d) CFCP: The California Fuel Cell Partnership with partners from industry and politics has announced they are preparing the installation of hydrogen fuel stations aas well as 20-25 fuel cell buses and 30 passenger cars, mainly operated with hydrogen. (e) NEDO: The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan has announced they are going to build hydrogen pilot refueling stations 18 months ahead of the original schedule to reduce the first-to-market-time. (f) Norway: A study group of Norwegian industry and institutes has carried out a comprehensive study for the Research Ministry on further R and D areas which should be intensified in a national strategy to be prepared for an international hydrogen energy system [SINTEF, 00]. (g) German Greens: The German ecologist party ''Greens'' has announced last week a shift from an anti-car lobbying to fostering greener cars, focussing on renewable hydrogen as a clean fuel. (h) Linde: The largest European Technical Gas Company has announced recently they will strategically

  15. Is Finland different? Quality of Work Among Finnish and European Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Hartikainen, Armi; Anttila, Timo; Oinas, Tomi; Nätti, Jouko

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the quality of work-life has risen in popularity due to concerns about the economic and social sustainability of European societies. Throughout the continent, global competition, technological change and the intensification of work are common developments which are seen to a ect the well-being of the workforce. Nevertheless, European countries di er substantially in terms of job quality. According to earlier research, employees in Sweden and Denmark (and to lesser ...

  16. New European initiatives in colorectal cancer screening: Budapest Declaration. Official appeal during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union under the Auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation, the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy and the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Tibor; Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Herszényi, László; Jonkers, Daisy; Molnár, Béla; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Regula, Jaroslaw; Malesci, Alberto; Laghi, Luigi; Pintér, Tamás; Teleky, Béla; Dítě, Petr; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common newly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of death in the European Union (EU). CRC is an enormous health and economic burden. Early detection and prevention have the possibility of reducing this burden significantly. Many cancer-associated deaths can be avoided through early detection by high-quality colorectal screening programs followed by appropriate treatment. Under the auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation (UEGF), the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology and the Hungarian College of Gastroenterology, the 'Budapest Declaration' (2011) was an accepted official scientific program during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The Budapest Declaration follows the Munich Declaration (2001), the Brussels Declaration (2007), the Transatlantic Declaration (2009), the Barcelona Declaration (2010), the written declaration of CRC screening, a joint initiative with European Parliamentarians coordinated by the UEGF, and finally, the 'European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Colorectal Cancer Screening and Diagnosis'. The 'Budapest Declaration' together with previous declarations aims to urge the national and supranational healthcare decision makers to launch new Europe-wide initiatives to establish high-quality CRC programs to achieve optimal efficiency in CRC screening. In case of implementation of the proposals, actions and conditions recommended, we can achieve that one of the basic principles of the EU - the chance of equal access - be realized in member states with respect to the prevention of CRC and reduction of cancer-related mortality. To better achieve this goal, we propose to establish an UEGF joint committee, with one participant representing each EU member state to coordinate and supervise the implementation of CRC screening. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A balancing act? Work-life balance, health and well-being in European welfare states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Thorsten; Bambra, Clare; Eikemo, Terje A; van der Wel, Kjetil A; Dragano, Nico

    2014-06-01

    Recent analyses have shown that adverse psychosocial working conditions, such as job strain and effort-reward imbalance, vary by country and welfare state regimes. Another work-related factor with potential impact on health is a poor work-life balance. The aims of this study are to determine the association between a poor work-life balance and poor health across a variety of European countries and to explore the variation of work-life balance between European countries. Data from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey were used with 24,096 employees in 27 European countries. Work-life balance is measured with a question on the fit between working hours and family or social commitments. The WHO-5 well-being index and self-rated general health are used as health indicators. Logistic multilevel models were calculated to assess the association between work-life balance and health indicators and to explore the between-country variation of a poor work-life balance. Employees reporting a poor work-life balance reported more health problems (Poor well-being: OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.83-2.31; Poor self-rated health: OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.84-2.17). The associations were very similar for men and women. A considerable part of the between-country variation of work-life balance is explained by working hours, working time regulations and welfare state regimes. The best overall work-life balance is reported by Scandinavian men and women. This study provides some evidence on the public health impact of a poor work-life balance and that working time regulations and welfare state characteristics can influence the work-life balance of employees. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Union Type on Work-Life Conflict in Five European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasearu, Kairi

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the strategies for reconciling family and work in different union types. The focus here is on investigating how cohabiting and married individuals perceive the work-life conflict in different European countries. To test the union type impact on work-life balance in the context of different societal conditions, this paper draws…

  19. Human and animal health in Europe: the view from the European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC on challenges in infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fears Robin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For the last seven years, the European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC has conducted a series of projects defining and clarifying priorities for European policy in infectious disease. Both human and animal populations are increasingly threatened by emerging and re-emerging infections, including zoonoses, partly attributable to the impact of environmental change on the distributions of pathogens, hosts and vectors. Among the key challenges to be faced are the impact of climate change, the increase of antibiotic resistance and the need to develop novel global surveillance and early warning systems worldwide. Multidisciplinary approaches are required to build the new interfaces between human and animal medicine (One Health, with new connections between epidemiological and environmental data for surveillance, communication and risk assessment. This multidisciplinarity involves integration between microbiology, immunology, genetics and genomics, entomology, ecology and the social sciences, among other disciplines. Improved understanding of patterns of both human and animal disease also requires commitment to standardisation of surveillance methodologies and better analysis, co-ordination and use of the data collected. There must be sustained support for fundamental research, for example to explore how pathogens cross the species barrier, encouragement for industry innovation in developing diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines, and the increased use of scientific evidence to inform coherent strategic development across different policy-making functions and to support international leadership. Our paper is intended as an introduction to some of the issues for building collaboration between human and animal medicine, to be discussed in greater detail in the other contributions to this Issue....

  20. Parents' experiences of flexible work arrangements in changing European workplaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lewis (Suzan); L. den Dulk (Laura)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractVarious leaves and other forms of flexible working arrangements have been implemented in workplaces to support employees with family commitments. Some are a response to public policy, others developed voluntarily. However, research examining the effectiveness of these policies in a

  1. Part-time working in Ireland in a European context

    OpenAIRE

    DREW, EILEEN PATRICIA

    1991-01-01

    Read before the Society, 25 October 1990 The subject of part-time work is one which has become increasingly important in industrialized economies, most notably Norway, Sweden, United States, Canada, Denmark and the United Kingdom, where it accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total employment. It has been noted that resort to part-time workers was generally a response to a shortage of available labour, particularly when it coincided with periods of economic ...

  2. Discrimination at Work: Comparing European, French, and American Law

    OpenAIRE

    Mercat-Bruns, Marie

    2016-01-01

    How do the United States and France differ in laws and attitudes concerning discrimination at work? Franco-American scholar Marie Mercat-Bruns interviews prominent legal scholars to demonstrate how these two post-industrial democracies have adopted divergent strategies. Whereas employers in the United States and France rarely discriminate openly, deep systemic discrimination exists in both countries, each with a unique history of dealing with difference. Powerful and incisive, the book examin...

  3. 75 FR 33245 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) will hold a working... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... be held at the Pacific Fishery Management Council office, Large Conference Room, 7700 NE Ambassador...

  4. THE PECULIARITIES OF WORK OF THE EUROPEAN NETWORK OF HEALTH PROMOTING SCHOOLS (COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Iermakova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – to analyze the main peculiarities of European Network of Health Promoting Schools functioning in European Union and Ukraine. Results. Students are a big group of population that demand introduction of health education in modern rhythm of life. A great example of such education is schools of Members States of European Union. Address to experience of forming of students’ health culture in the Health Promoting Schools in countries of European Union, experience of that can become an example for the countries of post-soviet space and Ukraine in particular. In the article is shown main peculiarities and structure of the work of such school network. Single out the main principles and approached of network activity. Conclusions. The ENHPS is intended above all to be of practical help to schools and those working with schools on becoming more effective in health promotion and therefore ultimately more effective in meeting their educational goals.

  5. CULTURAL DIMENSIONS AND WORK MOTIVATION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matei Mirabela

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the field of work motivation was moulded mainly by the cultural constraints. The present scientific paper is a theoretical research which aims at identifying various motivational patterns which might be used in the EU countries. In order to illustrate these differences, we will use three Hofstede’s cultural dimensions: individualism, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity. Each of these cultural dimensions presents particularities which exert an influence on the way of thinking, on the abilities and behaviours of the individuals in a certain society, but we will refer only at the influence on the attitude towards work. For the identification of the motivational patterns, we will have as starting points, on one side, the particularities of the cultural differences and results of the relevant research performed so far; on the other hand there is Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Hence, we can consider that safety and security prevails upon other needs where uncertainty avoidance is strong (Greece, Romania and so on. The need of belongingness will prevail upon the need of esteem in the feminine cultures (such as Sweden, Latvia, but in the masculine cultures esteem need is stronger (such as in the case of Hungary. In masculine countries with an increased collectivism (Greece, the opportunities for improvement, recognition and extra incomes will have an increased importance, while in feminine countries (Holland, Sweden personal time, freedom and need for belongingness will be more important. Without claiming to be an exhaustive presentation of the motivational patterns, the purpose of the present paper is to underline the necessity that the motivation theories are to be considered valid only in the cultural environment where they were conceived. The transfer and the application of the motivation theories and patterns from one culture to the other, implies the testing of their validity in the new context.

  6. Finnish participation in the European utility requirements work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Finnish participation in the EUR process started already in April 1994 when IVO (Imatran Voima Oy presently Fortum Oyj) and TVO (Teollisuuden Voima Oy) were asked to comment EUR Volume 1 and 2 Revision A in April 1994. A formal application for the Finnish membership in the EUR organisation was sent on 20 November 1995, and Finland was accepted as an associated member on the next day. The Finnish representatives in the various EUR bodies were appointed in March 1996, at which time the formal participation in these bodies commenced. On 7 November 1996, EUR Steering Committee approved a full membership of IVO and TVO that are joint EUR members representing Finland together. A major Finnish contribution was made in 1997 when IVO and TVO performed a comparison between the EUR document and YVL guides. The period of the Finnish membership has been characterised by the compilation of EUR Volume 3 subsets, in which process IVO/Fortum and TVO have been actively participating. From the Finnish point of view, the EUR work can also be seen as a part of getting prepared to proceed with a possible new NPP project. The EUR document is a substantial aid when preparing the technical specifications for a NPP bid inquiry. The information received in connection with the detailed assessment work for Volume 3 subsets is very valuable when considering the feasibility of NPP concepts. In addition. the experiences gained in the Volume 3 activities enable to develop even better requirements that are manifested by Revision C of Volumes 1 and 2. (author)

  7. Work organization, exposure to workplace hazards and sickness presenteeism in the European employed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Errico, Angelo; Ardito, Chiara; Leombruni, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study was to identify work organization features and workplace hazards associated with sickness presenteeism (SP) among European workers. The study was conducted on data from the European Working Conditions Survey 2010 and included a study population of 30,279 employees. The relationship between work-related factors and SP was assessed through Poisson multivariate robust regression models, adjusting for significant (P work-related characteristics. SP for at least 2 days in the previous year was reported by 35% of the workers. In fully adjusted model, several psychosocial (decision authority, skill discretion, reward, abuse; psychological, cognitive, and emotional demand), and organizational factors (shift work, working with clients, long work hours) were positively associated with SP, whereas job insecurity and exposure to physical factors (lifting or moving people, vibration) decreased SP risk. Our results support the importance of work-related factors, especially psychosocial exposures and organizational features, in determining workers' SP. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Policy Brief - Precarious versus protected care work in the European Union: finding the right balance

    OpenAIRE

    Knijn Trudie; Oomkens Rosanne

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on research conducted during the project, this policy brief addresses care work for elderly people in European Union countries in the context ofthe right to free movement of labour. Despite a range of guidelines and directives in the past decades, the European Union still faces the intersectional problem of an ageing population, gender inequality, and lack of rights for caregivers, the latter being mainly women and – in some countries – increasingly migrant women. The risks of olde...

  9. Associate Status at CERN for non-European States

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On a number of occasions in the past, the Committee of Council has examined proposals to create an Associate Status for non-European States wishing to participate in, and make substantial contributions to, a CERN activity or activities. The immediate purpose of the proposed status was to permit those States to participate in the LHC Project. In 1995, the Committee of Council decided not to follow up the matter at that stage since the mechanism of Co-operation Agreements with individual countries (USA, Japan, Russian Federation etc.) was considered more appropriate. At its meeting of 20 June 2002, the Committee of Council reviewed the proposal prepared by the Working Group appointed by the Committee of Council to examine the question of CERN's enlargement. Taking into account the comments received from the Delegations, the Working Group has finalised its proposal, which is now submitted to the Committee of Council for recommendation to the Council and to the Council for a decision.

  10. A Mysterious European Threesome: Work-care Regimes, Policies and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anália Torres

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Arguing that European family lives are affected by many societal factors, this article discusses the interplay between three sets of phenomena: the management of work and care responsibilities, workcarepolicies and regimes, and gender order within the family context. Based on discussions about orientations to work and care, we compare European countries and analyze regularities and singularities among them. Identifying and assessing the interplay between structural, institutional and cultural determinants of orientations we try to explain country diversity mobilizing data from the European Social Survey (rounds 2002, 2004 and 2006 and data from Eurobarometer 2003.The paper is organized around three analytical axes. First, we nalyze how work and family orientations are perceived by the Europeans. Secondly, we assess different European political policies regarding work and care arrangements, the outcome being a proposal for a workcare political typology. And finally we discuss the connectionsbetween those policies and the production or reproduction of gender order within the family. We conclude that in countries with more egalitarian gender values and policies targeted at workcarearrangements, individuals experience less workfamily conflict. Conversely, in countries with more traditional gender values and restricted or disadvantaged policies we found more familyworkconflict. But institutional constraints don’t act alone: orientations to work and care differ according to age, education, family forms and employment status.

  11. Explanatory memorandum on European Community Document 6323/87: proposal for a Council decision on a Community system of rapid exchange of information in cases of abnormal levels of radioactivity or of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Council of the European Commnity proposes a system of rapid exchange of information in cases of abnormal radioactivity or a nuclear accident. In addition to the existing procedures of early notification drawn up by the International Atomic Energy Authority this proposes a further notification system between member states of the European Community. Under this there would be notification, not only of accidents with possible transboundary effects, but of any accident for which emergency measures are taken to protect the public. However, the United Kingdom would prefer the trigger of these procedures to be abnormally high radiation levels rather than the introduction of emergency measures. (U.K.)

  12. Genişlemelerle Birlikte Avrupa Birliği Bakanlar Konseyi’nde Oylama Gücü Dağılımı(Voting Power Distribution With The Enlargements In The Council of The European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Burcu ESKİCİ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, enlargement is one of the most important issue for European Union. The situation that makes this issue important is the influence of membership of the candidate states on the voting power distribution. With the enlargements, European Union decision-making processes were regulated several times. The last regulation to the European Union voting system was brought by the Treaty of Lisbon. In this study, voting power distribution in Council of the European Union is evaluated for candidate states and member states considering the acts adopted by the Treaty of Lisbon and determined as candidate states determined as Turkey, Croatia, Iceland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. In the analysis, member states are grouped the according to the enlargement of the EU and the effect of the states that take part in these groups on the decision and changes of voting power are calculated using Banzhaf power index for power measurement.

  13. European Commission (Hg.: Flexible working time arrangements and gender equality. A comparative review of 30 European countries. Luxemburg: Publications Office of the European Union 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Muschiol

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Die Flexibilisierung der Arbeitszeitgestaltung und die Gleichstellung der Geschlechter sind zentrale Bestandteile europäischer Direktive. Der Expertenbericht der Europäischen Kommission bietet nun eine Zusammenfassung über die gegenwärtigen Praktiken flexibler Arbeitszeitmodelle in den 27 EU-Ländern und drei EWR-EFTA-Staaten und stellt deren Auswirkungen auf die Gleichberechtigung der Geschlechter dar. Besonderes Augenmerk liegt hierbei auf der internen Flexibilität, was einesteils die flexible Gestaltung der Arbeitsdauer beinhaltet und anderenteils die flexible Organisation der Arbeitszeit. Die Ergebnisse lassen darauf schließen, dass beide Größen wichtige Voraussetzungen für den wirtschaftlichen Aufschwung darstellen. Es zeigt sich allerdings auch, dass eine zunehmende Flexibilisierung der Arbeitszeitgestaltung den Frauen auch zum Nachteil gereichen kann.Flexibilizing the organization of working hours and treating all genders as equals are central constituents of the European directives. The European Commission’s expert report does now offer a summary of the current practices of flexible work time in the 27 EU countries and three EEA-EFTA countries and portrays their effects on equal opportunities for all genders. Special attention is paid to internal flexibility, both with regard to the flexible realization of the work duration and the flexible organization of working hours. The results imply that both components are important prerequisites for economic advancement. However, it can also be seen that an increased flexibilization of the organization of working hours can lead to disadvantages for women.

  14. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  15. European Approaches to Work-Related Stress: A Critical Review on Risk Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Zoni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various international organizations have raised awareness regarding psychosocial risks and work-related stress. European stakeholders have also taken action on these issues by producing important documents, such as position papers and government regulations, which are reviewed in this article. In particular, 4 European models that have been developed for the assessment and management of work-related stress are considered here. Although important advances have been made in the understanding of work-related stress, there are still gaps in the translation of this knowledge into effective practice at the enterprise level. There are additional problems regarding the methodology in the evaluation of work-related stress. The European models described in this article are based on holistic, global and participatory approaches, where the active role of and involvement of workers are always emphasized. The limitations of these models are in the lack of clarity on preventive intervention and, for two of them, the lack of instrument standardization for risk evaluation. The comparison among the European models to approach work-related stress, although with limitations and socio-cultural differences, offers the possibility for the development of a social dialogue that is important in defining the correct and practical methodology for work stress evaluation and prevention.

  16. European approaches to work-related stress: a critical review on risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoni, Silvia; Lucchini, Roberto G

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, various international organizations have raised awareness regarding psychosocial risks and work-related stress. European stakeholders have also taken action on these issues by producing important documents, such as position papers and government regulations, which are reviewed in this article. In particular, 4 European models that have been developed for the assessment and management of work-related stress are considered here. Although important advances have been made in the understanding of work-related stress, there are still gaps in the translation of this knowledge into effective practice at the enterprise level. There are additional problems regarding the methodology in the evaluation of work-related stress. The European models described in this article are based on holistic, global and participatory approaches, where the active role of and involvement of workers are always emphasized. The limitations of these models are in the lack of clarity on preventive intervention and, for two of them, the lack of instrument standardization for risk evaluation. The comparison among the European models to approach work-related stress, although with limitations and socio-cultural differences, offers the possibility for the development of a social dialogue that is important in defining the correct and practical methodology for work stress evaluation and prevention.

  17. Draft for a resolution of the Council of the European Communities on the continuation and implementation of a European Community policy and action programme on the environment (1987-1992)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-18

    With the agreement of the Governments of Member States to the amendments to the Treaty of Rome contained in the Single Act, the Community has given a new status and impetus to its environmental policy. The European Council has underlined that environmental protection can contribute to improved economic growth and job creation; and it has called, for the integration of environmental requirements into the economic, industrial, agricultural and social policies implemented by both the Community and its Member States. There is a wide and growing recognition that strict environmental standards are a necessity - not only in order to achieve an adequate degree of environmental protection and an improved quality of life, but also for economic reasons. As progress is made towards the completion of the Community's internal market by 1992, opportunities will grow in many areas and for many reasons - but only provided that high environmental standards are maintained. The Commission is convinced that better competitivity of Community industry on world markets in the future will depend heavily upon its ability to offer environmentally-friendly goods and services, achieving standards at least as high as its competitors and that an alliance between technological innovation and a commitment to high environmental standards can offer new opportunities through the development of new and growing markets for environmental protection technologies and techniques.

  18. Opportunities, constraints and constrained opportunities - A study on mothers' working time patterns in 22 European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milla Salin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze mothers’ working time patters across 22 European countries. The focu was on three questions: how much mothers prefer to work, how much they actually work, and to what degree their preferred and actual working times are (inconsistent with each other. The focus was on cross-national differences in mothers’ working time patterns, comparison of mothers’ working times to that of childless women and fathers, as well as on individual- and country-level factors that explain the variation between them. In the theoretical background, the departure point was an integrative theoretical approach where the assumption is that there are various kinds of explanations for the differences in mothers’ working time patterns – namely structural, cultural and institutional – , and that these factors are laid in two levels: individual- and country-levels. Data were extracted from the European Social Survey (ESS 2010 / 2011. The results showed that mothers’ working time patterns, both preferred and actual working times, varied across European countries. Four clusters were formed to illustrate the differences. In the full-time pattern, full-time work was the most important form of work, leaving all other working time forms marginal. The full-time pattern was perceived in terms of preferred working times in Bulgaria and Portugal. In polarised pattern countries, full-time work was also important, but it was accompanied by a large share of mothers not working at all. In the case of preferred working times, many Eastern and Southern European countries followed it whereas in terms of actual working times it included all Eastern and Southern European countries as well as Finland. The combination pattern was characterised by the importance of long part-time hours and full-time work. It was the preferred working time pattern in the Nordic countries, France, Slovenia, and Spain, but Belgium, Denmark, France, Norway, and Sweden

  19. A balancing act? Work-life balance, health and well-being in European welfare states

    OpenAIRE

    Lunau, Thorsten; Bambra, Clare; Eikemo, Terje Andreas; van Der Wel, Kjetil A.; Dragano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent analyses have shown that adverse psychosocial working conditions, such as job strain and effort–reward imbalance, vary by country and welfare state regimes. Another work-related factor with potential impact on health is a poor work–life balance. The aims of this study are to determine the association between a poor work–life balance and poor health across a variety of European countries and to explore the variation of work–life balance between European countries. Methods: D...

  20. Psychosocial working conditions and psychological well-being among employees in 34 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Stefanie; Chastang, Jean-François; Malard, Lucile; Parent-Thirion, Agnès; Vermeylen, Greet; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the associations between psychosocial working conditions and psychological well-being among employees in 34 European countries. Another objective was to examine whether these associations varied according to occupation and country. The study was based on data from the European Working Conditions Survey 2010 including 33,443 employees, 16,512 men and 16,931 women, from 34 European countries. Well-being was measured by the WHO-5 well-being index. Twenty-five psychosocial work factors were constructed including job demands, role stressors, work hours, job influence and freedom, job promotion, job insecurity, social support, quality of leadership, discrimination and violence at work, and work-life imbalance. The associations between these factors and well-being were examined using multilevel logistic regression analyses. Different models were performed including interaction tests. When all 25 psychosocial work factors were studied simultaneously in the same model with adjustment variables, 13 showed a significant association with poor well-being among both genders: quantitative demands, demands for hiding emotions, low possibilities for development, low meaning of work, low role conflict, low quality of leadership, low social support, low sense of community, job insecurity, low job promotion, work-life imbalance, discrimination, and bullying. The association with low sense of community on poor well-being was particularly strong. A large number of psychosocial work factors were associated with poor well-being. Almost no country and occupational differences were found in these associations. This study gave a first European overview and could be useful to inform cross-national policy debate.

  1. The Second Workshop of the European Network for Work Information (ENWI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borlund, Pia; Mandl, Thomas; Womser-Hacker, Christa

    2013-01-01

    The second workshop of ENWI was held in Malmö, Sweden, June 12-13, 2013. ENWI is the European Network for Work Information which intends to establish a group of researchers who share a common interest in the study of workplace information practices. The better understanding of people and their ta...

  2. More does not always mean better – the problem of working time in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Ignaciuk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of an eight-hour working day and forty eight-hour working week was the result of many years of struggle of the workers of Europe and America, demanding respect for their rights, including the right to leisure and family life. Currently, in many European countries, average working time is shorter than that established by the International Labour Conference in the Convention of 1919. The longest – 40 hour working time – valid in Greece, Malta and in most countries of the former socialist bloc (with the exception of Slovakia and the Czech Republic. In the so-called fifteen countries (EU-15 average weekly working hours (excluding overtime in 2007 was 37.9 hours. According to official statistics in all countries of the European Union, the actual working time is longer than that specified in collective agreements. Employees work the longest in Austria, Greece, Great Britain, the Czech Republic and Poland, while the shortest is in Luxembourg.It was observed that there is an inverse relationship between working time and work efficiency. In countries, where workers have the most days off from work and/or shortest time, labor productivity is the largest (eg, Luxembourg, Sweden, Ireland, France and Germany. The effects of fatigue for workers not only have an impact on staff competencies, but also imprint their mark on the sphere of social life and the whole economy. Therefore, the concern should be treated any ideas for extending working hours.

  3. [Meeting the needs of the European working time directive in german medical profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, M; Popov, A F; Schmitto, J D; Bireta, C; Emmert, A; Tirilomis, T

    2011-06-01

    The legal obligation of the European Working Time Directive with its implementation into a German Working Hours Act requires German hospitals to give up old structures and requires the implementation of new working time models. The failure of the revision of the European Working Time Directive in April 2009 prevented that any changes of status quo might happen in the near future. Fundamental terms of the working law for the medical area have been elucidated and have been implemented into concrete calculation formulas. The planned working time has been clearly determined. Particularly, on-call duties and a signed "OptOut-declaration" have huge effects on the upper limit of the working time that is to be determined. Shift duty leads to the greatest limitations of the upper limit of the working time. The Working Hours Act defines the maximal, available, individual working time budget and thus the working time budget of a hospital and it limits the maximal availability of the service providers of a hospital as well as defining the maximal personnel costs. Transparency in this area lays the foundation for an effective time management and the creation of new working time models in accordance with the European Working Time Directive as well as the Working Hours Act and the "TVÄ" (labour contract for doctors at municipal hospitals). It is possible, with the knowledge of the maximal working time budget and the thereof resulting personnel costs, to calculate the economical revenues better. The reallocation of the working time of doctors enables efficiency enhancement. It is necessary to demand a clear definition of the tasks of doctors with the consequential discharge of tasks that should not/do not belong to the responsibilities of a doctor. This would lead to a more attractive working environment for doctors at hospitals and thus to an improvement of the care of the patients. The implementation of the European Time Directive is not to be seen as unrealizable, as has been

  4. Comparison of the Selected Indicators of Work Life Balance in European Union Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Živčicová; Kristína Bulková; Tatiana Masárová

    2017-01-01

    The article elaborates on the characteristics and indicators of work life balance (WLB). The focus is on the selected criteria of WLB as well as social life and time spent off work. The WLB factors chosen and discussed are: the amount of stress, exhaustion and lack of time for family activities and responsibilities in the context of WLB. The results of the European survey conducted by the Eurofond are compared with the authors’ questionnaire survey conducted in Slovakia in 2015. The survey r...

  5. Impact of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work-hour regulations on neurosurgical resident education and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Jay; Vates, G Edward; Pouratian, Nader; Sheehan, Jason P; Patrie, James; Grady, M Sean; Jane, John A

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the Institute of Medicine examined resident duty hours and their impact on patient safety. Experts have suggested that reducing resident work hours to 56 hours per week would further decrease medical errors. Although some reports have indicated that cutbacks in resident duty hours reduce errors and make resident life safer, few authors have specifically analyzed the effect of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour limits on neurosurgical resident education and the perceived quality of training. The authors have evaluated multiple objective surrogate markers of resident performance and quality of training to determine the impact of the 80-hour workweek. The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 data on neurosurgical applicants entering ACGME-accredited programs between 1998 and 2007 (before and after the implementation of the work-hour rules) were obtained from the Society of Neurological Surgeons. The American Board of Neurological Surgery (ABNS) written examination scores for this group of residents were also acquired. Resident registration for and presentations at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) annual meetings between 2002 and 2007 were examined as a measure of resident academic productivity. As a case example, the authors analyzed the distribution of resident training hours in the University of Virginia (UVA) neurosurgical training program before and after the institution of the 80-hour workweek. Finally, program directors and chief residents in ACGME-accredited programs were surveyed regarding the effects of the 80-hour workweek on patient care, resident training, surgical experience, patient safety, and patient access to quality care. Respondents were also queried about their perceptions of a 56-hour workweek. Despite stable mean USMLE Step 1 scores for matched applicants to neurosurgery programs between 2000 and 2008, ABNS written examination scores for residents

  6. Habit, prisoner’s dilemma and Americans' welfare cost of working much more than Europeans

    OpenAIRE

    SCHIFF, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Europeans work much less than Americans. Some studies claim this is due to high taxes in Europe, which would benefit by adopting US tax rates and work time; others find that taxes have little or no impact on work time. I examine the hypothesis that Americans would benefit by reducing work time to Europe’s level. Empirical and experimental studies show utility falls as other people’s income rises. Due to its historical experience, Europe is able to internalize this and other negative externali...

  7. Nuclear energy: work to be done. A report of the General Council to the 1986 TUC Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The paper on nuclear energy is a Report of the General Council to the United Kingdom 1986 TUC Congress. The contents contains four sections on:- 1) control of risks to health, safety and the environment: the TUC role, 2) radioactive waste, 3) Chernobyl reactor accident, and 4) TUC energy policy. The annex contains a report of a fact finding visit to Sellafield reprocessing plant by members of the TUC Radioactive Waste Group.

  8. Jornada de trabalho: o exemplo europeu Hours of work: the European example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Augusto M. de Mattos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role played by the decline in average annual hours of work per person in employment over the behavior of unemployment rate in Europe since II World War. The results show that, during the Golden Age of Capitalism in the twentieth century, the pronounced reduction in the average annual hours of work per person in employment (which can be traced to legal action or to particularly negotiation between the social partners has been very important to keep the unemployment rate at very low levels in the main European countries. Nevertheless, after the eigthies, there has been an important decline in the rate of reduction of average annual hours of work per person in employment. Since then, this fact explains a great part of the raise of the unemployment rates in European countries.

  9. Psychosocial work exposures among European employees: explanations for occupational inequalities in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Stefanie; Chastang, Jean-François; Parent-Thirion, Agnès; Vermeylen, Greet; Niedhammer, Isabelle

    2015-09-01

    Social inequalities in mental health have been demonstrated but understanding the mechanisms remains unclear. This study aims at exploring the role of psychosocial work factors in explaining occupational inequalities in mental health among European employees. The study sample covered 33,443 employees coming from the European Working Conditions Survey 2010. Mental health was measured by the WHO-5 well-being index and socioeconomic position by occupation. Twenty-five psychosocial work factors were constructed including job demands, job influence and development, role stressors, social support, quality of leadership, discrimination, violence at work, working hours, job promotion, job insecurity and work-life imbalance. Multilevel linear regressions and bootstrap analyses were performed. Occupational differences were observed for poor mental health and almost all psychosocial work factors. Factors related to job demands, influence and development at work, social relationships and leadership, working hours and other factors contributed to explain the occupational inequalities in mental health. In particular, factors related to influence and development contributed substantially. Among men, workplace violences were found to contribute little whereas among women these factors did not play a role. Future prevention interventions should have a broad and comprehensive focus in order to reduce social inequalities in mental health. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the location of the Town of Cary’s four Town Council districts.Please note that one district, District A, is split into two geo-spatial areas. One area is in...

  11. The relationship between employment quality and work-related well-being in the European labor force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aerden, K.; Moors, G.B.D.; Levecque, K.; Vanroelen, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, data from the 2005 European Working Conditions Survey are used to examine the relationship between contemporary employment arrangements and the work-related well-being of European employees. By means of a Latent Class Cluster Analysis, several features of the employment conditions

  12. The Court of Justice of the European Union and Fixed-term Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Porte, Caroline; Emmenegger, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    permanent workers and aims to prevent abuse of this contract form. Surprisingly, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) rulings in this area have by and large been neglected in comparative labour market research. We fill this gap by systematically analysing the CJEU case law concerning fixed......While fixed-term work benefits employers and increases the prospects of employability of various categories of workers, it is inherently precarious. The European Union (EU) directive on fixed-term work emphasizes the importance of equal treatment of workers on fixed-term contracts with comparable...... show that the equal treatment is affirmed in all cases under analysis for different provisions of labour contracts. With regard to abuse of recourse to fixed-term contracts, by contrast, the rulings still represent a zone of legal uncertainty, whereby some judgments allow for fixed-term contracts...

  13. News from the CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    The CERN Council today thanked the Organization’s outgoing management, and welcomed in the new. Outgoing Director General Robert Aymar, looked back on his five years at the helm, while new Director General, Rolf Heuer, presented his vision for the future. In other Council business, Romania was welcomed as a Candidate for Accession as Member State of CERN; and the groundwork was laid for a study of geographical and scientific extension of the role of CERN. Council also established the practical procedures for following projects relevant to the European Strategy for Particle Physics. Consult the complete Press Release.

  14. [Ethical aspects of human embryonic stem cell use and commercial umbilical cord blood stem cell banking. Ethical reflections on the occasion of the regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virt, G

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products also includes therapies with human embryonic stem cells. The use of these stem cells is controversially and heavily discussed. Contrary to the use of adult stem cells, medical and ethical problems concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells persists, because this use is based on the destruction of human life at the very beginning. The regulation foresees, therefore, subsidiarity within the European Member States. Although there are no ethical problems in principle with the use of stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, there are social ethical doubts with the banking of these stem cells for autologous use without any currently foreseeable medical advantage by commercial blood banks. Also in this case subsidiarity is valid.

  15. Measuring employment precariousness in the European Working Conditions Survey: the social distribution in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Barrachina, Vanessa; Vanroelen, Christophe; Vives, Alejandra; Martínez, José Miguel; Muntaner, Carles; Levecque, Katia; Benach, Joan; Louckx, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Precarious employment is becoming an increasingly important social determinant of health inequalities among workers. The way in which contemporary employment arrangements and their health consequences are addressed in empirical research is mostly based on the contract-related or employment instability dimension. A broader conceptual approach including various important characteristics of the degrading of employment conditions and relations is needed. The general objective of this paper is to empirically test a new multidimensional construct for measuring precarious employment in an existing database. Special focus is on the social distribution of precarious employment. A subsample of 21,415 participants in the EU-27 from the Fourth European Working Conditions Survey-2005 was analysed. A cross-sectional study of the social distribution of precarious employment was conducted through the analysis of proportional differences according to gender, social class and credentials for the European Union as a whole and within each country. The 8 dimensions of the employment precariousness construct were represented by 11 indicators. In general, women, workers without supervisory authority, those with fewer credentials, and those living in Eastern and Southern European countries suffer the highest levels of precarious employment. Exceptionally, men, workers with supervisory authority and those with the highest credentials suffer the highest levels of long working hours, schedule unpredictability and uncompensated flexible working times. This article offers the first validation for an innovative multidimensional conceptualisation of employment precariousness applied to the analysis of existing survey data, showing the unequal distribution of precarious employment across the European labour force. This set of indicators can be useful for monitoring precarious employment.

  16. Interactions between care-giving and paid work hours among European midlife women, 1994 to 1996

    OpenAIRE

    Spieß, Christa Katharina; Schneider, A. Ulrike

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses data from the European Community Household Panel surveys of 1994 and 1996 to study the association between changes in care-giving and changes in weekly work hours. Our sample comprises women aged 45-59 years who participated in the labour force in at least one of the two years studied. Controlling for country variation, we find significant relationships between starting or increasing informal care-giving and changes in weekly work hours. No such association is found however am...

  17. The true ‘EURESCO’? The Council of Europe,transnational networking and the emergence of European Community cultural policies, 1970–90

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calligaro, Oriane; Patel, Kiran Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The roots of EU action in the field of culture lie in the 1970s. At the time, the Council of Europe (CoE), the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and other organizations were already established players in the field. This article analyses the incremental and

  18. European Working Time Directive: Implementation across -Europe and consequences upon training in obstetrics and -gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärgmäe, P; Martins, N; Rodríguez, D; Christopoulos, P; Werner, H M J

    2011-01-01

    To review the compliance of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) in different teaching hospitals across Europe and its consequences upon training. It is an observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The sample is constituted by the answers from trainees selected by the representatives of 29 European Network of Trainees in Ob/Gyn (ENTOG) member countries to a survey designed by ENTOG Executive. The survey content was based on a joint survey by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and the Royal College for Paediatrics (RCP), carried out in 2008, but adapted for use on a European level. An answer rate of 75% was obtained. Only 5 countries out of 29 were compliant with EWTD two months before the compulsory adherence. Countries needed to introduce 1 to 4 changes to the system to make the rotas -compliant. Positive effect on work and private life balance was noticed in 87% from all responses. Trainees notice the need to further improve training programmes in order to have the same quality of training and continuous care of patients. Steps forward to implement EWTD are being made. Trainees should be involved with the introduction to optimize training conditions under the EWTD. Countries that still struggle to introduce the directive may learn from countries that already are compliant. It is suggested to organize a survey on senior society level to gain additional information to further investigate the effects on training quality and patient care.

  19. ERA—European Radiochemists Association: Report on the activities of the Working Party for Nuclear and Radiochemistry of the Federation of European Chemical Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Z. I.; Ware, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Radiochemists Association started almost simultaneously with the appearance of the first issue of the Radiochemistry in Europe newsletter in August 1995. The objective of the European Radiochemists Association (ERA) is to extend and improve communication between radiochemists in Europe through a newsletter. Liaison persons within each country or group exchange details of their activities, set up a diary of relevant international events and exchange details of specialist equipment, facilities and technology. In the year 2000 the Federation of European Chemical Societies decided to form a working party on nuclear and radiochemistry. It is a formalisation of the European Radiochemists Association. Each chemical society is allowed to nominate a member to the Working Party on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Currently we have 12 nominated members plus two invited and one observer. In addition to the ERA aims and objectives it proposes to put together a syllabus of radiochemistry for undergraduate and post-graduate students—this aspect has been a part of our support of the International Atomic Energy Agency initiative. Also the aim of the working party is to support other working parties and divisions, to press the Federation of the European Chemical Societies for financial structure. To this end an Expression of Interest has been tabled with the Framework 6 Programme for networking within radiochemistry in Europe. The WP will liaise with the International Isotope Society and the International Society on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology to seek to communicate and to consider ways of working together.

  20. The effects of the European Working Time Directive on surgical training: the basic surgical trainee's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, B D

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: On the 1 August 2009, the implementation of European Working Time Directive became European law and was implemented in Galway University Hospital (GUH). AIMS: The aim of the study is to ascertain the opinion of the 25 surgical SHOs in GUH on the effect of the implementation of an EWTD compliant roster had on the quality of their training. METHODS: A questionnaire was circulated to all 25 surgical SHOs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) SHOs report a reduction in the quality of their training. 18 (72%) report a reduction in the development of their operative skills. The SHOs believed the EWTD Rotas would encourage Irish graduates to train abroad. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical training faces a challenge with the implementation of EWTD Rotas. Major changes need to be made to the surgical training structure to train surgeons to the highest standard and to retain Irish-trained surgeons in the Irish healthcare system.

  1. Do you think that your health or safety are at risk because of your work? A large European study on psychological and physical work demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andries, F.; Kompier, M.A.J.; Smulders, P.G.W.

    1996-01-01

    A secondary analysis was performed on a large scale cross-sectional survey (n = 12,500) by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. The analysis investigates (1) 'strain', i.e. whether or not employees in 12 European Union (EU) member states considered their

  2. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries and the European Union.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragstra, A.; Tijdens, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how working hours are asked in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  3. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries and the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Dragstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews how working hours are asked for in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all

  4. Council Session

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    From face, 1st raw: Erich Lohrmann, Sergio Fubini, Léon Van Hove, John Adams (Directors-General), Paul Levaux (President of the Council) Hans-Otto Wüster, Franco Bonaudi, Robert Lévy-Mandel and 2nd raw, centre: Patrick Mollet, Eliane de Modzelewska, Jean-Marie Dufour

  5. 75 FR 971 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee, Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team, and Groundfish Management Team will hold a working meeting, which is open to the... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...

  6. Brief considerations on the acquisition of works of art in the European regulation of public contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo Forte

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The work, renouncing to a precise definition of art, acknowledges that there are art objects and cultural objects, which, in this way, are relevant also in legal terms, and try to advance some reflections on the relevance of art in relation to the European discipline of public contracts and, in particular, what can be deduced from Directive 2014/24 / EU, which can well be understood as a sort of cultural sign that can provide insights into how art is perceived in Europe, even in political terms, in this historical phase. The paper therefore examines the use of negotiated procedures without prior publication of a contract notice, for the «creation or acquisition of a unique work of art or artistic performance», and to do so faces the problem of the object of the procurement by “contracting authorities” which deals with things or performances (works, supplies or services relating to artistic products, by examining the needs which a public administration may have in relation to obtaining the availability of a work of art, and the different modes of this type of acquisition. Finally, the study examines the theme of «art exhibitions», trying to prove that they are autonomous objects, which are represented in the European directive under the diction «artistic performance».

  7. Introduction: European climate leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurzel, R.K.W.; Liefferink, J.D.; Connelly, J.; Wurzel, R.K.W.; Connelly, J.; Liefferink, D.

    2017-01-01

    There is no shortage of would-be leaders in EU climate change politics. The EU institutions (e.g. European Council, Council of the EU, Commission and the European Parliament (EP)), member states and societal actors have all, though to varying degrees and at different time periods, tried to offer

  8. Risk and resilience: health inequalities, working conditions and sickness benefit arrangements: an analysis of the 2010 European Working Conditions survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wel, Kjetil A; Bambra, Clare; Dragano, Nico; Eikemo, Terje A; Lunau, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    In this article we ask whether the level of sickness benefit provision protects the health of employees, particularly those who are most exposed to hazardous working conditions or who have a little education. The study uses the European Working Condition Survey that includes information on 20,626 individuals from 28 countries. Health was measured by self-reported mental wellbeing and self-rated general health. Country-level sickness benefit provision was constructed using spending data from Eurostat. Group-specific associations were fitted using cross-level interaction terms between sickness benefit provision and physical and psychosocial working conditions respectively, as well as those with little education. The mental wellbeing of employees exposed to psychosocial job strain and physical hazards, or who had little education, was better in countries that offer more generous sickness benefit. These results were found in both men and women and were robust to the inclusion of GDP and country fixed effects. In the analyses of self-reported general health, few group-specific associations were found. This article concludes that generous sickness benefit provision may strengthen employee's resilience against mental health risks at work and risks associated with little education. Consequently, in countries with a generous provision of sickness benefit, social inequalities in mental health are smaller. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  9. 77 FR 72296 - Public Meeting of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council (RCC) Motor Vehicles Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... the initiatives identified in the Joint Action Plan, bilateral working groups led by senior officials... Plan, bilateral working groups led by senior officials from regulatory agencies have developed work... Vehicles Working Group AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), DOT. ACTION...

  10. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Urban Planning and Construction. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European Climate Change Policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to climate change impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national, regional and local level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on urban planning and infrastructure in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the urban planning sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting. Some of the other stakeholder meetings, such as the meeting on human health, have a strong connection with the urban planning agenda. Therefore, some actions in the sector report on adaptation and human health relate to urban planning and infrastructure considerations

  11. European Climate Change Programme. Working Group II. Impacts and Adaptation. Water Management. Sectoral Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation is a new policy area for the European climate change policy. The Impacts and Adaptation Workgroup has been set up as part of European Climate Change Programme (ECCP II). The main objective of the workgroup is to explore options to improve Europe's resilience to Climate Change Impacts, to encourage the integration of climate change adaptation into other policy areas at the European, national and regional level and to define the role of EU-wide policies complementing action by Member States. The aim of this initial programme of work is to identify good practice in the development of adaptation policy and foster learning from different sectoral experiences and explore a possible EU role in adaptation policies. The Commission has led a series of 10 sectoral meetings looking at adaptation issues for different sectors. One of these meetings looked at the impacts on the water cycle and water resources management and prediction of extreme events in particular. This report summarises the state of play in the Water Resources sector in relation to adaptation to climate change on the basis of the information gathered at the stakeholder meeting on 11 April, 2006

  12. Comparison of the Selected Indicators of Work Life Balance in European Union Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Živčicová

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article elaborates on the characteristics and indicators of work life balance (WLB. The focus is on the selected criteria of WLB as well as social life and time spent off work. The WLB factors chosen and discussed are: the amount of stress, exhaustion and lack of time for family activities and responsibilities in the context of WLB. The results of the European survey conducted by the Eurofond are compared with the authors’ questionnaire survey conducted in Slovakia in 2015. The survey results revealed stress and working hours to be statistically significant factors that can be seen as obstacles in the WLB and fulfilling family duties for many Slovaks. The survey also shows that the given sample of Slovak respondents performed much worse in the criteria of stress and lack of time results than the European average according to the Eurofond survey. The results could be partly influenced by the fact that the survey participants were mostly employed in the social sector.

  13. [The European Working Time Directive and surgical residents' expertise: no effect on the number of operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guicherit, Onno R

    2015-01-01

    Residents' working hours in the Netherlands were first capped in the early 1990 s. In 2003, European legislation consolidated restrictions to a 48-hour week. No adverse effects were seen on the number of surgical operations performed either in the first or the second decade following these measures. Either the effect on surgical training is minimal, or the number of operations carried out during a residency is not a meaningful indicator of its quality. Personalized modular rotations in both university and teaching hospitals are needed for residents with sub-specializations. Training activities, in combination with more supervision, have to focus on a broader set of competencies beyond simply mastering surgical procedures.

  14. Health effects of supplemental work from home in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Anna; Nachreiner, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    Internationalization and technological developments have changed the work organization in developed and developing industrial economies. Information and communication technologies, such as computers and smartphones, are increasingly used, allowing more temporal and spatial flexibility of work. This may lead to an increase in supplemental work, i.e. constant availability or working in addition to contractually agreed work hours. This in turn extends work hours and leads to work hours in evenings and weekends, causing interferences of work hours with biological and social rhythms for sleep, recovery and social interaction. However, empirical findings on the effects of supplemental work and work hours on occupational health are rather scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between (1) work-related contacts outside of regular work hours and (2) working in the free time with self-reported work-related health impairments in the fourth and fifth European Working Conditions Surveys (EWCS 2005, EWCS 2010). Out of these cross-sectional, large-scale surveys, data on n = 22 836 and n = 34 399 employed workers were used for weighted logistic regression analyses. About half of the sample reported at least occasional supplemental work. The results showed an increased risk of reporting at least one health problem for employees who had been contacted by their employer (EWCS 2005), or worked in their free time to meet work demands (EWCS 2010) in the last 12 months, compared to those reporting no supplemental work or work-related contacts during free time. These results were controlled for demographic variables, physical and mental work load, worker autonomy, and several work hours characteristics (e.g. hours per week, unusual and variable hours). The risk of reporting health problems was increased by being contacted both sometimes (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.14-1.39) and often (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1

  15. ITER Council proceedings: 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ''ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2'' (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tasks; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings

  16. ITER council proceedings: 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Records of the third ITER Council Meeting (IC-3), held on 21-22 April 1993, in Tokyo, Japan, and the fourth ITER Council Meeting (IC-4) held on 29 September - 1 October 1993 in San Diego, USA, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA), such as the text of the draft of Protocol 2 further elaborated in ``ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2`` (ITER EDA Documentation Series No. 5), recommendations on future work programmes: a description of technology R and D tastes; the establishment of a trust fund for the ITER EDA activities; arrangements for Visiting Home Team Personnel; the general framework for the involvement of other countries in the ITER EDA; conditions for the involvement of Canada in the Euratom Contribution to the ITER EDA; and other attachments as parts of the Records of Decision of the aforementioned ITER Council Meetings.

  17. Council dinner

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Jean Teillac (President of the Council) gives the speech. The occasion was the end-of-term of Leon Van Hove and John Adams as Research and Executive Director-General, respectively, to be succeeded by Herwig Schopper. The venue was the Hotel Beau-Rivage in Geneva. Beside Jean Teillac are (on the left) G.H. Stafford and Mme Van Hove, (on the right) Mme Schopper.

  18. Working in a developing communication space. Facebook and Twitter as journalistic tools for European information pure-player websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Tixier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of the European Union, European information has been a very important issue of communication. Numerous Europe-specialized information websites were born in the first decade of the 21st century, thus creating a European informational landscape on the Internet. In a context of journalistic technological and economical evolutions, journalists have to adapt rapidly their ways of working. A new function in terms of management of socio-numeric networks has appeared: community management. This research aims at analyzing the uses of Facebook and Twitter in the community management of online European information websites. We will be specifically observing how information makers integrate these technologies, which originally were not part of the journalistic work patterns, and how they use these new means of communication to circulate European ideas through self-promotion practices.

  19. WORKING IN A DEVELOPING COMMUNICATION SPACE. FACEBOOK AND TWITTER AS JOURNALISTIC TOOLS FOR EUROPEAN INFORMATION PURE-PLAYER WEBSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Tixier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of the European Union, European information has been a very important issue of communication. Numerous Europe-specialized information websites were born in the first decade of the 21st century, thus creating a European informational landscape on the Internet. In a context of journalistic technological and economical evolutions, journalists have to adapt rapidly their ways of working. A new function in terms of management of socio-numeric networks has appeared: community management. This research aims at analyzing the uses of Facebook and Twitter in the community management of online European information websites. We will be specifically observing how information makers integrate these technologies, which originally were not part of the journalistic work patterns, and how they use these new means of communication to circulate European ideas through self-promotion practices.

  20. The European Working Time Directive: a practical review for surgical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J E F; Caesar, B C

    2012-01-01

    The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) 2003/88/EC is a Union Directive laying down minimum health and safety requirements for the organisation of working time. Originally primarily intended as labour law, its progressive introduction up to full implementation for doctors-in-training in August 2009 has substantially reduced duty-hours and caused widespread concern in surgery. Detrimental effects on the continuity of patient care, reduced availability of medical staff with associated rota difficulties, and the reduction in time for training junior doctors have been widely cited. Craft-specialities such as surgery and those providing an acute service have faced particular challenges. This review offers a practical guide for surgical trainees, explaining the European regulations in the context of current terms and conditions of doctor's employment in the UK. Information is provided on protecting training, opting-out, seeking remuneration for this, and ensuring doctors and patients are protected with appropriate medical indemnity cover in place. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lack of Commitment? Work Orientations of Finnish Employees in a European Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Turunen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that individuals’ employment commitment, that is, their commitment to work in general is crucial in today’s labor markets where life-long employment relationships are less frequently offered by organizations. In addition, employees’ organizational commitment, that is, their commitment to their own organization is also vital for organizations and firms, affecting many areas of importance to them. This article asks how Finnish employees rank in both employment commitment and affective organizational commitment compared with employees in 15 other European countries. The data were collected in 2005–2007 through the International Social Survey Program (ISSP, Work Orientation Module III. The results show Finnish employees scoring below European averages in both types of commitment when employee-level and organizationlevel factors are taken into account. Employment commitment was highest in Norway and affective organizational commitment highest in Portugal. The perceived intrinsic rewards of the job were the strongest predictor of employment and affective organizational commitment in most of the countries researched, increasing both these types of commitment. However, the perceived social relations between management and employees were found to be the most powerful determinant of affective organizational commitment in Finland, with perceived good relations adding to the affective organizational commitment of employees. The data were analyzed mainly by means of a general linear model procedure.

  2. Observations on European Education and Educational Research: The "European Educational Research Journal" at Work, 2002-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Sverker

    2014-01-01

    This is a review of the "European Educational Research Journal" ("EERJ") since the start in 2002 and up to 2014. Three questions were put forward: what are the ambitions with the journal, how has the journal developed over time, and what are its possible futures? The review is based on minutes and emails from the late 1990s up…

  3. Surgical training and the European Working Time Directive: The role of informal workplace learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, James A

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of European Working Time Directive, limiting doctors' working hours to 48 per week, has caused recent controversy within the profession. The Royal College of Surgeons of England in particular has been one of the loudest critics of the legislation. One of the main concerns is regarding the negative impact on training hours for those embarking on surgical careers. Simulation technology has been suggested as a method to overcome this reduction in hospital training hours, and research suggests that this is a good substitute for operative training in a theatre. However, modern educational theory emphasises the power of informal workplace learning in postgraduate education, and the essential role of experience in training future surgeons. Copyright 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on the operative experience of surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Cornelis J; den Hoed, Pieter T; van der Laan, Lijckle; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Elst, Maarten; Mannaerts, Guido H H; Dawson, Imro; Timman, Reinier; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2015-04-01

    In Europe and the United States, work hour restrictions are considered to be particularly burdensome for residents in surgery specialties. The aim of this study was to examine whether reduction of the work week to 48 hours resulting from the implementation of the European Working Time Directive has affected the operative experience of surgery residents. This study was conducted in a general surgery training region in the Netherlands, consisting of 1 university hospital and 6 district training hospitals. Operating records summarizing the surgical procedures performed as "primary surgeon" in the operating theater for different grades of surgeons were retrospectively analyzed for the period 2005-2012 by the use of linear regression models. Operative procedures performed by residents were considered the main outcome measure. In total, 235,357 operative procedures were performed, including 47,458 (20.2%) in the university hospital and 187,899 (79.8%) in the district training hospitals (n = 5). For residents in the university hospital, the mean number of operative procedures performed per 1.0 full-time equivalent increased from 128 operations in 2005 to 204 operations in 2012 (P = .001), whereas for residents in district training hospitals, no substantial differences were found over time. The mean (±SD) operative caseload of 64 residents who completed the 6-year training program between 2005 and 2012 was 1,391 ± 226 (range, 768-1856). A comparison of the operative caseload according to year of board-certification showed no difference. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive has not affected adversely the number of surgical procedures performed by residents within a general surgical training region in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. European Working Time Directive and doctors' health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Skerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

    2014-07-07

    To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. The total number of participants was 14 338. Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or 'dose-response' relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy. Policymakers should consider safety issues when working on relaxing EWTD for doctors. Published by the

  6. European Working Time Directive and doctors’ health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Škerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Setting Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. Participants The total number of participants was 14 338. Primary and secondary outcome measures Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. Conclusions LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or ‘dose–response’ relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy

  7. DECLARATION TO COUNCIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    One year ago, the Staff Association, together with the CERN-ESO Pensioners' Association, organized a staff meeting in front of this building to express our concern about certain actions of this Committee. Today we deem it necessary to come before you and convey in person, dear delegates, the concerns and worries of the staff. Indeed, the last 18 months we have observed a tendency of Council to take matters, in particular in the field of pensions, into its own hands, bypassing established governance structures, which Council has itself put into place. As a result, the Director General was prevented from playing his essential role of intermediary between staff and Council, an essential element of the established social dialogue. The creation of CERN in 1954 was very much based on the willingness of many countries of the old Continent to share resources to create a joint fundamental physics laboratory. The emphasis was on sharing resources for the common good to allow European scientists to engage in...

  8. STYLE - A European project on structural integrity: Progress of the work after 2 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussner, Stefan; Nicak, Tomas; Keim, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the progress of the work on the EURATOM project STYLE (Structural integrity for lifetime management - non-RPV components). The project focuses on the structural integrity assessment of reactor coolant pressure boundary components (RCPB) relevant to ageing and life time management. The 4-years project started in January 2010 and is now in its third year. Within STYLE realistic failure models for some of the key components will be identified. The range of assessment tools considered will include those for assessment of component failure by advanced fracture mechanics analyses validated on small and large scale experiments, quantification of weld residual stresses by numerical analysis and by measurements, stress corrosion crack initiation and growth effects and assessment of RCPB components (excluding the reactor pressure vessel) under dynamic and seismic loading. Based on theoretical and experimental results, performance assessment and further development of simplified engineering assessment methods (EAM) will be carried out considering both deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Integrity assessment case studies and large scale demonstration experiments will be performed on Mock-ups of safety relevant components. These will include a repair weld in an aged butt-welded austenitic pipe, a dissimilar narrow gap TIG weld (following the EPR design) and a cladded ferritic pipe. Moreover, experiments on specimens and feature test pieces will be carried out to support the large scale Mock-up analyses. The end product of the project ('STYLE TOOLS') will comprise best practice guidelines on the use of advanced tools, on improvement and qualification of EAM as a part of European Leak-before-break (LBB) procedures and on life time management of the integrity of RCPB components in European nuclear power plants. The project is interacting with the European Network of Excellence NUGENIA (former NULIFE). (author)

  9. Comparative decline in funding of European Commission malaria vaccine projects: what next for the European scientists working in this field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imoukhuede Egeruan B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since 2000, under the Fifth and subsequent Framework Programmes, the European Commission has funded research to spur the development of a malaria vaccine. This funding has contributed to the promotion of an integrated infrastructure consisting of European basic, applied and clinical scientists in academia and small and medium enterprises, together with partners in Africa. Research has added basic understanding of what is required of a malaria vaccine, allowing selected candidates to be prioritized and some to be moved forward into clinical trials. To end the health burden of malaria, and its economic and social impact on development, the international community has now essentially committed itself to the eventual eradication of malaria. Given the current tentative advances towards elimination or eradication of malaria in many endemic areas, malaria vaccines constitute an additional and almost certainly essential component of any strategic plan to interrupt transmission of malaria. However, funding for malaria vaccines has been substantially reduced in the Seventh Framework Programme compared with earlier Framework Programmes, and without further support the gains made by earlier European investment will be lost.

  10. A qualitative investigation of Foundation Year 2 doctors' views on the European Working Time Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Myanna; Haslam, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE - The purpose of this paper is to examine the personal views and experiences of Foundation Year 2 doctors operating under the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH - In total, 36 Foundation Year 2 doctors from a single UK-based Deanery participated in this semistructured interview study. FINDINGS - Findings indicated that Foundation doctors typically welcomed a regulation of working hours, but reported frustration at the manner in which the Directive had been implemented. Participants reported concerns at reducing hours by removing out-of-hours working in order to meet EWTD requirements. Out-of-hours shifts were highly valued owing to their increased opportunities for autonomous clinical decision making. By contrast, day-shifts were regarded as heavily administrative in nature and were perceived as service provision. Foundation doctors discussed the unique nature of the out-of-hours working period which appeared to provide specific learning opportunities as doctors draw on time management and prioritisation skills. ORIGINALITY/VALUE - Given the challenges the EWTD presents, careful rota planning is essential. First, the authors would encourage the restructuring of day-shift work to provide a greater emphasis on hands-on skills experience in a supportive, supervised environment. Second, where possible, Foundation doctors might benefit from the opportunity to engage in some out-of-hours working, such as with multi-professional "Hospital at Night" teams. Third, the authors would encourage junior doctor involvement in rota design and planning which may increase their perceived autonomy and therefore buy-in of working practices.

  11. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  12. WAYS OF INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE COMMERCIAL COMPANIES UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE ROMANIAN LOCAL COUNCIL IN THE POST-ACCESSION PERIOD TO THE EUROPEAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Pendiuc

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available More and more companies under the authority of the Local Council are interested in implementing a quality management system following the quality assurance models proposed by the ISO9000 type international standards. Almost 200 organizations have in place a quality management system certified based on these standards. These organizatios requested certification in order to enjoy a number of advantages, especially as regards their position on the market towards competition, by establishing new contractual relationships, foreseeing customers' demands, creating products and services to better fulfill these demands, at better prices. According to some surveys, many commercial companies under the authority of the Loal Council managed to obtain these advantages to gether with other ones such as: a better working structure, motivation of the workers, improvement of the product quality, an increase in the efficiency, productivity and market quota. As more and more similar products manufactured using the same technologies emerge on the market, quality becomes the main selection factor of the commercial companies under the authority of the Local Council on the market, thus the main mean of competitiveness. Thus, lately, in our county we witness an increasingly intense concern in this field, the change of quality-related aspects, this being the main motivation for drafting this article.

  13. Radioactivity in north European waters: report of Working Group 2 of CEC project MARINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.; Aarkrog, A.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of Working Group 2 of Project MARINA was to consider recent measurements of environmental radioactivity in north European waters and to use this, and other information, to report likely magnitude of doses to the critical group from marine pathways. The monitoring data were supplemented, where appropriate, with predictions from simple models. The major sources of radioactivity studied were as follows: (i) liquid wastes from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, (Sellafield, Dounreay, Cap de la Hague); (ii) liquid wastes from nuclear power plants and other major nuclear industry sites, (including Belgium, Denmark, France, Finland, GDR, FDR, Netherlands, Sweden, UK, USSR); (iii) solid waste disposal in the deep north-east Atlantic; (iv) fallout from Chernobyl; and (v) naturally-occurring radionuclides. (author)

  14. European Social Work Research Association SIG to Study Decisions, Assessment, and Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Brian; Killick, Campbell; Bertotti, Teresa; Enosh, Guy; Gautschi, Joel; Hietamäki, Johanna; Sicora, Alessandro; Whittaker, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The increasing interest in professional judgement and decision making is often separate from the discourse about "risk," and the time-honored focus on assessment. The need to develop research in and across these topics was recognized in the founding of a Decisions, Assessment, and Risk Special Interest Group (DARSIG) by the European Social Work Research Association in 2014. The Group's interests include cognitive judgements; decision processes with clients, families, other professionals and courts; assessment tools and processes; the assessment, communication, and management of risk; and legal, ethical, and emotional aspects of these. This article outlines the founding and scope of DARSIG; gives an overview of decision making, assessment, and risk for practice; illustrates connections between these; and highlights future research directions. Professional knowledge about decision making, assessment, and risk complements knowledge about effectiveness of interventions. DARSIG promises to be a useful mechanism for the purpose.

  15. THE PECULIARITIES OF WORK OF THE EUROPEAN NETWORK OF HEALTH PROMOTING SCHOOLS (COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS)

    OpenAIRE

    T.S. Iermakova

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – to analyze the main peculiarities of European Network of Health Promoting Schools functioning in European Union and Ukraine. Results. Students are a big group of population that demand introduction of health education in modern rhythm of life. A great example of such education is schools of Members States of European Union. Address to experience of forming of students’ health culture in the Health Promoting Schools in countries of European Union, experience of that can become an exa...

  16. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Report to the IFLA Council: The Work of the Professional Board and Index to Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The first of two papers in this document is a report describing the work of the International Federation of Library Association's (IFLA) first professional board functioning under the Chicago rule changes of 1985. Topics include changes in the annual meeting structure; changes in the Medium Term Programme 1986-1991 (MTP); coordination with the…

  17. Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

  18. Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit

    CERN Document Server

    European Gender Summit, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit to the European Parliament and the Council, the European Commission, the Council of Europe, EU Member and Associate States, Science Institutions. Developing Systematic Implementation Strategy to Advance EU Policy on Gender Equality in Science, as part of HORIZON 2020, European Research Area and Innovation Union.

  19. Reproductive behaviour in the 1980s: Europe revisited. Council of Europe: an account of the work of a committee of experts on fertility trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deven, F

    1985-01-01

    This article highlights the findings of a 3-stage analysis conducted in 1982-85 by the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on Fertility Trends: The 1st phase involved a demographic analysis of reproductive behavior in the past decade, the 2nd focused on the background of recent fertility trends, and the 3rd examined possible consequences of these trends. Participating countries included Belgium, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, and Switzerland. During the 1970s; most of these countries experienced a continuation of the fertility decline begun in the mid-60s, resulting in the large majority of countries in below-replacement reproduction. In general, the effect of the fertility decline on the birth rate has been partially compensated by the favorable age structure of the reproductive age population. In the 1st half of the 1970s, both nuptiality and reproductive behavior in marriage contributed to the fertility decline; in the 2nd half, marital fertility showed increases. The fertility decline in the 1st half of the 1970s largely reflected the steep decline in fertility among younger age groups, whereas a rise in the fertility in the older age groups was a characteristic of the late 1970s. However, the stabilization or even slight increase in fertility noted in the late 1970s in several European countries reverted to a decline in the early 1980s. In general, small family size appears to be viewed as a good compromise between pyschological and economic costs and benefits. These low fertility trends have had a dramatic effect on household composition and have also facilitated women's personal growth and economic independence. These trends are expected to lead to demographic aging of the population and alleviation of pressures on the labor market. All such changes will require adaptive population policy measures. It is important that such policies do not endanger achievements of modernization such as human

  20. Dimensional comparability of psychosocial working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formazin, Maren; Burr, Hermann; Aagestad, Cecilie; Tynes, Tore; Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Perkio-Makela, Merja; Díaz Aramburu, Clara Isabel; Pinilla García, Francisco Javier; Galiana Blanco, Luz; Vermeylen, Greet; Parent-Thirion, Agnes; Hooftman, Wendela; Houtman, Irene

    2014-12-09

    In most countries in the EU, national surveys are used to monitor working conditions and health. Since the development processes behind the various surveys are not necessarily theoretical, but certainly practical and political, the extent of similarity among the dimensions covered in these surveys has been unclear. Another interesting question is whether prominent models from scientific research on work and health are present in the surveys--bearing in mind that the primary focus of these surveys is on monitoring status and trends, not on mapping scientific models. Moreover, it is relevant to know which other scales and concepts not stemming from these models have been included in the surveys. The purpose of this paper is to determine (1) the similarity of dimensions covered in the surveys included and (2) the congruence of dimensions of scientific research and of dimensions present in the monitoring systems. Items from surveys representing six European countries and one European wide survey were classified into the dimensions they cover, using a taxonomy agreed upon among all involved partners from the six countries. The classification reveals that there is a large overlap of dimensions, albeit not in the formulation of items, covered in the seven surveys. Among the available items, the two prominent work-stress-models--job-demand-control-support-model (DCS) and effort-reward-imbalance-model (ERI)--are covered in most surveys even though this has not been the primary aim in the compilation of these surveys. In addition, a large variety of items included in the surveillance systems are not part of these models and are--at least partly--used in nearly all surveys. These additional items reflect concepts such as "restructuring", "meaning of work", "emotional demands" and "offensive behaviour/violence & harassment". The overlap of the dimensions being covered in the various questionnaires indicates that the interests of the parties deciding on the questionnaires in

  1. New production concepts in the clothing industry : new ways of work for unpredictable markets : results from a European survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Peeters, M.H.H.

    1994-01-01

    This brochure summarises the results of a survey carried out among 86 clothing companies representing eight different West European countries. The research examined the effect of new ways of work in clothing companies on personnel policy, on the organisation of work and on the effectiveness of the

  2. Student supervision as educational method in faculties of social work. A study in seven European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godelieve van Hees

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Student supervision as educational method in faculties of social work. A study in seven European countries Supervision Meets Education (Van Hees & Geiβler-Piltz, 2010 is the title of a comparative study on the use of supervision in training social workers as part of the Bachelor degree programmes at seven European universities and universities of applied sciences. It is the first research project to be carried out by the Supervision in Social Work Education in Europe (SSWEE network. Supervision is seen as an educational method and to indicate this specific form of supervision, the term “student supervision” has been used. The results of the study are based on seven case studies and a comparative analysis to answer the question: how is supervision integrated into the curriculum and why is it done in this way? The second part of the study concerns a comparative analysis of the case studies. This article details the main results of the differences and similarities not only regarding the way that “supervision” is understood in various settings but also the variety of organizational approaches to supervision within the study programmes themselves. In conclusion, we can say that this description of “the current state of play” provides common ground from which one go on to develop student supervision methodology in the context of European Higher Education and the challenges of a changing profession. Opleidingssupervisie als didactische methode in opleidingen Sociaal Werk. Een zoektocht in zeven Europese landen Dit artikel doet verslag van een vergelijkende studie naar de praktijk van supervisie in de Bachelor Social Work aan zeven verschillende Europese universiteiten en hogescholen, genaamd Supervision Meets Education (Van Hees & Geiβler-Piltz, 2010. Het betreft een onderzoeksproject van het “Network Supervision in Social Work Education in Europe (SSWEE”. Supervisie wordt hier besproken als een didactische methode waarvoor in

  3. NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR COMBATING DISCRIMINATION – COURT OF JUSTICE OF EUROPEAN UNION – BUCHAREST COURT OF APPEAL. CAUSE C-81/12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian JURA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this investigation consists in closing the jurisdictional circle initiated in 2010 and analysing the national and European procedural, jurisdictional-administrative issues, in case of notifying some institutions related to certain discriminatory assertions. The investigation relies on assertions made during a radio show. On 12 October 2011 the Bucharest Court of Appeal ruled the notification of the Court of Justice of European Union related to preliminary questions formulated and ordered the suspension of the case until the settlement of the procedure. In 2013, the Bucharest Court of Appeal, although initially accepting the preliminary application of ACCEPT, submitting the case to the Court of Justice of European Union in order to determine the manner of interpretation of communitarian legislation related to the claims of plaintiff, eventually all arguments of CNCD have been accepted that is the warning is an effective, reasonable, dissuasive and (contextual proportional sanction, and such declaration cannot be understood as a discrimination in the labour field. De facto, the assertions of CNCD were in full agreement with the resolution of the Court of Justice of European Union, that is the communitarian legislation does not exclude the application of some sanctions without pecuniary character, such as the sanction with warning, since this kind of sanction does not have only a symbolic character, being a contraventional legal sanction, mainly when associated a relevant degree of advertising (such in the case, and the addressee is addressed, with arguments, directly and expressly the recommendation of meeting the non-discrimination principle, under the implicit effect of a more drastic sanction in case of relapse (discrimination in the same field.

  4. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work-home balance and the European working time directive: a panel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-10-13

    To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work-home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Norway. Unbalanced cohort of 1300-1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46-47 h) and junior (45-46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27-35%) than junior (11-20%) doctors reported suboptimal work-home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. An investigation into how the European Working Time Directive has affected anaesthetic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowhay Andrew R

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The European Working Time Directive (EWTD became law in 1993 but only applied to doctors in training in the United Kingdom in 2004. The trainees have in consequence had a reduction in their working hours but also a change to a shift pattern of working. For craft specialities, such as anaesthesia, there are concerns that a reduction in working hours has also led to a reduction in the time available for learning and that ultimately this may affect patient care. However, there is scant research on the perceptions of trainees concerning the impact of the EWTD on their training and working lives. This study investigated what the anaesthetic Specialist Registrars (SpRs on the Mersey Deanery SpR rotation perceived to be training and also what effect the EWTD has had on that training and their quality of life, both within and outside work. Methods The project was a cross sectional survey, using a quantitative questionnaire with qualitative free text comments which were aggregated into overarching themes and sub themes. Results 117 SpRs were sent questionnaires in April 2005; 73 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 62.4%. Hierarchies of training opportunities emerged with training by consultants being most valued. 71.8% (95% CI 60.7 – 81.3 of trainees believed the EWTD has had a deleterious effect on their training and experience and 74.3% (95% CI 63.2 – 83.4 thought that they will be less prepared for a consultant post. 69.9% (95% CI 58.7 – 79.5 considered that their quality of life outside work had deteriorated, with only 15% (95% CI 8.3 – 24.6 finding improvement. 38.6% (95% CI 27.8 – 50.3 felt that they were not functioning as well as doctors, only 14.3% (95% CI 7.6 – 23.9 noting improvement. The trainees were still positive about anaesthesia and 73.2% (95% CI 62.2 – 82.5 would recommend this specialty to a student. Conclusion The majority of anaesthetic SpRs in the Mersey Deanery have not welcomed

  6. An investigation into how the European Working Time Directive has affected anaesthetic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowhay, Andrew R

    2008-08-12

    The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) became law in 1993 but only applied to doctors in training in the United Kingdom in 2004. The trainees have in consequence had a reduction in their working hours but also a change to a shift pattern of working. For craft specialities, such as anaesthesia, there are concerns that a reduction in working hours has also led to a reduction in the time available for learning and that ultimately this may affect patient care. However, there is scant research on the perceptions of trainees concerning the impact of the EWTD on their training and working lives. This study investigated what the anaesthetic Specialist Registrars (SpRs) on the Mersey Deanery SpR rotation perceived to be training and also what effect the EWTD has had on that training and their quality of life, both within and outside work. The project was a cross sectional survey, using a quantitative questionnaire with qualitative free text comments which were aggregated into overarching themes and sub themes. 117 SpRs were sent questionnaires in April 2005; 73 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 62.4%). Hierarchies of training opportunities emerged with training by consultants being most valued. 71.8% (95% CI 60.7-81.3) of trainees believed the EWTD has had a deleterious effect on their training and experience and 74.3% (95% CI 63.2-83.4) thought that they will be less prepared for a consultant post. 69.9% (95% CI 58.7-79.5) considered that their quality of life outside work had deteriorated, with only 15% (95% CI 8.3-24.6) finding improvement. 38.6% (95% CI 27.8-50.3) felt that they were not functioning as well as doctors, only 14.3% (95% CI 7.6-23.9) noting improvement. The trainees were still positive about anaesthesia and 73.2% (95% CI 62.2-82.5) would recommend this specialty to a student. The majority of anaesthetic SpRs in the Mersey Deanery have not welcomed the changes brought by the EWTD to their training, experience and quality of life

  7. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Tijdens, K.; Dragstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews how working hours are asked for in 26 large-scale surveys in six countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all questionnaires ask for hours worked, the terminology varies greatly. In only half of the cases a reference period is taken into account and in half the reasons for working more/less in the survey w...

  8. How many hours do you usually work? An analysis of the working hours questions in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries and the European Union.

    OpenAIRE

    Dragstra, A.; Tijdens, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how working hours are asked in 26 large-scale surveys in 6 countries plus the European Union. Four dimensions of working time were investigated, notably number of working hours, timing of work, predictability and control over hours, and commuting time. Although almost all questionnaires ask for hours worked, the terminology varies largely. In only half of the cases a reference period is taken into account and in half the reasons for working more/less in the survey week than...

  9. GRETA’s First Years of Work: Review of the monitoring of implementation of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Planitzer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring mechanism of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (CoE Convention consists of an independent group of experts (GRETA and a Committee of Parties. GRETA, which began work in 2009, develops questionnaires for States Parties, reviews their replies and conducts study visits. It then produces a report that is used by the Committee of Parties to make recommendations. This article analyses GRETA’s work until November 2011 by assessing the available materials including the questionnaire, the three published replies of States Parties to the questionnaire and the five published final reports on the parties. The objective of the article is to examine the capacity of this process to contribute to enhancing the accountability of States Parties, and to consider whether the application of a human rights-based approach by the parties can, in fact, be effectively monitored. The article also considers the role of civil society in the monitoring process and the ways in which this could be enhanced.

  10. Zygomycosis in Europe: analysis of 230 cases accrued by the registry of the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) Working Group on Zygomycosis between 2005 and 2007.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skiada, A.; Pagano, L.; Groll, A.; Zimmerli, S.; Dupont, B.; Lagrou, K.; Lass-Florl, C.; Bouza, E.; Klimko, N.; Gaustad, P.; Richardson, M.; Hamal, P.; Akova, M.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J.L.; Roilides, E.; Mitrousia-Ziouva, A.; Petrikkos, G.

    2011-01-01

    Zygomycosis is an important emerging fungal infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. The Working Group on Zygomycosis of the European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) prospectively collected cases of proven and probable zygomycosis in 13 European countries occurring between

  11. Report of the Council on Environmental Quality. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution of the Committee on Public Works, 91st Congress, Second Session, August 11, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Public Works.

    Presented in this bulletin is the text of the hearing before the Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution of the Committee on Public Works, United States Senate concerning the "First Annual Environmental Quality Report" of the Council on Environmental Quality. The hearing was held August 11, 1970 for the purpose of providing open discussion of the…

  12. Approaches to Working with Children, Young People and Families for Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities. A Literature Review Report for the Children's Workforce Development Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) commissioned this literature review as the first part of a project exploring issues around and approaches to working with Travellers, Irish Travellers, Gypsies, Roma and Showpeople, and the support, training and other programs available to staff involved. The project is intended to contribute to…

  13. 77 FR 21972 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT) will hold... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... work sessions will be held at Large Conference Room, Pacific Fishery Management Council Office, 7700 NE...

  14. Information report submitted by the Commission for European Affairs on the directive proposition by the European Parliament and the Council on the deployment on alternative fuels infrastructure- Nr 1126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savary, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    As clean fuels are facing three main obstacles (high vehicle cost, low consumer receptivity, and lack of charge ports and refuelling stations), this report discusses the context and the implications of a European directive which aims establishing constraining objectives for infrastructures dedicated to clean fuels as electricity, hydrogen and natural gas. The author presents this directive in relationship with the objective of development of low-carbon or de-carbonated transports through the use of electricity, hydrogen, bio-fuels, liquefied or compressed natural gas (LNG and CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and in relationship with European connector harmonisation. He outlines the interest of the European initiative with respect to the French position: being ahead with the existence of a French plan for the development of the electric vehicle, France must not fall behind on the issue of connector system. Two strategies are proposed in conclusion

  15. Experience of plastic surgery registrars in a European Working Time Directive compliant rota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blacam, Catherine; Tierney, Sean; Shelley, Odhran

    2017-08-01

    Surgical training requires exposure to clinical decision-making and operative experience in a supervised environment. It is recognised that learning ability is compromised when fatigued. The European Working Time Directive requires a decrease in working hours, but compliance reduces trainees' clinical exposure, which has profound implications for plastic surgery training. The aim of this study was to evaluate plastic surgery registrars' experience of an EWTD-compliant rota, and to examine its impact on patient care, education, and logbook activity. An electronic survey was distributed to plastic surgery registrars in a university teaching hospital. Registrars were asked to rate 31 items on a five-point Likert scale, including statements on patient care, clinical and operative duties, training, and quality-of-life. Interquartile deviations explored consensus among responses. Operative caseload was objectively evaluated using eLogbook data to compare activity at equal time points before and after implementation of the EWTD rota. Highest levels of consensus among respondents were found in positive statements addressing alertness and preparation for theatre, as well as time to read and study for exams. Registrars agreed that EWTD compliance improved their quality-of-life. However, it was felt that continuity of patient care was compromised by work hours restriction. Registrars were concerned about their operative experience. eLogbook data confirmed a fall-off in mean caseload of 31.8% compared to activity prior to EWTD rota implementation. While EWTD compliant rotas promote trainee quality-of-life and satisfaction with training, attention needs to be paid to optimising operative opportunities.

  16. UN human rights council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuksanović Mlrjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the structure, mechanisms, practices and perspectives of the Human Rights Council, the UN body that, at universal level is the most important body in this area. Introductory section provides for a brief overview of the origins of human rights and the work of the Commission on Human Rights, in whose jurisdiction were questions of human rights before the establishment of the Council. After the introductory section the author gives an analysis of the structure, objectives, mandate and main procedures for the protection of human rights within the united Nations. In the final section the authorpoints out the advantages of this authority and criticism addressed to it, with emphasis on the possibility and the need for its reform.

  17. Get a Life? The Impact of the European Working Time Directive: The Case of UK Senior Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolton, Peter J; Kidd, Michael P; Fooken, Jonas

    2015-10-01

    This paper seeks to identify the effect of the implementation of the European Working Time Directive on the working hours of UK doctors. The Labour Force Survey is used to compare the working hours of doctors with a variety of control groups before and after the implementation of the directive. The controls include those unconstrained by the directive and doctor counterparts working in Europe. We use differences-in-differences and matching methods to estimate the impact of this natural experiment, distinguishing between the anticipation and enactment of the European Working Time Directive. We find that the legislation reduced the hours of senior doctors by around 8 hours in total including the component attributable to anticipation effects and allowing for (exogenously set) rising wages. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. European otorhinolaryngology training programs: results of a European survey about training satisfaction, work environment and conditions in six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oker, N; Alotaibi, Naif H; Reichelt, A C; Herman, P; Bernal-Sprekelsen, M; Albers, Andreas E

    2017-11-01

    ORL-students and residents have an ongoing debate about the "best" programme in Europe. Aim of this study was to comparatively assess differences among programmes in training, satisfaction, quality of life (QoL) of residents and recent otorhinolaryngologist (ORL) specialists in France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Austria, and Belgium. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire, structured in ten sections including general information, provided guidance, working environment, training structure, teaching of medical students, publication work, QoL, and satisfaction with training, were emailed to residents and recent ORL specialists. 476 returned questionnaires from 6 countries revealed that daily work hours were the highest in France and Belgium with 11 and 10.4 h on average, respectively. QoL, work conditions, and salary were best in Germany followed by Austria in terms of possibility of part-time contracts, better respect for post-duty day off, and compensation for overtime. Satisfaction with training including support and guidance of seniors was lowest in Italy, but, on the other hand, the publication work and support had a more important place than in other countries. In Belgium, there was some gap between the quality of teaching and feedback from seniors as well as apprenticeship. The highest satisfaction with training was in France and Spain followed by Austria. The study results provide guidance before choosing an ORL training programme in Europe. Country-specific strengths could be included into future harmonization efforts to improve all programmes, facilitate professional exchange and, finally, establish standards-of-care carried out by well-trained doctors also looking after a satisfying work-life balance.

  19. Effects of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education work hour rules on surgical interns: a prospective study in a community teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Barron, Rebecca J; Lesicka, Agnieszka; Galbraith, John D; Millham, Frederick H; Larson, Janet

    2013-02-01

    On July 1, 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) eliminated 30-hour call in an attempt to improve resident wakefulness. We surveyed interns on the Newton Wellesley Hospital (NWH) surgery service before and after the transition from Q4 overnight call to a night float schedule. For 15 weeks, interns completed weekly surveys including the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The service changed to a night float schedule after 3 weeks (ie, first to 3-4 and then to 6 nights in a row). The average ESS score rose from 9.8 ± 5.2 to 14.9 ± 3.1 and 14.4 ± 4.5 (P = .042) on the 3/4 and 6/1 schedules, respectively. Interns were more likely to be abnormally tired on either night float schedule (relative risk = 2.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-6.97, P = .029). The new ACGME work hours increased the ESS scores among interns at NWH and caused interns to be more tired than interns on the Q4 schedule. This is likely caused by the multiple nights of poor sleep without a post-call day to make up sleep. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microbial characterization of probiotics–Advisory report of the Working Group “8651 Probiotics” of the Belgian Superior Health Council (SHC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Geert; Botteldoorn, Nadine; Delvigne, Frank; Vuyst, Luc De; Heyndrickx, Marc; Pot, Bruno; Dubois, Jean-Jacques; Daube, Georges

    2013-01-01

    When ingested in sufficient numbers, probiotics are expected to confer one or more proven health benefits on the consumer. Theoretically, the effectiveness of a probiotic food product is the sum of its microbial quality and its functional potential. Whereas the latter may vary much with the body (target) site, delivery mode, human target population, and health benefit envisaged microbial assessment of the probiotic product quality is more straightforward. The range of stakeholders that need to be informed on probiotic quality assessments is extremely broad, including academics, food and biotherapeutic industries, healthcare professionals, competent authorities, consumers, and professional press. In view of the rapidly expanding knowledge on this subject, the Belgian Superior Health Council installed Working Group “8651 Probiotics” to review the state of knowledge regarding the methodologies that make it possible to characterize strains and products with purported probiotic activity. This advisory report covers three main steps in the microbial quality assessment process, i.e. (i) correct species identification and strain-specific typing of bacterial and yeast strains used in probiotic applications, (ii) safety assessment of probiotic strains used for human consumption, and (iii) quality of the final probiotic product in terms of its microbial composition, concentration, stability, authenticity, and labeling. PMID:23801655

  1. The radiopharmaceutical industry and European Union regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallais, C.J.; Sivewright, S.; Ogle, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    After a brief historical introduction to Council Directives relating to the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals the work of the Association of Radiopharmaceuticals Producers - Europe (ARPE) is discussed. ARPE has played a significant role as an officially recognized interlocutor with the EEC, influencing decisions on the registration of radiopharmaceuticals and labelling; this role is reviewed and difficulties identified. The future of radiopharmaceuticals is then considered; it is emphasized that harmonization of national laws by the European Council would represent a first step to enabling radiopharmaceutical manufacturers to access the largest possible market for their products. (orig.)

  2. Why Dutch women work part-time: A Oaxaca-decomposition of differences in European female part-time work rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deschacht, N.; Tijdens, K.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze differences in female part-time work rates across countries using European Social Survey data for 2012 to study composition and selectivity effects by means of Oaxaca-decompositions. A novel treatment of the selection term distinguishes the effect of country differences in employment

  3. Reconciling work and poverty reduction: how successful are European welfare states?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantillon, B.; Vandenbroucke, F.

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the great recession, poverty has, not unexpectedly, increased in many Member States of the European Union. More worrying in view of its structural implications is the observation that in the years before the financial crisis, in most European countries poverty rates for the

  4. European Working Time Directive and the use of simulators and models in Irish orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, C

    2011-09-07

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the perceptions of a group of orthopaedic trainees and trainers on perceived effects of the proposed introduction of European Working Time Directive (EWTD) restrictions into Ireland and on the use of simulators in training orthopaedic skills. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was developed to evaluate the opinions of a group of orthopaedic surgeons and trainees at the annual national orthopaedic conference. RESULTS: There were 44 participants [12 consultants, 32 trainees (15 specialist registrars, 8 registrars, 9 senior house officers)]. Seventy-five percent of participants felt that both the quality of patient care and training would be negatively affected. A higher proportion of consultants than trainees felt that quality of life would be affected. A high proportion of participants (81.8%) had used a simulator or model to learn a surgical skill and 100% would consider using them again. CONCLUSIONS: While we wait for the full introduction of the EWTD hours the perception is that both quality of patient care and training will be affected. Models and simulators are well perceived as a method of training.

  5. European Working Time Directive and the use of simulators and models in Irish orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C; Elliott, R; Fleming, P

    2012-03-01

    To report on the perceptions of a group of orthopaedic trainees and trainers on perceived effects of the proposed introduction of European Working Time Directive (EWTD) restrictions into Ireland and on the use of simulators in training orthopaedic skills. A structured questionnaire was developed to evaluate the opinions of a group of orthopaedic surgeons and trainees at the annual national orthopaedic conference. There were 44 participants [12 consultants, 32 trainees (15 specialist registrars, 8 registrars, 9 senior house officers)]. Seventy-five percent of participants felt that both the quality of patient care and training would be negatively affected. A higher proportion of consultants than trainees felt that quality of life would be affected. A high proportion of participants (81.8%) had used a simulator or model to learn a surgical skill and 100% would consider using them again. While we wait for the full introduction of the EWTD hours the perception is that both quality of patient care and training will be affected. Models and simulators are well perceived as a method of training.

  6. Early years neurosurgical training in the era of the European Working Time Directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Watkins, Laurence D; Kitchen, Neil D; Sethi, Huma

    2013-10-01

    The past decade has seen significant changes to the face of neurosurgical training in the United Kingdom, driven in part by an increasing focus on patient safety and the introduction of Modernising Medical Careers and the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Recent reforms to neurosurgical training over the past few years have resulted in creation of an 8-year 'run-through' training programme. In this programme, early years (ST1 and ST2) trainees often lack dedicated time for elective theatre lists and outpatient clinics. Further, any time spent in theatre and clinics is often with different teams. Here we describe a training model for early years trainees at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, who are given the responsibilities traditionally associated with a more senior trainee including dedicated weekly theatre and clinic time under the supervision of a single consultant, in addition to out of hours experience. The advantages and considerations for implementing this model are discussed, including the benefit of guidance under a single consultant in the early stages of training, along with key educational concepts necessary for understanding its utility. We feel that this is an effective model for junior neurosurgical training in the EWTD era, expediting the trainee's development of key technical and non-technical skills, with potentially significant rewards for patient, trainee and trainer. National implementation of this model should be considered.

  7. Radioactivity in north European waters: report of Working Group 2 of CEC project MARINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camplin, W C [Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Lowestoft (UK). Directorate of Fisheries Research; Aarkrog, A [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective of Working Group 2 of Project MARINA was to consider recent measurements of environmental radioactivity in north European waters and to use this, and other information, to report the likely magnitude of doses to the critical group from marine pathways. The monitoring data were supplemented, where appropriate, with predictions from simple models. The major sources of radioactivity studied were as follows: (i) liquid wastes from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; (ii) liquid wastes from nuclear power plants and other major nuclear industry sites; (iii) solid waste disposal in the deep north-east Atlantic; (iv) fallout from Chernobyl; and (v) naturally-occurring radionuclides. Some of the largest doses from marine pathways are predicted for naturally-occurring radionuclides. In this case, the dominant radionuclide is polonium-210 and the dominant pathway is via consumption of molluscan species. The highest doses from the nuclear industry were due to the operation of the reprocessing plant at Sellafield. Discharges from this site have been decreasing substantially in recent years and, as a consequence, doses have also been reducing. (author).

  8. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-11-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and lessons learned from methodological research prompted this review and update of the 2004 Utstein guidelines. Representatives of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation developed an updated Utstein reporting framework iteratively by meeting face to face, by teleconference, and by Web survey during 2012 through 2014. Herein are recommendations for reporting out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Data elements were grouped by system factors, dispatch/recognition, patient variables, resuscitation/postresuscitation processes, and outcomes. Elements were classified as core or supplemental using a modified Delphi process primarily based on respondents' assessment of the evidence-based importance of capturing those elements, tempered by the challenges to collect them. New or modified elements reflected consensus on the need to account for emergency medical services system factors, increasing availability of automated external defibrillators, data collection processes, epidemiology trends, increasing use of dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emerging field treatments, postresuscitation care, prognostication tools, and trends in organ recovery. A standard reporting template is recommended to promote standardized reporting. This template facilitates reporting of the bystander-witnessed, shockable rhythm as a measure of emergency medical services system efficacy and all emergency medical services system-treated arrests as a measure of system effectiveness. Several additional important subgroups are identified that enable an estimate of the specific contribution of rhythm and bystander actions that are key determinants of outcome. Copyright © 2014 European

  9. The Institutional vs. the Academic Definition of the Quality of Work Life. What Is the Focus of the European Commission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, Vicente; Lopez-Tamayo, Jordi; Surinach, Jordi

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, we have seen how the quality of work life has been focused and defined by the European Commission (EC). In our study we compare the EC definition with the academic one and try to see how close they are. We also analyse the possibility of applying the institutional definition to the Spanish case through the development of specific…

  10. Low-perceived work ability, ageing and intention to leave nursing: a comparison among 10 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Consonni, Dario; Gould, Dinah; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports a study exploring nurses' perceived work ability and its associations with age and intention to leave nursing in a representative sample of Registered Nurses in 10 European countries. Background: Throughout Europe, there is now a substantial shortage of Registered Nurses and

  11. Women’s working hours: The interplay between gender role attitudes, motherhood, and public childcare support in 23 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andringa, Wouter; Nieuwenhuis, Rense; van Gerven-Haanpää, Minna Marja-Leena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show how the interplay between individual women’s gender role attitudes, having young children at home, as well as the country-context characterized by gender egalitarianism and public childcare support, relates to women’s working hours in 23 European

  12. Trust in the employer: The role of high-involvement work practices and procedural justice in European organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Searle, R.; den Hartog, D.N.; Weibel, A.; Gillespie, N.; Six, F.; Hatzakis, T.; Skinner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the central role of trust in the organizational sciences, we know little about what makes people trust the organizations they work for. This paper examines the antecedents of employees' trust in their organizations drawing on survey data from over 600 European professional workers and

  13. [The Working Group of Enforcement Officers (WGEO) : The European Network of Drug Regulatory Authorities to Combat Pharmaceutical Crime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstock, Marcus; Streit, Renz

    2017-11-01

    Ten years ago the Heads of Medicines Agencies (HMA) officially founded the Working Group of Enforcement Officers (WGEO), a European working group to reduce falsifications of human and veterinarian medicinal products in the legal and illegal supply chain. Police, customs and other international organisations are also represented in the WGEO. Partner organisations are for example the Directorate General for Health and Food Safety of the European Commission, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the European Police Office (Europol), the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol), the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and Healthcare (EDQM) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The main goal of the group is the protection of public health from harmful medicines for both humans and animals. The WGEO has created a network of its members and a rapid alert system to exchange confidential information on falsified or stolen medicinal products. There are face-to-face meetings twice a year including training using case studies.

  14. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  15. The role and the results of the European Community's R and D work on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlowski, S.; Girardi, F.

    1986-01-01

    The role and results of the European Community's research and development (R and D) work on radioactive waste management are described. The R and D work includes: radioactive waste conditioning, characterization and storage, materials science studies for the storage, geological media confinement studies, and radionuclide migration investigations. Financial management and the long term, and the socio-political aspects of waste management, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Cultural competence in working with the Arab Australian community: a conceptual review and the experience of the Arab Council Australia (ACA gambling help counselling service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Mazbouh-Moussa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD communities participate less in gambling than the general population, those who gamble are more likely to show signs of disordered gambling (Moore and Ohtsuka International Gambling Studies, 1, 87–101, 2001; Raylu and Oei Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1087–1114, 2004; Yamine and Thomas The impact of gaming on specific cultural groups, Victorian Casino and Gaming Authority, Melbourne, 2000. Research data on gambling problems and interventions in the Arab Australian community are extremely scarce. Therefore, this article will present an overview of the Arab Australian community and cultural issues regarding gambling within the Arab Australian community. Identifying these issues is important to work effectively with Arab Australians clients and those from other CALD backgrounds. The article also presents a conceptual review of peer-reviewed research articles on cultural competence in working with the Arab clients, the overview of Arab migration history to Australia and a summary of recent events that suggest a tension between Arab and non-Arab Australian communities. Observations and experiences that were encountered during the gambling counselling service operating in the Australian Arab community in New South Wales are also discussed. The research data to validate the effectiveness and positive impact of cultural competence are still in its early stages. However, a small number of community education resources have been available for working with the Arab community. From the data in annual reviews on the Arab Council Australia gambling counselling service, it was identified that cultural beliefs and expectations influence risk-taking decisions, identification of gambling issues, and preference of help seeking within the client’s social network. Further, culturally-specific sensitive issues related to political and global security events, which in turn influenced openness and

  17. The need for scientists and judges to work together: regarding a new European network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosuosso Amedeo

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Is it always true to say that science is, by definition, universal whilst laws and the courts which apply them are a classic state and national expression? Yes and no. In recent years a new scenario has opened all over the world. Courts intervene more and more in disputes on matters related to scientific procedures in the biological field. In doing so the courts' decisions are affected by scientific issues and ways of reasoning and, on the other hand, affect the scientific field and its way of reasoning. While the old matter of bioethics was still alive and while judges were improving their skill in dealing with hard matters, like refusal of medical treatments, abortion, euthanasia et cetera, a new challenge appeared on the horizon, the challenge of biological sciences, and especially of the most troubled field of human genetics. A completely new awareness is developing among judges that they belong to an international judiciary community, as informal as it is real. Such a community is, even at an embryonic stage, sufficiently universal to be able to come together with the international scientific community. The authors maintain we are in urgent need for new interaction between judges and scientists and of new international means in the light of such cooperation. Judges and jurists need to become better acquainted with scientific questions and learn to exchange ideas with scientists. They also need to set themselves against the latters' conceptual systems and be willing to put their own up for discussion. A European Network for Life Sciences, Health and the Courts is taking its first steps, and judges and scientists are working side by side to tackle the new challenges. The provisional headquarters are located at the University of Pavia (I, Laboratorio di Biologia dello Sviluppo and Collegio Ghislieri (e-mail:. enlsc@unipv.it. ENLSC activity is inspired by the following idea: to be against science is as much antiscientific as to be

  18. The need for scientists and judges to work together: regarding a new European network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosuosso, Amedeo; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Is it always true to say that science is, by definition, universal whilst laws and the courts which apply them are a classic state and national expression? Yes and no. In recent years a new scenario has opened all over the world. Courts intervene more and more in disputes on matters related to scientific procedures in the biological field. In doing so the courts' decisions are affected by scientific issues and ways of reasoning and, on the other hand, affect the scientific field and its way of reasoning. While the old matter of bioethics was still alive and while judges were improving their skill in dealing with hard matters, like refusal of medical treatments, abortion, euthanasia et cetera, a new challenge appeared on the horizon, the challenge of biological sciences, and especially of the most troubled field of human genetics. A completely new awareness is developing among judges that they belong to an international judiciary community, as informal as it is real. Such a community is, even at an embryonic stage, sufficiently universal to be able to come together with the international scientific community. The authors maintain we are in urgent need for new interaction between judges and scientists and of new international means in the light of such cooperation. Judges and jurists need to become better acquainted with scientific questions and learn to exchange ideas with scientists. They also need to set themselves against the latters' conceptual systems and be willing to put their own up for discussion. A European Network for Life Sciences, Health and the Courts is taking its first steps, and judges and scientists are working side by side to tackle the new challenges. The provisional headquarters are located at the University of Pavia (I), Laboratorio di Biologia dello Sviluppo and Collegio Ghislieri (e-mail:. enlsc@unipv.it). ENLSC activity is inspired by the following idea: to be against science is as much antiscientific as to be acritically pro-science. PMID

  19. The need for scientists and judges to work together: regarding a new European network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosuosso, Amedeo; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2003-07-01

    Is it always true to say that science is, by definition, universal whilst laws and the courts which apply them are a classic state and national expression? Yes and no. In recent years a new scenario has opened all over the world. Courts intervene more and more in disputes on matters related to scientific procedures in the biological field. In doing so the courts' decisions are affected by scientific issues and ways of reasoning and, on the other hand, affect the scientific field and its way of reasoning. While the old matter of bioethics was still alive and while judges were improving their skill in dealing with hard matters, like refusal of medical treatments, abortion, euthanasia et cetera, a new challenge appeared on the horizon, the challenge of biological sciences, and especially of the most troubled field of human genetics. A completely new awareness is developing among judges that they belong to an international judiciary community, as informal as it is real. Such a community is, even at an embryonic stage, sufficiently universal to be able to come together with the international scientific community. The authors maintain we are in urgent need for new interaction between judges and scientists and of new international means in the light of such cooperation. Judges and jurists need to become better acquainted with scientific questions and learn to exchange ideas with scientists. They also need to set themselves against the latters' conceptual systems and be willing to put their own up for discussion. A European Network for Life Sciences, Health and the Courts is taking its first steps, and judges and scientists are working side by side to tackle the new challenges. The provisional headquarters are located at the University of Pavia (I), Laboratorio di Biologia dello Sviluppo and Collegio Ghislieri (e-mail: enlsc@unipv.it). ENLSC activity is inspired by the following idea: to be against science is as much antiscientific as to be acritically pro-science.

  20. Diversity in Action conference | Council Chamber | 30 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers, by Dr Pippa Wells (CERN) and Dr Claartje Vinkenburg (VU University Amsterdam).   Wednesday, 30 September 1.30 p.m. - 3.00 p.m. Council Chamber To register, please click here. Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful career as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes.  Dr Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks...

  1. Has the impact of the working time regulations changed neurosurgical trainees' attitudes towards the European working time directive 5 years on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Christopher J A; Pešić-Smith, Jonathan D; Boukas, Alexandros; Nelson, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a survey of the British Neurosurgical Trainees' Association which aimed to assess current rota patterns and their compliance with the government's working time regulations. The survey questioned whether trainees felt that shift working, imposed as a result of the European working time directive, is continuing to impact on patient care and training opportunities in neurosurgery. The responses to this survey indicate that neurosurgical trainees remain concerned with the impact that the current working time regulations have on all facets of their work: training, work- life balance, and the provision of patient care. The survey comments show that the majority would support a change in legislation to allow greater flexibility in the working time regulations.

  2. Report on the behalf of the economy, sustainable development and land planning commission of the European resolution proposition by Mr Ladislas Poniatowski on the directive proposition by the European Parliament and Council related to energy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poniatowski, L.

    2011-01-01

    In its first part, this report outlines the interest of the directive proposition as energy efficiency and energy savings must be a priority for the European energy policy, that important energy saving fields are still to be explored, and that this directive is an ambitious and multi-sector oriented arrangement. The second part deals with the resolution proposition (the version proposed by M. Poniatowski and that of the commission). These propositions present the general objectives, comment the rules concerning public bodies, discuss obligation mechanisms regarding energy savings, discuss the issue of energy counting and billing, and the development of cogeneration and networks. The discussion of the commission is reported

  3. Working together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-01

    The film summarizes international cooperation in advancing peaceful applications of atomic energy. It describes: U.S. shipments abroad of radioisotopes; formation of the European Council for Nuclear Research; former president Dwight D. Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' announcement to the UN; first International Conference at the University of Michigan; first shipment abroad by AEC Libraries; UN General Assembly debate on the international agency; the Joint Norwegian-Dutch Atomic Energy Laboratory; atomic energy work of India, Brazil and others; U.S. training of foreign scientists; U.S. agreements with other nations; Geneva 1955 International Conference; approval and signing of the Charter of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  4. Working together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1958-12-31

    The film summarizes international cooperation in advancing peaceful applications of atomic energy. It describes: U.S. shipments abroad of radioisotopes; formation of the European Council for Nuclear Research; former president Dwight D. Eisenhower`s `Atoms for Peace` announcement to the UN; first International Conference at the University of Michigan; first shipment abroad by AEC Libraries; UN General Assembly debate on the international agency; the Joint Norwegian-Dutch Atomic Energy Laboratory; atomic energy work of India, Brazil and others; U.S. training of foreign scientists; U.S. agreements with other nations; Geneva 1955 International Conference; approval and signing of the Charter of the International Atomic Energy Agency

  5. Public health council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The internal matters of the council are reported followed by reports from the individual committees. These include committees of radiation hygiene, food irradiation, the disposal of radioactive waste and the classification of isotope laboratories, guide-lines for radiation protection in hospitals and clinics, isotope laboratories, legal liability for radiation accidents, nuclear heart stimulators, computer tomography, supplementary advice about nuclear energy, combustion furnace for radioactive waste, and experiments with radioactive materials on testees. Each report describes the setting up of the committee, the members, its function with a short description of the work completed in 1977. (Auth.)

  6. Nurses' shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Simon, Michael; Ball, Jane; Lindqvist, Rikard; Rafferty, Anne-Marie; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Tishelman, Carol; Aiken, Linda H

    2014-11-01

    Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. To describe shift patterns of European nurses and investigate whether shift length and working beyond contracted hours (overtime) is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. Cross-sectional survey of 31,627 registered nurses in general medical/surgical units within 488 hospitals across 12 European countries. A total of 50% of nurses worked shifts of ≤ 8 hours, but 15% worked ≥ 12 hours. Typical shift length varied between countries and within some countries. Nurses working for ≥ 12 hours were more likely to report poor or failing patient safety [odds ratio (OR)=1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-1.76], poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.30; 95% CI, 1.10-1.53), and more care activities left undone (RR=1.13; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16). Working overtime was also associated with reports of poor or failing patient safety (OR=1.67; 95% CI, 1.51-1.86), poor/fair quality of care (OR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.23-1.42), and more care left undone (RR=1.29; 95% CI, 1.27-1.31). European registered nurses working shifts of ≥ 12 hours and those working overtime report lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to mitigate staffing shortages or increase flexibility may also incur additional risk to quality.

  7. Full- and part-time work: gender and welfare-type differences in European working conditions, job satisfaction, health status, and psychosocial issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoll, Xavier; Cortès, Imma; Artazcoz, Lucía

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the differences between full- and part-time employment (FTE and PTE) in terms of working conditions, on the one hand, and job satisfaction, health status, and work-related psychosocial problems according to gender and welfare state regime, on the other hand, and to analyze the role of working conditions in the association between PTE and FTE. This cross-sectional study was based on a sample of 7921 men and 8220 women from the European Working Conditions Survey aged 16-64 years, who were employed part-time (5-19 or 20-30 hours per week) or full-time (31-40 hours/week). Multiple logistic regression models were fitted separately for each gender and welfare state regime. PTE is associated with poorer working conditions than FTE for all national welfare types. Among women, only those in southern European countries experienced low job satisfaction [odds ratio after adjustment (OR adj) for sociodemographic variables, OR adj1.73, and 1.66, for those working 20-30 and 5-19 hours/week, respectively; reference group: FTE workers], but this association disappeared after further adjustment for working conditions. Low job satisfaction and poorer health status was more common among PTE men from continental (low job satisfaction, OR adj1.80 and 3.61, for 20-30 and 5-19 working hours/week, respectively), and southern European (OR adj, 2.98, for 5-19 working hours/week) countries. PTE tended to be associated with fewer psychosocial problems among women, but with more psychosocial problems among men in continental Europe and those those engaged in "mini-jobs" in southern European welfare regimes. The association between FTE and PTE and job satisfaction, health status, and psychosocial problems is partly driven by working conditions and differs between gender and welfare regime. This highlights the importance of promoting effective measures to ensure equal treatment between FTE and PTE workers and the role of the social norms that form part of

  8. European ways to combat psychosocial risks related to work organisation : towards organisational interventions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Morvan, E.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Vaas, F.; Wiezer, N.

    2004-01-01

    From 24-26 November 2004, the 6h Annual Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology ‘Healthy, Efficient & Productive Organisations’ was held in Oporto, Portugal. During this conference, the Workshop ‘Organisational interventions to combat psychosocial factors of stress’ was

  9. 75 FR 67688 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Council's) Ad Hoc Groundfish Essential Fish Habitat Review Committee... groundfish Essential Fish Habitat (EFH). DATES: The work session will be held Monday, December 20, 2010 from...

  10. 76 FR 43987 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) ad hoc groundfish Essential Fish Habitat Review... of groundfish Essential Fish Habitat (EFH). DATES: The work session will be held Thursday, October 6...

  11. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-01-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF)

  12. Is part-time work a good or bad opportunity for people with disabilities? A European analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Ricardo

    2007-12-30

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the incidence of part-time employment among people with disabilities within a European context. Particular attention is paid to the type of part-time employment (voluntary vs. involuntary) and the levels of job satisfaction that people with disabilities report. Using data from the European Community Household Panel for the period 1995-2001, we estimate part-time rates, preferences and levels of job satisfaction for people with and without disabilities for 13 European countries. The results show that a higher number of people with disabilities work part-time, compared to non-disabled workers. This is mainly due to disabled part-time workers having a much higher preference for part-time working than people without disability. This finding is corroborated when we analyse the levels of job satisfaction for disabled part-time workers. Part-time employment becomes a relevant instrument for policy makers and employers to improve the social inclusion, income and labour conditions of the people with disabilities because it allows these people to achieve a much better balance between their personal and health needs and working life.

  13. APA Council Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    At the fall component meetings of the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Va., September 13-16, 2017, the APA councils heard reports from their components. Following are summaries of the activities of the councils and their components.

  14. Play the European card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, O.

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Otto Majewski, Chief Executive Officer of the Bayernwerk AG utility, in his capacity as Chairman of the European Nuclear Council pointed out at ENC 98 in Nice that national energy policies constituted a major danger to the use of nuclear power. At the same time, he indicated ways and means by which to evade that danger. The decisions taken in Sweden and in the Federal Republic of Germany to opt out of the use of nuclear power show that national energy policies can seriously jeopardize the use of nuclear power. Bayernwerk CEO Dr. Majewski urged nuclear power plant operators to counteract these tendencies by playing the European card. Nuclear power anyway was a classical topic of European cooperation which, in the past, had resulted in higher safety standards and in the development of the EPR. It should also be attempted, by working on European institutions, to strengthen the use of nuclear power, even on a national level. He invoked economic arguments against nuclear opponents, especially the preservation of competitiveness by means of lower electricity prices, and arguments of climate protection. (orig.) [de

  15. Do we really want nine Chernobyl accidents every year for the next ten years? European Council Directive 96/29/Euratom the so-called 'basic standards directive' on radiation protection. Low level radiation campaign briefing June 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This Directive was adopted by the European Council of Ministers in 1996. All member states are required to transpose it into domestic law by May 2000. In the UK the transposition is taking place in two parts, revision of the Ionising Radiation Regulations - consultation on this closed a year ago; revision of the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 - consultation closes on 25th June 1999 A further round of consultation is promised for the autumn. The Department of Environment, Transport, and the Regions (DETR) is the lead department. The Directive covers all aspects of ionising radiation. Most of it is uncontentious, but hidden within the text are deregulatory provisions which threaten to allow a flood of contaminated materials into landfill and incinerators, and even into consumer goods. Radioactivity is under regulation inside licensed sites, where radiation doses are mostly to workers who are monitored and are compensated for detrimental effects by the social and financial benefits of having employment. This is in line with the ICRP 'Justification' principle to which all authorities pay lip service. Waste is recycled reused incinerated, and dumped, steadily increasing the general level of man-made radioactivity in the environment, and exposing the unwitting public whose doses are not monitored, whose health detriment is written off as trivial, and who obtain no social or economic benefit to offset the exposure. Contrary to official assumptions about radioactive discharges in the environment, distribution does not become uniform. Many nuclides reconcentrate through a variety of as yet poorly described physical and biological mechanisms, thus exposing the population unequally. Hot particles remain a permanent source of high local doses to tissue following ingestion and/or inhalation

  16. Protection from psychosocial risks at work under the European Convention on Human Rights: is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychenko, Elena

    2016-09-01

    This paper argues the possibility of establishing common principles of protection from psychosocial risks (PSR) on the basis of the legal positions of the European Court of Human Rights (the Court) expressed in recent cases on degrading treatment and occupational health. The author focuses on the positive obligations of the States to ensure the protection of the right for life and of the right to respect for private life. The prohibition of degrading treatment in relations between private persons is also considered as relevant to the issue of the protection from PSR. Analyzing the Court's case law (judgments of the Court) we substantiate the possibility of claiming protection from PSR under the European Convention on Human Rights, namely, articles 2, 3 and 6, 8.

  17. Project work Is the Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome really the Cradle of European Civilization?

    OpenAIRE

    Hvastija, Darka; Kos, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the project for 15-year-old students with the title Ancient Greece and Rome and the sub-title Is the Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome really the Cradle of European Civilization? is introduced. It shows how to connect mathematics with art, history, physics, geography and philosophy by studying ancient Greek scientists and their achievements. Collaborative teaching is introduced. The major aim of the project was to show mathematics as a part of human civilization and to follow...

  18. The Lisbon Treaty and the role of the European Parliament in the European Atomic Energy Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, the European Council commissioned an intergovernmental conference to draft a 'treaty of reform' of the European Union. The wording of the treaty was signed by the heads of state and government of the member countries on December 13, 2007. The ongoing process of ratification in the 27 EU member countries is to be completed before the next elections to the European Parliament in June 2009. The treaty is now referred to as 'Lisbon Treaty'. The Lisbon Treaty (Treaty Amending the Treaty about the European Union and the Treaty Establishing the European Community) does not replace the European Treaties currently in force, but merely amends them. Also the 'Treaty Establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)' is amended in this way. On the basis of the contributions about 'The German Presidency Program of the Council Working Group on Nuclear Issues - an Interim Report' (W. Sandtner and S. Thomas) and 'Euratom Treaty and Intergovernmental Conference' (S. Thomas), current links to the Euratom Treaty with potential amendments are presented and commented upon. (orig.)

  19. Promoting and Protecting Public Health: How the European Union Pharmacovigilance System Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Aniello; Genov, Georgy; Spooner, Almath; Raine, June; Arlett, Peter

    2017-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the European Union pharmacovigilance system resulting from the rationalisation and strengthening delivered through the implementation of the revised pharmacovigilance legislation. It outlines the system aims, underlying principles, components and drivers for future change. At its core, the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee is responsible for assessing all aspects of the risk management of medicinal products, thus ensuring that medicines approved for the European Union market are optimally used by maximising their benefits and minimising risks. The main objectives of the system are to promote and protect public health by supporting the availability of medicines including those that fulfil previously unmet medical needs, and reducing the burden of adverse drug reactions. These are achieved through a proactive, risk proportionate and patient-centred approach, with high levels of transparency and engagement of civil society. In the European Union, pharmacovigilance is now fully integrated into the life cycle of medicinal products, with the planning of pharmacovigilance activities commencing before a medicine is placed on the market, and companies encouraged to start planning very early in development for high-innovation products. After authorisation, information on the safety of medicines continues to be obtained through a variety of sources, including spontaneous reports of adverse drug reactions or monitoring real-world data. Finally, the measurement of the impact of pharmacovigilance activities, auditing and inspections, as well as capacity building ensure that the system undergoes continuous improvement and can always rely on the best methodologies to safeguard public health.

  20. The impact of the European Working Time Regulations on Ophthalmic Specialist Training--a national trainee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gallagher, M K; Lewis, G; Mercieca, K; Moutray, T

    2013-01-01

    To assess ophthalmic trainees' perspective of the impact of the European Working Time Regulations (EWTR) on their training. All trainees in ophthalmology in the UK were emailed a link to an electronic survey asking about their experiences of the EWTR. 324 trainees (46% of those invited) responded to the survey. 44.4% of trainees reported that their posts were compliant with the EWTR. 40.7% felt that training had been adversely affected. 49.1% thought that ophthalmic trainees should opt out of the EWTR to work more than 48 h per week, with 57 the mean number of hours suggested appropriate. Many ophthalmic trainees in the United Kingdom are working in rotas which are not compliant with the European Working Time Directive. Many trainees feel that implementation of the EWTD has had a negative effect on training and feel it would be acceptable to work a higher number of hours per week. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of rheumatoid arthritis-related morning stiffness on productivity at work: results from a survey in 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Kalle; Buttgereit, Frank; Tuominen, Risto

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of morning stiffness on productivity at work and to estimate the work-related economic consequences of morning stiffness among patients with RA-related morning stiffness in 11 European countries. The original sample comprised 1061 RA patients from 11 European countries (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden and UK). They had been diagnosed with RA and experience morning stiffness three or more times per week. Data were collected by interviews. Women comprised 77.9 % of the sample, the average age was 50.4 years, and 84.3 % had RA diagnosed for more than 2 years. Overall costs of RA-related morning stiffness was calculated to be 27,712€ per patient per year, varying from 4965€ in Spain to 66,706€ in Norway. On average, 96 % of the overall production losses were attributed to early retirement, with a markedly lower level (77 %) in Italy than in other countries (p productivity losses due to late work arrivals and working while sick showed considerable variation across the countries represented in the study. Overall, the average annual cost of late arrivals (0.8 % of the total costs) was approximately half of the costs attributed to sick leave (1.7 %) and working while sick (1.5 %). Morning stiffness due to RA causes significant production losses and is a significant cost burden throughout Europe. There seem to be notable differences in the impact of morning stiffness on productivity between European countries.

  2. Advocating vaccination of adults aged 60 years and older in Western Europe: statement by the Joint Vaccine Working Group of the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society and the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-European Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Johnson, Robert W; Lambert, Paul Henri; Maggi, Stefania; Moulias, Robert; Nicholson, Karl; Werner, Hans

    2009-04-01

    Vaccines are an underused public health strategy for healthy aging. Considering the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases and the current low vaccine coverage rates in older European citizens, the two European geriatric and gerontological societies (European Union Geriatric Medicine Society [EUGMS] and International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics-European Region [IAGG-ER]) convened a Joint Vaccine Working Group to develop a consensus document advocating routine vaccination of aging populations. The mandate of this Working Group was to improve the uptake of routine vaccinations in adults aged 60 years and over. The consensus statement underlines the need to establish, strengthen, and harmonize European policies that continue routine vaccinations to adulthood and that will include older populations. Improved vaccination rates will promote healthy aging by reducing the burden of vaccine-preventable infectious diseases in older populations, a population that is rapidly increasing in Europe.

  3. Social Policies and Families in Stress: Gender and Educational Differences in Work-Family Conflict from a European Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notten, Natascha; Grunow, Daniela; Verbakel, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    In modern welfare states, family policies may resolve the tension between employment and care-focused demands. However these policies sometimes have adverse consequences for distinct social groups. This study examined gender and educational differences in working parents' perceived work-family conflict and used a comparative approach to test whether family policies, in particular support for child care and leave from paid work, are capable of reducing work-family conflict as well as the gender and educational gaps in work-family conflict. We use data from the European Social Survey 2010 for 20 countries and 5296 respondents (parents), extended with information on national policies for maternity and parental leave and child care support from the OECD Family Database. Employing multilevel analysis, we find that mothers and the higher educated report most work-family conflict. Policies supporting child care reduce the level of experienced work-family conflict; family leave policy appears to have no alleviating impact on working parents' work-family conflict. Our findings indicate that family policies appear to be unable to reduce the gender gap in conflict perception and even widen the educational gap in work-family conflict.

  4. [European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunyadi-Anticević, Silvija; Colak, Zeljko; Funtak, Ines Lojna; Lukić, Anita; Filipović-Grcić, Boris; Tomljanović, Branka; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Protić, Alen; Pandak, Tatjana; Poljaković, Zdravka; Canadija, Marino

    2011-01-01

    All rescuers trained or not, should provide chest compressions to victims of cardiac arrest. The aim should be to push to a depth of at least 5 cm at a rate of at least 100 compressions per minute, to allow full chest recoil, and to minimise interruptions in chest compressions. Trained rescuers should also provide ventilations with a compression-ventilation ratio of 30:2. ELECTRICAL THERAPIES: Much greater emphasis on minimising the duration of the pre-shock and post-shock pauses; the continuation of compressions during charging of the defibrillator is recommended. Further development of AED programmes is encouraged. ADULT ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT: Increased emphasis on high-quality chest compressions throughout any ALS intervention paused briefly only to enable specific interventions. Removal of the recommendation for a pre-specified period of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before out-of-hospital defibrillation following cardiac arrest unwitnessed by the EMS. The role of precordial thump is de-emphasized. Delivery of drugs via a tracheal tube is no longer recommended, drugs should be given by the intraosseous (IO) route. Atropine is no longer recommended for routine use in asystole or pulseless electrical activity. Reduced emphasis on early tracheal intubation unless achieved by highly skilled individuals with minimal interruptions in chest compressions. Increased emphasis on the use of capnography. Recognition of potential harm caused by hyperoxaemia. Revision of the recommendation of glucose control. Use of therapeutic hypothermia to include comatose survivors of cardiac arrest associated initially with shockable rhythms, as well as non-shockable rhythms, with a lower level of evidence acknowledged for the latter. INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES: The term non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-acute coronary syndrome (non-STEMI-ACS) has been introduced for both NSTEMI and unstable angina pectoris. Primary PCI (PPCI) is the preferred reperfusion strategy provided it is performed in a timely manner by an experienced team. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided, as well as routine use of intravenous beta-blockers; oxygen is to be given only to those patients with hypoxaemia, breathlessness or pulmonary congestion. PAEDIATRIC LIFE SUPPORT: The decision to begin resuscitation must be taken in less than 10 seconds. Lay rescuers should be taught to use a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 ventilations, rescuers with a duty to respond should learn and use a 15:2 ratio; however, they can use the 30:2 compression-ventilation ratio if they are alone. Ventilation remains a very important component of resuscitation in asphyxial arrest. The emphasis is on achieving quality compressions with the rate of at least 100 but not greater than 120 per minute, with minimal interruptions. AEDs are safe and successful when used in children older than 1 year. A single shock strategy using a non-escalating dose of 4 J/kg is recommended for defibrillation in children. Cuffed tubes can be used safely in infants and young children. Monitoring exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2), ideally by capnography, is recommended during resuscitation. RESUSCITATION OF BABIES AT BIRTH: For uncompromised babies, a delay in cord clamping of at least one minute from the complete delivery is now recommended. For term infants, air should be used fro resuscitation at birth. For preterm babies less than 32 weeks gestation blended oxygen and air should be given judiciously and its use guided by pulse oximetry. Preterm babies of less than 28 weeks gestation should be completely covered in a plastic wrap up to their necks, without drying, immediately after birth. The recommended compression: ventilation ratio remains at 3:1 for newborn resuscitation. Attempts to aspirate meconium from the nose and mouth of the unborn baby, while the head is still on the perineum, are not recommended. If adrenaline is given the n the intravenous route is recommended using a dose of 10-30 microg/kg. Newly born infants born at term or near-term with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be treated with therapeutic hypothermia. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION IN RESUSCITATION: The aim is to ensure that learners acquire and retain skill and knowledge that will enable them to act correctly in actual cardiac arrest and improve patient outcome. Short video/computer self-instruction courses, with minimal or no instructor coaching, combined with hands-on practice can be considered as an effective alternative to instructor-led basic life support (BLS and AED) courses. Ideally all citizens should be trained in standard CPR that includes compressions and ventilations. Basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills deteriorate in as little as three to six months. CPR prompt or feedback devices improve CPR skill acquisition and retention.

  5. Meeting of the ITER Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A meeting of the ITER Council took place in Toronto, Canada, on 27-28 February 2001 (Canada participates in the ITER EDA as an associate of the EU Party). The delegations to the Council were led by Dr. U. Finzi, Principal Advisor in charge of Fusion R and D in the Directorate-General for Research of the European Commission, Mr. T. Sugawa, Deputy Director-General of the Research and Development Bureau of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology of Japan, and Academician E. Velikhov, President of the RRC ''Kurchatov Institute''. The European delegation was joined by Canadian experts including a representative from the Canadian Department of Natural Resources. The Council heard presentations from Dr. H. Kishimoto on the successful completion of the Explorations concerning future joint implementation of ITER, and from Dr. J.-P. Rager on the ITER International Industry Liaison Meeting held in Toronto in November 2000. Having noted statements of Parties' status, in particular concerning the readiness to start negotiations and the progress toward site offers, the Council encouraged the Parties to pursue preparations toward future implementation of ITER along the general lines proposed in the Explorers' final report. The Council also noted the readiness the of the RF and EU Parties to instruct specified current JCT members to remain at their places of assignment after the end of the EDA, in preparation for a transition to the Co-ordinated Technical Activities foreseen as support to ITER negotiations. The Council was pleased to hear that meetings with the Director of the ITER Parties' Designated Safety Representatives had started, and commended the progress toward achieving timely licensing processes with a good common understanding. The Council noted with appreciation the Director's view that no difficulties of principle in the licensing approach had been identified during the informal discussions with the regulatory representatives and

  6. European Economic Policies at Work : the costs of Price Stability and Budget Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Altavilla

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates whether the policy framework adopted by the EMU participating countries might create recessive tendencies. First, we check the existence of a deflationary bias by separately analysing monetary and fiscal policy. The analysis of monetary policy focuses on a backward- and a forward-looking monetary rule. The reaction functions are estimated to capture the criteria that a centralized monetary authority should use in setting short-term interest rate. Second, a comparative analysis is made of the ability of different central banks to stabilize output and inflation. Precisely, we compare the strategy followed by the European Central Bank, the Deutsche Bundesbank and the US Federal Reserve. Then, a measure of fiscal bias is retrieved by estimating the impact that a change in the primary surplus to GDP ratio has on the real economy. Finally, we search for a quantitative assessment of the recessive propensity of the European economic policies by estimating an overall policy bias. The results suggest the EU institutional set-up might create and/or amplify the recessive tendencies. The policy constraints the EMU members face were dreamt when the Community was struggling with an inflationary legacy. The danger nowadays is not inflation but rather its opposite, deflation. As a consequence, the EU institutions need to be at least partially reformed

  7. The EIROforum Collaboration Agreement with the European Union

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Collaboration between CERN and the European Union has extended over many years, and the European Commission were granted Observer Status in the CERN Council in 1985 already. In 1994, an Administrative Arrangement was signed between CERN's Director-General, Professor C.H. Llewellyn Smith, and the Commissioner of the European Communities, Professor Antonio Ruberti, "to promote co-operation between the Commission of the European Communities and CERN in research and technological development". (See Annex I). In 2000, the EIROforum was set up composed of the Directors-General of the seven organisations - CERN, EFDA, EMBL, ESA, ESO, ESRF and ILL - whom now meet regularly twice per year. More information is available at the Web site www.eiroforum.org. On 27 October 2003, the EIROforum members signed a joint "Statement of Intent" with the European Commission, represented by Commissioner Philippe Busquin, confirming their common commitment to developing the European Research Area. The goal is to work together to estab...

  8. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics. Policy Statement No. 7.1: The roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist including the criteria for the staffing levels in a Medical Physics Department approved by EFOMP Council on 5th February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephen; Christofides, Stelios; Brambilla, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 2, 4 and 7. It presents guidelines for the roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist together with recommended minimum staffing levels. These recommendations take into account the ever-increasing demands for competence, patient safety, specialisation and cost effectiveness of modern healthcare services, the requirements of the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down the basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation, the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report No. 174: "Guidelines on medical physics expert", as well as the relevant publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The provided recommendations on minimum staffing levels are in very good agreement with those provided by both the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Addressing unmet needs in understanding asthma mechanisms: From the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership (EARIP) Work Package (WP)2 collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Michael R.; Saglani, Sejal; Schwarze, Jurgen; Skevaki, Chrysanthi; Smith, Jaclyn A.; Ainsworth, Ben; Almond, Mark; Andreakos, Evangelos; Belvisi, Maria G.; Chung, Kian Fan; Cookson, William; Cullinan, Paul; Hawrylowicz, Catherine; Lommatzsch, Marek; Jackson, David; Lutter, Rene; Marsland, Benjamin; Moffatt, Miriam; Thomas, Mike; Virchow, J. Christian; Xanthou, Georgina; Edwards, Jessica; Walker, Samantha; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous, complex disease with clinical phenotypes that incorporate persistent symptoms and acute exacerbations. It affects many millions of Europeans throughout their education and working lives and puts a heavy cost on European productivity. There is a wide spectrum of disease

  10. European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well.

  11. 75 FR 177 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice Number 6844] Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Executive Committee... 12 p.m. The Overseas Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in...

  12. 77 FR 75695 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8130] Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Executive Committee Meeting on.... The Overseas Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in improving...

  13. 77 FR 32168 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7904] Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Annual Meeting on Thursday, June 21... Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in improving those American...

  14. 76 FR 78079 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7712] Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Executive Committee Meeting on.... The Overseas Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in improving...

  15. 78 FR 77195 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8564] Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Executive Committee Meeting on.... The Overseas Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in improving...

  16. 78 FR 33465 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8346] Overseas Schools Advisory Council; Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Annual Meeting on Thursday, June 27... Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in improving those American...

  17. 75 FR 80566 - Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice Number 7171] Overseas Schools Advisory Council Notice of Meeting The Overseas Schools Advisory Council, Department of State, will hold its Executive Committee... 12 p.m. The Overseas Schools Advisory Council works closely with the U.S. business community in...

  18. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive in an NHS trust: impact on patient care and junior doctor welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Hugh F; Winfield, Sarah; Te, Hui Sen; Crook, David

    2010-04-01

    To comply with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD), from 1 August 2009, junior doctors are required to work no more than 48 hours per week. In accordance with this, East Sussex Hospitals Trust introduced changes to working practice in August 2007. To assess the impact upon patient care and junior doctor welfare a retrospective observational survey comparing data from the year prior to and the year following August 2007 was conducted. No impact on the standard of patient care, as measured by length of stay, death during admission or readmission was found. However, there was a notable increase in episodes of sick leave among junior doctors. Implementation of the EWTD may maintain standards of patient care but may be detrimental to the welfare of doctors in training.

  19. National sex work policy and HIV prevalence among sex workers: an ecological regression analysis of 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Aaron; Steele, Sarah; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin; Amato-Gauci, Andrew; Semenza, Jan C

    2017-03-01

    Sex workers are disproportionately affected by HIV compared with the general population. Most studies of HIV risk among sex workers have focused on individual-level risk factors, with few studies assessing potential structural determinants of HIV risk. In this Article, we examine whether criminal laws around sex work are associated with HIV prevalence among female sex workers. We estimate cross-sectional, ecological regression models with data from 27 European countries on HIV prevalence among sex workers from the European Centre for Disease Control; sex-work legislation from the US State Department's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices and country-specific legal documents; the rule of law and gross-domestic product per capita, adjusted for purchasing power, from the World Bank; and the prevalence of injecting drug use among sex workers. Although data from two countries include male sex workers, the numbers are so small that the findings here essentially pertain to prevalence in female sex workers. Countries that have legalised some aspects of sex work (n=17) have significantly lower HIV prevalence among sex workers than countries that criminalise all aspects of sex work (n=10; β=-2·09, 95% CI -0·80 to -3·37; p=0·003), even after controlling for the level of economic development (β=-1·86; p=0·038) and the proportion of sex workers who are injecting drug users (-1·93; p=0·026). We found that the relation between sex work policy and HIV among sex workers might be partly moderated by the effectiveness and fairness of enforcement, suggesting legalisation of some aspects of sex work could reduce HIV among sex workers to the greatest extent in countries where enforcement is fair and effective. Our findings suggest that the legalisation of some aspects of sex work might help reduce HIV prevalence in this high-risk group, particularly in countries where the judiciary is effective and fair. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Copyright

  20. The European vocation of the Romanian Atomic Forum. Participation to the FORATOM working groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor

    2004-01-01

    ROMATOM, the Romanian Atomic Forum, participates in the activity of the following FORATOM working groups: Quality Management, Business Excellence, Accession Task Force, Radioactive Waste Management, Civil Liability and Law Aspects, Climatic Changes. Recently, Romania was invited to attend the working groups for Research and Development and Community Waste Management

  1. Scenarios for the implementation of daytime running lights in the European Union : study in the framework of a European Commission project, Work Package 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F. Mathijssen, M.P.M. Elvik, R. Janssen, W. & Kallberg, V.-P.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the last part of the documentation of a project funded by the European Commission, designed to assess the effects of Daytime Running Lights (DRL) and possible strategies for implementing the use of DRL in the European Union (EU). The general objective of the present report is to

  2. Decomposition of useful work intensity: The EU (European Union)-15 countries from 1960 to 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrenho, André Cabrera; Sousa, Tânia; Warr, Benjamin; Ayres, Robert U.; Domingos, Tiago

    2014-01-01

    Energy intensity measures, defined as the ratio of energy use to gross domestic product of a country, are widely used to study the productivity of energy use in an economy. Unlike conventional primary and/or final energy intensities, useful work intensity (useful work/gross domestic product) addresses the problem of aggregating in a single measure the different energy forms used, and allows for a clear distinction between thermodynamic efficiencies and structural changes in the demand for energy end-uses. Here, our aim is twofold: (1) Disclose the factors that control the useful work intensities across the EU-15 countries over the deindustrialization process, performing a decomposition of the useful work intensities from 1960 to 2009. (2) Describe a methodology for the automatization of useful work accounting, based on a general mapping of energy end-uses from IEA (International Energy Agency) energy balances. We show that, in contrast to the other conventional energy intensity measures, useful work intensity depends only on the intensity of high temperature heat uses and the relative size of residential energy needs. Aggregate thermodynamic efficiencies slightly increased as a consequence of technological improvements, but were negatively affected by deindustrialization, as a consequence of a transition to less efficient and productive energy uses. - Highlights: • We provide an automated useful work accounting methodology from IEA energy balances. • We provide an estimation of 2nd law efficiencies for EU-15 countries since 1960. • This methodology is applied to EU-15 from 1960 to 2009. • Useful work intensity depends only on high temperature heat and residential uses. • Thermodynamic 2nd law efficiencies were negatively affected by deindustrialization

  3. Overview of European Community (Activity 3) work on materials properties of fast reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.S.

    The Fast Reactor Coordinating Committee set up in 1974 the Working Group Codes and Standards, and organized its work into four main activities: Manufacturing standards, Structural analysis, Materials and Classification of components. The main purpose of materials activity is to compare and contrast existing national specifications and associated properties relevant to structural materials in fast reactors. Funds are available on a yearly basis for tasks to be carried out through Study Contracts. At present about four Study Contract Reports are prepared each year

  4. Policy making, Comitology and the Balance of power in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, Bernard; Steunenberg, B.; Koboldt, Christian; Schmidtchen, Dieter

    1996-01-01

    Using simple game theory, this paper analyzes the working properties of the different procedures laid down in the comitology decision, i.e., the European Council's decision on procedures for the exercise of implementing powers conferred on the Commission. Furthermore, it addresses the question of

  5. Assignment of personnel to work in Switzerland by companies from the European Union / EFTA(1)

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2011-01-01

    Before performing any services at CERN, companies not established in Switzerland are required under the Swiss legislation in force to make a declaration to the Swiss Federal Office for Migration or to obtain work permits from the Geneva authorities for the employees they intend to assign to work on the Swiss part of the CERN Site. At the request of the Swiss authorities, CERN cannot register employees to whom this legislation applies except in the following circumstances: Case No. 1: Work lasting less than 90 days in the case of companies from the EU-25/EFTA; Case No. 2: Work lasting less than 90 days in the case of EU-2 companies (Bulgaria and Romania); Case No. 3: Work lasting more than 90 days in the case of companies from the EU-27/EFTA. In case No. 1, an attestation d’annonce (declaration certificate) must be obtained. The declaration must be made via the Internet, using the official declaration form, at least 8 days before the start of the services. It is required only if the company pe...

  6. Assignment of personnel to work in Switzerland by companies from the European Union / EFTA(1)

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2011-01-01

      *** Obsolete information ***     Before performing any services at CERN, companies not established in Switzerland are required under the Swiss legislation in force to make a declaration to the Swiss Federal Office for Migration or to obtain work permits from the Geneva authorities for the employees they intend to assign to work on the Swiss part of the CERN Site. At the request of the Swiss authorities, CERN cannot register employees to whom this legislation applies except in the following circumstances: Case No. 1: Work lasting less than 90 days in the case of companies from the EU-25/EFTA; Case No. 2: Work lasting less than 90 days in the case of EU-2 companies (Bulgaria and Romania); Case No. 3: Work lasting more than 90 days in the case of companies from the EU-27/EFTA. In case No. 1, an attestation d’annonce (declaration certificate) must be obtained. The declaration must be made via the Internet, using the official declaration form, at le...

  7. The impact of social work environment, teamwork characteristics, burnout, and personal factors upon intent to leave among European nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estryn-Béhar, Madeleine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Ogińska, Halszka; Camerino, Donatella; Le Nézet, Olivier; Conway, Paul Maurice; Fry, Clementine; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin

    2007-10-01

    Europe's nursing shortage calls for more effective ways to recruit and retain nurses. This contribution aims to clarify whether and how social work environment, teamwork characteristics, burnout, and personal factors are associated with nurses' intent to leave (ITL). Our sample comprises 28,561 hospital-based nurses from 10 European countries. Different occupational levels have been taken into account: qualified registered nurses (n = 18,594), specialized nurses (n = 3957), head nurses (n = 3256), and nursing aides and ancillary staff (n = 2754). Our outcomes indicate that ITL is quite prevalent across Europe, although we have found some differences across the countries depending on working conditions and economic situation. Quality of teamwork, interpersonal relationships, career development possibilities, uncertainty regarding treatment, and influence at work are associated with nurses' decision to leave the profession across Europe, notwithstanding some country-specific outcomes. A serious lack of quality of teamwork seems to be associated with a 5-fold risk of ITL in 7 countries. As far as personal factors are concerned, our data support the hypothesized importance of work-family conflicts, satisfaction with pay, and burnout. A high burnout score seems to be associated with 3 times the risk of ITL in 5 countries. To prevent premature leaving, it is important to expand nurses' expertise, to improve working processes through collaboration and multidisciplinary teamwork, and to develop team training approaches and ward design facilitating teamwork.

  8. The contribution of the Volcano Observations Work Package to the implementation of the European Plate Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    The overall aim of the implementation phase of European Plate Observing System (EPOS) is to make the integrated platform operational in order to guarantee seamless access to the data provided by the European Solid Earth communities. The Volcano Observations Work Package (WP11) contributes to this objective by implementing a Thematic Core Service (TCS) which is planned to give access to the data and services provided by the European Volcano Observatories (VO) and some Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.). Both types are considered as national research infrastructures (RI) which the TCS will integrate. Currently, monitoring networks on European volcanoes consist of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), as well as various prototypal monitoring systems (e.g. Doppler radars, ground based SAR). Across Europe several laboratories provide sample characterization (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), quasi-continuous analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing facilities. All these RIs provide high-quality information (observations) on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. The implementation of the Volcano Observations TCS will address technical as well as managerial issues, both considering the current heterogeneous state-of-the-art of the volcanological research infrastructures in Europe. Indeed, the current arrangement of individual VO and VRI is considered too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort in the framework of the EPOS

  9. Paving the Way to the Future? Education and Young Europeans' Paths to Work and Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses young people's transitions from school to work at a time when educational systems have become more closely connected to the economy than ever before. The serious situation of high unemployment, unstable employment conditions and poverty among young people and young adults in Europe is highlighted. Using Sweden as an…

  10. Dimensional comparability of psychosocial working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formazin, M.; Burr, H.; Aagestad, C.; Tynes, T.; Thorsen, S.V.; Perkio-Makela, M.; Díaz Aramburu, C.I.; Pinilla García, F.J.; Galiana Blanco, L.; Vermeylen, G.; Parent-Thirion, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background.In most countries in the EU, national surveys are used to monitor working conditions and health. Since the development processes behind the various surveys are not necessarily theoretical, but certainly practical and political, the extent of similarity among the dimensions covered in

  11. Formulating European work and employment regulation during the pre-crisis years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Mikkel; Arnholtz, Jens

    2015-01-01

    of Social Europe is only seen in a minority of the eight cases of EU-level work and employment regulation analysed. It is argued that two mechanisms can help explain this weaker than expected impact: successful resistance from pro-regulation actors and a certain form of organizational inertia linked...

  12. Policy-level interventions and work-related psychosocial risk management in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leka, S.; Jain, A.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Cox, T.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a substantial degree of diversity across strategies to prevent and manage work- related psychosocial risks and their associated health effects. Whereas it is common to distinguish between organizational and individual interventions, the important level of policy- level interventions has

  13. Regulations, policies and practices concerning work stress in five European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kompier, M.; Gier, E. de; Smulders, P.; Draaisma, D.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative inventory of regulations, policies and practices in The Netherlands, Sweden, UK, Germany and France with regard to the prevention of work stress was carried out. In each country data were collected by means of interviews with key informants and through exploring relevant documents and

  14. A European multicenter study on systematic ethics work in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Georg; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Gjengedal, Eva; Schmidt, Gerda; May, Arnd T; Heller, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    There are many existing ethical challenges in nursing homes. Although different methods and approaches to discussing the ethical challenges have been established, systematic ethics work is not yet a standard in all nursing homes. The aim of the present study was to explore ethical challenges and approaches to implementing systematic ethics work in nursing homes. Data from five institutions in Austria, Germany and Norway were collected, and a mixed-methods two-tiered study approach was chosen. Documentation of ethics discussions was combined with qualitative focus group interviews with staff members regarding the implementation of systematic ethics work in nursing homes. One hundred and five ethics meetings were documented. The main topics were advance care planning, ethical challenges associated with artificial nutrition, hospitalisation and end-of-life decision-making. Of the meetings, 33% focused mainly on everyday ethical challenges. In 76% of prospective case discussions, agreements about a solution were reached; however, in 29% of these no residents or relatives participated. The advantages of systematic ethics work described by the staff were enhanced openness and dialogue, overall, and a greater ethical awareness. Many voiced a need for structure and support from the administration. Systematic ethics work is greatly appreciated by the staff and helps to reach a consensus in the majority of case discussions. It should be implemented in all nursing homes. Attention to everyday ethical challenges is important. The participation of relatives and physicians could be improved. The participation of the residents' in ethics discussions should be encouraged to strengthen their autonomy and dignity. © 2016 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. ITER council proceedings: 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Records of the 10. ITER Council Meeting (IC-10), held on 26-27 July 1996, in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the 11. ITER Council Meeting (IC-11) held on 17-18 December 1996, in Tokyo, Japan, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the cost review and safety analysis. Figs, tabs

  16. Strategic transformation of population studies: recommendations of the working group on epidemiology and population sciences from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council and Board of External Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Véronique L; Boerwinkle, Eric; Crapo, James D; Douglas, Pamela S; Epstein, Jonathan A; Granger, Christopher B; Greenland, Philip; Kohane, Isaac; Psaty, Bruce M

    2015-03-15

    In 2013, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute assembled a working group on epidemiology and population sciences from its Advisory Council and Board of External Experts. The working group was charged with making recommendations to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council about how the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute could take advantage of new scientific opportunities and delineate future directions for the epidemiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases. Seven actionable recommendations were proposed for consideration. The themes included 1) defining the compelling scientific questions and challenges in population sciences and epidemiology of heart, lung, blood, and sleep diseases; 2) developing methods and training mechanisms to integrate "big data" science into the practice of epidemiology; 3) creating a cohort consortium and inventory of major studies to optimize the efficient use of data and specimens; and 4) fostering a more open, competitive approach to evaluating large-scale longitudinal epidemiology and population studies. By building on the track record of success of the heart, lung, blood, and sleep cohorts to leverage new data science opportunities and encourage broad research and training partnerships, these recommendations lay a strong foundation for the transformation of heart, lung, blood, and sleep epidemiology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. ITER council proceedings: 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    At the signing of the ITER EDA Agreement on July, 1992, each of the Parties presented to the Director General the names of their designated members of the ITER Council. Upon receiving those names, the Director General stated that the ITER Engineering Design Activities were ''ready to begin''. The next step in this process was the convening of the first meeting of the ITER Council. The first meeting of the Council, held in Vienna, was opened by Director General Hans Blix. The second meeting was held in Moscow, the formal seat of the Council. This volume presents records of these first two Council meetings and, together with the previous volumes on the text of the Agreement and Protocol 1 and the preparations for their signing respectively, represents essential information on the evolution of the ITER EDA

  18. Work relating to defect assessment undertaken by activity group 2 of the European Commission's working group on codes and standards. WGCS overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, C.H.A.; Guinovart, J.

    1995-01-01

    For about twenty years, the Working Group on Codes and Standards has been an Advisory Group of the European Commission and three sub-groups AG1, AG2 and AG3, were formed to consider manufacture and inspection, structural mechanics and materials topics respectively. Representation on the Working Group and its sub-groups comes from designers, utilities and atomic energy agencies in those member States with active nuclear power programmes. There has also been a very valuable input from universities and research organisations in the countries concerned. The method of working is to identify topics on which there is a difference of opinion; projects are set up to review the up to date scientific and technological knowledge. The investigations are undertaken collaboratively by specialists from as many countries as can contribute and there is an obligation to reach conclusions which can be put to practical use by engineers. While the Working group and its sub-groups are not directly involved in the production of standards, there is a very important input to the pre-standardization process. The work produced by AG2 covered a wide range of subjects associated with structural integrity, mainly concerning the Fast Breeder Reactors. Since 1991 the Group has progressively set up Light Water Reactor programmes. Currently, most of efforts are devoted to Thermal Reactors with a minor extent to Fast Breeder Reactors. The present paper is mainly concerned with those aspects of the AG2 activities which have a bearing on defect assessment. Although work was initiated as part of the FBR programme, it must be remembered that the greater part of it can be extended to a wide range of high temperature plants. Concerning the LWR programmes, an overview on current selected studies is being provided in this paper. (authors). 23 refs

  19. Commuting--a further stress factor for working people: evidence from the European Community. II. An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G; Pickup, L; Di Martino, V

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the main results of research promoted by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions, concerning the impact of commuting on the health and safety of workers. An empirical study, carried out among 1167 industrial Italian workers, shows that "commuters" (workers whose journey from home to work usually does not take less than 45 min in each direction) experienced a more stressed life-style than did "non commuters" (whose journey does not take more than 20 min). Commuting appears for many workers to be a necessity which is imposed by external factors, such as the housing market and job opportunities. Commuting is shown to interfere with patterns of everyday life by restricting free-time and reducing sleeping time. A majority of commuters use public transport mainly because of cost. Public transport commuters have problems due to more changes between modes, idle waiting times and delays leading to late arrival at work. Inside transport modes, commuters suffered discomfort as a result of overcrowding, microclimatic conditions, noise and vibrations. Commuters also reported higher psychological stress scores, more health complaints, essentially of psychosomatic nature, and greater absenteeism from work due to sickness. Commuting, in addition to shiftwork, further increases sleep problems, psychosomatic complaints and difficulties with family and social life. Women commuters were at a greater disadvantage than men, having more family difficulties, more travelling complaints and higher absenteeism.

  20. UK doctors’ views on the implementation of the European Working Time Directive as applied to medical practice: a qualitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel T; Pitcher, Alex; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To report on what doctors at very different levels of seniority wrote, in their own words, about their concerns about the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and its implementation in the National Health Service (NHS). Design All medical school graduates from 1993, 2005 and 2009 were surveyed by post and email in 2010. Setting The UK. Methods Using qualitative methods, we analysed free-text responses made in 2010, towards the end of the first year of full EWTD implementation, of three cohorts of the UK medical graduates (graduates of 1993, 2005 and 2009), surveyed as part of the UK Medical Careers Research Group's schedule of multipurpose longitudinal surveys of doctors. Results Of 2459 respondents who gave free-text comments, 279 (11%) made unprompted reference to the EWTD; 270 of the 279 comments were broadly critical. Key themes to emerge included frequent dissociation between rotas and actual hours worked, adverse effects on training opportunities and quality, concerns about patient safety, lowering of morale and job satisfaction, and attempts reportedly made in some hospitals to persuade junior doctors to collude in the inaccurate reporting of compliance. Conclusions Further work is needed to determine whether problems perceived with the EWTD, when they occur, are attributable to the EWTD itself, and shortened working hours, or to the way that it has been implemented in some hospitals. PMID:24503304

  1. UK doctors' views on the implementation of the European Working Time Directive as applied to medical practice: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Rachel T; Pitcher, Alex; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-02-06

    To report on what doctors at very different levels of seniority wrote, in their own words, about their concerns about the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and its implementation in the National Health Service (NHS). All medical school graduates from 1993, 2005 and 2009 were surveyed by post and email in 2010. The UK. Using qualitative methods, we analysed free-text responses made in 2010, towards the end of the first year of full EWTD implementation, of three cohorts of the UK medical graduates (graduates of 1993, 2005 and 2009), surveyed as part of the UK Medical Careers Research Group's schedule of multipurpose longitudinal surveys of doctors. Of 2459 respondents who gave free-text comments, 279 (11%) made unprompted reference to the EWTD; 270 of the 279 comments were broadly critical. Key themes to emerge included frequent dissociation between rotas and actual hours worked, adverse effects on training opportunities and quality, concerns about patient safety, lowering of morale and job satisfaction, and attempts reportedly made in some hospitals to persuade junior doctors to collude in the inaccurate reporting of compliance. Further work is needed to determine whether problems perceived with the EWTD, when they occur, are attributable to the EWTD itself, and shortened working hours, or to the way that it has been implemented in some hospitals.

  2. Weekly working hours for Norwegian hospital doctors since 1994 with special attention to postgraduate training, work–home balance and the European Working Time Directive: a panel study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Judith; Aasland, Olaf G

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors from 1994 to 2012 with special emphasis on the quality of postgraduate training and work–home balance, and in relation to the requirements of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD). Design Panel study based on postal questionnaires. Setting Norway. Participants Unbalanced cohort of 1300–1600 doctors in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2012. Outcome measures Self-reported total weekly working hours and whether 45 weekly working hours are too short, sufficient, or too long to meet the quality requirements of obligatory postgraduate training for junior doctors. Results From 1994 to 2012, the number of weekly working hours was stable for senior (46–47 h) and junior (45–46 h) hospital doctors. In 2012, significantly more senior (27–35%) than junior (11–20%) doctors reported suboptimal work–home balance, defined as working more than 48 h a week. The majority perceived the present situation with an average of 45 h per week for juniors as sufficient for obligatory postgraduate specialist training, but doctors of higher age (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.08), senior doctors (1.07, 1.04 to 1.11) and doctors working in surgical specialties (OR 1 vs laboratory medicine 0.03, 0.01 to 0.25, internal medicine 0.31, 0.17 to 0.58, psychiatry 0.12, 0.04 to 0.36, paediatrics 0.36, 0.12 to 1.07, anaesthesiology 0.08, 0.02 to 0.39, gynaecology 0.07, 0.01 to 0.56 and others 0.39, 0.04 to 3.56) were more likely to want the work-week to be longer. Conclusions The weekly working hours of Norwegian hospital doctors were always below the EWTD requirements. A significant growth of hospital doctor density over the past two decades, national regulations and cultural values might be important factors. Specialty differences in perception of sufficient training time may call for more flexibility in working time regulations. PMID:25311038

  3. Quality assurance in European pharmacy education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Morais JA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of quality assurance (QA systems in European faculties of pharmacy was carried out under the auspices of the European Association of Faculties of Pharmacy PHARMINE consortium. A questionnaire based on the quality criteria of the International Pharmaceutical Federation and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (USA was sent out to European faculties. Replies were obtained from 28 countries. Just above half has a working QA system. QA scores were high concerning matters such as complete curriculum and training, use of European Credit Transfer System, students’ representation and promotion of professional behavior. QA scores were low concerning matters such as evaluation of achievement of mission and goals, and financial resources. The PHARMINE consortium now has a basis upon which to elaborate and promote QA in European pharmacy faculties.

  4. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Nuevo, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD]) study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. Methods RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK). All subjects (aged ≥18 years) who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit). From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism) and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD). Results Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%); 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week) and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week), with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from €55/week per employed patient in the UK to €273/patient in Sweden). Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. Conclusion GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily

  5. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatlebakk Jan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD] study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. Methods RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK. All subjects (aged ≥18 years who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit. From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD. Results Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%; 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week, with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from €55/week per employed patient in the UK to €273/patient in Sweden. Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. Conclusion GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and

  6. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Nuevo, Javier

    2009-10-16

    The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD]) study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK). All subjects (aged >or=18 years) who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit). From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism) and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD). Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%); 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week) and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week), with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from euro55/week per employed patient in the UK to euro273/patient in Sweden). Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily life. The resulting costs to the

  7. Implementation and translation: from European standards and guidelines for quality assurance to education quality work in higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerheijden, Donald F.; Kohoutek, Jan; Eggins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area (ESG for short) have been part of the regulative infrastructure of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) since 2005 (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education, 2009).

  8. Training for the future NHS: training junior doctors in the United Kingdom within the 48-hour European working time directive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shreelatta T; Davies, Sally J

    2014-01-01

    Since August 2009, the National Health Service of the United Kingdom has faced the challenge of delivering training for junior doctors within a 48-hour working week, as stipulated by the European Working Time Directive and legislated in the UK by the Working Time Regulations 1998. Since that time, widespread concern has been expressed about the impact of restricted duty hours on the quality of postgraduate medical training in the UK, particularly in the "craft" specialties--that is, those disciplines in which trainees develop practical skills that are best learned through direct experience with patients. At the same time, specialist training in the UK has experienced considerable change since 2007 with the introduction of competency-based specialty curricula, workplace-based assessment, and the annual review of competency progression. The challenges presented by the reduction of duty hours include increased pressure on doctors-in-training to provide service during evening and overnight hours, reduced interaction with supervisors, and reduced opportunities for learning. This paper explores these challenges and proposes potential responses with respect to the reorganization of training and service provision.

  9. ITER council proceedings: 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Continuing the ITER EDA, two further ITER Council Meetings were held since the publication of ITER EDA documentation series no, 20, namely the ITER Council Meeting on 27-28 February 2001 in Toronto, and the ITER Council Meeting on 18-19 July in Vienna. That Meeting was the last one during the ITER EDA. This volume contains records of these Meetings, including: Records of decisions; List of attendees; ITER EDA status report; ITER EDA technical activities report; MAC report and advice; Final report of ITER EDA; and Press release

  10. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  11. European Utility Requirements: European nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komsi, M.; Patrakka, E.

    1997-01-01

    The work procedure and the content of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) concerning the future LWRs is described in the article. European Utility Requirements, produced by utilities in a number of European countries, is a document specifying the details relating to engineered safety, operating performance, reliability and economics of the reactors to be built by manufacturers for the European market

  12. Medicare Appeals Council Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Decisions of the Departmental Appeals Board's Medicare Appeals Council involving claims for entitlement to Medicare and individual claims for Medicare coverage and...

  13. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  14. Selective Europeanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoch Jovanovic, Tamara; Lynggaard, Kennet

    2014-01-01

    and rules. The article examines the reasons for both resistance and selectiveness to Europeanization of the Danish minority policy through a “path dependency” perspective accentuating decision makers’ reluctance to deviate from existing institutional commitments, even in subsequently significantly altered...... political contexts at the European level. We further show how the “translation” of international norms to a domestic context has worked to reinforce the original institutional setup, dating back to the mid-1950s. The translation of European-level minority policy developed in the 1990s and 2000s works most...

  15. Effect of the full implementation of the European Working Time Directive on operative training in adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Sharples, Linda; Codispoti, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Surgical specialties rely on practice and apprenticeship to acquire technical skills. In 2009, the final reduction in working hours to 48 per week, in accordance with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD), has also led to an expansion in the number of trainees. We examined the effect of these changes on operative training in a single high-volume [>1500 procedures/year] adult cardiac surgical center. Setting: A single high-volume [>1500 procedures/year] adult cardiac surgical center. Design: Consecutive data were prospectively collected into a database and retrospectively analyzed. Procedures and Main Outcome Measures: Between January 2006 and August 2010, 6688 consecutive adult cardiac surgical procedures were analyzed. The proportion of cases offered for surgical training were compared for 2 non-overlapping consecutive time periods: 4504 procedures were performed before the final implementation of the EWTD (Phase 1: January 2006-December 2008) and 2184 procedures after the final implementation of the EWTD (Phase 2: January 2009-August 2010). Other predictors of training considered in the analysis were grade of trainee, logistic European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE), type of surgical procedure, weekend or late procedure, and consultant. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of training cases (procedure performed by trainee) and to evaluate the effect of the EWTD on operative surgical training after correcting for confounding factors. Proportion of training cases rose from 34.6% (1558/4504) during Phase 1 to 43.6% (953/2184) in Phase 2 (p hours [153 (3.4) during Phase 1 vs 116 (5.3) during Phase 2, p hours' procedures, and surgery other than coronary artery bypass grafts. Implementation of the final phase of EWTD has not decreased training in a high-volume center. The positive adjustment of trainers' attitudes and efforts to match trainees' needs allow maintenance of adequate training, despite reduction in

  16. ITER council proceedings: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Records of the 8. ITER Council Meeting (IC-8), held on 26-27 July 1995, in San Diego, USA, and the 9. ITER Council Meeting (IC-9) held on 12-13 December 1995, in Garching, Germany, are presented, giving essential information on the evolution of the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) and the ITER Interim Design Report Package and Relevant Documents. Figs, tabs

  17. ITER council proceedings: 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains documents of the 13th and the 14th ITER council meeting as well as of the 1st extraordinary ITER council meeting. Documents of the ITER meetings held in Vienna and Yokohama during 1998 are also included. The contents include an outline of the ITER objectives, the ITER parameters and design overview as well as operating scenarios and plasma performance. Furthermore, design features, safety and environmental characteristics are given

  18. Training and the European Working Time Directive: a 7 year review of paediatric anaesthetic trainee caseload data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, E; Williams, D G

    2009-10-01

    The implementation of the European Working Time Directive (WTD) has reduced the hours worked by trainees in the UK to a maximum of 56 h per week. With a further and final reduction to 48 h per week scheduled for August 2009, there is concern amongst doctors about the impact on training and on patient care. Paediatric anaesthesia is one of the specialist areas of anaesthesia for which the Royal College of Anaesthetists (RCoA) recommends a minimum caseload during the period of advanced training. We conducted a retrospective analysis of theatre logbook data from 62 Specialist Registrars (SpRs) who had completed a 12 month period of advanced training in paediatric anaesthesia in our institution between 2000 and 2007. After the implementation of the WTD 56 h week in 2004, the mean total number of cases performed by SpRs per year decreased from 441 to 336, a 24% reduction. We found a statistically significant reduction across all age groups with the largest reduction in the under 1 month of age group. The post-WTD group did not meet the RCoA recommended total minimum caseload or the minimum number of cases of <1 yr of age. Since the implementation of the WTD, there has been a significant reduction in the number of cases performed by SpRs in paediatric anaesthesia and they are no longer achieving the RCoA recommended minimum numbers for advanced training.

  19. European Music Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  20. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Today concludes a very busy week for Council. As you’ll have seen from the press release this morning, Council elected a new President, who will take up his mandate on 1 January along with the new management team, which was also approved by Council yesterday.   You’ll find full details of the incoming Director-General’s management team and structures here. Completing the configuration for the immediate future, Council also approved the medium term plan, along with the budget for 2016. In other Council business, two complete applications for Associate Membership were discussed. Following an earlier letter, India’s complete application was received and considered by Council. Consequently, a fact-finding mission has been established to report back before the end of the year. A new application was also received from Azerbaijan, with a fact-finding mission to be established. India’s involvement with CERN goes back to the 1970s, and the country...

  1. UK doctors' views on the implementation of the European Working Time Directive as applied to medical practice: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Jenny J; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-02-06

    To report on doctors' views, from all specialty backgrounds, about the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and its impact on the National Health Service (NHS), senior doctors and junior doctors. All medical school graduates from 1999 to 2000 were surveyed by post and email in 2012. The UK. Among other questions, in a multipurpose survey on medical careers and career intentions, doctors were asked to respond to three statements about the EWTD on a five-point scale (from strongly agree to strongly disagree): 'The implementation of the EWTD has benefited the NHS', 'The implementation of the EWTD has benefited senior doctors' and 'The implementation of the EWTD has benefited junior doctors'. The response rate was 54.4% overall (4486/8252), 55.8% (2256/4042) of the 1999 cohort and 53% (2230/4210) of the 2000 cohort. 54.1% (2427) of all respondents were women. Only 12% (498/4136 doctors) agreed that the EWTD has benefited the NHS, 9% (377) that it has benefited senior doctors and 31% (1289) that it has benefited junior doctors. Doctors' views on EWTD differed significantly by specialty groups: 'craft' specialties such as surgery, requiring extensive experience in performing operations, were particularly critical. These cohorts have experience of working in the NHS before and after the implementation of EWTD. Their lack of support for the EWTD 4 years after its implementation should be a concern. However, it is unclear whether problems rest with the current ceiling on hours worked or with the ways in which EWTD has been implemented.

  2. Controlling Delegated Powers in the Post-Lisbon European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsma, Gijs Jan; Blom-Hansen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Most European Union rules are made by the Commission, not the Council of Ministers or the European Parliament. But although the Commission is an important rule-maker, it is not autonomous. The member states have always taken care to install committees to control the Commission (comitology). However......, the Lisbon Treaty introduced alternative control mechanisms (delegated acts) and a reform of the comitology system (implementing acts). This article investigates how the post-Lisbon control system works in daily legislative practice. It represents the first investigation of the institutional preferences...... of the Council, the Parliament and the Commission in the new system. Further, it utilizes better data than previous studies. The analysis is based on data on the control preferences of all actors before the first trilogue meeting for a large number of cases in the period 2010–13. The results indicate...

  3. Approaches to Working with Children, Young People and Families for Traveller, Irish Traveller, Gypsy, Roma and Show People Communities. Annotated Bibliography for the Children's Workforce Development Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark; Martin, Kerry; Wilkin, Carol

    2008-01-01

    This annoted bibliography relays a range of issues and approaches to working with Travellers, Irish Travellers, Gypsies, Roma and Show People. This is an accompanying document to the literature review report, ED501860.

  4. A report from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The June meeting of Council is always a very busy one, having approval of the next year’s budget and the MTP as fixed agenda points. This year in addition, we had discussions on enlargement, as well as on the pension fund. I’d like to use this message to bring you up to date on all of those matters.   I’ll begin with the good news that the 2015 budget and MTP were recommended for approval by Finance Committee on Wednesday, and approved by Council on Thursday. This is extremely good news, and a solid vote of confidence from Council in the current economic situation. Coupled with that, I am pleased to report that at the half way stage of 2014, some 89% of budget contributions for the year have been received. Turning now to enlargement, I can inform you that the task force that went to Pakistan came back with a positive report, and as a consequence Council has authorised us to finalise discussion with Pakistan for Associate Membership. Council also authoris...

  5. Democratic Citizenship: European referents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María PUIG GUTIÉRREZ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Let’s sense beforehand in this article a tour concerning the educational European policies that favors the development of a democratic citizenship. The aim that we chase is to understand the way in which nowadays it is being interpreted and stimulated the Citizenship education from European Union. for it we offer a conceptual delimiting of «Citizenship education» and later, we show an analysis of the principal documents and materials elaborated principally by the Council of Europe that mark the way followed by European Union as for education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC.

  6. The work of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Food Additives (EURL) and its support for the authorisation process of feed additives in the European Union: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; de la Huebra, María José González; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods. PMID:26540604

  7. European Master in Innovation in Nuclear Energy (EMINE). Developed in the frame work of the European Institut of Innovation and Technology, KIC InnoEnergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrié, E.; Carreira, M.; Gudowski, W.; Garrido, F.; Reynier, B.; Dies, J.; Batet, Ll.; Otic, I.; Patte, C.; Darrigues, I.; Fernandez-Olano, P.; Leon, P.T.; Coste-Leconte, S.; Fanjas, Y.; Henriksson, H.

    2014-01-01

    KIC InnoEnergy SE is a European company fostering the integration of education, technology, business and entrepreneurship and strengthening the culture of innovation. The strategic objective is to become the leading engine of innovation in the field of sustainable energy. It has been designated as a one of the first three Knowledge and Innovation Communities by the EIT's Governing Board on 16 December 2009 in Budapest. KIC InnoEnergy addresses sustainable energy as its priority area. KIC InnoEnergy is a world class alliance of top European players with a proven track record. The Consortium consists of 30+ shareholders and additional 50+ partners - companies, research institutes, universities and business schools covering the whole energy mix. They are organised around six regional units, the Co-Location Centres (CC): France, Benelux, Germany, Iberia, Poland Plus and Sweden. On completion of the EMINE programme, a Master of Science degree will be awarded from the universities where studies were performed during year one and year two, i.e. a double-degree. A diploma from KIC InnoEnergy related to innovation and entrepreneurship will also be presented

  8. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Case study: Teaching European Active Citizenship (TEACh)-course, EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Bernt Sorensen, Tore

    2007-01-01

    Learning for democratic citizenship has been the object of several projects supported by the European Commission, under the Socrates / Grundtvig 1.1. Action. Nonetheless only very few had the specific aim of exploring the relations between learning for democratic citizenship and non-formal adult...... for different professionals in education. Thirdly, the course is to be considered on the edge of non-formal and formal learning activities, as it is organized accordingly to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). Participants are awarded 3 ECTS points to be spent in a variety of learning and working...... contexts. Fourthly, the course has a point of reference in the political debate on active and democratic citizenship at European level. In particular, the course makes use of the conceptualization of competences for active and democratic citizenship developed by the European Union and the Council of Europe...

  10. The European energy community is now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoura, Sami; Buzek, Jerzy; Delors, Jacques; Vitorino, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    On the eve of the European Council on 22 May dealing with energy issues, the Jacques Delors Institute publishes a Tribune calling for the implementation of a positive agenda for the European energy policy and the definition of the concrete bases of a genuine European Energy

  11. ITER council proceedings: 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This volume of the ITER EDA Documentation Series presents records of the 12th ITER Council Meeting, IC-12, which took place on 23-24 July, 1997 in Tampere, Finland. The Council received from the Parties (EU, Japan, Russia, US) positive responses on the Detailed Design Report. The Parties stated their willingness to contribute to fulfil their obligations in contributing to the ITER EDA. The summary discussions among the Parties led to the consensus that in July 1998 the ITER activities should proceed for additional three years with a general intent to enable an efficient start of possible, future ITER construction

  12. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée

    2016-01-01

    Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Labor......Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry...... and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  13. The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory progress report for 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Swedish Research Councils' Laboratory herewith presents its progress report for 1975. The report summarizes the current projects carried out by the research groups working at the laboratory. The very efficient assistance of the staff of the laboratory is greatfully acknowledged. The laboratory has been financially supported by the Atomic Research Council, the Medical Research Council, the Natural Science Research Council, and the Board of Technical Development. Valuable support in various ways has also been given by the Atomic Energy Company (AB Atomenergi). (author)

  14. Statewide Suicide Prevention Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Statewide Suicide Prevention Council DHSS State of Alaska Home Divisions and Agencies National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Alaska Community Mental Health Centers National Survivors of Suicide Meetings Presentations 2010 Alaska Statewide Suicide Prevention Summit: Mending the Net Connect with us on

  15. International fusion research council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belozerov, A.N.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of the International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) is given and the minutes of the 1976 meeting in Garching are summarized. At the Garching meeting, the IFRC evaluated the quality of papers presented at recent IAEA conferences on plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear research, and made recommendations on the organization and timing of future meetings on nuclear fusion

  16. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  17. Council Membership Directory 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the purposes, goals, functions, membership, board of directors, calendar of events, publications, and names and addresses of the officers or executive committees of 19 national organizations serving the deaf. Organizations included are the Council of Organizations Serving the Deaf, Alexander Graham Bell Association for…

  18. Councils of Urgent Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellarius, Richard A.; Platt, John

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the role of national or international coordinating councils in focusing research on solutions of major human problems. Presents a taxonomy of 25 areas under the major heading: Physical Technology and Engineering; Biotechnology; Behavior and Personal Relations; National Social Structures; World Structure; and Channels of Effectiveness.…

  19. Report from Council

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This week’s Council meeting was dominated by discussions about the long-term, sustainable future of CERN. Key points are progress on the Medium-Term Plan, the successful LHC restart, and enlargement.   The budget proposed by management for 2016 was well received, as were the measures to mitigate against the recent change in exchange rates. These items will be put to the vote in September. Discussions on CERN staff employment conditions were conducted in a constructive atmosphere this week, and will continue in future Council meetings. The Council also clearly voiced its congratulations for the smooth and successful start of LHC run 2, coming on top of a clear run of spectacular scientific and technological successes over recent years. In the current climate of austerity, these developments are a strong endorsement from the Council. Nevertheless, it would be disingenuous of me to pretend that everything is rosy. There has been an air of unease at CERN over recent months, which was v...

  20. Addressing unmet needs in understanding asthma mechanisms: From the European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership (EARIP) Work Package (WP)2 collaborators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael R; Saglani, Sejal; Schwarze, Jurgen; Skevaki, Chrysanthi; Smith, Jaclyn A; Ainsworth, Ben; Almond, Mark; Andreakos, Evangelos; Belvisi, Maria G; Chung, Kian Fan; Cookson, William; Cullinan, Paul; Hawrylowicz, Catherine; Lommatzsch, Marek; Jackson, David; Lutter, Rene; Marsland, Benjamin; Moffatt, Miriam; Thomas, Mike; Virchow, J Christian; Xanthou, Georgina; Edwards, Jessica; Walker, Samantha; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous, complex disease with clinical phenotypes that incorporate persistent symptoms and acute exacerbations. It affects many millions of Europeans throughout their education and working lives and puts a heavy cost on European productivity. There is a wide spectrum of disease severity and control. Therapeutic advances have been slow despite greater understanding of basic mechanisms and the lack of satisfactory preventative and disease modifying management for asthma constitutes a significant unmet clinical need. Preventing, treating and ultimately curing asthma requires co-ordinated research and innovation across Europe. The European Asthma Research and Innovation Partnership (EARIP) is an FP7-funded programme which has taken a co-ordinated and integrated approach to analysing the future of asthma research and development. This report aims to identify the mechanistic areas in which investment is required to bring about significant improvements in asthma outcomes. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  1. European hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The European Hadron Facility (EHF) is a project for particle and nuclear physics in the 1990s which would consist of a fast cycling high intensity proton synchrotron of about 30 GeV primary energy and providing a varied spectrum of intense high quality secondary beams (polarized protons, pions, muons, kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos). The physics case of this project has been studied over the last two years by a European group of particle and nuclear physicists (EHF Study Group), whilst the conceptual design for the accelerator complex was worked out (and is still being worked on) by an international group of machine experts (EHF Design Study Group). Both aspects have been discussed in recent years in a series of working parties, topical seminars, and workshops held in Freiburg, Trieste, Heidelberg, Karlsruhe, Les Rasses and Villigen. This long series of meetings culminated in the International Conference on a European Hadron Facility held in Mainz from 10-14 March

  2. 77 FR 2275 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... candidate's proven experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing... participating in Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal...

  3. 76 FR 33244 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY... experience in promoting, developing and marketing programs in support of manufacturing industries, in job... Council meetings and events are responsible for their travel, living and other personal expenses. Meetings...

  4. Working conditions survey and trainees situation: new approach to auditing the situation of European trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Martins, Nuno; Pärgmäe, Pille; Werner, Henrica M J

    2009-12-01

    (1) To review the training and working conditions for trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) in Europe. (2) To suggest further improvements in working conditions for trainees in Ob/Gyn. It is an observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study. The sample is constituted of the answers from the representatives of 25 European Network of Trainees in Ob/Gyn (ENTOG) member countries to a survey designed by ENTOG's executive. The current survey is based on the former ENTOG working conditions survey published in 1997, but has been extended to include questions that have become important recently, and to include new countries that have entered the European Union (EU) since that time. The total number of trainees represented in this study is 6056. The male/female ratio is 35/65. The average number of official working hours is 51.6 h weekly, but varies widely. The average number of duties/month is five, but varies widely from two to nine. Fewer than 50% of countries have a hospital visitation system implemented. Training abroad is possible in most training systems. Compared with the 1997 survey further harmonisation is taking place. Steps towards harmonisation are being made. Hospital visitation systems should be further introduced. Not all countries have remunerated training posts. Assessment should become more homogeneous. Compliance with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) is a big challenge.

  5. How to Enforce European Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the well known saga of the European Court of Justice’s introduction of direct effect of Council directives on basis of new comprehensive archival research. The expansion of the doctrine of direct effect to include directives was part of a drive of the Legal Service of the Eu......This article explores the well known saga of the European Court of Justice’s introduction of direct effect of Council directives on basis of new comprehensive archival research. The expansion of the doctrine of direct effect to include directives was part of a drive of the Legal Service...... of the European Commission and the ECJ to strengthen the enforcement of European law. This threatened the deeper balance of competences between the European Community and its member states and consequently led to a sharp response from the national parliaments and courts. The force of these responses and the deep...

  6. Council of Presidents: A Multifaceted Idea for 4-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torretta, Alayne

    2015-01-01

    Communication between 4-H professionals and the youth they work with is an important part of a successful 4-H program. By creating a Council of Presidents comprised of officers of all the clubs in your county, you can increase communication while assuring your program addresses all four essential elements. The Council is also as a vehicle for…

  7. Science councils in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available for Scien- tific and Industrial Research (CSIR), the Medical Research Council, Agricultural Research Council, Human Sciences Research Council, Council for Geosciences, Mintek, and the Nuclear Energy Corporation of SA. Legally, it includes the National... with social or commercial impact is long and uncer- tain, and becomes more and more expen- sive the closer the development gets to implementation. It is hard for a single organization to span this entire contin- uum effectively—it requires ‘interfacial...

  8. The theoretical and practical principles of determining doses and carrying out dosimetric audit programmes in radiotherapy units in Poland (adjustment to the European Union Council Directive 97/43 EURATOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulski, W.

    2011-01-01

    This project was aimed at developing research and organizational programmes to implement in Poland the Council Directive 97143 EURATOM in the field of dosimetric audits. The project included two types of research in detail: (1) the preparation of precise and reproducible standards of radiation doses, or, in other words, the investigation, development and determination of exact and effective principles of the standardization of ionization chambers used in carrying out dosimetric audit programmes, (2) the investigation of TL detectors used in audits, with the aim of obtaining the best possible measurement accuracy as well as analysis of available results of audits under reference conditions, and the development and implementation of audits for non-reference conditions, including computer-assisted treatment planning systems (TPS) indispensable in present-day radiotherapy practices. (author)

  9. Community Bioethics: The Health Decisions Community Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tom; Mrgudic, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Sees health care decision making posing variety of complex issues for individuals, families, and providers. Describes Health Decisions Community Council (HDCC), community-based bioethics committee established to offer noninstitutional forum for discussion of health care dilemmas. Notes that social work skills and values for autonomy and…

  10. Doctrinal controversies and ecumenical councils | Ogbonnaya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work focused on the doctrinal controversies that have confronted the Church in the course of its development and the accompanying councils that sought to resolve these theological controversies. The paper did this historically, by showing the origin of the problems, the factors and features involved in the controversies ...

  11. The Council Presidency and legislative leadership: The case of occupational health and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warntjen, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Many international institutions feature a leadership office to organize its decision-making process. In the case of the Council of the European Union, the rotating Council Presidency exercises the role of a process manager and enjoys proposal power. This function might allow the Presidency to steer

  12. 75 FR 19661 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... includes the following topics: --Review European Space Agency-NASA Coordination on Planetary Protection... Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC...

  13. The European Communities (Privileges of the Joint European Torus) Order 1978 (S.I. no. 1033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Order confers privileges on the Joint European Torus, as required by Decision 78/472/Euratom of 30 May 1978 of the Council of the European Communities and by the Exchange of Letters of 3 May 1978 between the Government of the United Kingdom and the European Atomic Energy Community [fr

  14. A communication to the European Council and Parliament concerning a common strategy against acidification; Communication au conseil et au parlement concernant une strategie communautaire de lutte contre l`acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linher, O. [Commission Europeenne, DG III, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    The quantities of the main air pollution emissions which contribute to acidification (sulfur and nitrogen oxides, ammonium) are presented, for the various european countries, and their effects on ecosystems is described, using the critical load principle. The present European Union legislation on acidifying emission reduction is presented, and it is shown that it is insufficient to ensure in a long term future that critical loads will not be exceeded. A more rational and efficient strategy is proposed against environmental acidification: development of national emission upper limits, ratification of the 1994 sulfur protocol, modification of the directive on sulfur content in various liquid fuels, actions concerning fuel burning plant and maritime transport emissions, Central and Oriental Europe, long range transfrontier air pollution and ammonium emissions. Economic instruments (such as taxes, incentives, protocols, etc.) are reviewed together with actions for promoting energy efficiency and conservation. Effects of the proposed strategy on pollution level reduction are discussed

  15. What Persons with Chronic Health Conditions Need to Maintain or Return to Work-Results of an Online-Survey in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foitzek, Nicole; Ávila, Carolina C; Ivandic, Ivana; Bitenc, Črtomir; Cabello, Maria; Gruber, Sonja; Leonardi, Matilde; Muñoz-Murillo, Amalia; Scaratti, Chiara; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Vlachou, Anastasia; Esteban, Eva; Sabariego, Carla; Coenen, Michaela

    2018-03-26

    Chronic health conditions represent the major share of the disease burden in Europe and have a significant impact on work. This study aims to: (1) identify factors that have a negative or positive impact on the work lives of persons with chronic health conditions; (2) explore the needs of these persons to maintain a job or return to work and (3) compare these results with respect to these persons' occupational status. An online survey was performed in seven European countries. Open-ended survey questions were analyzed using qualitative methods. In total, 487 participants with six chronic health conditions participated. The majority of participants named work-related aspects (such as career development, stress at the workplace, work structure and schedule as well as workload), support of others and attitudes of others as being the factors positively and negatively impact their work lives the most. Our study shed light on the importance of changing the attitudes of supervisors and co-workers to counteract stigmatization of persons with chronic health conditions in the workplace. In conclusion, this study provides a basis for developing new strategies of integration and reintegration at work for persons with chronic health conditions in European countries.

  16. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  17. Future systems for regional defence: The case in an enlarged European Union. Report on working group 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Report deals with the future systems for regional defense in case of an enlarged European Union. In the frame of security issues the future of nuclear arms control and disarmament if of concern. The implications of NATO expansion to the east and desirability of establishing a nuclear-weapon-free-zone from the Baltic to the Black Sea are discussed at length

  18. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Health in the Ukrainian Working-age Population: Evidence from the European Social Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazhak, Iryna

    Gender is a one of the most important social determinants of health inequality. Ukrainian life expectancy gender gap is almost ten years in favor of women. Data from the 2 - 6 rounds (N=5158) of a European Social Survey are used to show gender differences in self-reported health (IBM SPSS 22...

  19. The Professional Value of Temporary Study in Another European Country: Employment and Work of Former ERASMUS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichler, Ulrich; Janson, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Temporary study in another European country supported by the ERASMUS programmes spread from a few thousand participants in the late 1980s to about 150,000 annually in recent years. Such a study period is not only viewed as academically, culturally, and linguistically valuable but is also expected to have a positive impact on subsequent employment…

  20. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Kjell [Karinta-Konsult, Taeby (Sweden); Chataignier, Stephane [Electricite de France (France); Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie [BMD Research (Sweden)] [and others

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  1. Public Values and Stakeholder Involvement - A new framework for Performance Assessment? The European Project RISCOM-II. Work Package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell; Chataignier, Stephane; Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie

    2002-11-01

    RISCOM-II is a project within the fifth framework programme of the European Commission. It is based on a widely recognised need for more transparent decision processes in nuclear waste management. The objective of the RISCOM-II project is to share the knowledge of the context of radioactive waste management in various European countries and to see to what extent it is possible to apply more widely the RISCOM Model in order to improve the acceptability of radioactive waste management. Thus, the project aims to promote the development of processes involving transparency, as well as means involving greater participation of the public. Key topics studied in the RISCOM-II Project are issues in risk assessment to better understand how factual elements relate to value-laden issues and how stakeholder concerns can be addressed, as well as organizational issues affecting transparency in Europe. A range of public participation processes are analysed, some will be selected for testing and hearings are evaluated with respect to transparency. There are five participating countries: Sweden, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Czech Republic, and France, which are represented by various organizations: safety or radiation protection authorities, operators involved in nuclear wastes and the production of nuclear power, research institutes or organizations, and consultants. Work Package No 1(WP-1), Public values and performance assessment, emphasises the importance of value-laden issues involved in nuclear waste management. The expert dominance in the field has so far tended to avoid values or deal with them in seemingly factual frameworks. The objectives of (WP-1) are thus: 1. to identify value-laden issues raised by performance assessment, trying to understand how factual and technical elements relate to value-laden issues 2. to find value judgements of stakeholders, and explore if and how they could be addressed in performance assessment 3. to initiate open debate about risk and

  2. Impact of estradiol-valerate/dienogest on work productivity and activities of daily living in European and Australian women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, Radoslaw; Filonenko, Anna; Vanness, David J; Wittrup-Jensen, Kim U; Stull, Donald E; Siak, Steven; Fraser, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of estradiol-valerate/dienogest (E(2)V/DNG; Qlaira(®)/Natazia(®)) on work productivity and activities of daily living in European and Australian women with heavy menstrual bleeding. Women aged 18-54 years with a confirmed diagnosis of heavy menstrual bleeding and no recognizable pathology were recruited across nine European countries (the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, The Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, UK, and Ukraine) and Australia. The women were randomized to receive either E(2)V/DNG (n = 149) or placebo (n = 82) for seven treatment cycles (196 days). The outcomes assessed included work productivity (ie, productivity while at work) and activities of daily living, measured on a Likert scale from 0 to 10 (with higher values denoting higher impairment levels) at baseline and at the end of the third and seventh cycles (days 84 and 196). The equivalent monetary value associated with the changes in work productivity and activities of daily living was also calculated. Across all the countries, greater improvements from baseline to the end of treatment were observed with E(2)V/DNG treatment than placebo in work productivity (46.0% versus 15.1%) and activities of daily living (55.6% versus 30.8%). In 2008, savings associated with improvements in work productivity and activities of daily living due to E(2)V/DNG treatment (net of placebo improvement) were estimated to be between US$22-62 and US$18-56 per month (in purchasing power parity of US$), respectively. E(2)V/DNG has a consistent positive impact on work productivity and activities of daily living in European and Australian women with heavy menstrual bleeding. These improvements were associated with a reduction in monetary burden of heavy menstrual bleeding compared with the placebo group, consistent with the response to treatment observed.

  3. European Union Budget Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citi, Manuele

    2015-01-01

    The marginal involvement of the European Union (EU) in redistributive policies and its limited fiscal resources have led to a notable lack of attention by EU scholars towards the EU budget and its dynamics. Yet the nature of the budgetary data and their high usability for statistical analysis make...... to form winning coalitions in the Council, the ideological positioning of the co-legislators and the inclusion of the cohesion countries have played a significant role in driving budget change....

  4. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; En Chiang, Chern; Williams, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The influence of the European Union on the Range of Employees’ Management participation in the Companies from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Śmietański

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acknowledging the accession, and as a result, joining the European Union in May 2004 required Poland to make a number of changes, including a number that related to labor rights. These changes were partially based on resolving legal barriers in Polish law in order to bring them into compliance with the European Union's law. These efforts are reflected in the laws related to the so-called employee participation. Generally speaking, this is the right of workers to co-manage and be consulted in the activities of the enterprise for which they work. The most important provisions in this regard (those which Poland had to implement in the past few years are, among others, the directives on the development of the European Works Councils and on the right of workers to establish councils of workers within their company. When the European Parliament and the Council of the European Union established the directives which referred to employee participation, it was the result of the promotion of social dialogue between representatives of management and representatives of workers (which is a particular goal of the EU community and its member states. Unfortunately, in Poland these rights are not honored for the majority of employees.

  6. Advice on cultural policy matters: changing times for the Council for Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveldt, Philomeen; Minnaert, Toine

    The central question is the changing role of advisory councils in Dutch cultural policy and the subsequent change in discourse on culture and the arts within cultural policy. Our working hypothesis is that the role of the Council for Culture (Raad voor Cultuur), the formal advisory council, is

  7. Statutory Instruments No 144 of 1994. European Communities (Protection of outside workers from ionising radiation) Regulations, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    These Regulations implement Council Directive 90/641 EURATOM of 4 December, 1990 on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas. The Regulations provide for the radiation protection of workers liable to receive an exposure of high radiation levels while working away from their employers' premises. The Regulations also apply to workers who come from, or who go to work in, another Member State of the European Community

  8. (Environmental) Panel measures in European law. Importance of the judgement Rs C-176/03 of the European Court, comission/council; (Umwelt-)Strafrechtliche Massnahmen im Europarecht. Bedeutung des EuGH-Urteils Rs C-176/03, Kommission/Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, M.

    2007-07-01

    The problem of international criminality strengthened by the progressive European integration. In particular, this is applied to the environmental criminality, since damages of the environment are not bound to the borders of individual states. Due to the appearing liberty rights, defaults on European level were introduced, whose conversion and penetration ensure effective further effective protection of the right property for the environment. The European Commission raised a complaint against the conversion of the skeleton resolution because of the interference of the union-legal measure into community-legal authority. The Court of Justice of the European Community explained this skeleton resolution as authority adverse. The European Court of Justice assumes community-legal authority authorizes in principle to supranational criminal measures. The practical conditions for it are put out in the contribution under consideration. Finally, the new guideline suggestion KOM(2007) 521 is based on these conditions.

  9. Labour contracts in the European Union, 2000-2005: Differences among demographic groups and implications for the quality of working life and work satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, A.F.; Taris, T.W.; Houtman, I.L.D.; Bossche, S. van den; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Current theorizing holds that organizations may be less motivated to offer good work circumstances to temporary workers because the latter do not constitute the core of the organization. This implies that their quality of working life and work satisfaction could be lower than that of permanent

  10. The Work-Family Interface of Service Sector Workers : A Comparison of Work Resources and Professional Status across Five European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beham, Barbara; Drobnic, Sonja; Praeg, Patrick

    The present paper examines cross-national differences in the utilisation of work-family resources at the organisational level and the relationships between these resources and work-to-home interference (WHI) and satisfaction with work-family balance (SWFB) among professional and non-professional

  11. Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council, 1 April 1993 - 31 March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This final Annual Report of the Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) covers the work of the organization for 1993-1994 and explains the structures and missions of the organizations which replace it. SERC funds and supports United Kingdom research programs covering many aspects of science and engineering. Its work will be split between the new Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council and the Natural Environment Research Council. Research achievements and training initiatives are reported for each of SERC's current Boards. (UK)

  12. Communication in a Human biomonitoring study: Focus group work, public engagement and lessons learnt in 17 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Karen; Cano, Noemi; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda; Castaño, Argelia; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M; Esteban, Marta; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Horvat, Milena; Bloemen, Louis; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Van de Mieroop, Els; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Cerna, Milena; Krskova, Andrea; Becker, Kerstin; Fiddicke, Ulrike; Seiwert, Margarete; Mørck, Thit A; Rudnai, Peter; Kozepesy, Szilvia; Cullen, Elizabeth; Kellegher, Anne; Gutleb, Arno C; Fischer, Marc E; Ligocka, Danuta; Kamińska, Joanna; Namorado, Sónia; Reis, M Fátima; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Gurzau, Anca E; Halzlova, Katarina; Jajcaj, Michal; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Huetos, Olga; López, Ana; Berglund, Marika; Larsson, Kristin; Sepai, Ovnair

    2015-08-01

    A communication strategy was developed by The Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (COPHES), as part of its objectives to develop a framework and protocols to enable the collection of comparable human biomonitoring data throughout Europe. The framework and protocols were tested in the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). The aims of the communication strategy were to raise awareness of human biomonitoring, encourage participation in the study and to communicate the study results and their public health significance. It identified the audiences and key messages, documented the procedure for dissemination of results and was updated as the project progressed. A communication plan listed the tools and materials such as press releases, flyers, recruitment letters and information leaflets required for each audience with a time frame for releasing them. Public insight research was used to evaluate the recruitment material, and the feedback was used to improve the documents. Dissemination of results was coordinated in a step by step approach by the participating countries within DEMOCOPHES, taking into account specific national messages according to the needs of each country. Participants received individual results, unless they refused to be informed, along with guidance on what the results meant. The aggregate results and policy recommendations were then communicated to the general public and stakeholders, followed by dissemination at European level. Several lessons were learnt that may assist other future human biomonitoring studies. Recruitment took longer than anticipated and so social scientists, to help with community engagement, should be part of the research team from the start. As a European study, involving multiple countries, additional considerations were needed for the numerous organisations, different languages, cultures, policies and priorities

  13. European research and development programme for water-cooled lithium-lead blankets: present status and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giancarli, L.; Leroy, P.; Proust, E.; Raepsaet, X.

    1992-01-01

    The European R and D programme in support of the development of water-cooled Pb-17Li blankets for DEMO aims at improving the data base concerning tritium behaviour and compatibility between blanket materials. The four main areas of the experimental programme are structural material corrosion by Pb-17Li, tritium extraction and permeation control.=, Pb-17Li physico-chemistry, and water/Pb-17Li interaction. This paper describes the most significant results obtained to date in the various experiments performed in Europe and the future programme required to complete the data base by 1994. 28 refs

  14. European Vegetation Archive (EVA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chytrý, Milan; Hennekens, S.M.; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Schaminée, J.H.J.; Haveman, Rense; Janssen, J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The European Vegetation Archive (EVA) is a centralized database of European vegetation plots developed by the IAVS Working Group European Vegetation Survey. It has been in development since 2012 and first made available for use in research projects in 2014. It stores copies of national and

  15. Benchmarking European Gas Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter; Trinkner, Urs

    This is the final report for the pan-European efficiency benchmarking of gas transmission system operations commissioned by the Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM), Den Haag, on behalf of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) under the supervision of the authors....

  16. Impact of estradiol-valerate dienogest on work productivity and activities of daily living in European and Australian women with heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasiak R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radoslaw Wasiak,1 Anna Filonenko,2 David J Vanness,3 Kim U Wittrup-Jensen,2 Donald E Stull,1 Steven Siak,1 Ian Fraser41Centre for Health Economics and Science Policy, United BioSource Corporation, London, United Kingdom; 2Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany; 3University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of estradiol valerate-dienogest (E2V/DNG; Qlaira®/Natazia® on work productivity and activities of daily living in European and Australian women with heavy menstrual bleeding.Methods: Women aged 18–54 years with a confirmed diagnosis of heavy menstrual bleeding and no recognizable pathology were recruited across nine European countries (the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, The Netherlands, Poland, Sweden, UK, and Ukraine and Australia. The women were randomized to receive either E2V/DNG (n = 149 or placebo (n = 82 for seven treatment cycles (196 days. The outcomes assessed included work productivity (ie, productivity while at work and activities of daily living, measured on a Likert scale from 0 to 10 (with higher values denoting higher impairment levels at baseline and at the end of the third and seventh cycles (days 84 and 196. The equivalent monetary value associated with the changes in work productivity and activities of daily living was also calculated.Results: Across all the countries, greater improvements from baseline to the end of treatment were observed with E2V/DNG treatment than placebo in work productivity (46.0% versus 15.1% and activities of daily living (55.6% versus 30.8%. In 2008, savings associated with improvements in work productivity and activities of daily living due to E2V/DNG treatment (net of placebo improvement were estimated to be between US$22–62 and US$18–56 per month (in purchasing power

  17. Compliance of blood sampling procedures with the CLSI H3-A6 guidelines: An observational study by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) working group for the preanalytical phase (WG-PRE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Church, Stephen; Cornes, Michael P.; Grankvist, Kjell; Lippi, Giuseppe; Nybo, Mads; Nikolac, Nora; van Dongen-Lases, Edmee; Eker, Pinar; Kovalevskaya, Svjetlana; Kristensen, Gunn B. B.; Sprongl, Ludek; Sumarac, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An observational study was conducted in 12 European countries by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) to assess the level of compliance with the CLSI H3-A6 guidelines. Methods: A structured

  18. Socioeconomic position, psychosocial work environment and disability in an ageing workforce: a longitudinal analysis of SHARE data from 11 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Jan D; Wahrendorf, Morten; Siegrist, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    Prevention of disability in the ageing workforce is essential for sustaining economic growth in Europe. In order to provide information on entry points for preventive measures, it is important to better understand sociodemographic, socioeconomic and work-related determinants of disability in older employees. We aimed to test the hypothesis that low socioeconomic position and exposure to a stressful psychosocial work environment at baseline contribute to later disability. We further assumed that the association of socioeconomic position with disability is partly mediated by exposure to adverse working conditions. We studied longitudinal data from the first two waves of the Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe comprising 11 European countries. Sociodemographic, socioeconomic and work-related factors (low control, effort-reward imbalance) and baseline disability of 2665 male and 2209 female employees aged between 50 and 64 years were used to predict disability 2 years later. Following the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), disability was subdivided into the components 'impairment' and 'restriction in activities and participation'. Two multilevel Poisson regressions were fitted to the data. After adjusting for baseline disability and relevant confounding variables, low socioeconomic position and chronic stress at work exerted significant effects on disability scores 2 years later. We found some support for the hypothesis that the association of socioeconomic position with disability is partly mediated by work stress. Investing in reduction of work stress and reducing social inequalities in health functioning are relevant entry points of policies that aim at maintaining work ability in early old age.

  19. Updated European Union Risk Assessment Report of Alkanes, C10-13, Chloro

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A risk assessment of alkanes, C10-13, chloro (short-chain chlorinated paraffins or SCCPs) produced in accordance with Council Regulation (EEC) 793/93 was published in October 1999 . Subsequent marketing and use restrictions for two uses (metal working and use for fat liquoring of leather) have come into force in the European Union through Directive 2002/45/EC . This Directive also states that all remaining uses of short-chain chlorinated paraffins will be reviewed by the European Commission ...

  20. 40 CFR 1508.6 - Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Council. 1508.6 Section 1508.6 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.6 Council. Council means the Council on Environmental Quality established by title II of the Act. ...

  1. Randomized trial on the efficacy of radiotherapy for cerebral low-grade glioma in the adult: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Study 22845 with the Medical Research Council study BRO4: an interim analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Abul B.M.F.; Afra, Denes; Cornu, Philippe; Bleehan, Norman; Schraub, Simon; De Witte, Olivier; Darcel, Francois; Stenning, Sally; Pierart, Marianne; Van Glabbeke, Martine

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is no consensus on the treatment strategy for adult patients with cerebral low-grade glioma. The diagnosis and primary treatment are usually undertaken by surgery. Some investigators doubt the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy (RT), whereas others advise routine postoperative RT. We report the primary results of a multicenter randomized trial on this controversy. Methods and Materials: From 24 European centers, 311 adult patients with low-grade glioma were randomized centrally after surgery from March 1986 through September 1997, between the two arms of the trial. The irradiated group received 54 Gy in 6 weeks. The other patients did not receive any treatment after surgery until the tumor showed progression, defined as clinical-neurologic deterioration and evidence of progressive tumor on imaging. Results: Of 290 eligible and assessable patients (93%), the irradiated group showed a significant (log-rank p = 0.02) improvement in time to progression but not in overall survival, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate was, respectively, 63% vs. 66% (overall survival) and 44% vs. 37% (time to progression) for the treated and control arms. Different treatment modalities, including RT, were undertaken for the 85 controls when a progressive tumor was noted. Conclusion: Early postoperative conventional RT such as that used for this protocol appears to improve the time to progression or progression-free survival, but not overall survival, for patients with low-grade glioma

  2. Psychosocial Hazard Analysis in a Heterogeneous Workforce: Determinants of Work Stress in Blue- and White-Collar Workers of the European Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Yannick Arnold; Bellingrath, Silja

    2017-01-01

    The European steel industry's workforce is highly heterogeneous and consists of various occupational groups, presumably facing different psychosocial stressors. The few existing studies on the subject mainly focused on physical constraints of blue-collar workers, whereas the supposable psychosocial workload received only little research attention. This is remarkable considering the challenges associated with statutory required risk assessment of psychosocial hazards. Valid measures of hazard analysis must account for various stressors and reliably identify them, also between occupational groups. The present study, based on a sample of blue- and white-collar workers ( N  = 124) from the European steel industry, aims to provide a first insight into psychosocial stressors and strain at work in this rarely researched industrial sector. Furthermore, two well-known theoretical roadmaps in job analysis are examined regarding their utility for risk assessment in heterogeneous workforces: the German standard version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and the short version of the effort-reward imbalance questionnaire. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that the COPSOQ was better suited to predict various strain indices in the present sample. Especially stressors relating to socioemotional aspects, such as work-privacy conflict, revealed a reasonable impact, indicating the need for comprehensive solutions at the organizational level instead of solutions focusing on single workplaces. To conclude, a broadly diversified and validated approach in psychosocial risk assessment is needed to adequately assess the variety of psychosocial factors at work and in different occupational groups.

  3. An Optional Instrument for European Insurance Contract Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Heiss

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Principles of European Insurance Contract Law, also referred tousing the acronym PEICL, were published in September 2009. They are the result of ten years of academic work undertaken by the"Restatement of European Insurance Contract Law" Project Group. In the time since its establishment in 1999, the project has been transformed from being a stand-alone project to a part of the CoPECL (Common Principles of European Insurance Contract Law network, drafting a specific part of the Common Frame of Reference. Having continually worked under the guiding principle that "the law of insurance [in Europe] must be one," it now represents a serious option for providing Europe with a single legal framework for insurance contracts.Despite the European Council's proclamations that the Common Frame of Reference will remain a non-binding instrument, the implementation of one or more optional instruments in the future does not appear to beimprobable considering recent developments. The possibility of anoptional instrument has been expressed more than once by the European Commission in its Action Plan and Communication on European Contract Law. Other indications in favour of an optional instrument include the European Parliament's repeated references to the Common Frame of Reference as providing, at the very least, a model for a futureoptional instrument, as well as the EESC's earlier proposal of anoptional instrument as an alternative to standardising insurancecontract law. The preparation by the EESC of another (own-initiative opinion on European contract law is underway, and its presentation is anticipated in 2010. Hence, the optional instrument is evidently the subject of serious political deliberation. Using Article 1:102, the Principles of European Insurance Contract Law represent a prototype for such an instrument.

  4. An Optional Instrument for European Insurance Contract Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Lakhan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Principles of European Insurance Contract Law, also referred tousing the acronym PEICL, were published in September 2009. They are the result of ten years of academic work undertaken by the"Restatement of European Insurance Contract Law" Project Group. In the time since its establishment in 1999, the project has been transformed from being a stand-alone project to a part of the CoPECL (Common Principles of European Insurance Contract Law network, drafting a specific part of the Common Frame of Reference. Having continually worked under the guiding principle that "the law of insurance [in Europe] must be one," it now represents a serious option for providing Europe with a single legal framework for insurance contracts. Despite the European Council's proclamations that the Common Frame of Reference will remain a non-binding instrument, the implementation of one or more optional instruments in the future does not appear to beimprobable considering recent developments. The possibility of anoptional instrument has been expressed more than once by the European Commission in its Action Plan and Communication on European Contract Law. Other indications in favour of an optional instrument include the European Parliament's repeated references to the Common Frame of Reference as providing, at the very least, a model for a futureoptional instrument, as well as the EESC's earlier proposal of anoptional instrument as an alternative to standardising insurancecontract law. The preparation by the EESC of another (own-initiative opinion on European contract law is underway, and its presentation is anticipated in 2010. Hence, the optional instrument is evidently the subject of serious political deliberation. Using Article 1:102, the Principles of European Insurance Contract Law represent a prototype for such an instrument.

  5. Experimental programme in support of the development of the European ceramic-breeder-inside-tube test-blanket: present status and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, E.; Roux, N.; Flament, T.; Anzidei, L.; ENEA, Frascati; Casadio, S.; Dell'orco, G.

    1992-01-01

    Four DEMO blanket classes are under investigation within the framework of the European Test-Blanket Development Programme. One of them is featured by the use of lithium ceramic breeder pellets contained inside externally helium cooled tubes. This paper summarizes the main achievements to date of the experimental programme supporting the development of this class of blanket. It also gives an outline of the areas of the breeder material, beryllium, tritium control, and thermomechanical tests, the future work envisaged for the 92-94 period. 53 refs

  6. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme; Activites liees a l'hydrogene dans le programme de travail de l'Union Europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P. [Joint Research Centre, IHCP, Ispra (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Growing concern over urban air pollution, global climatic change allegedly caused by rising levels of greenhouse gases and future energy security requirements demand a solution: a clean and sustainable energy supply. Hydrogen is seen as a promising clean fuel when integrated into a wide and long-term vision in which it provides, in parallel with electricity, a secondary energy carrier, ultimately derived from renewable energy sources. Europe has been a pioneer in promoting the wider use of hydrogen. Already in 1991, various demonstration projects were started with funds under the Euro-Quebec Hydro-Hydrogen Pilot Project (EQHPP). The European Commission, the European Industry, the Government of Quebec and the Canadian Industry made resources available so that hydrogen, from surplus in Canada, could be applied in various end-use technologies. Under this project, about thirty European industry/research centres/universities have been involved, working on a comprehensive set of hydrogen applications/uses. Innovative public transportation means (city buses, boats) equipped with internal combustion engines (ICE) or fuel cells and using either liquid or compressed hydrogen were put into demonstration service. Cogeneration (CHP) projects based on the use of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) were realised. In joint programs, aviation combustor test activities were carried out by Daimler Benz Aerospace, Airbus Industries and Pratt and Whitney. Investigation of hydrogen storage in zeolites, carbon and nano-tubes were started. Tests on compressed hydrogen gas storage tanks were also conducted. All these projects are now terminated. As intended, the initial momentum set by the EQHPP project has now been replaced by many private initiatives, especially in Germany. Only one specific project funded by the European Commission, the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) remains. In the EIHP project, several companies which designed and constructed prototypes and demonstration

  7. ITER council proceedings: 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    No ITER Council Meetings were held during 2000. However, two ITER EDA Meetings were held, one in Tokyo, January 19-20, and one in Moscow, June 29-30. The parties participating in these meetings were those that partake in the extended ITER EDA, namely the EU, the Russian Federation, and Japan. This document contains, a/o, the records of these meetings, the list of attendees, the agenda, the ITER EDA Status Reports issued during these meetings, the TAC (Technical Advisory Committee) reports and recommendations, the MAC Reports and Advice (also for the July 1999 Meeting), the ITER-FEAT Outline Design Report, the TAC Reports and Recommendations both meetings), Site requirements and Site Design Assumptions, the Tentative Sequence of technical Activities 2000-2001, Report of the ITER SWG-P2 on Joint Implementation of ITER, EU/ITER Canada Proposal for New ITER Identification

  8. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-12-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The main aim of the document was to summarise 'best practice' in dealing with bleeding risk in AF patients when approaching antithrombotic therapy, by addressing the epidemiology and size of the problem, and review established bleeding risk factors. We also summarise definitions of bleeding in the published literature. Patient values and preferences balancing the risk of bleeding against thromboembolism as well as the prognostic implications of bleeding are reviewed. We also provide an overview of published bleeding risk stratification and bleeding risk schema. Brief discussion of special situations (e.g. periablation, peri-devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICD] or pacemakers, presentation with acute coronary syndromes and/or requiring percutanous coronary interventions/stents and bridging therapy) is made, as well as a discussion of the prevention of bleeds and managing bleeding complications. Finally, this document puts forwards consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist in everyday clinical practice.

  9. Trump revives National Space Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-08-01

    US president Donald Trump has signed an executive order to re-establish the US National Space Council. The 12-member council will include key government officials with an interest in space exploration, including NASA’s acting administrator Robert Lightfoot and the secretaries of state, commerce and defence.

  10. The Education Council Report 2001: An Evaluation Based on the ATEE-RDC19 Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikl, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Examines recent developments in European Union educational policy, highlighting a 2001 document of the Education Council. Evaluates the document's intentions and directions from a pedagogical viewpoint and assesses the document using the Association for Teacher Education in Europe's scenario framework. Shows that future European Union education…

  11. Cooperation in research in the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marka, Philippe.

    1977-01-01

    This work studies the legal instruments for cooperative research granted to Euratom under the Treaty establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, and the conditions whereby concrete use was made of these instruments. This assessment of Euratom's efforts to launch a community nuclear industry is accompanied by an analysis of the respective roles of the bodies of the Community, the Council and the Commission, as well as of the circumstances which, according to the author, have led to a paralysis of this institution. (NEA) [fr

  12. Effects of requested, forced and denied shift schedule change on work ability and health of nurses in Europe -results from the European NEXT-Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatsch, Michael; Li, Jian; Derycke, Hanne; Müller, Bernd Hans; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2013-12-05

    Previous cross-sectional findings from the European Nurses Early Exit Study (NEXT) show that nurses who were dissatisfied with their work schedule tended to consider leaving the nursing profession. Mediating factors in this decision process may be caused by self-perceived poor work ability and/or health. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in work ability and general health among nurses in relation to requested, forced and denied change of shift schedule. Longitudinal data from the NEXT Study was used. In total 11,102 nurses from Belgium, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, France and Italy completed both the 'basic questionnaire' (t1) and the '12 month follow-up questionnaire' (t2). To examine the time-effect (repeated measures) and the group-effect of five defined groups of nurses on the Work Ability Index (WAI) and general health (SF36), an adjusted 2-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed. The nurses who wanted to, but could not change their shifts during the 12 month follow-up had the lowest initial and follow-up scores for WAI (t1: 37.6, t2: 36.6, p work ability and to a lesser comparatively low extent with increased decline in health scores. A forced change of shift against the nurses' will was significantly associated with a deteriorating work ability and health. The findings would suggest that nurses' desire to change their shift patterns may be an indicator for perceived low work ability and/or low health. The results also indicate that fulfilling nurses' wishes with respect to their shift work pattern may improve their personal resources such as work ability and - to somewhat lesser extent - health. Disregarding nurses' preferences, however, bears the risk for further resource deterioration. The findings imply that shift schedule organization may constitute a valuable preventive tool to promote nurses' work ability and - to lesser extent - their perceived health, not least in aging nursing work forces.

  13. Employment and the Reduction of the Work Week: A Comparison of Seven European Macro-economic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginneken, Wouter

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of a reduced work week on employment, productivity, wages, investment, economic growth, inflation, and government deficits. Concludes that reducing working hours would have greater effect if accompanied by wage reductions and limitation of overtime, but would not affect underlying causes of unemployment. (SK)

  14. Social policies and families in stress: Gender and educational differences in work-family conflict from a European perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notten, N.J.W.R.; Grunow, D.; Verbakel, C.M.C.

    2017-01-01

    In modern welfare states, family policies may resolve the tension between employment and care-focused demands. However these policies sometimes have adverse consequences for distinct social groups. This study examined gender and educational differences in working parents' perceived work-family

  15. 78 FR 18633 - Notice of Public Meeting of Fort Scott Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... recommendations related to the Center's programmatic goals, target audiences, content, implementation and... input on a marketing presentation and develop task groups for the Council's strategic work plan. The...

  16. The Lisbon Treaty and the role of the European Parliament in the European Atomic Energy Community; Der Vertrag von Lissabon (EUV) und die Rolle des Europaeischen Parlaments im Rahmen der Europaeischen Atomgemeinschaft (EURATOM / EAGV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S. [Staatskanzlei des Landes Sachsen-Anhalt, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    In June 2007, the European Council commissioned an intergovernmental conference to draft a 'treaty of reform' of the European Union. The wording of the treaty was signed by the heads of state and government of the member countries on December 13, 2007. The ongoing process of ratification in the 27 EU member countries is to be completed before the next elections to the European Parliament in June 2009. The treaty is now referred to as 'Lisbon Treaty'. The Lisbon Treaty (Treaty Amending the Treaty about the European Union and the Treaty Establishing the European Community) does not replace the European Treaties currently in force, but merely amends them. Also the 'Treaty Establishing the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM)' is amended in this way. On the basis of the contributions about 'The German Presidency Program of the Council Working Group on Nuclear Issues - an Interim Report' (W. Sandtner and S. Thomas) and 'Euratom Treaty and Intergovernmental Conference' (S. Thomas), current links to the Euratom Treaty with potential amendments are presented and commented upon. (orig.)

  17. Family Practitioners' Advice about Taking Time Off Work for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: A Prospective Study in Twelve European Primary Care Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Nocun, Marek; Butler, Christopher C; Little, Paul; Verheij, Theo; Hood, Kerenza; Fleten, Nils; Kowalczyk, Anna; Melbye, Hasse

    2016-01-01

    Acute cough and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) are one of the most important causes of lost working hours. to explore variation and predictors in family practitioners (FPs) advice to patients with LRTIs about taking time off work in different European countries. Prospective observational study in primary care networks in 12 countries, with multilevel mixed-effects binomial logistic regression. 324 FPs recruited 1616 employed adults who presented to primary care with LRTIs. The proportion of patients advised to take time off work varied from 7.6% in the Netherlands to 89.2% in Slovakia, and of these, 88.2% overall were advised to stay off work for seven days or less. None of Finnish or Dutch patients were advised to take more than 7 days off, in contrast to 35.5% of Polish and 27.0% of Slovak patients. The strongest predictors of FPs' advice about time off work were: patient symptoms interfering with normal activities (OR 4.43; Pwork, which is not explained by differences in patients' reported illness duration, but might be explained by differences in regulations around certification and sick pay. Evidence based guidance for advising patients about taking time off work for this common condition is needed.

  18. Long hours and stress in the UK's IT profession: has the European Union's Working Time Directive offered relief?

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, I

    2005-01-01

    Only a small amount of research thus far has investigated the relationship between the working conditions of those employed in technical professions, such as Information Technology (IT), and the implications for their well being (Sonnetag et al., 1994). In particular the IT profession in the UK appears to be at risk from a culture characterised by long working hours (Kodz, 2003). In addition to the established links between long-term computer use and upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders ...

  19. Information report by the Commission for European Affairs on the second Energy-Climate Package - Nr 2294

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    This report first recalls the objectives of the first Energy-Climate package and outlines that its implementation revealed some gaps despite some promising results. The author then notices that the current context requires new efforts, and that new objectives have been defined to promote energy transition: propositions of the European Commission are recalled as well as the opinions of the European Parliament and European Council. The author discusses the ambition of this second package as a lever for a transition towards a new growth model. He discusses divergence issues between countries, and the triple challenge (emission reduction, share of renewable energy, energy efficiency), and outlines that energy transition represents a new industrial project for Europe, and that the evolution towards a Union of energy is needed. Works of the French Commission for European Affairs are briefly reported, and the proposal for a European resolution is given

  20. Flexible work hours, health and well-being in the European Union: preliminary data from a SALTSA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G; Akerstedt, T; Nachreiner, F; Baltieri, F; Folkard, S; Frings Dresen, M; Gadbois, C; Gartner, J; Grzech Sukalo, H; Harma, M; Kandolin, I; Silverio, J; Simoes, A

    2001-12-01

    Demand for flexible work hours (FWH) is increasing in Europe aimed at increasing the number of production hours on one hand, and, on the other, reducing individual working hours and/or increasing autonomy and control on them. In view of the lack of knowledge of the effects of FWH on health and safety, we started a pilot project, funded by the Joint Programme for Working Life Research in Europe (SALTSA), aimed at: a) comparing the most relevant national legislation and how the EU Directive 93/104 "concerning certain aspects of working time" has been implemented in the member States; b) reporting prevalence and trend of FWH in Europe according to the three EU Surveys on Working Conditions carried out in the last decade; c) collecting practical examples of innovative FWH; d) evaluating their impact on health and safety in relation to work sectors, job demands, social life, aging and gender. Consequent actions are going to include information and consultancy for pertinent authorities and social parties involved, as well as training programmes for Union officials and similar groups concerning the organisation of FWH according to ergonomic principles.

  1. Competences for Working with Older People: The Development and Verification of The European Core Competence Framework for Health and Social Care Professionals Working with Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, Bea; Reehuis, Lidwien; Roodbol, Petrie

    2017-01-01

    Universities of applied sciences in Europe face the challenge of preparing students in health and social care for working with older people and contributing to the innovations needed in light of the ageing of society, along with changes in the health and social care systems in many countries. Dealing with the special needs of older people and the…

  2. [Review of: U. Holtgrewe, V. Kirov, M. Ramioul Hard work in new jobs: the quality of work and life in European growth sectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, J.

    2016-01-01

    All four parts of the book include relevant contributions, resulting in an impressive overview of thoughts and (new) insights that places this work in an almost forgotten tradition of human relations and the idea that industrial relations are the result of a social construction of reality.

  3. Organization and regulation of energy markets in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, J.

    2002-01-01

    The energy regulation policy and the organization of power matters in the European Union as well as the energy markets are discussed in this Keynote Paper. The Council of European Energy Regulators is introduced. The goal of the European Union regarding energy generation and consumption in the future are analyzed. (R.P.)

  4. Work stress and quality of life in persons with disabilities from four European countries: the case of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Christine; Wahrendorf, Morten; Reinhardt, Jan D; Post, Marcel W M; Siegrist, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Evidence on the adverse effects of work stress on quality of life (QoL) is largely derived from general populations, while respective information is lacking for people with disabilities. We investigated associations between work stress and QoL and the potentially moderating role of socioeconomic circumstances in employed persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional data from 386 employed men and women with SCI (≥18 work h/week) from the Netherlands, Switzerland, Denmark, and Norway were analyzed. Work stress was assessed with the 'effort-reward imbalance' (ERI) model and the control component of the 'demand/control' model. QoL was operationalized with five WHOQoL BREF items. Socioeconomic circumstances were measured by years of formal education and perception of financial hardship. We applied ordinal and linear regressions to predict QoL and introduced interaction terms to assess a potential moderation of socioeconomic circumstances. Multivariate analyses showed consistent associations between increased ERI and decreased overall QoL (coefficient -1.55, p life satisfaction (health -1.32, p work stress and QoL among persons with SCI.

  5. A combined analysis of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Medical Research Council randomized clinical trials for the prophylactic treatment of stage TaT1 bladder cancer. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Genitourinary Tract Cancer Cooperative Group and the Medical Research Council Working Party on Superficial Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawinski, A.; Sylvester, R.; Kurth, K. H.; Bouffioux, C.; van der Meijden, A.; Parmar, M. K.; Bijnens, L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prophylactic agents after primary resection can decrease the incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with stage TaT1 bladder cancer. However, the long-term impact on progression to muscle invasive disease as well as on duration of survival is unknown. A combined analysis of individual

  6. Estimating the costs of work-related accidents and ill-health: An analysis of European data sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S. van den; Zwaan, L. van der; Dam, L. van; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Eekhout, I.; Emmerik, M.L. van; Oldenburg, C.; Brück, C.; Janowski, P.; Wilhelm, C.

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of national and international data sources on the costs of work-related injuries, illnesses and deaths. The aim was to evaluate the quality and comparability of different sources as a first step towards estimating the costs of accidents and ill-health at

  7. Nurses' shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griffiths, P.; Dall'Ora, C.; Simon, M.; Ball, J.; Lindqvist, R.; Rafferty, A.M.; Schoonhoven, L.; Tishelman, C.; Aiken, L.H.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite concerns as to whether nurses can perform reliably and effectively when working longer shifts, a pattern of two 12- to 13-hour shifts per day is becoming common in many hospitals to reduce shift to shift handovers, staffing overlap, and hence costs. OBJECTIVES: To describe shift

  8. A benchmarking project on the quality of previous guidelines about the management of malignant pleural effusion from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) Pleural Diseases Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Bedetti, Benedetta; Brunelli, Alessandro; Marinova, Katerina; Raveglia, Federico; Rocco, Gaetano; Shargall, Yaron; Solli, Piergiorgio; Varela, Gonzalo; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas; Kuzdzal, Jaroslaw; Massard, Gilbert; Ruffini, Enrico; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Martinez-Barenys, Carlos; Opitz, Isabelle; Batirel, Hasan F; Toker, Alper; Scarci, Marco

    2017-08-01

    In the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) survey about management of malignant pleural effusions (MPE), 56% of respondents are not informed of any relevant clinical guidelines and 52%, who are aware of the existence of guidelines, declared that they are in need of updating or revision. The ESTS Pleural Diseases Working Group developed a benchmarking project on quality of previous guidelines on the management of MPE. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument was used to assess each guideline. Each item was scored on a 7-point scale. Scores for each domain were calculated. Economic data for the nations which have issued the guidelines were collected from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development health statistics database. Six guidelines fitted the inclusion criteria and were assessed. Five out of 6 guidelines were produced by a multinational collaboration. Observers would recommend only 2 guidelines with minimal modification. Two areas that received the best score were clarity of presentation and scope and purpose (objectives and health questions target population). The applicability of guideline domain had the lowest score. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that clarity of presentation, international guidelines and publication through medical journal were related to improved scores. A strong correlation was observed between the measures of economic status. The quality of guidelines assessed by the AGREE II criteria was found to be extremely variable. Guidelines achieving higher AGREE II scores were more likely to come from the European Union with the direct involvement of scientific societies in their development. It was also recognized that some fundamental unanswered questions remain about the management of MPE. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Eating at restaurants, at work or at home. Is there a difference? A study among adults of 11 European countries in the context of the HECTOR* project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, P; Naska, A; Rodrigues, S; Lopes, C; Freisling, H; Rohrmann, S; Sieri, S; Elmadfa, I; Lachat, C; Gedrich, K; Boeing, H; Katzke, V; Turrini, A; Tumino, R; Ricceri, F; Mattiello, A; Palli, D; Ocké, M; Engeset, D; Oltarzewski, M; Nilsson, L M; Key, T; Trichopoulou, A

    2017-03-01

    To compare macronutrient intakes out of home-by location-to those at home and to investigate differences in total daily intakes between individuals consuming more than half of their daily energy out of home and those eating only at home. Data collected through 24-h recalls or diaries among 23 766 European adults. Participants were grouped as 'non-substantial', 'intermediate' and 'very substantial out-of-home' eaters based on energy intake out of home. Mean macronutrient intakes were estimated at home and out of home (overall, at restaurants, at work). Study/cohort-specific mean differences in total intakes between the 'very substantial out-of-home' and the 'at-home' eaters were estimated through linear regression and pooled estimates were derived. At restaurants, men consumed 29% of their energy as fat, 15% as protein, 45% as carbohydrates and 11% as alcohol. Among women, fat contributed 33% of energy intake at restaurants, protein 16%, carbohydrates 45% and alcohol 6%. When eating at work, both sexes reported 30% of energy from fat and 55% from carbohydrates. Intakes at home were higher in fat and lower in carbohydrates and alcohol. Total daily intakes of the 'very substantial out-of-home' eaters were generally similar to those of individuals eating only at home, apart from lower carbohydrate and higher alcohol intakes among individuals eating at restaurants. In a large population of adults from 11 European countries, eating at work was generally similar to eating at home. Alcoholic drinks were the primary contributors of higher daily energy intakes among individuals eating substantially at restaurants.

  10. National Safety Council Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Karen; Shannon, Tom

    2005-01-01

    In December 1995, the National Safety Council (NSC) entered into Cooperative Agreement No.DE-FC02-96EW 12729 with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to work together over the next few years on safety and health initiatives surrounding the management of radioactive materials. As a result, three publications, including print and non-print deliverables, were developed and distributed: (1) Series of Backgrounders, Web Services for WIPP; (2) A Guide to Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel; and (3) A Guide to the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste. DOE and its predecessor agencies have maintained a record of safe transportation of radioactive materials for more than 50 years. Thousands of shipments involving three million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. Historically, DOE shipments constitute less than one percent of the total radioactive material shipments; however, they comprise a significant portion (approaching 75 percent) of the curies, or amounts of radioactivity shipped annually. DOE operations and field offices are responsible for detailed planning and for ensuring full regulatory compliance for their shipments. Packaging is designed to protect workers and limit the risk to the public during transportation. DOE headquarters and program offices provide policy direction and oversight for packaging and transportation activities for their respective offices. The publications NSC produced under the agreement also included primary points of contact for external audiences, including the press, the public, and stakeholders who would not have access to DOE regulations, manuals, and practices

  11. Hewitt launches Research Councils UK

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt today launched 'Research Councils UK' - a new strategic partnership that will champion research in science, engineering and technology across the UK" (1 page).

  12. 75 FR 12507 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... in the selection of Council members include candidates' proven experience in developing and marketing... contact information such as mailing address, fax, e-mail, fixed and mobile phone numbers and support staff...

  13. Transfer of innovation, knowledge and competencies on the care service for people with acquired disabilities: the European Project "Care for Work".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchitta, M; Fragapane, S; Consoli, M T; Pennisi, C; Agodi, A

    2012-01-01

    The growing needs of people with disabilities require to integrate this issue into public health in order to improve political feasibility and to ensure that disability will not be left off from any strategic table. The main aim of the "Care for Work" project was to provide training contents to help workers and unemployed people to adapt their knowledge, skills and competencies to the care services sector in order to facilitate their insertion in a new employment source. The partners participating in the project are Organizations from 5 European countries. The project has been divided into seven Work Packages (WPs): three transversal WPs and four specific WPs, each addressing specific activities necessary to achieve the final objectives of the project. The "Care for Work" learning environment contains specific information and training on the techniques for caring people with acquired physical disabilities, as text documents and short training films. The project combines e-learning (Web 2.0) and mobile learning providing a flexible training platform for workers of care services sector. The "Care for Work" project offers specific training addressed to meet the new existing needs of workers of the care services sector and/or unemployed people. All the information and results of the project are available on the web page: www.careforwork.eu, and the present article is part of the WP "Valorization".

  14. Collaborative models for the joint production of core health technology assessments: negative and positive aspects for the joint work of different European agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Vicari, Nicola; Corio, Mirella; Perrini, Maria Rosaria; Jefferson, Tom; Gillespie, Francesca; Cerbo, Marina

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) is to make HTA agencies collaborate sharing methods and tools thus avoiding duplication of evaluative efforts and allowing resource savings. From 2010 to 2012, the activities of the network were carried out through EUnetHTA Joint Action 1 and Work Package 4 Strand B aimed at producing two Core HTAs with two main objectives: to test the Web based Core model and the collaborative working models. Our objective in this article is to give an historical record of the Work Package activities highlighting what worked and what did not in the collaboration of researchers' groups coming from different agencies. A retrospective description of all the steps for the joint production of the two Core HTAs is provided starting from the first step of selecting technologies of common interest. Primary researchers' views on the whole process have been collected through a semi-structured telephonic interview supported by a questionnaire. Coordinators views were gathered during internal meetings and validated. Majority of respondents thought topic selection procedure was not clear and well managed. About collaborative models, small groups were seen to enable more exchange, whatever the model. According to coordinators, loss of expertise and experience during the production process, different languages, and novelty of the Online Tool were main barriers. Lessons learned from this first experience in Joint Action 1 paved the path for the collaboration in Joint Action 2, as it allowed enhancements and changes in models of collaborations and coordination.

  15. Common Sleep, Psychiatric, and Somatic Problems According to Work Schedule: an Internet Survey in an Eastern European Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinescu, Bogdan I

    2018-03-19

    A wide range of health problems was investigated, aiming to identify the presence and severity of a set of self-reported and common sleep, psychiatric, and somatic health problems among working professionals in four different shift schedules (morning, evening, rotating, and day) in several cities in Romania. A heterogeneous sample of 488 workers of different professions completed online a battery of tests, namely the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire, the Parasomnia Questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire, designed to identity symptoms of insomnia, sleepiness, snoring, parasomnia, as well as of depression, anxiety, eating, somatoform, and alcohol use disorders, respectively. The timing and the duration of the sleep, along with the presence of high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes mellitus were also inquired. The prevalence of the different health problems in relation to the type of shift schedule was evaluated with the Pearson Chi-square test. ANOVA was used to calculate the significance of the difference between the means, while associations with different health problems were estimated by binary logistic regression. The most common mental health problems were depression (26%), insomnia (20%), alcohol misuse (18%), and anxiety (17%). No significant differences based on the type of shift in terms of health problems were found, except for high blood pressure and symptoms of panic disorder that were more frequently reported by the workers in early morning shifts. Together with the workers in rotating shifts, they also reported increased sleepiness, poorer sleep quality, and shorter sleep duration. In contrast, the workers in evening shifts reported less severe health problems and longer sleep duration. Working in early morning shifts was found to be associated with poorer health outcomes, while working in rotating and early morning shifts with more severe sleep-related problems.

  16. 78 FR 44187 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council ACTION: Notice of open Federal..., and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be... the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked...

  17. 77 FR 40400 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on July 17... Business Council. The National Women's Business Council is tasked with providing policy recommendations on...

  18. Council | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Council. The affairs and property of the Academy are administered by a Council of 20, consisting of a President, four Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, two Secretaries, and twelve other members. The Council, with a term of three years, is elected by the Fellows triennially. Members of the Council for the period 2016 to 2018:.

  19. 76 FR 55363 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Groundfish Management Team (GMT) [[Page 55364... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...; telephone: (206) 526-6150. Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE Ambassador Place...

  20. 77 FR 75614 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Highly Migratory Species Management Team (HMSMT... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National.... Council address: Pacific Fishery Management Council, 7700 NE. Ambassador Place, Suite 101, Portland, OR...

  1. Effect of interaction between dynapenic component of the European working group on sarcopenia in older people sarcopenia criteria and obesity on activities of daily living in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Pyo; Kim, Sun; Joh, Ju-Youn; Hwang, Hwan-Sik

    2014-05-01

    To examine the effects of interaction between dynapenic component of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) sarcopenia and obesity (dynapenia × obesity) on activities of daily living (ADL) in older participants. Cross-sectional analysis of the Validity and Reliability of Korean Frailty Index and the Validity and Reliability of the Kaigo-Yobo Checklist in Korean Elderly studies. Six welfare facilities operated by government in South Korea. Four hundred eighty-seven community-dwelling individuals (157 males, 330 females) >65 years of age. Dynapenic component of the EWGSOP sarcopenia was defined as usual gait speed sarcopenia and obesity in the elderly is associated with multiplicative interactions rather than additive interactions in ADL. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood pressure monitoring: theory and practice. European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring and Cardiovascular Variability Teaching Course Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, George S; Palatini, Paolo; Asmar, Roland; Bilo, Grzegorz; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Head, Geoff; Kario, Kazuomi; Mihailidou, Anastasia; Wang, Jiguang; Mancia, Giuseppe; O'Brien, Eoin; Parati, Gianfranco

    2018-02-01

    The European Society of Hypertension (ESH) Working Group on Blood Pressure (BP) Monitoring and Cardiovascular Variability organized a Teaching Course on 'Blood Pressure Monitoring: Theory and Practice' during the 2017 ESH Meeting in Milan, Italy. This course performed by 11 international BP monitoring experts covered key topics of BP monitoring, including office BP measurement, ambulatory BP monitoring, home BP monitoring, ambulatory versus home BP, white-coat and masked hypertension, cuff use, and BP variability. This article presents a summary of the proceedings of the ESH BP Monitoring Teaching Course, including essential information, practical issues, and recommendations on the clinical application of BP monitoring methods, aiming to the optimal management of patients with suspected or diagnosed hypertension.

  3. Ukraine and the Council of Europe common activity in implementation of key principles of participatory democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaliuk Nazar Yuriyovych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the main forms of mutual cooperation of Ukraine and the Council of Europe in order to implement basic principles of participatory democracy, to conform the legislation of Ukraine to standards of the European Union. The article examines the main legal documents, phases, and the main areas of cooperation between Ukraine and the Council of Europe. The author also assesses the processes of implementation of key principles of participatory democracy in Ukraine.

  4. Politic culture’s impact on effectiveness of istanbul city councils

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadır Şahin

    2012-01-01

    City councils are governance platforms proposed through a number of European Union accession negotiations as decentralization devices in order to implement policies for benefit of the public. Regulation establishing city councils puts out the objectives of the policy as "development of a city vision and consciousness of citizenship, protection of the city's rights and social order, providing sustainable development, environmental sensitivity, social assistance and solidarity, and implementati...

  5. LABOR MOBILITY – EUROPEAN UNION AND NATIONAL RULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Catană

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the four fundamental freedoms guaranteed by the Treaty establishing the European Community is the free movement of persons, whose Foundation lies in the Elimination of discrimination between citizens of the Member State in whose territory they reside and operate and citizens of other countries who are working in the territory of the same State. Mobility of labor in terms of the concept of free movement of workers, the term worker referring both to persons carrying on an activity in the wage and the notion of the worker, as these concepts have been determined by the Court of Justice or by the Council (through the provisions of Regulation 1612/68, became his new in the context of Romania's integration in the European Union. Although the movement of workers is free, legal regime of these is different from one Member State to another, which leads to inequities that the Community rules have failed to cover.

  6. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleau, Th

    2005-07-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  7. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  8. European nuclear features. Interview: Commissioner Piebalgs (DG TREN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Fifth issue of the European Nuclear Features. A joint publication of atw, Nuclear Espana, and Revue Generale Nucleaire. Contents: Frontier research in the EU Scientific Council of the European Research Council announced proactive safety management strategies; Pebble Bed Modular Reactor; New experiences applying methodologies for control room I and C modernization; Experts from Taiwan fulfil their training in Madrid; Ensa's activities in the Asian Commercial Nuclear Power Market; Clearance survey approach for scrap metals from NPP. (orig.)

  9. 77 FR 44216 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... MAFMC Strategic Planning--Objective, Process, and Possible Outcomes and an introduction to the new.... SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) and its Strategic Planning Working Group... INFORMATION: Monday, August 13, 2012 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.--The Visioning and Strategic Planning Working Group...

  10. The impact of the European Working Time Directive 10 years on: views of the UK medical graduates of 2002 surveyed in 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    To report doctors' views about the European Working Time Directive ('the Directive'). Survey of the medical graduates of 2002 (surveyed in 2013-2014). Medical graduates. UK. Questions on views about the Directive. The response rate was 64% (2056/3196). Twelve per cent of respondents agreed that the Directive had benefited senior doctors, 39% that it benefited junior doctors, and 17% that it had benefited the NHS. More women (41%) than men (35%) agreed that the Directive had benefited junior doctors. Surgeons (6%) and adult medical specialists (8%) were least likely to agree that the Directive had benefited senior doctors. Surgeons (20%) were less likely than others to agree that the Directive had benefited junior doctors, whilst specialists in emergency medicine (57%) and psychiatry (52%) were more likely to agree. Surgeons (7%) were least likely to agree that the Directive had benefited the NHS. Most respondents (62%) reported a positive effect upon work-life balance. With regard to quality of patient care, 45% reported a neutral effect, 40% reported a negative effect, and 15% a positive effect. Most respondents (71%) reported a negative effect of the Directive on continuity of patient care, and 71% felt that the Directive had a negative effect upon junior doctors' training opportunities. Fifty-two per cent reported a negative effect on efficiency in managing patient care. Senior doctors agreed that the Directive benefited doctors' work-life balance. In other respects, they were more negative about it. Surgeons were the least positive about aspects of the Directive.

  11. Microprocessing in European High Energy Physics Experiments - ECFA Working Group on Data Processing Standards - Report of the Microprocessor Subgroup May 1982

    CERN Document Server

    European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA)

    1982-01-01

    This document contains two reports on the use of microprocessors in European High-Energy Physics experiments. The first is a presentation of data collected by a sub-group of the ECFA working group on data procesing standards. The working group is organised by E. Lillestol, University of Bergen and E.M. Rimmer, CERN, DD Division; the Microprocessor sub-group organiser is L.O. Hertzberger, NIKHEF, Amsterdam. Data are given from projects numbered 81 - 194, and some CERN projects are included. Even though there is some duplication of information, a second report has been appended which covers a wider range of CERN projects. This was the result of a microprocessor survey made at CERN by P. Scharff-Hansen, DD Division, at the request of E. Gabthuler. The ECFA working group intends to have reports for all the sub-groups (10 in number) available in machine-readable form at the CERN computer centre. However, it was felt that the information herein is most valuable to designers and users of microprocessors, and that it...

  12. 77 FR 69869 - National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National Cancer Advisory Board... Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and National...: National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse, and...

  13. Long working hours and risk of coronary heart disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Jokela, Markus; Nyberg, Solja T

    2015-01-01

    , Economic and Social Research Council, European Union New and Emerging Risks in Occupational Safety and Health research programme, Finnish Work Environment Fund, Swedish Research Council for Working Life and Social Research, German Social Accident Insurance, Danish National Research Centre for the Working......BACKGROUND: Long working hours might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but prospective evidence is scarce, imprecise, and mostly limited to coronary heart disease. We aimed to assess long working hours as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. METHODS: We...... identified published studies through a systematic review of PubMed and Embase from inception to Aug 20, 2014. We obtained unpublished data for 20 cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-analysis in Working Populations (IPD-Work) Consortium and open-access data archives. We used cumulative...

  14. Importance of social and cultural factors for attitudes, disclosure and time off work for depression: findings from a seven country European study on depression in the workplace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Evans-Lacko

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Depression is experienced by a large proportion of the workforce and associated with high costs to employers and employees. There is little research on how the social costs of depression vary by social and cultural context. This study investigates individual, workplace and societal factors associated with greater perceived discomfort regarding depression in the workplace, greater likelihood of employees taking time off of work as a result of depression and greater likelihood of disclosure of depression to one's employer. METHODS: Employees and managers (n = 7,065 were recruited from seven European countries to participate in the IDEA survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between individual characteristics and country contextual characteristics in relation to workplace perceptions, likelihood of taking time off work and disclosing depression to an employer. RESULTS: Our findings suggest that structural factors such as benefit systems and flexible working hours are important for understanding workplace perceptions and consequences for employees with depression. However, manager responses that focus on offering help to the employee with depression appear to have stronger associations with positive perceptions in the workplace, and also with openness and disclosure by employees with depression. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of individual, workplace and societal factors that may be associated with how people with depression are perceived and treated in the workplace, and, hence, factors that may be associated with openness and disclosure among employees with depression. Some responses, such as flexible working hours, may be helpful but are not necessarily sufficient, and our findings also emphasise the importance of support and openness of managers in addition to flexible working hours.

  15. Importance of Social and Cultural Factors for Attitudes, Disclosure and Time off Work for Depression: Findings from a Seven Country European Study on Depression in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; Knapp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is experienced by a large proportion of the workforce and associated with high costs to employers and employees. There is little research on how the social costs of depression vary by social and cultural context. This study investigates individual, workplace and societal factors associated with greater perceived discomfort regarding depression in the workplace, greater likelihood of employees taking time off of work as a result of depression and greater likelihood of disclosure of depression to one's employer. Methods Employees and managers (n = 7,065) were recruited from seven European countries to participate in the IDEA survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between individual characteristics and country contextual characteristics in relation to workplace perceptions, likelihood of taking time off work and disclosing depression to an employer. Results Our findings suggest that structural factors such as benefit systems and flexible working hours are important for understanding workplace perceptions and consequences for employees with depression. However, manager responses that focus on offering help to the employee with depression appear to have stronger associations with positive perceptions in the workplace, and also with openness and disclosure by employees with depression. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of individual, workplace and societal factors that may be associated with how people with depression are perceived and treated in the workplace, and, hence, factors that may be associated with openness and disclosure among employees with depression. Some responses, such as flexible working hours, may be helpful but are not necessarily sufficient, and our findings also emphasise the importance of support and openness of managers in addition to flexible working hours. PMID:24622046

  16. Importance of social and cultural factors for attitudes, disclosure and time off work for depression: findings from a seven country European study on depression in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; Knapp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Depression is experienced by a large proportion of the workforce and associated with high costs to employers and employees. There is little research on how the social costs of depression vary by social and cultural context. This study investigates individual, workplace and societal factors associated with greater perceived discomfort regarding depression in the workplace, greater likelihood of employees taking time off of work as a result of depression and greater likelihood of disclosure of depression to one's employer. Employees and managers (n = 7,065) were recruited from seven European countries to participate in the IDEA survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between individual characteristics and country contextual characteristics in relation to workplace perceptions, likelihood of taking time off work and disclosing depression to an employer. Our findings suggest that structural factors such as benefit systems and flexible working hours are important for understanding workplace perceptions and consequences for employees with depression. However, manager responses that focus on offering help to the employee with depression appear to have stronger associations with positive perceptions in the workplace, and also with openness and disclosure by employees with depression. This study highlights the importance of individual, workplace and societal factors that may be associated with how people with depression are perceived and treated in the workplace, and, hence, factors that may be associated with openness and disclosure among employees with depression. Some responses, such as flexible working hours, may be helpful but are not necessarily sufficient, and our findings also emphasise the importance of support and openness of managers in addition to flexible working hours.

  17. Fiscal councils as a mechanism for establishing fiscal discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Mileva

    2014-01-01

    process and strengthening the fiscal discipline. In the new European fiscal governance framework, these institutions become particularly important in the context of mending the consequences of the current economic crisis. In their hitherto activities, fiscal councils have encountered some difficulties: their competences have been challenged, their assessment and recommendations have been disregarded, and their financial resources (aimed at promoting their activities have been significantly restricted. Relying on this analysis, we may conclude that the independence and responsibility of fiscal councils largely depends on the government's resolve to be fully accountable in administering a sustainable fiscal policy.

  18. "Working the system"--British American tobacco's influence on the European union treaty and its implications for policy: an analysis of internal tobacco industry documents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact assessment (IA of all major European Union (EU policies is now mandatory. The form of IA used has been criticised for favouring corporate interests by overemphasising economic impacts and failing to adequately assess health impacts. Our study sought to assess how, why, and in what ways corporations, and particularly the tobacco industry, influenced the EU's approach to IA.In order to identify whether industry played a role in promoting this system of IA within the EU, we analysed internal documents from British American Tobacco (BAT that were disclosed following a series of litigation cases in the United States. We combined this analysis with one of related literature and interviews with key informants. Our analysis demonstrates that from 1995 onwards BAT actively worked with other corporate actors to successfully promote a business-oriented form of IA that favoured large corporations. It appears that BAT favoured this form of IA because it could advance the company's European interests by establishing ground rules for policymaking that would: (i provide an economic framework for evaluating all policy decisions, implicitly prioritising costs to businesses; (ii secure early corporate involvement in policy discussions; (iii bestow the corporate sector with a long-term advantage over other actors by increasing policymakers' dependence on information they supplied; and (iv provide businesses with a persuasive means of challenging potential and existing legislation. The data reveal that an ensuing lobbying campaign, largely driven by BAT, helped secure binding changes to the EU Treaty via the Treaty of Amsterdam that required EU policymakers to minimise legislative burdens on businesses. Efforts subsequently focused on ensuring that these Treaty changes were translated into the application of a business orientated form of IA (cost-benefit analysis [CBA] within EU policymaking procedures. Both the tobacco and chemical industries have since

  19. The judicial process: an overview from the TDA Council on Ethics and Judicial Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Roy N

    2011-08-01

    From time to time, the Council on Ethics and Judicial Affairs must investigate and act on the alleged unethical behavior of Texas Dental Association members. Because the alleged behavior is directed at a colleague and TDA member, the work of the council is neither comfortable nor inviting. Nonetheless, council decisions are made taking into account its mission to investigate the allegation between the parties and to improve dental ethics in the state.

  20. Council of public health. Report of 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Following a general introduction over the organisation and function of the Council of Public Health, of the work carried out by two philosophy committees, two deliberation groups and 60 general committees, during 1978, are presented. Included are reports from the philosophy committee for radiation hygiene and committees for food irradiation, disposal of radioactive waste and categorised radionuclide laboratories, guide-lines for radiation safety in hospitals and clinics, isotope laboratories, legal responsibility of radiation accidents, computer tomography, supplementary advice for nuclear energy, combustion furnace for radioactive waste, experiments on subjects with radioactive materials and systematic dental X-ray examination. (C.F.)

  1. Assessment of advanced materials development in the European Fusion long-term Technology Programme. Report to the FTSC-P by the Advanced Materials Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Schaaf, B.

    1998-08-01

    In view of the transition to the next, fifth, framework program, and the resources available, the European Commission (EC) requested to launch an assessment for the Advanced Materials area, as part of the European Fusion Technology Programme. A working group chaired by the Materials Field Coordinator assessed the current status of the programme with the view to prepare its future focusing on one class of materials, as expressed by the FTSC-P. Two classes of materials: SiC/SiC ceramic composites and low activation alloys on the basis of V, Ti and Cr are presently in the Advanced Materials area. They are all in very early stages of development with a view to their application in fusion power reactors. All have adverse properties that could exclude their use. SiC/SiC ceramic composites have by far the highest potential operating temperature, contributing greatly to the efficiency of fusion power reactors. At the same time it is also the development with the highest development loss risk. This class of materials needs an integrated approach of design, manufacturing and materials development different from alloy development. The alloys with vanadium and titanium as base element have limited application windows due to their inherent properties. If the development of RAFM steels continues as foreseen, the development of V and Ti alloys is not justifiable in the frame of the advanced materials programme. The oxide dispersion strengthened variant of RAFM steels might reach similar temperature limits: about 900K. Chromium based alloys hold the promise of higher operating temperatures, but the knowledge and experience in fusion applications is limited. Investigating the potential of chromium alloys is considered worthwhile. The alloys have comparable activation hazards and early recycling potential, with properly controlled compositions. Recycling of the SiC/SiC class of materials needs further investigation. The working group concludes that at this stage no contender can be

  2. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  3. Members of the State Council of Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Luncheon hosted by the Director-General for members of the State Council of Geneva: From left to right A. Naudi; J. May; M. Carlo Lamprecht, State Council - Employement, Foreign Office and Economic Departement; M. Robert Hensler, State Chancellor; L. Maiani, CERN Director General; H.F. Hoffmann; M. Robert Cramer, State Council - Environment, Agriculture and Interior Departement; J.Van Der Boon; M. Laurent Moutinot, State Council - Installation, equipment and housing Departement; C. Détraz; C. Wyss; P. Jenni; G. Hentsch; M. Pierre-François Unger, State Council - Health and Social Action Departement; G. Stassinakis; M. Bourquin, CERN Council President.

  4. The American Council of Women Chiropractors from 1935 to 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, N R

    1998-06-01

    Equal rights for women have been a never ending battle in the professional world. Even though many women influenced the chiropractic profession, these same battles could not be avoided. For this reason, several students from the Lincoln Chiropractic College worked to form the American Council of Women Chiropractors (ACWC), a council of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA). From 1935 to 1960, the organization was represented in the House of Counselors of the NCA, had a monthly section in the Journal of the National Chiropractic Association to publish information about the council along with scholarly work by their members, and formed a Scholarship Foundation for Women Chiropractic Students. Perhaps one of the most important roles the ACWC played was in its support of women chiropractors. Through annual meetings and personal contacts, the members were able to endure many difficulties that existed both inside and outside chiropractic.

  5. THE COMPETITION POLICY IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitriţa Florea (Ionescu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The idea of European unity dates back to antiquity, the time when the Roman Empire alsopursued such a goal. Attempts to unify European countries have appeared constantly in history, but theirsuccessful culmination crystallized only after the Second World War.Basically, the two wars have led to the downfall of Europe and the loss of its centenary political andmilitary position. The experience of these wars has led the states to initiate a defense mechanism of peace,security and international cooperation - resulted in creating an organization of universal jurisdiction -TheLeague of Nations. However, the successor of this organization, The United Nations - was one thatmanaged thorough its collective security system represented by the Security Council, to ensure andmaintain universal / global peace until now (Stelian Scăunaş, 2005.The creation of the European Union is based on four founding treaties: The Treaty establishingThe European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC - adopted in Paris on April 18, 1951, entered into forcein 1952 - treaty concluded for a period of 50 years and that has terminated in 2002, The Treatyestablishing the European Economic Community (EEC, The Treaty establishing the European AtomicEnergy Community (EAEC or EURATOM, both signed in Rome on March 25, 1947 and entered into forcein 1958 as the Treaties of Rome, and The Treaty on the European Union, which was adopted at Maastrichton 7th of February 1992 and entered into force in 1993. To these institution treaties we can add themodifying treaties of the founding treaties, including: The Merger Treaty - adopted in Brussels on 8 April1965, entered into force in 1967; The Single European Act - signed in Luxembourg and Hague in 1986,entered into force in 1987; The Amsterdam Treaty - signed on October 2, 1997, entered into force in 1999,The Treaty of Nice - signed on February 26, 2001, entered into force in 2003, The Lisbon Treaty signed in2007 and entered into force on December 1st

  6. Green power. Renewable electricity purchasing by Leicester City Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This case study describes the use of renewable energy by Leicester City Council in the East Midlands. The Council, which has a long-term commitment to sustainable energy and the environment, employs over 14,000 people. A contract was first negotiated with East Midlands Electricity (now PowerGen) to supply the Council's New Walk Centre with green electricity in 1995. Some of the green energy is supplied by the Milford Mill hydroelectric plant. Use of building energy monitoring systems (BEMSs) and other good practice has allowed the Council to achieve a 20% saving in its electricity bill. The Council has also negotiated contracts to supply two smaller sites (a recycling facility called Planet Works and the city's Energy Efficiency centre) with green electricity generated by Beacon Energy, a small renewable energy company which operates two 25 kW wind turbines and two 3 kW arrays of photovoltaic cells at a site some 15 miles from Leicester. The exemption given to renewable energy from the climate change levy makes these schemes even more economic; a worked example is provided to demonstrate the impact of the climate change levy on electricity costs at the New Walk Centre. Six steps to follow when seeking to connect to green electricity are advised

  7. Fiscal councils and economic volatility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Geršl, A.; Jašová, M.; Zápal, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2014), s. 190-212 ISSN 0015-1920 Grant - others:UK(CZ) UNCE 204005/2012 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : dynamic inconsistency * fiscal and monetary policy interaction * independent fiscal council Subject RIV: AH - Economic s Impact factor: 0.420, year: 2014 http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1298_jasova.pdf

  8. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  9. The Political Position of Southeast Russian Church Council (1919 During the Civil War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biriukova Iuliia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the attitude of the Southeast Russian Church Council toward rather an inhomogeneous politically White Movement. This council took place in Stavropol in 1919. Various socio-political forces, represented at the council, tried to take advantage of that assembly in order to use its authority for political causes, but the council successfully ignored such attempts. According to the council the main purpose of the Church was to work constructively in a religious and moral sphere. Since the White Army became an ally of the Church in its struggle with militant atheism, the leader of the White Movement General Anton Denikin was the only political fi gure who received a special support from the council

  10. The European Central Bank and the Eurosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Carol C. Bertaut

    2002-01-01

    The Eurosystem comprises the European Central Bank at its center as well as the national central banks of the twelve countries currently participating in monetary union. The European Central Bank was established in July 1998, six months before the beginning of Stage Three of economic and monetary union. Although decisions regarding monetary policy are made centrally by the Governing Council of the Eurosystem, the operational aspects of monetary policy-including open market operations, adminis...

  11. The single European energy market: the electricity supply sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The completion of the Internal Market in the Community by the end of 1992 has become a key objective and the focal point of the revival of the European Community. Within this overall objective, the development of the Single European Energy Market, the Internal Energy market, is a major element. The energy objectives for the Community, adopted in 1986 by the Council of Ministers and relating to targets in the energy sector to be achieved by 1995, contain what are effectively the aims of the Internal Energy Market. This is in a reference to the need for greater integration, free from barriers to trade, of the Internal Energy Market with a view to improving security of supply, reducing costs and improving economic competitiveness. In the light of these aims, the Commission drew up, in 1988, an inventory of potential obstacles to the achievement of the Internal Energy Market. This was accepted by the Council, together with a list of suggested priority areas of work, and has formed the basis of the Commission's efforts to move forward as quickly as possible in the development of the Internal Energy Market, in all branches of the energy sector. The impact on the electricity sector, in particular, is considered here. (author)

  12. Sarcopenia according to the european working group on sarcopenia in older people (EWGSOP) versus Dynapenia as a risk factor for disability in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Alexandre, T; de Oliveira Duarte, Y A; Ferreira Santos, J L; Wong, R; Lebrão, M L

    2014-05-01

    Sarcopenia, defined as low muscle mass (LMM), and dynapenia have been associated with adverse outcomes in elderly. Contrast the association of sarcopenia versus dynapenia with incidence of disability. A four-year prospective study (2006-2010). São Paulo, Brazil. 478 individuals aged 60 and older from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE) study who were non-disabled at baseline. Sarcopenia, measured according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), includes: LMM assessed by skeletal muscle mass index ≤8.90kg/m2 (men) and ≤6.37kg/m2 (women); low muscle strength (LMS) assessed by handgrip strength sarcopenia required LMM plus LMS or LPP. Dynapenia was defined as handgrip strength sarcopenia or dynapenia status. After controlling for all covariates, sarcopenia was associated with mobility or IADL disability (relative risk ratio = 2.23, 95%Confidence Interval: 1.03-4.85). Dynapenia was not associated with disability. Sarcopenia according to the EWGSOP definition can be used in clinical practice as a screening tool for early functional decline (mobility or IADL disability).

  13. Sarcopenia according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) versus dynapenia as a risk factor for mortality in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, T da Silva; Duarte, Y A de Oliveira; Santos, J L Ferreira; Wong, R; Lebrão, M L

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia and dynapenia have been associated with poorer physical performance, disability and death. The aim of this study was to compare the association between sarcopenia and dynapenia with mortality. We studied 1,149 Brazilians aged 60 years or older residing in São Paulo. Sarcopenia was defined according to the consensus of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), which includes three components: low muscle mass (LMM) assessed by skeletal muscle mass index ≤ 8.90kg/m2 (men) and ≤ 6.37kg/m2 (women); low muscle strength (LMS) assessed by handgrip strength sarcopenia required presence of LMM plus LMS or LPP. Dynapenia was defined as handgrip strength sarcopenia were 65.9/1,000 person/years and 20.1/1,000 person/years and for dynapenia were 44.3/1,000 person/years and 14.9/1,000 person/years. The adjusted model showed that sarcopenia (HR=1.52, 95%CI: 1.06 - 2.19) and dynapenia (HR=2.04, 95%CI: 1.24 - 3.37) are independent risk factors for death. The EWGSOP definition of sarcopenia and dynapenia can help to determine risk for mortality and can be used as a screening instrument in public health.

  14. Work Package 1B.2 under the European Commission, Integrated Wind Turbine Design (UPWIND): Verification of long-term load measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt Paulsen, U.

    2011-02-15

    The present report is the final effort of tasks carried out under UPWIND WP1B2 transmission and conversion, which describes: 1) results and recommendations developed in the course of developing the long-term load measurement technique. 2) the hardware details, type of sensors and location, data storage and. 3) data analysis technique to verify design load assumptions. The work is carried out under Contract no 019945 (SES6) 'UPWIND' within the European Commission The interaction between the mechanical and electrical generator subsystems is described rudimentarily, based primarily on HAWC2 simulations below stall of the mechanical system with simple generator and gearbox systems. The electrical system simulations were not carried out as intended in DOW[2], but indications of the conditions for establishing the interaction have been described by measurements and by argument, that this might have an effect as indicated. The hypothesis stating, that the power signal can be utilized as a basic signal for extended analysis of mechanical as well as electrical power signal with static and dynamic features, has been demonstrated on performance and dynamic bandwidth capability. It is however from present analysis obvious that improved signal conditions could be achieved with other mechanical joint solutions than with the present torque signal as measured with the cardan joint. For the reasons mentioned, the comparison with a signal showing the mechanical properties could be improved, with a likely gain on the accuracy as a result. (Author)

  15. 77 FR 61466 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on October... [[Page 61467

  16. National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month NCADD National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Addiction is a Disease - Treatment is Available - Recovery ... years, The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) has been a valuable resource for ...

  17. European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, K.

    1995-01-01

    Different instruments used by European Commission of the European Union for financial support radioactive waste management activities in the Russian Federation are outlined. Three particular programmes in the area are described

  18. 78 FR 27407 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    .... Work on the Council's 21st report on the restructuring of graduate medical education will finish. The... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory...

  19. 78 FR 79674 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Limits Monitoring Overview 5. Red Snapper Slot Limit Analysis 6. Alternative Red Snapper ABCs a. based on...: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of the ABC Control Rule... the individual meeting agendas are as follows: ABC Control Rule Working Group Agenda, Wednesday...

  20. European approaches to ensure good animal welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veissier, I.; Butterworth, A.; Bock, B.B.; Roe, E.

    2008-01-01

    Conventions to protect domestic animals during transport, farming and slaughter were established by the Council of Europe and approved by many European states. Conventions are followed by recommendations that specify how the general principles of conventions apply for the different species. The

  1. Inequality and rising levels of socio-economic segregation : Lessons from a pan-European comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcinczak, S.; Musterd, S.; Van Ham, M.; Tammaru, T.

    2015-01-01

    The research leading to these results has received funding from the Estonian Research Council (Institutional Research Grant IUT no. 2–17 on Spatial Population Mobility and Geographical Changes in Urban Regions); the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme

  2. 76 FR 62133 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday...., Appendix 2), SBA announces the meeting of the National Women's Business Council. The National Women's...

  3. Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education DHSS State of Alaska Home ; Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education Page Content Untitled Document Patrick Reinhart : follow GCDSE to 40404 The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education is pleased to award

  4. 78 FR 15928 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... apportionment of funds. Advisory Council Organization The Council will be comprised of not more than 20 members. The members appointed to the Council will be fairly balanced in terms of the points of view... relevancy to a membership category. Geographic balance and a balanced distribution among the categories are...

  5. Parent-School Councils in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Wayne D.; Bjork, Lars G.; Zhao, Yuru; Chi, Bin

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study examines how schools in Beijing have responded to a Chinese national policy mandate to establish and maintain parent councils. We surveyed principals and parent council members across schools in the Beijing municipality about the establishment and functions of their schools' parent councils. Survey results provide insights…

  6. 36 CFR 801.4 - Council comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Council comments. 801.4 Section 801.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION HISTORIC PRESERVATION REQUIREMENTS OF THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT ACTION GRANT PROGRAM § 801.4 Council comments. The following...

  7. 75 FR 20832 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory... Biomass/Coal Blending to Generate Electricity Council Business: [cir] Finance Report by Committee Chairman...

  8. 76 FR 74049 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy..., notice is hereby given that the National Coal Council will be renewed for a two-year period beginning... general policy matters relating to coal issues. Additionally, the renewal of the Council has been...

  9. 78 FR 7424 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal Advisory... 2013 meeting of the National Coal Council. Agenda: 1. Opening Remarks by NCC Chairman John Eaves 2...

  10. 78 FR 71592 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy..., notice is hereby given that the National Coal Council (NCC) will be renewed for a two-year period. The... matters relating to coal issues. Additionally, the renewal of the National Coal Council has been...

  11. 78 FR 23242 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meetings. SUMMARY: This notice announces two meetings of the National Coal Council (NCC). The Federal...: Agenda for Thursday, May 16, 2013 1. Call to Order by John Eaves, Chairman, National Coal Council 2...

  12. 78 FR 40131 - National Petroleum Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of... Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public... Administrative Matters Discussion of Any Other Business Properly Brought Before the National Petroleum Council...

  13. 77 FR 42297 - National Petroleum Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil... National Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that... Matters Discussion of Any Other Business Properly Brought Before the National Petroleum Council...

  14. 76 FR 53889 - National Petroleum Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Fossil... Petroleum Council. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that public... Properly Brought Before the National, Petroleum Council, Adjournment. Public Participation: The meeting is...

  15. Police Enforcement Policy and Programmes on European Roads (PEPPER). Workpackage WP4 `Good Practices in Traffic Enforcement', Working paper 24: Good practice in data and data collection for monitoring and evaluating traffic law enforcement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van Bernhoft, I.M. Erke, A. Ewert, U. Kallberg, V.-P. & Skladana, P.

    2007-01-01

    This working paper describes the good practice requirements regarding data and data collection for monitoring and evaluating Traffic Law Enforcement (TLE). The aim is at, eventually, individual police forces/countries put the identified ’good practice’ data into a European TLE monitoring database

  16. 76 FR 37064 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a public meeting via webinar... meeting will be held via webinar. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North... Executive Director, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; telephone: (813) 348-1630. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  17. 75 FR 31418 - Intermountain Region, Payette National Forest, Council Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek-Council...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Ranger District; Idaho; Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project AGENCY: Forest Service... the Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape Restoration Project. The approximate 51,900 acre project area is located about two miles east of Council, Idaho. The Mill Creek--Council Mountain Landscape...

  18. Current Activities of the Joint Council on Economic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews current activities of the Joint Council, among them, a researcher training institute, a new K-12 economic education scope and sequence document, a junior high level test of economic knowledge, an instructional package for advanced placement classes, a textbook conference, a project to help teachers of students who work with at-risk…

  19. The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of Council Health Management Team in the Improvement of Health Services Quality: The Case of Kinondoni and Ilala Municipalities in Dar es ... poor working equipment, lack of commitment on the part of members of the CHMT, lack of effective CHMTs' supervision, as well as the lack of good networking and ...

  20. 78 FR 65617 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... at the Newport Marriott Hotel, 25 America's Cup Avenue, Newport, Rhode Island 02840; Telephone 401-849- 1000 or online at http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/pvdlw-newport-marriott/ . Requests for..., the Council will review and discuss a report and recommendations from its ABC Control Rule Working...

  1. Climate and energy targets of the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolwijk, H.; Veenendaal, P.

    2007-01-01

    Attention is paid to two important parts of the targets for climate and energy which were determined by the European Council in March 2007 for the year 2020: (1) the impact of the emission reduction target and the correlations with the sustainable development targets; and (2) the obstacles for the European Union on the way to thar 20% renewable energy target [nl

  2. 20-20-20: the target of European energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clo, R.; Verde, S.

    2007-01-01

    The last Spring European Council set ambitious targets in its new EU energy policy. Reaching these objectives is far from going without saying and without hidden dangers, if the EU aims at these targets uncritically, national and European energy systems will be exposed to additional risks and problems. Hence, the critical issues must be born in mind negotiating national targets in Brussels [it

  3. European Association of Echocardiography: Research Grant Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargani, Luna; Muraru, Denisa; Badano, Luigi P; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Sicari, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) offers a variety of grants/fellowships to help young professionals in the field of cardiological training or research activities throughout Europe. The number of grants has significantly increased in recent years with contributions from the Associations, Working Groups and Councils of the ESC. The European Association of Echocardiography (EAE) is a registered branch of the ESC and actively takes part in this initiative. One of the aims of EAE is to promote excellence in research in cardiovascular ultrasound and other imaging modalities in Europe. Therefore, since 2008, the EAE offers a Research Grant Programme to help young doctors to obtain research experience in a high standard academic centre (or similar institution oriented to clinical or pre-clinical research) in an ESC member country other than their own. This programme can be considered as a valorization of the geographical mobility as well as cultural exchanges and professional practice in the field of cardiovascular imaging. The programme has been very successful so far, therefore in 2012 the EAE has increased its offer to two grants of 25,000 euros per annum each.

  4. Overcoming Gridlock: The Council Presidency, Legislative Activity and Issue De-Coupling in the Area of Occupational Health and Safety Regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warntjen, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A member state of the European Union can use its term as the Council president to make progress on pending but stalled proposals which it would like to see adopted. This case study of the directive on the risk arising from physical agents shows how a Council presidency can use issue subtraction,

  5. 78 FR 64200 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Caribbean Fishery Management Council's (Council) Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) will hold... Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... held at the Caribbean Fishery Management Council Headquarters, located at 270 Mu[ntilde]oz Rivera...

  6. 75 FR 49890 - Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Pacific Fishery Management Council's (Pacific Council) Coastal Pelagic Species Management Team (CPSMT) and... Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... will be available at the following location: Pacific Fishery Management Council, Small Conference Room...

  7. INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT OF EUROPEAN STATISTICS AND OF THEIR QUALITY - CURRENT CONCERNS AT EUROPEAN LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ŞTEFĂNESCU

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The issues referring to official statistics quality and reliability became the main topics of debates as far as statistical governance in Europe is concerned. The Council welcomed the Commission Communication to the European Parliament and to the Council « Towards robust quality management for European Statistics » (COM 211, appreciating that the approach and the objective of the strategy would confer the European Statistical System (ESS the quality management framework for the coordination of consolidated economic policies. The Council pointed out that the European Statistical System management was improved during recent years, that progress was noticed in relation with high quality statistics production and dissemination within the European Union, but has also noticed that, in the context of recent financial crisis, certain weaknesses were identified, particularly related to quality management general framework.„Greece Case” proved that progresses were not enough for guaranteeing the complete independence of national statistical institutes and entailed the need for further consolidating ESS governance. Several undertakings are now in the preparatory stage, in accordance with the Commission Communication; these actions are welcomed, but the question arise: are these sufficient for definitively solving the problem?The paper aims to go ahead in the attempt of identifying a different way, innovative (courageous! on the long run, towards an advanced institutional structure of ESS, by setting up the European System of Statistical Institutes, similar to the European System of Central Banks, that would require a change in the Treaty.

  8. Nr 832 and Nr 833 - Report made on the behalf of the foreign affairs Commission on: - the bill project nr 4 authorizing the approval of the amendment protocol of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the Swiss Federal Council related to the extension in the French territory of the domain of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research concluded on the 13 September 1965, and - the bill project nr 5 authorizing the approval of the agreement between the Government of the French Republic, the Swiss Federal Council, and the European organisation for nuclear research on the law applicable to companies intervening on the Organisation's domain to provide services with a trans-national character, and Appendix: texts of the Commission of foreign affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This report first presents the European organisation for nuclear research as an example of a European achievement, and as a significant source of fallouts for the French economy. It comments the complex application of territoriality rules in the field of labour law, and notably the fact that the location of work performance prevails for the determination of the applicable law, and that this issue has significant implications for French companies. The third part recalls the long negotiation process and comments the content of both agreements

  9. On Law and Policy in a European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Petersen, Clement Salung

    On 4 December 2009, the European Council unanimously adopted conclusions on an enhanced patent system in Europe, which inter alia intends to establish a new EU patent as well as a new common patent judiciary - the European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC). The EEUPC will constitute a new sui...... generis, transnational court system with exclusive jurisdiction in respect of civil litigation related to the infringement and validity of European patents and EU patent. This paper considers this proposal for the establishment of the EEUPC under two basic observations, namely that substantive law...

  10. On Law and Policy in a European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2010-01-01

    On 4 December 2009, the European Council unanimously adopted conclusions on an enhanced patent system in Europe, which inter alia intends to establish a new EU patent as well as a new common patent judiciary – the European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC). The EEUPC will constitute a new sui...... generis, transnational court system with exclusive jurisdiction in respect of civil litigation related to the infringement and validity of European patents and EU patent. This paper considers this proposal for the establishment of the EEUPC under two basic observations, namely that substantive law...

  11. Law of the Slovak National Council of 14 July 1960 on the Procedure and Functions of the Slovak National Council

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1960-01-01

    ... of the economy and culture in Slovakia (2) The Slovak National-Council carries out its operations to the extent designated by the Constitution in such a way that it is an effective instrument of the working people in ensuring the political, economic and cultural tasks in Slovakia.

  12. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  13. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  14. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  15. Practices in relation to nutritional care and support--report from the Council of Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Balknäs, Ulla Nilsson; Camilo, Maria Ermelinda; Fürst, Peter; Gentile, Maria Gabriella; Hasunen, Kaija; Jones, Liz; Jonkers-Schuitema, Cora; Keller, Ulrich; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; Pavcic, Marusa; Schauder, Peter; Sivonen, Lauri; Zinck, Orla; Øien, Henriette; Ovesen, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Disease-related undernutrition is significant in European hospitals but is seldom treated. In 1999, the Council of Europe decided to collect information regarding Nutrition programmes in hospitals and for this purpose a network consisting of national experts from 12 of the Partial Agreement member

  16. Improving quality in the preanalytical phase through innovation, on behalf of the European Federation for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    process remain, especially in the preanalytical phase ranging from test ordering to obtaining and managing the biological specimens. The Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase (WG-PRE) of the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has planned many activities aimed...... at mitigating the vulnerability of the preanalytical phase, including the organization of three European meetings in the past 7 years. Hence, this collective article follows the previous three opinion papers that were published by the EFLM WGPRE on the same topic, and brings together the summaries...

  17. The resistance councils in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Per

    in the capitals. In my dissertation I propose to change that focus. Partly by paying particular attention to rural politics, partly through a discussion of democracy in a longer-term perspective using a broader definition of democracy and finally through a discussion of democracy as effective political...... participation rather than only form al rights. I shall do so by analysing the Resistance Councils (RCs) in Uganda....

  18. Removal of radon by aeration: testing of various aeration techniques for small water works. For European Commission under Contract No FI4PCT960054 TENAWA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, L.; Mehtonen, J.; Turunen, H.; Mjoenes, L.; Hagberg, N.; Raff, O.

    2002-12-01

    Capability of various aeration techniques to remove radon from water in small waterworks was studied as a part of project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water), which was carried out during 1997-1999 on a cost-shared basis (contract No. F14PCT960054) with The European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of the Directorate-General XII Radiation Protection Research Unit. In TENAWA project both laboratory and field experiments were performed in order to find reliable methods and equipment for removing natural radionuclides from ground water originating either from private wells or small waterworks. Because such techniques are more often needed in private households than at waterworks, the main emphasis of the research was aimed to solve the water treatment problems related to the private water supplies, especially bedrock wells. Radon was the most important radionuclide to be removed from water at waterworks whereas the removal of other radionuclides ( 234,238 U, 226,228 Ra, 210 Pb and 210 Po) was oft required from radonrich bedrock waters. The currently available methods and equipment were mainly tested during the field and laboratory experiments but the project was also aimed to find new materials, absorbents and membranes applicable for radionuclide removal from various types of ground waters (e.g. soft, hard, acidic). Because iron, manganese or organic occur in waters with radionuclides, their simultaneous removal was also studied. The project was divided into 13 work packages. In this report the results of the work package 2.2 are described. Elevated levels of radon and other natural radionuclides in European ground waters have been observed mainly in wide areas of the crystalline Scandinavian bedrock, especially in the granite rock areas of Finland and Sweden but also in more limited crystalline rock areas of Central and Southern Europe, Ukraine and Scotland. The radon removal efficiencies of different aeration methods

  19. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  20. Sarcopenia and falls in community-dwelling elderly subjects in Japan: Defining sarcopenia according to criteria of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Misuzu; Sun, Wei; Sugiura, Yumiko; Hayashida, Itsushi; Kusabiraki, Toshiyuki; Tamaki, Junko

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the association between sarcopenia (using the definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People) and fall in the past year among community-dwelling Japanese elderly. Subjects were 1110 community-dwelling Japanese aged 65 or older. We used bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to measure muscle mass, grip strength to measure muscle strength, and usual walking speed to measure physical performance in a baseline study. "Sarcopenia" was characterized by low muscle mass and low muscle strength or low physical performance. "Presarcopenia" was characterized only by low muscle mass. Subjects who did not have any of these deficiencies were classified as "normal." We then administered a questionnaire assessing age, sex, household status, chronic illness, lifestyle-related habits, and fall. This study showed the prevalence of fall was 16.9% and 21.3% in men and women, respectively, while that of sarcopenia was 13.4% and 14.9% in men and women, respectively. In men and women, the prevalence of sarcopenia was higher among those who had fallen. A logistic regression analysis using age, body fat, current drinker status, and physical inactivity for men, and age, body fat, smoking, and diabetes for women as covariate variables revealed that sarcopenia was significantly associated with a history of fall. The odds ratio for fall in the sarcopenia group relative to the normal group was 4.42 (95%CI 2.08-9.39) in men and 2.34 (95%CI 1.39-3.94) in women. This study revealed sarcopenia to be associated with falling in elderly Japanese. Sarcopenia prevention interventions may help prevent falls among elderly individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.