WorldWideScience

Sample records for european resuscitation council

  1. Are European Resuscitation Council recommendations for paddle force achievable during defibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sado, D M; Deakin, C D; Petley, G W

    2001-12-01

    Transthoracic impedance (TTI) is an important determinant of success in defibrillation. Low TTI increases transmyocardial current and therefore increases the chance of depolarising a critical mass of myocardium. A major component of TTI occurs at the paddle-skin interface and is minimised by pressure applied to the defibrillation paddles. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) 2000 guidelines recommend that 'firm force' should be applied to both paddles, whereas previous European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 1992 guidelines were more precise, recommending that 12 kg of force should to be applied. We assessed whether defibrillator operators are capable of achieving 12 kg paddle force. Fifty advanced life support-trained doctors and nurses attempted to achieve 12 kg paddle force while simulating defibrillation on a resuscitation doll. The median value of the maximum pressures obtainable was 10.1 (max 16.0; min 5.0) kg force. Only 14% could achieve > or =12 kg force on both paddles for defibrillation. Men achieved more force than women (10.7 vs. 8.1 kg force; Pdefibrillator operators.

  2. Major Differences in Implementation Strategies of the European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2015 in Danish Hospitals - A Nationwide Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Mathilde; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Mygind-Klausen, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of guidelines into clinical practice is important to provide quality of care. Implementation of clinical guidelines is known to be poor. This study aimed to investigate awareness, expected time frame and strategy for implementation of the European Resuscitation Council...... (ERC) Guidelines 2015 in Danish hospitals.Methods: All public, somatic hospitals with a cardiac arrest team in Denmark were included. A questionnaire was sent to hospital resuscitation committees one week after guideline publication. The questionnaire included questions on awareness of ERC Guidelines...... 2015 and time frame and strategy for implementation.Results: In total, 41 hospitals replied (response rate: 87%) between October 22nd and December 22nd 2015. Overall, 37% of hospital resuscitation committees were unaware of the content of the guidelines. The majority of hospitals (80%) expected...

  3. Education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council CPR/AED course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexopoulou, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Dontas, Ioannis; Pliatsika, Paraskevi; Giannakakos, Charalampos; Papapanagiotou, Panagiotis; Aggelina, Afroditi; Moumouris, Theodoros; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    To examine whether education and age affect skill acquisition and retention in lay rescuers after a European Resuscitation Council (ERC) CPR/AED course. Because of the importance of bystander CPR/AED skills in the setting of cardiac arrest, acquisition and retention of resuscitation skills has gained a great amount of interest. The ERC CPR/AED course format for written and practical evaluation was used. Eighty lay people were trained and evaluated at the end of the course, as well as at one, three, and six months. Retention of CPR/AED skills improved over time, recording the lowest practical scores at one month after initial training and the lowest written scores at initial training. In practical evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, age presented a significant adverse effect and higher background education presented a non-significant positive effect. Moreover, regarding written evaluation scores, when examined longitudinally, education presented a significant positive effect while age did not significantly correlate with written scores. Education and age affected retention of CPR/AED skills in lay rescuers. Also, our results suggest that the ERC CPR/AED course format may be poorly designed to discriminate between participants with different levels of practical and written resuscitation skills and merit a thorough investigation in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Councils of Southern Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-11-23

    Outcome after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002, a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (ie, essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conferences. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage

  5. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries. A statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the international liaison committee on resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-12-01

    Outcome following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002 a task force of ILCOR met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (i.e., essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conference. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage, confidentiality, management, and registry

  6. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Jacobs, Ian G; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Berg, Robert A; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L; Brett, Stephen J; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R; Deakin, Charles D; Finn, Judith C; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Huei-Ming Ma, Matthew; McNally, Bryan F; Morley, Peter T; Morrison, Laurie J; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Eng Hock Ong, Marcus; Travers, Andrew H; Nolan, Jerry P

    2015-09-29

    Association, Inc., and European Resuscitation Council.

  7. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2003-01-01

    The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme adressed by this paper is the opportunities for European Works Councils (EWCs) of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  8. European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2004-01-01

    The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies.......The theme addressed by this artcle is the opportunities for European Works Councils of gaining influence on corporate decisions in multinational companies....

  9. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  10. Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcome Reports: Update of the Utstein Resuscitation Registry Templates for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From a Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian and New Zealand Council on Resuscitation, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa, Resuscitation Council of Asia); and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkins, Gavin D.; Jacobs, Ian G.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Bhanji, Farhan; Biarent, Dominique; Bossaert, Leo L.; Brett, Stephen J.; Chamberlain, Douglas; de Caen, Allan R.; Deakin, Charles D.; Finn, Judith C.; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Lim, Swee Han; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; McNally, Bryan F.; Morley, Peter T.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; Montgomery, William; Nichol, Graham; Okada, Kazuo; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Travers, Andrew H.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Aikin, Richard P.; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Castren, Maaret K.; Eisenberg, Mickey S.; Kleinman, Monica E.; Kloeck, David A.; Kloeck, Walter G.; Mancini, Mary E.; Neumar, Robert W.; Ornato, Joseph P.; Paiva, Edison F.; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Soar, Jasmeet; Sierra, Alfredo F.; Stanton, David; Zideman, David A.; Rea, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Utstein-style guidelines contribute to improved public health internationally by providing a structured framework with which to compare emergency medical services systems. Advances in resuscitation science, new insights into important predictors of outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and

  11. Resuscitation, prolonged cardiac arrest, and an automated chest compression device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Martin; Jørgensen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest.......The European Resuscitation Council's 2005 guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) emphasize the delivery of uninterrupted chest compressions of adequate depth during cardiac arrest....

  12. The European research council takes flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis; Hemmelskamp, Jens; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2009-03-06

    In 2007, the European Research Council (ERC) was launched amid much fanfare with the goal of spearheading Europe's aspirations to become the most dynamic and competitive knowledge-based society in the world. Here, we examine the results of the first two ERC calls for research grants and discuss the latest developments and the challenges that face this unique research council.

  13. Barriers in the implementation of the Resuscitation Guidelines: European survey of defibrillation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Paweł; Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Andres, Janusz

    2016-03-11

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines recommend providing chest compressions during defibrillator charging and using adhesive pads for defibrillation to increase the effectiveness of resuscitation. However, the most common defibrillation technique in each European country is unknown, as are the potential barriers in implementation of the guidelines. The aim of this study was to assess the techniques of defibrillation procedures performed by professional European healthcare providers and to estimate how frequently adhesive pads are used. We sent an online questionnaire to the ERC National Representatives that contained 12 questions regarding the techniques of defibrillation and monitoring heart rhythm during cardiac arrest. We also evaluated the frequency and indications of manual paddles use. We collected questionnaires from 27 out of 33 invited ERC member countries. The response rate was 82%. Seventeen (17/27; 63%) declared the use of adhesive pads. The leading cause for not using adhesive pads was economic reason (9/17; 53%). Some respondents declared resistance to using adhesive pads by healthcare providers or tradition connected with manual paddles use. We found three leading techniques of defibrillation with manual paddles: Charging paddles keeping them on the defibrillator during chest compressions being delivered (9/21; 43%), Charging paddles keeping them on the patient chest during chest compressions being delivered (6/21; 29 %), Charging paddles on the patient chest without chest compressions (5/21; 24%). Respondents from 11 countries declared the use of gel or electrode pastes during defibrillation with manual paddles. This study collected preliminary data showing how defibrillation is performed in Europe. It revealed the recommeded techniques underuse and identyfied barriers in the Resuscitation Guidelines implementation. The survey should be open to a wider group of respondents. in each country in future. There are limitations and barriers

  14. Public Accountability in the European Union: Is the European Parliament able to hold the European Council accountable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne van de Steeg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Council occupies a central role in European politics. Yet it is not officially accountable to any public or parliamentary body for the decisions it makes on behalf of European citizens. National parliaments are only entitled to exert control over their own Heads of Government or State. The European Parliament, as a supranational institution, is the only parliamentary body that regularly discusses European politics with the European Council as a collective, namely via the European Council Presidency. As such, it alone has the possibility to hold the Council accountable for the agreements made at European Summits. However, the European Parliament has limited rights to impose pressure on the European Council Presidency. Nonetheless, despite the lack of a formal accountability arrangement, the European Council Presidency is more forthcoming than could have been expected.

  15. The making of environmental policy in the European Council

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Skou; Rasmussen, Lise Nordvig

    1998-01-01

    Details the decision-making processes regarding the legal acts approved by the European Union Council of Ministers on environmental issues during 1993 and 1994. Role of the Committee of the Permanent Representatives; Use of council presidency by member states; Significance of decision-making proc......Details the decision-making processes regarding the legal acts approved by the European Union Council of Ministers on environmental issues during 1993 and 1994. Role of the Committee of the Permanent Representatives; Use of council presidency by member states; Significance of decision...

  16. Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gene Yong Kwang; Chan, Irene Lai Yeen; Ng, Agnes Suah Bwee; Chew, Su Yah; Mok, Yee Hui; Chan, Yoke Hwee; Ong, Jacqueline Soo May; Ganapathy, Sashikumar; Ng, Kee Chong

    2017-01-01

    We present the revised 2016 Singapore paediatric resuscitation guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation’s Pediatric Taskforce Consensus Statements on Science and Treatment Recommendations, as well as the updated resuscitation guidelines from the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council released in October 2015, were debated and discussed by the workgroup. The final recommendations for the Singapore Paediatric Resuscitation Guidelines 2016 were derived after carefully reviewing the current available evidence in the literature and balancing it with local clinical practice. PMID:28741003

  17. Transparency in the Council of the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    of the most powerful political forums in Europe, transparency in the Council has its limits. This study explores institutional factors which hinder Council press officers from being as transparent as journalists would like them to be. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with Council press officers......The Council of the European Union is often described as the least transparent of the three big EU institutions although steps have been taken to improve the transparency of its activities during the last couple of decades. This article focuses on the Council’s press officers who provide journalists...... with information and thereby act as day-to-day facilitators of transparency of the Council’s activities. Although these communicators see themselves as contributing substantially to the transparency of the Council’s work and thereby as enabling the media to provide EU citizens with information about one...

  18. A Measure of Excellence of Young European Research Council Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Bibliometric benchmarking can be an aid to researchers pondering whether to apply for competitive grants. In this paper, the highly prestigious grants offered by the European Research Council to young scientists of any nationality were scrutinized. The analysis of the 2014-2015 data indicates that over 75% of life science grantees in the starting…

  19. From Summitry to EU Government : An Agenda Formation Perspective on the European Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carammia, Marcello; Princen, Sebastiaan; Timmermans, Arco

    2016-01-01

    While some observers have claimed that the European Council has become the key institution in European Union politics, others have argued that the Council's role has remained relatively stable over time. In this article, we argue that an analysis of agenda formation dynamics in the European Council

  20. Bibliometric assessment of European Research Council Grantees – Comparative evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Grøngaard, Pernille Hamburger; Isaksson, Eva; Koivula, Leena; Arévalo, Javier; Warnan, Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Since their creation in 2007, European Research Council (ERC) Starting, Consolidator and Advanced grants have increasingly become a measure of prestige for universities. The number of ERC grantees a university gets per year can now appear as a proxy to its research excellence. As universities are putting a lot of effort to best support their applicants for ERC grants, they are looking for ways to (i) pre-select the researchers who have the best chances to have a successful application and (ii...

  1. [CPR--guidelines 2000. New international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, H W

    2001-03-01

    The "Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. An International Consensus an Science" are the first true international CPR guidelines in the history of resuscitation medicine. Experts from major international resuscitation organizations (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, ILCOR) achieved a consensus of recommendations which had to pass a rigorous review procedure applying the tools of evidence-based medicine: all proposed guidelines or guideline changes had to be based on critically appraised pieces of evidence which had to be integrated into a final class of recommendations. The most important changes compared to previous recommendations from either the European Resuscitation Council or the American Heart Association are presented and commented upon.

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation : the history and evidence behind modern management

    OpenAIRE

    Tua, Carl;

    2014-01-01

    Resuscitation following cardiac arrest involves a life-saving set of skills which are practised by healthcare workers and trained laypersons throughout the world. Various associations and groups, such as the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the American Heart Association have training programmes on resuscitation techniques using standardized algorithms. There are different protocols for different situations, using various pieces of equipment and with a range of...

  3. Council of the European Union from a Rational Choice Institutionalist Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela DĂNILĂ

    2009-01-01

    This paper’s aim is to analyze the EU’s Council and the European Council as a whole from the rational choice institutionalism’s point of view. I’ll try to demonstrate through the mentioned theory that the EU’s Council has a status of a “government of the United Europe”. I’ll bring off a presentation of the EU’s Council and of the European Council and of their activity, I’ll present the “game” that goes on in the two councils (having in mind the rational choice institutionalism’s theory) and t...

  4. Time matters--realism in resuscitation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Høyer, Christian; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The advanced life support guidelines recommend 2min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and minimal hands-off time to ensure sufficient cardiac and cerebral perfusion. We have observed doctors who shorten the CPR intervals during resuscitation attempts. During simulation......-based resuscitation training, the recommended 2-min CPR cycles are often deliberately decreased in order to increase the number of scenarios. The aim of this study was to test if keeping 2-min CPR cycles during resuscitation training ensures better adherence to time during resuscitation in a simulated setting......s) or shortened CPR cycles (30-45s instead of 120s) in the scenarios. Adherence to time was measured using the European Resuscitation Council's Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest) in retention tests conducted one and 12 weeks after the course. RESULTS: The real-time group adhered significantly...

  5. What direction for the European Council? Institutional reforms and counter-reforms in EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Ciascai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the political and institutional impact of the juridical consecration of the European Council that official institution of European Union by the Lisbon Treaty. Until 1 December 2009, the European Council was a political body with a strong informal role within the european decision making process, but with ambiguous institutional and legal powers. After entry in force of the Lisbon Treaty, European Council becomes an institution that try to exercise a collective leadership in EU.

  6. Gender equality observations and actions by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; Penny, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Women have historically been underrepresented in science. Much positive progress in attracting women to research careers has been achieved in recent years; however, the most influential and high profile positions in most countries are still predominantly occupied by men. The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views gender equality as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle gender imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected from ERC's internationally recognised funding schemes are presented.

  7. Comparing German and Danish employee representatives on European Works Councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bicknell, Helen; Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to analyse the links and possible‘fit’ between German and Danish representation structures and trade union policies on the one hand, and the views and activities of European Works Council (EWC) representatives from the two countries on the other. Which similarities or differences...... can be observed in the way German and Danish EWC representatives act on and view EWCs? Can differences be explained by cross-national variations in representation structures and associated trade union policies? The article describes the national representation structures in the two countries......, their linkage to EWCs and trade unions, and identifies the typical profile of German and Danish EWC representatives respectively. Data on how the representatives view the EWC and its activities and the extent to which they have been involved in negotiations with management are presented and analysed...

  8. Comparing German and Danish industrial relations actors on European works councils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bicknell, Helen; Knudsen, Herman Lyhne

    The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs).......The paper brings together recent research carried out by the two authors on German and Danish representatives and representation systems within the context of European Works Councils (EWCs)....

  9. [The latest in paediatric resuscitation recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Defibrillator charging before rhythm analysis significantly reduces hands-off time during resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. K.; Folkestad, L.; Brabrand, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our objective was to reduce hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation as increased hands-off time leads to higher mortality. METHODS: The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2005 and ERC 2010 guidelines were compared with an alternative sequence (ALT). Pulseless ventricular...

  11. Trauma resuscitation time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olden, G.D.J. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Biert, J.; Goris, R.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Documenting the timing and organisation of trauma resuscitation can be utilised to assess performance standards, and to ensure a high quality of trauma resuscitation procedures. Since there is no European literature available on trauma resuscitation time (TRT) in the emergency room, the aim of this

  12. The varying ethical attitudes towards resuscitation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskett, Peter J F; Lim, Andy

    2004-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess the varying attitudes in Europe towards ethical aspects of resuscitation in Europe. The ethics of resuscitation is a key discussion topic in the European Resuscitation Council Advanced Life Support (ALS) course. A questionnaire was sent to all leading ALS course directors in 20 European countries. All completed the questionnaire. The results were compiled in March 2004. Views were sought on the following ethical aspects:When not to attempt resuscitation Active euthanasia When to abandon resuscitation efforts The diagnosis of death by non physicians Permission for relatives to be with the patient during resuscitation if they wish Teaching on the recently dead Breaking bad news Results: The results reveal a considerable variation in the interpretation of ethical dilemmas within European countries. It is interesting to note that the results do not necessarily conform to traditional beliefs in the characteristic differences between Northern and Southern Europe. The Mediterranean countries do not all have the same attitudes, any more than the Nordic or Central European countries share the same views. There remains a widespread divergence of views on ethical aspects of resuscitation with the countries of Europe that are largely unpredictable according to commonly perceived national characteristics. The trend over the past 6 years is towards a more permissive attitude. For many ethical questions there can be no clear and correct didactic answers.

  13. THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL AND ITS ROLE IN PROMOTING AND DEFENDING HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE EUROPEAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion, POPESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Council of Europe advocates freedom of expression and of the media, freedom of assembly, equality, and the protection of minorities. It has launched campaigns on issues such as child protection, online hate speech, and the rights of the Roma, Europe's largest minority. The Council of Europe helps member states fight corruption and terrorism and undertake necessary judicial reforms. Its group of constitutional experts, known as the Venice Commission, offers legal advice to countries throughout the world. The Council of Europe promotes human rights through international conventions, such as the Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and the Convention on Cybercrime. It monitors member states' progress in these areas and makes recommendations through independent expert monitoring bodies. All Council of Europe member states have abolished the death penalty.

  14. The Important Step for European Integration: “Council of Europe” and the Matter of Turkey’s Membership to Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Servet Öncü

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is not a new idea that European states gather and form a union. This idea had been discussed since the nineteenth century. However, it was not until the end of World War II that Europeans realized their idea. The most important reason is the struggle for power and dominance that great powers on the continent were engaged in with each other. After World War II, Europeans set up several organizations both not to suffer similar disasters anymore and to become more powerful against the Soviet Union making its power felt in Europe day by day. The Council of Europe is one of the most important of such organizations founded around the idea of the European Union. This organization which stipulates cooperation in such areas human rights, social affairs, education, culture, sports, youth, public health, environmental, architectural heritage, urban planning, local and regional authorities, and law as well as defence and security was founded on 5 May 1949 by ten European states. The Republic of Turkey was invited to the Council of Europe about three months after its foundation and by accepting this invitation participated in the Council as a founding member. The Statute of the Council of Europe was adopted on 12 December 1949 by the Grand National Assembly of Turkey

  15. [Peer-led training in basic life support and resuscitation using an automatic external defibrillator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løfgren, Bo; Petersen, Christina Børlum; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Secher, Niels; Eika, Berit; Grove, Erik L

    2009-11-30

    Peer-led training has been identified as a useful tool for delivering undergraduate healthcare training. In this paper we describe the implementation of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED Course as a peer-led training program for medical students.

  16. Peer-led training in basic life support and resuscitation using an automatic external defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfgren, Bo; Petersen, Christina Børlum; Mikkelsen, Ronni

    2009-01-01

    Peer-led training has been identified as a useful tool for delivering undergraduate healthcare training. In this paper we describe the implementation of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED Course as a peer-led training program for medical students....

  17. The presence of resuscitation equipment and influencing factors at General Practitioners' offices in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niegsch, Mark L; Krarup, Nikolaj T; Clausen, Niels Erikstrup

    2013-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have proven effective when used by GPs. Despite this and the latest guidelines from the European Resuscitation Council, there are no recommendations for Danish GPs regarding proper equipment to treat cardiac arrest. Currently, there are no published data...

  18. Implementing the Provision of the European Council Convention on Cybercrime în the Romanian Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe-Iulian IONITA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The European concerns with respect to preventing and fighting cybercrime materialized in the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime. As a reflection of such concerns, the Draft onpreventing and fighting cybercrime was included in Title III of Romanian Law no. 161/2003. In the same context, most recommendations which incriminate cybercrimes were also entered in the futureRomanian Criminal Code as well. As in other countries, the implementation in the Romanian legislation of the convention provisions generated a number of problems which have been more orless noted and solved. This study attempts to pinpoint such problems.

  19. Observations and actions to ensure equal treatment of all candidates by the European Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydin, Claudia Alves de Jesus; Farina Busto, Luis; El Mjiyad, Nadia; Kota, Jhansi; Thelen, Lionel

    2017-04-01

    The European Research Council (ERC), Europe's premiere funding agency for frontier research, views equality of opportunities as an important challenge. The ERC monitors closely gender figures on every call and has taken actions to tackle imbalances and potential unconscious biases. The ERC talk is focused on efforts made to understand and ensure equal treatment of all candidates, with particular focus on gender balance and with specific attention to geosciences. Data and statistics collected in running highly competitive and internationally recognised funding schemes are presented. Recent initiatives to tackle geographical imbalances will also be presented.

  20. Transparency as a Platform for Institutional Politics: The Case of the Council of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Hillebrandt

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The question of transparency is widely regarded as a thermometer of the relation between the Council of the EU and the public at large. Relatively little attention however has been devoted to the implications of transparency (i.e., access for the general public for inter-institutional information politics, even when the limited evidence suggests that the connection is considerable. This article asks how EU actors use Council transparency as a platform and for what reason. It approaches transparency as a policy that is developed in three arenas: the internal, the external political, and the external judicial arena. The article finds strong evidence in support of the view that the Council’s transparency policy played a central role in EU institutions’ attempt to advance their information ambitions. By strongly engaging with the issue of transparency particularly the European Parliament and its members succeeded at expanding their institutional information basis in an area where their political grip was traditionally at its weakest: the Foreign Affairs Council. Acting in turn as a bargaining chip, a political lever, or an alternative to institutional information, the Foreign Affairs Council’s transparency policy was thus clearly used to advance information agendas of oversight and legislative prerogatives.

  1. Where does supranationalism come from? Ideas floating through the working groups of the Council of the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Beyers

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The central purpose of the paper is to explain why some officials involved in Council working groups have a more positive disposition towards European integration than others. The paper is inspired by the fact that many studies on European integration deal only occasionally with the attitudes and the ideas of the men and the women involved in daily negotiations. Consequently most studies employ member-states or European institutions (e.g. the Council, the Commission and the European Parliament as central units of analysis and the description of European policy-making is therefore often based on a limited number of observations (small-N-analysis. In this paper we propose to desaggregate the Council in multiple observations, the officials involved in day-to-day proceedings. In doing so we hope to obtain a more profound understanding of the Council negotiator's attitudes. This systematic empirical analysis leads to the conclusion that the interaction between domestic and transgovernemental experiences explains a signification proportion of the variance along the supranational-intergovernmental continuum.

  2. Emergency Medical Technicians Are Often Consulted on Termination of Resuscitation, and Will Terminate Resuscitation Based on Controversial Single Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind-Klausen, Troels; Glerup Lauridsen, Kasper; Bødtker, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Many out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts have to be terminated. Previous studies have investigated knowledge on abandoning resuscitation among physicians. In the prehospital setting emergency medical technicians (EMTs) may be involved in the decision...... on abandoning CPR but this is sparsely investigated. Aim: To investigate if EMTs are involved in termination of CPR, their self-assessed competence and knowledge of guidelines on termination of CPR according to European Resuscitation Council guidelines 2015. In addition, to evaluate single factors...... that according to an EMT should lead to termination of CPR. Methods: This was a pilot-study including EMTs from a Danish Emergency Medical Service. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire. All responses were collected anonymously. Results: In total, 50 EMTs (male: 88%, median age: 38, response rate...

  3. The Council of Europe's "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" (CEFR): Approach, Status, Function and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    The Council of Europe's "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" is rapidly becoming a powerful instrument for shaping language education policies in Europe and beyond. The task of relating language policies, language curricula, teacher education and training, textbook and course design and content, examinations and…

  4. Intercultural Dialogue. Visions of the Council of Europe and the European Commission for a Post-Multiculturalist Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustin, Oscar Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural dialogue was introduced at the European level through policy documents of the Council of Europe and the European Commission in the 2000s. This article explores the ways in which intercultural dialogue is developed as a model to handle cultural diversity in different areas. Furthermore...... it discusses whether intercultural dialogue can be perceived as an alternative model to the previous integration policies marked by assimilationism and multiculturalism. A comparison is carried out of the ways in which the policies of both European organizations represent cultural diversity as a problem......, their narratives concerning the need for intercultural dialogue as well as its definition. While the Council of Europe offers a concrete model, especially regarding integration, the Commission moves between the intertwined fields of culture, integration and interaction, but in doing so it fails to present...

  5. Colorectal cancer screening in countries of European Council outside of the EU-28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altobelli, Emma; D'Aloisio, Francesco; Angeletti, Paolo Matteo

    2016-05-28

    To provide an update on colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programmes in non-European Union (EU)-28 Council of Europe member states as of December 2015. The mission of the Council of Europe is to protect and promote human rights in its 47 member countries. Its 19 non-EU member states are Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Republika Srpska, Georgia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Republic of Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Norway, Russian Federation, San Marino, Serbia, Switzerland, FYR of Macedonia, Turkey, and Ukraine (EU-19). The main data source were GLOBOCAN, IARC, WHO, EUCAN, NORDCAN, ENCR, volume X of the CI5, the ministerial and Public Health Agency websites of the individual countries, PubMed, EMBASE, registries of some websites and the www.cochranelibrary.com, Scopus, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, Research gate, Google and data extracted from screening programme results. Our results show that epidemiological data quality varies broadly between EU-28 and EU-19 countries. In terms of incidence, only 30% of EU-19 countries rank high in data quality as opposed to 86% of EU-28 states. The same applies to mortality data, since 52% of EU-19 countries as against all EU-28 countries are found in the high ranks. Assessment of the method of collection of incidence data showed that only 32% of EU-19 countries are found in the top three quality classes as against 89% of EU-28 countries. For the mortality data, 63% of EU-19 countries are found in the highest ranks as opposed to all EU-28 member states. Interestingly, comparison of neighbouring countries offering regional screening shows, for instance, that incidence and mortality rates are respectively 38.9 and 13.0 in Norway and 29.2 and 10.9 in Sweden, whereas in Finland, where a national organised programme is available, they are respectively 23.5 and 9.3. Cancer screening should be viewed as a key health care tool, also because investing in screening protects the weakest in

  6. The protection of the European trademark in the light of the EU Regulation 2015/2424 of the European Parliament and of the Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. MURZEA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to analyze the novelty aspects brought about by the EU Regulation 2015/2424 of the European Parliament and of the Council which came into force March 23rd, 2016, regarding the trademark, especially aspects regarding its protection and the rights it provides, as opposed to national law and the old community law. We will consider both theoretical aspects, as well as jurisprudence issues in this domain.

  7. [Changes in the international recommendations on neonatal stabilisation and resuscitation (2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeballos Sarrato, Gonzalo; Salguero García, Enrique; Aguayo Maldonado, Josefa; Gómez Robles, Celia; Thió Lluch, Marta; Iriondo Sanz, Martín

    2017-01-01

    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) recommendations provide a universal guide of measures to support the transition and resuscitation of newborn after their birth. This guide is expected to be adapted by local groups or committees on resuscitation, according to their own circumstances. The objective of this review is to analyse the main changes, to discuss several of the controversies that have appeared since 2010, and contrasting with other national and international organisations, such as European Resuscitation Council (ERC), American Heart Association (AHA), or the Australian-New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation (ANZCOR). Thus, the Neonatal Resuscitation Group of the Spanish Society of Neonatology (GRN-SENeo) aims to give clear answers to many of the questions when different options are available, generating the forthcoming recommendations of our country to support the transition and/or resuscitation of a newborn after birth, safely and effectively. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. After Hierarchy? Domestic Executive Governance and the Differentiated Impact of the European Commission and the Council of Ministers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarle Trondal

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This study offers an organisation theory approach that claims that the differentiated organisational constellation of the European Union contributes to a differentiated Europeanisation of domestic core-executives. It is argued that the European Commission mainly activates the lower echelons of the domestic government hierarchies, notably professional experts within sector ministries and agencies. Furthermore, the European Commission arguably weakens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. By contrast, the Council of Ministers arguably strengthens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. A comparative analysis of the decision-making processes within the central administrations of Norway and Sweden is offered. Based on a rich body of survey and interview data this analysis reveals that multi-level interaction of administrative systems between the European Commission and the Norwegian and Swedish central administrations occur largely outside the control of the domestic politico-administrative leadership, Prime Ministers Office and Foreign Office. In Sweden this tendency is to some extent counterbalanced by the inter-sectorally interlocking effect of the Council of Ministers.

  9. Resuscitation Guideline 2000: What is the level of Awareness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was officially instituted in 1960. In 1992, the American Heart Association released the first set of resuscitation guidelines. Following a general consensus by experts drawn from various resuscitation councils worldwide, a new set of evidence based guidelines was released in ...

  10. European Court of Justice Secures Fundamental Rights from UN Security Council Resolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Recker

    2009-02-01

    /msohtml1/01/clip_header.htm" fcs; mso-endnote-separator:url("file:///C:/DOKUME~1/mlippold/LOKALE~1/Temp/msohtml1/01/clip_header.htm" es; mso-endnote-continuation-separator:url("file:///C:/DOKUME~1/mlippold/LOKALE~1/Temp/msohtml1/01/clip_header.htm" ecs;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:70.85pt 70.85pt 2.0cm 70.85pt; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} -->

    The European Court of Justice has annulled Council Regulation (EC No 881/2002[1] freezing funds of Mr. Kadi and Al Barakaat based on Resolution 1267 (1999[2] of the United Nations Security Council[3]. In so doing, the European Court of Justice has set aside the Court of First Instance’s judgment

  11. Where Human Rights Meet Administrative Law: Essential Elements and Limits to Delegation: European Court of Justice, Grand Chamber C-355/10: European Parliament v. Council of the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, M.; Tauschinsky, E.

    2013-01-01

    Case C-355/10 deals with institutional questions and with the delicate issue of intercepting migrants at sea, and thus with fundamental rights. The European Parliament had sought the annulment of a decision of the Council, adopted under the regulatory procedure with scrutiny (PRAC), on the grounds

  12. European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) accreditation of forensic pathology services in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, P; Bonbled, F; Väli, M; Luna, A; Bajanowski, T; Hougen, H P; Ludes, B; Ferrara, D; Cusack, D; Keller, E; Vieira, N

    2015-03-01

    Forensic experts play a major role in the legal process as they offer professional expert opinion and evidence within the criminal justice system adjudicating on the innocence or alleged guilt of an accused person. In this respect, medico-legal examination is an essential part of the investigation process, determining in a scientific way the cause(s) and manner of unexpected and/or unnatural death or bringing clinical evidence in case of physical, psychological, or sexual abuse in living people. From a legal perspective, these types of investigation must meet international standards, i.e., it should be independent, effective, and prompt. Ideally, the investigations should be conducted by board-certified experts in forensic medicine, endowed with a solid experience in this field, without any hierarchical relationship with the prosecuting authorities and having access to appropriate facilities in order to provide forensic reports of high quality. In this respect, there is a need for any private or public national or international authority including non-governmental organizations seeking experts qualified in forensic medicine to have at disposal a list of specialists working in accordance with high standards of professional performance within forensic pathology services that have been successfully submitted to an official accreditation/certification process using valid and acceptable criteria. To reach this goal, the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) has elaborated an accreditation/certification checklist which should be served as decision-making support to assist inspectors appointed to evaluate applicants. In the same spirit than NAME Accreditation Standards, European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) board decided to set up an ad hoc working group with the mission to elaborate an accreditation/certification procedure similar to the NAME's one but taking into account the realities of forensic medicine practices in Europe and restricted to post

  13. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    improvement in the management of patients with cancer over stand-alone acquired CT and PET images. Hybrid cardiac imaging either with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or PET combined with CT depicts cardiac and vascular anatomical abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single....... The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  14. The European Trauma Course (ETC) and the team approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lott, Carsten; Araujo, Rui; Cassar, Mary Rose

    2009-01-01

    The European Trauma Course (ETC) was officially launched during the international conference of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2008. The ETC was developed on behalf of ESTES (European Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery), EuSEM (European Society of Emergency Medicine), the ESA...... other trauma courses, are a strong focus on team training and a novel modular design that is adaptable to the differing regional European requirements. This article describes the lessons learnt during the European Trauma Course development and provides an outline of the planned future development....

  15. The European Court of Human Rights’ Use of Standard-Setting Council of Europe Documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, L.R.

    2017-01-01

    In many judgments, the European Court of Human Rights (Court) lists relevant international materials and sometimes uses these documents when determining whether the European Convention on Human Rights has been violated. These materials are often standard-setting documents that originate in the

  16. FROM THE NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR COMBATING DISCRIMINATION TO THE COURT OF JUSTICE OF EUROPEAN UNION – CASE C-81/12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN JURA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this research is to present and analyze national and European, jurisdictional-administrative procedural issues, if courts are notified related to certain discriminatory statements. The starting point of the research consists in some statements made during a radio show. During the research, the following are analyzed: notification of the National Council for Combating Discrimination (CNCD, decision of the National Council for Combating Discrimination, challenge of the resolution of the National Council for Combating Discrimination at the Court of Appeal Bucharest, notification of the Court of Justice of European Union by the Court of Appeal Bucharest and the beginning of the procedures before the Court of Justice of the European Union. The scientific demarche has as objectives a better understanding of the mechanisms of operation of every institution involved in this process, as well as the chronology of the terms necessary to settle this case.

  17. Transposition of provisions of the Recast Directive on the functioning of the European Works Council

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan; Lorber, Pascale; Jagodzinski, Romuald

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to list selected broader legal provisions and key conditions that can contribute to an improved environment for EWC work and thus stimulate improved functioning of this European body (sine qua non conditions), although an analysis of several of these broader concepts is

  18. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steckelings, U. Muscha; de Mey, Jo G. R.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or

  19. Interview: Professor Helle Neergaard, President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, on the Nature of Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Industry and Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    On August 13, 2014, Rita G. Klapper conducted a Skype interview with Helle Neergaard. Neergaard is not only President of the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, but also Docent at the Hanken School of Economics, and Professor at iCARE, Department of Business Administration, School of Business and Social Sciences, University…

  20. Communication from the commission to the council and the European parliament. Final report on the green paper: towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-15

    The Green Paper on the security of energy supply, adopted by the Commission more than a year ago, opened up a debate on energy policy unprecedented in 30 years. In most of the Member States this debate revived discussion on national options in the energy field. Looking ahead to the next twenty to thirty years, the Green Paper drew attention to the structural weaknesses and geopolitical, social and environmental shortcomings of the EU energy supply, notably as regards European commitments in the Kyoto Protocol. The European economy, steadily demanding more and more energy, is essentially based on fossil fuels. The Green Paper offers a clear strategy based on demand management. It has the merit of pointing out that the EU has little room for manoeuvre with regard to energy supply notably due to its low, or in certain cases less competitive (e.g. coal), energy resources. Therefore it is appropriate for the Union to concentrate on guiding and steering demand, unlike the United States which, in the energy plan it announced in May 2001, seeks to meet demand by constantly boosting supply. The Green Paper put 13 questions as a framework for the general debate. The conclusion is that there is virtually unanimous agreement on the strategic axis of demand management: energy consumption must be guided and steered. The conclusions of the Barcelona European Council, stressing in particular the need for better energy efficiency by 2010 and rapid adoption of energy taxation proposals, clearly give political backing to this priority. Without waiting for the debate to end, the Commission made some very well received proposals along these lines, involving actual legislation and not just encouraging words or exchange of good practice, some of which have already been adopted by the Council and the European Parliament. One of these proposals in particular was the Directive on electricity production from renewable sources, adopted in 2001. Another was the proposal for a Directive on

  1. CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice otv CPR. problems encountered and doctors" perception ol' each other's knowledge of resuscitation. The returned terms were analysed. ... tirst. respiration or heartbeat. (respiration). Normal heart rate (6090/ min). Normal respiratory rate (1220/ min). lHow do you recognise a patient needing CPR? 2'; to methods of ...

  2. Assessment of the Quality of Basic and Expanded Resuscitative Measures in a Multifield Hospital (Simulation Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The survival of patients after the sudden circulatory arrest (SCA depends not only on immediate onset of resuscitative measures, but also on their quality.The purpose of the study. The purpose is to assess the compliance of basic and expanded resuscitative measures carried out by healthcare providers in hospitals with modern national and international guidelines within the frames of a stimulation course.Materials and Methods. The research was perfomed in a multifield hospital in Moscow, in 2016. It consisted of two phases. During the first phase, within the frames of a simulation course, providers' skills in the cardiopul monary resuscitation (CPR and chest compression (CC technique mastership were evaluated. During the second stage, their skills in expanded CPR and ability to work as a part of resuscitation teams were assessed. During the simulation, all team activities were recorded (both audio and video; CC parameters were also registered using a CC pressure control sensor (hereinafter referred to as a sensor and audiovisual tips. The European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 were used as reference criteria. The analysis was performed using the ZOLL RescueNet Code Review® software. A statistical analysis was performed using the Statistica 7.0 software (MannWhitney Utest. The data were presented as a mean, median ± 25—75 percentiles (25—75 IQR, minimum and maximum values. The difference was considered significant at P<0.05.Results. Test results of most healthcare providers were unsatisfactory when the CPR was performed without sensors and audiovisual tips: the percentage of target CCs was not more than 10% in 72% of providers (n=18. When the CPR was performed with sensors and audiovisual tips regulating the CC quality, the percentage of target CCs was 65.7%. i.e. it was significantly higher than that during the CPR without the sensor and the tips (P=0.0000. While only one provider was able to perform

  3. Conclusions of the presidency. European council of Barcelona, March 15 and 16 2002; Conclusions de la presidence. Conseil europeen de Barcelone 15 et 16 mars 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document summarizes the conclusions of the European Council held in Barcelona (Spain) on March 15 and 16, 2002. Among the priority actions listed by the council figure the integration of energy, transportation and communication networks at the European scale. In particular, the council commits the Parliament and itself to start the final phase of opening of gas and electricity markets: free choice of a supplier, obligation of public utility, security of supplies, separation between transmission and distribution and between production and supply, non-discriminatory access of consumers and suppliers to networks with transparent tariffs, establishment of a regulatory agency in each member state, agreement for a tariffing system for the international electricity trades etc.. Concerning the sustainable development strategy of the European union, the council is pressing the member states for the completion of the national procedures of ratification of the Kyoto protocol. However, new measures need to be taken to develop technologies respectful for the environment, in particular in the domain of energy and transports. (J.S.)

  4. 2015 revised Utstein-style recommended guidelines for uniform reporting of data from drowning-related resuscitation: An ILCOR advisory statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Bierens, Joost J L M; Perkins, Gavin D; Wenzel, Volker; Nadkarni, Vinay; Morley, Peter; Warner, David S; Topjian, Alexis; Venema, Allart M; Branche, Christine M; Szpilman, David; Morizot-Leite, Luiz; Nitta, Masahiko; Løfgren, Bo; Webber, Jonathon; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Beerman, Stephen B; Youn, Chun Song; Jost, Ulrich; Quan, Linda; Dezfulian, Cameron; Handley, Anthony J; Hazinski, Mary Fran

    2017-09-01

    Utstein-style guidelines use an established consensus process, endorsed by the international resuscitation community, to facilitate and structure resuscitation research and publication. The first "Guidelines for Uniform Reporting of Data From Drowning" were published over a decade ago. During the intervening years, resuscitation science has advanced considerably, thus making revision of the guidelines timely. In particular, measurement of cardiopulmonary resuscitation elements and neurological outcomes reporting have advanced substantially. The purpose of this report is to provide updated guidelines for reporting data from studies of resuscitation from drowning. An international group with scientific expertise in the fields of drowning research, resuscitation research, emergency medical services, public health, and development of guidelines met in Potsdam, Germany, to determine the data that should be reported in scientific articles on the subject of resuscitation from drowning. At the Utstein-style meeting, participants discussed data elements in detail, defined the data, determined data priority, and decided how data should be reported, including scoring methods and category details. The template for reporting data from drowning research was revised extensively, with new emphasis on measurement of quality of resuscitation, neurological outcomes, and deletion of data that have proved to be less relevant or difficult to capture. The report describes the consensus process, rationale for selecting data elements to be reported, definitions and priority of data, and scoring methods. These guidelines are intended to improve the clarity of scientific communication and the comparability of scientific investigations. Copyright © 2017 European Resuscitation Council, American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Members of the European Brain Council led by President Mary Baker visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Technology Department Group Leader L. Bottura and CMS experimental area with Run Coordinator M. Chamizo-Llatas.

  6. Supplementary agreement prolonging the agreement constituting a council of representatives of European states for d planning an international laboratory and organizing other forms of co-operation in nuclear research; Paris, 30th June 1953

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    1953-01-01

    Supplementary agreement prolonging the agreement constituting a council of representatives of European states for d planning an international laboratory and organizing other forms of co-operation in nuclear research; Paris, 30th June 1953

  7. Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1960-01-01

    Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

  8. [A brief history of resuscitation - the influence of previous experience on modern techniques and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucmin, Tomasz; Płowaś-Goral, Małgorzata; Nogalski, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is relatively novel branch of medical science, however first descriptions of mouth-to-mouth ventilation are to be found in the Bible and literature is full of descriptions of different resuscitation methods - from flagellation and ventilation with bellows through hanging the victims upside down and compressing the chest in order to stimulate ventilation to rectal fumigation with tobacco smoke. The modern history of CPR starts with Kouwenhoven et al. who in 1960 published a paper regarding heart massage through chest compressions. Shortly after that in 1961Peter Safar presented a paradigm promoting opening the airway, performing rescue breaths and chest compressions. First CPR guidelines were published in 1966. Since that time guidelines were modified and improved numerously by two leading world expert organizations ERC (European Resuscitation Council) and AHA (American Heart Association) and published in a new version every 5 years. Currently 2010 guidelines should be obliged. In this paper authors made an attempt to present history of development of resuscitation techniques and methods and assess the influence of previous lifesaving methods on nowadays technologies, equipment and guidelines which allow to help those women and men whose life is in danger due to sudden cardiac arrest. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  9. Advances in cardiovascular research. 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Cardiovascular Research (ECCR). La Colle sur Loup, France, 8–10 October 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckelings, U Muscha; De Mey, Jo G R; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; Henrion, Daniel; Unger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The 15th Annual Meeting of the European Council of Cardiovascular Research brought together basic and clinical scientists working in the cardiovascular field in La Colle sur Loup, France. Upfront basic and clinical research addressing the mechanisms of disease, identification of biomarkers or development of new treatments was communicated in 101 presentations, 35 of them as a part of five on-topic oral sessions and three workshops. Three keynote lectures reviewed current knowledge and the latest data about mechanosensitive channels in pressure regulation, cell therapy in cardiovascular disease and mechanisms of cardiovascular risk associated with diabetic nephropathy. This article summarizes highlights of the oral sessions, workshops and keynote lectures.

  10. The Consequences of “Options” in the Directive 2013/34/Eu of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Financial Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hýblová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 13/34/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 June 2013 on the annual financial statements, consolidated financial statements and related reports of certain types of undertakings is an instrument of the harmonisation of accounting in member states of the European Union. The Directive contains a number of various ways for recognition and measurement of financial statements, alternative forms of statements or simplifications for small and medium sized enterprises, worded as “permit or require”. On the one hand, these differing ways can facilitate application of the Directive in national legislations; on the other hand, they can significantly reduce the comparability of information published in financial statements. The aim of the paper is to verify the relation between the options to be chosen and the variability of the resulting values of the financial statement items. Based on the findings, the results are evaluated in relation to the informative function of financial reporting.

  11. Ukraine: Resuscitation of Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliakova Olha Yu.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at identifying, generalizing and structuring the current problems in the sphere of innovations of Ukraine and development of proposals for their solution. The article analyzes the key indicators of innovation activity of enterprises of Ukraine for the period 2005-2015, carries out the international comparisons using data reports of «Global innovation index – 2016" and «European Innovation Scoreboard 2016», revealing worsening of negative tendencies in the sphere of innovations of Ukraine. The carried out study allowed to formulate three directions under which the key problems in the sphere of innovations of Ukraine and the ways for resuscitation of innovations were structured: financing, innovation activity of enterprises and its State regulation, organizational and infrastructural provision. As a matter of priority, development and approval of an integrated strategy for the development of innovation, science and education of Ukraine have been proposed.

  12. The Stop-Only-While-Shocking algorithm reduces hands-off time by 17% during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Koch; Mohammed, Anna; Pedersen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reducing hands-off time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is believed to increase survival after cardiac arrests because of the sustaining of organ perfusion. The aim of our study was to investigate whether charging the defibrillator before rhythm analyses and shock delivery...... significantly reduced hands-off time compared with the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 CPR guideline algorithm in full-scale cardiac arrest scenarios. METHODS: The study was designed as a full-scale cardiac arrest simulation study including administration of drugs. Participants were randomized...... into using the Stop-Only-While-Shocking (SOWS) algorithm or the ERC2010 algorithm. In SOWS, chest compressions were only interrupted for a post-charging rhythm analysis and immediate shock delivery. A Resusci Anne HLR-D manikin and a LIFEPACK 20 defibrillator were used. The manikin recorded time and chest...

  13. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  14. Salience, path dependency and the coalition between the European Commission and the Danish Council Presidency: Why the EU opened a visa liberalisation process with Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bürgin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2012 the European Commission received the backing of the member states to launch a visa liberalisation process with Turkey in exchange for a readmission agreement that obliges Ankara to take back illegal immigrants who passed through Turkey as a transit country. This is a remarkable development in view of the earlier rejection by several member states of the perspective of a visa free travel for Turkish citizens. My process tracing analysis suggests that the key to explaining this development is the argumentative strength of the European Commission, stemming from the necessity of cooperation with Turkey on migration and the norms of procedures set in previous readmission negotiations, as well as the coalition between the Commission and the Danish Council Presidency. Thus, this article contributes to a better understanding of the dynamics of Turkey’s EU accession process, the role of the Commission in the EU’s visa policy, and the influence of Council Presidencies.

  15. The Council of Europe and Sport, 1966-1998. Volume IV: Texts of the European Convention on Spectator Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This document presents texts from the European Convention on Spectator Violence. The six parts are (1) "Texts Adopted by the Committee of Ministers"; (2) "Texts Adopted at Conferences, Working Parties, and Informal Meetings of European Ministers Responsible for Sport" and "Informal Working Parties/Informal Meeting of…

  16. 26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    26th May 2011 -Delegate to CERN Open Council sessions and European Commission Head of Unit for Joint Programming European Research Area, DG Research and Innovation R. Lečbychová visiting the CERN Control Centre with M. Pojer, accompanied by CERN S. Stavrev.

  17. Council of Europe. European Commission against Racism and Intolerance: Recommendations on Media and Internet in New Country Reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGonagle, T.

    2012-01-01

    On 21 February 2012, the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance (ECRI) released its latest reports on Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Montenegro and Ukraine, adopted in the fourth cycle of its monitoring of the laws, policies and practices to combat racism in the Member States of the

  18. Tableau de Bord, 1996. Follow-up to the Conclusions of the Essen European Council on Employment Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium).

    This document presents an overview of the principal labor market measures taken by the 15 member states of the European Union since the publication of the 1995 overview. In each section, individual countries' actions are discussed separately, with code letters indicating the country name. The following topics are among those discussed in the…

  19. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR): First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including heart attack or near ...

  20. European Union Council Directive 2009/71/EURATOM; Directiva 2009/71/Euratom del Consejo de la Union Europea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butragueno, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Summary of Directive 2009/71, approved by the European Union on June 25th last. This text establishes a new Community framework for the safety of nuclear facilities and includes an analysis of issues such as the reactivation of nuclear programmes, the extension of the operating lifetime of the plants beyond their theoretical period of service and the need for safety requirements accepted by all the Member States. (Author)

  1. [Promotion of basic research in the European Union: the European research council (ERC) and the initiative for science in Europe (ISE )].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Federico Mayor

    2007-01-01

    Europe has today a function of intellectual guidance and watch tower that will be unable to accomplish if remains far of the forefront in scientific research and application of knowledge The "delocalization of talents" towards the west is much worst than that of production towards the east. From January 1st 2007, the ERC, with an annual budget of 1.5 billion Euros, represents an important step to improve the situation. The ISE, representing the European scientific community, will further enhance it.

  2. An unsuccessful resuscitation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resuscitation and the cause of death. They were not too concerned with possible mistakes made during the resuscitation, as long as they had the details. The doctors experienced many difficulties in breaking the bad news, due to the low level of education of the families, emotional and unpredictable responses, not being.

  3. New European initiatives in colorectal cancer screening: Budapest Declaration. Official appeal during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union under the Auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation, the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy and the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Tibor; Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Herszényi, László; Jonkers, Daisy; Molnár, Béla; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Regula, Jaroslaw; Malesci, Alberto; Laghi, Luigi; Pintér, Tamás; Teleky, Béla; Dítě, Petr; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common newly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of death in the European Union (EU). CRC is an enormous health and economic burden. Early detection and prevention have the possibility of reducing this burden significantly. Many cancer-associated deaths can be avoided through early detection by high-quality colorectal screening programs followed by appropriate treatment. Under the auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation (UEGF), the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology and the Hungarian College of Gastroenterology, the 'Budapest Declaration' (2011) was an accepted official scientific program during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The Budapest Declaration follows the Munich Declaration (2001), the Brussels Declaration (2007), the Transatlantic Declaration (2009), the Barcelona Declaration (2010), the written declaration of CRC screening, a joint initiative with European Parliamentarians coordinated by the UEGF, and finally, the 'European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Colorectal Cancer Screening and Diagnosis'. The 'Budapest Declaration' together with previous declarations aims to urge the national and supranational healthcare decision makers to launch new Europe-wide initiatives to establish high-quality CRC programs to achieve optimal efficiency in CRC screening. In case of implementation of the proposals, actions and conditions recommended, we can achieve that one of the basic principles of the EU - the chance of equal access - be realized in member states with respect to the prevention of CRC and reduction of cancer-related mortality. To better achieve this goal, we propose to establish an UEGF joint committee, with one participant representing each EU member state to coordinate and supervise the implementation of CRC screening. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Human and animal health in Europe: the view from the European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC on challenges in infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fears Robin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available For the last seven years, the European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC has conducted a series of projects defining and clarifying priorities for European policy in infectious disease. Both human and animal populations are increasingly threatened by emerging and re-emerging infections, including zoonoses, partly attributable to the impact of environmental change on the distributions of pathogens, hosts and vectors. Among the key challenges to be faced are the impact of climate change, the increase of antibiotic resistance and the need to develop novel global surveillance and early warning systems worldwide. Multidisciplinary approaches are required to build the new interfaces between human and animal medicine (One Health, with new connections between epidemiological and environmental data for surveillance, communication and risk assessment. This multidisciplinarity involves integration between microbiology, immunology, genetics and genomics, entomology, ecology and the social sciences, among other disciplines. Improved understanding of patterns of both human and animal disease also requires commitment to standardisation of surveillance methodologies and better analysis, co-ordination and use of the data collected. There must be sustained support for fundamental research, for example to explore how pathogens cross the species barrier, encouragement for industry innovation in developing diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines, and the increased use of scientific evidence to inform coherent strategic development across different policy-making functions and to support international leadership. Our paper is intended as an introduction to some of the issues for building collaboration between human and animal medicine, to be discussed in greater detail in the other contributions to this Issue....

  5. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. 30 : 2: A Game Designed to Promote the Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imma Boada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a first-aid key survival technique used to stimulate breathing and keep blood flowing to the heart. Its effective administration can significantly increase the survival chances of cardiac arrest victims. We propose 30 : 2, a videogame designed to introduce the main steps of the CPR protocol. It is not intended for certification and training purpose. Driven by the 2010 European Resuscitation Council guidelines we have designed a game composed of eight mini games corresponding to the main steps of the protocol. The player acts as a helper and has to solve a different challenge. We present a detailed description of the game creation process presenting the requirements, the design decisions, and the implementation details. In addition, we present some first impressions of our testing users (25 children, five of each age from 8 to 12 years old and 12 males and 13 females. We evaluated clarity of instructions and three settings of the game: the aesthetics of scenarios, the playability, and the enjoyability of each mini game. All games were well punctuated, and there are no significantly differences between their sex. The proposed game can be a suitable tool to disseminate and promote CPR knowledge.

  7. CJEU – Judgment of 24.06.2014 (Grand Chamber) – Case C-658/11 European Parliament v Council – «External relations of the EU – Annulment of the decision on the conclusion of the EU – Mauritius Agreement – Choice of the proper legal basis». Context or Content? A CFSP or AFSJ Legal Basis for EU International Agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matera, Claudio; Wessel, Ramses A.

    2014-01-01

    In the case C-658/11 European Parliament v Council the CJEU was asked to assess the legitimacy of Council Decision 2011/640/CFSP on the conclusion of the agreement between the EU and Mauritius for the transfer and trial of suspected pirates arrested in the framework of Operation Atalanta. More

  8. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  9. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the recent developments in and evolvement of next generation haemostatic resuscitation in bleeding trauma. RECENT FINDINGS: Mortality from major trauma is a worldwide problem, and massive haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Development...... of coagulopathy further increases trauma mortality emphasizing that coagulopathy is a key target in the phase of bleeding. The pathophysiology of coagulopathy in trauma reflects at least three distinct mechanisms that may be present isolated or coexist: acute traumatic coagulopathy, coagulopathy associated...... with the lethal triad, and consumptive coagulopathy. The concepts of 'damage control surgery' and 'damage control resuscitation' have been developed to ensure early control of bleeding and coagulopathy to improve outcome in bleeding trauma. Haemostatic resuscitation aims at controlling coagulopathy and consists...

  10. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheans, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining high levels of readiness for neonatal resuscitation in low-risk maternity settings is challenging. The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) algorithm is a community standard in the United States; yet training is biannual, and exposure to enough critical events to be proficient at timely implementation of the algorithm and the advanced procedures is rare. Evidence supports hands-free leadership to help prevent task saturation and communication to promote patient safety. Telemedicine for neonatal resuscitation involves the addition of remote, expert NRP leadership (a NICU-based neonatal nurse practitioner) via camera link to augment effectiveness of the low-risk birth center team. Unanticipated outcomes to report include faster times to transfer initiation and neuroprotective cooling. The positive impact of remote NRP leadership could lead to use of telemedicine to support teams at birthing centers throughout the United States as well as around the world.

  11. Emergency medical system response time does not affect incidence of return of spontaneous circulation after prehospital resuscitation in one million central European agglomeration residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiewicz, Tomasz; Skitek-Adamczak, Ilona; Zieliński, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The survival of out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHSCA) in Europe still remains low. The State Medical Rescue System is composed of several elements. The efficacy of each of these elements may have an influence on the victim's survival. Until now, the incidence of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and its correlation with rescue services time in the city of Poznan has not been determined. The main purpose of this study was to assess incidents of OHSCA and prehospital frequency of ROSC after OHSCA in Poznan city and district. We also wanted to analyse whether ROSC depends on Emergency Medical System (EMS) reaction time. Retrospective analysis based on medical documentation conducted in 2015 in Poznan EMS. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 68.88% of cases. It was most frequent when OHSCA occurred in public places (p = 0.000, contingency factor = 0.233) and victims were younger (p = 0.042, contingency factor = 0.129). 63.17% of patients were male, but sex did not affect the incidence of ROSC. The median time of system response was 8.53 min, while time from ambulance departure to arrival was 5.42 min. We did not find any statistically significant difference between the number of deaths and those parameters (p = 0.723, p = 0.891). However, longer team response time correlated with the highest mortality (p = 0.042, contingency factor = 0.126). In the group where ROSC was achieved the median time of EMS response was 8.18 min, while among the group of deceased the median was 8.63 min. The incidence of OHSCA in our region is similar to other Polish and European cities. EMS response time does not affect the frequency of ROSC. ROSC was achieved more often if OHSCA occurred in public and the victim was younger.

  12. Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — View the location of the Town of Cary’s four Town Council districts.Please note that one district, District A, is split into two geo-spatial areas. One area is in...

  13. resuscitation among Nigerian doctors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University.

  14. Resuscitation of the Newborn

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to insufflate the lungs (this is an application of La Place's law), but more gas will be forced through the escape pres- sure vent and less gas will reach the lungs than in a larger neonate. The resuscitator (Fig. 1) consists of a polypropylene accordion-like bellows (capacity 100 cm') which is attached to a clear polystyrene valve ...

  15. Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Failure of the circulation for 3-4 minutes will lead to irreversible cerebral damage. Delay, within that time, will lessen the ... airway /breathing/ circulation. The basic principles of resuscitation: These include a SAFE ... units, accident and emergency, theatres, intensive care units and x-ray departments must be trained. This. 47 ...

  16. Hydroxyethyl starch for resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is controversial. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of HES solutions including data from recent high-quality randomized clinical trials. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses of HES vs. control fluids show clear...

  17. Recommendations in dispatcher-assisted bystander resuscitation from emergency call center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Águila, J; López-Messa, J; Rosell-Ortiz, F; de Elías Hernández, R; Martínez del Valle, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; López-Herce, J; Cerdà-Vila, M; Roza-Alonso, C L; Bernardez-Otero, M

    2015-01-01

    Dispatch-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been shown as an effective measure to improve the survival of this process. The development of a unified protocol for all dispatch centers of the different emergency medical services can be a first step towards this goal in our environment. The process of developing a recommendations document and the realization of posters of dispatch-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation, agreed by different actors and promoted by the Spanish Resuscitation Council, is presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. News from the CERN Council

    CERN Multimedia

    The CERN Council today thanked the Organization’s outgoing management, and welcomed in the new. Outgoing Director General Robert Aymar, looked back on his five years at the helm, while new Director General, Rolf Heuer, presented his vision for the future. In other Council business, Romania was welcomed as a Candidate for Accession as Member State of CERN; and the groundwork was laid for a study of geographical and scientific extension of the role of CERN. Council also established the practical procedures for following projects relevant to the European Strategy for Particle Physics. Consult the complete Press Release.

  19. Council Session

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    From face, 1st raw: Erich Lohrmann, Sergio Fubini, Léon Van Hove, John Adams (Directors-General), Paul Levaux (President of the Council) Hans-Otto Wüster, Franco Bonaudi, Robert Lévy-Mandel and 2nd raw, centre: Patrick Mollet, Eliane de Modzelewska, Jean-Marie Dufour

  20. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Danish first aid books compliance with the new evidence-based non-resuscitative first aid guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Viereck, Søren; Roland, Jens; Pedersen, Thomas Egesborg; Lippert, Freddy K

    2018-01-10

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) released new guidelines on resuscitation in 2015. For the first time, the guidelines included a separate chapter on first aid for laypersons. We analysed the current major Danish national first aid books to identify potential inconsistencies between the current books and the new evidence-based first aid guidelines. We identified first aid books from all the first aid courses offered by major Danish suppliers. Based on the new ERC first aid guidelines, we developed a checklist of 26 items within 16 different categories to assess the content; this checklist was adapted following the principle of mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive questioning. To assess the agreement between four raters, Fleiss' kappa test was used. Items that did not reach an acceptable kappa score were excluded. We evaluated 10 first aid books used for first aid courses and published between 2009 and 2015. The content of the books complied with the new in 38% of the answers. In 12 of the 26 items, there was less than 50% consistency. These items include proximal pressure points and elevation of extremities for the control of bleeding, use of cervical collars, treatment for an open chest wound, burn dressing, dental avulsion, passive leg raising, administration of bronchodilators, adrenaline, and aspirin. Danish course material showed significant inconsistencies with the new evidence-based first aid guidelines. The new knowledge from the evidence-based guidelines should be incorporated into revised and updated first aid course material.

  3. Introduction: European climate leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurzel, R.K.W.; Liefferink, J.D.; Connelly, J.

    2017-01-01

    There is no shortage of would-be leaders in EU climate change politics. The EU institutions (e.g. European Council, Council of the EU, Commission and the European Parliament (EP)), member states and societal actors have all, though to varying degrees and at different time periods, tried to offer

  4. Can surf-lifeguards perform a quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation sailing on a lifeboat? A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Abelairas-Gomez, Cristian; Palacios-Aguilar, Jose; Rey, Ezequiel; Costas-Veiga, Javier; Lopez-Garcia, Sergio; Rodriguez-Nunez, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Drowning is a high-priority public health problem around the world. The European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015 put special emphasis on special environments like open waters. Stopping the drowning process as soon as possible and starting an early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improve survival. Inflatable rescue boats (IRBs) are used around the world in the water rescue of drowning victims. Our objective was to test the quality of CPR performed by surf-lifeguards while sailing on an IRB. A quasi-experimental simulation trial was conducted in Tenerife (Canary Islands-Spain) on September 2015. Ten surf-lifeguards were asked to perform a 2 min CPR on manikins in four different scenarios: (1) onshore, (2) on adrift boat, (3) on a boat sailing at 5 knots and (4) on a boat sailing at 10 knots. CPR was performed individually and was measured by means of CPRmeter (Laerdal, Norway) located on the standard manikin. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used in order to analyse the differences between scenarios. The composite of all CPR variables was over 84% in all conditions, but it was lower when CPR was performed on board: onshore (96.49±3.58%) versus adrift (91.80±3.56, p=0.04), sailing at 5 knots (88.65±5.54, p=0.03) and sailing at 10 knots (84.74±5.56, p=0.001). Surf-lifeguards are able to deliver good-quality CPR even on a moving IRB, but their performance is lower than onshore. This fact should be considered in real cases to balance the risk and benefits of CPR on board. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Council dinner

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Jean Teillac (President of the Council) gives the speech. The occasion was the end-of-term of Leon Van Hove and John Adams as Research and Executive Director-General, respectively, to be succeeded by Herwig Schopper. The venue was the Hotel Beau-Rivage in Geneva. Beside Jean Teillac are (on the left) G.H. Stafford and Mme Van Hove, (on the right) Mme Schopper.

  6. Viscoelastic guidance of resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bleeding in trauma carries a high mortality and is increased in case of coagulopathy. Our understanding of hemostasis and coagulopathy has improved, leading to a change in the protocols for hemostatic monitoring. This review describes the current state of evidence supporting...... populations. In trauma care, viscoelastic hemostatic assays allows for rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy and individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. As part of the resuscitation concept, viscoelastic hemostatic assays seem to improve outcome also in trauma; however, there is a need...

  7. Debriefing after resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Perkins, Gavin D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence of suboptimal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) delivery in practice has driven interest in strategies to improve CPR quality. Early data suggest that debriefing may be an effective strategy. In this review, we analyse types of debriefing and the evidence to support their usage. There is a general lack of standardization in terminology and methods used for debriefing that limits evaluation. Debriefing interventions generally take two different formats. Hot debriefing is one where individuals or teams are provided with debriefing immediately after the event. Although perhaps the most widely used and easiest to implement, research evidence for its effectiveness is scant. Cold debriefing, where individuals or teams are provided with feedback sometime after the event, is associated with improvements in process and patient outcomes. Such feedback usually involves the use of objective performance data, such as defibrillator downloads or videotape records. Before and after cohort studies have found that both verbal debriefing in groups and individual written feedback seem to be associated with an improvement in performance. Debriefing is a useful strategy to improve resuscitation performance, but the optimal delivery method remains unclear. Future high-quality research is required to identify the most effective form of debriefing.

  8. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA and compare it with the European Resuscitation Council 2010 and 2015 Guidelines. We included OHCA cases from the Capital Region, Denmark, (2012-2016) where a Zoll AED was used before ambulance arrival. For cases with at least one minute of continuous data, the initial 10min of CPR data were analysed for compression rate, depth, fraction and compressions delivered for each minute of CPR. Data are presented as median [25th;75th percentile]. We included 136 cases. Bystander median compression rate was 101min(-1) [94;113], compression depth was 4.8cm [3.9;5.8] and compressions per minute were 62 [48;73]. Of all cases, the median compression rate was 100-120min(-1) in 42%, compression depth was 5-6cm in 26%, compression fraction≥60% in 51% and compressions delivered per minute exceeded 60 in 54%. In a minute-to-minute analysis, we found no evidence of deterioration in CPR quality over time. The median peri-shock pause was 27s [23;31] and the pre-shock pause was 19s [17;22]. The median CPR performed by bystanders using AEDs with audio-feedback in OHCA was within guideline recommendations without deterioration over time. Compression depth had poorer quality compared with other parameters. To improve bystander CPR quality, focus should be on proper compression depth and minimizing pauses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rescuer fatigue under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and its effect on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Catherine H; Heggie, James; Jones, Christopher M; Thorne, Christopher J; Hulme, Jonathan

    2013-08-01

    Updated life-support guidelines were published by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) in 2010, increasing the required depth and rate of chest compression delivery. This study sought to determine the impact of these guidelines on rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. 62 Health science students performed 5 min of conventional CPR in accordance with the 2010 ERC guidelines. A SkillReporter manikin was used to objectively assess temporal change in determinants of CPR quality. Participants subjectively reported their end-fatigue levels, using a visual analogue scale, and the point at which they believed fatigue was affecting CPR delivery. 49 (79%) participants reported that fatigue affected their CPR performance, at an average of 167 s. End fatigue averaged 49.5/100 (range 0-95). The proportion of chest compressions delivered correctly decreased from 52% in min 1 to 39% in min 5, approaching significance (p=0.071). A significant decline in chest compressions reaching the recommended depth occurred between the first (53%) and fifth (38%) min (p=0.012). Almost half this decline (6%) was between the first and second minutes of CPR. Neither chest compression rate, nor rescue breath volume, were affected by rescuer fatigue. Fatigue affects chest compression delivery within the second minute of CPR under the 2010 ERC guidelines, and is poorly judged by rescuers. Rescuers should, therefore, be encouraged to interchange after 2 min of CPR delivery. Team leaders should be advised to not rely on rescuers to self-report fatigue, and should, instead, monitor for its effects.

  10. Highlights: Spring Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council members present at the May 24, 1981, meeting were Keiiti Aki, Steven Burges (for Jim Wallis), Peter S. Eagleson, E. R. Engdahl, Charles E. Helsley, James R. Heirtzler, Carl Kisslinger, Leslie H. Meredith, Chris N. K. Mooers, Norman F. Ness, Marcia M. Neugebauer, James J. O'Brien, Richard Rapp, Carl Sagan, James C. Savage, Joseph V. Smith, Fred Spilhaus, Donald L. Turcotte, James A. Van Allen, J. Tuzo Wilson, and Jay Winston (for Elmar R. Reiter until his arrival at 6:50 P.M.). David Strangway, representing the Canadian Geophysical Union, and Peter Steinhauser, representing the European Geophysical Society, were special observers at the meeting. Council meetings are open, and a number of section secretaries, committee chairmen, journal editors, and other members attended. The following major actions were adopted by the Council:The experiment of publishing oceanography and lower-atmosphere papers in JGR Green issues alternate to those containing upper-atmosphere papers will be continued through 1982. From preliminary indications the experiment seems to be working, but a full year of data, including a renewal cycle, is needed to assess the success of the experiment. Final decision will be made prior to the 1983 dues notices.

  11. DECLARATION TO COUNCIL

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    One year ago, the Staff Association, together with the CERN-ESO Pensioners' Association, organized a staff meeting in front of this building to express our concern about certain actions of this Committee. Today we deem it necessary to come before you and convey in person, dear delegates, the concerns and worries of the staff. Indeed, the last 18 months we have observed a tendency of Council to take matters, in particular in the field of pensions, into its own hands, bypassing established governance structures, which Council has itself put into place. As a result, the Director General was prevented from playing his essential role of intermediary between staff and Council, an essential element of the established social dialogue. The creation of CERN in 1954 was very much based on the willingness of many countries of the old Continent to share resources to create a joint fundamental physics laboratory. The emphasis was on sharing resources for the common good to allow European scientists to engage in...

  12. EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN RESUSCITATION

    OpenAIRE

    O. Zabolotina

    2010-01-01

    Study of human resuscitation development history is the first step in understanding modern approaches to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A significant increase in survival parameters is driven by accumulation of knowledge, expertise, improvement in resuscitation technologies. Development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation structure, development of recommendations approved for study and practical use, addressing these issues at the state level are accompanied with a significant reduction in morta...

  13. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  14. The Forgotten Half: Two-Thirds: An Hispanic Perspective on Apprenticeship, European Style. Report of the National Council of La Raza Consultation on Apprenticeship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Emily Gantz

    A Hispanic-based consultation on European-style apprenticeships was undertaken to add a Hispanic perspective to the current policy debate about apprenticeships as a school-to-work transition option providing effective career preparation for non-college bound American youth. In March 1992, a delegation of 10 specialists in Hispanic education and…

  15. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), European Society for Neonatology (ESN), Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS), European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI)ORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann...

  16. Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Following the terrorist attacks recently committed in the United States of America, and according to the recommendations of the Council of the European Union, the CERN staff observed 3 minutes of silence on Friday 14 September 2001 at 12h00, as a sign of deepest sympathy for all the victims and their families, and of solidarity with the American people

  17. Avanceret genoplivning af voksne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  18. Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit

    CERN Document Server

    European Gender Summit, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit to the European Parliament and the Council, the European Commission, the Council of Europe, EU Member and Associate States, Science Institutions. Developing Systematic Implementation Strategy to Advance EU Policy on Gender Equality in Science, as part of HORIZON 2020, European Research Area and Innovation Union.

  19. Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Peter J; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-04-01

    'Suspended animation for delayed resuscitation' is a new concept for attempting resuscitation from cardiac arrest of patients who currently (totally or temporarily) cannot be resuscitated, such as traumatic exsanguination cardiac arrest. Suspended animation means preservation of the viability of brain and organism during cardiac arrest, until restoration of stable spontaneous circulation or prolonged artificial circulation is possible. Suspended animation for exsanguination cardiac arrest of trauma victims would have to be induced within the critical first 5 min after the start of cardiac arrest no-flow, to buy time for transport and resuscitative surgery (hemostasis) performed during no-flow. Cardiac arrest is then reversed with all-out resuscitation, usually requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Suspended animation has been explored and documented as effective in dogs in terms of long-term survival without brain damage after very prolonged cardiac arrest. In the 1990s, the Pittsburgh group achieved survival without brain damage in dogs after cardiac arrest of up to 90 min no-flow at brain (tympanic) temperature of 10 degrees C, with functionally and histologically normal brains. These studies used emergency cardiopulmonary bypass with heat exchanger or a single hypothermic saline flush into the aorta, which proved superior to pharmacologic strategies. For the large number of normovolemic sudden cardiac death victims, which currently cannot be resuscitated, more research in large animals is needed.

  20. Time Perception during Neonatal Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Res, Giulia; Sordino, Desiree; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Weiner, Gary; Cavallin, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of time perception during a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participants in 5 neonatal resuscitation program courses were directly involved in a complex simulation scenario. They were asked to assume the role of team leader, assistant 1, or assistant 2. At the end of the scenario, each participant completed a questionnaire on perceived time intervals for key resuscitation interventions. During the scenario, actual times were documented by an external observer and video recorded for later review. In addition, participants were asked to evaluate their self-perceived level of stress and preparation. Health care providers (68 physicians and 40 nurses) were involved in 36 scenarios. Perceived time intervals for the initiation of key resuscitation interventions were shorter than the actual time intervals, regardless of the participant's role in the scenario. Self-assessed levels of stress and preparation did not influence time perception. Health care providers underestimate the passage of time, irrespective of their role in a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participant's self-assessed levels of stress and preparation were not related to the accuracy of their time perception. These findings highlight the importance of assigning a dedicated individual to document interventions and the passage of time during a neonatal resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR COMBATING DISCRIMINATION – COURT OF JUSTICE OF EUROPEAN UNION – BUCHAREST COURT OF APPEAL. CAUSE C-81/12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian JURA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this investigation consists in closing the jurisdictional circle initiated in 2010 and analysing the national and European procedural, jurisdictional-administrative issues, in case of notifying some institutions related to certain discriminatory assertions. The investigation relies on assertions made during a radio show. On 12 October 2011 the Bucharest Court of Appeal ruled the notification of the Court of Justice of European Union related to preliminary questions formulated and ordered the suspension of the case until the settlement of the procedure. In 2013, the Bucharest Court of Appeal, although initially accepting the preliminary application of ACCEPT, submitting the case to the Court of Justice of European Union in order to determine the manner of interpretation of communitarian legislation related to the claims of plaintiff, eventually all arguments of CNCD have been accepted that is the warning is an effective, reasonable, dissuasive and (contextual proportional sanction, and such declaration cannot be understood as a discrimination in the labour field. De facto, the assertions of CNCD were in full agreement with the resolution of the Court of Justice of European Union, that is the communitarian legislation does not exclude the application of some sanctions without pecuniary character, such as the sanction with warning, since this kind of sanction does not have only a symbolic character, being a contraventional legal sanction, mainly when associated a relevant degree of advertising (such in the case, and the addressee is addressed, with arguments, directly and expressly the recommendation of meeting the non-discrimination principle, under the implicit effect of a more drastic sanction in case of relapse (discrimination in the same field.

  2. Resuscitation og abdominalkirurgiske aspekter ved damage control-kirurgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillingsø, Jens G; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Johansson, Pär I

    2011-01-01

    vicious cycle". Due to this a new resuscitation practice has been defined; damage control resuscitation, consisting of hypotensive resuscitation (restricted use of crystalloids), haemostatic resuscitation (balanced use of blood components) in combination with surgical haemostatic procedures (damage...... control surgery)....

  3. The history of derogations from chemical parametric values set by the European Drinking Water Directive (Council Directive 98/83/EC), in Italy and the Piedmont region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, Giuseppe; Marro, Silvia; Soardo, Vincenzo; Berruti, Renza; Maggi, Claudio; Cerrato, Elena; Ferrari, Romina; Gulino, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Italian legislation (Article 13 of Legislative Decree 31/2001) provides for the possibility of establishing derogations from chemical parametric values for drinking water set by EU legislation (Council Directive 98/83/EC), if the supply of drinking water cannot be maintained by any other reasonable means. A derogation is possible only after obtaining a specific authorization and must be limited to the shortest time possible. This paper presents the history of derogations granted in Italy and the case of arsenic and nickel in Piedmont. From 2003 to 2009, 13 regions requested a derogation (Campania, Emilia Romagna, Latium, Lombardy, Marche, Piedmont, Apulia, Sardinia, Sicily, Tuscany, Trentino Alto Adige, Umbria, Venetia) at different times and for a total of 13 parameters. In 2012, tap water provided to almost one million Italians in 112 municipalities of three regions (Latium, Tuscany and Campania), did not comply with the legal limits for the following parameters: arsenic, boron and fluorides. Currently, in the Piedmont region there are no derogations from the maximum permitted concentrations of contaminants in drinking water. In the past derogations have been applied for the nickel parameter (years 2006-2007) and from the arsenic parameter (years 2006-2008).

  4. A busy week for Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This has been a busy week for the CERN Council, and there is much to report. Firstly, I’m pleased to say that Council approved the Organization’s Medium Term Plan, and with it the budget for financial year 2010. In a time of global recession, this is a strong vote of confidence from the Member States. This meeting of Council provided an opportunity for the working group on the scientific and geographical enlargement of CERN to set out a roadmap towards its final report, which is to be made at Council’s December session this year. One part of the process over the coming months is to bring the major players in particle physics from beyond the European region into the discussion, ensuring that the working group’s recommendations lead to an optimum position for CERN and European particle physics in the global context. An indicator of the continuing attractiveness of CERN is the fact that Council has received four new applications...

  5. EUROPEAN HARMONIZATION OF CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS REGULATIONS?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cirstea Andreea; Baltariu Carmen-Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    ... No. 1606/2002 adopted by the European Parliament and European Council on the 19th of July 2002, which regulates the application of IAS/IFRS regarding the financial reporting of listed European companies...

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Andrés Vargas-Garzón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reanimation’s guidelines dictated by the AHA (American Heart Association are the strategies to follow in the envi­ronment of any situation related to cardiac arrest. They are acquired after the analysis of the evidence available in reani­mation from higher to less quality, with the best neurological results. After years of observation, was achieved to establish that survival behind cardiac arrest is, in general, low (6%, except that any witness starts immediately cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers; therefore, medical personal must know and practice these maneuvers. With these con­siderations, it’s necessary to emphasize in the theoretical training of CPR of all health professional and laity, which guarantee everybody be prepared to emergency system ac­tivation, brain’s preservation and defibrillate to recuperate heart and life. The actual approach that combines compres­sions and defibrillation to closed chest, rescue ventilation and cardio tonic drugs. The guidelines AHA 2010, focus on increase frequency and quality of CPR. The objective of this article is to recognize various changes in these guidelines in cardiopulmonary reanimation and promote the continued education’s importance in reanimation.

  7. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"ABS 1. HOW SAFE IS NASAL CANNULAE OXYGEN THERAPY DURING NEONATAL TRANSPORT? • A. Brunton, J. O’Shea, A. JacksonABS 2. WEANING PREMATURE INFANTS FROM NASAL CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE – CURRENT PRACTICE IN GERMANY • A. Kidszun, C. Arnold, J. Winter, C. Whybra-Trümpler, E. MildenbergerABS 3. TIMING OF KEY EVENTS IN NEONATAL RE­SUSCITATION • A. Heathcote, J. Jones, P. ClarkeABS 4. COMPARING NON-INVASIVE VENTILATION METHODS IN RESPIRATORY SUPPORT OF PRETERM NEONATES WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES • A.S. Farhat, A. Mohammadzadeh, G.A. Mamuri, R. Saeidi, S. NoorizadehABS 5. PREDICTORS AND OUTCOMES OF CONTINU­OUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE AND NA­SAL HIGH-FLOW TREATMENT FAILURE IN PRE­TERM INFANTS: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF A RANDOMIZED TRIAL • B. Manley, C. Roberts, D. Frøisland, L. Doyle, P. Davis, L. OwenABS 6. NEONATAL NON-INVASIVE RESPIRATORY SUPPORT APPROACH: A TWO COUNTRIES COMPARISON • I. Bresesti, S. Zivanovic, G. Lista, C. RoehrABS 7. PREDICTORS OF EARLY CPAP FAILURE IN VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PRETERM

  8. Drugs in resuscitation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S W

    2011-08-01

    Drug therapy is recommended after effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation in cardiac arrest. Some drugs appear to have short-term benefits, such as improved survival to hospital, e.g. vasopressor and antiarrhythmics. Hence, they have been included in the cardiac life support algorithm. However, to date, no drug (or combination of drugs) has been shown to improve long-term survival in randomised trials. Hopefully, improvements in post-arrest intensive unit care can translate improved survival in hospitals into better long-term outcomes. This review is an update on drugs during resuscitation, including the choice of agents, dosing, sequence and route. Specific drugs may have benefits in correcting identified causes of collapse. Drug usage during resuscitation is an evolving science, with the use of medications improving as results of clinical studies become available.

  9. Practical Considerations in Sepsis Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex; Modisett, Katharine L; Woods, Christian J

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department, and the majority of patients respond to resuscitation measures, including antibiotics and i.v. fluids. However, a proportion of patients will fail to respond to standard treatment. This review elucidates practical considerations for management of sepsis in patients who fail to respond to standard treatment. Early goal-directed therapy revolutionized sepsis management. However, there is a paucity of literature that provides a well-defined treatment algorithm for patients who fail to improve with therapy. Refractory shock can be defined as continued patient hemodynamic instability (mean arterial pressure, ≤ 65 mm Hg, lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L, altered mental status) after adequate fluid loading (at least 30 mL/kg i.v.), the use of two vasopressors (with one as norepinephrine), and provision of antibiotics. When a lack of improvement is evident in the early stages of resuscitation, systematically considering source control, appropriate volume resuscitation, adequate antimicrobial coverage, vasopressor selection, presence of metabolic pathology, and complications of resuscitation, such as abdominal compartment syndrome and respiratory failure, allow emergency physicians to address the entire clinical scenario. The care of sepsis has experienced many changes in recent years. Care of the patient with sepsis who is not responding appropriately to initial resuscitation is troublesome for emergency physicians. This review provides practical considerations for resuscitation of the patient with septic shock. When a septic patient is refractory to standard therapy, systematically evaluating the patient and clinical course may lead to improved outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, The Council, The European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions: Strategy for equality between women and men 2010-2015

    OpenAIRE

    European Commission

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission’s Strategy for Gender Equality lays down its programme in this area for 2010-15. The Strategy sets out priorities including equal economic independence, pay, labour market opportunities and access to decision-making positions. It also stresses the need to promote women’s dignity and stop gender-based violence. The Strategy outlines EU efforts to integrate gender equality into its external actions regarding policies such as enlargement and development. Finally, it addre...

  11. Effect of two additional interventions, test and reflection, added to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation training on seventh grade students' practical skills and willingness to act: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, Anette; Hult, Håkan; Kreitz-Sandberg, Susanne; Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this research is to investigate if two additional interventions, test and reflection, after standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training facilitate learning by comparing 13-year-old students' practical skills and willingness to act. Seventh grade students in council schools of two municipalities in south-east Sweden. School classes were randomised to CPR training only (O), CPR training with a practical test including feedback (T) or CPR training with reflection and a practical test including feedback (RT). Measures of practical skills and willingness to act in a potential life-threatening situation were studied directly after training and at 6 months using a digital reporting system and a survey. A modified Cardiff test was used to register the practical skills, where scores in each of 12 items resulted in a total score of 12-48 points. The study was conducted in accordance with current European Resuscitation Council guidelines during December 2013 to October 2014. 29 classes for a total of 587 seventh grade students were included in the study. The total score of the modified Cardiff test at 6 months was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were the total score directly after training, the 12 individual items of the modified Cardiff test and willingness to act. At 6 months, the T and O groups scored 32 (3.9) and 30 (4.0) points, respectively (pskills. Reflection did not increase further CPR skills. At 6-month follow-up, no intervention effect was found regarding willingness to make a life-saving effort. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Implementation of European Council resolution ResAP(2008)1 in Italy. National and regional regulation of tattoo practices: diversity and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzoni, Alberto; Pirrera, Antonia; Novello, Francesco; Diamante, Maria Simonetta; Guarino, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, tattoos and permanent make-up have become increasingly popular in recent years. The number of tattoo parlours has increased from 257 in 2009 to 2,055 in 2014, wich is a eight-fold increase over the last 6 years. Although there is no specific legislation, the Italian Ministry of Health issued a document containing the 'Guidelines for the implementation of procedures for tattooing and piercing in safe conditions'. This document has not been adopted by all Italian regions, principally regarding training course requirements for tattoo professionals, creating a highly fragmented situation that resembles the European scene in miniature. ResAP(2008)1, which is not mandatory in Italy but was made binding by Italian Decree n. 206/2005, has been applied uniformly throughout the country. Thus, as far as the safety of inks is concerned, the surveillance system appears to be working well. However, surveillance has highlighted the presence of non-compliant inks and potentially unsafe preparations for tattoo removal in the market. Updating and rebalancing the situation will be the goal in order to face the challenge of combining well-being with the on-going social demand of looking after and beautifying the body. This would include the growing fashion of tattoos, provided that the products that are used are safe and that tattooing is performed in controlled hygienic conditions that fully guarantee the health of consumers. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. EVOLUTION OF KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT IN HUMAN RESUSCITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zabolotina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of human resuscitation development history is the first step in understanding modern approaches to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. A significant increase in survival parameters is driven by accumulation of knowledge, expertise, improvement in resuscitation technologies. Development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation structure, development of recommendations approved for study and practical use, addressing these issues at the state level are accompanied with a significant reduction in mortality both at the hospital and pre-hospital levels. Key words: children, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, development stages, training of pediatricians. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:25-27

  14. Conflicting perspectives compromising discussions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Groarke, J

    2010-09-01

    Healthcare professionals, patients and their relatives are expected to discuss resuscitation together. This study aims to identify the differences in the knowledge base and understanding of these parties. Questionnaires examining knowledge and opinion on resuscitation matters were completed during interviews of randomly selected doctors, nurses and the general public. 70% doctors, 24% nurses and 0% of a public group correctly estimated survival to discharge following in-hospital resuscitation attempts. Deficiencies were identified in doctor and nurse knowledge of ethics governing resuscitation decisions. Public opinion often conflicts with ethical guidelines. Public understanding of the nature of cardiopulmonary arrests and resuscitation attempts; and of the implications of a \\'Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)\\' order is poor. Television medical dramas are the primary source of resuscitation knowledge. Deficiencies in healthcare professionals\\' knowledge of resuscitation ethics and outcomes may compromise resuscitation decisions. Educational initiatives to address deficiencies are necessary. Parties involved in discussion on resuscitation do not share the same knowledge base reducing the likelihood of meaningful discussion. Public misapprehensions surrounding resuscitation must be identified and corrected during discussion.

  15. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts n...

  16. Trauma patients' rights during resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Doctors and nurses working in hospital emergency departments face ethical and moral conflicts more so than in other health care units. Traditional curricular approaches to health professional education have been embedded in a discriminatory societal context and as such have not prepared health professionals adequately for the ethical realities of their practice. Furthermore, the discourse on ethical theories and ethical principles do not provide clear-cut solutions to ethical dilemmas but rather serve as a guide to ethical decision- making. Within the arena of trauma and resuscitation, fundamental ethical principles such as respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice cannot be taken as absolutes as these may in themselves create moral conflict. Resuscitation room activities require a balance between what is “ ethically" correct and what is “pragmatically required” . Because of the urgent nature of a resuscitation event, this balance is often under threat, with resultant transgression of patients’ rights. This article explores the sources of ethical and moral issues in trauma care and proposes a culture of human rights to provide a context for preserving and protecting trauma patients’ rights during resuscitation. Recommendations for education and research are alluded to in concluding the article.

  17. Ethical issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, S; Jørgensen, E O

    2001-08-01

    If patients are to benefit from resuscitation, they must regain consciousness and their full faculties. In recent years, we have acquired important information about the natural history of neurological recovery from circulatory arrest. There are clinical tests that predict the outcome, both during ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and in the period after restoration of spontaneous circulation. The ability to predict neurological outcome at this stage offers a basis for certain ethical considerations, which are not exclusively centered on "do-not-attempt-resuscitation" (DNAR)- orders. Instead of being forced to make the decision that "I do not want CPR", the patient should be able to decide that "I want resuscitation to be discontinued, if you predict that I will not recover to a level of neurological function that is acceptable to me". Ideally, no competent patient should be given a DNAR-status without his or her consent. No CPR-attempt should be stopped, and no treatment decision for a patient recovering after CPR should be taken without knowing and assessing the available information. Good ethical decision-making requires reliable facts, which we now know are available.

  18. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  19. APA Council Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    At the fall component meetings of the American Psychiatric Association in Arlington, Va., September 13-16, 2017, the APA councils heard reports from their components. Following are summaries of the activities of the councils and their components.

  20. 75 FR 30781 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On March 16, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... the Manufacturing Council (Council). The March 16, 2010 notice provided that all applications must be...

  1. 75 FR 80040 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On November 23, 2010, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... vacant position on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The November 23, 2010 notice provided that all...

  2. Highlights from the eleventh ISCB Student Council Symposium 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkins, Katie; Hassan, Mehedi; Francescatto, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the annual symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) / European Conference on Computational...

  3. T-piece resuscitator versus self-inflating bag for preterm resuscitation: an institutional experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jayaram, Archana; Sima, Adam; Barker, Gail; Thacker, Leroy R

    2013-01-01

    ...), flow-inflating bags, and T-piece resuscitators. To compare the effect of type of manual ventilation device on overall response to resuscitation among preterm neonates born at < 35 weeks gestation...

  4. Early Management and Fluid Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaya Yorgancı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Initial management of severely burned patient is similar with a trauma victim. Determination of airway patency, evaluation of respiration and circulation, early recognition of concomitant trauma has vital importance in burn patients. In the early phase, mortality mainly depends on missed or un-treated severe injuries or pathologies, but not burn injury itself.In patients that have TBSA greater than 15 %, fluid resuscitation should be started. In the first 24 hours, crystalloid solutions should be preferred. .Several formulas can guide fluid resuscitation; however the amount of fluid that is given to the patient should be individualized according to the patient’s need. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 7-10

  5. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  6. Fluid Resuscitation in Trauma Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayca Acikalin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic shock may be defined as a syndrome that begun the insufficient sytemic perfusion causes the tissue hypoxia and vital organ dysfunction. The most important point is to achieve the efficient volume. In this review we tried to discuss the recommended blood and blood products, syntethic blood, isotonic and hypertonic cristalloids and their structures, tenancy areas, advantages and dysadvantages and fluid resuscitation intended to coagulopathy in trauma cases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(2.000: 89-106

  7. History of the evolution of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    George Karlis; Marianna Korre

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is as old as humankind. The evolution of CPR represents a combination of human errors and discoveries. Aim: The present study reviews the most important moments in the history of resuscitation, from the first attempts of CPR until now. Methods: The methodology followed included bibliography research from review literature, through databases PubMed, Medline, Scopus, with the use of keywords, such as cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, hist...

  8. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  9. Patient Experiences of Trauma Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Elinore J; Richmond, Therese S; Wiebe, Douglas J; Jacoby, Sara F; Holena, Daniel N

    2017-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an increasingly common feature of quality measurement, and patient-centered care is a key aspect of high-quality clinical care. Incorporating patient preferences in an acute context, such as trauma resuscitation, presents distinct challenges; however, to our knowledge, patients' experiences of trauma resuscitation have not been explored. To describe patient experiences of trauma resuscitation and to identify opportunities to improve patient experience without compromising speed or thoroughness. This qualitative, descriptive study was conducted at an urban, academic, level I trauma center. Semistructured interviews and video observations were conducted from May to December 2015. Interview participants were adult English-speaking patients who had experienced trauma resuscitation and were clinically stable with no alteration in consciousness. We recruited interview participants and conducted video observations until thematic saturation was reached, resulting in 30 interviews and 20 observations. Video observation patients did not overlap with interview participants. The purposive sample included equal numbers of violently and nonviolently injured patients. Data were analyzed for thematic content from June 2015 to April 2016. The main outcomes reported are themes of patient experience. Of 30 interview participants, 25 were men (83.3%), and 21 were black (70.0%). Of 20 video observation patients, 16 were men (80.0%), and 17 were black (85.0%). Salient aspects of patient experience of trauma resuscitation included emotional responses, physical experience, nonclinical concerns, treatment and procedures, trauma team members' interactions, communication, and comfort. Participants drew satisfaction from trauma team members' demeanor, expertise, and efficiency and valued clear clinical communication, as well as words of reassurance. Dissatisfaction stemmed from the perceived absence of these attributes and from participants' emotional or physical

  10. The European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics. Policy Statement No. 7.1: The roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist including the criteria for the staffing levels in a Medical Physics Department approved by EFOMP Council on 5th February 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephen; Christofides, Stelios; Brambilla, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This EFOMP Policy Statement is an amalgamation and an update of the EFOMP Policy Statements No. 2, 4 and 7. It presents guidelines for the roles, responsibilities and status of the medical physicist together with recommended minimum staffing levels. These recommendations take into account the ever-increasing demands for competence, patient safety, specialisation and cost effectiveness of modern healthcare services, the requirements of the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/Euratom laying down the basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation, the European Commission's Radiation Protection Report No. 174: "Guidelines on medical physics expert", as well as the relevant publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The provided recommendations on minimum staffing levels are in very good agreement with those provided by both the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Cardiac arrest leadership: in need of resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip S; Shall, Emma; Rakhit, Roby

    2016-12-01

    Leadership skills directly correlate with the quality of technical performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes. Despite an improved focus on non-technical skills in CPR training, the leadership of cardiac arrests is often variable. To assess the perceptions of leadership and team working among members of a cardiac arrest team and to evaluate future training needs. Cross-sectional survey of 102 members of a cardiac arrest team at an Acute Hospital Trust in the UK with 892 inpatient beds. Responses sought from doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to 12 rated statements and 4 dichotomous questions. Of 102 responses, 81 (79%) were from doctors and 21 (21%) from nurses. Among specialist registrars 90% agreed or strongly agreed that there was clear leadership at all arrests compared with between 28% and 49% of nurses and junior doctors respectively. Routine omission of key leadership tasks was reported by as many as 80% of junior doctors and 50% of nurses. Almost half of respondents reported non-adherence with Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines. Among junior members of the team, 36% felt confident to lead an arrest and 75% would welcome further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training. Leadership training is integrated into the ALS (Resus Council, UK) qualification. However, this paper found that in spite of this training; standards of leadership are variable. The findings suggest a pressing need for further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training with a focus on improving key leadership tasks such as role assignment, team briefing and debriefing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-05

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  13. Review of commonly used age-based weight estimates for paediatric drug dosing in relation to the pharmacokinetic properties of resuscitation drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasco, Clare Francesca; Fletcher, Penny; Maconochie, Ian

    2016-05-01

    To study which weight estimate calculation used in paediatric resuscitation results in optimal drug dosing; Advanced Paediatric and Life Support (APLS) or the UK Resuscitation Council age-based formula. Commonly used drugs used in paediatric resuscitation were selected and a literature search conducted for each drug's pharmacokinetic properties, concentrating on the volume of distribution (Vd). Hydrophobic drugs have a higher Vd than hydrophilic drugs as they distribute preferentially to fat mass (FM). The larger the Vd, the higher the initial dose required to achieve therapeutic plasma concentrations. Actual body weight (ABW) estimates are a good indicator of Vd for hydrophobic drugs as they correlate well with FM. Ideal body weight (IBW) estimates may be a better indicator of Vd for hydrophilic drugs, as they correlate better with lean body mass. This highlights potential variation between ABW and IBW, which may result in toxic or sub-therapeutic dosing. The new APLS formulae give higher estimates of expected weight for a wider age range. This may be a more accurate reflection of ABW due to increasing prevalence of obesity in children. The UK Resuscitation Council's formula appears to result in a lower estimate of weight, which may relate more closely to IBW. The main drugs used in paediatric resuscitation are hydrophilic, thus the APLS formulae may result in too much being given. Therefore the UK Resuscitation Council's single formula may be preferred. In addition, a single formula may minimize error in the context of a child of unknown weight requiring administration of emergency resuscitation drugs. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. 78 FR 67117 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... small- and medium-sized enterprises. The Secretary of Commerce appoints all Council members. All Council.... manufacturing industry to fill five vacant positions on the Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the... from representatives of the U.S. manufacturing industry for five vacant positions on the Council for...

  15. 77 FR 56811 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity to Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council... ] Manufacturing Council (Council) for a two-year term to begin in fall 2012. The purpose of the Council is to...

  16. 76 FR 33244 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an Opportunity To Apply for Membership on the Manufacturing Council... Manufacturing Council (Council). The purpose of the Council is to advise the Secretary of Commerce on matters...

  17. Resuscitative goals and new strategies in severe trauma patient resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea-Guerrero, J J; Freire-Aragón, M D; Serrano-Lázaro, A; Quintana-Díaz, M

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic injuries represent a major health problem all over the world. In recent years we have witnessed profound changes in the paradigm of severe trauma patient resuscitation, new concepts regarding acute coagulopathy in trauma have been proposed, and there has been an expansion of specific commercial products related to hemostasis, among other aspects. New strategies in severe trauma management include the early identification of those injuries that are life threatening and require surgical hemostasis, tolerance of moderate hypotension, rational intravascular volume replacement, prevention of hypothermia, correction of acidosis, optimization of oxygen carriers, and identification of those factors required by the patient (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, tranexamic acid, fibrinogen, cryoprecipitates and prothrombin complex). However, despite such advances, further evidence is required to improve survival rates in severe trauma patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  19. Damage control resuscitation: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoudi, M; Harwood, P

    2016-06-01

    Damage control resuscitation describes an approach to the early care of very seriously injured patients. The aim is to keep the patient alive whilst avoiding interventions and situations that risk worsening their situation by driving the lethal triad of hypothermia, coagulopathy and acidosis or excessively stimulating the immune-inflammatory system. It is critical that the concepts and practicalities of this approach are understood by all those involved in the early management of trauma patients. This review aims to summarise this and discusses current knowledge on the subject. Damage control resuscitation forms part of an overall approach to patient care rather than a specific intervention and has evolved from damage control surgery. It is characterised by early blood product administration, haemorrhage arrest and restoration of blood volume aiming to rapidly restore physiologic stability. The infusion of large volumes of crystalloid is no longer appropriate, instead the aim is to replace lost blood and avoid dilution and coagulopathy. In specific situations, permissive hypotension may also be of benefit, particularly in patients with severe haemorrhage from an arterial source. As rapid arrest of haemorrhage is so important, team-based protocols that deliver patients rapidly but safely, via CT scan where appropriate, to operating theatres or interventional radiology suites form a critical part of this process. Given that interventions are so time dependent in the severely injured, it is likely that by further improving trauma systems and protocols, improvements in outcome can still be made. Further research work in this area will allow us to target these approaches more accurately to those patients who can benefit most.

  20. Blocking Minorities. Networks and Meaning in the Opposition Against the Proposal for a Directive on Temporary Work in the Council of Ministers of the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article contains a case study of the behaviour of a blocking minority in the Council of Ministers. The article demonstrates that the behaviour of the Member States cannot be explained directly in this case by domestic circumstances and interests, as is often done, for example, in the liberal...

  1. Teamwork and Leadership in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunziker, Sabina; Johansson, Anna C; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Rock, Laura; Howell, Michael D; Marsch, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    .... Resuscitation teams often deviate from algorithms of CPR. Emerging evidence suggests that in addition to technical skills of individual rescuers, human factors such as teamwork and leadership affect adherence to algorithms and hence the outcome of CPR...

  2. Fluid resuscitation for critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-hu ZHOU

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluid overload is frequently found in patients with intravenous fluid resuscitation, and recent studies showed the potential risks of fluid overload for organ failure and mortality. To avoid volume overload and its associated complications, strategies to identify fluid responsiveness are necessary. Apart from the amount of fluid utilized for resuscitation, the type of fluid used also impacts patient outcome. In recent years, there has also been an increasing focus on comparing various resuscitation fluids with respect to both benefits and risks. In this article, through analyzing the impact of fluid overload on patient outcome, we describe the differences in static and dynamic estimates of fluid responsiveness, and review the current literature regarding choice of intravenous fluids for resuscitation in critically ill patients to help clinicians to make appropriative decision on intravenous fluids prescription and to optimize patient outcome. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.02.04

  3. The Evolving Science of Trauma Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Mak, Matthew; Brohi, Karim

    2018-02-01

    This review summarizes the evolution of trauma resuscitation from a one-size-fits-all approach to one tailored to patient physiology. The most dramatic change is in the management of actively bleeding patients, with a balanced blood product-based resuscitation approach (avoiding crystalloids) and surgery focused on hemorrhage control, not definitive care. When hemostasis has been achieved, definitive resuscitation to restore organ perfusion is initiated. This approach is associated with decreased mortality, reduced duration of stay, improved coagulation profile, and reduced crystalloid/vasopressor use. This article focuses on the tools and methods used for trauma resuscitation in the acute phase of trauma care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Medical history of hypercholesterolaemia adversely affects the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation; the 'Shahal' experience in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, A; Golovner, M; Gavish, D; Shapira, I; Malov, N; Sender, J; Alroy, I; Kaplinski, E; Laniado, S

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the impact selected risk factors for cardiac death may have on the success rate in a large cohort of subscribers to 'SHAHAL' who were resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In this medical facility currently serving 50 000 subscribers, data were prospectively gathered from between 1987-1998. The information retrieved from the patients' medical records included a medical history of hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolaemia (>220.mg. dl(-1)) smoking, angina, previous myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. A total of 998 patients aged 74+/-12 years (mean+/-1 SD) were included. Death was announced at the scene for 659 (66%) victims, while 339 (34%) patients were taken to hospital. Of these 140 (14% of the total cohort) survived and were discharged from the hospital. A comparison of various selected parameters between survivors and non-survivors of resuscitation revealed that survivors were younger, had a higher rate of pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, more were among the arrests witnessed by the 'SHAHAL' team, and that more had a shorter time lag to initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation than non-survivors. None of the studied risk factors predicted the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, with the exception of hypercholesterolaemia, which carried a significantly worse prognosis for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (P=0.009). A medical history of hypercholesterolaemia appears to be an important risk factor which adversely affects the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Copyright 2000 The European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Medicare Appeals Council Decisions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Decisions of the Departmental Appeals Board's Medicare Appeals Council involving claims for entitlement to Medicare and individual claims for Medicare coverage and...

  6. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  7. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Nalan Kozaci; Mehmet Oguzhan Ay; Ferhat Icme; Abdulkadir Akturk; Salim Satar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status o...

  8. Amitriptyline Intoxication Responded to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güldem Turan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The most severe effects in amitriptiline intoxications are related with central nervous system and cardiovascular system. Amitriptiline intoxication especially with high doses has severe cardiac effects and can result in cardiac arrest. Most favorable responses can be achieved with efficient and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We wanted to present a case ingested high dose of amitriptiline for attempt to suicide and responded to prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  9. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Today concludes a very busy week for Council. As you’ll have seen from the press release this morning, Council elected a new President, who will take up his mandate on 1 January along with the new management team, which was also approved by Council yesterday.   You’ll find full details of the incoming Director-General’s management team and structures here. Completing the configuration for the immediate future, Council also approved the medium term plan, along with the budget for 2016. In other Council business, two complete applications for Associate Membership were discussed. Following an earlier letter, India’s complete application was received and considered by Council. Consequently, a fact-finding mission has been established to report back before the end of the year. A new application was also received from Azerbaijan, with a fact-finding mission to be established. India’s involvement with CERN goes back to the 1970s, and the country...

  10. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma: the next generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I

    2016-12-01

    To discuss the recent developments in and evolvement of next generation haemostatic resuscitation in bleeding trauma. Mortality from major trauma is a worldwide problem, and massive haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Development of coagulopathy further increases trauma mortality emphasizing that coagulopathy is a key target in the phase of bleeding. The pathophysiology of coagulopathy in trauma reflects at least three distinct mechanisms that may be present isolated or coexist: acute traumatic coagulopathy, coagulopathy associated with the lethal triad, and consumptive coagulopathy. The concepts of 'damage control surgery' and 'damage control resuscitation' have been developed to ensure early control of bleeding and coagulopathy to improve outcome in bleeding trauma. Haemostatic resuscitation aims at controlling coagulopathy and consists of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival. The next generation of haemostatic resuscitation aims at applying a ratio 1 : 1 : 1 driven strategy while using antifibrinolytics, haemostatic monitoring and avoiding critical fibrinogen deficiency by substitution.

  11. 77 FR 66179 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... manufacturing council. SUMMARY: On September 14, 2012, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... of 25 members of the Manufacturing Council (Council) for a two-year term to begin in fall 2012. The...

  12. 77 FR 69794 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S... Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: On September 14, 2012, the Department of Commerce's International Trade... appointment of 25 members of the Manufacturing Council (Council) for a two-year term to begin in fall 2012...

  13. European Music Year 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanderson, Thomas; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Articles concerning music are included in this newsletter dedicated to cultural venture to be jointly carried out by the Council of Europe and the European communities. Many events will mark Music Year 1985, including concerts, dance performances, operas, publications, recordings, festivals, exhibitions, competitions, and conferences on musical…

  14. WAYS OF INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE COMMERCIAL COMPANIES UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF THE ROMANIAN LOCAL COUNCIL IN THE POST-ACCESSION PERIOD TO THE EUROPEAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Pendiuc

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available More and more companies under the authority of the Local Council are interested in implementing a quality management system following the quality assurance models proposed by the ISO9000 type international standards. Almost 200 organizations have in place a quality management system certified based on these standards. These organizatios requested certification in order to enjoy a number of advantages, especially as regards their position on the market towards competition, by establishing new contractual relationships, foreseeing customers' demands, creating products and services to better fulfill these demands, at better prices. According to some surveys, many commercial companies under the authority of the Loal Council managed to obtain these advantages to gether with other ones such as: a better working structure, motivation of the workers, improvement of the product quality, an increase in the efficiency, productivity and market quota. As more and more similar products manufactured using the same technologies emerge on the market, quality becomes the main selection factor of the commercial companies under the authority of the Local Council on the market, thus the main mean of competitiveness. Thus, lately, in our county we witness an increasingly intense concern in this field, the change of quality-related aspects, this being the main motivation for drafting this article.

  15. Leadership of resuscitation teams: "Lighthouse Leadership'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S; Wakelam, A

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between leadership behaviour, team dynamics and task performance. This was as an observational study, using video recordings of 20 resuscitation attempts. The Leadership Behaviour Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was used to measure the level of structure built within the team. Interpersonal behaviour and the tasks of resuscitation were measured with a team dynamics and a task performance scale. The degree to which the leader actively participated, 'hands on', with the tasks of resuscitation, and their previous training in advanced life support (ALS), and experience of resuscitation attempts, were evaluated against the leadership rating. The degree to which the leader built a structure within the team was found to correlate significantly with the team dynamics (P = 0.000) and the task performance (P = 0.013). Where the leaders participated 'hands on' they were less likely to build a structured team (P = 0.005), the team were less dynamic (P = 0.028) and the tasks of resuscitation were performed less effectively (P = 0.099). Experience gained over a 1-year period did not enhance leadership performance, but leaders who had up to 3 years experience were more likely to be effective in this role (P = 0.072). Interestingly, ALS training did not enhance leadership performance per se. However those leaders who had had recent ALS training were more likely not to participate 'hands on' (P = 0.035). There were some notable shortcomings in the performance of the task and some interesting correlations relating to duration of resuscitation, survival rate estimations, the leaders' attitudes and the teams' level of experience. Leaders must build a structure within a resuscitation team in order for them to perform effectively. An emergency leadership training programme is essential to enhance the performance of leaders and their teams.

  16. A report from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The June meeting of Council is always a very busy one, having approval of the next year’s budget and the MTP as fixed agenda points. This year in addition, we had discussions on enlargement, as well as on the pension fund. I’d like to use this message to bring you up to date on all of those matters.   I’ll begin with the good news that the 2015 budget and MTP were recommended for approval by Finance Committee on Wednesday, and approved by Council on Thursday. This is extremely good news, and a solid vote of confidence from Council in the current economic situation. Coupled with that, I am pleased to report that at the half way stage of 2014, some 89% of budget contributions for the year have been received. Turning now to enlargement, I can inform you that the task force that went to Pakistan came back with a positive report, and as a consequence Council has authorised us to finalise discussion with Pakistan for Associate Membership. Council also authoris...

  17. NAS council approves reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A proposed reorganization at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) would fold the Commission on Natural Resources into the Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (AMPS) to form what would be called the Commission on Mathematics, Physical Sciences, and Resources. Spurred by NAS President Frank Press, past president of AGU, the merger is part of a reorganization that aims to clarify the division of labor within the National Research Council (NRC). The NAS council approved the general structure of the reorganization; the National Academy of Engineering's council was scheduled to review the matter at its March 12 meeting. Administrative details of the restructuring will not be finalized until the April 3 meeting of the NRC governing board.

  18. A comparison of three neonatal resuscitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Stacie; Finer, Neil N; Rich, Wade; Vaucher, Yvonne

    2005-10-01

    Ventilation during neonatal resuscitation involves the use of self-inflating bags, flow-inflating bags, and T-piece resuscitators. The ability of operators to deliver desired peak inspiratory pressures (PIP), positive end expiratory pressures (PEEP), prolonged inflations and the length of time to transition between different pressures has not been compared for all three of these devices. To compare the ability of neonatal resuscitation personnel to deliver predetermined ventilation interventions using these devices in advance of a clinical trial of neonatal resuscitation. We studied 31 operators (neomatologists, neonatal respiratory therapists, neonatal fellows, a pediatrician, pediatric residents, neonatal nurse practitioners, and neonatal nurses) using a T-piece resuscitator (Neopuff), Fisher and Paykel Healthcare, Auckland, New Zealand), a self-inflating bag (Baby Blue II, Vital Signs, Totowa, NJ), and a flow-inflating bag (Model E191 Anesthesia Associates, San Marcos, CA). The self-inflating bag was tested with and without the manufacturer's PEEP valve. Using a continuous pressure recording system and a neonatal manikin, we evaluated the ability to deliver a consistent PIP of 20 or 40 cmH2O and a PEEP of 5 cmH2O during 30 s of ventilation, the ability to maintain a 5 s inflation at a PIP of 20 cmH2O and the time to transition from a PIP of 20 to 40 cmH2O. Each device was evaluated with and without a qualitative CO2 detector (Pedicap) Nellcor Pleasanton, CA). The T-piece resuscitator delivered the desired PIP more precisely and consistently compared with the self-inflating bag at a target of 20 cmH2O (maximum PIP 20.7 cmH2O, S.D.=0.8 versus 24.7 cmH2O, S.D.=2.8; ppiece resuscitator was significantly less than both the flow-inflating bag and the self-inflating bag (39.7 cmH2O, S.D.=2.1 versus 44 cmH2O, S.D.=3.3 versus 45.3 cmH2O, S.D.=4.7; ppiece resuscitator compared to the self-inflating bag or the flow-inflating bag (5.7 s versus 2.2 s versus 1.8 s; pinflation

  19. Are We Successful in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Kozaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine the success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed in the patients with diagnosis of cardiac arrest, and demographic characteristics of these patients. Material and Methods: The patients admitted to Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2012, and who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation were included to this study planned as retrospectively. The age, gender, status of judicial cases, causes and time of cardiac arrest, first observed arrest rhythm, the diseases prior to the arrest, means of arrival to emergency department, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the name of the hospitalised clinic, the existence of the operation, and outcome of the patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation in accordance with current advanced life support protocols were recorded in standard data entry form. Results: A total of 290 patients with completely accessible data were included to the study. Most of these patients were men (65.2%. The mean ages were 61 ± 19 years for men, 67 ± 14 years for women (p = 0.018. The most common diagnosis were ischemic heart disease and heart failure according to the analysis of the patient's medical history. 92 patients (31.7% were brought to the emergency department after death, and all of these patients were unsuccessful following to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 198 patients (68.3% had cardiac arrest in the emergency department, and we determined that cardiopulmonary resuscitation application of 102 patients were successful. The most common causes of cardiac arrest were myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mostly first observed rhythm in the monitor was asystole. The response rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia was higher. Most patients were hospitalised to the

  20. Democratic Citizenship: European referents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María PUIG GUTIÉRREZ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Let’s sense beforehand in this article a tour concerning the educational European policies that favors the development of a democratic citizenship. The aim that we chase is to understand the way in which nowadays it is being interpreted and stimulated the Citizenship education from European Union. for it we offer a conceptual delimiting of «Citizenship education» and later, we show an analysis of the principal documents and materials elaborated principally by the Council of Europe that mark the way followed by European Union as for education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC.

  1. The Art of Providing Resuscitation in Greek Mythology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siempos, Ilias I; Ntaidou, Theodora K; Samonis, George

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:We reviewed Greek mythology to accumulate tales of resuscitation and we explored whether these tales could be viewed as indirect evidence that ancient Greeks considered resuscitation strategies...

  2. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; Chiang, Chern-En; Williams, Bryan; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Gorenek, Bulent; Fauchier, Laurent; Savelieva, Irina; Hatala, Robert; van Gelder, Isabelle; Brguljan-Hitij, Jana; Erdine, Serap; Lovic, Dragan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Salinas-Arce, Jorge; Field, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available evidence to publish a joint consensus document on hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, and to provide up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment regarding care of a particular patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all of the circumstances presented by that patient. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Persisting effect of community approaches to resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Isbye, Dan Lou; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the Danish island of Bornholm an intervention was carried out during 2008-2010 aiming at increasing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival. The intervention included mass media focus on resuscitation and widespread educational activities. The aim of this study was to compare....... There was no significant change in all-rhythm 30-day survival for non-EMS witnessed OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology (6.7% [95% CI 3-13] in the follow-up period; vs. 4.6% [95% CI 1-12], p=0.76). CONCLUSION: In a 3-year follow-up period after an intervention engaging laypersons in resuscitation through mass education...... in BLS combined with a media focus on resuscitation, we observed a persistent significant increase in the bystander BLS rate for all OHCAs with presumed cardiac aetiology. There was no significant difference in 30-day survival....

  4. Liver laceration related to cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Beydilli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is recognized as a medical procedure performed to maintain vital functions of a person whose cardiac and respiratory functions have stopped. Chest compression is the most essential component of CPR and it is performed on the lower half of the sternum. During CPR, many complications may occur because of chest compressions, especially chest injuries including sternum and rib fractures. Rarely tracheal injury, rupture of the stomach, or liver or spleen injury may also occur as complications.In this study, we present two cases of liver injury caused by resuscitation. With this article, we want to emphasize the importance of making correct chest compressions. Keywords: Resuscitation complications, Emergency service, Liver laceration, Autopsy

  5. Decision to resuscitate or not in patients with chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltbæk, Lena; Tvedegaard, Erling

    2012-01-01

    Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are frequently made without informing the patients. We attempt to determine whether patients and physicians wish to discuss the DNR decision, who they think, should be the final decision maker and whether they agree on the indication for cardiopulmonary resuscit...... resuscitation (CPR) in case of cardiac arrest....

  6. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  7. Report from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week’s Council meeting was dominated by discussions about the long-term, sustainable future of CERN. Key points are progress on the Medium-Term Plan, the successful LHC restart, and enlargement.   The budget proposed by management for 2016 was well received, as were the measures to mitigate against the recent change in exchange rates. These items will be put to the vote in September. Discussions on CERN staff employment conditions were conducted in a constructive atmosphere this week, and will continue in future Council meetings. The Council also clearly voiced its congratulations for the smooth and successful start of LHC run 2, coming on top of a clear run of spectacular scientific and technological successes over recent years. In the current climate of austerity, these developments are a strong endorsement from the Council. Nevertheless, it would be disingenuous of me to pretend that everything is rosy. There has been an air of unease at CERN over recent months, which was v...

  8. World Council-OMEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Details the 1990 meeting of the World Council of the World Organization for Early Childhood Education (OMEP) in Lagos, Nigeria. OMEP's Statement to the World Summit for Children is provided. The conditions of Nigerian children and female children in India are considered. (BG)

  9. Hemostatic resuscitation for acute traumatic coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trauma resuscitation paradigms have changed considerably over the last twenty years. Originally, the goal was to normalize a blood pressure as quickly as possible. Large volume crystalloid resuscitation was used to accomplish this. Standard therapy was that any patient with suspected bleeding received a two liter crystalloid bolus as initial therapy. It was often repeated and blood transfusion therapy was used relatively late. Fresh frozen plasma and platelets were also used relatively late, often after patients had received ten units of red cells. Dilutional anemia was relatively common. Patients with large volume blood loss often died from what was termed, "the bloody vicious cycle," of hypothermia, acidosis and coagulopathy.

  10. Physicists get new research council

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartlidge, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    "A new research council to fund users of large scientific facilities is being launched in the UK this month. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), which comes into effect on 1 April...." (1 page)

  11. Extract of the conclusions of the Brussels european council presidency, the 8 March 2007, relative to the energy; Extrait des conclusions de la presidence du Conseil europeen de bruxelles, le 8 mars 2007, relatif a l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-03-15

    The energy production and utilization are responsible of the main sources of greenhouse gases emissions. Thus it is necessary to apply an integrated policy in the domain of the climate and the energy policy. These two topics must complement each other. In this framework the european energy policy will follow the three following objectives: increase the supplying security, allow the competitiveness of the european economies and the availability of a cheap energy, promote the environmental viability and fight against the climatic change. (A.L.B.)

  12. Family Presence During Resuscitation: A Double-Edged Sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Haririan, Hamidreza; Porter, Joanne E

    2017-03-01

    To illuminate the meaning of the lived experiences of resuscitation team members with the presence of the patient's family during resuscitation in the cultural context of Iran. An interpretative phenomenology was used to discover the lived experiences of the nurses and physicians of Tabriz hospitals, Iran, with family presence during resuscitation (FPDR). A total of 12 nurses and 9 physicians were interviewed over a 6-month period. The interviews were audio recorded and semistructured, and were transcribed verbatim. Van Manen's technique was used for data analysis. Two major themes and 10 subthemes emerged, including destructive presence (cessation of resuscitation, interference in resuscitation, disruption to the resuscitation team's focus, argument with the resuscitation team, and adverse mental image in the family) and supportive presence (trust in the resuscitation team, collaboration with the resuscitation team, alleviating the family's concern and settling their nerves, increasing the family's satisfaction, and reducing conflict with resuscitation team members). Participants stated that FPDR may work as a double-edged sword for the family and resuscitation team, hurting or preserving quality. It is thus recommended that guidelines be created to protect patients' and families' rights, while considering the positive aspects of the phenomenon for hospitals. A liaison support person would act to decrease family anxiety levels and would be able to de-escalate any potentially aggressive or confrontational events during resuscitation. Well-trained and expert cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members do not have any stress in the presence of family during resuscitation. Resuscitation events tend to be prolonged when family members are allowed to be present. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. DECISIONS OF ROMANIAN LAW COURTS IN CASES CONCERNING THE INTERPRETATION OF ARTICLE 3 (D OF REGULATION (EC NO 469/2009 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL OF 6 MAY 2009, CONCERNING THE SUPPLEMENTARY PROTECTION CERTIFICATE FOR MEDICINAL PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BUCURA IONESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The supplementary protection certificate is currently considered to represent an accessory of a national or European patent granted in order to extend the duration of the rights that said patent confers on its owner in respect of an active substance or a combination of active substances. Based on the above-mentioned patent and on the certificate, the owner shall have the exclusive right of manufacturing and commercializing the patented product, as well as the right to oppose to any form of counterfeiting of the patented product. The grant of this protection title for medicaments is regulated on the territory of the European Union by the Regulation (EC No 469/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 concerning the supplementary protection certificate for medicinal products (Codified version. The conditions for obtaining the certificate are stipulated under Art. 3. The paper is intended to present the decisions made by the Romanian courts in the cases concerning the controversial interpretation of Art. 3 letter d of the Regulation, which provides that the valid authorization to place the medicament on the market in accordance with Directive 2001/83/EC or Directive 2001/82/EC, as the case may be, should be the first authorization to place the product on the market as a medicament. At the same time, the paper presents the differences in the approach and the judgment of such cases by OSIM (State Office for Inventions and Trademarks and by the national courts. The paper aims at analyzing said decisions as compared to the European practice, with a view to identifying solutions for a uniform interpretation of Community legislation at the level of the Romanian courts.

  14. T-piece resuscitator versus self-inflating bag for preterm resuscitation: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Archana; Sima, Adam; Barker, Gail; Thacker, Leroy R

    2013-07-01

    Manual ventilation in the delivery room is provided with devices such as self-inflating bags (SIBs), flow-inflating bags, and T-piece resuscitators. To compare the effect of type of manual ventilation device on overall response to resuscitation among preterm neonates born at piece was used for 159 neonates. There was no significant difference between the 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores between SIB and T-piece (P = .77 and P = .11, respectively), nor were there significant differences in secondary outcomes. The rate of rise of Apgar score was higher, by 0.47, with T-piece, compared to SIB (95% CI 0.08-0.87, P = .02). Although some manikin studies favor T-piece for providing reliable and consistent pressures, our experience did not indicate significant differences in effectiveness of resuscitation between the T-piece and SIB in preterm resuscitations.

  15. EPOS--The European E-Portfolio of Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Democratic principles and human rights, the core values of the Council of Europe, informed the development of the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" (CEFR; Council of Europe 2001. "Common European framework of reference for languages: Learning, teaching, assessment." Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.…

  16. Do not resuscitate, brain death, and organ transplantation: Islamic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed Ali

    2017-01-01

    Muslim patients and families are often reluctant to discuss and accept fatal diagnoses and prognoses. In many instances, aggressive therapy is requested by a patient's family, prolonging the life of the patient at all costs. Islamic law permits the withdrawal of futile treatment, including life support, from terminally ill patients allowing death to take its natural course. “Do not resuscitate” is permitted in Islamic law in certain situations. Debate continues about the certainty of brain death criteria within Islamic scholars. Although brain death is accepted as true death by the majority of Muslim scholars and medical organizations, the consensus in the Muslim world is not unanimous, and some scholars still accept death only by cardiopulmonary criteria. Organ transplantation has been accepted in Islamic countries (with some resistance from some jurists). Many fatwas (decrees) of Islamic Jurisprudence Councils have been issued and allowed organs to be donated from living competent adult donor; and from deceased (cadavers), provided that they have agreed to donate or their families have agreed to donate after their death (usually these are brain-dead cases). A clear and well-defined policy from the ministry of health regarding do not resuscitate, brain death, and other end-of-life issues is urgently needed for all hospitals and health providers in most (if not all) Muslim and Arab countries. PMID:28469984

  17. The Council Presidency and legislative leadership: The case of occupational health and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warntjen, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Many international institutions feature a leadership office to organize its decision-making process. In the case of the Council of the European Union, the rotating Council Presidency exercises the role of a process manager and enjoys proposal power. This function might allow the Presidency to steer

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and do-not-resuscitate orders: a guide for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Laura; Reed, Darcy A; Bannon, Michael P; Mueller, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    The do-not-resuscitate order, introduced nearly a half century ago, continues to raise questions and controversy among health care providers and patients. In today's society, the expectation and availability of medical interventions, including at the end of life, have rendered the do-not-resuscitate order particularly relevant. The do-not-resuscitate order is the only order that requires patient consent to prevent a medical procedure from being performed; therefore, informed code status discussions between physicians and patients are especially important. Epidemiologic studies have informed our understanding of resuscitation outcomes; however, patient, provider, and institutional characteristics account for great variability in the prevalence of do-not-resuscitate orders. Specific strategies can improve the quality of code status conversations and enhance end-of-life care planning. In this article, we review the history, epidemiology, and determinants of do-not-resuscitate orders, as well as frequently encountered questions and recommended strategies for discussing this important topic with patients. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A SOF Damage Control Resuscitation Cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    include Hextend for volume resuscitation and tissue perfusion, fibrinogen concentrate for hemostasis , and tranexamic acid for hemostasis . These...for hemostasis , and tranexamic acid for hemostasis . These components are tested in a combat-relevant swine polytrauma model of hemorrhagic shock with

  20. Resuscitation in hip fractures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocos, Brett; Whitehouse, Michael R; Kelly, Michael B

    2017-05-04

    To evaluate the evidence for the resuscitation of patients with hip fracture in the preoperative or perioperative phase of their treatment and its impact on mortality. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PROSPERO databases using a systematic search strategy for randomised trials and observational studies investigating the fluid resuscitation of any patient with hip fracture. No language limits were applied to the search, which was complemented by manually screening the reference lists of appropriate studies. Mortality at 1 week, 30 days and 1 year following surgery. Two hundred and ninety-eight citations were identified, and 12 full manuscripts were reviewed; no studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. The background literature showed that the mortality for these patients at 30 days is approximately 8.5% and that bone cement implantation syndrome is insufficient to explain this. The literature was explored to define the need for an interventional investigation into the preoperative resuscitation of patients with hip fracture. Patients with hip fracture show similar physiological disturbance to major trauma patients. Nineteen per cent of patients presenting with hip fracture are hypoperfused and 50% show preoperative anaemia suggesting that under resuscitation is a common problem that has not been investigated. A properly conducted interventional trial could improve the outcome of these vulnerable patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Outcome of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the demographic characteristics of patients Who suffered cardiac arrest in our ICUs and to identify thOse factors influencing outcome after resuscitation following cardiac arrest. We reviewed the records of all patients who underwent CPR in the two ICUs at the ...

  2. Quality of survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, R.; de Haes, H. C.; Koster, R. W.; de Haan, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be poor, in terms of life expectancy and quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of patient characteristics before, during, and after CPR on these outcomes, and to compare results of the quality-of-life assessment with

  3. An unsuccessful resuscitation: The families' and doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... should be organised after the initial shock, when further questions can be asked and abnormal grief reactions identified. Bereavement counselling should be available and community-based resources should be identified in this regard. Debriefing should also be available for staff involved in unsuccessful resuscitations.

  4. Time matters – Realism in resuscitation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Kristian; Høyer, Christian Bjerre; Østergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    . Methods: This study was designed as a randomised control trial. Fifty-four 4th-year medical students with no prior advanced resuscitation training participated in an extra-curricular one-day advanced life support course. Participants were either randomised to simulation-based training using real-time (120...

  5. Knowledge and practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University Teaching ...

  6. Resuscitation Training at Rwanda Military Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learning the C-A-Bs: Resuscitation Training at Rwanda Military Hospital. Kathryn Norgang1, Auni Idi Muhire1, Sarah Howrath1. 1Rwanda Military Hospital, Rwanda. Background. There is a lack of trained staff to respond to critically ill patients and cardiac and respiratory arrests in a health facility in Rwanda. This lack of ...

  7. Acute posthypoxic myoclonus after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwes, Aline; van Poppelen, Daniel; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Tromp, Selma C.; Zandbergen, Eveline G. J.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Horn, Janneke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) can occur in patients admitted after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and is considered to have a poor prognosis. The origin can be cortical and/or subcortical and this might be an important determinant for treatment options and prognosis. The aim of

  8. Creating advocates for family presence during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agard, Marcia

    2008-06-01

    Research suggests that family presence at the bedside during resuscitation is beneficial for both family members and staff Education of health care personnel will help them communicate effectively with and guide distraught family members during a code. Tools to implement a family presence protocol are provided.

  9. Resuscitation of the Newborn: AN IMPROVED NEONATAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insufflatory resuscitation of a newborn baby that has not breathed presents many problems. These are dependent not only on the size and prematurity of the neonate, but on the amount of fluid which is present in the alveoli of the lungs, and the absence of the functional residual capacity (FRC). Before adequate gaseous ...

  10. Anaesthetists' knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation | Ogboli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is an integral part of an anaesthetist's knowledge and practice. In Nigeria, these skills are taught mainly during medical school and postgraduate training. Objectives: The study sought to assess the knowledge of anaesthetists about CPR. Methodology: A structured ...

  11. Iatrogenic burns injury complicating neonatal resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La blessure dans les membres inférieurs a une surface d'environ 4%. Cette communication souligne la mauvaise méthode traditionnelle de la réanimation chez des nouveau nés. Keywords: Asphyxia, Burns, Newborn, Perinatal care, Resuscitation, Traditional medical practice. West African Journal of Medicine Vol.

  12. An unsuccessful resuscitation: The families' and doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective was to elicit families' experience of the death of a family member at the Elsies River Community Health Centre, their feelings towards the staff involved in the resuscitation and their opinions about how things could be improved. The study also elicited the doctors' experiences of communicating ...

  13. Doctors' attitudes regarding not for resuscitation orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Gaya; Mills, Amber C; Levinson, Michele R; Gellie, Anthea L

    2017-12-01

    Objectives The aims of the present study were to investigate doctors' attitudes regarding the discussion and writing of not for resuscitation (NFR) orders and to identify potential barriers to the completion of these orders. Methods A questionnaire-based convenience study was undertaken at a tertiary hospital. Likert scales and open-ended questions were directed to issues surrounding the discussion, timing, understanding and writing of NFR orders, including legal and personal considerations. Results Doctors thought the presence of an NFR order both should and does alter care delivered by nursing staff, particularly delivery of pain relief, nursing observations and contacting the medical emergency team. Eighty-five per cent of doctors believed they needed somebody else's consent to write an NFR order (seeking of consent is not a requirement in most Australian jurisdictions). Conclusion There are complex barriers to the writing and implementation of NFR orders, including doctors' knowledge around the need for consent when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is likely to be futile or excessively burdensome. Doctors also believed that NFR orders result in changes to goals-of-care, suggesting a confounding of NFR orders with palliative care. Furthermore, doctors are willing to write NFR orders where there is clear medical indication and the patient is imminently dying, but are otherwise reliant on patients and family to initiate discussion. What is known about the topic? Hospitalised elderly patients, in the absence of an NFR order, are known to have poor survival and outcomes following resuscitation. Further, Australian data on the prevalence of NFR forms show that only a minority of older in-patients have a written NFR order in their history. In Australian hospitals, NFR orders are completed by doctors. What does this paper add? To our knowledge, the present study is the first in Australia to qualitatively analyse doctors' reasons to writing NFR orders. The open-text nature

  14. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  15. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  16. A communication to the European Council and Parliament concerning a common strategy against acidification; Communication au conseil et au parlement concernant une strategie communautaire de lutte contre l`acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linher, O. [Commission Europeenne, DG III, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    The quantities of the main air pollution emissions which contribute to acidification (sulfur and nitrogen oxides, ammonium) are presented, for the various european countries, and their effects on ecosystems is described, using the critical load principle. The present European Union legislation on acidifying emission reduction is presented, and it is shown that it is insufficient to ensure in a long term future that critical loads will not be exceeded. A more rational and efficient strategy is proposed against environmental acidification: development of national emission upper limits, ratification of the 1994 sulfur protocol, modification of the directive on sulfur content in various liquid fuels, actions concerning fuel burning plant and maritime transport emissions, Central and Oriental Europe, long range transfrontier air pollution and ammonium emissions. Economic instruments (such as taxes, incentives, protocols, etc.) are reviewed together with actions for promoting energy efficiency and conservation. Effects of the proposed strategy on pollution level reduction are discussed

  17. Resuscitation education: narrowing the gap between evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and performance using best educational practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Elizabeth A; Fiedor-Hamilton, Melinda; Eppich, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Recent data from in- and out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests reveal that health care teams frequently deviate from American Heart Association guidelines during resuscitation efforts. These discrepancies between the current state of evidence-based resuscitation guidelines and the quality of basic and advanced life support actually delivered represent a missed opportunity and provide a significant target for optimizing patient outcomes through improved educational effectiveness. This article presents discussion of the quality of resuscitation delivered to patients, a brief history of the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and attempts to translate the science of resuscitation to the bedside through effective educational strategies, a review of educational best practices that relate to resuscitation education, and discussion of the role of medical simulation in resuscitation training.

  18. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias: executive summary of a consensus document from the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and ESC Council on Hypertension, endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Manolis, Antonis S; Olsen, Michael Hecht; Oto, Ali; Potpara, Tatjana S; Steffel, Jan; Marín, Francisco; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Márcio Jansen; de Simone, Giovanni; Tzou, Wendy S; En Chiang, Chern; Williams, Bryan

    2017-10-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in HTN patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), CAD, or HF. In addition, high doses of thiazide diuretics commonly used to treat HTN, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence and publishing a joint consensus document on HTN and cardiac arrhythmias, and providing up-to-date consensus recommendations for use in clinical practice. The ultimate judgment on the care of a specific patient must be made by the healthcare provider and the patient in light of all individual factors presented. This is an executive summary of the full document co-published by EHRA in EP-Europace. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Ojaghi Haghighi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a lifesaving technique useful in the prevention of death or delaying it in a person with cardiac arrest. In this regard, demographic information about patients who need CPR is vital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study patients with cardiopulmonary arrest or arrhythmias admitted to Imam Reza and Sina educational hospitals of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from 22 December 2013 to 21 December 2014 entered the study. Demographic information such as age, sex, cardiopulmonary resuscitation time, the place of cardiopulmonary arrest (outside or inside the hospital, the duration of resuscitation process, success or failure of the resuscitation process and the mechanism of cardiopulmonary arrest were obtained. Results: From a total of 354 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 281 cases (79% were unsuccessful and 73 cases (21% were successful. The average age of patients was 59 ± 22 years. The average time of the resuscitation process was 31 ± 12 minutes. There was a significant difference between the mean of age and resuscitation time in patients who had experienced successful or unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.0001. There was a significant relationship between sex and the success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.0001. In addition, a significant relationship between the success of the resuscitation operation and the ward of resuscitation was observed (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: The most common mechanism leading to cardiopulmonary arrest among patients was asystole. In this regard, no significant difference was observed between successful and unsuccessful resuscitation processes. It was also observed that the success of resuscitation from 8 am to 4 pm was more than any other time period.

  20. (Environmental) Panel measures in European law. Importance of the judgement Rs C-176/03 of the European Court, comission/council; (Umwelt-)Strafrechtliche Massnahmen im Europarecht. Bedeutung des EuGH-Urteils Rs C-176/03, Kommission/Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, M.

    2007-07-01

    The problem of international criminality strengthened by the progressive European integration. In particular, this is applied to the environmental criminality, since damages of the environment are not bound to the borders of individual states. Due to the appearing liberty rights, defaults on European level were introduced, whose conversion and penetration ensure effective further effective protection of the right property for the environment. The European Commission raised a complaint against the conversion of the skeleton resolution because of the interference of the union-legal measure into community-legal authority. The Court of Justice of the European Community explained this skeleton resolution as authority adverse. The European Court of Justice assumes community-legal authority authorizes in principle to supranational criminal measures. The practical conditions for it are put out in the contribution under consideration. Finally, the new guideline suggestion KOM(2007) 521 is based on these conditions.

  1. Communication during trauma resuscitation: do we know what is happening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergs, Engelbert A G; Rutten, Frans L P A; Tadros, Tamer; Krijnen, Pieta; Schipper, Inger B

    2005-08-01

    Verbal communication is essential for teamwork and leadership in high-intensity performances like trauma resuscitation. We evaluated communication during multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation. The main trauma room of a level one trauma centre was equipped with a digital video recording system. Resuscitations were consecutively and prospectively enrolled. Patients with revised trauma score (RTS)=12 were resuscitated by a 'minor trauma team' and patients with RTSresuscitations were included, 12 were lost for evaluation. The 'major trauma team' resuscitated 74 patients (ISS:21.4). Communication was audible in 56% and understandable in 44% during the primary survey. The 'minor trauma team' assessed 119 patients (ISS:7.4). Communication was audible in 43% and understandable in 33%. Communication during trauma resuscitation was found to be sub optimal. This is potentially harmful for trauma victims. Professionals and institutions should be aware that communication is not self-evident. Introduction of an aviation-like communication feedback system could help to optimise trauma care.

  2. Interruptions of Trauma Resuscitations for Radiographic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Kaoru S; Pillsbury, McKinsey M; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-08-01

    Although x-ray studies provide important diagnostic information during trauma resuscitations, they may also lead to significant interruptions in care. We sought to determine the frequency and duration of interruptions for chest x-ray studies (CXR) and pelvic x-ray studies (PXR) and the frequency of lead apron use among providers who exited trauma rooms during resuscitation. Using a convenience sampling method, we conducted a prospective, observational study from August 2013 to March 2014, enrolling adult trauma patients at a Level I trauma center who received CXR and PXR in the first 30 min of evaluation. An observer stood outside resuscitation rooms and recorded the time elapsed from the first provider exiting the room to the last provider returning. We recorded how many exiting providers wore lead aprons and whether unused aprons were available. Of the 156 trauma cases observed, 67.3% were of male patients with a mean age of 52 years (interquartile range [IQR] 34-67 years); 97.4% (184/189) of radiographs resulted in interruptions of trauma evaluation. Mean and median interruption times were 67 s and 50 s, respectively (IQR 25-95) for CXR; 37 s and 27 s, respectively (IQR 16-43) for PXR; and 160 s and 180 s, respectively (IQR 120-180) for combined CXR/PXR. A mean of 3.5 providers (IQR 3-5) left the immediate bedside and exited the room during x-ray studies. Most (91%) providers leaving the room were not wearing lead aprons, and extra aprons were available in the room 91% (167/184) of the time. Radiographic procedures often result in interruptions of trauma resuscitations despite the availability of lead aprons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    M Adib Hajbaghery; Akbari, H.; GA Mousavi

    2005-01-01

    Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and unt...

  4. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Menchine; Elizabeth Burner; Sanjay Arora; Kenji Inaba; Demetrios Demetriades; Bertrand Yersin

    2016-01-01

    I ntroduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. D...

  5. Survival after in-hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib Hajbaghery

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: During recent years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in hospital has received much attention. However, the survival rate of CPR in Iran’s hospitals is unknown. This study was designed to evaluate outcome of in-hospital CPR in Kashan. Methods: A longitudinal case registry study was conducted on all cases of in-hospital CPR during 6 months at 2002. Necessary data including; age, sex, underlying disease, working shift, time from cardiac arrest until initiating of CPR and until defibrillation, duration and result of CPR, frequency of tracheal intubations and time served for it were collected in a checklist. Results: In six months study, 206 cases of cardiopulmonary resuscitation attempted. The survival rate was similar for both sexes. Short-term survival observed in19.9% of cases and only 5.3% survived to discharge. Conclusions: Duration of CPR, time of the first defibrillation, response time and the location of cardiac arrest are the key predictors of survival to hospital discharge and in-hospital CPR strategies require improvement. This study promotes a national study on post CPR survival for accurate data on our performance in attention to chain of survival. KeyWords: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR, Survival rate, Iran

  6. Impact of Training Frequency on Nurses' Pediatric Resuscitation Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurzynski, Susan M; Gottfried, Julie Albright; Pietraszewski, Julie; Zalewski, Melinda

    The ideal time frame for frequency of resuscitation skills training has yet to be determined. Results obtained from this performance improvement project using hands-on practice sessions suggest that 6 months may be an adequate time frame for retention of resuscitation skills. Professional development educators may want to consider 6-month retraining intervals for low-volume/high-risk skills such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation to optimize nurses' proficiency in these life-saving competencies.

  7. Advancements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: increasing circulation and improving survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Philip T; Maxwell, Robert A

    2009-05-01

    Clinicians, as well as lay people, have realized the importance of resuscitative maneuvers throughout recorded history. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation has evolved from a relatively primitive technique to one now dictated by data from evidence based medicine. Recent advancements include changes in life support guidelines, the development of an impedance threshold device, and the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia. We can only expect continued advancements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation through new technology with resultant improved outcomes.

  8. A not so delicate sound of Europeanness : European fiscal policy events and the euro-dollar risk premium

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrholz, Christian; Schneider, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Although the European Monetary Union (EMU) is mainly an economic institution, its future has always hinged upon political manoeuvres. This article examines whether and to what extent non-scheduled and scheduled political events concerning the fiscal governance framework of the EMU have influenced foreign exchange markets. In particular, we estimate how decisions made by the European Commission, the Economic and Financial Affairs Council and the European Council affected the systematic euro-do...

  9. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjersberg, W R; Bergs, E A; Mushkudiani, N; Klimek, M; Schipper, I B

    2009-01-01

    To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. All victims of severe blunt trauma were consecutively included. Patients with a revised trauma score (RTS) of 12 were resuscitated by a "minor trauma" team and patients with an RTS of less than 12 were resuscitated by a "severe trauma" team. Digital video recordings were used to analyse protocol compliance and time management during initial assessment. From 1 May to 1 September 2003, 193 resuscitations were included. The "minor trauma" team assessed 119 patients, with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 7 (range 1-45). Overall protocol compliance was 42%, ranging from 0% for thoracic percussion to 93% for thoracic auscultation. The median resuscitation time was 45.9 minutes (range 39.7-55.9). The "severe team" assessed 74 patients, with a mean ISS of 22 (range 1-59). Overall protocol compliance was 53%, ranging from 4% for thoracic percussion to 95% for thoracic auscultation. Resuscitation took 34.8 minutes median (range 21.6-44.1). Results showed the current trauma resuscitation to be ATLS-like, with sometimes very low protocol compliance rates. Timing of secondary survey and radiology and thus time efficiency remains a challenge in all trauma patients. To assess the effect of trauma resuscitation protocols on outcome, protocol adherence needs to be improved.

  10. Some Medicolegal Aspects of the Russian Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Kuksinsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the Russian legislation to identify the medicolegal aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are most significant for an intensive care anesthesiologist. Statutory acts concerning human health care, including those pertinent to cardiopulmonary resuscitation and those providing for the responsibility of medical workers in some cases were analyzed. A number of discrepancies in various legal acts concerning human death verification and resuscitative measures were identified. The analysis has revealed the aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which are, from the point of view of legislation, most important for the physician.

  11. European labour law legislation 2012/2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    This publication brings together the most important European and international regulation in the area of labour law. It includes regulations from, among others, the European Union, the Council of Europe and the International Labour Organisation. The selected regulations are decisive to some extent

  12. Benchmarking European Gas Transmission System Operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter; Trinkner, Urs

    This is the final report for the pan-European efficiency benchmarking of gas transmission system operations commissioned by the Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM), Den Haag, on behalf of the Council of European Energy Regulators (CEER) under the supervision of the authors....

  13. Quality of Power Supply in European View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenek Hradilek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with comparisons of situation in quality of power supply regulation in some of European countries, which are interested in CEER (Council of European Energy Regulators. Especially we focused our analysis on reliability indices, relationship between supplier and consumer and electric power supply aftereffects. There are discussed differences in each countries and comparison with situation in Czech Republic.

  14. Trump revives National Space Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-08-01

    US president Donald Trump has signed an executive order to re-establish the US National Space Council. The 12-member council will include key government officials with an interest in space exploration, including NASA’s acting administrator Robert Lightfoot and the secretaries of state, commerce and defence.

  15. 75 FR 12507 - Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an opportunity to apply for membership on the Manufacturing Council. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce is currently seeking applications for membership on the Manufacturing...

  16. Effect of methylene blue on resuscitation after haemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeroukhimov, I; Weinbroum, A; Ben-Avraham, R; Abu-Abid, S; Michowitz, M; Kluger, Y

    2001-10-01

    To compare prehospital hypotensive resuscitation with volume resuscitation, and find out whether reagents that inhibit free-oxygen radical formation, such as methylene blue, can improve resuscitation and survival. Randomised controlled trial. Animal laboratory, Israel. 48 adult male Wistar rats. After 30 minutes of controlled haemorrhage, rats were subjected to 60 minutes of uncontrolled haemorrhage with simultaneous resuscitation. Hartmann's solution alone, or with blood or with a bolus of methylene blue were infused to maintain the mean arterial pressure (MAP) at 80 or 40 mm Hg. Then haemorrhage was stopped and Hartmann's solution plus whole blood were infused to obtain a MAP that was within normal limits. Volumes of shed blood and resuscitation fluids, MAP, packed cell volume, blood pH and base deficit, and survival. During uncontrolled haemorrhage. a MAP of 80 mm Hg could not be reached in animals resuscitated with Hartmann's solution alone, and all died. All the rats given Hartmann's solution with a bolus of methylene blue or with whole blood achieved a higher MAP. MAP of 40 mm Hg was attained in all animals regardless of the resuscitation fluid. Only 15 of 24 animals resuscitated to a MAP of 80 mm Hg survived, compared with 22 survivors of the 24 rats resuscitated to a MAP of 40 mm Hg (p <0.04). Methylene blue or whole blood drastically reduced the volumes of shed blood and of fluids required, and moderated the reduction in packed cell volume, particularly during hypotensive resuscitation. Hypotensive protocols should be used to improve survival. Methylene blue given with the electrolyte solutions could negate their detrimental effects during resuscitation.

  17. Resuscitation skills of pediatric residents and effects of Neonatal Resuscitation Program training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Ilker; Agin, Hasan; Devrim, Ilker; Apa, Hursit; Tezel, Basak; Ozbas, Sema

    2013-08-01

    The Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) is an effective tool in decreasing mortality and morbidity due to birth asphyxia. The aim of the study was to assess the skill and knowledge level of pediatric residents in a teaching hospital and the effects of NRP training. Subjects consisted of pediatric residents of Dr Behcet Uz Hospital, Izmir, Turkey. They were assessed on practice exam scenarios and NRP provider course flow charts. Teams with two members were formed randomly. Each resident was evaluated on a 100 point scale covering all resuscitation steps and interventions. Exam scores were analyzed for two major parameters: resident participation in NRP training (never, within the last 6 months, and ≥6 months previously) and being a senior (>18 months residency). A total of 49 residents enrolled in the study (94.2% of the target group). Twenty-one residents had NRP training (42.9%). Junior residents comprised 46.9% of the study group. The mean skill score was 72.1, and it was significantly higher for senior residents and residents who attended the NRP course (P training significantly increases the resuscitation knowledge and skill of pediatric residents, although this can be achieved by being a senior. Residents should undergo training as soon as possible to achieve a higher level of quality in resuscitating babies. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Resuscitation debriefing for nurses at the Accident and Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two of the nurses had no recollection of any emotions, while one stated that, after an unsuccessful resuscitation, she or he “felt terribly traumatised and heartsore after the death of the child”, and another stated that, after a successful resuscitation, she or he “felt good, extremely good, because something was done to help ...

  19. Protocol compliance and time management in blunt trauma resuscitation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, E.A.; Mushkudiani, N.; Klimek, M.; Schipper, I.B.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study advanced trauma life support (ATLS) protocol adherence prospectively in trauma resuscitation and to analyse time management of daily multidisciplinary trauma resuscitation at a level 1 trauma centre, for both moderately and severely injured patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All

  20. Neonatal resuscitation – knowledge and practice of nurses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... special care baby unit within the last 5 years while only 14.0% had attended neonatal resuscitation training course within the last 5 years. Similarly ... Frequent and intensive courses on neonatal resuscitation are highly desired. SAJCH MARCH .... knowledge, experience and comfort level. Appl Nurs Res ...

  1. Resuscitation of thermal injuries in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R H J; Akhavani, M A; Jallali, N

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the consistency of burns resuscitation practice throughout UK and Ireland. Twenty-six Burns Units were identified via the National Burn Bed Bureau and surveyed via a postal questionnaire. Twenty-three units returned a completed questionnaire, covering all of the units treating children and 17 out of 20 units that treat adults. Nearly all of the Burns Units commence fluid resuscitation at 10% total body surface area of burn in children and 15% total body surface area of burn in adults. The estimated resuscitation volume is calculated using the Parkland or the Muir and Barclay formula in 76% and 11% of units, respectively. The most commonly used resuscitation fluid is Hartmann's solution. No unit uses blood as a first line fluid. Resuscitation is discontinued after 24h in 35% of units and after 36 h in 30% of units. Approximately half of the units do not routinely change the type of intravenous fluid administered after the initial period of resuscitation. This survey illustrates that resuscitation of thermally injured patients in UK and Ireland Burns Units is fairly consistent with a shift towards crystalloid resuscitation.

  2. The art of providing resuscitation in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siempos, Ilias I; Ntaidou, Theodora K; Samonis, George

    2014-12-01

    We reviewed Greek mythology to accumulate tales of resuscitation and we explored whether these tales could be viewed as indirect evidence that ancient Greeks considered resuscitation strategies similar to those currently used. Three compendia of Greek mythology: The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology, The Greek Myths by Robert Graves, and Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were used to find potentially relevant narratives. Thirteen myths that may suggest resuscitation (including 1 case of autoresuscitation) were identified. Methods to attempt mythological resuscitation included use of hands (which may correlate with basic life support procedures), a kiss on the mouth (similar to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation), application of burning torches (which might recall contemporary use of external defibrillators), and administration of drugs (a possible analogy to advanced life support procedures). A careful assessment of relevant myths demonstrated that interpretations other than medical might be more credible. Although several narratives of Greek mythology might suggest modern resuscitation techniques, they do not clearly indicate that ancient Greeks presaged scientific methods of resuscitation. Nevertheless, these elegant tales reflect humankind's optimism that a dying human might be restored to life if the appropriate procedures were implemented. Without this optimism, scientific improvement in the field of resuscitation might not have been achieved.

  3. Neonatal Resuscitation: Knowledge And Practice Of Nurses In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Appropriate resuscitation techniques are crucial to the survival of newborn infants. Objective. To assess knowledge of nurses in western Nigeria about neonatal resuscitation. Method. A cross-sectional survey of the nurses attached to secondary health facilities in western Nigeria was done using a ...

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Family-witnessed resuscitation in emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients in their 2000 and 2005 Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary. Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care.12 The AHA encourages family presence at the resuscitation, and recommends this in all AHA adult and paediatric life support courses. Methods. We studied the attitudes of emergency doctors working in Gauteng.

  5. The Level of Awareness of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resuscitation is one of the most evolving areas of modern medicine. For the past forty years newer techniques are developed in order to improve the outcome of resuscitation. The study is aimed at finding the level of knowledge amongst radiographers practising in Nigeria because radiographers use materials that ...

  6. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: state of the art in 2011

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... The science of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is dynamic and ever changing as new evidence continuously comes to light. Modern CPR dates back to 1966, when the first consensus statement was released. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. (ILCOR) was founded in 1992.

  7. Optimal oxygenation during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W

    2011-06-01

    Reversal of tissue hypoxia, particularly in the heart and brain, is a fundamental goal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that hyperoxia, especially after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), may worsen outcomes. The purpose of this review is to describe the current evidence supporting the concept of controlled oxygenation during and after cardiac arrest. Animal studies over the last two decades have built a compelling case that arterial hyperoxemia during the first hour after ROSC causes increased oxidative damage, increased neuronal death, and worse neurologic function. However, human data are limited. The only prospective randomized clinical trial comparing different inspired oxygen concentrations in post-cardiac arrest patients was underpowered to detect a difference in survival or neurologic outcome. More recently a retrospective analysis of data from a multicenter registry found that initial arterial hyperoxemia (paO2 ≥ 300 mmHg) was associated with increased mortality and worse functional outcome in patients admitted to the ICU after cardiac arrest. The existing evidence, though limited, has contributed to new guidelines for oxygen therapy in patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of supplemental oxygen during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remains uncertain. However, in patients who achieve ROSC after cardiac arrest, available evidence supports adjusting inspired oxygen content to avoid arterial hyperoxemia while providing adequate arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation. This strategy is likely to be most effective when initiated as soon as possible after ROSC and appears to be most important during the first hour. Definitive clinical trials are needed to determine the ultimate impact on outcome.

  8. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-from the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, S; Chang, Z Y; Lau, Y H; Wong, Yky; Ong, Cym

    2017-05-01

    With increasing emphasis on patient autonomy, patients are encouraged to be more involved in end-of-life issues, including the use of extraordinary efforts to prolong their lives. Being able to make anticipatory decisions is seen to promote autonomy, empower patients and optimise patient care. To facilitate shared decision-making, patients need to have a clear and accurate understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to understand the knowledge and perspectives of the local community regarding resuscitation options and end-of-life decision-making and to explore ways to improve the quality of end-of-life discussions. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted with a prospectively recruited group of surgical patients admitted postoperatively to the day surgery ward of a single tertiary institution in Singapore from April to May 2015. The survey, modelled after two validated questionnaires, measured patients' knowledge, attitudes and preferences regarding CPR in a series of 18 questions. Fifty-one out of 67 (76.1%) patients completed the survey. Results indicated that 80.4% (n=41) of participants correctly understood the purpose of CPR, but 64.7% (n=33) did not know of any possible complications of CPR. Less than half (n=21, 41.2%) of participants had thought about life support measures they wanted for themselves. Most of the participants agreed that they should personally be involved in making end-of-life decisions (n=44, 86.3%). Many patients had a poor knowledge of CPR and other resuscitation measures and the majority overestimated the success rate of CPR. However, a majority were receptive to improving their knowledge and keen to discuss end-of-life issues with physicians.

  9. Evaluation of the Augmented Infant Resuscitator: A Monitoring Device for Neonatal Bag-Valve-Mask Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Desmond J; Itagaki, Taiga; Chenelle, Christopher T; Bittner, Edward A; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2017-08-31

    Annually, 6 million newborns require bag-valve-mask resuscitation, and providing live feedback has the potential to improve the quality of resuscitation. The Augmented Infant Resuscitator (AIR), a real-time feedback device, has been designed to identify leaks, obstructions, and inappropriate breath rates during bag-valve-mask resuscitation. However, its function has not been evaluated. The resistance of the AIR was measured by attaching it between a ventilator and a ventilator tester. To test the device's reliability in training and clinical-use settings, it was placed in-line between a ventilation bag or ventilator and a neonatal manikin and a clinical lung model simulator. The lung model simulator simulated neonates of 3 sizes (2, 4, and 6 kg). Leaks, obstructions, and respiratory rate alterations were introduced. At a flow of 5 L/min, the pressure drop across the AIR was only 0.38 cm H2O, and the device had almost no effect on ventilator breath parameters. During the manikin trials, it was able to detect all leaks and obstructions, correctly displaying an alarm 100% of the time. During the simulated clinical trials, the AIR performed best on the 6-kg neonatal model, followed by the 4-kg model, and finally the 2-kg model. Over all 3 clinical models, the prototype displayed the correct indicator 73.5% of the time, and when doing so, took 1.6 ± 0.9 seconds. The AIR is a promising innovation that has the potential to improve neonatal resuscitation. It introduces only marginal resistance and performs well on neonatal manikins, but its firmware should be improved before clinical use.

  10. Resuscitation of canine and feline neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traas, A M

    2008-08-01

    Fetal depression following dystocia and Cesarean section has two primary causes; the first (and often most important) cause is hypoxia, and the second is depression from anesthetic agents given to the dam. Resuscitation efforts should be provided in the following order: warmth, airway, breathing, circulation, and drugs. Adequate time should be allowed for correction of hypoxia using ventilatory and circulatory support before drugs are used, with the exception of drugs given to reverse anesthetic and analgesic agents that were given to the dam prior to delivery of the neonates.

  11. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: how far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, John J; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2007-01-01

    In the 43 years since it was first described, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has grown from an obscure medical theory to a basic first aid skill taught to adults and is now the near-universal technique used in CPR instruction. This article provides insight into the history of CPR. We explore the phenomenon of sudden cardiac arrest, the historical roots of CPR, current practice data and recommendations, and the society's role in the development of this life-saving technique. We conclude with a review of CPR's economic impact on the healthcare system and the ethical and policy issues surrounding CPR.

  13. History of neonatal resuscitation. Tales of heroism and desperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T N

    1999-09-01

    Although the history of neonatal resuscitation is as old as medicine itself, today's standards of practice evolved over the past 40 years. Most ancient physicians and midwives did know that stimulation and expansion of lungs was needed to revive the "apparently dead" newborn, but the means of providing these 'therapies' varied from brutal shaking, hitting, swinging, electrocuting, hanging upside-down to applying gentle pressures or squeezing of the chest. It would take centuries of development in physiological concepts and technology for the evolution of a rational approach in resuscitating the newborn infant. Even after great advances in medical science in the 19th century, cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques remained primitive until the mid-1950s. In this article the author has traced some elements of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques and developed an outline of the history of neonatal resuscitation.

  14. Fluid Resuscitation in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: Yesterday and Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Frank K

    2017-06-01

    The prevailing wisdom for the prehospital fluid resuscitation of trauma victims in hemorrhagic shock in 1992 was to administer 2 L of crystalloid solution as rapidly as possible. A review of the fluid resuscitation literature found that this recommendation was not well supported by the evidence at the time. Prehospital fluid resuscitation strategies were reevaluated in the 1993-1996 Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) research program. This article reviews the advances in prehospital fluid resuscitation as recommended by the original TCCC Guidelines and modified over the following 2 decades. These advances include hypotensive resuscitation, use of prehospital whole blood or blood components when feasible, and use of Hextend or selected crystalloids when logistical considerations make blood or blood component use not feasible. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The European Private Company, its shareholders and its creditors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braak, Sandra van den

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the Proposal for a Council Regulation on the Statute for a European Private Company (Societas Privata Europaea, SPE) as put forward by the European Commission in 2008 as well as with the amendments proposed by the European Parliament in 2009. The SPE will be a new legal form

  16. Post-resuscitation myocardial microcirculatory dysfunction is ameliorated with eptifibatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Karl B; Sasaoka, Taro; Higashi, Haruhiko; Hilwig, Ronald W; Berg, Robert A; Zuercher, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    The post-cardiac arrest syndrome includes a decline in myocardial microcirculation function. Inhibition of the platelet IIb/IIIa glycoprotein receptor has improved myocardial microvascular function post-percutaneous coronary intervention. Therefore, we evaluated such inhibition with eptifibatide for its effect on myocardial microcirculation function post-cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Four groups of swine were studied in a prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled protocol including; eptifibatide administered during CPR (Group 1, n=5), after resuscitation (Group 2, n=4), during and after resuscitation (Group 3, n=5), or placebo (Group 4, n=10). CPR was initiated following 12min of untreated VF. Those successfully resuscitated were studied during a 4-h post-resuscitation period. Coronary flow reserve, a measure of microcirculation function (in the absence of coronary obstruction), as well as parameters of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, were measured pre-arrest and serially post-resuscitation. Coronary flow reserve was preserved during the post-resuscitation period, indicating normal microcirculatory function in the eptifibatide-treated animals, but not in the placebo-treated group. However, LV function declined equally in both groups during the first 4h after cardiac arrest. Inhibition of platelet IIb/IIIa glycoprotein receptors with eptifibatide post-resuscitation prevented myocardial microcirculation dysfunction. Left ventricular dysfunction post-resuscitation was not improved with eptifibatide, and perhaps transiently worse at 30min post-resuscitation. Post-cardiac arrest ventricular dysfunction may require a multi-modality treatment strategy for successful prevention or amelioration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rabbit model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and hypotensive resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Rezende-Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinically relevant animal models capable of simulating traumatic hemorrhagic shock are needed. We developed a hemorrhagic shock model with male New Zealand rabbits (2200-2800 g, 60-70 days old that simulates the pre-hospital and acute care of a penetrating trauma victim in an urban scenario using current resuscitation strategies. A laparotomy was performed to reproduce tissue trauma and an aortic injury was created using a standardized single puncture to the left side of the infrarenal aorta to induce hemorrhagic shock similar to a penetrating mechanism. A 15-min interval was used to simulate the arrival of pre-hospital care. Fluid resuscitation was then applied using two regimens: normotensive resuscitation to achieve baseline mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, 10 animals and hypotensive resuscitation at 60% of baseline MAP (10 animals. Another 10 animals were sham operated. The total time of the experiment was 85 min, reproducing scene, transport and emergency room times. Intra-abdominal blood loss was significantly greater in animals that underwent normotensive resuscitation compared to hypotensive resuscitation (17.1 ± 2.0 vs 8.0 ± 1.5 mL/kg. Antithrombin levels decreased significantly in normotensive resuscitated animals compared to baseline (102 ± 2.0 vs 59 ± 4.1%, sham (95 ± 2.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%, and hypotensive resuscitated animals (98 ± 7.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%. Evidence of re-bleeding was also noted in the normotensive resuscitation group. A hypotensive resuscitation regimen resulted in decreased blood loss in a clinically relevant small animal model capable of reproducing hemorrhagic shock caused by a penetrating mechanism.

  18. Bystander initiated actions in out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: results from the Amsterdam Resuscitation Study (ARRESUST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, R. A.; Tijssen, J. G.; Koster, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the functioning of the first two links of the chain of survival: 'access' and 'basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)'. In a prospective study, all bystander witnessed circulatory arrests resuscitated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel, were

  19. Crystalloids and colloids in critical patient resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnacho-Montero, J; Fernández-Mondéjar, E; Ferrer-Roca, R; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Lorente, J A; Ruiz-Santana, S; Artigas, A

    2015-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is essential for the survival of critically ill patients in shock, regardless of the origin of shock. A number of crystalloids and colloids (synthetic and natural) are currently available, and there is strong controversy regarding which type of fluid should be administered and the potential adverse effects associated with the use of these products, especially the development of renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy. Recently, several clinical trials and metaanalyses have suggested the use of hydroxyethyl starch (130/0.4) to be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure, and data have been obtained showing clinical benefit with the use of crystalloids that contain a lesser concentration of sodium and chlorine than normal saline. This new information has increased uncertainty among clinicians regarding which type of fluid should be used. We therefore have conducted a review of the literature with a view to developing practical recommendations on the use of fluids in the resuscitation phase in critically ill adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Hewitt launches Research Councils UK

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary Patricia Hewitt today launched 'Research Councils UK' - a new strategic partnership that will champion research in science, engineering and technology across the UK" (1 page).

  1. Montgomery County Council Legislation - Bills

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — The Council enacts local public laws for the ‘peace, good government, health, and welfare of the county’. The bills dataset contains all legislation considered by...

  2. Council | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Council. The affairs and property of the Academy are administered by a Council of 20, consisting of a President, four Vice-Presidents, a Treasurer, two Secretaries, and twelve other members. The Council, with a term of three years, is elected by the Fellows triennially. Members of the Council for the period 2016 to 2018:.

  3. Resuscitation at the limits of viability--an Irish perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, R A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in neonatal care continue to lower the limit of viability. Decision making in this grey zone remains a challenging process. OBJECTIVE: To explore the opinions of healthcare providers on resuscitation and outcome in the less than 28-week preterm newborn. DESIGN\\/METHODS: An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to health care providers working in maternity units in the Republic of Ireland. Questions related to neonatal management of the extreme preterm infant, and estimated survival and long-term outcome. RESULTS: The response rate was 55% (74% obstetricians and 70% neonatologists). Less than 1% would advocate resuscitation at 22 weeks, 10% of health care providers advocate resuscitation at 23 weeks gestation, 80% of all health care providers would resuscitate at 24 weeks gestation. 20% of all health care providers would advocate cessation of resuscitation efforts on 22-25 weeks gestation at 5 min of age. 65% of Neonatologists and 54% trainees in Paediatrics would cease resuscitation at 10 min of age. Obstetricians were more pessimistic about survival and long term outcome in newborns delivered between 23 and 27 weeks when compared with neonatologists. This difference was also observed in trainees in paediatrics and obstetrics. CONCLUSION: Neonatologists, trainees in paediatrics and neonatal nurses are generally more optimistic about outcome than their counterparts in obstetrical care and this is reflected in a greater willingness to provide resuscitation efforts at the limits of viability.

  4. Implementation of an in situ qualitative debriefing tool for resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Paul C; Wuestner, Elizabeth; Kerr, Tarra D; Christopher, Daniel P; Patel, Binita

    2013-07-01

    Multiple guidelines recommend debriefing of resuscitations to improve clinical performance. We implemented a novel standardized debriefing program using a Debriefing In Situ Conversation after Emergent Resuscitation Now (DISCERN) tool. Following the development of the evidence-based DISCERN tool, we conducted an observational study of all resuscitations (intubation, CPR, and/or defibrillation) at a pediatric emergency department (ED) over one year. Resuscitation interventions, patient survival, and physician team leader characteristics were analyzed as predictors for debriefing. Each debriefing's participants, time duration, and content were recorded. Thematic content of debriefings was categorized by framework approach into Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) elements. There were 241 resuscitations and 63 (26%) debriefings. A higher proportion of debriefings occurred after CPR (pDebriefing participants always included an attending and nurse; the median number of staff roles present was six. Median intervals (from resuscitation end to start of debriefing) & debriefing durations were 33 (IQR 15, 67) and 10 min (IQR 5, 12), respectively. Common TEAM themes included co-operation/coordination (30%), communication (22%), and situational awareness (15%). Stated reasons for not debriefing included: unnecessary (78%), time constraints (19%), or other reasons (3%). Debriefings with the DISCERN tool usually involved higher acuity resuscitations, involved most of the indicated personnel, and lasted less than 10 min. Future studies are needed to evaluate the tool for adaptation to other settings and potential impacts on education, quality improvement programming, and staff emotional well-being. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Speaking Up and Sharing Information Improves Trainee Neonatal Resuscitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Lakshmi I; Trickey, Amber W; Thomas, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify teamwork behaviors associated with improving efficiency and quality of simulated resuscitation training. Methods Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial of trainees undergoing neonatal resuscitation training was performed. Trainees at a large academic center (n=100) were randomized to receive standard curriculum (n=36) versus supplemental team training curriculum (n=62). A two-hour team training session focused on communication skills and team behaviors served as the intervention. Outcomes of interest included resuscitation duration, time required to complete a simulated newborn resuscitation, and performance score, determined by evaluation of each of the team’s steps during simulated resuscitation scenarios. Results The teamwork behaviors assertion and sharing information were associated with shorter resuscitation duration and higher performance scores. Each additional use of assertion (per minute) was associated with a duration reduction of 41 s (95%CI: −71.5 to −10.2) and an increase in performance score of 1.6% (95%CI: 0.4 to 2.7). Each additional use of sharing information (per minute) was associated with a 14 s reduction in duration (95%CI: −30.4 to 2.9) and a 0.8% increase in performance score (95%CI: 0.05 to 1.5). Conclusions Teamwork behaviors of assertion and sharing information are two important mediators of efficiency and quality of resuscitations. PMID:23007245

  6. 77 FR 16051 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Office of the... Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat... nominations to Joshua Winchell, Coordinator, Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council, Division of...

  7. Ukraine and the Council of Europe common activity in implementation of key principles of participatory democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykhaliuk Nazar Yuriyovych

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the main forms of mutual cooperation of Ukraine and the Council of Europe in order to implement basic principles of participatory democracy, to conform the legislation of Ukraine to standards of the European Union. The article examines the main legal documents, phases, and the main areas of cooperation between Ukraine and the Council of Europe. The author also assesses the processes of implementation of key principles of participatory democracy in Ukraine.

  8. A multi-factor approach to understanding socio-economic segregation in European capital cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tammaru, T.; Musterd, S.; Van Ham, M.; Marcinczak, S.

    2015-01-01

    The research leading to the results presented in this chapter has received funding from the Estonian Research Council (Institutional Research Grant IUT no. 2–17 on Spatial Population Mobility and Geographical Changes in Urban Regions); European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh

  9. Draft for an European Parliament and Council directive to foster domestic market of electricity produced from renewable energy resources; Proposition de Directive du Parlement Europeen et du Conseil relative a la promotion de l'electricite produite a partir de sources d'energie renouvelables sur le marche interieur de l'electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-06

    This document contains two parts, an exposition of motives and the proposal. The draft of directive has as objective the creation of an EU frame for boosting on a medium term the electricity production from renewable energy resources (RER). It presents a number of important measures to implement the commitment of reducing the greenhouse gas releases accepted by EU in Kyoto, particularly to increase twice, i.e., from 6% to 12%, the net domestic energy consumption, as established by the White Book on renewable energies and approved by the European Council in May 1998. RER include: Wind Power, Solar Energy, Geothermal Energy, Wave Power, Tidal Power, Hydroelectric Power (of capacity lower than 10 MW) and Biomass The exposition of motives contains six sections: - 1. Introduction; - 2. Detailed outlook of the proposal;- 3. Expertise panel; - 4. Impact on enterprises; - 5. Consulting during drafting the proposal; - 6. Conclusions. The second part displays the proposal in the following six chapters: - 1. Domain of application and definitions; -2. National objectives of the consumption of electricity produced from renewable energy resources; -3. Access of electricity produced from renewable energy resources to the interior domestic energy market; -4. Management procedures; -5. Questions concerning the distribution grid; -6. Final directions. An Appendix is given presenting the indicative figures as objectives of the Member States. So, the RER fraction in the total electricity consumption in the Member States in 2010 as percentage/TWh should looks like: Austria, 78.1/55.3; Belgium, 6.0/6.3; Denmark, 29.0/12.9; Finland, 35.0/33.7; France, 21.0/112.9; Germany, 12.5/76.4; Greece, 20.1/14.5; Ireland, 13.2/4.5; Italy, 25.0/89.6; Luxemburg, 5.7/0.5; Netherlands, 12.0/15.9; Portugal, 45.6/28.3; Spain, 29.4/76.6; Sweden, 60.0/97.5; United Kingdom, 10.0/50.0. Thus, the global figures for the European Union would be 22.1/674.9.

  10. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, S S; Adhikari, K M; Rajeev, A

    2015-01-01

    Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3-6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users.

  11. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, S.S.; Adhikari, K.M.; Rajeev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. Methods 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Results Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3–6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. Conclusion It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users. PMID:25609858

  12. Availability and Utilization of Cardiac Resuscitation Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn E. Mumma

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association (AHA recommends regionalized care following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA at cardiac resuscitation centers (CRCs. Key level 1 CRC criteria include 24/7 percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI capability, therapeutic hypothermia capability, and annual volume of ≥40 patients resuscitated from OHCA. Our objective was to characterize the availability and utilization of resources relevant to post-cardiac arrest care, including level 1 CRCs in California. Methods: We combined data from the AHA, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD, and surveys to identify CRCs. We surveyed emergency department directors and nurse managers at all 24/7 PCI centers identified by the AHA to determine their post-OHCA care capabilities. The survey included questions regarding therapeutic hypothermia use and specialist availability and was pilot-tested prior to distribution. Cases of OHCA were identified in the 2011 OSHPD Patient Discharge Database using a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest (ICD-9-CM code 427.5. We defined key level 1 CRC criteria as 24/7 PCI capability, therapeutic hypothermia, and annual volume ≥40 patients admitted with a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest. Our primary outcome was the proportion of hospitals meeting these criteria. Descriptive statistics and 95% CI are presented. Results: Of the 333 acute care hospitals in California, 31 (9.3%, 95% CI 6.4-13% met level 1 CRC criteria. These hospitals treated 25% (1937/7780; 95% CI 24-26% of all admitted OHCA patients in California in 2011. Of the 125 hospitals identified as 24/7 PCI centers by the AHA, 54 (43%, 95% CI 34-52% admitted ≥40 patients following OHCA in 2011. Seventy (56%, 95% CI 47-65% responded to the survey; 69/70 (99%, 95% CI 92-100% reported having a therapeutic hypothermia protocol in effect by 2011. Five percent of admitted OHCA patients (402/7780; 95% CI

  13. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menchine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders.  Methods: We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1 how leadership affects patient care; 2 which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3 methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results: We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs

  14. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  15. Definitive studies on pole-top resuscitation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A.S.; Ridolpho, P.F.; Cole, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report summarizes the history of the application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation to the electric shock victim located at the top of a utility pole. This dramatic and urgent situation requires that rescue be attempted with procedures which are thoroughly understood and effective. Questions related to the use of resuscitation and precordial thump at the pole top were subjected to experimental testing, both in animals and in humans. Results of this study clearly demonstrate the advantages of postponing resuscitation until the victim has been lowered to the ground. The author concludes with seven recommendations for emergency treatment at the scene.

  16. Ethics and medico legal aspects of "Not for Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sulakshan Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not for resuscitation in India still remains an abstract concept with no clear guidelines or legal frame work. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a complex medical intervention which is often used inappropriately in hospitalized patients and usually guided by medical decision making rather than patient-directed choices. Patient autonomy still remains a weak concept and relatives are expected to make this big decision in a short time and at a time of great emotional distress. This article outlines concepts around ethics and medico legal aspects of not for resuscitation, especially in Indian setting.

  17. 77 FR 27029 - The Manufacturing Council: Teleconference Meeting of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Teleconference Meeting of the Manufacturing... Manufacturing Council (Council). The agenda may change to accommodate Council business. The final agenda will be... Manufacturing Council, Room 4043, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20230, telephone 202-482-4501...

  18. Quality of resuscitation by first responders using the 'public access resuscitator': a randomized manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taelman, Dries G; Huybrechts, Sofie A M; Peersman, Wim; Calle, Paul A; Monsieurs, Koenraad G

    2014-12-01

    The CAREvent Public Access Resuscitator (PAR) is an electronic, oxygen-driven cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) device allowing volume-controlled ventilation with a face mask and guiding the rescuer through the resuscitation with voice prompts and visual indications. We hypothesized that 1 year after initial training, the efficacy of ventilation skills (primary outcome) and compression skills (secondary outcome) by first responders using the PAR would be superior compared with CPR with only a face mask. Seventy-one first responders were randomized to a group using the PAR (n=35) and a control group using only a face mask (n=36). CPR skills were assessed immediately after training and after 3, 7 and 12 months using a Skill Reporter manikin. Differences between groups over time and the interaction between time and groups were assessed using repeated measures models. Results are reported as mean values and number of participants with good ventilation or compression skills. Twelve months after training, there were more PAR users with adequate tidal volume than face mask users. Other ventilations skills did not differ between groups. There were more PAR users with an adequate number of compressions and with good hand position. Skill decay over 12 months did not differ between groups, except for hand position, where no decline was observed in the PAR group. Compared with the face mask, PAR improved tidal volume, compressions per minute and hand position in a manikin setting.

  19. Prosecutorial councils and guarantees of prosecutors autonomy in Western Balkans states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić-Bošković Marina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available More than five years ago judicial and prosecutorial councils were established in the Western Balkans countries. Newly established institutions took over jurisdiction related to the election, promotion and dismissal of public prosecutors in line with the international standards of judicial independence. It is necessary to assess whether the prosecutorial councils fulfilled professional public expectations. In the paper author analysed European standards and good practices of prosecutorial councils' regulations, as well as comparative law models in Western Balkans countries and their compliance with standards.

  20. A description of the "event manager" role in resuscitations: A qualitative study of interviews and focus groups of resuscitation participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Katherine L; Parshuram, Christopher S; Ferri, Susan; Mema, Briseida

    2017-06-01

    Communication during resuscitation is essential for the provision of coordinated, effective care. Previously, we observed 44% of resuscitation communication originated from participants other than the physician team leader; 65% of which was directed to the team, exclusive of the team leader. We called this outer-loop communication. This institutional review board-approved qualitative study used grounded theory analysis of focus groups and interviews to describe and define outer-loop communication and the role of "event manager" as an additional "leader." Participants were health care staff involved in the medical management of resuscitations in a quaternary pediatric academic hospital. The following 3 domains were identified: the existence and rationale of outer-loop communication; the functions fulfilled by outer-loop communication; and the leadership and learning of event manager skills. The role was recognized by all team members and evolved organically as resuscitation complexity increased. A "good" manager has similar qualities to a "good team leader" with strong nontechnical skills. Event managers were not formally identified and no specific training had occurred. "Outer-loop" communication supports resuscitation activities. An event manager gives direction to the team, coordinates activities, and supports the team leader. We describe a new role in resuscitation in light of structural organizational theory and cognitive load with a view to incorporating this structure into resuscitation training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immediate defibrillation or defibrillation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Soichi; Tanabe, Seizan; Ogawa, Toshio; Akahane, Manabu; Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Shinya; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether short cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency medical services before defibrillation (CPR first) has a better outcome than immediate defibrillation followed by CPR (shock first) in patients with ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/pulseless VT) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed a national database between 2006 and 2008, and included patients aged 18 years or more who had witnessed cardiac arrests and whose first recorded rhythm was VF/pulseless VT. Those study subjects were divided into five groups in accordance with the CPR/defibrillation intervention sequence. Each group was subdivided into call-to-response intervals of attempted defibrillation did not present a better outcome compared with shock first as measured by either one-month survival or neurologically favorable one-month survival, after adjusting for potential confounders. Further studies are required to determine whether CPR first has an advantage over shock first.

  2. Fiscal councils as a mechanism for establishing fiscal discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Mileva

    2014-01-01

    process and strengthening the fiscal discipline. In the new European fiscal governance framework, these institutions become particularly important in the context of mending the consequences of the current economic crisis. In their hitherto activities, fiscal councils have encountered some difficulties: their competences have been challenged, their assessment and recommendations have been disregarded, and their financial resources (aimed at promoting their activities have been significantly restricted. Relying on this analysis, we may conclude that the independence and responsibility of fiscal councils largely depends on the government's resolve to be fully accountable in administering a sustainable fiscal policy.

  3. Sustained inflations: comparing three neonatal resuscitation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Claus; Dawson, Jennifer A; Gerber, Angela; Kamlin, C Omar F; Davis, Peter G; Morley, Colin J

    2011-01-01

    Some national resuscitation guidelines advocate using sustained initial inflations (2-3 s) for babies requiring resuscitation. Inflation times ≥10 s have been used for preterm infants. This study examines the ability of operators of varying experience to provide a sustained inflation using three different manual ventilation devices. We compared a self-inflating bag, a flow-inflating bag and a pressure-limited T-piece device. Fifty clinical staff members from five professional groups gave a sustained inflation with a target peak pressure of 30 cm H2O and target duration of 10 s to an internal leak-free manikin. We measured peak inflating pressure (PIP) and mean inflating pressure (MIP) during the sustained inflation, and the duration of inflating pressure (IP) >20 and 25 cm H2O. Median (IQR) duration of IP >25 cm H2O was: self-inflating bag 2.5 s (0.8-5.7), flow-inflating bag 10.6 s (8.4-12.9) and the T-piece 10.7 s (8.9-11.9). There was a weak correlation between experience using a self-inflating bag and longer inflation times (R = 0.290, p = 0.041). When compared with the T-piece, the flow-inflating bag had lower mean MIP (27.0 ± 1.8 vs. 28.8 ± 2.0 cm H2O) and higher mean PIP (32.3 ± 3.7 vs. 29.8 ± 1.8 cm H2O). There were no differences in performance between operator groups. The T-piece provided consistent PIP during a single 10 s sustained inflation with less variation in pressure compared with the flow-inflating bag. Sustained inflations >3 s were difficult to achieve with a self-inflating bag. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Reversible myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Aguayo de Hoyos, Eduardo; Ruiz-Navarro, Silvia; Díaz-Castellanos, Miguel Angel; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Escobar, Sergio; Moreno, Rafael Melgares; Fierro-Rosón, Javier

    2005-08-01

    Myocardial stunning frequently has been described in patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Recently, it has also been described in critically ill patients without ischaemic heart disease. It is possible that the most severe form of any syndrome, leading to cardio-respiratory arrest, may cause myocardial stunning. Myocardial stunning appears to have been demonstrated in experimental studies, though this phenomenon has not been sufficiently studied in human models. The aim of the present work has been to study and describe the possible development of myocardial dysfunction in patients resuscitated after cardio-respiratory arrest, in the absence of acute or previous coronary artery disease. Descriptive study of a case series. The intensive care unit (ICU) of a provincial hospital. The study period was from April 1999 to June 2001. All patients admitted to the ICU with critical, non-coronary artery pathology, with no past history of cardiac disease, and those who were resuscitated after cardio-respiratory arrest, were included in the study. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and disturbances of segmental contractility. This study was carried out within the first 24h after admission, during the first week, during the second or third week, after 1 month, and between 3 and 6 months. Twenty-nine patients with a median age of 65 years (range 24--76) were included in the study. Twelve patients died. Twenty patients developed myocardial dysfunction; the initial LVEF in these patients was 0.28 (0.12--0.51), showing improvement over time in the patients who survived. All of these patients presented disturbances of segmental contractility which also became normal over time. After successful CPR, reversible myocardial dysfunction, consisting of systolic myocardial dysfunction and disturbances of segmental contractility, may occur.

  5. Interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji-ke; Wang, Jun; Li, Tian-fa

    2014-12-01

    The management of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery differs from the management of cardiac arrest under other circumstances. In other studies, interposed abdominal compression-cardiopulmonary resuscitation (IAC-CPR) resulted in a better outcome compared with conventional CPR. The aim of the present study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of IAC-CPR compared with conventional CPR in patients with cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. Data on all cardiac surgical patients who suffered a sudden cardiac arrest during the first 24 h after surgery were collected prospectively. Cardiac arrest was defined as the cessation of cardiac mechanical activity with the absence of a palpable central pulse, apnoea and unresponsiveness, including ventricular fibrillation, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Forty patients were randomized to either conventional CPR (n = 21) or IAC-CPR (n = 19). IAC-CPR was initially performed by compressing the abdomen midway between the xiphoid and the umbilicus during the relaxation phase of chest compression. If spontaneous circulation was not restored after 10-15 min, the surgical team would immediately proceed to resternotomy. The endpoints of the study were safety, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) >5 min, survival to hospital discharge and survival for 6 months. With IAC-CPR, there were more patients in terms of ROSC, survival to hospital discharge, survival for 6 months and fewer CPR-related injuries compared with patients who underwent conventional CPR. IAC-CPR is feasible and safe and may be advantageous in cases of cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. In-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation: prearrest morbidity and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, R.; Koster, R. W.; de Haan, R. J.; Oosting, H.; van der Wouw, P. A.; Lampe-Schoenmaeckers, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Considerations about the application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should include the expected probability of survival. The survival probability after CPR may be more accurately estimated by the occurrence in time of the prearrest morbidity of patients. OBJECTIVE: To identify

  7. Towards evidence-based resuscitation of the newborn infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Brett J; Owen, Louise S; Hooper, Stuart B; Jacobs, Susan E; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W; Davis, Peter G

    2017-04-22

    Effective resuscitation of the newborn infant has the potential to save many lives around the world and reduce disabilities in children who survive peripartum asphyxia. In this Series paper, we highlight some of the important advances in the understanding of how best to resuscitate newborn infants, which includes monitoring techniques to guide resuscitative efforts, increasing awareness of the adverse effects of hyperoxia, delayed umbilical cord clamping, the avoidance of routine endotracheal intubation for extremely preterm infants, and therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Despite the challenges of performing high-quality clinical research in the delivery room, researchers continue to refine and advance our knowledge of effective resuscitation of newborn infants through scientific experiments and clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resuscitation and coagulation in the severely injured trauma patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwinter, Mark J.; Woolley, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Developments in the resuscitation of the severely injured trauma patient in the last decade have been through the increased understanding of the early pathophysiological consequences of injury together with some observations and experiences of recent casualties of conflict. In particular, the recognition of early derangements of haemostasis with hypocoagulopathy being associated with increased mortality and morbidity and the prime importance of tissue hypoperfusion as a central driver to this process in this population of patients has led to new resuscitation strategies. These strategies have focused on haemostatic resuscitation and the development of the ideas of damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery continuum. This in turn has led to a requirement to be able to more closely monitor the physiological status, of major trauma patients, including their coagulation status, and react in an anticipatory fashion. PMID:21149355

  9. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  10. Resuscitation in hip fractures:A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Rocos, Brett; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Kelly, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the resuscitation of patients with hip fracture in the preoperative or perioperative phase of their treatment and its impact on mortality.DESIGN: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PROSPERO databases using a systematic search strategy for randomised trials and observational studies investigating the fluid resuscitation of any patient with hip fracture. No language limits were applied to the search, which was complemented by manually screening the reference l...

  11. The Level Of Knowlege Guidelines Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation For Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Lukešová, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to determine the level of theoretical knowledge of the procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of selected non-medical staff members in VFN in Prague. The work is subdivided into a theoretical and a practical part. In the first part I comment on the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the basic and widespread vital support to adults and children and the didactics of CPR. In the second- practical part I compare the theoretical knowledge of CPR of selected n...

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: from the beginning to the present day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Weil, Max Harry

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac arrest represents a dramatic event that can occur suddenly and often without premonitory signs, characterized by sudden loss of consciousness and breathing after cardiac output ceases and both coronary and cerebral blood flows stop. Restarting of the blood flow by cardiopulmonary resuscitation potentially re-establishes some cardiac output and organ blood flows. This article summarizes the major events that encompass the history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, beginning with ancient history and evolving into the current American Heart Association's commitment to save hearts.

  13. Do resuscitation-related injuries kill infants and children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matshes, Evan W; Lew, Emma O

    2010-06-01

    Occasionally, individuals accused of inflicting fatal injuries on infants and young children will claim some variant of the "CPR defense," that is, they attribute the cause of injuries found at autopsy to their "untrained" resuscitative efforts. A 10-year (1994-2003) historical fixed cohort study of all pediatric forensic autopsies at the Miami-Dade County Medical Examiner Department was undertaken. To be eligible for inclusion in the study, children had to have died of atraumatic causes, with or without resuscitative efforts (N(atraumatic) = 546). Of these, 382 had a history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; average age of 4.17 years); 248 had CPR provided by trained individuals only; 133 had CPR provided by both trained and untrained individuals; 1 had CPR provided by untrained individuals only. There was no overlap between these 3 distinct groups. Twenty-two findings potentially attributable to CPR were identified in 19:15 cases of orofacial injuries compatible with attempted endotracheal intubation; 4 cases with focal pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage; 1 case with prominent anterior mediastinal emphysema; and 2 cases with anterior chest abrasions. There were no significant hollow or solid thoracoabdominal organ injuries. There were no rib fractures. The estimated relative risk of injury subsequent to resuscitation was not statistically different between the subset of decedents whose resuscitative attempts were made by trained individuals only, and the subset who received CPR from both trained and untrained individuals. In the single case of CPR application by an untrained individual only, no injuries resulted. The remaining 164 children dying from nontraumatic causes and who did not undergo resuscitative efforts served as a control group; no injuries were identified. This study indicates that in the pediatric population, injuries secondary to resuscitative efforts are infrequent or rare, pathophysiologically inconsequential, and predominantly orofacial in

  14. Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Process and Lower Frequency of Medical Staff Visit Predicts Independently In-hospital Resuscitation Success in the Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chen Tsai

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the initial resuscitation success rate was not affected by age, a longer time interval between the last medical staffs’ visit and the onset of resuscitation did result in a worse success rate in elderly patients. Our data suggest that more frequent staff visits to the elderly population during hospitalization could alter initial resuscitation results.

  15. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yiqun Lin,1 Adam Cheng2 1KidSIM-ASPIRE Simulation Research Program, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2KidSIM-ASPIRE Research Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. Keywords: simulation, pediatric resuscitation, medical education, instructional design, crisis resource management, health care

  16. Analysis of neonatal resuscitation using eye tracking: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Brenda Hiu Yan; Cheung, Po-Yin; Wagner, Michael; van Os, Sylvia; Zheng, Bin; Schmölzer, Georg

    2017-08-19

    Visual attention (VA) is important for situation awareness and decision-making. Eye tracking can be used to analyse the VA of healthcare providers. No study has examined eye tracking during neonatal resuscitation. To test the use of eye tracking to examine VA during neonatal resuscitation. Six video recordings were obtained using eye tracking glasses worn by resuscitators during the first 5 min of neonatal resuscitation. Videos were analysed to obtain (i) areas of interest (AOIs), (ii) time spent on each AOI and (iii) frequency of saccades between AOIs. Five videos were of acceptable quality and analysed. Only 35% of VA was directed at the infant, with 33% at patient monitors and gauges. There were frequent saccades (0.45/s) and most involved patient monitors. During neonatal resuscitation, VA is often directed away from the infant towards patient monitors. Eye tracking can be used to analyse human performance during neonatal resuscitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Decisions not to resuscitate in a Swedish university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, H; Adolfsson, A; Lundberg, D

    1997-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has the potential to save many lives. Used indiscriminately though, it may be harmful and not in the best interest of the patient. An advance directive to refrain from resuscitation in selected patients is probably not uncommon in Sweden, but guidelines ruling this are still generally lacking. This study was performed to evaluate the use and documentation of do-not-resuscitate orders in a Swedish university hospital. Adult inpatients at 7 medical, 3 surgical and 2 neurological wards, a total of 220, were investigated on one specific day by interviewing the physicians and nurses responsible for their care. We found a discrepancy in doctors' and nurses' perception concerning the appropriateness of CPR in selected patients. CPR was judged by doctors to be inappropriate for 45 patients (20%). Out of these 45 patients, only 24 had a written do-not-resuscitate order in their medical record, in most cases noted as a code word or sign only. Rarely were the patient or his/her relatives involved in the decision-making process. We conclude that a decision to refrain from resuscitation is often not made, even when considered medically and ethically justifiable. Also, the use of coded information as a sole indicator for a patient not to be resuscitated is still common practice. The patient or his/her relatives are rarely involved in this decision.

  18. Ethical dilemmas of recording and reviewing neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boer, Maria C; Houtlosser, Mirjam; van Zanten, Henriëtte Anje; Foglia, Elizabeth E; Engberts, Dirk P; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2018-01-20

    Neonatal resuscitation is provided to approximately 3% of neonates. Adequate ventilation is often the key to successful resuscitation, but this can be difficult to provide. There is increasing evidence that inappropriate respiratory support can have severe consequences. Several neonatal intensive care units have recorded and reviewed neonatal resuscitation procedures for quality assessment, education and research; however, ethical dilemmas sometimes make it difficult to implement this review process. We reviewed the literature on the development of recording and reviewing neonatal resuscitation and have summarised the ethical concerns involved. Recording and reviewing vital physiological parameters and video imaging of neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room is a valuable tool for quality assurance, education and research. Furthermore, it can improve the quality of neonatal resuscitation provided. We observed that ethical dilemmas arise as the review process is operating in several domains of healthcare that all have their specific moral framework with requirements and conditions on issues such as consent, privacy and data storage. These moral requirements and conditions vary due to local circumstances. Further research on the ethical aspects of recording and reviewing is desirable before wider implementation of this technique can be recommended. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Members of the State Council of Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Luncheon hosted by the Director-General for members of the State Council of Geneva: From left to right A. Naudi; J. May; M. Carlo Lamprecht, State Council - Employement, Foreign Office and Economic Departement; M. Robert Hensler, State Chancellor; L. Maiani, CERN Director General; H.F. Hoffmann; M. Robert Cramer, State Council - Environment, Agriculture and Interior Departement; J.Van Der Boon; M. Laurent Moutinot, State Council - Installation, equipment and housing Departement; C. Détraz; C. Wyss; P. Jenni; G. Hentsch; M. Pierre-François Unger, State Council - Health and Social Action Departement; G. Stassinakis; M. Bourquin, CERN Council President.

  20. Turkey and European Security Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    relationships between Turkey, the United States, the Kurds, and Europe. As a source often critical of Turkey and the United States ( Noam Chomsky ...2008, http://consilium.europa.eu/uedocs/cmsUpload/080220Altheaupdate10. pdf . 129 Ibid. 130 Ibid. 131 Ibid. 132 The Council of the European Union...Factsheet, “EU Police Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (EUPM),” March 2006, http://consilium.europa.eu/uedocs/cmsUpload/Factsheet_060312. pdf . 48

  1. European strategies for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiandra, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The most recent developments of strategies and policies in the mental health field in Europe are related to the World Health Organization (WHO) Declaration and Action Plan on Mental Health signed by all the Ministers of Health of all Member States in the European Region (2005). The Action Plan proposes ways and means of developing comprehensive mental health policies, listing 12 areas in which challenges are indicated and detailed actions are required. Afterwards the Green Paper on Mental Health has been launched by the European Commission for the definition of an European strategy. The more precise European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being has been presented in 2008. Many other international bodies (OECD, Council of Europe, etc.) have actively worked to stress the mental health issue. All are clearly referring to the Italian model, started 30 years ago.

  2. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  3. Family support liaison in the witnessed resuscitation: A phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Hadi; Zamanzade, Vahid; Rahmani, Azad; Haririan, Hamidreza; Porter, Joanne E

    2017-09-01

    Family-witnessed resuscitation remains controversial among clinicians from implementation to practice and there are a number of countries, such as Iran, where that is considered a low priority. To explore the lived experience of resuscitation team members with the presence of the patient's family during resuscitation. The hermeneutic phenomenology. The emergency departments and critical care units of 6 tertiary hospitals in Tabriz, Iran. There were potentially 380 nurses and physicians working in the emergency departments and acute care settings of 6 tertiary hospitals in Tabriz. A purposive sample of these nurses and physicians was used to recruit participants who had at least 2 years of experience, had experienced an actual family witnessed resuscitation event, and wanted to participate. The sample size was determined according to data saturation. Data collection ended when the data were considered rich and varied enough to illuminate the phenomenon, and no new themes emerged following the interview of 12 nurses and 8 physicians. Semi-structured, face- to- face interviews were held with the participants over a period of 6 months (April 2015 to September 2015), and Van Manen's method of data analysis was adopted. Three main themes emerged from the data analysis, including 'Futile resuscitation', 'Family support liaison', and 'Influence on team's performance'. A further 9 sub-themes emerged under the 3 main themes, which included 'futile resuscitation in end-stage cancer patients', 'when a patient dies', 'young patients', 'care of the elderly', 'accountable person', 'family supporter', 'no influence', 'positive influence', and 'negative influence'. Participants noted both positive and negative experiences of having family members present during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Welltrained and expert resuscitation team members are less likely to be stressed in the presence of family. A family support liaison would act to decrease family anxiety levels and to de

  4. Resuscitation of the trauma patient: tell me a trigger for early haemostatic resuscitation please!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew J; Lone, Nazir; Walsh, Timothy S

    2011-03-01

    The management of trauma-related coagulopathy and haemorrhage is changing from a reactive strategy to a proactive early intervention with blood products and haemostatic agents. Although major haemorrhage and massive transfusion are associated with higher mortality, the pattern of this association with modern trauma care is poorly described. In addition, early predictors of massive transfusion, which might trigger a proactive haemostatic resuscitation strategy, are not currently available. We review recent literature relating to predictors of massive transfusions and the relationship between transfusion and mortality.

  5. National Survey of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows on Debriefing After Medical Resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinns, Lauren E; O'Connell, Karen J; Mullan, Paul C; Ryan, Leticia M; Wratney, Angela T

    2015-08-01

    Medical resuscitations of critically ill children in the emergency department are stressful events requiring a coordinated team effort. Current guidelines recommend debriefing after such events to improve future performance. Debriefing practices within pediatric emergency departments by pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the United States has not been studied. The aim of this study was to describe the current debriefing experience of PEM fellows in the United States. A 10-item, anonymous questionnaire regarding debriefing characteristics was distributed to fellows in US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited PEM programs via e-mail and paper format from December 2011 to March 2012. Results were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of 393 eligible PEM fellows, 201 (51.1%) completed the survey. The 201 respondents included 82 first-year fellows (40.8%), 71 second-year fellows (35.3%), and 48 third-year fellows (23.9%). Ninety-nine percent had participated in medical resuscitations during their fellowship training, yet 88.0% reported no formal teaching on how to debrief. There was wide variability in the format and timing of debriefings. The majority of debriefings were led by PEM attending physicians (65.5%) and PEM fellows (19.6%). Most (91.5%) of the fellows indicated they would like further education about debriefing. The majority of PEM fellows do not receive formal training on how to debrief after a critical event and may have limited experience in leading debriefings. Debriefing training should be considered part of the educational curriculum during PEM fellowship.

  6. Research council leaders issue merit review principles, establish Global Research Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-05-01

    The directors of research councils from 41 countries, along with representatives from the European Commission and other organizations, issued a set of merit review principles and established a virtual Global Research Council following a 14-15 May Global Summit on Merit Review that was hosted by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). The merit review principles cover six key areas: expert assessment by reviewers; transparency regarding decisions; impartiality of proposal assessments; appropriateness of the review process; confidentiality in handling proposals; and integrity and ethical consideration, which was deemed paramount to the review process. According to NSF, the merit review principles statement was developed with two primary objectives. “First, the worldwide agreement on core, high-level principles will foster international cooperation between funding agencies that support the scientific research community. Second, for those countries that are developing new funding agencies, the principles provide a global consensus on the key elements necessary for a rigorous and transparent review system.”

  7. Diversity in Action conference | Council Chamber | 30 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers, by Dr Pippa Wells (CERN) and Dr Claartje Vinkenburg (VU University Amsterdam).   Wednesday, 30 September 1.30 p.m. - 3.00 p.m. Council Chamber To register, please click here. Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful career as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes.  Dr Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks...

  8. Works Council Effectiveness: Determinants and Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapulete, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aimed to gain more insights into works council effectiveness in two ways: 1. studying the influence of works council presence on organizational outcomes; and, 2. studying the determinants of works council effectiveness. We found that productivity increases with the presence of a works

  9. 78 FR 2950 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in Washington, DC February 7-8, 2013. The... Apple, Designated Federal Officer, Forestry Research Advisory Council, USDA Forest Service Research and...

  10. Networking Africa's science granting councils | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Science granting councils are central to funding and catalyzing research and innovation. A recent scoping study supported by IDRC underscored the important role of these councils in national science systems in sub-Saharan Africa. However, that study also noted that most councils are pursuing their efforts in isolation, with ...

  11. 76 FR 79655 - Manufacturing Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing Council Meeting AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The Manufacturing Council will hold a..., trade agreements and other issues affecting the U.S. manufacturing sector and to determine the Council's...

  12. Do-not-resuscitate order: The experiences of iranian cardiopulmonary resuscitation team members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghader Assarroudi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One dilemma in the end-of-life care is making decisions for conducting cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. This dilemma is perceived in different ways due to the influence of culture and religion. This study aimed to understand the experiences of CPR team members about the do-not-resuscitate order. Methods: CPR team members were interviewed, and data were analyzed using a conventional content analysis method. Results: Three categories and six subcategories emerged: “The dilemma between revival and suffering” with the subcategories of “revival likelihood” and “death as a cause for comfort;” “conflicting situation” with the subcategories of “latent decision” and “ambivalent order;” and “low-quality CPR” with the subcategories of “team member demotivation” and “disrupting CPR performance.” Conclusion: There is a need for the development of a contextual guideline, which is required for respecting the rights of patients and their families and providing legal support to health-care professionals during CPR.

  13. Inequality and rising levels of socio-economic segregation : Lessons from a pan-European comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcinczak, S.; Musterd, S.; Van Ham, M.; Tammaru, T.

    2015-01-01

    The research leading to these results has received funding from the Estonian Research Council (Institutional Research Grant IUT no. 2–17 on Spatial Population Mobility and Geographical Changes in Urban Regions); the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme

  14. Ten Years A-Talking! Reflecting on the Role of the EERA Council from the Perspective of National Educational Research Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Joe; Holm, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on their personal experiences, the authors reflect on the relationship between the European Educational Research Association (EERA) Council and the National Educational Research Associations (NERAs). The article will argue that while much of the work undertaken by the EERA Council is hugely valuable, at times it can be difficult to see a…

  15. Open Letter to the European Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej; Schwemer, Sebastian Felix

    2016-01-01

    for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on copyright in the Digital Single Market) and soft law initiatives (the EU Internet Forum against Terrorism and the Code of Conduct on Countering Illegal Hate Speech Online) seriously put at risk the consistency and integrity of the EU acquis related...

  16. European approaches to ensure good animal welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veissier, I.; Butterworth, A.; Bock, B.B.; Roe, E.

    2008-01-01

    Conventions to protect domestic animals during transport, farming and slaughter were established by the Council of Europe and approved by many European states. Conventions are followed by recommendations that specify how the general principles of conventions apply for the different species. The

  17. [Which drugs are useful during resuscitation? Which are not?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2016-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation represents a therapeutic challenge. Evidence-based guidelines, which were updated in 2015, give detailed advice on how to treat the patient. Basic life support consists of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (30 chest compressions interrupted briefly to provide to 2 ventilations) and, if ventricular tachyarrhythmia is present, urgent cardiac defibrillation. Administration of drugs is one of the aspects of advanced life support. Vasopressors (adrenaline, vasopressin) aim to optimize coronary and cerebral perfusion. Antiarrhythmic drugs (amiodarone or lidocaine, when amiodarone is not available) are given during cardiac arrest to treat specific cardiac arrhythmias, mainly ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia. However, even in current guidelines, there is growing ambivalence towards drug treatment in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. This is mainly due to a paucity of robust clinical data. Most of the studies that have addressed the efficacy and safety of drugs during resuscitation are observational studies; however, a few small randomized controlled studies also exist. Recently, two large randomized controlled studies addressing the efficacy and safety of adrenaline versus placebo and amiodarone or lidocaine versus placebo have started. Both are currently recruiting patients. The hope is that the results of these studies will help to better define the role of drugs administered during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  18. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunziker S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field.

  19. New perspectives of volemic resuscitation in polytrauma patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Carmen Alina; Vernic, Corina; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, fluid resuscitation of multiple trauma patients is still a challenging therapy. Existing therapies for volume replacement in severe haemorrhagic shock can lead to adverse reactions that may be fatal for the patient. Patients presenting with multiple trauma often develop hemorrhagic shock, which triggers a series of metabolic, physiological and cellular dysfunction. These disorders combined, lead to complications that significantly decrease survival rate in this subset of patients. Volume and electrolyte resuscitation is challenging due to many factors that overlap. Poor management can lead to post-resuscitation systemic inflammation causing multiple organ failure and ultimately death. In literature, there is no exact formula for this purpose, and opinions are divided. This paper presents a review of modern techniques and current studies regarding the management of fluid resuscitation in trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. According to the literature and from clinical experience, all aspects regarding post-resuscitation period need to be considered. Also, for every case in particular, emergency therapy management needs to be rigorously respected considering all physiological, biochemical and biological parameters.

  20. Design of a Functional Training Prototype for Neonatal Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Rajaraman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Birth Asphyxia is considered to be one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality around the world. Asphyxiated neonates require skilled resuscitation to survive the neonatal period. The project aims to train health professionals in a basic newborn care using a prototype with an ultimate objective to have one person at every delivery trained in neonatal resuscitation. This prototype will be a user-friendly device with which one can get trained in performing neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings. The prototype consists of a Force Sensing Resistor (FSR that measures the pressure applied and is interfaced with Arduino® which controls the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD and Light Emitting Diode (LED indication for pressure and compression counts. With the increase in population and absence of proper medical care, the need for neonatal resuscitation program is not well addressed. The proposed work aims at offering a promising solution for training health care individuals on resuscitating newborn babies under low resource settings.

  1. Analysis of Medication Errors in Simulated Pediatric Resuscitation by Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Porter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of prescribing medication errors specifically made by a trainee and identify factors associated with these errors during the simulated resuscitation of a critically ill child. Methods: The results of the simulated resuscitation are described. We analyzed data from the simulated resuscitation for the occurrence of a prescribing medication error. We compared univariate analysis of each variable to medication error rate and performed a separate multiple logistic regression analysis on the significant univariate variables to assess the association between the selected variables. Results: We reviewed 49 simulated resuscitations . The final medication error rate for the simulation was 26.5% (95% CI 13.7% - 39.3%. On univariate analysis, statistically significant findings for decreased prescribing medication error rates included senior residents in charge, presence of a pharmacist, sleeping greater than 8 hours prior to the simulation, and a visual analog scale score showing more confidence in caring for critically ill children. Multiple logistic regression analysis using the above significant variables showed only the presence of a pharmacist to remain significantly associated with decreased medication error, odds ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01 - 0.64. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the presence of a clinical pharmacist during the resuscitation of a critically ill child reduces the medication errors made by resident physician trainees.

  2. Controlling delegated powers in the post-Lisbon European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Gijs Jan; Blom-Hansen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Most European Union rules are made by the Commission, not the Council of Ministers or the European Parliament. But although the Commission is an important rule-maker, it is not autonomous. The member states have always taken care to install committees to control the Commission (comitology). However,

  3. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  4. In-hospital resuscitation evaluated by in situ simulation: a prospective simulation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Frederik; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: : Interruption in chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be characterized as no flow ratio (NFR) and the importance of minimizing these pauses in chest compression has been highlighted recently. Further, documentation of resuscitation performance has been...

  5. Complications of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in non-traumatic cases and factors affecting complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Kaldırım

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, severe injuries can occur due to thoracic compression. Only a positive correlation with the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was found in our study.

  6. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended.

  7. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  8. Roster of president's Advisory Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-30

    Twenty-three of the thirty members of President Clinton's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS are listed. Seven members will be named at a later date. R. Scott Hitt, a physician and member of the board of directors of AIDS Project Los Angeles, will chair the Council. Bob Hattoy, Jeremy Landau, Steve Lew, and H. Alexander Robinson, each working in the AIDS community, are all living with HIV disease. Other members include Terje Anderson, Regina Aragon, Mary Boland, Nicholas Bollman, Robert L. Fogel, Debra Frazer-Howze, Kathleen M. Gerus, Edward Gould, Phyllis Greenberger, Carole laFavor, Alexandra Mary Levine, Altagracia Perez, Debbie Runions, Benjamin Schatz, Denise Stokes, Charles Quincy Troupe, Sandra Thurman, and Bruce G. Weninger.

  9. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  10. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  11. Symposium to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the first Council session

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The Convention for the Establishment of a European Organization for Nuclear Research entered into force on 29 September 1954, 60 years ago. This marks CERN's official birthday. The first session of the CERN Council, the Governance of CERN, was held at Geneva on 7 and 8 October 1954, just one week later.

  12. The Impact of European Democracy Promotion on Party Financing in the East European Neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Timus

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how the cooperation of European institutions (the EU, the Council of Europe, and the OSCE in democracy promotion affects the success of European conditionality on party financing in the East European Neighbourhood. It examines the two major European-level factors, the determinacy of requirements and the rewards, based on the Ukrainian, Moldovan and Georgian case studies and a cross-case comparative analysis before and during Action Plans’ period. The paper shows that there exists a European-level influence on party financing changes in line with the European standards set by the Venice Commission. Also, the cooperation of European institutions in democracy promotion contributes to the success of the common European leverage in the field of party financing. Although the EU lacks a specific party financing conditionality in Action Plans, the reference to the standards set by the Council of Europe and the OSCE increases indirectly the determinacy of its requirements and offers domestic elites a clearer picture of its demands. At the same time, the EU’s merit in the joint European influence on party financing lies in its increased leverage on aspiring European members, even in the case of low credibility of EU membership.

  13. The resistance councils in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Per

    in the capitals. In my dissertation I propose to change that focus. Partly by paying particular attention to rural politics, partly through a discussion of democracy in a longer-term perspective using a broader definition of democracy and finally through a discussion of democracy as effective political...... participation rather than only form al rights. I shall do so by analysing the Resistance Councils (RCs) in Uganda....

  14. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  15. POWER MANAGEMENT OF COMMUNITY COUNCILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lourdes Sánchez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power delegated to today's social organizations a factor in the efficient management of organizations in a context marked by complexity. The present research was to interpret the word power of management in the actions undertaken by the Community Councils of the Municipality Naguanagua and Valencia Carabobo State in the first half of 2012, compared with other Community Councils that make life in other regions of country, where policies and actions defined by the organization reach its goals. The methodology consisted in the study of theoretical and empirical papers of these organizations in question. Eventually you will reach a reflection that there are communal councils in different regions of Venezuela, who show their ability and control over the development of their activities enabling a leading role in planning, evaluation and control in public administration, proving to be a healthy organization with a common goal which results in social welfare, linking philosophy, technology and society. It is a key word in the strategy adopted by these organizations, so power is a fundamental human component and the interrelations of the members of these organized communities and their environment, hence it has been studied by different disciplines and social sciences

  16. Initial resuscitation and management of pediatric septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K; Weiss, S L

    2015-04-01

    The pediatric sepsis syndrome remains a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization costs worldwide. The initial resuscitation and management of pediatric sepsis is focused on 1) rapid recognition of abnormal tissue perfusion and restoration of adequate cardiovascular function; 2) eradication of the inciting invasive infection, including prompt administration of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial medications; and 3) supportive care of organ system dysfunction. Efforts to improve early and aggressive initial resuscitation and ongoing management strategies have improved outcomes in pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock, though many questions still remain as to the optimal therapeutic strategies for many patients. In this article, we will briefly review the definitions, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and pathophysiology of sepsis and provide an extensive overview of both current and novel therapeutic strategies used to resuscitate and manage pediatric patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  17. The AED in resuscitation: it's not just about the shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    The automated external defibrillator (AED), in combination with effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is a critical part of the American Heart Association's "Chain of survival." Newer guidelines have simplified resuscitation and emphasized the importance of CPR in providing rapid and deep compressions with minimal interruptions; in fact, CPR should resume immediately after the shock given by the AED, without the delay entailed in checking for pulse or rhythm conversion. Our experience with the AED aboard aircraft, showing 40% long-term survival with the AED in ventricular fibrillation, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the device. Despite this and other reports of successful AED deployment, AEDs are not yet available at all public locations. Prospective research, as undertaken by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, will be the key to future refinements of the guidelines and enhanced survival with use of the AED in sudden cardiac arrest.

  18. Role of the family support person during resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottle, Elita-Mae; James, Jayne Elizabeth

    This article discusses family witnessed resuscitation and describes the need for a healthcare professional to be available to support the family before and during this experience. Careful explanation and emotional support are required during the event and if cardiopulmonary resuscitation is unsuccessful, further explanation and support will be required. A family support person is usually a nurse but could also be a hospital chaplain or social worker. The chaplain's background and ability to interpret medical information, combined with the emotional and spiritual support he or she can offer, make the chaplain suitable for this role. However, for some patients and families a chaplain's involvement might not be appropriate. The authors suggest that further research and evidence-based guidance should be developed to maximise the benefits of a family support person's presence during witnessed resuscitation.

  19. Moral distress in the resuscitation of extremely premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Jennifer; Evans, Marilyn; Coughlin, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    To increase our understanding of moral distress experienced by neonatal registered nurses when directly or indirectly involved in the decision-making process of resuscitating infants who are born extremely premature. A secondary qualitative analysis was conducted on a portion of the data collected from an earlier study which explored the ethical decision-making process among health professionals and parents concerning resuscitation of extremely premature infants. A regional, tertiary academic referral hospital in Ontario offering a perinatal program. A total of 15 registered nurses were directly or indirectly involved in the resuscitation of extremely premature infants. Interview transcripts of nurses from the original study were purposefully selected from the original 42 transcripts of health professionals. Inductive content analysis was conducted to identify themes describing factors and situations contributing to moral distress experienced by nurses regarding resuscitation of extremely premature infants. Ethical approval was obtained from the research ethics review board for both the initial study and this secondary data analysis. Five themes, uncertainty, questioning of informed consent, differing perspectives, perceptions of harm and suffering, and being with the family, contribute to the moral distress felt by nurses when exposed to neonatal resuscitation of extremely premature infants. An interesting finding was the nurses' perceived lack of power and influence in the neonatal resuscitation decision-making process. Moral distress continues to be a significant issue for nursing practice, particularly among neonatal nurses. Strategies are needed to help mediate the moral distress experienced by nurses, such as debriefing sessions, effective communication, role clarification, and interprofessional education and collaboration. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Cellular edema regulates tissue capillary perfusion after hemorrhage resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Li, Na; Matheson, Paul J; Garrison, Richard N

    2007-10-01

    Hemorrhage-induced activation of endothelial cell Na+/H+ -exchanger results in cellular swelling, which physically impedes capillary filling and compromises gut perfusion. We hypothesized that correction of the vascular volume deficit by conventional resuscitation does not improve capillary filling unless cellular swelling is prevented. Also, we hypothesized that adjunctive direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR) with topical peritoneal dialysis solution (Delflex; Fresenius USA, Inc., Ogden, Ut) enhances capillary filling and gut perfusion by mechanisms that are independent of the Na+/H+ function. In vivo intravital videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimeter were used by us to measure microvascular diameter and flow, capillary filling (index of functional capillary density, FCD), and endothelial cell function in the terminal ileum of anesthetized rats. Rats were bled to 50% mean arterial pressure for 60 min and resuscitated with the shed blood plus 2 volumes of saline (conventional resuscitation). Prevention of endothelial cell swelling was achieved with topical amiloride (specific Na+/H+ inhibitor) in the tissue bath before hemorrhage or simultaneously with conventional resuscitation. DPR was simulated by instillation of Delflex in the tissue bath as adjunctive to conventional resuscitation. Sham no hemorrhage group and a simulated DPR group that received topical amiloride treatment served as controls. Conventional resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock restored and maintained central hemodynamics but caused progressive and persistent intestinal vasoconstriction and hypoperfusion associated with low FCD and endothelial cell dysfunction. Prevention of endothelial cell swelling when combined with conventional resuscitation, preserved endothelial cell function, and restored local intestinal microvascular variables to near-prehemorrhage levels. Simulated adjunctive DPR produced rapid, sustained, and generalized vasodilation associated with restoration of endothelial cell

  1. Blood Transfusion Strategies for Hemostatic Resuscitation in Massive Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Massive transfusion practices were transformed during the 1970s without solid evidence supporting the use of component therapy. A manual literature search was performed for all references to the lethal triad, acute or early coagulopathy of trauma, fresh whole blood, and component transfusion therapy in massive trauma, and damage control resuscitation. Data from recent wars suggest traditional component therapy causes a nonhemostatic resuscitation worsening the propagation of the lethal triad hastening death. These same studies also indicate the advantage of fresh whole blood over component therapy even when administered in a 1:1:1 replacement ratio. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Hæmostatisk resuscitation til blødende traumepatienter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Trauma haemorrhage is a common reversible cause of death. Haemostatic resuscitation focuses on replacing the lost blood with transfusions equivalent to whole blood as early as possible. In Denmark, the optimal ratio for transfusions in massive bleeding is four packs of red blood cells, four packs...... of plasma and one pool of platelets (equal to ratio 1:1:1 in USA). Haemostatic resuscitation also includes a restricted use of crystalloids, early tranexamic acid, and a goal-directed transfusion therapy by using viscoelastic haemostatic assays to detect coagulopathy and the need for additional transfusions...

  3. Interest Organisations and European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ove K.

    . The paper focuses exclusively on the national policy processes that are involved with managing European Union (EU) issues. More specifically, this paper discusses two aspects of multi-level governance. First is the important role of private interests in the coordination of decision making at the national...... level preceding their government's representation of national interests in the European Council of Ministers and other EU organizations. Second is the effect of all this on national democratic systems.......This paper examines the influence of European integration on the relationship between state administration and private interests in the four Nordic countries - Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland. By private interests I mean interest organizations, private corporations and independent experts...

  4. European courts and old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulley, Graham P

    2013-09-01

    There are two major European Courts, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). The ECJ deals with legal matters, mainly involving the interpretation of EU law and ensuring that the law is applied evenly across all 27 EU member states. The ECHR aims to make certain that civil and political rights of citizens in the 46 member states of the Council of Europe are observed. Most cases involving older citizens are about social policy (such as pension arrangements, equality, age discrimination and mandatory retirement). There have been few cases dealing with patients' rights, long-term care or housing. Referrals of selected cases involving old people should be considered if their rights are not being protected. In this Commentary, there is an account of how these Courts have evolved, together with guidance on whom to refer, to which Court, and when and how referrals should be made.

  5. Duration of Prehospital Resuscitation Efforts After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Ken; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Gaieski, David F; Ito, Noritoshi; Takayama, Morimasa; Shirai, Shinichi; Furuya, Singo; Tani, Sigemasa; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-05

    During out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, it is unclear how long prehospital resuscitation efforts should be continued to maximize lives saved. Between 2005 and 2012, we enrolled 282 183 adult patients with bystander-witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from the All-Japan Utstein Registry. Prehospital resuscitation duration was calculated as the time interval from call receipt to return of spontaneous circulation in cases achieving prehospital return of spontaneous circulation or from call receipt to hospital arrival in cases not achieving prehospital return of spontaneous circulation. In each of 4 groups stratified by initial cardiac arrest rhythm (shockable versus nonshockable) and bystander resuscitation (presence versus absence), we calculated minimum prehospital resuscitation duration, defined as the length of resuscitation efforts in minutes required to achieve ≥99% sensitivity for the primary end point, favorable 30-day neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Prehospital resuscitation duration to achieve prehospital return of spontaneous circulation ranged from 1 to 60 minutes. Longer prehospital resuscitation duration reduced the likelihood of favorable neurological outcome (adjusted odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.838-0.844). Although the frequency of favorable neurological outcome was significantly different among the 4 groups, ranging from 20.0% (shockable/bystander resuscitation group) to 0.9% (nonshockable/bystander resuscitation group; Pprehospital resuscitation duration did not differ widely among the 4 groups (40 minutes in the shockable/bystander resuscitation group and the shockable/no bystander resuscitation group, 44 minutes in the nonshockable/bystander resuscitation group, and 45 minutes in the nonshockable/no bystander resuscitation group). On the basis of time intervals from the shockable arrest groups, prehospital resuscitation efforts should be continued for at least 40 minutes in all adults with

  6. Reform of the European Court of human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsilović Marijana

    2013-01-01

    The European Court of Human Rights is the crown in the international system for protecting human rights. In recent years the Court has become a victim of its own success. In response to growing backlog of individual complaints, the Council of Europe has, over the last five years, considered numerous proposals to restructure the European human rights regime and redesign the European Convention on Human Rights. The aim of this article is just to show the most important innovations introduced pr...

  7. European organization of telecom regulators and the impact on the pace of telecom innovations. Is EU modesty hampering innovation in telecom? Think global, act local.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, L.C.P.; Broos, Lesley Constantinus Petrus; Heldeweg, Michiel A.; Wessel, Ramses A.

    2009-01-01

    In a recent political discussion about the optimal division of power and competence between national and European regulatory bodies for telecommunication markets, the European Commission, the Parliament and the Council fundamentally disagreed about the necessity and most suitable arrangement (if

  8. Comparing Czech and Slovak Council Newspapers’ Policy and Regulation Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Waschkova Cisarova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Council newspapers form an integral part of European media systems and, as such, have been analysed for their important contribution to the development of local politics. However, despite a recognition of the media’s important democratic function in the transition countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE after the fall of socialism, the consideration of council newspapers’ political role in the Czech Republic and Slovakia have been largely absent in debates surrounding the development of regulatory frameworks until recently. Interestingly, debates regarding local government transparency emerged recently (2011 in the United Kingdom, resulting in the Code of recommended practice on local authority publicity, underscoring the importance of this issue. However, developments in the aforementioned situations demonstrate divergent outcomes in such considerations: the British addressed the causes, the Czechs addressed the symptoms, and the Slovaks have yet to make any headway. This article utilizes qualitative analysis of policy and regulation documents to compare the trajectories of media policy and regulation of council publicity in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, ultimately contrasting it with developments in the UK, suggesting possible future trajectories for the development of this type of regulation in the CEE countries.

  9. Teaching leadership in trauma resuscitation: Immediate feedback from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool shows long-term improvement in resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Shea C; Heffernan, Daithi S; Connolly, Michael D; Stephen, Andrew H; Leuckel, Stephanie N; Harrington, David T; Machan, Jason T; Adams, Charles A; Cioffi, William G

    2016-10-01

    Limited data exist on how to develop resident leadership and communication skills during actual trauma resuscitations. An evaluation tool was developed to grade senior resident performance as the team leader during full-trauma-team activations. Thirty actions that demonstrated the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies were graded on a Likert scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (exceptional). These actions were grouped by their respective core competencies on 5 × 7-inch index cards. In Phase 1, baseline performance scores were obtained. In Phase 2, trauma-focused communication in-services were conducted early in the academic year, and immediate, personalized feedback sessions were performed after resuscitations based on the evaluation tool. In Phase 3, residents received only evaluation-based feedback following resuscitations. In Phase 1 (October 2009 to April 2010), 27 evaluations were performed on 10 residents. In Phase 2 (April 2010 to October 2010), 28 evaluations were performed on nine residents. In Phase 3 (October 2010 to January 2012), 44 evaluations were performed on 13 residents. Total scores improved significantly between Phases 1 and 2 (p = 0.003) and remained elevated throughout Phase 3. When analyzing performance by competency, significant improvement between Phases 1 and 2 (p communication and professionalism" (p = 0.56). Statistically similar scores were observed between Phases 2 and 3 in all competencies with the exception of "medical knowledge," which showed ongoing significant improvement (p = 0.003). Directed resident feedback sessions utilizing data from a real-time, competency-based evaluation tool have allowed us to improve our residents' abilities to lead trauma resuscitations over a 30-month period. Given pressures to maximize clinical educational opportunities among work-hour constraints, such a model may help decrease the need for costly simulation-based training. Therapeutic study, level III.

  10. Part 3: Adult Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation: 2015 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Andrew H; Perkins, Gavin D; Berg, Robert A; Castren, Maaret; Considine, Julie; Escalante, Raffo; Gazmuri, Raul J; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Nation, Kevin J; Olasveengen, Theresa M; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sayre, Michael R; Sierra, Alfredo; Smyth, Michael A; Stanton, David; Vaillancourt, Christian

    2015-10-20

    resuscitation. We hope that resuscitation councils and other stakeholders will be able to translate this body of knowledge of international consensus statements to build their own effective resuscitation guidelines.

  11. Multicenter observational prehospital resuscitation on helicopter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, John B; Swartz, Michael D; DeSantis, Stacia M; Greene, Thomas J; Fox, Erin E; Stein, Deborah M; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Goodman, Michael; Schreiber, Martin A; Zielinski, Martin D; O'Keeffe, Terence; Inaba, Kenji; Tomasek, Jeffrey S; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Appana, Savitri N; Yi, Misung; Wade, Charles E

    2017-07-01

    Earlier use of in-hospital plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) has improved survival in trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Retrospective studies have associated improved early survival with prehospital blood product transfusion (PHT). We hypothesized that PHT of plasma and/or RBCs would result in improved survival after injury in patients transported by helicopter. Adult trauma patients transported by helicopter from the scene to nine Level 1 trauma centers were prospectively observed from January to November 2015. Five helicopter systems had plasma and/or RBCs, whereas the other four helicopter systems used only crystalloid resuscitation. All patients meeting predetermined high-risk criteria were analyzed. Patients receiving PHT were compared with patients not receiving PHT. Our primary analysis compared mortality at 3 hours, 24 hours, and 30 days, using logistic regression to adjust for confounders and site heterogeneity to model patients who were matched on propensity scores. Twenty-five thousand one hundred eighteen trauma patients were admitted, 2,341 (9%) were transported by helicopter, of which 1,058 (45%) met the highest-risk criteria. Five hundred eighty-five of 1,058 patients were flown on helicopters carrying blood products. In the systems with blood available, prehospital median systolic blood pressure (125 vs 128) and Glasgow Coma Scale (7 vs 14) was significantly lower, whereas median Injury Severity Score was significantly higher (21 vs 14). Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in the systems with blood products available, at 3 hours (8.4% vs 3.6%), 24 hours (12.6% vs 8.9%), and 30 days (19.3% vs 13.3%). Twenty-four percent of eligible patients received a PHT. A median of 1 unit of RBCs and plasma were transfused prehospital. Of patients receiving PHT, 24% received only plasma, 7% received only RBCs, and 69% received both. In the propensity score matching analysis (n = 109), PHT was not significantly associated with mortality

  12. The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages: A "Magnum Opus" or an Incomplete "Modus Vivendi?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldat-Jaffe, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent the European Union (EU) has the means to protect minority and regional languages in the EU, looking at the ways three different bodies of the EU, the European Parliament (EP), the Council of Europe (CoE) and the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (ECRML) differ in handling language…

  13. European communion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2013-01-01

    Political theory of European union, through an engagement between political concepts and theoretical understandings, provides a means of identifying the EU as a political object. It is argued that understanding the projects, processes and products of European union, based on ‘sharing’ or ‘communion......’, provides a better means of perceiving the EU as a political object rather than terms such as ‘integration’ or ‘co-operation’. The concept of ‘European communion’ is defined as the ‘subjective sharing of relationships’, understood as the extent to which individuals or groups believe themselves to be sharing...... relations (or not), and the consequences of these beliefs for European political projects, processes and products. By exploring European communion through an engagement with contemporary political theory, using very brief illustrations from the Treaty of Lisbon, the article also suggests that European...

  14. Rectors of European universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Several rectors of European universities visited CERN recently while in Geneva for a conference on coordination between their institutions. The visit began with a welcome by Roger Cashmore, CERN Director of Collider Programmes,and continued with tours of CMS, ALICE and the LHC magnet assembly hall. Photos 01, 02: The visitors in the ALICE assembly hall: (left to right) Dr. Raymond Werlen, Deputy Secretary-General of the Conference of Rectors of Swiss Universities; visit guide Prof. Alain Blondel, Department of Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics, University of Geneva; Prof. Adriano Pimpão, Rector of the University of Algarve, President of the Council of Rectors of Portuguese Universities; Prof. Jean-Pierre Finance, Conference of University Presidents, France; Prof. Jean-Paul Lehners, Vice-President of the Centre Universitaire, Luxemburg.

  15. Notification of upcoming AGU Council meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Billy

    2012-10-01

    The AGU Council will meet on Sunday, 2 December 2012, at the InterContinental Hotel in San Francisco, Calif. The meeting, which is open to all AGU members, will include discussions of AGU's new Grand Challenge Project (a project that will be introduced to members at the 2012 Fall Meeting), the proposed AGU scientific ethics policy, publishing strategies, future plans for honors and recognition, and leadership transition as new members join the Council. This year the Council experimented with a new approach to conducting business. By holding virtual meetings throughout the year, Council members have been able to act in a more timely manner and provide input on important membership and science issues on the Board of Directors' agenda. The Council Leadership Team—an elected subset of the Council—also experimented with a new approach, meeting every month to keep moving projects forward. This approach has increased communication and improved effectiveness in Council decision making.

  16. Nitroglycerin Attenuates Vasoconstriction of HBOC-201 during Hemorrhagic Shock Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Noack E. Nitric oxide (NO) formation from nitrovasodilators occurs independently of hemoglobin or non-heme iron . Eur 1 Pharmacol 1987;142:465-9...gen monitoring during hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation: a comparison or lactated Ringer’s solution, hypertonic saline dextran , and HBOC-201.1

  17. First resuscitation of critical burn patients: progresses and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M; García-de-Lorenzo, A; Asensio, M J

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the aim of the resuscitation of burn patients is to maintain end-organ perfusion with fluid intake as minimal as possible. To avoid excess intake, we can improve the estimation using computer methods. Parkland and Brooke are the commonly used formulas, and recently, a new, an easy formula is been used, i.e. the 'Rule of TEN'. Fluid resuscitation should be titrated to maintain the urine output of approximately 30-35 mL/h for an average-sized adult. The most commonly used fluids are crystalloid, but the phenomenon of creep flow has renewed interest in albumin. In severely burn patients, monitoring with transpulmonary thermodilution together with lactate, ScvO2 and intraabdominal pressures is a good option. Nurse-driven protocols or computer-based resuscitation algorithms reduce the dependence on clinical decision making and decrease fluid resuscitation intake. High-dose vitamin C, propranolol, the avoidance of excessive use of morphine and mechanical ventilation are other useful resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: biomedical and biophysical analysis (Chapter XXX)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordergraaf, G.J; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Scheffer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the human in caring for others is reflected in the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Superstition, divine intervention and finally science have contributed to the development of a technique which may allow any person to save another’s life. Fully 50% of the firs...

  19. Abstract: Magnitude and Outcome of Resuscitation Activities at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Magnitude and Outcome of Resuscitation Activities at Rwanda Military Hospital for the Period of April 2013-September 2013. ... Lack of compliance with drug administration guidelines was noted, particularly in the lack of initiating administration of specific drugs, despite the drug being available (59%). Conclusion

  20. Assessment of knowledge on neonatal resuscitation amongst health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Health providers, as the key personnel in the management of neonatal resuscitation, in this survey seem to have inadequate training and knowledge on this subject. Increasing the duration and quality of formal training should be considered during the pre-service medical education to ensure acceptable ...

  1. Rapid Resuscitation with Small Volume Hypertonic Saline Solution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data were entered into a computer data base and analysed. Results: Forty five patients were enrolled and resuscitated with 250 mls 7.5% HSS. Among the studied patients, 88.9% recovered from shock immediately after being infused with 7.5% HSS. Of patients with a single injury, 96.6% recovered from shock whereas ...

  2. Epidemiology of admissions in a pediatric resuscitation room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, Isabelle; Bounes, Vincent; Fédérici, Sonia; Laporte, Eve; Pajot, Christine; Micheau, Pascale; Grouteau, Erick

    2009-05-01

    Describe the epidemiology of a pediatric resuscitation room (PRR). A prospective study was performed in a pediatric emergency department (PED) from June 17, 2004 to March 19, 2006. Collected data were date and time of admission in the unit and, in the PRR, age and sex, geographical origin, mode of transportation, PED referral mode, diagnosis, evolution, and resuscitation techniques. Statistical analysis included a univariate analysis of hypothetical links between variables and their relation to the risk of death or transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit, then a multivariate analysis by logistical regression where the dependant variable was this risk. Three hundred sixty-one patients totaled 370 admissions. The male-female ratio was 1.3. Mean (SD) age was 5.5 (5.2) years. A quarter of the population was recommended for admission by a physician. Main causes were cardiocirculatory (32%), neurological (26%), respiratory (23%), and traumas (18%), and 17% were hospitalized in an intensive care unit and 4 died. Sixteen technical resuscitation procedures were performed. Children from 0 to 2 years old were more often admitted for cardiocirculatory insufficiency (P management, the teaching and knowledge of the different diagnosis admitted in the PRR and their resuscitation technical procedures warranty a serener approach of those stressful situations.

  3. National neonatal resuscitation training program in Nigeria (2008 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-08-05

    Aug 5, 2014 ... Nigeria were conducted eight months after the primary training, to evaluate the post-training neonatal resuscitation activities. Results: Over the period of study, 357 doctors and 370 .... During the training workshop, the participants had didactic lectures conducted in modules, as well as hands‑on skills.

  4. Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. ... Background: The time from birth to the first paediatric surgical consultation of neonates with gastroschisis is a predictor of mortality in developing countries. This is contrary to findings in the ...

  5. Voice advisory manikin versus instructor facilitated training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isbye, Dan L; Høiby, Pernilla; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2008-01-01

    for Resuscitation 2005) was assessed in a 2 min test before randomisation to either IF training in groups of 8 or individual VAM training. Immediately after training and after 3 months, CPR performance was assessed in identical 2 min tests. Laerdal PC Skill Reporting System 2.0 was used to collect data. To quantify...

  6. Cultural Resuscitation and Nation-Building: An Examination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Afam

    sentimental attachment to western values seem to be eroding Nigerian cultural values even in the post colonial ... are to yield results. Key words: Cultural Resuscitation, Nation-building, Nigeria and Ughievwen ..... Intelligence Assessment Report on Jeremi Clan, Sobo Sub-Tribe, 1932 compiled by. S.E. Johnson, CSO.

  7. Magnitude and Outcome of Resuscitation Activities at Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods. The purpose of this project was to analyze the frequency, obstacles, and outcomes of patient resus- citation following cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. A form was developed to record all actions taken during resuscitation including: response time, staff presence, and equipment and medications used. Collection of ...

  8. Knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation of clinicians at a South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess clinicians' knowledge about evaluating possible cardiac arrest patients and recognising cardiac arrest, to assess clinicians' knowledge about appropriate decisions and actions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to determine which advanced life support ...

  9. Outcome of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the demographic characteristics of patients who suffered cardiac arrest in our ICUs and to identify those factors influencing outcome after resuscitation following cardiac arrest. We reviewed the records of all patients who underwent CPR in the two ICUs at the Georg-August University ...

  10. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Araujo G. Ferreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%, in Medicine and Nursing (46%, and were surveys (72% with healthcare team members (67% as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c to develop a written institutional policy; d to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes.

  11. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  12. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resuscitation: Saving lives is the primary responsibility of secondary care services. Many patients arrive in hospitals when they are acutely ill and are hoping for rescue treatment that will save their lives, but also deal with the primary cause of the acute illness. It is therefore important that all staff involved in the care of such ...

  13. Alterations in Cerebral Blood Flow after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra Iordanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Greater than 50% of patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest have evidence of neurological disability. Numerous studies in children and adults, as well as in animal models have demonstrated that cerebral blood flow (CBF is impaired after cardiac arrest. Stages of cerebral perfusion post-resuscitation include early hyperemia, followed by hypoperfusion, and finally either resolution of normal blood flow or protracted hyperemia. At the level of the microcirculation the blood flow is heterogeneous, with areas of no flow, low flow, and increased flow. CBF directed therapies in animal models of cardiac arrest improved neurological outcome, and therefore, the alterations in CBF after cardiac arrest likely contribute to the development of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Current intensive care after cardiac arrest is centered upon maintaining systemic oxygenation, normal blood pressure values for age, maintaining general homeostasis, and avoiding hyperthermia. Assessment of CBF and oxygenation is not routinely performed after cardiac arrest. Currently available and underutilized techniques to assess cerebral perfusion include transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging. Limited clinical studies established the role of CBF and oxygenation monitoring in prognostication after cardiac arrest and few studies suggest that guiding critical care post-resuscitation to mean arterial pressures above the minimal autoregulatory range might improve outcome. Important knowledge gaps thus remain in cerebral monitoring and CBF and oxygen goal-directed therapies post-resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

  14. Page 1 SAMJFoRUM -~----- BOOKS RESUSCITATION OF BABIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This little paperback is meant to be used as a template for the development of locally agreed policies for resuscitation of babies at birth, and it should be a real help to anyone concerned with that. Much of the content could be incorporated verbatim. It starts with a brief ctiscussion of general principles and the physiology of.

  15. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  16. A Wireless Text Messaging System Improves Communication for Neonatal Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Driscoll, Colleen A; Schub, Jamie A; Pollard, Kristi; El-Metwally, Dina

    Handoffs for neonatal resuscitation involve communicating critical delivery information (CDI). The authors sought to achieve ≥95% communication of CDI during resuscitation team requests. CDI included name of caller, urgency of request, location of delivery, gestation of fetus, status of amniotic fluid, and indication for presence of the resuscitation team. Three interventions were implemented: verbal scripted handoff, Spök text messaging, and Engage text messaging. Percentages of CDI communications were analyzed using statistical process control. Following implementation of Engage, the communication of all CDI, except for indication, was ≥95%; communication of indication occurred 93% of the time. Control limits for most CDI were narrower with Engage, indicating greater reliability of communication compared to the verbal handoff and Spök. Delayed resuscitation team arrival, a countermeasure, was not higher with text messaging compared to verbal handoff ( P = 1.00). Text messaging improved communication during high-risk deliveries, and it may represent an effective tool for other delivery centers.

  17. Management of foetal asphyxia by intrauterine foetal resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Velayudhareddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of foetal distress is a subject of gynaecological interest, but an anaesthesiologist should know about resuscitation, because he should be able to treat the patient, whenever he is directly involved in managing the parturient patient during labour analgesia and before an emergency operative delivery. Progressive asphyxia is known as foetal distress; the foetus does not breathe directly from the atmosphere, but depends on maternal circulation for its oxygen requirement. The oxygen delivery to the foetus depends on the placental (maternal side, placental transfer and foetal circulation. Oxygen transport to the foetus is reduced physiologically during uterine contractions in labour. Significant impairment of oxygen transport to the foetus, either temporary or permanent may cause foetal distress, resulting in progressive hypoxia and acidosis. Intrauterine foetal resuscitation comprises of applying measures to a mother in active labour, with the intention of improving oxygen delivery to the distressed foetus to the base line, if the placenta is functioning normally. These measures include left lateral recumbent position, high flow oxygen administration, tocolysis to reduce uterine contractions, rapid intravenous fluid administration, vasopressors for correction of maternal hypotension and amnioinfusion for improving uterine blood flow. Intrauterine Foetal Resuscitation measures are easy to perform and do not require extensive resources, but the results are encouraging in improving the foetal well-being. The anaesthesiologist plays a major role in the application of intrauterine foetal resuscitation measures.

  18. Starch safety in resuscitation – when will we ever learn?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    systematic review exist.[19] High-quality reviews are reliable if the underlying trials are unbiased, and if adequate patient numbers have accrued. ... sepsis, and may increase the need for dialysis in resuscitation. With these caveats, and in the absence of adequately powered studies to confirm safety in other situations, it is ...

  19. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  20. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  1. Weer nieuwe richtlijnen voor reanimatie : onderbouwing, kosten en mogelijke verwarring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, J H J M; Monteban-Kooistra, W E; Tulleken, J E; Ligtenberg, J J M; Zijlstra, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The last revision of the Dutch resuscitation guidelines, a translation of the European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2005, is based on the recommendations of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). The previous Dutch guidelines were issued in 2002. Most changes are based on

  2. 75 FR 20832 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Generate Electricity Council Business: Finance Report by Committee Chairman Joe Hopf Secretary's Report by... Roger Bezdek on Green Transmission: An Opportunity for Clean Coal Technologies Other Business Adjourn...

  3. Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Lisa Anne; Mastoras, George; Rahimpour, Mitra; Sohmer, Benjamin; Weitzman, Brian; Cwinn, A Adam; Hobin, Tara; Parush, Avi

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to

  4. 78 FR 45182 - South Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Radisson Airport Hotel, 2081 Post Road, Warwick, RI 02886; telephone: (401) 739-3000. Council address... required to purchase all species managed by the SAFMC and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council...

  5. More efficient policy of energy and regional electricity supply by the directive 96/92/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 10 december 1996 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity; Effizientere Energiepolitik und regionale Elektrizitaetsversorgung durch die EU-Elektrizitaetsrichtlinie 1996. Politikfeldanalyse der europaeischen, deutschen und bayerischen Energiepolitik und Elektrizitaetswirtschaft im Zusammenhang mit der Entstehung und Umsetzung der EU-Richtlinie 96 sowie der Veraenderung der Effizienz in der traditionellen Elektrizitaetsversorgung unter supranationalem EU-Einfluss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtner, Franz

    2006-07-01

    The German energy policy and its main addressees, the regional electricity companies (EVU), are going through a critical phase at the beginning of the 21st century. The increasing complexity and inconsistency of energy issues have, in Germany and in other countries, led to decisions which again have produced extensive, but not yet foreseeable developments, as, for example, the liberalisation of the electricity and gas market within the European Union. The first objective of this paper is an empirical analysis of the regional electricity supply industry in Germany and particularly in Bavaria in so far as it is relevant for energy politics, as well as an introduction to the German energy policy up to approximately the time when the Directive 96/92/EC of the European Parliament and the Council of 19 December 1996 concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity, was passed. Moreover, findings for the definition of energy efficiency in electricity supply and of the policy analysis are outlined. The second objective of this paper is the analysis and evaluation of the European Union energy policy, in particular of the Directive 96/92/EC, its formation and how it has been put into action by the German and Bavarian electricity supply industry. Energy efficiency of the electricity supply serves as a yardstick, the research method employed is the policy analysis. The main part of this paper, by comparing objectives to effects and by evaluating interviews with energy experts, examines the questions if, in what ways and to what extent the Directive 96/92/EC has led to an increase of energy efficiency in the narrow as well as in the boarder sense, within the EU, Germany and Bavaria. Additionally, three hypotheses are tested: firstly the significance of energy efficiency (in the narrow sense), secondly the alignment of European energy supply, and thirdly the importance of supranational control through EU politics. The results are presented in tabular form, and the

  6. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  7. Selective Europeanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoch Jovanovic, Tamara; Lynggaard, Kennet

    2014-01-01

    political contexts at the European level. We further show how the “translation” of international norms to a domestic context has worked to reinforce the original institutional setup, dating back to the mid-1950s. The translation of European-level minority policy developed in the 1990s and 2000s works most...

  8. Resuscitation and post resuscitation care of the very old after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is worthwhile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. As comorbidity and frailty increase with age; ethical dilemmas may arise when OHCA occur in the very old. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate mortality, neurological outcome and post resuscitation care...

  9. 77 FR 44216 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ....m.--The Council will convene. 1 p.m. until 1:15 p.m.--Swearing in of new and reappointed Council...). The Council will swear in new and reappointed Council members and elect Council Officers. The Council...

  10. 75 FR 80039 - The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY... Manufacturing Council will hold a meeting to discuss competitiveness, clean energy, export/import issues and workforce development issues affecting the U.S. manufacturing sector and to receive briefings from the...

  11. 75 FR 60411 - The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY... Manufacturing Council will hold a meeting to discuss and identify the priority issues affecting the U.S. manufacturing industry, which may include increasing exports, supply chain and access to credit, among others...

  12. 77 FR 26743 - The Manufacturing Council: Work Session of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Work Session of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY...: This notice sets forth the schedule and agenda for an open work session of the Manufacturing Council... Freescale Austin Technology and Manufacturing Center, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas. All guests...

  13. 75 FR 10216 - The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ...: 2010-4797] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY: International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of an open meeting. SUMMARY: The Manufacturing Council will hold a meeting to discuss a...

  14. 76 FR 57714 - The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... International Trade Administration The Manufacturing Council: Meeting of the Manufacturing Council AGENCY... Manufacturing Council will hold a meeting to hear updates from the Department of Commerce in addition to the... agreements and other issues affecting the U.S. manufacturing sector and to determine future areas of focus...

  15. 1994 expected to be year of decision for European Super Collider.

    CERN Document Server

    Sweet, William N

    1994-01-01

    Plans to build Europe's counterpart to the US' Superconducting Super Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, may push through when the CERN Council meets on Apr 15, 1994. The European scientific community is optimistic that the plan will be approved.

  16. An important day for European science

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Today is an important day for the future of European science. It is the day on which CERN’s relationship with the European Union reaches maturity. Ever since the early 1950s, CERN and the European project have grown together. CERN was a child of the European movement: the first discussions at Denis de Rougemont’s European Cultural Conference in Lausanne in 1949 led directly to the foundation of CERN in 1954. More recently, the European Union has become an Observer at the CERN Council, links between CERN and the EU have strengthened as Europe has pursued the goal of creating a European Research Area, and CERN has benefited from European support for projects as varied as Grid computing and future accelerator R&D, not forgetting, of course, the numerous Marie Curie fellows whose careers have received a boost thanks to European funds. Today, that collaboration goes one step further with the signature of a Memorandum of Understanding between CERN and the European C...

  17. Resuscitation on television: realistic or ridiculous? A quantitative observational analysis of the portrayal of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in television medical drama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan; Willoughby, Hannah

    2009-11-01

    Patients' preferences for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) relate to their perception about the likelihood of success of the procedure. There is evidence that the lay public largely base their perceptions about CPR on their experience of the portrayal of CPR in the media. The medical profession has generally been critical of the portrayal of CPR on medical drama programmes although there is no recent evidence to support such views. To compare the patient characteristics, cause and success rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on medical television drama with published resuscitation statistics. Observational study. 88 episodes of television medical drama were reviewed (26 episodes of Casualty, Casualty, 25 episodes of Holby City, 23 episodes of Grey's Anatomy and 14 episodes of ER) screened between July 2008 and April 2009. The patient's age and sex, medical history, presumed cause of arrest, use of CPR and immediate and long term survival rate were recorded. Immediate survival and survival to discharge following CPR. There were a total of 76 cardio-respiratory arrests and 70 resuscitation attempts in the episodes reviewed. The immediate success rate (46%) did not differ significantly from published real life figures (p=0.48). The resuscitation process appeared to follow current guidelines. Survival (or not) to discharge was rarely shown. The average age of patients was 36 years and contrary to reality there was not an age related difference in likely success of CPR in patients less than 65 compared with those 65 and over (p=0.72). The most common cause of cardiac arrest was trauma with only a minor proportion of arrests due to cardio-respiratory causes such as myocardial infarction. Whilst the immediate success rate of CPR in medical television drama does not significantly differ from reality the lack of depiction of poorer medium to long term outcomes may give a falsely high expectation to the lay public. Equally the lay public may perceive that the

  18. 75 FR 22423 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATES: The meeting will be... announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting. Background The Council...

  19. 78 FR 25463 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010, the Council provides...

  20. 78 FR 73205 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010, the Council provides...

  1. 18 CFR 701.53 - Council decisions by Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Members. 701.53 Section 701.53 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.53 Council decisions by Members. Council decisions by Members may... is deemed necessary. Issues raised at Council meetings shall be decided by majority vote of Members...

  2. Predicting medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation: A cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Meng-Kuan; Aritejo, Bayu Aji; Tang, Jing-Shia; Chen, Chien-Liang; Chuang, Chia-Chang

    2017-05-01

    Family presence during resuscitation is an emerging trend, yet it remains controversial, even in countries with relatively high acceptance of family presence during resuscitation among medical professionals. Family presence during resuscitation is not common in many countries, and medical professionals in these regions are unfamiliar with family presence during resuscitation. Therefore, this study predicted the medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation by applying the theory of planned behaviour. A cross-sectional survey. A single medical centre in southern Taiwan. Medical staffs including physicians and nurses in a single medical centre (n=714). A questionnaire was constructed to measure the theory of planned behaviour constructs of attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control, and behavioural intentions as well as the awareness of family presence during resuscitation and demographics. In total, 950 questionnaires were distributed to doctors and nurses in a medical centre. Among the 714 valid questionnaires, only 11 participants were aware of any association in Taiwan that promotes family presence during resuscitation; 94.7% replied that they were unsure (30.4%) or that their unit did not have a family presence during resuscitation policy (74.8%). Regression analysis was performed to predict medical professionals' intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. The results indicated that only positive attitudes and subjective norms regarding family presence during resuscitation and clinical tenure could predict the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation. Because Family presence during resuscitation practice is not common in Taiwan and only 26.19% of the participants agreed to both items measuring the intention to allow family presence during resuscitation, we recommend the implementation of a family presence during resuscitation education program that will enhance the positive beliefs

  3. Nursing and Midwifery Council revalidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Rebecca

    2015-10-14

    All UK nurses and midwives will be required to perform revalidation as part of their registration process, from April 2016. This entails a pre-determined number of practice hours and study time, reflection on practice, obtaining feedback on individual performance and confirmation of these achievements by a third party source. This article describes the actions nurses and midwives can take to fulfil their revalidation requirements. It also discusses how to prepare for the forthcoming changes and what the nurse and midwife need to consider to perform successful revalidation. By completing the time out activities included with this article, reflecting on your practice and submitting your work for continuing professional development credits, you will be working towards creating a revalidation portfolio, in accordance with Nursing and Midwifery Council guidelines.

  4. The Council of Psychological Advisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2016-01-01

    Findings in behavioral science, including psychology, have influenced policies and reforms in many nations. Choice architecture can affect outcomes even if material incentives are not involved. In some contexts, default rules, simplification, and social norms have had even larger effects than significant economic incentives. Psychological research is helping to inform initiatives in savings, finance, highway safety, consumer protection, energy, climate change, obesity, education, poverty, development, crime, corruption, health, and the environment. No nation has yet created a council of psychological advisers, but the role of behavioral research in policy domains is likely to grow in the coming years, especially in light of the mounting interest in promoting ease and simplification ("navigability"); in increasing effectiveness, economic growth, and competitiveness; and in providing low-cost, choice-preserving approaches.

  5. Health council report 'Antimicrobial growth promoters'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goettsch, W; Degener, JE

    1999-01-01

    The Health Council of the Netherlands has issued a report on the risk of development of resistance among bacteria as result of the use of antibiotics as growth promotors in livestock farming. The committee appointed by the Health Council conclude that the use of antimicrobial growth promotors

  6. 77 FR 2714 - National Petroleum Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Petroleum Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Renewal.... The Council will provide advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy on matters relating to...

  7. 76 FR 74049 - National Coal Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Coal Council AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of renewal... Council will provide advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy on general policy matters...

  8. 76 FR 43651 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in Washington DC August 16-17, 2011. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will be held...

  9. 75 FR 46903 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in Washington, DC September 8-9, 2010. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will be held...

  10. 77 FR 26734 - Forestry Research Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Forest Service Forestry Research Advisory Council AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forestry Research Advisory Council will meet in Washington, DC, on June 6-7, 2012. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss emerging issues in forestry research. DATES: The meeting will be held...

  11. Coordinating Council. Ninth Meeting: Total Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the 9th meeting of the STI Coordinating Council. The council listened to the speakers' understanding of Total Quality Management (TQM) principles and heard stories of successful applications of these principles. Definitions of quality stated were focused on customer satisfaction. Reports presented by the speakers are also included.

  12. 77 FR 40400 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of... location, date, time, and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The...

  13. 77 FR 61466 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of... location, date, time, and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The...

  14. 76 FR 62133 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of... location, date, time, and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The...

  15. 76 FR 37873 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of... location, date, time, ] and agenda for the next meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC...

  16. The Agricultural Development Council. A History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Russell; Locke, Virginia O.

    This history of the Agriculture Development Council (ADC) consists of eight chapters and four appendices. Chapter 1 traces the early years of the ADC, from its inception in 1953 to 1957, the year of the retirement of the council's first director, J. Lossing Buck. The chapter covers the role of John D. Rockefeller, III, the incorporation of the…

  17. State Children's Cabinets and Councils: 2008 Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Elizabeth; Ravindranath, Nalini; Folliard, June

    2008-01-01

    This paper serves as the introduction to the State Children's Cabinets and Councils Series, a set of reports intended to capture and organize the decisions and experiences of more than 20 children's cabinets and councils and present them against an emerging set of expectations about what the public and policy makers could and should expect from…

  18. 75 FR 5629 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 18, 2010, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST; Friday, February 19, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., EST. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20456, James E...

  19. 76 FR 4133 - NASA Advisory Council; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... NASA Advisory Council. DATES: Thursday, February 10, 2011, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Local Time. Friday, February 11, 2011, 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, 300 E Street, SW., Room 9H40...

  20. 78 FR 44187 - National Women's Business Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION National Women's Business Council ACTION: Notice of open Federal advisory committee meeting... meeting of the National Women's Business Council (NWBC). The meeting will be open to the public. ] DATES...

  1. Science Granting Councils Initiative: Research uptake | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Science Granting Councils Initiative in sub-Saharan Africa aims to strengthen the capacities of science granting councils in sub-Saharan Africa to support research and evidence-based policies that contribute to economic and social development. The initiative's activities include training, regional exchanges and forums, ...

  2. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shere-Wolfe Roger F

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care of the polytrauma patient does not end in the operating room or resuscitation bay. The patient presenting to the intensive care unit following initial resuscitation and damage control surgery may be far from stable with ongoing hemorrhage, resuscitation needs, and injuries still requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust the ongoing resuscitative needs of the patient and address potential complications. In this review, we address ongoing resuscitation in the intensive care unit along with potential complications in the trauma patient after initial resuscitation. Complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome, transfusion related patterns of acute lung injury and metabolic consequences subsequent to post-trauma resuscitation are presented. Methods A non-systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to May 2012. Results and conclusion Polytrauma patients with severe shock from hemorrhage and massive tissue injury present major challenges for management and resuscitation in the intensive care setting. Many of the current recommendations for “damage control resuscitation” including the use of fixed ratios in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy remain controversial. A lack of large, randomized, controlled trials leaves most recommendations at the level of consensus, expert opinion. Ongoing trials and improvements in monitoring and resuscitation technologies will further influence how we manage these complex and challenging patients.

  3. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Care of the polytrauma patient does not end in the operating room or resuscitation bay. The patient presenting to the intensive care unit following initial resuscitation and damage control surgery may be far from stable with ongoing hemorrhage, resuscitation needs, and injuries still requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust the ongoing resuscitative needs of the patient and address potential complications. In this review, we address ongoing resuscitation in the intensive care unit along with potential complications in the trauma patient after initial resuscitation. Complications such as abdominal compartment syndrome, transfusion related patterns of acute lung injury and metabolic consequences subsequent to post-trauma resuscitation are presented. Methods A non-systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to May 2012. Results and conclusion Polytrauma patients with severe shock from hemorrhage and massive tissue injury present major challenges for management and resuscitation in the intensive care setting. Many of the current recommendations for “damage control resuscitation” including the use of fixed ratios in the treatment of trauma induced coagulopathy remain controversial. A lack of large, randomized, controlled trials leaves most recommendations at the level of consensus, expert opinion. Ongoing trials and improvements in monitoring and resuscitation technologies will further influence how we manage these complex and challenging patients. PMID:22989116

  4. European Whiteness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette

    2008-01-01

    Born out of the United States’ (U.S.) history of slavery and segregation and intertwined with gender studies and feminism, the field of critical whiteness studies does not fit easily into a European setting and the particular historical context that entails. In order for a field of European...... critical whiteness studies to emerge, its relation to the U.S. theoretical framework, as well as the particularities of the European context need to be taken into account.. The article makes a call for a multi-layered approach to take over from the identity politics so often employed in the fields of U...

  5. ESO Council Decides to Continue VLT Project at Paranal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The Council [1] of the European Southern Observatory has met in extraordinary session at the ESO Headquarters in Garching near Munich on August 8 and 9, 1994. The main agenda items were concerned with the recent developments around ESO's relations with the host state, the Republic of Chile, as well as the status of the organisation's main project, the 16-metre equivalent Very Large Telescope (VLT) which will become the world's largest optical telescope. Council had decided to hold this special meeting [2] because of various uncertainties that have arisen in connection with the implementation of the VLT Project at Cerro Paranal, approx. 130 kilometres south of Antofagasta, capital of the II Region in Chile. Following continued consultations at different levels within the ESO member states and after careful consideration of all aspects of the current situation - including various supportive actions by the Chilean Government as well as the incessive attacks against this international organisation from certain sides reported in the media in that country - Council took the important decision to continue the construction of the VLT Observatory at Paranal, while at the same time requesting the ESO Management to pursue the ongoing studies of alternative solutions. THE COUNCIL DECISIONS In particular, the ESO Council took note of recent positive developments which have occurred since the May 1994 round of discussions with the Chilean authorities in Santiago. The confirmation of ESO's immunities as an International Organization in Chile, contained in a number of important statements and documents, is considered a significant step by the Chilean Government to insure to ESO the unhindered erection and later operation of the VLT on Paranal. Under these circumstances and in order to maintain progress on the VLT project, the ESO Council authorized the ESO Management to continue the on-site work at Paranal. Council also took note of the desire expressed by the Chilean Government

  6. Quality councils as health system performance and accountability mechanisms: the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrow, Mark; Langer, Bernard; Angus, Helen; Sullivan, Terrence

    2006-01-01

    Recent national and provincial reviews on the status of healthcare in Canada have recommended the establishment of quality councils to guide quality improvement efforts. The emergence of quality councils, such as the Health Quality Council of Alberta, the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council, the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario and the Health Council of Canada, reflect new but largely unscrutinized models for improving quality of care. We discuss the varying mandates of these new quality councils, their fit with evolving governance and accountability structures and the credibility and legitimacy of their role as perceived by other health system organizations. To further illustrate these issues, we present insiders' perspectives on the Cancer Quality Council of Ontario's activities over its first three years, including the initial agenda, critical success factors and the nature of evolving relationships with other organizations in Ontario's healthcare system. While current Canadian quality councils represent an eclectic mix of methods for achieving improvements in quality of care, it is not entirely clear how quality councils will stimulate sustained and significant improvements in quality of care where other models have failed. However, these new Canadian quality councils represent natural experiments in motion from which much needs to be learned.

  7. 77 FR 19647 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Management Council (Council) is hosting the Council Coordination Committee (CCC) meeting on Tuesday May 1... Requests. b. Technology--Virtual Public Hearings/Scoping versus Travel. c. Professional Liability. d. Other...

  8. [Diagnostic and resuscitative aspects of pediatric nerve agent intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Abraham, Ron; Hadad, Eran; Sokolov, Tali; Weinbroum, Avi

    2002-08-01

    Chemical warfare and the use of nerve agents are still a threat to the civilian population in the 21st century. Modern history of chemical warfare began in 1915 in the battle of Ypres when German troops used chlorine against the French army. Since then, the arsenal of such agents has included asphyxiates, burn-causing and nerve paralytic agents. Nerve gases are considered the most dangerous of all chemical weapons with little known about the treatment of the civilian population especially children. Management of the civilian population injured by these agents may be a tremendous challenge, especially in children, due to lack of previous data regarding pediatric resuscitation. This review emphasizes resuscitation issues of the child who suffers from multiple trauma and nerve agent poisoning, mainly based on data from reports concerning episodic civilian exposure to organophosphates.

  9. Hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Oliveri, Roberto S; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2012-01-01

    Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists although recently, the concept of hemostatic resuscitation, i.e., providing large amount of blood products to critically injured patients in an im......Continued hemorrhage remains a major contributor of mortality in massively transfused patients and controversy regarding the optimal management exists although recently, the concept of hemostatic resuscitation, i.e., providing large amount of blood products to critically injured patients...... in an immediate and sustained manner as part of an early massive transfusion protocol has been introduced. The aim of the present review was to investigate the potential effect on survival of proactive administration of plasma and/or platelets (PLT) in trauma patients with massive bleeding....

  10. Functional systemic approach to the resuscitation and intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadchikov D.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional systemic approach to the resuscitation and intensive care may be considered as a direct correlation between analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, and, in general, between the formal and dialectical categories. The realization of this system should be started with the interaction and formation of the final beneficial result. Therefore the experience assessment on the basis of functional systematic approach will enable us to formulate more precisely the subject and methods of resuscitation from the philosophical point of view taking into consideration the interaction of the human life integrity with death phenomenon as fixed in ontogenesis and will allow to methodically justify the distinguishing of functional systems and standard processes both in sanogenesis and thanatogenesis.

  11. Cardiorespiratory monitoring during neonatal resuscitation for direct feedback and audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Johannes van Vonderen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, colour and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can be used directly to guide care, but can also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this review we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation.

  12. Ruptured subcapsular liver haematoma following mechanically-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, John R; Freundlich, Robert Edward; Abir, Mahshid

    2016-02-02

    A 64-year-old man with a history of ascending aortic surgery and pulmonary embolus presented with shortness of breath. He rapidly decompensated, prompting intubation, after which he lost pulses. Manual resuscitation was initiated immediately, with subsequent use of a LUCAS-2 mechanical compression device. The patient was given bolus thrombolytic therapy and regained pulses after 7 min of CPR. Compressions were reinitiated with the LUCAS-2 twice more during resuscitation over the subsequent hour for brief episodes of PEA. After confirmation of massive pulmonary embolism on CT, the patient underwent interventional radiology-guided ultrasonic catheter placement with local thrombolytic therapy and experienced immediate improvement in oxygenation. He later developed abdominal compartment syndrome, despite cessation of thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy. Bedside exploratory abdominal laparotomy revealed a ruptured subcapsular haematoma of the liver. The patient's haemodynamics improved following surgery and he was extubated 11 days postarrest with intact neurological function. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Contingent leadership and effectiveness of trauma resuscitation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seokhwa; Faraj, Samer; Sims, Henry P

    2005-11-01

    This research investigated leadership and effectiveness of teams operating in a high-velocity environment, specifically trauma resuscitation teams. On the basis of the literature and their own ethnographic work, the authors proposed and tested a contingency model in which the influence of leadership on team effectiveness during trauma resuscitation differs according to the situation. Results indicated that empowering leadership was more effective when trauma severity was low and when team experience was high. Directive leadership was more effective when trauma severity was high or when the team was inexperienced. Findings also suggested that an empowering leader provided more learning opportunities than did a directive leader. The major contribution of this article is the linkage of leadership to team effectiveness, as moderated by relatively specific situational contingencies. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Correlations between technical skills and behavioral skills in simulated neonatal resuscitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T; Leonard, D; Sierocka-Castaneda, A; Chan, D; Thompson, M

    2014-10-01

    Neonatal resuscitation requires both technical and behavioral skills. Key behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation have been identified by the Neonatal Resuscitation Program. Correlations and interactions between technical skills and behavioral skills in neonatal resuscitation were investigated. Behavioral skills were evaluated via blinded video review of 45 simulated neonatal resuscitations using a validated assessment tool. These were statistically correlated with previously obtained technical skill performance data. Technical skills and behavioral skills were strongly correlated (ρ=0.48; P=0.001). The strongest correlations were seen in distribution of workload (ρ=0.60; P=0.01), utilization of information (ρ=0.55; P=0.03) and utilization of resources (ρ=0.61; P=0.01). Teams with superior behavioral skills also demonstrated superior technical skills, and vice versa. Technical and behavioral skills were highly correlated during simulated neonatal resuscitations. Individual behavioral skill correlations are likely dependent on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

  15. Midwives' Experiences, Education, and Support Needs Regarding Basic Newborn Resuscitation in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Manal; Alnuaimi, Karimeh; Mohammad, Khitam; Creedy, Debra; Hamadneh, Shereen

    2016-06-01

    Newborns who are compromised at birth require rapid attention to stabilize their respiration attempts. Lack of knowledge regarding basic newborn resuscitation is a contributing factor to poor newborn health outcomes and increased mortality. The purpose of this study was to explore Jordanian midwives' experiences, education, and support needs to competently perform basic newborn resuscitation. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to analyze a convenience sample of 20 midwives. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants discussed their experiences of basic newborn resuscitation including knowledge, skills, and barriers and suggested solutions to improve practice. Four themes were revealed: lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints, inadequate teamwork, and educational needs. The midwives perceived that their ability to perform newborn resuscitation was hindered by lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints (such as lack of equipment), and poor co-ordination and communication among team members. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Fluid Resuscitation and Massive Transfusion Protocol in Pediatric Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanović Vesna; Budić Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children due to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock and its consequences, anemia and hypovolemia, decrease oxygen delivery, due to which appropriate transfusion and volume resuscitation are critical. Guidelines for massive transfusion, in the pediatric trauma, have not been defined yet. Current data indicate that early identification of coagulopathy and its treatment with RBSs, plasma and platelets in a 1:1:1 unit ra...

  17. Human granuloma in vitro model, for TB dormancy and resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Kapoor

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is responsible for death of nearly two million people in the world annually. Upon infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb causes formation of granuloma where the pathogen goes into dormant state and can live for decades before resuscitation to develop active disease when the immune system of the host is weakened and/or suppressed. In an attempt to better understand host-pathogen interactions, several groups have been developing in vitro models of human tuberculosis granuloma. However, to date, an in vitro granuloma model in which Mtb goes into dormancy and can subsequently resuscitate under conditions that mimic weakening of the immune system has not been reported. We describe the development of a biomimetic in vitro model of human tuberculosis granuloma using human primary leukocytes, in which the Mtb exhibited characteristics of dormant mycobacteria as demonstrated by (1 loss of acid-fastness, (2 accumulation of lipid bodies (3 development of rifampicin-tolerance and (4 gene expression changes. Further, when these micro granulomas were treated with immunosuppressant anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibodies (anti-TNFα mAbs, resuscitation of Mtb was observed as has been found in humans. In this human in vitro granuloma model triacylglycerol synthase 1deletion mutant (Δtgs1 with impaired ability to accumulate triacylglycerides (TG, but not the complemented mutant, could not go into dormancy. Deletion mutant of lipY, with compromised ability to mobilize the stored TG, but not the complemented mutant, was unable to come out of dormancy upon treatment with anti-TNFα mAbs. In conclusion, we have developed an in vitro human tuberculosis granuloma model that largely exhibits functional features of dormancy and resuscitation observed in human tuberculosis.

  18. An institutionwide approach to redesigning management of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighthall, Geoffrey K; Mayette, Michael; Harrison, T Kyle

    2013-04-01

    Despite widespread training in basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) among hospital personnel, the likelihood of survival from in-hospital cardiac arrests remains low. In 2006 a university-affiliated tertiary medical center initiated a cardiopulmonary (CPR) resuscitation redesign project. REDESIGNING THE HOSPITAL'S RESUSCITATION SYSTEM: The CPR Committee developed the interventions on the basis of a large-scale view of the process of delivering BLS and ACLS, identification of key decision nodes and actions, and compartmentalization of specific functions. It was proposed that arrest management follow a steady progression in a two-layer scheme from BLS to ACLS. Handouts describing team structure and specific roles were given to all code team providers and house staff at the start of their month-long rotations. To further increase role clarity and team organization, daily morning and evening meetings of the arrest team were instituted. Site-specific BLS training, on-site ACLS refresher training, and defibrillator training were initiated. Project elements also included use of unannounced mock codes to provide system oversight; preparation and distribution of cognitive aids (printed algorithms, dosing guides, and other checklists to ensure compliance with ACLS protocols), identification of patients who may be unstable or a source of concern, event review and analysis of arrests and other critical events, and a CPR website. A mature hospital-based resuscitation system should include definition of arrest trends and resuscitation needs, development of local methods for approaching the arresting patient, an emphasis on prevention, establishment of training programs tailored to meet specific hospital needs, system examination and oversight, and administrative processes that maximize interaction between all components.

  19. Development of a leadership skills workshop in paediatric advanced resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilfoyle, Elaine; Gottesman, Ronald; Razack, Saleem

    2007-11-01

    Paediatric residency programs rarely prepare trainees to assume resuscitation team leadership roles despite the recognized need for these skills by specialty accreditation organizations. We conducted a needs-assessment survey of all residents in the McGill Pediatric Residency Program, which demonstrated that most residents had minimal or no experience at leading resuscitation events and felt unprepared to assume this role in the future. We developed an educational intervention (workshop) and evaluated immediate and long term learning outcomes in order to determine whether residents could acquire and retain team leadership skills in pediatric advanced resuscitation. Fifteen paediatric residents participated in a workshop that we developed to fulfill the learning needs highlighted with the needs assessment, as well as the Objectives of Training in Pediatrics from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. It consisted of a plenary session followed by 2 simulated resuscitation scenarios. Team performance was evaluated by checklist. Residents were evaluated again 6 months later without prior interactive lecture. Learning was also assessed by self-reported retrospective pre/post questionnaire. Checklist score (assigning roles, limitations of team, communication, overall team atmosphere) expressed as % correct: initial workshop scenario 1 vs. scenario 2 (63 vs. 82 p learning in knowledge of tasks, impact and components of communication, avoidance of fixation errors and overall leadership performance (p leadership skills following an educational intervention as shown by both observational checklist scores and self-reported survey. The six-month follow-up evaluation demonstrated skill retention beyond the initial intervention. A control group suggested that these results were due to completion of the first workshop.

  20. Implementation and execution of military forward resuscitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Timothy J; Nadler, Roy; Badloe, John; Butler, Frank K; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-05-01

    Through necessity, military medicine has been the driver of medical innovation throughout history. The battlefield presents challenges, such as the requirement to provide care while under threat, resource limitation, and prolonged evacuation times, which must be overcome to improve casualty survival. Focus must also be placed on identifying the causes, and timing, of death within the battlefield. By doing so, military medical doctrine can be shaped, appropriate goals set, new concepts adopted, and relevant technologies investigated and implemented. The majority of battlefield casualties still die in the prehospital environment, before reaching a medical treatment facility, and hemorrhage remains the leading cause of potentially survivable death. Many countries have adopted policies that push damage control resuscitation forward into the prehospital setting, while understanding the need for timely medical evacuation. Although these policies vary according to country, the majority share many common principles. These include the need for early catastrophic hemorrhage control at point-of-wounding, judicious use of fluid resuscitation, use of blood products as far forward as possible, and early evacuation to a surgical facility. Some countries place medical providers with the ability, and resources, for advanced resuscitation with the forward fighting units (perhaps at company level), whereas others have established en route resuscitation capabilities. If we are to continue to improve battlefield casualty survival, we must continue to work together and learn from each other. We must also carry on working alongside our civilian colleagues so that the benefits of translational experience are not lost. This review describes several countries current military approaches to prehospital trauma care. These approaches, refined through a decade of experience, merit consideration for integration into civilian prehospital care practice.

  1. Variable Saline Concentrations for Initial Resuscitation Following Polytrauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 22 Feb 2017 2. REPORT TYPE Final Technical Report...cerebral edema. In addition, 3% saline may be the optimal crystalloid fluid to resuscitate in the setting of hypotension after head injury, as it limits...in the setting of hypotension after head injury, as it limits ongoing inflammation, cerebral edema, and neurologic injury while preserving blood

  2. Human granuloma in vitro model, for TB dormancy and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Nidhi; Pawar, Santosh; Sirakova, Tatiana D; Deb, Chirajyoti; Warren, William L; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is responsible for death of nearly two million people in the world annually. Upon infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes formation of granuloma where the pathogen goes into dormant state and can live for decades before resuscitation to develop active disease when the immune system of the host is weakened and/or suppressed. In an attempt to better understand host-pathogen interactions, several groups have been developing in vitro models of human tuberculosis granuloma. However, to date, an in vitro granuloma model in which Mtb goes into dormancy and can subsequently resuscitate under conditions that mimic weakening of the immune system has not been reported. We describe the development of a biomimetic in vitro model of human tuberculosis granuloma using human primary leukocytes, in which the Mtb exhibited characteristics of dormant mycobacteria as demonstrated by (1) loss of acid-fastness, (2) accumulation of lipid bodies (3) development of rifampicin-tolerance and (4) gene expression changes. Further, when these micro granulomas were treated with immunosuppressant anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibodies (anti-TNFα mAbs), resuscitation of Mtb was observed as has been found in humans. In this human in vitro granuloma model triacylglycerol synthase 1deletion mutant (Δtgs1) with impaired ability to accumulate triacylglycerides (TG), but not the complemented mutant, could not go into dormancy. Deletion mutant of lipY, with compromised ability to mobilize the stored TG, but not the complemented mutant, was unable to come out of dormancy upon treatment with anti-TNFα mAbs. In conclusion, we have developed an in vitro human tuberculosis granuloma model that largely exhibits functional features of dormancy and resuscitation observed in human tuberculosis.

  3. Rabbit model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and hypotensive resuscitation

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende-Neto,J.B.; Rizoli,S.B.; Andrade,M.V.; Lisboa,T.A.; Cunha-Melo,J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Clinically relevant animal models capable of simulating traumatic hemorrhagic shock are needed. We developed a hemorrhagic shock model with male New Zealand rabbits (2200-2800 g, 60-70 days old) that simulates the pre-hospital and acute care of a penetrating trauma victim in an urban scenario using current resuscitation strategies. A laparotomy was performed to reproduce tissue trauma and an aortic injury was created using a standardized single puncture to the left side of the infrarenal aort...

  4. The Role of the European Ombudsman in the Implementation of the Right to Good Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Popescu-Slaniceanu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The regulations and general conditions of the exercise of the Ombudsman's functions are determined by the European Parliament after receiving the Commission's opinion and the approval ofthe Council. Many of the complaints addressed to the European Ombudsman relate to administrative delays, lack of transparency or refusal of access to information. Some relate to labor relationsbetween European institutions and their agencies, staffing, and the procedure of hiring. Others are related to contractual relations between European institutions and private firms.

  5. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation knowledge and attitude among general dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Sarah A; Alyahya, Lolwa; Abdulwahab, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dentists as health care providers should maintain a competence in resuscitation. This cannot be overemphasized by the fact that the population in our country is living longer with an increasing proportion of medically compromised persons in the general population. This preliminary study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of general dentists towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A cross-sectional study was carried out among 250 licensed general dental practitioners working in ministry of health. Data were obtained through electronic self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data of general dentists, and their experience, attitude and knowledge about CPR based on the 2010 American Heart Association guidelines update for CPR. Totally 208 general dentists took part in the present study giving a response rate of 83.2%. Only 36% of the participants demonstrated high knowledge on CPR, while 64% demonstrated low knowledge. Participants' age, gender, nationality, years of experience, career hierarchy, and formal CPR training were associated significantly with CPR knowledge. Almost all the participants (99%) felt that dentists needed to be competent in basic resuscitation skills and showed a positive attitude towards attending continuing dental educational programs on CPR. This study showed that majority of general dental practitioners in Kuwait had inadequate knowledge on CPR. It was also found that CPR training significantly influenced the CPR knowledge of the participants. Therefore, training courses on CPR should be regularly provided to general dentists in the country.

  6. Providing PEEP during neonatal resuscitation: which device is best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jennifer A; Gerber, Angela; Kamlin, C Omar F; Davis, Peter G; Morley, Colin J

    2011-10-01

    The study aims to compare three commonly used neonatal resuscitation devices, the Laerdal self-inflating bag with a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) valve, a T-piece resuscitator (T-piece) and a flow-inflating bag to provide peak inflation pressure (PIP) and PEEP. Participants were asked to use each device to give positive pressure ventilation to a modified neonatal mannequin via a face mask to achieve 40-60 inflations per minute, aiming for a PIP/PEEP of 30/5 cm H₂O. A manometer was visible to participants with each device. PIP, PEEP, percentage leak at the face mask and expired tidal volume were measured using a hot-wire anemometer. We analysed 20 inflations from each participant for each device. Fifty participants provided PIP and PEEP with each device. The T-piece was the most accurate and consistent. The flow-inflating bag had the most variation. The leak was lowest with the self-inflating bag and PEEP and highest with the flow-inflating bag, but all had wide variation. Each device was able to provide PIP and PEEP when used appropriately. When compared with other resuscitation devices, the T-piece provided the most accurate and consistent PIP and PEEP. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  7. Factors Influencing the Success Rate of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Amanda Hanif

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is a series of actions performed on cardiac arrest patients. Not all patients receiving CPR can survive. The outcome of CPR is influenced by several factors. This study was conducted to determine the success rate of CPR and the factors influencing it in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in 2013. Methods: This study was conducted by using 168 patient medical records who underwent CPR and met the inclusion criteria in the Resuscitation Room of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital from January to December 2013. The collected data consisted of age, gender, pre-arrest diagnosis, initial rhythm, response time and clinical outcome of CPR. The results were expressed in frequencies and percentage. The data were analyzed using the chi-square test. Results: The Success rate of CPR was 15.5%. The success rate was higher in patients with cardiac prearrest diagnoses (8.33%, p=0.024. The most common initial rhythm was unshockable rhythms (83.92%, yet patients with shockable heart rhythms had higher success rates (40.74%, p<0.001. All of the surviving patients had response time within the first minute from cardiac arrest. Conclusions: Success rate of CPR in the resuscitation room of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital during 2013 is still low. The factors influencing the survival rate are the pre-arrest diagnosis and initial heart rhythm.

  8. [Materials for the paediatric resuscitation trolley or backpack: Expert recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Herce Cid, Jesús; Rodríguez Núñez, Antonio; Carrillo Álvarez, Ángel; Zeballos Sarrato, Gonzalo; Martínez Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia; Calvo Macías, Custodio

    2017-07-05

    Cardio-respiratory arrest (CPA) is infrequent in children, but it can occur in any place and at any time. This fact means that every health care facility must always have the staff and material ready to resuscitate a child. These recommendations are the consensus of experts of the Spanish Paediatric and Neonatal Resuscitation Group on the material and medication for paediatric and neonatal resuscitation and their distribution and use. CPR trolleys and backpacks must include the essential material to quickly and efficiently perform a paediatric CPR. At least one CPR trolley must be available in every Primary Care facility, Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, and Pre-hospital Emergency Areas, as well as in paediatric wards, paediatric ambulatory areas, and radiology suites. This trolley must be easily accessible and exclusively include the essential items to perform a CPR and to assist children (from newborns to adolescents) who present with a life-threatening event. Such material must be familiar to all healthcare staff and also include the needed spare parts, as well as enough drug doses. It must also be re-checked periodically. The standardisation and unification of the material and medication of paediatric CPR carts, trolleys, and backpacks, as well as the training of the personnel in their use are an essential part of the paediatric CPR. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition improves macrocirculation and microcirculation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyuan; Li, Chunsheng; Yuan, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This study is to clarify whether sildenafil, which is a selective inhibitor of the isoform 5 of the enzyme phosphodiesterase, improves macrocirculation or/and microcirculation during ventricular fibrillation (VF) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) so as to improve outcomes of resuscitation. Sixteen female pigs were used. After anesthesia, the abdominal cavity was opened to observe the mesenteric microcirculation. Following the guidelines, we determined microvascular flow index, perfused vessel density and proportion of perfused vessels both for large(diameter >20 μm)and small (diameter defibrillation was attempted. Compared with saline, sildenafil reduced the shocks and duration of CPR (all P .05). Microvascular flow index in both large and small microvessels were closely correlated to each other (r = 0.91, P < .01), and to CPP during CPR ([r = .88, P < .01] and [r = .70, P < .05], respectively). Sildenafil increases the success of resuscitation through improving macrocirculation and microcirculation during VF and CPR. There is a close relationship between microvascular flow and CPP during CPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bispectral index monitoring is useless during cardiac arrest patients' resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet-Xémard, Charlotte; Combes, Xavier; Soupizet, François; Jabre, Patricia; Penet, Candice; Bertrand, Catherine; Margenet, Alain; Marty, Jean

    2009-02-01

    It has been suggested that out-of-hospital bispectral (BIS) index monitoring during advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) might provide an indication of cerebral resuscitation. The aims of our study were to establish whether BIS values during ACLS might predict return to spontaneous circulation, and whether BIS values on hospital admission might predict survival. This was a prospective observational study in 92 patients with cardiac arrest who received basic life support from a fire-fighter squad and ACLS on arrival of an emergency medical team on the scene. BIS values, electromyographic activity, and signal quality index were recorded throughout resuscitation and out-of-hospital management. Seven patients had recovered spontaneous cardiac activity by the time the medical team arrived on scene. Of the 92 patients, 62 patients died on scene and 30 patients returned to spontaneous cardiac activity and were admitted to hospital. The correlation between BIS values and end-tidal CO(2) during the first minutes of ACLS was poor (r(2)=0.02, P=0.19). Of the 30 admitted patients, 27 died. Three were discharged with no disabilities. There was no significant difference in BIS values on admission between the group of patients who died and the group who survived (P=0.78). Although BIS monitoring during resuscitation was not difficult, it did not predict return to spontaneous cardiac activity, nor survival after admission to intensive care. Its use to monitor cerebral function during ACLS is therefore pointless.

  11. [Need of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the sport of soccer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Martín, María Dolores; Martínez-Montilla, José Manuel; Amador-Marín, Bárbara

    2016-01-01

    In Spain there are around 25,000 cardiac arrests, many of them in the presence of non-medical personnel. In less than 25% of the cardio-respiratory arrests witnessed, witnesses began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Soccer is a contact sport with multiple physical characteristics and requirements which pushes your body to the limit, thus leading to a higher chance of developing multiple lesions, including cardio-respiratory arrest. Therefore, our goal was to know the actual situation on training in basic life support in soccer. A literature review was performed on different databases both national (IME, CUIDEN, ENCUENTR@, ENFERMERÍA AL DÍA, ISOC) and international (PUBMED, SCOPUS, CINAHL), with different MESH descriptors related to the topic. A total of 395 references were identified. 17 studies were selected; 8 of them had like main theme cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the remaining 9 spoke on the use of semi-automatic defibrillators. There is a lack of research on this topic in soccer. This strikes our attention because in this area there could be situations requiring immediate rescue action. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of early cardio-respiratory resuscitation because training in basic life support and semi-automatic defibrillators in soccer are fundamental. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcomes and Cost Analysis of Patients With Successful In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Liu

    2011-12-01

    Conclusions: Given the fact that less than one quarter of the successfully resuscitated patients have a favorable outcome, two-thirds of the mortality cases died within 24 hours, which is a high cost for successful resuscitation, and one-third of the survivors had to stay on chronic respiratory care center. A better prognostic tool to predict outcomes should be developed to avoid futile resuscitation.

  13. Interhospital Transport of Children Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Practical and Ethical Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noje, Corina; Fishe, Jennifer N; Costabile, Philomena M; Klein, Bruce L; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    To discuss risks and benefits of interhospital transport of children in cardiac arrest undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Narrative review. Not applicable. Transporting children in cardiac arrest with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between hospitals is potentially lifesaving if it enables access to resources such as extracorporeal support, but may risk transport personnel safety. Research is needed to optimize outcomes of patients transported with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reduce risks to the staff caring for them.

  14. Restricting volumes of resuscitation fluid in adults with septic shock after initial management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, Peter B; Haase, Nicolai; Bundgaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the effects of a protocol restricting resuscitation fluid vs. a standard care protocol after initial resuscitation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock. METHODS: We randomised 151 adult patients with septic shock who had received initial fluid resuscitation...... patients with septic shock. The patient-centred outcomes all pointed towards benefit with fluid restriction, but our trial was not powered to show differences in these exploratory outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02079402....

  15. Health professionals' perceptions regarding family witnessed resuscitation in adult critical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashayreh, Ibrahim; Saifan, Ahmad; Batiha, Abdul-Monim; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    To deepen our understanding of the perceptions of health professionals regarding family witnessed resuscitation in Jordanian adult critical care settings. The issue of family witnessed resuscitation has developed dramatically in the last three decades. The traditional practice of excluding family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation had been questioned. Family witnessed resuscitation has been described as good practice by many researchers and health organisations. However, family witnessed resuscitation has been perceived by some practitioners to be unhealthy and harmful to the life-saving process. The literature showed that there are no policies or guidelines to allow or to prevent family witnessed resuscitation in Jordan. An exploratory qualitative design was adopted. A purposive sample of 31 health professionals from several disciplines was recruited over a period of six months. Individual semi-structured interviews were used. These interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. It was found that most healthcare professionals were against family witnessed resuscitation. They raised several concerns related to being verbally and physically attacked if they allowed family witnessed resuscitation. Almost all of the respondents expressed their fears of patients' family members' interfering in their work. Most of the participants in this study stated that family witnessed resuscitation is traumatic for family members. This was viewed as a barrier to allowing family witnessed resuscitation in Jordanian critical care settings. The study provides a unique understanding of Jordanian health professionals' perceptions regarding family witnessed resuscitation. They raised some views that contest some arguments in the broader literature. Further research with patients, family members, health professionals and policy makers is still required. This is the first study about family witnessed resuscitation in Jordan. Considering multi

  16. As seen on TV: observational study of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical dramas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P N; Williamson, S; Lawler, P G

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and accuracy with which cardiopulmonary resuscitation is portrayed in British television medical dramas. Design: Observational study. Subjects: 64 episodes of three major British television medical dramas: Casualty, Cardiac Arrest, and Medics. Main outcome measures: Frequency of cardiopulmonary resuscitation shown on television; age, sex, and diagnosis of the patients undergoing resuscitation; rate of survival through resuscitation. Results: Overall 52 patients had a cardiorespiratory arrest on screen and 3 had a respiratory arrest alone, all the arrests occurring in 40 of the 64 episodes. Of the 52 patients having cardiorespiratory arrest, 32 (62%) underwent an attempt at cardiopulmonary resuscitation; 8 attempts were successful. All 3 of the patients having respiratory arrests alone received ventilatory support and survived. On 48% of occasions, victims of cardiac arrest seemed to be less than 35 years old. Conclusions: Cardiorespiratory resuscitation is often depicted in British television medical dramas. Patients portrayed receiving resuscitation are likely to be in a younger age group than in real life. Though the reasons for resuscitation are more varied and more often associated with trauma than in reality, the overall success rate is nevertheless realistic. Widespread overoptimism of patients for survival after resuscitation cannot necessarily be blamed on British television medical dramas. Key messagesA quarter of patients in British television medical dramas who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation on screen seemed to surviveThis figure is comparable to initial survival rates in a series of patients in real lifePatients on television are more likely to suffer cardiac arrest as a result of trauma than in real life, and patients undergoing resuscitation are likely to be younger than patients in real lifeThe overall survival rate of patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in British television medical drama seems

  17. The European Private Company, its shareholders and its creditors

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra van den Braak

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the Proposal for a Council Regulation on the Statute for a European Private Company (Societas Privata Europaea, SPE) as put forward by the European Commission in 2008 as well as with the amendments proposed by the European Parliament in 2009. The SPE will be a new legal form for small and medium-sized companies, allowing them to set up the same European legal entity across the Member States. In this paper the focus is on the question whether we need the SPE and whether t...

  18. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  19. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  20. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  1. Variation in local trust Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies: a review of 48 English healthcare trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Karoline; Field, Richard A; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-01-13

    To explore Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) policies from English acute, community and ambulance service Trusts for evidence of consistency and variation in implementation of national guidelines between healthcare organisations. Acute, community or ambulance National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England. 48 NHS Trusts. Freedom of information requests for adult DNACPR policies were sent to a random sample of Trusts. DNACPR policies were assessed on aspects identified from national guidelines including documentation, ethical and legal issues, decision-makers and involvement of others in DNACPR decisions as well as practical considerations such as validity, review and portability of decisions. Policies from 26 acute, 12 community and 10 ambulance service Trusts were reviewed. There was variation in terminology used (85% described documents as policies, 6% procedures and 8% guidelines). Only one quarter of Trusts used the recommended Resuscitation Council (UK) record form (or a modification of the form). There was variation in the terminology used which included DNAR, DNACPR, Not for CPR and AND (allow natural death). Accountability for DNACPR decisions rested with consultants at all acute Trusts and the most senior clinician at community Trusts. Most Trusts (74%) recommended discussion of decisions with a multidisciplinary team. Compliance with guidance requiring clinical staff to assess the patient for capacity and when to consult a lasting power of attorney or independent mental capacity advocate occurred less commonly. There was wide variation in the duration of time over which a DNACPR decision was considered valid as well as in the Trusts' approach to reviewing DNACPR decisions. The level of portability of DNACPR decisions between healthcare organisations was one of the greatest sources of variation. There is significant variation in the translation of the national DNACPR guidelines into English healthcare Trusts' DNACPR policies. Published

  2. Critical care considerations in the management of the trauma patient following initial resuscitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shere-Wolfe, Roger F; Galvagno, Jr, Samuel M; Grissom, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    ... requiring definitive repair. The intensive care physician must understand the respiratory, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immunologic consequences of trauma resuscitation and massive transfusion in order to evaluate and adjust...

  3. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures: practices of critical care and emergency nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacLean, Susan L; Guzzetta, Cathie E; White, Cheri; Fontaine, Dorrie; Eichhorn, Dezra J; Meyers, Theresa A; Désy, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, patients' families are remaining with them during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures, but this practice remains controversial and little is known about the practices...

  4. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  5. [In-hospital resuscitation. Concept of first-responder resuscitation using semi-automated external defibrillators (AED)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, C; Lichte, C; Laubenthal, H; Hanke, E; Mügge, A

    2006-09-29

    The prognosis after in-hospital resuscitation has not significantly improved in the last 40 years. This account presents the results over a three-year period of a hospital-wide emergency plan which implements the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) by the first responder to the emergency call. 15 "defibrillator points" were installed, which could be reached within 30 s from all wards, out-patient departments and other areas, thus making them accessible for immediate defibrillator application. The hospital personnel is trained periodically in the alarm sequence, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of the defibrillator. Data on 57 patients who had sustained a cardiac arrest were prospectively recorded and analysed. In 46 patients (81%) the "on-the-spot" personnel (first-responder) was able to apply AED before arrival of the hospital's resuscitation team. Mean period between arrest alarm and activation of the AED was 2.2 (0.7-4.7) min. Ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachyarrhythmia was recorded in 40 patients, making immediate shock delivery by AED possible. Restoration of the circulation was achieved in 23 (80%) of the patients and 20 (50%) were discharged home, 17 (43%) without neurological deficit. The high proportion of first-responder AED applications and evaluation of the personnel training indicate a wide acceptance of the emergency plan among the personnel. An immediate resuscitation plan consisting of an integrated programme of early defibrillation is feasible and seems to achieve an improved prognosis for patients who have sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest.

  6. "Science and Peace" symposium to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the first Council session | 19 September

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Friday 19 September 2014 In the tent behind the Globe of Science and Innovation The Convention for the Establishment of a European Organization for Nuclear Research entered into force on 29 September 1954, 60 years ago. This marks CERN's official birthday. The first session of the CERN Council, the governance of CERN, was held in Geneva on 7 and 8 October 1954, just one week later. The symposium "Science and Peace" is being held to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the first Council session. Speakers from all generations will present highlights from 60 years of the Council and various views from their own perspectives. Programme 3.00 - 3.10 p.m.: Welcome address - Agnieszka Zalewska 3.10 - 3.25 p.m.: The history of the Council: a brief selection of highlights - Jens Vigen 3.25 - 3.40 p.m.: The Council as seen by a Member State - Sijbrand De Jong 3.40 - 3.55 p.m.: The Council as seen by an outreach specialist - Steven Goldfarb 3.55 - 4.10 p.m.: The Council as seen by a young scie...

  7. On Law and Policy in a European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Clement Salung; Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2010-01-01

    generis, transnational court system with exclusive jurisdiction in respect of civil litigation related to the infringement and validity of European patents and EU patent. This paper considers this proposal for the establishment of the EEUPC under two basic observations, namely that substantive law......On 4 December 2009, the European Council unanimously adopted conclusions on an enhanced patent system in Europe, which inter alia intends to establish a new EU patent as well as a new common patent judiciary – the European and European Union Patent Court (EEUPC). The EEUPC will constitute a new sui...... requires legal institutions, which support the purposes and policies underlying the substantive law in question, and that legal institutions affect the law. The first observation leads to a discussion of the requirements which a common judiciary in the European patent system should satisfy and different...

  8. Consensus document on European brain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research programs....... Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the previous......Psychiatric and neurological diseases combined represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. A recent study conducted by the European Brain Council (EBC) quantified the 'cost and burden' of major brain diseases in Europe, amounting to €386bn per year. Considering that these costs...

  9. The future of UK/Irish surgery: A European solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzgalis, M; Kerin, M J; Sweeney, K J

    2015-11-01

    The United Kingdom (UK) and Republic of Ireland (ROI) hospital systems are dependent on junior doctors for their functionality however it is increasingly difficult to recruit UK/ROI trained doctors to fill these posts. Directive 2005/36/EC, which came into force in 2007, is the principal European legislation on the recognition of equivalence of professional qualifications across Europe. European trained doctors are therefore attractive candidates for junior doctor posts. However, although their training is recognised as equivalent by the Irish Medical Council (IMC) and General Medical Council (GMC) they are not being appointed to equivalent posts by the Health Service Executive (HSE) or National Health Service (NHS). With the influence of European Union (EU) centralisation, modification of UK/ROI consultant grade is imminent, possibly to pyramidal structure of the Continental European model with clearer lines of corporate responsibility. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The National Security Council: An Organizational Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best Jr, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    The National Security Council (NSC) was established by statute in 1947 to create an interdepartmental body to advise the President with respect to the integration of domestic, foreign, and military policies relating to the national...

  11. Roles and Responsibilities for Web Council Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members represent their Region or AAship on the Web Council, act as a primary point of contact, coordinate Regional/AAship web development within broader Agency efforts including One EPA Web standards and best practices, and have other responsibilites.

  12. Appeals Council Requests - Average Processing Time

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual data from 1989 through 2015 for the average processing time (elapsed time in days) for dispositions by the Appeals Council (AC) (both...

  13. Minimal interruption of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for a single shock as mandated by automated external defibrillations does not compromise outcomes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Tang, Wanchun; Russell, James K; Jorgenson, Dawn; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shijie; Weil, Max Harry

    2008-11-01

    Current automated external defibrillations require interruptions in chest compressions to avoid artifacts during electrocardiographic analyses and to minimize the risk of accidental delivery of an electric shock to the rescuer. The earlier three-shock algorithm, with prolonged interruptions of chest compressions, compromised outcomes and increased severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the effect of timing of minimal automated external defibrillation-mandated interruptions of chest compressions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcomes, using a single-shock algorithm. We hypothesized that an 8-sec interruption of chest compressions for a single shock, as mandated by automated external defibrillations, would not impair initial resuscitation and outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Randomized prospective animal study. University affiliated research laboratory. Domestic pigs. In 24 domestic male pigs weighing 41 +/- 2 kg, ventricular fibrillation was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and untreated for 7 min. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including chest compressions and ventilation with oxygen, was then performed for an interval of 2 min before attempted defibrillation. Animals were randomized into three groups: A) interruption immediately before defibrillation; B) interruption after 1 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation; or C) no interruption. Chest compressions were delivered with the aid of a mechanical chest compressor at a rate of 100 compressions/min and compression/ventilation ratio of 30:2. Defibrillation was attempted with a single biphasic 150-J shock. Each animal was successfully resuscitated and survived for >72 hr. No differences in the number of shocks before return of spontaneous circulation, frequency of recurrent ventricular fibrillation, duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and severity of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction were observed. In this

  14. Urban freight distribution: council warehouses & freight by rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander SŁADKOWSKI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rail is the one of the highly underused form of freight transportation in the European Union. Majority of the freightage are distributed by trucks and HGVs. With new regulations and socio-environmental concerns urban logistics is facing a new challenge which can be tackled using innovative transport mechanisms and streamline operations. This article sheds light on a system which integrates freight distribution via metro lines in the closest vicinity of the customer, use of council warehouses and further innovative transport mechanisms for final delivery. This system uses existing infrastructure effectively without impacting its surroundings and triggers the reduction of polluting carriers. This system offers the option of immediate implementation which will enable EU to compete with a global freight distribution market.

  15. CDA Judicial Council: blending idealism and practicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiger, Robert D

    2013-07-01

    The California Dental Association Judicial Council has the responsibility for interpreting and enforcing the Code of Ethics, for disciplining members and for fostering a climate of education and ethics awareness for CDA members. The Council recognizes the inherent difficulty in rigid enforcement of the Code of Ethics, and chooses to take an approach that educates and encourages members to embrace the highest standards of our profession as outlined in the Code.

  16. Effects of biliverdin administration on acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Junko; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Shimizu, Hiroko; Kawanishi, Susumu; Omori, Emiko; Endo, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Naofumi; Morita, Manabu; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation induces pulmonary inflammation that leads to acute lung injury. Biliverdin, a metabolite of heme catabolism, has been shown to have potent cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of intravenous biliverdin administration on lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Biliverdin or vehicle was administered to the rats 1 h before sham or hemorrhagic shock-inducing surgery. The sham-operated rats underwent all surgical procedures except bleeding. To induce hemorrhagic shock, rats were bled to achieve a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg that was maintained for 60 min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Histopathological changes in the lungs were evaluated by histopathological scoring analysis. Inflammatory gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, and oxidative DNA damage was assessed by measuring 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in the lungs. Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation resulted in prominent histopathological damage, including congestion, edema, cellular infiltration, and hemorrhage. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation significantly ameliorated these lung injuries as judged by histopathological improvement. After hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, inflammatory gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased by 18- and 8-fold, respectively. Inflammatory gene expression significantly decreased when biliverdin was administered prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Moreover, after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, lung 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA expressed in the pulmonary interstitium increased by 1.5-fold. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation decreased mitochondrial 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels to almost the same level as that in the control animals. We also

  17. Effects of biliverdin administration on acute lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Kosaka

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation induces pulmonary inflammation that leads to acute lung injury. Biliverdin, a metabolite of heme catabolism, has been shown to have potent cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant effects. This study aimed to examine the effects of intravenous biliverdin administration on lung injury induced by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation in rats. Biliverdin or vehicle was administered to the rats 1 h before sham or hemorrhagic shock-inducing surgery. The sham-operated rats underwent all surgical procedures except bleeding. To induce hemorrhagic shock, rats were bled to achieve a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg that was maintained for 60 min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Histopathological changes in the lungs were evaluated by histopathological scoring analysis. Inflammatory gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis, and oxidative DNA damage was assessed by measuring 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in the lungs. Hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation resulted in prominent histopathological damage, including congestion, edema, cellular infiltration, and hemorrhage. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation significantly ameliorated these lung injuries as judged by histopathological improvement. After hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, inflammatory gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased by 18- and 8-fold, respectively. Inflammatory gene expression significantly decreased when biliverdin was administered prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Moreover, after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, lung 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels in mitochondrial DNA expressed in the pulmonary interstitium increased by 1.5-fold. Biliverdin administration prior to hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation decreased mitochondrial 8-hydroxy-2' deoxyguanosine levels to almost the same level as that in the

  18. Oral and Enteral Resuscitation of Burn Shock The Historical Record and Implications for Mass Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, George C.; Michell, Michael W.; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H.; Herndon, David; Baker, R. David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10–40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in “peripheral circulatory collapse”. The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  19. [Discussing the resuscitation policy at a geriatric ward: the experience of patients or their representatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressers, J P A; Algra, A; Dautzenberg, P L J; van Delden, J J M

    2011-12-01

    To identify geriatric patients' and their surrogate decision makers' experience with regard to discussing cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) policy. This is a prospective, observational, explorative survey. During 10 weeks, all patients admitted to a geriatric ward of a general Dutch hospital or their representatives were asked for their experience regarding discussion of the resuscitation policy with the physician in attendance. Discussing this policy is a standard procedure at the first day of admission. We also asked on several factors which could influence their experience and on factors to improve discussing resuscitation policies. The primary outcome was the participant's satisfaction expressed on a scale of 1 to l0 regarding satisfaction with the CPR discussion. Seventy-six participants were included, of which 29 patients and 47 surrogate decision makers. Discussing the resuscitation policy took an average of 4,5 minutes (SD 3.2) to complete. In 70% (n=53) of cases a do-not-resuscitate decision was made. Discussing the resuscitation policy was experienced positive, with an average rate of 7,8 (SD 1.5). A total of 121 positive comments were made, as opposed to 70 negative comments. When they talked about their resuscitation policy, most patients expressed positive emotional responses. As most important improvements were mentioned: a better introduction to discussing this subject (17%), a better explanation of resuscitation and chances of survival (17%) and providing information prior to admission to the ward, so that patient and surrogate decision maker have been informed that the resuscitation policy will be discussed (12%). Most patients and relatives in this study wished to discuss their resuscitation policy with physicians. Still, there is room for improvement in several respects. Patients and surrogate decision makers are in favour of discussing the standard resuscitation policy with the doctor, and evaluate this conversation with a 7.8 / 10. In order

  20. New multifactorial burn resuscitation formula offers superior predictive reliability in comparison to established algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benicke, Markus; Perbix, Walter; Lefering, Rolf; Knam, Friedrich; Ipaktchi, Kyros R; Tannapfel, Andrea; Neugebauer, Edmund A M; Spilker, Gerald

    2009-02-01

    The Parkland-Baxter formula is a widely utilized resuscitation guideline for the initial management of fluid deficits in burn victims. Implementation of resuscitation formulas has helped to reduce the incidence of shock and hypovolemic organ failure such as acute renal failure in the setting of burn trauma. However, it has been shown that indiscriminate implementation of these formulas may inappropriately suit individual patient's requirements. In our experience resuscitation by the Parkland formula often forced corrections in order to reach predefined resuscitation goals. Given these findings we felt the need to refine formula based resuscitation strategies. Reviewing a subset of 81 burn admissions we screened for predictive parameters in addition to total body surface area burned (TBSA burned) and body weight influencing resuscitation volume requirements. Using multivariate linear regression analysis (MRA) various parameters were integrated in a stepwise forward mathematical selection procedure resulting in a modified resuscitation formula. A new formula including body weight, TBSA burned, inhalation injury (IHI), high blood alcohol level (BAL) and a compensating factor for advanced age was set up. The new formula was compared to the original Parkland formula. Both were assessed for predictive reliability (PR(+/-20%)). Using this strategy we were able to improve PR(+/-20%) from 28.4% to 51.9%. Optimal fluid resuscitation of severe burn victims is a complex clinical challenge. Rigid-formula based resuscitation schemes often fail to match all subtleties of current clinical practice but need to provide a reliable starting point for fluid resuscitation. We demonstrate a new multifactorial formula resulting in a better guide to initial fluid resuscitation.

  1. European Cinema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different

  2. ACUTE EFFECTS OF BALANCED VERSUS UNBALANCED COLLOID RESUSCITATION ON RENAL MACROCIRCULATORY AND MICROCIRCULATORY PERFUSION DURING ENDOTOXEMIC SHOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksu, Ugur; Bezemer, Rick; Demirci, Cihan; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the acute effects of balanced versus unbalanced colloid resuscitation on renal macrocirculatory and microcirculatory perfusions during lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemic shock in rats. We tested the hypothesis that balanced colloid resuscitation would be

  3. Nurses' Perceptions of Role, Team Performance, and Education Regarding Resuscitation in the Adult Medical-Surgical Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Sharon C; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Fealy, Natalie; Saba, Christine R; Smith, Stacey; McHugh, Allison T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' perception of their roles, team performance, and educational needs during resuscitation using an electronic survey. Findings provide direction for clinical practice, nursing education, and future research to improve resuscitation care.

  4. 77 FR 26784 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a teleconference...

  5. 78 FR 33856 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; FF09X60000-FVWF97920900000-XXX] Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council... Act, 5 U.S.C. App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a...

  6. 77 FR 61626 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), announce a public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). A Federal.... App., we announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting...

  7. 76 FR 75898 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... The Council represents the interests of the public and private sectors of the sport fishing, boating...

  8. 75 FR 47624 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council). DATES: The meeting will be.... App., we announce that the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a meeting on...

  9. 78 FR 4161 - Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... (Service), announce a public teleconference of the Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council (Council.... App., we announce that Sport Fishing and Boating Partnership Council will hold a teleconference...

  10. 76 FR 66955 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010...

  11. 78 FR 42104 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed in...

  12. 77 FR 74864 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting.... App., we announce that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting...

  13. 77 FR 15386 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  14. 76 FR 3155 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  15. 77 FR 38317 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed...

  16. 75 FR 57292 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... that Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in...

  17. 77 FR 31636 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010, the...

  18. 77 FR 4575 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... public meeting of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES: Meeting... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a meeting. Background Formed in February 2010...

  19. 77 FR 25191 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., announce a public teleconference of the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). DATES... Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council will hold a teleconference. Background Formed in...

  20. 77 FR 10543 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council Charter AGENCY: Office of the... Secretary of Agriculture have renewed the Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council... Heritage Conservation Council is necessary and is in the public interest in connection with the performance...