WorldWideScience

Sample records for european organization for nuclear research

  1. Inside CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research

    CERN Document Server

    Pol, Andri; Heuer, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    For most people locations that hold a particular importance for the development of our society and for the advancement of science and technology remain hidden from view. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is best known for its giant particle accelerator. Here researchers take part in a diverse array of fundamental physical research, in the pursuit of knowledge that will perhaps one dayrevolutionize our understanding of the universe and life on our planet. The Swiss photographer Andri Pol mixed with this multicultural community of researchers and followed their work over an extended period of time. In doing so he created a unique portrait of this fascinating “underworld.” The cutting-edge research is given a human face and the pictures allow us to perceive how in this world of the tiniest particles the biggest connections are searched for. With an essay by Peter Stamm.

  2. European Organization for Nuclear Research annual report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The 1976 CERN annual report begins with a brief history of the organization and description of the organizational structure. A description of the CERN accelerators is given and CERN scientific activities are reviewed. The main body of the report comprises reports from the eleven main divisions, and administrative divisions such as personnel and finance. The reports from the scientific divisions contain descriptions of, and data from, present research and plans for long term development. The appendices contain a list of CERN publications for 1976, a list of lectures and seminars held, a list of training programmes undertaken and a list of scientific conferences and schools held. (B.D.)

  3. A possible biomedical facility at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, M; Jones, B; Myers, S

    2013-05-01

    A well-attended meeting, called "Brainstorming discussion for a possible biomedical facility at CERN", was held by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics on 25 June 2012. This was concerned with adapting an existing, but little used, 78-m circumference CERN synchrotron to deliver a wide range of ion species, preferably from protons to at least neon ions, with beam specifications that match existing clinical facilities. The potential extensive research portfolio discussed included beam ballistics in humanoid phantoms, advanced dosimetry, remote imaging techniques and technical developments in beam delivery, including gantry design. In addition, a modern laboratory for biomedical characterisation of these beams would allow important radiobiological studies, such as relative biological effectiveness, in a dedicated facility with standardisation of experimental conditions and biological end points. A control photon and electron beam would be required nearby for relative biological effectiveness comparisons. Research beam time availability would far exceed that at other facilities throughout the world. This would allow more rapid progress in several biomedical areas, such as in charged hadron therapy of cancer, radioisotope production and radioprotection. The ethos of CERN, in terms of open access, peer-reviewed projects and governance has been so successful for High Energy Physics that application of the same to biomedicine would attract high-quality research, with possible contributions from Europe and beyond, along with potential new funding streams.

  4. Implementation of manufacturing data management application in the scientific research project. Case: CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research

    CERN Document Server

    Saifoulina, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis examined the implementation process of an MTF (Manufacturing and Test Folder) application in the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) Radio Frequency Structure Development project for manufacturing data management purposes. The primary goal of the study was to investigate how MTF implementation and its integration with CERN EDMS (Engineering and Equipment Data Management System) system could facilitate product life cycle through the supply chain, and could affect on manufacturing operations performance in internaland external levels. The aim of the study was also to find out implementation differences within CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) projects. The study is divided into two parts: a qualitative theory section and an empirical section. In the theory section differences of features between PDM (Product Data Management), EDM (Engineering Data Management) and PLM (Product Life Cycle Management) systems were studied. The thesis examined the benefits and managerial challeng...

  5. Improving the Indico Framework at the European Organization for Nuclear Research - Internship Report - LEIC 2006/2007 (FEUP)

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Jose Pedro

    2007-01-01

    This document describes the work developed by José Pedro Macedo Alves Ferreira, Informatics Engineering and Computing (LEIC) undergraduate student at the Engineering Faculty of the University of Porto (FEUP), in the context of the project "Improving the Indico Framework". The project took place at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), in the framework of both the Technical Student Program of this organization, and the curricular internship of the aforementioned degree. The contents of this report refer to the internship period, the first half of the one-year Technical Student program. The project aimed to introduce usability improvements into an already existing web application, the Indico platform, a integrated system for event scheduling and management, which was initially developed as a European project and continued by CERN, being currently used by several institutions worldwide. Indico presented some usability issues that for long had been noticed by the users and required correction, m...

  6. ENSAR, a Nuclear Science Project for European Research Area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turzó, Ketel; Lewitowicz, Marek; Harakeh, Muhsin N.

    2015-01-01

    During the period from September 2010 to December 2014, the European project European Nuclear Science and Applications Research (ENSAR) coordinated research activities of the Nuclear Physics community performing research in three major subfields: Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Astrophysics, and Nuclear

  7. Polymicro technologies receives prestigious award from European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CMS Collaboration of CERN presented two awards today to Polymicro Technologies, LLC of Phoenix, AZ in appreciation of their achievements in the development and production of radiation resistant silica optical fibers for use in the CMS detector (1/2 page).

  8. Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-o

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Vietnamese Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-o

  9. Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arab

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arab

  10. Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation Agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and The Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  11. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  12. Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1960-01-01

    Speech to be delivered by Mr. François de Rose, president of Council of the european organization for nuclear research on the occasion of the inauguration of the CERN proton synchrotron on 5 february 1960

  13. Government Decree No 30/85 approving accession to the Convention for the Establishment of a European Organization for nuclear Research and its Financial Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    By this Decree of 18 July 1985 the Government has approved Portugal's accession to CERN, which now counts 14 Members. The purpose of CERN is to provide for collaboration among European states in nuclear research of a scientific and fundamental character and it has established an international laboratory to carry out research relating to high-energy physics. (NEA) [fr

  14. Requirements for BNCT at a nuclear research reactor. Results from a BNCT workshop organized by the European Commission in Prague, November 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, Ray; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Wittig, Andrea; Burian, Jiri

    2006-01-01

    As part of the European Commission's Enlargement and Integration Action (E and IA), which is intended to improve exchange and relationship within the extended European Union (EU), a Workshop was organized in Prague in November 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to present and discuss technical and organisational requirements in setting up a BNCT facility at a research reactor. Topics included: treatment of a patient by BNCT; organisational aspects and regulatory affairs; BNCT from the nuclear perspective and BNCT from the clinician's perspective. Presentations were given by BNCT experts in their particular field, whilst eleven different national nuclear research centres from the New Member States and Accession Countries, interested in developing a BNCT programme, presented the status of their preparations. The conclusions of the Workshop were that an early and close collaboration between nuclear and medical groups is the basis for BNCT, that a local effort to build a BNCT facility should be supported by a national research programme including basic and clinical science and that the JRC and its partners are ready to support national initiatives within the EU and candidate countries. (author)

  15. Solid-state Marx based two-switch voltage modulator for the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, L M; Silva, J Fernando; Canacsinh, H; Ferrão, N; Mendes, C; Soares, R; Schipper, J; Fowler, A

    2010-07-01

    A new circuit topology is proposed to replace the actual pulse transformer and thyratron based resonant modulator that supplies the 60 kV target potential for the ion acceleration of the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator accelerator, the stability of which is critical for the mass resolution downstream separator, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The improved modulator uses two solid-state switches working together, each one based on the Marx generator concept, operating as series and parallel switches, reducing the stress on the series stacked semiconductors, and also as auxiliary pulse generator in order to fulfill the target requirements. Preliminary results of a 10 kV prototype, using 1200 V insulated gate bipolar transistors and capacitors in the solid-state Marx circuits, ten stages each, with an electrical equivalent circuit of the target, are presented, demonstrating both the improved voltage stability and pulse flexibility potential wanted for this new modulator.

  16. Development of electronic document management system for scientific and technical design administration automation (evidence from European Organization for Nuclear Research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titov, R.N.

    2011-01-01

    The new principles and methods of electronic document management system construction are developed. The software package for electronic document handling is made, it provides automation of work flow management and permits to trace and correct on-line the flow of documents. The formal models of electronic documents describing complex hierarchic structures of data with the use of XML-trees are considered. On the base of investigations conducted the CERN electronic document management system has been upgraded, it allowed to shorten more than twofold the time for automation of new business processes [ru

  17. Development of a semantically operating risk management information system using the example of the European organization for nuclear research (CERN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aprin, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The term risk analysis summarises the systematic endeavour to identify and evaluate the risks within an organisation associated with projects and actions, and make it possible to regulate risks. Risk analyses are an integral component of risk management, and thus essential to consolidating safety. In that respect, the adequacy and reliability of the findings obtained by way of risk analysis directly depend on the availability and quality of the knowledge resources supplied organisationally. Access to knowledge relevant to making decisions is, however, hampered, in the real world of work through the impact of various informational barriers. Knowledge that is conducive to understanding and avoiding risks is frequently stored in very specialised database systems, the individual syntactic and semantic structures of which make it a very time-consuming and laborious operation to use such knowledge in the context of applications other than the one originally linked to the databases. In addition, a degree of ambiguity that accompanies the semi-structured nature of many documentation and reporting systems makes it difficult to process knowledge efficiently and in an automated way, for example in conjunction with search engines. This dissertation presents a contribution towards overcoming the existing knowledge barriers in risk management. To this end, the method of applying semantic methods of representing knowledge in the domain of risk analysis is proposed. The focus is on the semantic web, which -as an enhancement of the World Wide Web- makes it possible to explicitly grasp the meaning of knowledge contexts and reproduce this information. Should the present risk management be distinguished by document-based organisation and distribution of knowledge, the semantic web presents methods and tools which make it possible to put the knowledge directly to work on the data set level. Building on the latter, the concept of a semantically operating risk management information

  18. Nuclear safety research at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power plants currently generate some 35 % of electricity used in the European Union and applicant countries. Nuclear safety will therefore remain a priority for the EU, particularly in view of enlargement, the need to monitor ageing nuclear installations and the licencing of advanced new reactor systems. The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), with its long involvement and recognised competence in nuclear safety related activities, provides direct support to the European Commission services responsible for nuclear safety and civil protection. (author)

  19. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R&D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles, and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects such as transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management for R&D project managers and other workers from nuclear R&D organizations.

  20. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R and D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects including transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management to R and D project managers and other workers from nuclear R and D organizations.

  1. Nuclear research and development in the European community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Research programmes undertaken by the European Atomic Energy Community and the European Economic Community are discussed. These programmes are carried out both at the Communities own Joint Research Centres (at Ispra, Karlsruhe, Geel and Petten) and also, although centrally managed by the Commission, at research organizations in the Member States. Such research projects include radioactive waste management and storage, decommissioning of nuclear power stations and nuclear fusion. Culham Laboratory is not only the centre for the UKAEA's research into controlled thermonuclear fusion but is also host to the Joint European Torus Joint Undertaking. (U.K.)

  2. European pathways for Slovak research and education in the nuclear power domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    New approaches of the European Commission (DG RTD Energy) to the development of nuclear power engineering (focussed on fission and reactor systems) through various support programmes, which can be of use also in Slovak conditions, are discussed. The following topics are described in detail: Globalization of European research and education; Competency in the nuclear power domain; EU platforms for directing EURATOM research activities (SET, SNE-TP, ENEF, ENSREG); ENEN, EHRO-N, ENELA and their position in European education; Objectives of EURATOM research and professional training programmes; Focus on the creation of competencies serving the nuclear sector at the EU level (ECVET); and Towards mutual recognition of nuclear competencies new EURATOM educational programmes in the domain of fission (examples of EFTS: TRASNUSAFE, ENEN III, ENETRAP II, PETRUS II). (orig.)

  3. The European programme for controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This illustrated document is intended for information only and should not be used as a technical reference. The nuclear fusion reactors are presented with the two approaches: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement; are described: the place of fusion in the world energy scene and its importance for Europe, how research is at present organized, and the European programme with this next stage: the JET (Joint European Torus), the largest tokamak machine in Europe

  4. The European space of research: what fundamental role for the development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluzny, Y.; Chaix, P.

    2010-01-01

    The SET (Strategic Energy Technology) plan draws the priority axis for the development of no-carbon energies on the whole and of nuclear energy in particular. The double aim of SET for 2020 is to maintain the competitiveness of fission reactors and to find a valid solution for the management of radioactive wastes. The SET plan also includes a system (SETIS) for assessing the progress made and an organization (ESFRI) whose role is to earmark the projects that are most relevant for research infrastructure projects. The SNETPR (Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform) gathers the actors of a given sector with the objective to develop the public-private collaboration around strategic topics. The purpose of the European sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII) is to assure a sustainable nuclear energy by the management of radioactive wastes and by a better use of natural resources. ESNII has led to the selection of fast reactor with a closed cycle. ESNII includes the design of a sodium prototype (ASTRID), of a gas cooled demonstrator (ALLEGRO) and of lead cooled pilot plant (MYRRHA). The achievement of all these projects is very dependent on the financial perspectives of the E.U. (A.C.)

  5. European nuclear data studies for fast systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rullhusen, P.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Mondelaers, W.; Plompen, A.J.M.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear data needs for fast systems are highlighted and the following projects are described: Joint European research projects: MUSE Experiments for Sub-critical Neutronics Validation; High- and Intermediate Energy Nuclear Data for ADS (HINDAS); and the Time-Of-Flight facility for Nuclear Data Measurements for ADS (n T OF N D A DS); European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System (EUROTRANS-NUDATRA); and CANDIDE; Programmes for transnational access to experimental facilities in Europe: European Facilities for Nuclear Data Measurements (EFNUDAT); Neutron Data Measurements at IRMM (NUDAME); European facility for innovative reactor and transmutation neutron data (EUFRAT) (P.A.)

  6. Search for free quarks produced in ultra-relativistic collisions at BNL [Brookhaven National Laboratory] and CERN [European Organization for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matis, H.S.; Pugh, H.G.; Alba, G.P.; Bland, R.W.; Calloway, D.H.; Dickson, S.; Hodges, C.L.; Palmer, T.L.; Stricker, D.A.; Johnson, R.T.

    1990-07-01

    A high intensity experiment was performed to search for free quarks at BNL and CERN using ultra-relativistic beams. The experiment was designed to trap quarks in a Hg target or liquid Ar tank. No free quark candidate was found. Limits from 10 -7 to 10 -10 quarks per incident ion are reported. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  8. Signature of the Agreement between the University of Liverpool, acting on behalf of the Cockcroft Institute, represented by Inaugural Director of Cockcroft Institute S. Chattopadhyay and the European Organization for Nuclear Research represented by Director-General R. Aymar,concerning collaboration between the Cockcroft Institute and CERN in Accelerator Physics and Technologies.

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    Signature of the Agreement between the University of Liverpool, acting on behalf of the Cockcroft Institute, represented by Inaugural Director of Cockcroft Institute S. Chattopadhyay and the European Organization for Nuclear Research represented by Director-General R. Aymar,concerning collaboration between the Cockcroft Institute and CERN in Accelerator Physics and Technologies.

  9. CHANDA and ERINDA: Joint European programs for research on safety of nuclear facilities and waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Roland; Hannaske, Roland; Koegler, Toni [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Helmholtz Zentrum DD-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Grosse, Eckart [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Junghans, Arnd R. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Helmholtz Zentrum DD-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    In spite of the planned termination of the German nuclear power program neutron beam facilities in Germany can contribute considerably to research studies on the reduction of hazards due to nuclear waste. Transnational research programs support EU groups who want to carry out projects at the new tof set-up nELBE at HZDR, the calibrated n-flux at PTB and the FRANZ accelerator under construction at Frankfurt. Vice versa various facilities in the EU offer beams for transmutation and safety related studies with neutrons to German scientists under support by ERINDA (2011-2013) and CHANDA (2014-2017; solving challenges in nuclear data for the safety of European nuclear facilities). For work in that field scientific visits are also fostered to improve the exchange of experience between the partners (13 and in future about 35 from 18 countries). Plans for new projects as well as results obtained so far are discussed, and special emphasis is given to the present research performed at nELBE on neutron scattering and absorption.

  10. Resistive plate chamber online data quality monitoring for the Compact Muon Solenoid at the European Center for Nuclear Research

    CERN Document Server

    Whitaker, William David

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive, online, data quality monitoring software package has been developed for the muon system at the European Center for Nuclear Research's (CERN's) Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The package was written in Java, C++, and HTML. It provides real-time, RPC performance feedback in an easy to use graphic user interface (GUI).

  11. A European network for nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. EMIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehenson, P.; Lartigau, E.; Guidez, J.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy make a vital contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of major disease. This role is likely to expand with new developments including availability of new medical isotopes. A European network (EMIR) was initiated in 2001 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, to identify and solve difficulties that constrain nuclear medicine and radiotherapy development in Europe and facilitate closer interdisciplinary collaboration. Participating organisations include the main European associations of medical radiation specialists, radiopharmaceutical/radioisotope producers, nuclear research reactor institutions, research organizations and the JRC. The steering committee established task groups focusing on eight key areas for development. Liaison with non-European organizations will be encouraged. (author)

  12. The safety R and D for GEN-IV reactors in the European nuclear energy technology platform strategic research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, G.

    2009-01-01

    In the fall 2007 EC launched the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE-TP). The SNE-TP governing board set-up three working groups (WG): 1) Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) WG, in charge of drafting road-maps to support research, development and demonstration for current and future NPPs; 2) Deployment Strategy (DS) WG, in charge of defining the research road-map implementation and 3) Education, Training and Knowledge management (ETKM) WG, which was aimed at issuing proposal to reinforce European education and attract young in the nuclear field. The SRA WG was mandated to prepare the SRA vision document based on the preliminary road-map sketched in the document published by the Commission earlier in 2007. The SRA WG was originally organized in 5 sub-groups covering specific topics (1) GEN II and III, III+, including Advanced LWR, 2) Advanced Fuel Cycle for waste minimization and resource optimization; 3) GEN IV Fast Systems (SFR, LFR, GFR, ADS); 4) GEN IV (V) HTR and non-electricity-production applications; 5) New Nuclear Large Research Infrastructures) and 5 other sub-groups dealing with more generic cross-cutting research activities applicable to many specific topics, namely: 1) Structural material research; 2) modeling, simulation and methods, including physical data and tools and means for qualification and validation; 3) Reactor Safety, including severe accidents and human factor; 4) Advanced Driver and Minor Actinide Fuels: science and properties; 5) Pre-normative Research, Codes and Standards.The present paper is mainly aimed at summarizing the content of the SRA Safety sub-chapter focusing on GEN-IV aspects

  13. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology...... research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness...... of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology...

  14. Euratom research and training in nuclear reactor safety: Towards European research and the higher education area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a European perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European policy, namely: common needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders across the Member States concerned. As a result, the following questions are addressed: What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training, in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the European Commission (EC) to conduct joint research programmes of common interest for the nuclear fission community? In conclusion, amongst the stakeholders in Europe, there seems to be a wide consensus about common needs and instruments, but not about a common vision regarding nuclear. (author)

  15. The sixth Euratom framework programme 2003-2006: a driving force for the construction of the Nuclear European Research Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, P.; Forsstroem, H.; Goethem, G. van

    2005-01-01

    At the Lisbon 2000 summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: 'to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010'. Overall, in particular in the community of nuclear fission research, this EC initiative was well accepted by the main stakeholders. In Europe, the main stakeholders (i.e. suppliers and/or demanders) of nuclear research are actually: the research organisations (with mixed public/private funding), the manufacturing industry (or vendors), the utilities (or engineering companies), the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations) and the academia (or universities). In response to the Lisbon 2000 objectives, Commissioner P. BUSQUIN launched the concept of European Research Area (ERA) which sets also the frame for the FP-6. In this invited lecture, research and training in nuclear fission are looked at from a nuclear ERA perspective with emphasis on the three success factors of any European integration policy, namely: needs, vision and instruments, that ought to be strongly shared amongst the stakeholders in the EU-25. The following questions are addressed. What is driving the current EU trend towards more research, more education and more training in general? Regarding nuclear fission, in particular, who are the end-users of Euratom 'research and training' and what are their expectations (needs) from EU programmes? Do all stakeholders share the same vision about European research and training in nuclear fission? What are the instruments proposed by the Commission to the end-users to conduct joint research programmes? The above questions are all linked to nuclear knowledge management. It is shown that, in Community research, production of knowledge remains the most important objective, be it to generate products or services. However, dissemination/transfer (e.g. education and training) and exploitation (e.g. innovation) of knowledge become equally important as

  16. Cooperation Agreement between the Government of Australia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in the research projects of CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This agreement was concluded on 1 November 1991 for five years and is renewable. Australia will participate in the CERN research projects in the field of experimental and technical physics, accelerator and detector engineering. (NEA)

  17. A history of the collaboration between the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), and with Soviet research institutes in the USSR 1955-1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lock, W.O.

    1975-01-01

    The report describes in some detail the origins and development up to 1970 of the collaboration which now exists between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and its counterpart the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) at Dubna, USSR and also with the Institute for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov, USSR. Part 1 deals with the relations between JINR and CERN, their beginnings and the subsequent development of exchange of scientists, joint Summer Schools, and the organization of Seminars to discuss perspectives in high energy physics. Part 2 describes first the steps which led up to the signing of an Agreement between CERN and the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy, governing collaboration between CERN and the Institute for High Energy Physics at Serpukhov. A brief account is then given of the subsequent installation of equipment built at CERN for the Institute's 76-Gev proton accelerator and the carrying out of joint physics experiments by teams from Western Europe and from the Soviet Union. Part 3 summarizes the origins of collaborative agreements which have been made by CERN with a few other leading Institutes in the Soviet Union. A number of Annexes reproduce some of the relevant documents and letters. (author)

  18. 9 May 2008 - Signature of the Protocol to the co-operation agreement dated 21 January 2006 between King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, represented by M. I. Al-Suwaiyel and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), represented by R. Aymar, concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    9 May 2008 - Signature of the Protocol to the co-operation agreement dated 21 January 2006 between King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) on behalf of the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, represented by M. I. Al-Suwaiyel and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), represented by R. Aymar, concerning the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy physics

  19. Cross-cutting european thermal-hydraulics research for innovative nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Class, A.; Cheng, X.; Meloni, P.; Van Tichelen, K.; Boudier, P.; Prasser, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key scientific subject in the development of different innovative nuclear reactor systems. From the thermal-hydraulic point of view, different innovative reactors are mainly characterized by their coolants (gas, water, liquid metals and molten salt). This results in different micro- and macroscopic behavior of flow and heat transfer and requires specific models and advanced analysis tools. However, many common thermal-hydraulic issues are identified among various innovative nuclear systems. In Europe, such cross-cutting thermal-hydraulic issues are the subject of the 7. framework programme THINS (Thermal-Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems) project which runs from 2010 until 2014. This paper will describe the activities in this project which address the main identified thermal hydraulics issues for innovative nuclear systems. (authors)

  20. European Clearinghouse for Nuclear Power Plants Operational Experience Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Ramos, M.; Noel, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the European Union, in order to support the Community activities on operational experience, a centralized regional network on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback (European Clearinghouse on Operational Experience Feedback for Nuclear Power Plants) was established in 2008 at the EC JRC-IE, Petten (The Netherlands) on request of nuclear Safety Authorities of several Member States. Its main goal is to improve the communication and information sharing on OEF, to promote regional collaboration on analyses of operational experience and dissemination of the lessons learned. The enlarged EU Clearinghouse was launched in April 2010, and it is currently gathering the Regulatory Authorities of Finland, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovenia, Switzerland, Bulgaria, Czec Republic, France, Germany, Slovak Republic, and Spain (these last six countries as observers). The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the IAEA, the EC Directorates General of the JRC and ENER are also part of the network. Recently, collaboration between some European Technical Support Organizations (such IRSN and GRS) and the EU Clearinghouse has been initiated. This paper explains in detail the objectives and organization of the EU Clearinghouse, as well as the most relevant activities carried out, like research work in trend analysis of events ocurred in NPP, topical reports on particular events, dissemination of the results, quarterly reports on events reported publicly and operational experience support to the members of the EU Clearinghouse. (Author)

  1. European Nuclear Education Network Association - Support for nuclear education, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre

    2009-01-01

    Developed in 2002-2003 the FP5 EURATOM project 'European Nuclear Engineering Network - ENEN' aimed to establish the basis for conserving nuclear knowledge and expertise, to create an European Higher Education Area for nuclear disciplines and to facilitate the implementation of the Bologna declaration in the nuclear disciplines. In order to ensure the continuity of the achievements and results of the ENEN project, on 22 September 2003, the European Nuclear Higher Education Area was formalized by creating the European Nuclear Education Network Association. ENEN Association goals are oriented towards universities by developing a more harmonized approach for education in the nuclear sciences and engineering in Europe, integrating European education and training in nuclear safety and radiation protection and achieving a better cooperation and sharing of resources and capabilities at the national and international level. At the same time it is oriented towards the end-users (industries, regulatory bodies, research centers, universities) by creating a secure basis of knowledge and skills of value to the EU. It maintains an adequate supply of qualified human resources for design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear infrastructures and plants. Also it maintains the necessary competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and applications of radiation in industry and medicine. In 2004-2005, 35 partners continued and expanded the started in FP 5 ENEN Association activities with the FP6 project 'NEPTUNO- Nuclear Education Platform for Training and Universities Organizations'. Thus ENEN established and implemented the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering, expanded its activities from education to training, organized and coordinated training sessions and pilot courses and included in its activities the Knowledge Management. At present, the ENEN Association gathers 45 universities, 7 research centers and one multinational company

  2. Whole-Organism Concentration Ratios for Plutonium in Wildlife from Past US Nuclear Research Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    johansen, M.; Kamboj; Kuhne, W.

    2012-07-26

    Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR{sub wo-media}) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR{sub wo-media} values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR{sub wo-media} values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt.

  3. Whole-organism concentration ratios for plutonium in wildlife from past US nuclear research data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, M.P.; Kamboj, S.; Kuhne, W.W.

    2013-01-01

    Whole-organism concentration ratios (CR wo-media ) for plutonium (Pu) in wildlife were calculated using data from the broad range of organism types and environmental settings of the US nuclear research program. Original sources included site-specific reports and scientific journal articles typically from 1960s to 80s research. Most of the calculated CR wo-media values are new to existing data sets, and, for some wildlife categories, serve to fill gaps or add to sparse data including those for terrestrial reptile; freshwater bird, crustacean and zooplankton; and marine crustacean and zooplankton. Ratios of Pu concentration in the whole-organism to that in specific tissues and organs are provided here for a range of freshwater and marine fish. The CR wo-media values in fish living in liquid discharge ponds were two orders of magnitude higher than those for similar species living in lakes receiving Pu from atmospheric fallout, suggesting the physico-chemical form of the source Pu can dominate over other factors related to transfer, such as organism size and feeding behavior. Small rodent data indicated one to two order of magnitude increases when carcass, pelt, and gastrointestinal tract were included together in the whole-organism calculation compared to that for carcass alone. Only 4% of Pu resided in the carcass of small rodents compared to 75% in the gastrointestinal tract and 21% in the pelt

  4. The European reliability data system. An organized information exchange on the operation of European nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, G.; Amesz, J.; Bastianini, P.; Capobianchi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The paper revises the aims and objectives of the European Reliability Data System (ERDS), a centralized system collecting and organizing, at European level, information related to the operation of LWRs. The ERDS project was started in 1977 and after a preliminary feasibility study that ended in 1979 is now proceeding towards the final design and implementation stages. ERDS exploits information collected in national data systems and information deriving from single reactor sources. The paper describes first the development of the four data banks constituting the system: Component Event Data Bank, CEDB; Abnormal Occurrences Reporting System, AORS; Operating Unit Status Report, OUSR; and Generic Reliability Parameter Data Bank, GRPDB. Several typical aspects concerning the project are then outlined from the need of homogeneization of data and therefore the need for setting up reference classifications, to the problem of data transcoding and input into the system. Furthermore, the need is stressed of involving much more deeply nuclear power plant operators into the process of data acquisition by providing them with a useful feedback from the data analysis. (author)

  5. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-Life questionnaire cervical cancer module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greimel, Elfriede R; Kuljanic Vlasic, Karin; Waldenstrom, Ann-Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors report on the development and validation of a cervical cancer module for the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality-of-Life (QoL) questionnaire (QLQ), which was designed to assess disease-specific and treatment-specific aspects of Qo......L in patients with cervical cancer. METHODS: The cervical cancer module (EORTC QLQ-CX24) was developed in a multicultural, multidisciplinary setting to supplement the EORTC QLQ-C30 core questionnaire. The QLQ-C30 and the cervical cancer module were administered to 346 patients with cervical cancer who underwent...... compliance with questionnaires (65%). CONCLUSIONS: The current psychometric analyses supported the content and construct validity and the reliability...

  6. Research on nuclear energy within the European Commission Research Framework Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsstroem, H.

    2000-01-01

    The strategic goal of the 5 th EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) is to help exploit the full potential of nuclear energy in a sustainable manner, by making current technologies even safer and more economical and by exploring promising new concepts. The programme covers nuclear fusion, nuclear fission and radiation protection. Part of the programme on nuclear fission and radiation protection is being implemented through ''indirect actions'', i.e. research co-sponsored (up to 50% of total costs) and co-ordinated by DG RESEARCH of the European Commission (EC) but carried out by external public and private organisations as multi-partner projects. The budget available for these indirect actions during FP5 (1998-2002) is 191 MEuro. The programme covers four different areas: safety of existing reactors, including plant life management, severe accident management and development of evolutionary systems; safety of the fuel cycle, including radioactive waste management and disposal, partitioning and transmutation and decommissioning of nuclear installation; safety of future systems, including new or revisited reactor or fuel cycle concepts; radiation protection and radiological sciences, including both basic radiobiology and radiophysics and issues connected to the application of radiation protection. After the first calls for proposals of FP5, which were evaluated in 1999 about 140 research projects have been selected for funding and is now in the process of starting. In parallel the research projects that were supported in the 4th Framework Programme (1994 - 1998) are coming to an end, and being reported, at the same time as the first thoughts on the 6 t h FP are discussed.An important new component for the future research in Europe is the concept of a European Research Area (ERA). The purpose of ERA is to create better overall framework conditions for research in Europe. Some of the concepts being discussed in this context are networking of centres of excellence, a

  7. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30: factorial models to Brazilian cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juliana Alvares Duarte Bonini; Spexoto, Maria Cláudia Bernardes; da Silva, Wanderson Roberto; Serrano, Sergio Vicente; Marôco, João

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties of the seven theoretical models proposed in the literature for European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), when applied to a sample of Brazilian cancer patients. Methods Content and construct validity (factorial, convergent, discriminant) were estimated. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed. Convergent validity was analyzed using the average variance extracted. Discriminant validity was analyzed using correlational analysis. Internal consistency and composite reliability were used to assess the reliability of instrument. Results A total of 1,020 cancer patients participated. The mean age was 53.3±13.0 years, and 62% were female. All models showed adequate factorial validity for the study sample. Convergent and discriminant validities and the reliability were compromised in all of the models for all of the single items referring to symptoms, as well as for the “physical function” and “cognitive function” factors. Conclusion All theoretical models assessed in this study presented adequate factorial validity when applied to Brazilian cancer patients. The choice of the best model for use in research and/or clinical protocols should be centered on the purpose and underlying theory of each model. PMID:29694609

  8. Development of a semantically operating risk management information system using the example of the European organization for nuclear research (CERN); Entwicklung eines semantisch operierenden Risikomanagement-Informationssystems am Beispiel der Europaeischen Organisation fuer Kernforschung (CERN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprin, Lars

    2013-07-01

    The term risk analysis summarises the systematic endeavour to identify and evaluate the risks within an organisation associated with projects and actions, and make it possible to regulate risks. Risk analyses are an integral component of risk management, and thus essential to consolidating safety. In that respect, the adequacy and reliability of the findings obtained by way of risk analysis directly depend on the availability and quality of the knowledge resources supplied organisationally. Access to knowledge relevant to making decisions is, however, hampered, in the real world of work through the impact of various informational barriers. Knowledge that is conducive to understanding and avoiding risks is frequently stored in very specialised database systems, the individual syntactic and semantic structures of which make it a very time-consuming and laborious operation to use such knowledge in the context of applications other than the one originally linked to the databases. In addition, a degree of ambiguity that accompanies the semi-structured nature of many documentation and reporting systems makes it difficult to process knowledge efficiently and in an automated way, for example in conjunction with search engines. This dissertation presents a contribution towards overcoming the existing knowledge barriers in risk management. To this end, the method of applying semantic methods of representing knowledge in the domain of risk analysis is proposed. The focus is on the semantic web, which -as an enhancement of the World Wide Web- makes it possible to explicitly grasp the meaning of knowledge contexts and reproduce this information. Should the present risk management be distinguished by document-based organisation and distribution of knowledge, the semantic web presents methods and tools which make it possible to put the knowledge directly to work on the data set level. Building on the latter, the concept of a semantically operating risk management information

  9. Nuclear revival, nuclear safety: challenges for the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Claude; Lacoste, Andre-Claude; Stellfox, David; Hajjani, Abdellaziz; Jamet, Philippe; Kaluzny, Yves; Lallier, Michel; Lescoeur, Bruno; Naredo, Fernando; Palm, Martina; Vincent, Cyrille; Faross, Peter; Gillet, Guillaume; Lemaitre, Philippe; Barcelo, Julio; Decobert, Veronique; Doumont, Pierre; Gouze, Jean-Remi; Hohlefelder, Walter; Herczog, Edit; Pouleur, Yvan; Teule, Rianne; Zidi, Latifa; Herzog, Philippe; Ristori, Dominique; Coniam, Jon; Kopp, Gudrun; Lambert de Diesbach, Patrice; Le Roux, Jean-Pierre; Mestrallet, Gerard; Paparizov, Atanas; Rosier, Philippe; Tamburi, Carlo; Lauvergeon, Anne; San Antonio, Santiago; Linkohr, Rolf; Auer, Josef; Bresson, Thierry de; Hohlefelder, Walter; Janouch, Frantisek; MacNaughton, Joan; Onyszkiewicz, Janusz; Reul, Herbert; Dolinsek, Urska; Komarov, Kirill; Boshkov, Aleksander; Bartuska, Vaclav; Gonnot, Francois-Michel; Grimston, Malcolm; Jesien, Leszek; Keussen, Urban; Schmitt von Sydow, Helmut; Sotura, Jean-Pierre; Jouyet, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear revival is a fact, in Europe and the rest of the world. We are delighted at this. Today, all eyes are on the United Kingdom where the Government intends to do more than merely replace twenty-three aging power plants. The challenge facing them is considerable - Mr. Hutton, Britain's Minister for Trade and Industry, estimates that the work will generate 100,000 jobs. It is to be hoped that the soon-to-end Franco-British summit meeting will have strengthened understanding between the two countries. This would augur well for the French Presidency of the European Union which hopes to launch debate on a common energy policy within the European Council. Since the United Kingdom took the decision to re-launch the construction of nuclear reactors, France is no longer alone; it has a new ally in the nuclear debate. The British decision is also seen as encouraging by all the companies that wish to develop nuclear technology. This development is not only manifest in the United Kingdom; in Germany and a number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe, there is an obvious, if latent, desire to enter this sector. This document gathers the Proceedings of two symposiums: - the March 2008 conference on 'The Revival of Nuclear Energy, a challenge for the European Union' - and the November 2008 Conference on 'Nuclear safety: a worldwide Public Good'. Contents: Foreword by Claude Fischer; Introduction by Philippe Herzog. Part A: The revival of nuclear energy, a challenge for Europe: Partnerships, Speakers list, Synthesis for decision-makers by Andre Ferron and Michel Cruciani, 1 Address and 3 sessions, Opening Address by Dominique Ristori, First round table: Conditions to re-launch the nuclear industry in Europe, role of companies, banks and public institutions, Second round table: The need for a European energy mix and the necessity to improve the European common Market Model Last round table: The conditions for a European foreign energy policy, Speech of Anne Lauvergeon

  10. The European community's programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants: objectives, scope and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, B.

    1984-01-01

    The European Community's research activities on the decommissioning of nuclear installations are aimed at developing effective techniques and procedures for ensuring the protection of man and his environment against the potential hazards from nuclear installations that have been withdrawn from service. The first five-year (1979-1983) programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants has comprised seven R and D projects concerning the following areas: maintaining disused plants in safe condition; surface decontamination for decommissioning purposes; dismantling techniques; treatment of the main waste materials arising in decommissioning, i.e. steel, concrete and graphite; large containers for decommissioning waste; arisings and characteristics of decommissioning waste; plant design features facilitating decommissioning. The research work was carried out by organizations and companies in the Member States under 51 research contracts, most of them cost-sharing. The Commission is now launching a new five-year (1984-1988) programme of research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. (author)

  11. The European Research on Severe Accidents in Generation-II and -III Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Van Dorsselaere

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-three organisations from 22 countries network their capacities of research in SARNET (Severe Accident Research NETwork of excellence to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues on severe accidents in existing and future water-cooled nuclear power plants (NPP. After a first project in the 6th Framework Programme (FP6 of the European Commission, the SARNET2 project, coordinated by IRSN, started in April 2009 for 4 years in the FP7 frame. After 2,5 years, some main outcomes of joint research (modelling and experiments by the network members on the highest priority issues are presented: in-vessel degraded core coolability, molten-corium-concrete-interaction, containment phenomena (water spray, hydrogen combustion…, source term issues (mainly iodine behaviour. The ASTEC integral computer code, jointly developed by IRSN and GRS to predict the NPP SA behaviour, capitalizes in terms of models the knowledge produced in the network: a few validation results are presented. For dissemination of knowledge, an educational 1-week course was organized for young researchers or students in January 2011, and a two-day course is planned mid-2012 for senior staff. Mobility of young researchers or students between the European partners is being promoted. The ERMSAR conference is becoming the major worldwide conference on SA research.

  12. Neptuno-nuclear European platform of training and university organizations project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    The project focuses on a harmonised approach to education and training in nuclear engineering in Europe and its implementation, including better integration of national resources and capabilities. The expected result is an operational network for training and life-long learning schemes as well as for academic education at the master, doctoral and post doctoral degree, underpinning: - sustainability of European's excellence in nuclear technology; - harmonised approaches to safety and best practices, both operational and regulatory at European level in Member States and Accession Countries; - preservation of competence and expertise for the continued safe use of nuclear energy and other uses of irradiations in industry and medicine; - harmonised approach for training and education in nuclear engineering. In the network: - we implement the roadmap for nuclear education in Europe as developed and demonstrated in the ongoing Euratom FP5 project ENEM; - we warrant the end-user relevance of the education at all levels by recruiting (part-time) professors out of industry and by providing (re-)training of nuclear industry personnel; - we teach advanced courses preferably at selected centres of excellence; - bridging leading edge research and new knowledge generation with teaching and education; -creating nuclei of excellence for doctoral schools in nuclear engineering and sciences; - we facilitate transnational access to research infrastructure. The final aim of the NEPTUNO initiative is to guarantee sufficient people, means and knowledge (resources) to make possible the safe and efficient applications of the nuclear technology to the civil and industry in the medium and long term. This will be accomplished by the design, development and testing of a system able to achieve the sustainable integration of education and training in nuclear engineering and safety in Europe. Thus, by responding to the EC objective for call for proposals, a joint approach to be widely applied in

  13. European nuclear education initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Whatever option regarding their future nuclear energy development is chosen by European Union Member States, the availability of a sufficient number of well trained and experienced staff is key for the responsible use of nuclear energy. This is true in all areas including design, construction, operation, decommissioning, fuel cycle and waste management as well as radiation protection. Given the high average age of existing experts leading to a significant retirement induce a real risk of the loss of nuclear competencies in the coming years. Therefore the demand of hiring skilled employees is rising. The challenge of ensuring a sufficient number of qualified staff in the nuclear sector has been acknowledged widely among the different stakeholders, in particular the nuclear industry, national regulatory authorities and Technical Support Organisations (TSOs). Already the EURATOM Treaty refers explicitly to the obligation for the Commission to carry out training actions. Recently initiatives have been launched at EU level to facilitate and strengthen the efforts of national stakeholders. The European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association aims at preservation and further development of expertise in the nuclear field by higher education and training. The goal of the European Nuclear Energy Leadership Academy (ENELA) is to educate future leaders in the nuclear field to ensure the further development of sustainable European nuclear energy solutions The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) is a platform operated by the European Commission for a broad discussion on the opportunities and risks of nuclear energy. The nuclear programs under investigation in the Joint Research Center (JRC) are increasingly contributing to Education and Training (E and T) initiatives, promoting a better cooperation between key players and universities as well as operators and regulatory bodies in order to mutually optimise their training programmes. Another objective is to increase

  14. Knowledge Loss: A Defensive Model In Nuclear Research Organization Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Bin Sulaiman; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is an essential part of research based organization. It should be properly managed to ensure that any pitfalls of knowledge retention due to knowledge loss of both tacit and explicit is mitigated. Audit of the knowledge entities exist in the organization is important to identify the size of critical knowledge. It is very much related to how much know-what, know-how and know-why experts exist in the organization. This study conceptually proposed a defensive model for Nuclear Malaysia's organization memory and application of Knowledge Loss Risk Assessment (KLRA) as an important tool for critical knowledge identification. (author)

  15. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH........ No standardised diagnostic workup for the detection of the various underlying causes of ICH currently exists, and the evidence for medical or surgical therapeutic interventions remains limited. A dedicated European research programme for ICH is needed to identify ways to reduce the burden of ICH-related death...

  16. European parliament: nuclear power necessary for Eu at middle term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2007-01-01

    In a not binding resolution adopted with a very wide majority, the european deputies, reminding that 30 % of the European electricity is supplied by the nuclear power, considered on October 24., 2007, that this energy was indispensable to cover the energy basic needs of the medium-term. The European Parliament called member states to make efforts in the field of research and development in the sector of energy, nuclear or not. The deputies also asked to the European Commission to present legislative propositions concerning the capture and the storage of CO 2 . (N.C.)

  17. European Community research on improving the governance of nuclear waste management and other risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsstroem, H.; Kelly, N.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to broader socio-economic issues (eg, science and society, governance of risk, etc) within the European Commission's research programmes. This reflects the recognition of the importance of such issues for science policy and decision making with respect to nuclear and other technologies. This paper summarises those projects, supported by the Commission's Euratom research programme, which focus on socio-economic as opposed to narrower technical issues. These projects are concerned with risk governance in general, the governance of nuclear waste management and stakeholder involvement in the off-site management of accidents. (author)

  18. Nuclear data for fusion technology – the European approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The European approach for the development of nuclear data for fusion technology applications is presented. Related R&D activities are conducted by the Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion to satisfy the nuclear data needs of the major projects including ITER, the Early Neutron Source (ENS and DEMO. Recent achievements are presented in the area of nuclear data evaluations, benchmarking and validation, nuclear model improvements, and uncertainty assessments.

  19. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  20. Founding of ''European Mutual Association for Nuclear Insurance'' (EMANI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulck, A. van

    1979-01-01

    A brief account is given of the study leading to and the founding of the European pool for Nuclear Insurance concerning the liability for damage to property. The subject is dealt with under the following headings: the structure of insurance guarantee in a nuclear plant, insurances against nuclear risks and fires, founding project of a European Mutual Insurance, following the American experience and founding of ENAMI by the nuclear power plants operators and energy producers of Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, United Kingdom, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Switzerland. (AF)

  1. European Union Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdalbero, D.R.; Schmitz, B.; Raldow, W.; Poireau, M.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an extensive state of the art of the energy research conducted at European Union level between 1984 and 2006, i.e. from the first to the sixth European Community Framework Programmes (FP1-FP6) for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration (RTD and D). The FP is the main legal tool and financial instrument of EU RTD and D policy. It sets the objectives, priorities and budgets for a period of several years. It has been complemented over time with a number of policy oriented initiatives and notably with the launch of the European Research Area. FP7 will cover the period 2007-2013 and will have a total budget of more than euros 50 billion. Energy has been a main research area in Europe since the founding Treaties (European Coal and Steel Community, European Atomic Energy Community-Euratom and European Economic Community), and energy RTD and D has always been a substantial part of common EU research. Nevertheless, when inflation and successive European enlargements are taken into account, over time the RTD and D effort in the field of energy has decreased significantly in relative terms. In nominal terms it has remained relatively stable at about euros 500 million per year. For the next years (FP7), it is expected that energy will still represent about 10 % of total EU research effort but with an annual budget of more than euros 800 million per year. This article presents a detailed review of the thematic areas and budget in both European nuclear energy research (fusion and fission) and non-nuclear energy research (energy efficiency/rational use of energy, fossil fuels, CO 2 capture and storage, fuel cells and hydrogen, renewable energy sources, strategic energy research/socio-economy). (authors)

  2. TELEMAN - an European community research and development programme on robotics in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolley, B.; Robertson, B.

    1991-01-01

    The TELEMAN Programme is a five year cost-shared research programme covering remote handling in hazardous and disordered nuclear environments. It is supported within the current research and development of the European Communities. TELEMAN's strategic objective is to develop advanced teleoperators that respond to the needs of the nuclear industry. Its technical objective is to strengthen the scientific and engineering bases upon which the design of teleoperators for use throughout the nuclear industry rests. This will be done by providing new solutions to problems of manipulation, material transport and mobile surveillance in nuclear environments and by demonstrating their feasibility. Motivation for such a programme lies in the potential teleoperators have to improve the separation of workers from radioactive equipment. This technology will also enable plant operators and public authorities to deal more effectively with nuclear abnormal incidents and increase gains in productivity, mainly in the repair and maintenance area. Community support is justified by the cost of the reliability and autonomy required for the nuclear teleoperator, the need to rationalise R and D investment in an area of increasing industrial potential and a common interest in coherent responses to emergencies. (author)

  3. Central Institute for Nuclear Research (1956 - 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, G.; Bonitz, M.

    1979-12-01

    The Central Institute for Nuclear Research (ZfK) of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR is presented. This first overall survey covers the development of the ZfK since 1956, the main research activities and results, a description of the departments responsible for the complex implementation of nuclear research, the social services for staff and the activities of different organizations in the largest central institute of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR. (author)

  4. Integration of Translational Research in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Research (EORTC) Clinical Trial Cooperative Group Mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Lehmann (Frederick); D. Lacombe (Denis); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe landscape for cancer research is profoundly different today from that only one decade ago. Basic science is moving rapidly and biotechnological revolutions in molecular targeting and immunology have completely modified the opportunities and concepts for cancer

  5. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research : A consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology

  6. Overview of research potential of Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, Marin

    2007-01-01

    The main organizations involved in nuclear power production in Romania, under supervision of Presidency, Prime Minister and Parliament are: CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control), Nuclear Agency, Ministry of Economy and Commerce, ANDRAD (Waste Management Agency), SNN (Nuclearelectrica National Society), RAAN (Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities), ICN (Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti), SITON (Center of Design and Engineering for Nuclear Projects- Bucharest); ROMAG-PROD (Heavy Water Plant), CNE-PROD (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant - Production Unit), CNE-INVEST (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant -Investments Unit), FCN (Nuclear Fuel Factory). The Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti INR, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti is endowed with a TRIGA Reactor, Hot Cells, Materials Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety. Waste management. Other research centers and laboratories implied in nuclear activities are: ICIT, National Institute for cryogenics and isotope technologies at Rm Valcea Valcea. with R and D activity devoted to heavy water technologies, IFIN, Institute for nuclear physics and engineering, Bucharest, as well as the educational institutions involved in atomic energy applications and University research, Politechnical University Bucharest, University of Bucharest, University of Pitesti, etc. The INR activity outlined, i.e. the nuclear power research as a scientific and technical support for the Romanian nuclear power programme, mainly dedicated to the existing NPP in the country (CANDU). Focused with priority are: - Nuclear Safety (behavior of plant materials, components, installations during accident conditions and integrity investigations); - Radioactive Waste Management Radioactive; - Radioprotection; Product and services supply for NPP. INR Staff numbers 320 R and D qualified and experienced staff, 240 personnel in devices and prototype workshops and site support

  7. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)—Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    OpenAIRE

    A. Spinuso; L. Trani; S. Rives; P. Thomy; F. Euchner; Danijel Schorlemmer; Joachim Saul; Andres Heinloo; R. Bossu; T. van Eck

    2009-01-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach bas...

  8. Knowledge management for nuclear industry operating organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    research facilities to reduce operating costs and a decline in support to the universities to reduce overheads. The above factors have led to a reduction in technical innovation and a potential loss of technical competences that have drawn the attention of many concerned parties to the need for effective strategies and policies for nuclear knowledge management. The Director General of the IAEA, Mohamed ElBaradei, in his statement to the forty-seventh regular session of the IAEA General Conference 2003, said: 'Whether or not nuclear power witnesses an expansion in the coming decades, it is essential that we preserve nuclear scientific and technical competence for the safe operation of existing facilities and applications. Effective management of nuclear knowledge should include succession planning for the nuclear work force, the maintenance of the 'nuclear safety case' for operational reactors, and retention of the nuclear knowledge accumulated over the past six decades'. This report is intended for senior and middle level managers of nuclear industry operating organizations and provides practical information that can be used to improve knowledge management (KM) in such organizations. The information provided in this report is based upon actual experiences of Member State operating organizations as well as other related industries. The Nuclear Power Industry's Ageing Workforce: Transfer of Knowledge to the Next Generation, IAEA-TECDOC-1399, highlighted some of the knowledge management issues in Member States resulting from the large number of retiring NPP personnel who had been involved with the commissioning and initial operation of NPPs. This report complements that publication by broadening the scope of KM strategic issues, methods and techniques for nuclear industry operating organizations

  9. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70'. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs

  10. European Nuclear Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Gonzalez, E.; Diaz Diaz, J.L.; Jimenez, J.L.; Velarde, G.; Navarro, J.M.; Hittner, D.; Dominguez, M.T.; Bollini, G.; Martin, A.; Suarez, J.; Traini, E.; Lang-Lenton, J.

    2004-01-01

    ''European Nuclear Features - ENF'' is a joint publication of the three specialized technical journals, Nuclear Espana (Spain), Revue General Nucleaire (France), and atw - International Journal of Nuclear Power (Germany). The ENF support the international Europeen exchange of information and news about energy and nuclear power. News items, comments, and scientific and technical contributions will cover important aspects of the field. The second issue of ENF contains contributions about theses topics, among others: Institutional and Political Changes in the EU. - CIEMAT Department of Nuclear Fission: A General Overview. - Inertial Fusion Energy at DENIM. - High Temperature Reactors. European Research Programme. - On Site Assistance to Khmelnitsky NPP 1 and 2 (Ukraine). - Dismantling and Decommissioning of Vandellos I. (orig.)

  11. The European Community care for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrault, J.C.; Nordwall, J.H. de; Viseur, R.; Vivante, C.; Graziani, G.; Rinaldini, C.; Zanantoni, C.

    1977-01-01

    In recent times a large number of studies have investigated the various policies which can be followed to satisfy a given electric energy demand. Installation policies concerning conventional stations and several types of nuclear stations have been analyzed from the point of view of consumptions, expenditures, investments etc. The exercise is usually repeated for several demand-growth curves. Sometimes an optimization of the power station installation policy based on minimizing consumption of a type of fuel or expenditures is made. In the study presented here a different attitude is taken, in the sense that it is assumed that the energy demand growth will be large enough to justify the growth of nuclear energy production; this will be limited by a number of technological constraints, namely: 1- The Uranium delivery rate. This rate (tons/year) is assumed to increase from 1985 by 10% per annum and to reach a saturation level after a given number of years. 2- Availability of reprocessing capacity. It is assumed to increase with a given doubling time after 1985. 3- Development of reprocessing technology, which is represented here by the out-of-pile time of the fuel. 4-Availability and technology of fast reactors, represented by the year of first installlation and by their physical characteristics. All the values defining the above-mentioned constraints are varied parametrically and their effects on the penetration of thermal and fast reactors and on the consequent consumptions and expenditures are assessed. A few considerations on the demand of conventional energy resulting from such constraints and from various hypotheses on the total demand are made, to show that a considerable production of conventional energy must be foreseen in the next few decades

  12. European research priorities for intracerebral haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Thorsten; Petersson, Jesper; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2011-01-01

    Over 2 million people are affected by intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) worldwide every year, one third of them dying within 1 month, and many survivors being left with permanent disability. Unlike most other stroke types, the incidence, morbidity and mortality of ICH have not declined over time...... and disability. The European Research Network on Intracerebral Haemorrhage EURONICH is a multidisciplinary academic research collaboration that has been established to define current research priorities and to conduct large clinical studies on all aspects of ICH....

  13. European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Meglea, Claudia; Banutoiu, Marina; Paraschiva, M. V.; Meglea, S.

    2003-01-01

    The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and further development of a higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective should be achieved through the co-operation between European universities involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, research centers and the nuclear industry. To reach this objective, the ENEN Association has to: Promote and develop the collaboration in nuclear engineering education of engineers and researchers required by the nuclear industry and the regulatory bodies; Ensure the quality of nuclear academic engineering education and training; Increase the attractiveness for engagement in the nuclear field for students and young academics. The basic objectives of the ENEN Association shall be to: Deliver an European Master of Science Degree in Nuclear Engineering and promote PhD studies; Promote exchange of students and teachers participating in the frame of this network; Increase the number of students by providing incentives; Establish a framework for mutual recognition; Foster and strengthen the relationship with research laboratories and networks, industry and regulatory bodies, by involving them in (or association them with) nuclear academic education and by offering continuous training. The aims of the ENEN Association shall be achieved by: Discussion on educational objectives, methods and course contents among the members and with external partners, particularly national European industries; Organization of internal audits on the quality of nuclear engineering curricula; Awarding the label of 'European Master degree of Science in Nuclear Engineering' to the curricula satisfying the criteria set up by the ENEN Association; Cooperation between the members, and with the research centers and the nuclear industry for enhancement of mobility of teachers and students, organization of training and advanced courses, use of large research and teaching facilities or infrastructures; Cooperation

  14. European Birth Cohorts for Environmental Health Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrijheid, M.; Casas, M.; Bergström, A.; Carmichael, A.; Cordier, S.; Eggesbø, M.; Eller, E.; Fantini, M. P.; Fernández, M. F.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; Gehring, U.; Grazuleviciene, R.; Hohmann, C.; Karvonen, A. M.; Keil, T.; Kogevinas, M.; Koppen, G.; Krämer, U.; Kuehni, C. E.; Magnus, P.; Majewska, R.; Andersen, A. M. N.; Patelarou, E.; Petersen, M. S.; Pierik, F. H.; Polanska, K.; Porta, D.; Richiardi, L.; Santos, A. C.; Slama, R.; Šrám, Radim; Thijs, C.; Tischer, C.; Toft, G.; Trnovec, T.; Vandentorren, S.; Vrijkotte, T. G. M.; Wilhelm, M.; Wright, J.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 1 (2012), s. 29-37 ISSN 0091-6765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : environment pollution * child health * European birth cohorts Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 7.260, year: 2012

  15. Development of a European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Module to Assess the Quality of Life of Patients With Proctitis After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spry, Nigel; Halkett, Georgia; Aoun, Samar; Spry, Jane; Yeoh, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development of a proctitis-specific quality-of-life module to supplement the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: The module was developed according to EORTC guidelines, which consisted of an extensive literature review to identify previously described issues and interviews conducted with seven health professionals and 10 patients to rationalize the item list for construction into a provisional module. The module developed was then pretested with 28 patients and five health professionals. Results: The final module contains 21-items that are suitable to obtain information about the patients' quality of life after high-dose pelvic irradiation. The questionnaire has now been translated into four languages and commenced field testing in late 2007. Conclusions: The EORTC QLQ-C30, supplemented by EORTC QLQ-PRT21, will enable health professionals to more accurately monitor the side effects that patients experience after pelvic irradiation

  16. Public information and licensing procedures for nuclear installations. European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayoux, J.C.; Chevillard, F.; Mutschler, U.; Stubbe, C.

    1981-10-01

    This paper reviews the licensing procedures for nuclear installations in various European countries and examines the form, content and methods selected for information and consultation of the public. The author stresses the importance of this stage in the procedure, both for the nuclear operator and the public authorities, given the population's concern about the environment. He concludes that, irrespective of its complexity, the nuclear field cannot remain the concern of a few initiates competent to take decisions and that, consequently, this implies creation of new information systems to meet the public's desire to participate more directly in the process. (NEA) [fr

  17. Prospects for nuclear safety research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the text of a paper presented by Eric S. Beckjord (Director, Nuclear Regulatory Research/NRC) at the 22nd Water Reactor Safety Meeting in Bethesda, MD in October 1994. The following topics are briefly reviewed: (1) Reactor vessel research, (2) Probabilistic risk assessment, (3) Direct containment heating, (4) Advanced LWR research, (5) Nuclear energy prospects in the US, and (6) Future nuclear safety research. Subtopics within the last category include economics, waste disposal, and health and safety.

  18. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Research on the organization of equipment of nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Yang Jun

    2012-01-01

    The emergency rescue operation on major accident of nuclear facilities contains four kinds of abilities that are command and control, radiation protection, radiation monitoring and radioactive decontamination, so it needs to organize some equipment of nuclear emergency to enhance the efficiency of nuclear emergency operation. The organization of equipment of nuclear emergency should accord to the reality of the development in our country. It should have extractive structure, brief variety and advance capability, and also should be convenient, useful and adequate. The method of organization can first accord to the organization of group and organize the facilities accord to the organization of group of the emergency rescue force. (authors)

  20. The European Community's research and development programme on the decommissioning of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1988-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (CEC) continued with a second research programme on the decommissioning of nuclear installations (1984-88), after having completed a first programme on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants (1979-83). The programme, which has about 70 research contracts with organisations or private firms in the member states, includes the development and testing of advanced techniques, such as decontamination and dismantling, and the consideration of the radioactive waste arising therefrom. Work is done at laboratory scale or in the context of large-scale decommissioning operations. The paper will give an overview on the technical content and on some selected results. (author)

  1. Quality assurance organization for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides requirements, recommendations and illustrative examples for structuring, staffing and documenting the organizations that perform activities affecting quality of a nuclear power plant. It also provides guidance on control of organization interfaces, and establishment of lines for direction, communication and co-ordination. The provisions of this Guide are applicable to all organizations participating in any of the constituent areas of activities affecting quality of a nuclear power plant, such as design, manufacture, construction, commissioning and operation

  2. ENEN - European nuclear engineering network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsa, Olivia; Paraschiva, M.V.; Banutoiu, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the main objectives and expected results of European Project FP5 - ENEN - 'European Nuclear Engineering Network'. The underlying objective of the work is safeguarding the nuclear knowledge and expertise through the preservation of higher nuclear engineering education. Co-operation between universities and universities and research centres, will entail a better use of dwindling teaching capacity, scientific equipment and research infrastructure. 'Today, the priorities of the scientific community regarding basic research lie elsewhere than in nuclear sciences. Taken together, these circumstances create a significantly different situation from three to four decades ago when much of the present competence base was in fact generated. In addition, many of the highly competent engineers and scientists, who helped create the present nuclear industry, and its regulatory structure, are approaching retirement age. These competence issues need to be addressed at Community level and a well designed Community research and training programme should play a role that is more important than ever before. This is an area where the concept of an European research area should be further explored'. The outcome from this project should be a clear road map for the way ahead in nuclear engineering education in Europe. The underlying objective of the concerted action is the preservation of nuclear knowledge and expertise through the preservation of higher nuclear engineering education. 'Many diverse technologies, currently serving nations world-wide, would be affected by an inadequate number of future nuclear scientists and engineers. Nuclear technology is widespread and multidisciplinary: nuclear and reactor physics, thermal hydraulics and mechanics, material science, chemistry, health science, information technology and a variety of other areas. Yet the advancement of this technology, with all its associated benefits, will be threatened if not curtailed unless the

  3. Pre- and Postoperative Chemotherapy in Localized Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Expert Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothermundt, Christian; Fischer, Galina F; Bauer, Sebastian; Blay, Jean-Yves; Grünwald, Viktor; Italiano, Antoine; Kasper, Bernd; Kollár, Attila; Lindner, Lars H; Miah, Aisha; Sleijfer, Stefan; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Putora, Paul Martin

    2018-04-01

    The management of localized extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS) is challenging and the role of pre- and postoperative chemotherapy is unclear and debated among experts. Medical oncology experts of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group were asked to participate in this survey on the use of pre- and postoperative chemotherapy in STS. Experts from 12 centers in Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Switzerland, and The Netherlands agreed to participate and provided their treatment algorithm. Answers were converted into decision trees based on the objective consensus methodology. The decision trees were used as a basis to identify consensus and discrepancies. Several criteria used for decision-making in extremity STS were identified: chemosensitivity, fitness, grading, location, and size. In addition, resectability and resection status were relevant in the pre- and postoperative setting, respectively. Preoperative chemotherapy is considered in most centers for marginally resectable tumors only. Yet, in some centers, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is used routinely and partially combined with hyperthermia. Although most centers do not recommend postoperative chemotherapy, some offer this treatment on a regular basis. Radiotherapy is an undisputed treatment modality in extremity STS. Due to lacking evidence on the utility of pre- and postoperative chemotherapy in localized extremity STS, treatment strategies vary considerably among European experts. The majority recommended neoadjuvant chemotherapy for marginally resectable grade 2-3 tumors; the majority did not recommend postoperative chemotherapy in any setting. The management of localized extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS) is challenging and the role of pre- and postoperative chemotherapy is unclear and debated among experts. This study analyzed the decision-making process among 12 European experts on systemic therapy for STS. A wide range of

  4. A survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coucke, P.A.; Ciernik, I.F.; Maingon, P.; Do, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997-1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, defined radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no 'standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo-radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC. (author)

  5. European neutron research prepares for future challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    Neutrons are among the fundamental building blocks of matter. Some of the processes in which they are involved are responsible for energy generation in nuclear power plants. In this context, CERN’s n_TOF and other facilities participating in the ERINDA EU-funded programme help the community integrate all the scientific efforts needed to produce high-quality nuclear data for future nuclear technologies.   The 4π calorimeter inside the n_TOF experimental area. Image courtesy of the n_TOF Collaboration. Accurate measurements of the interactions between neutrons and each of the elements present in nuclear reactors are vital tools enabling scientists to explore solutions – other than simple protected storage – for the treatment of radioactive waste deriving from a number of applications, ranging from energy production to the medical field. Particularly valuable is the contribution provided by the 13 accelerator-based neutron sources, which the ERINDA EU-funded...

  6. Postoperative Quality of Life after Total Gastrectomy Compared with Partial Gastrectomy: Longitudinal Evaluation by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-OG25 and STO22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Choi, Yun Suk; Kim, Tae Han; Huh, Yeon-Ju; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Kong, Seong-Ho; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2016-12-01

    The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life questionnaire-OG25 was developed to evaluate the quality of life in patients with stomach and esophageal cancer. The following are included in the OG25 but not in the STO22: odynophagia, choked when swallowing, weight loss, trouble eating with others, trouble swallowing saliva, trouble talking, and trouble with coughing. In this study, we evaluated the quality of life of gastrectomized patients using both, the OG25 and the STO22. A total of 138 patients with partial gastrectomy (PG) (distal gastrectomy=91; pylorus-preserving gastrectomy= 47) and 44 patients with total gastrectomy (TG) were prospectively evaluated. Body weight and scores from the OG25 and STO22 were evaluated preoperatively and at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Patients with TG had significant weight loss compared to patients with PG. At 3 months, TG was associated with worse scores for dysphagia, eating, odynophagia, trouble eating with others, trouble with taste, and weight loss on the OG25. TG was also associated with dysphagia, eating restrictions, and anxiety on the STO22. The OG25 helped differentiate between the groups with respect to weight loss, odynophagia, choked when swallowing, and trouble eating with others. The OG25 scores changed over time and were significantly different. The OG25 is a more sensitive and useful scale than the STO22 for evaluating the quality of life of gastrectomized patients, especially those with total gastrectomy.

  7. Stepping up Open Science Training for European Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project.

  8. Translation into Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of "The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire-Bone Metastases-22".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki-Rosário, Natália; Garcia Filho, Reynaldo Jesus; Garcia, Jairo Greco; Dini, Gal Moreira; Bottomley, Andrew; Chow, Edward; Sabino Neto, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct a cross-cultural adaptation (with translation into Brazilian Portuguese) and validation of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire-Bone Metastases-22 (EORTC QLQ-BM22). Ninety-five bone metastasis patients (31 men and 64 women, mean age 58.36±8.90 years) took part in the investigation. The translation guide of the EORTC was used to translate from English into Brazilian Portuguese and adapt the instrument culturally. The reliability and the face, content and construct validities were tested. Internal consistency was estimated using Cronbach's alpha for the total score, pain and functional subscales of the EORTC QLQ-BM22 (0.93, 0.86, 0.90). Reliability was analyzed by Pearson's correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The correlations were higher than the recommended value of 0.75, which indicated good test-retest reliability. Construct validity was demonstrated by correlation with the questionnaire medical outcome study questionnaire 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36). It showed significant correlation between the fields of QLQ-BM22 and the SF-36 (P≤0.001). The EORTC QLQ-BM22 was translated into Brazilian Portuguese, was culturally adapted and was proven to be reliable, with face, content and construct validity.

  9. New nuclear package. At last a breakthrough for a European legal framework on nuclear safety?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the European Commission presented what it referred to as a nuclear package. Two draft directives were to cover nuclear safety and nuclear waste management in a legally binding sense on the level of the European Union. A separate directive on funds for decommissioning nuclear power plants and for waste management up to final storage, which had still been included in preliminary drafts in 2002, had been dropped and turned into recommendations in 2006. However, the nuclear package with the 2 draft directives found no sufficient majority in the Council in 2004. In November 2008, the Commission presented a new draft directive on nuclear safety, especially the safety of nuclear power plants. The Commission demands a European legal framework for the political acceptance of nuclear power. As far as procedures were concerned, the Commission had expressed its hope that the directive could be adopted by the summer of 2009. The draft directive has been thoroughly revised over the past four months. Shaping the European Union is a difficult matter. The improvement seems to be in the field of nuclear safety. It is to be hoped that a directive will be adopted in the end which will result in more acceptance, not just in arguments exchanged between the Commission and the member countries when it comes to transposition into national law and its execution. (orig.)

  10. European Human Resources Observatory for the Nuclear Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flore, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Institute for Energy and Transport provides support to European Union policies and technology innovation to ensure sustainable, safe, secure and efficient energy production, distribution and use and to foster sustainable and efficient transport in Europe. Briefly outlined are the organization, bottom-up approach and top-down approach

  11. The European Community case for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrault, J.C.; Nordwall, J.H. de; Viseur, R.; Vivante, C.; Graziani, G.; Rinaldini, C.; Zanantoni, C.

    1977-01-01

    Making conservative assumptions on the development of energy demand, the major requirements in terms of annual and cumulative uranium, separative work, reprocessing capacity and fossile fuel are reviewed for a reference case assuming the use of conventional, LWR, FBR power stations and recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors. A very long-term view is taken to show how the long-term future is affected by decisions taken in the medium-term future. A saturation of the demand is assumed in the long term, both because this assumption seems to be reasonable and because it helps making the scenario simpler and our arguments clearer. Four main conclusions are drawn: (1) Even assuming that conventional power stations are used in the long term only to cover peak-load demand, the number of conventional stations and the fossil-fuel consumption will be quite large. (2) Supplying enough uranium and enrichment capacity will pose formidable problems, particularly in view of the large increase in the demand in the last decades of our century. (3) Fast breeder reactors should be used to considerably reduce such demands. In any case, the availability of large reprocessing capacity is a must. (4) From the analysis of the sensitivity of the results to FBR breeding ratio and to the out-of-pile time (due to cooling and reprocessing), the conclusion is drawn that both are very important, the latter being more important in the short term, the former in the long term. The achievement of an advanced reprocessing technology must be considered as a primary development goal. (author)

  12. The european hematology association roadmap for european hematology research : A consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Engert (Andreas); C.L. Balduini (Carlo); A. Brand (Anneke); B. Coiffier (Bertrand); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H. Döhner (Hartmut); De Wit, T.D. (Thom Duyvené); Eichinger, S. (Sabine); W.E. Fibbe (Willem); Green, T. (Tony); De Haas, F. (Fleur); A. Iolascon (Achille); T. Jaffredo (Thierry); F. Rodeghiero (Francesco); G. Salles (Gilles); J.J. Schuringa (Jan Jacob)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European

  13. European nuclear education network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.; Moons, F.; Safieh, J.

    2005-01-01

    In most countries within the European Union that rely to a significant extent on nuclear power, neither undergraduate nor PhD education is producing a sufficient number of engineers and doctors to fill the needs of the industry. As a result of an EU-supported project, a new education organisation, European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN), has recently been established, with the aim to establish a European master's degree of nuclear engineering. Recently, a new EU project, Nuclear European Platform of Training and University Organisations (NEPTUNO), has been launched, aiming at the practical implementation of ENEN and harmonisation of training activities. (author)

  14. The construction and testing of the EORTC colorectal cancer-specific quality of life questionnaire module (QLQ-CR38). European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Study Group on Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, M. A.; te Velde, A.; Aaronson, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were to construct a colorectal cancer-specific quality of life (QL) questionnaire module to be used in conjunction with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and to test its reliability and validity in The Netherlands.

  15. Project 'European Research Center for Air Pollution Abatement Measures'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    During the 5-7th of March 1985 the first status report of the project 'European Research Center for Air Pollution Control Measures' took place in the Nuclear Research Center, Karlsruhe. Progress reports on the following topics assessment and analysis of the impacts of airborne pollutants on forest trees; distinction from other potential causes of recent forest dieback, research into atmospheric dispersion, conversion and deposition of airborne pollutants, development and optimization of industrial-technical processes to reduce or avoid emissions and providing instruments and making recommendations to the industrial and political sectors were presented. This volume is a collection of the work reported there. 42 papers were entered separately. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Nuclear power and sustainable energy supply for Europe. European Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilden, W.

    2005-01-01

    The right energy mix is decisive. The European Commission feels that nuclear power can make an important contribution towards sustainable energy supply in Europe. Nuclear power should keep its place in the European energy mix. One important aspect in this regard is improved public acceptance through communication, transparency, and confidence building. High safety standards and a credible approach to the safe long-term management of radioactive waste are major components of this sustainable energy source. (orig./GL)

  17. Challenges for EURATOM research and training in the frame of the European 'Higher Education' And 'Research' areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    The paper is intended to answer two major questions of the modern society: 1) What are the challenges for EURATOM Research and Training in the frame of the European 'Higher Education' and 'Research' areas? (main stakeholders); 2) What kind of response is offered by the EURATOM RD and DD and E and T programmes in nuclear fission and radiation protection? (scientific and societal impact). The actions of the research policy in the EU are not conducted for the sake of acquiring Knowledge as a goal per se, but as a support to other EU policies, in particular, the Energy policy. In the area of fission and radiation protection, this Community policy implies the co-operation of all stakeholders (most of them participate in the EURATOM programmes), that is: research organisations (public and private, power and medical applications, etc); systems suppliers (e.g. nuclear vendors, engineering companies, etc); energy providers (e.g. electric utilities, heat and/or hydrogen vendors, etc); nuclear regulatory bodies and associated technical safety organizations (TSO); education and training (E and T) institutions, and, in particular, universities; civil society and the international institutional framework (IAEA and OECD/NEA). The emphasis in the paper is on the improvements all along the history of nuclear fission power (Generations I, II and III) as well as on the visionary innovation proposed by the 'Generation IV International Forum' (GIF). International research (in particular, EURATOM), in this area is guided by the four 'GIF Technology Goals for industry and society', namely: sustainability: e.g. enhanced fuel utilisation and optimal waste management; economics: e.g. minimisation of costs of MWe installed and MWh generated; safety and reliability: e.g. robust safety architecture, no need for off-site measures; proliferation resistance and physical protection: e.g. absence of separated Pu. EURATOM research and training is presented in the broader context of the new EU policy

  18. Safety management at nuclear installations with research reactors. A comparison of five European installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troen, H.; Lauridsen, B.

    1997-11-01

    Five European institutions with nuclear research reactors were visited to compare safety management among institutions similar to Risoe. Risoe is a National Laboratory and the main activities are research and development. In 1996 it was decided to look into safety management at Risoe again; the last revision was in 1972. The purpose was to make it more efficient and to emphasise, that the responsibility lies in the operating organisation. Information such as nuclear facilities at the institutions, the safety management organisation, emergency preparedness, and lists of radiation doses to the employees from the years 1995 and 1996 is given in the report. Also international requirements and recommendations are given in short. Furthermore the report contains some reflections on the development in safety management organisations in resent years and the conclusions drawn from the information gathered

  19. A European Research Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R.

    2001-01-01

    This article is a summary of the presentation of the European Commissioner, Philippe Busquen, to the European Parliament (beginning of year 2000) with the proposal and method for a revival of the Research and Development in this wider sense in the European Union. The starting point of his thesis is that Europe performs less, and more disorderly, activities in this field that her main competitors. USA and Japan. His basic proposal is a larger coordination among the european research projects, with a previous phase of informatics intoxicator among the european research centres and the cross-linked participation, real of virtual in the experiments and projects. (Author)

  20. A new start for European nuclear energy: the forum and the sustainable nuclear energy platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueldner, Ralf [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hanover (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    reactors, and these vendors are part of the SNETP as well. To summarise, EON Kernkraft believes, that nuclear makes on important contribution to a sustainable energy mix today and will continue do so in the future. In Europe nuclear technology along the whole value chain is a cutting edge technology. Therefore research and development has to increase on European level to face the challenges. Finally public acceptance has to be stabilised and even increased as well. (1) An Energy Policy for Europe, COM (2007) 1 final (2) Update of the Nuclear Illustrative Programme in the context of the Second Strategic Energy Review, COM(2008) 776 final (3) Energy and Transport - Trend to 2030, Update 2007, COM (4) Strength - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Threats. (5) The Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform, A vision report, 2007. (author)

  1. Nuclear power: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 206 power reactors with a gross power of 181,941 MWe and a net power of 172,699 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2004, one nuclear power plant was commissioned in Russia (Kalinin 3), two (Kmelnitzki 2 and Rowno 4) in Ukraine. Five nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2004. As announced in 2000, the Chapelcross 1 to Chapelcross 4 plants in Britain were shut down for economic reasons. In Lithuania, the Ignalina 1 unit was disconnected from the power grid, as had been demanded by the EU Commission within the framework of the negotiations about the country's accession to the EU. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.5 GW. In late 2004, four nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (2). 150 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25), which is sixteen more than the year before as a consequence of the accession of new countries. They had an aggregate gross power of 137,943 MWe and a net power of 131,267 MWe, generating approx. 983 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2003, thus again contributing some 32% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in Lithuania (80%), followed by 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 56% in Belgium, and 46% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as

  2. Future for nuclear data research. Human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    A comment is given on the problem of human resources to support the future nuclear data activity which will be indispensable for advanced utilization of nuclear energy and radiations. Emphasis is put in the importance of the functional organization among the nuclear data center (JAEA), industries and universities for provision of human resources. (author)

  3. French nuclear safety authorities: for a harmonization of nuclear safety at the European level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    The European Commission is working on 2 directives concerning nuclear energy: the first one is dedicated to nuclear safety and the second to the management of radioactive wastes and spent fuels. In the context of the widening of the European Union and of the inter-connection of the different electric power grids throughout Europe, the harmonization of the rules in the nuclear safety field is seen by manufacturers as a mean to achieve a fair competition between nuclear equipment supplying companies and by the French nuclear safety authorities (FNSA) as a mean to keep on improving nuclear safety and to be sure that competitiveness does not drive safety standards down. According to FNSA the 2 European directives could give a legal framework to the harmonization and should contain principles that reinforce the responsibility of each state. FNSA considers that the EPR (European pressurized water reactor) may be an efficient tool for the harmonization because of existing industrial cooperation programs between France and Germany and between France and Finland. (A.C.)

  4. The directive establishing a community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations: the European Union approach to nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garribba, M.; Chirtes, A.; Nauduzaite, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article aims at explaining the evolution leading to the adoption of the recent Council Directive 2009/71/EURATOM establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations adopted with the consent of all 27 members states following the overwhelming support of the European Parliament, that creates for the first time, a binding legal framework that brings legal certainty to European Union citizens and reinforces the role and independence of national regulators. The paper is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the competence of the European Atomic energy Community to legislate in the area of nuclear safety. It focuses on the 2002 landmark ruling of the European Court of justice that confirmed this competence by recognizing the intrinsic link between radiation protection and nuclear safety. The second part describes the history of the Nuclear safety directive from the initial 2003 European Commission proposal to today 's text in force. The third part is dedicated to a description of the content of the Directive and its implications on the further development of nuclear safety in the European Union. (N.C.)

  5. Strategies for public health research in European Union countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Olivier; McCarthy, Mark; Conceição, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    'Health' is an identifiable theme within the European Union multi-annual research programmes. Public Health Innovation and Research in Europe (PHIRE), led by the European Public Health Association, sought to identify public health research strategies in EU member states. Within PHIRE, national public health associations reviewed structures for health research, held stakeholder workshops and produced reports. This information, supplemented by further web searches, including using assisted translation, was analysed for national research strategies and health research strategies. All countries described general research strategies, outlining organizational and capacity objectives. Thematic fields, including health, are mentioned in some strategies. A health research strategy was identified for 15 EU countries and not for 12. Ministries of health led research strategies for nine countries. Public health research was identified in only three strategies. National research strategies did not refer to the European Union's health research programme. Public health research strategies of European countries need to be developed by ministries of health, working with the research community to achieve the European Research Area.

  6. Combined Neutron Center for European Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagniel, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    High-power proton linacs are needed as driver for several applications, namely transmutation of nuclear waste using Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), spallation neutron sources (ESS in Europe) and other fields of basic and applied research (next generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, neutrino factories, muon colliders, irradiation facilities for material testing...). The possible synergies among these projects will be pointed out and the feasibility study of high-power proton linac used as driver of a multi-user facility (CONCERT) will be presented. There was excellent scientific, technical and economic reasons to study a Combined Neutron Center for European Research and Technology (CONCERT) based on a high-power proton accelerator. Such an installation would serve condensed matter studies by spallation neutron scattering, a technological irradiation tool and R and D facility for an hybrid reactor demonstrator, a radioactive ion beam facility for nuclear physics, R and D developments for a muon/neutrino facility. The installation could therefore constitute a European center of excellence in the field of neutronics where a large number of scientific and technical executives could be trained. The CONCERT Project Team has performed the feasibility study of such a multi-user facility with: - a review of the beam needs for the different applications, - an analyze of their compatibility, - the definition of the scope of a site-independent project, - a selection of the most appropriate options regarding scientific, technical, financial, organizational and administrative aspects, - an estimation of the costs for construction, operation and the needs in manpower. The conceptual design report [17] is sufficiently detailed to minimize contingencies on those parts of the project having a large potential impact in terms of performances, costs or delays. (author)

  7. Role of a national research organization in the transfer of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear technology holds great promise for developing countries because it can contribute to national development. The developing countries, however, lack the resources and expertise to develop nuclear technology through their own efforts. A national research organization devoted to the promotion and utilization of nucler technology can provide an effective channel for the transfer of nuclear technology. The problems which the national research organization is likely to face in executing its tasks as an agent for the transfer of technology are discussed. An appreciation of these problems would enable the organization to restructure its priorities so as to achieve maximum effectiveness. The various ways by which the national research organization can speed up the task of transfer of technology are also discussed

  8. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte very favorable and favorable, lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Richard B; Schlembach, Pamela J; Jones, Dan; Chronowski, Gregory M; Ha, Chul S; Younes, Anas; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Barista, Ibrahim; Cabanillas, Fernando; Cox, James D

    2002-03-15

    Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease (LPHD) is rare and has a natural history different from that of classic Hodgkin disease. There is little information in the literature regarding the role of chemotherapy in patients with early-stage LPHD. The objective of this study was to examine recurrence free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and patterns of first recurrence in patients with LPHD who were treated with radiotherapy alone or with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. From 1963 to 1996, 48 consecutive patients ages 16-49 years (median, 28 years) with Ann Arbor Stage I (n = 30 patients) or Stage II (n = 18 patients), very favorable (VF; n = 5 patients) or favorable (F; n = 43 patients) LPHD, according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (EORTC-GELA) criteria, received radiotherapy alone (n = 37 patients) or received chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (n = 11 patients). The percentages of patients with VF disease (11% vs. 9% in the radiotherapy group vs. the chemotherapy plus radiotherapy group, respectively) or F disease (89% vs. 91%, respectively) within the two treatment groups were similar (P = 1.00). A median of three cycles of chemotherapy with mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) or with mitoxantrone, vincristine, vinblastine, and prednisone (NOVP) was given initially to six patients and five patients, respectively. A median total radiotherapy dose of 40 grays (Gy) given in daily fractions of 2.0 Gy was delivered to both treatment groups. The median follow-up was 9.3 years, and 98% of patients were observed for > or = 3.0 years. RFS was similar for patients who were treated with radiotherapy alone and patients who were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (10-year survival rates: 77% and 68%, respectively; P = 0.89). The OS rate also was similar for the two groups (10-year survival rates: 90% and 100%, respectively; P = 0

  9. Prestigious nuclear research organization orders Silicom's cutting-edge server adapters

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Silicom Ltd today announced that one of the world's largest and most prestigious nuclear research organization has placed an initial order for its Gigabit Ethernet Server Adapters. Silicom's high-performance adapters will be deployed in the organization's state-of-the-art particle physics laboratory servers to help them attain reliable gigabit transfer rates" (1/2 page).

  10. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Trkov, A.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations

  11. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  12. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Hogan, J.T.; Porkolab, M.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  13. A legislative framework for the safety of nuclear installations in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kus, S.; Emmerechts, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the first time since the inception of the European Community in 1957 and after two previously unsuccessful attempts, on 25 June 2009 the Council of the European Union adopted European-wide, binding requirements on nuclear safety. The goal of the 'Council Directive establishing a Community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations' ('the Directive') is to maintain and to promote the continuous improvement of nuclear safety and to ensure that a high level of nuclear safety is provided by EU member states to protect workers and the general public against the dangers arising from nuclear installations. The Directive is based on the IAEA Safety Fundamentals and the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The 27 member states of the Community are required to bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with the Directive by 22 July 2011. The Directive applies to a range of nuclear installations that is wider than the one adopted in the Convention on Nuclear Safety.9 The Directive applies to any civilian nuclear installation, defined as: a) an enrichment plant, nuclear fuel fabrication plant, nuclear power plant, reprocessing plant, research reactor facility, spent fuel storage facility; and b) storage facilities for radioactive waste that are on the same site and are directly related to nuclear installations listed under point a). The Directive is without doubt a milestone in international and regional law making in the field of nuclear law, not so much because of its content but because of the supranational nature of European law and the powers of EU institutions. Member states have long resisted the Directive because of the powers which it delegates to the European Commission, and more importantly, to the European Court of Justice. The Commission, as the guardian of the treaties and the measures taken by the institutions, ensures that EU legislation is applied correctly by the member states. It can start

  14. European clearinghouse on nuclear power plants operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranguelova, Vesselina; Bruynooghe, Christiane; Noel, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Learning from operational experience and applying this knowledge promptly and intelligently is one of the ways to improve the safety of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Recent reviews of the effectiveness of Operational Experience Feedback (OEF) systems have pointed to the need for further improvement, with importance being placed on tailoring the information to the needs of the regulators. In 2007, at the request of a number of nuclear safety regulatory authorities in Europe, the Institute for Energy of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EC JRC) initiated a project on Nuclear Power Plant operational experience feedback, which adopts an integrated approach to the research needed to strengthen the European capabilities for assessment of NPP operational events and to promote the development of tools and mechanisms for the improved application of the lessons learned. Consequently, a so-called ''European Clearinghouse'' on NPP OEF was established, which includes scientific officers from the EC JRC, a number of European nuclear safety regulatory authorities and some of their Technical Support Organizations (TSOs). The paper discusses the activities implemented in 2008 within the framework of the European Clearinghouse on NPP OEF (hereinafter called the European NPP Clearinghouse) and provides an overview of the main conclusions drawn from the safety studies performed. Outlook of the activities carried out in 2009 are given. (orig.)

  15. Research for nuclear power. A Swiss perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foskolos, K.; Yadigaroglu, G.; Chawla, R.; Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear energy research in Switzerland is concentrated in the Department for Nuclear Energy and Safety Research of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Nuclear research at PSI is structured around three main poles: safety and related operational issues for existing NPPs, nuclear waste management, and safety characteristics of future reactor concepts. Further, global aspects of energy systems are examined with regard to safety, economics and environmental impact. Presently, a total effort of about 200 py/a is invested in the nuclear research. Government funding of nuclear research was relatively stable during recent years, reaching about 35 MCHF/a. External funding of about 15 MCHF/a is expected to remain stable. (R.P.)

  16. European master degree in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, Petre; Prisecaru, Ilie

    2003-01-01

    In order to preserve and to improve the quality of nuclear engineering education and training in Europe, as well to ensure the safe and economic operation of nuclear power plants, the European Nuclear Engineering Network Program (ENEN) started in 2002. It is a program aiming to establish and maintain a set of criteria for specific curricula of nuclear engineering education, in particular, for an European Master Degree in Nuclear Engineering (EMNE). The ENEN program is financed by the FP5 and has the wide support of IAEA, OECD and EU Commission departments dealing with the nuclear engineering knowledge management. The promising results up to now determined the creation of the Asian Nuclear Engineering Network (ANEN) in July 2003 and of the World Nuclear University (WNU) starting in September 2003. The paper presents the future structure of EMNE which will allow the harmonization of the curricula of the universities of Europe until the Bologna Convention will be fully accepted and operational in all European countries. The ENEN program has taken into consideration the curricula of 22 universities and research centres from 15 different European countries and proposed a feasible scheme which allows the undergraduates with a weak to strong nuclear background to continue their graduate education in the nuclear engineering field towards EMNE. As one of the contractors of this program, University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest brings its contribution and actively takes part in all activities establishing the EMNE. (author)

  17. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1961-07-15

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation.

  18. The OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The European Nuclear Energy Agency (ENEA) was set up in December 1957 as part of the OEEC to develop nuclear collaboration in Western Europe. The promotion of joint undertakings is one of the most important functions of ENEA, and why one of the first committees of the Agency to be set up was its Top Level Group on Co-operation in the Reactor Field. International collaboration in joint undertakings enables resources in effort, equipment and money to be pooled for the maximum benefit of the countries participating, and is the only way whereby a sufficiently wide range of research possibilities can be covered in a reasonable time. Examples fro such projects are: 1) Halden project - a joint three-year project to exploit the boiling heavy water reactor built by the Norwegian Institute for Atom energy at Halden; 2) Dragon Project - to investigate the possibilities of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors centered on the construction and operation, by an international team, of an experimental 20 MWt high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (Dragon) at the UK Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith; 3) Eurochemic - with a principle objective to construct an experimental plant for the treatment of used uranium fuel from reactors in the participating countries; 4) Nuclear Shops. In addition to promoting joint undertakings, a function of ENEA is to encourage scientific and technical collaboration between national research organizations. Co-operation has been facilitated in the areas od nuclear data, food irradiation, environment radioactivity, training, information and nuclear legislation

  19. European network for research in global change (ENRICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A [European Commission, Bruxelles (Belgium). DG XII/JRC

    1996-12-31

    While approaching the beginning of the twenty first century, the scientific community is faced with the formidable tasks of monitoring and detecting, understanding and predicting changes in the Earth System and its interactions with human beings. A crucial challenge is to make scientific research results accessible and usable for those involved in the decision making process related to the concept of Sustainable Development. Major international scientific programmes under the umbrella of ICSU, such as the IGBP and WCRP, are dealing with these issues. Although there exist many well developed global change research programmes in several European countries and effective collaboration networks between research institutes, there is an urgent need for overall communication with a view to promoting wider international links ensuring complementarity, synergy and coherence. Recognizing the importance of promoting coherence in research and utilising research results for various European Union (EU) policies, the European Commissioner responsible for Science, Research and Development wrote in March 1992 to all the EU Research Ministers to propose an initiative in this domain. In a rapid response, a group of Senior Experts from the EU Member States was set up in April 1992. This Group established a Task Force to develop the concept of the European Network for Research In Global CHange (ENRICH) which was approved in July 1993

  20. European network for research in global change (ENRICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A. [European Commission, Bruxelles (Belgium). DG XII/JRC

    1995-12-31

    While approaching the beginning of the twenty first century, the scientific community is faced with the formidable tasks of monitoring and detecting, understanding and predicting changes in the Earth System and its interactions with human beings. A crucial challenge is to make scientific research results accessible and usable for those involved in the decision making process related to the concept of Sustainable Development. Major international scientific programmes under the umbrella of ICSU, such as the IGBP and WCRP, are dealing with these issues. Although there exist many well developed global change research programmes in several European countries and effective collaboration networks between research institutes, there is an urgent need for overall communication with a view to promoting wider international links ensuring complementarity, synergy and coherence. Recognizing the importance of promoting coherence in research and utilising research results for various European Union (EU) policies, the European Commissioner responsible for Science, Research and Development wrote in March 1992 to all the EU Research Ministers to propose an initiative in this domain. In a rapid response, a group of Senior Experts from the EU Member States was set up in April 1992. This Group established a Task Force to develop the concept of the European Network for Research In Global CHange (ENRICH) which was approved in July 1993

  1. Building the European Research Area in nuclear fission pioneering steps in actinide science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsstroem, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The concept of the European Research Area (ERA) aims at closer development of research policies in Europe and closer networking of research capacities, to reduce fragmentation of research in Europe. The goal is to make European research more effective and competitive. Several approaches are made to create ERA. The European Research Framework Programme is one tool in this context, with the introduction of the new instruments, Integrated Projects, Networks of Excellence and Integrated Infrastructure Initiatives. Actinide science is one area that could benefit from better coordination and more effective use of the research capacities, both human and physical. The European Commission is thus funding a Network of Excellence (ACTINET-6) and an Integrated Project (EUROPART) in this area within the sixth EURATOM Framework Programme. (author)

  2. The European nuclear power industry: Restructuring for combined strength and worldwide leadership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Norman, R.E.; Reich, W.J.; Hill, L.J.

    1993-06-18

    The European nuclear power industry is being restructured from an industry drawn along national lines to a European-wide industry. This, in part, reflects growth of the European Economic Community, but it also reflects changes in the international nuclear power industry. The objectives of the participants, beyond better integration of the nuclear industry in Western Europe, are to (1) obtain European leadership of the worldwide commercial nuclear power industry, (2) improve medium- and long-term safety of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (FSU) power reactors, and (3) reduce domestic concerns about nuclear power. The activities to achieve these goals include (1) formation of Nuclear Power International (a joint venture of the German and French nuclear power plant vendors for design and construction of nuclear power plants), (2) formation of a utility group to forge agreement throughout Europe on what the requirements are for the next generation of nuclear power plants, and (3) agreement by regulators in multiple European countries to harmonize regulations. This is to be achieved before the end of the decade. These changes would allow a single design of nuclear power plant to be built anywhere in Europe. The creation of European-wide rules (utility requirements, engineering standards, and national regulations) would create strong economic and political forces for other European countries (Eastern Europe and FSU) to meet these standards.

  3. The European nuclear power industry: Restructuring for combined strength and worldwide leadership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Norman, R.E.; Reich, W.J.; Hill, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    The European nuclear power industry is being restructured from an industry drawn along national lines to a European-wide industry. This, in part, reflects growth of the European Economic Community, but it also reflects changes in the international nuclear power industry. The objectives of the participants, beyond better integration of the nuclear industry in Western Europe, are to (1) obtain European leadership of the worldwide commercial nuclear power industry, (2) improve medium- and long-term safety of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (FSU) power reactors, and (3) reduce domestic concerns about nuclear power. The activities to achieve these goals include (1) formation of Nuclear Power International (a joint venture of the German and French nuclear power plant vendors for design and construction of nuclear power plants), (2) formation of a utility group to forge agreement throughout Europe on what the requirements are for the next generation of nuclear power plants, and (3) agreement by regulators in multiple European countries to harmonize regulations. This is to be achieved before the end of the decade. These changes would allow a single design of nuclear power plant to be built anywhere in Europe. The creation of European-wide rules (utility requirements, engineering standards, and national regulations) would create strong economic and political forces for other European countries (Eastern Europe and FSU) to meet these standards

  4. Nuclear and radiological preparedness: the achievements of the European research project prepare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Thierry; Gering, Florian; Charron, Sylvie; Zhelezniak, Mark; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Heriard-Dubreuil, Gilles; Camps, Johan; Raskob, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The PREPARE project aimed closing gaps identified in nuclear and radiological preparedness in Europe following the first evaluation of the Fukushima disaster. With 46 partners from Europe and Japan, it collected the key players in the area of emergency management and rehabilitation preparedness. Starting from February 2013, the project ended in January 2016. Among others, the project reviewed existing operational procedures for long-lasting releases, cross-border problems in radiation monitoring and food safety and further developed missing functionalities in decision support systems ranging from improved source term estimation and dispersion modelling to the inclusion of hydrological pathways for European water bodies. In addition, a so-called Analytical Platform has been developed to explore the scientific and operational means to improve information collection, information exchange and the evaluation of such types of disasters. The tools developed within the project will be partly integrated into the decision support systems ARGOS and JRODOS. (authors)

  5. The 9. European nuclear conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions

  6. Forty years of European Society for Muscle Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Schaub

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Muscle Club was founded 1971 and since 1972 yearly muscle conferences were held in turn in different European countries. Regular scientific meetings in the field of muscle research did not exist before. The name of the Muscle Club was 1988 changed to European Society for Muscle Research (ESMR. The yearly meetings usually attract 200-300 participants. The 39th meeting will be held 11-15 Sept. 2010 in Abano Terme near Padova, and the 40th meeting 14-18 Sept. 2011 in Berlin. Since 1980 the meeting reports and abstracts are regularly published in the Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility (JMRCM. The history of the society and the muscle scientists involved with it will be outlined.

  7. ENEN - European Nuclear Educational Network Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.

    2006-01-01

    After the pioneering initiative of BNEN, the Belgian Nuclear higher Education Network, other countries, e.g. Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland, etc., created their own pool of education. At the European level the ENEN Association (European Nuclear Education Network) is a sustainable product generated by an FP5 project. The main objective of the ENEN Association is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, nuclear research centres and nuclear industry

  8. Nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The NNSA checked and coordinated in 1999 the research project of the Surveillance Technology on Nuclear Installations under the National 9th-Five-Year Program to promote the organizations that undertake the research work on schedule and lay a foundation of obtaining achievements and effectiveness for the 9th-five-year plan on nuclear safety research

  9. European research and development strategy for clean power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkohr, R.

    2006-01-01

    We need more rather than less money for research, energy research in particular, research being an important contributor to progress, in order to achieve peak performance, comply with the quest for knowledge about the structure of the world, or to be able to further improve our quality of life at far less expense of materials and energy. This latter concept is in line with European identity. If we succeed in demonstrating to the world that people can live a better life if they manage their affairs sustainably, we Europeans will have won a new trademark: a sustainable Europe which can be left to future generations. For this purpose Europeans, more than before, must perceive Europe as a space of knowledge. Science policy must be geared to Europe, not just to a national territory. Also, Europe should devote more attention to fundamental research. Some outstanding projects are needed, particularly in energy research, with the participation of industry in order to reduce materials consumption and avoid emissions. Education, too, must be given much attention. In the absence of enthusiastic young scientists, engineers, and skilled workers who know their neighboring countries and their technologies and languages from an early age, European energy policy is bound to remain fragmented. (orig.)

  10. International cooperation for promotion of nuclear science and engineering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Kazusuke; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Katoh, Toshio; Kimura, Itsuro.

    1993-01-01

    For promotion of nuclear science and engineering research, examinations were made on the possibilities and necessary measures to extend joint research at international level. The present article is a summary of the reports of investigations performed during FY 1986 through 1991 by the Special Committee of the AESJ for Feasibility Study on International Cooperation for Promotion of Nuclear Science and Engineering Research, under contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan. Background information was collected on the present status of scientific research facilities in US, European and Asian countries on one hand, and on the expectations and prospects of Japanese scientists on the other hand. Based on the analysis of these data, some measures necessary to expand the international cooperation were proposed. It was emphasized that international joint research on a reciprocal basis would be effective in order to strengthen the technological basis of peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Problems to be solved for the new development were also discussed. (author)

  11. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA (France)

    2010-07-01

    During the 1950's and 60's, the European countries built several research reactors, partially to support their emerging nuclear-powered electricity programs. Now, over forty years later, the use and operation of these reactors have both widened and grown more specialized. The irradiation reactors test materials and fuels for power reactors, produce radio-isotopes for medicine, neutro-graphies, doping silicon, and other materials. The neutron beam reactors are crucial to science of matter and provide vital support to the development of nano-technologies. Other reactors are used for other specialized services such as teaching, safety tests, neutron physics measurements... The modifications to the operating uses and the ageing of the nuclear facilities have led to increasing closures year after year. Since last ENC, for example, we have seen, only in France, the closure of the training reactor Ulysse in 2007, the closure of the safety test dedicated reactor Phebus in 2008 and recently the Phenix reactor, last fast breeder in operation in the European Community, has been shut down after a set of 'end of life' technological and physical tests. For other research reactors, safety re-evaluations have had to take place, to enable extension of reactor life. However, in the current context of streamlining and reorganization, new European tools have emerged to optimally meet the changing demands for research. However the operation market of these reactors seems now increasing in all fields. For the neutron beams reactors (FRMII, ORPHEE, ILL, ISIS,..) the experimental needs are increasing years after years, especially for nano sciences and bio sciences new needs. The measurement of residual stress on manufactured materials is also more and more utilised. All these reactors have increasing utilizations, and their future seems promising. A new project project based on a neutron spallation is under definition in Sweden (ESSS: European Spallation Source

  12. Research reactor status for future nuclear research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Patrick; Bignan, Gilles; Guidez, Joel

    2010-01-01

    During the 1950's and 60's, the European countries built several research reactors, partially to support their emerging nuclear-powered electricity programs. Now, over forty years later, the use and operation of these reactors have both widened and grown more specialized. The irradiation reactors test materials and fuels for power reactors, produce radio-isotopes for medicine, neutro-graphies, doping silicon, and other materials. The neutron beam reactors are crucial to science of matter and provide vital support to the development of nano-technologies. Other reactors are used for other specialized services such as teaching, safety tests, neutron physics measurements... The modifications to the operating uses and the ageing of the nuclear facilities have led to increasing closures year after year. Since last ENC, for example, we have seen, only in France, the closure of the training reactor Ulysse in 2007, the closure of the safety test dedicated reactor Phebus in 2008 and recently the Phenix reactor, last fast breeder in operation in the European Community, has been shut down after a set of 'end of life' technological and physical tests. For other research reactors, safety re-evaluations have had to take place, to enable extension of reactor life. However, in the current context of streamlining and reorganization, new European tools have emerged to optimally meet the changing demands for research. However the operation market of these reactors seems now increasing in all fields. For the neutron beams reactors (FRMII, ORPHEE, ILL, ISIS,..) the experimental needs are increasing years after years, especially for nano sciences and bio sciences new needs. The measurement of residual stress on manufactured materials is also more and more utilised. All these reactors have increasing utilizations, and their future seems promising. A new project project based on a neutron spallation is under definition in Sweden (ESSS: European Spallation Source Scandinavia). The nuclear

  13. The creation and operation of the European Mutual Association for Nuclear Insurance - EMANI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gulck, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    This general survey of the evolution of the nuclear operator's liability, with reference to the revision of the Paris Convention and the Brussels Supplementary Convention, describes the context in which the European Mutual Association for Nuclear Insurance (EMANI) was created and its operation. The author considers the repercussions of the European operator's increased liability on the nuclear insurance pool market and the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident for property damage insurance. (NEA) [fr

  14. Information for nuclear medicine researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has a major research program in nuclear medicine; this article describes the information support given to the program by the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories (LHRL) Library. The INIS database is a prime indicator of the information held at LHRL Library, however, other databases also cover nuclear medicine. As part of the Australian library system the ANSTO Library's resources are accessed by subscription. The ANSTO Library staff can also search INIS for a fee for external enquiries but the other databases can presently only be searched for LHRL staff and affiliates. Even so, most major library and information services can provide access to these databases

  15. European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.; Safieh, J.; Giot, M.; Mavko, B.; Sehgal, B.R.; Schaefer, A.; Goethem, G. van; D'haeseleer, W.

    2004-01-01

    The need to preserve, enhance or strengthen nuclear knowledge is worldwide recognised since a couple of years. It appears that within the European university education and training network, nuclear engineering is presently sufficiently covered, although somewhat fragmented. To take up the challenges of offering top quality, new, attractive and relevant curricula, higher education institutions should cooperate with industry, regulatory bodies and research centres, and more appropriate funding a.o. from public and private is to be re-established. More, European nuclear education and training should benefit from links with international organisations like IAEA, OECD-NEA and others, and should include world-wide cooperation with academic institutions and research centres. The European master in nuclear engineering guarantees a high quality nuclear education in Europe by means of stimulating student and instructor exchange, through mutual checks of the quality of the programmes offered, by close collaboration with renowned nuclear-research groups at universities and laboratories. The concept for a nuclear master programme consists of a solid basket of recommended basic nuclear science and engineering courses, but also contains advanced courses as well as practical training. Some of the advanced courses also serve as part of the curricula for doctoral programmes. A second important issue identified is Continued Professional Development. In order to achieve the objectives and practical goals described above, the ENEN association was formed. This international, non-profit association is be considered as a step towards a virtual European Nuclear University symbolising the active collaboration between various national institutions pursuing nuclear education. (author)

  16. Accountability Principles for Research Organizations | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-10-28

    Oct 28, 2011 ... Accountability Principles of Research Organisations provides a ... good practices and principles for policy-oriented research organizations working in developing countries. ... Image. IDRC. Accountability Principles of Research Organisations ... The Association for Progressive Communications Women's ...

  17. Marketing research for organizers of sports events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašović Milan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marketing research, which provide the data and the information for the decision making process, are essential for organizers of sport events, especially to the organizers of the most significant ones. The mentioned marketing research involves: research of the local market, visitors satisfaction research, evaluation of sponsorship effectiveness, research of the sport events economic influence on the local community or host cities, event host attitudes examination-local population and so on. The marketing research process, for the sport event organizers of needs, involves several steps, such as: goal definition, choice of the research method, research instruments determination, interviewer education, information gathering, data processing, data report, conclusions.

  18. Basic research for nuclear energy : a study on photo-catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, K. R

    1999-01-01

    In an experiment on TiO{sub 2} photo-catalysis of five nitrogen-containing organic compounds, the changes of pH and total carbon contents were measured, and the dependence of their photo-catalytic characteristic upon their chemical structures were investigated. -- calculation of the effect of ionic carbon species in an aqueous solution on thermodynamic equilibrium, pH and conductivity showed a small quantity of organics could lead conductivity increase and pH reduction. -- Based on the results of photo-catalytic experiment of ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea or EDTA, irradiated for 180 minutes after adsorption onto titanium dioxide for 60 minutes, relationship between nitrogen atomic charge and the first-order rate constant was as the following: R (1st - order rate constant) = {delta} ({epsilon} - a ){sup 1/3} + b where, {epsilon} : atomic charge of nitrogen in a molecular, {delta}, a and b : corrective coefficients.

  19. Perspectives for food research and European collaboration in the European Research Area and the new Framework Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, L

    2001-08-01

    Since 1987, successive framework programmes have contributed to strengthen European food research through the establishment of networks between research institutions, universities and companies from various European countries. In the FAIR programme (1994-1998), 118 research projects comprising nearly 1,000 participants from the European Union and Associated States have been supported in the food area with a European funding of about [symbol: see text] 108 million. Within the Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources programme (1998-2002), food research is mostly supported within the key action 'food, nutrition and health' with a budget of [symbol: see text] 290 million. After the first four deadlines, 735 eligible research proposals have already been received. Further to their evaluation by a panel of independent experts, 108 proposals have been funded or selected for funding representing a total contribution of about [symbol: see text] 168 million. Among those, several clusters of projects are now running on important topics such as probiotics, coeliac diseases, mycotoxins, GMO, safety and food for the elderly. In addition, technology stimulation measures are largely benefiting SMEs to foster their innovation potential. In January 2000, the European Commission adopted a Communication entitled "Towards the European Research Area (ERA)" with the objective to contribute to developing better framework conditions for research in Europe. On 21 February 2001, the Commission adopted proposals to be submitted to the European Parliament and Council for the next framework programme for research and innovation (2002-2006). The new framework programme that is becoming one of the financial instruments of the ERA aims at catalysing the integration of European research by: strengthening of links between the Community research effort and national and regional research policies; concentrating on a limited number of priority fields or research to which activities at the

  20. A strategic approach to a new organization of French and European research in energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appert, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    To reinforce the synergy between the parties involved in French research, ANCRE (Alliance Nationale de Coordination de la Recherche pour l'energie) has just been set up. It brings together all public research organizations in France that are working on problems related to energy. Its three major assignments are to: favor and reinforce partnerships and the synergy between public research organizations, universities and corporations; identify the scientific, technological, economic and societal factors that impede industrial applications in this field; and propose joint long-term R and D projects and the procedures for a coordinated implementation of them

  1. Increasing European Support for Neglected Infectious Disease Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole F. Olesen

    Full Text Available Neglected infectious diseases (NIDs are a persistent cause of death and disability in low-income countries. Currently available drugs and vaccines are often ineffective, costly or associated with severe side-effects. Although the scale of research on NIDs does not reflect their disease burden, there are encouraging signs that NIDs have begun to attract more political and public attention, which have translated into greater awareness and increased investments in NID research by both public and private donors. Using publicly available data, we analysed funding for NID research in the European Union's (EU's 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP7, which ran from 2007 to 2013. During FP7, the EU provided €169 million for 65 NID research projects, and thereby placed itself among the top global funders of NID research. Average annual FP7 investment in NID research exceeded €24 million, triple that committed by the EU before the launch of FP7. FP7 NID projects involved research teams from 331 different institutions in 72 countries on six continents, underlining the increasingly global nature of European research activities. NID research has remained a priority in the current EU Framework Programme for research and innovation, Horizon 2020, launched in 2014. This has most notably been reflected in the second programme of the European & Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP, which provides unprecedented opportunities to advance the clinical development of new medical interventions against NIDs. Europe is thus better positioned than ever before to play a major role in the global fight against NIDs.

  2. European nuclear features. Interview: Commissioner Piebalgs (DG TREN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Fifth issue of the European Nuclear Features. A joint publication of atw, Nuclear Espana, and Revue Generale Nucleaire. Contents: Frontier research in the EU Scientific Council of the European Research Council announced proactive safety management strategies; Pebble Bed Modular Reactor; New experiences applying methodologies for control room I and C modernization; Experts from Taiwan fulfil their training in Madrid; Ensa's activities in the Asian Commercial Nuclear Power Market; Clearance survey approach for scrap metals from NPP. (orig.)

  3. NERIS: European platform on preparedness for nuclear and radiological emergency response and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.; Bohunova, J.; Schneider, T.; Biduener, S.; Badelay, J.; Gallego, E.; Gering, F.; Hrdeman, F.; Dubreuil, G.; Murith, Ch.; Oughton, D.; Raskob, W.

    2014-01-01

    The NERIS platform was established in June 2010 to encourage European, national, regional and local authorities, technical support organisation, operators, professional organisations, research institutes, universities, and non-governmental organisations to cooperate and to facilitate access expertise and technology in maintaining competence in the field of nuclear emergency management and recovery for the benefit of European countries and citizens. 49 organisations are members of the NERIS Platform from 24 countries and 20 members are supporting organisations. The NERIS Association has been registered in August 2012 as a legal European Association under the French Law. It is operated by a management board of 10 members and the NERIS R and D Committee elaborates its strategic orientation. The NERIS Platform is linked to research projects, managed by KIT: - NERIS TP 'Towards a self sustaining European Technology Platform on Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response and Recovery'. - PREPARE project on innovative integrative tools and platforms to be prepared for radiological emergencies and post-accident response in Europe. To set up a common reflection, cooperation have been established with European and international organisations: HERCA, ALLIANCE, CRPPH, ICRP and AIEA. To share issues on lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident, cooperation have been initiated with IGES (Institute for Global Environment Strategies) and with the Fukushima University. The NERIS Platform is also involved in the steering committee of the EC Project OPERRA, aiming at structuring the research in the field of radiation protection at the Horizon 2020. This paper will present the key components of the NERIS Platform and its objectives. (authors)

  4. NERIS: The European platform on preparedness for nuclear and radiological emergency response and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.; Bohunova, J.; Schneider, T.; Biduener, S.; Badelay, J.; Gallego, E.; Gering, F.; Hrdeman, F.; Dubreuil, G.; Murith, Ch.; Oughton, D.; Raskob, W.

    2014-01-01

    The NERIS platform was established in June 2010 to encourage European, national, regional and local authorities, technical support organisation, operators, professional organisations, research institutes, universities, and non-governmental organisations to cooperate and to facilitate access expertise and technology in maintaining competence in the field of nuclear emergency management and recovery for the benefit of European countries and citizens. 49 organisations are members of the NERIS Platform from 24 countries and 20 members are supporting organisations. The NERIS Association has been registered in August 2012 as a legal European Association under the French Law. It is operated by a management board of 10 members and the NERIS R and D Committee elaborates its strategic orientation. The NERIS Platform is linked to research projects, managed by KIT: - NERIS TP 'Towards a self sustaining European Technology Platform on Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response and Recovery'. - PREPARE project on innovative integrative tools and platforms to be prepared for radiological emergencies and post-accident response in Europe. To set up a common reflection, cooperations have been established with European and international organisations: HERCA, ALLIANCE, CRPPH, ICRP and AIEA. To share issues on lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident, cooperation have been initiated with IGES (Institute for Global Environment Strategies) and with the Fukushima University. The NERIS Platform is also involved in the steering committee of the EC Project OPERRA, aiming at structuring the research in the field of radiation protection at the Horizon 2020. This paper will present the key components of the NERIS Platform and its objectives. (authors)

  5. Nuclear Energy and European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picamal, B.

    2010-01-01

    The interest shown by the European Institutions in the energy debates, in which the nuclear energy is included as a key component within the energy mix, is obvious. Climate change and energy supply have pushed some countries to publicly express their interest for developing the nuclear energy. These positions are however in contradiction with some others within the European Union which are a lot more critical towards this type of energy and where face-out policies still prevail. Despite the fact that the use of the nuclear energy will remain within the competence of each Member State, the European Union will continue to play a prominent role in the development of an energy strategy based on a low carbon economy. (Author)

  6. The key role of nuclear energy to strengthen economic safety for France and the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris; Chenu, Anne; Nieuviaert, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This publication first discusses how to improve the external safety (energy independence) for France. It outlines that nuclear energy is a safety factor for the economy, that France needs to reduce its dependence on fossil energies through an electrification of uses, that imports of fossil energies can be reduced by developing nuclear research. In a second part, it discusses how to improve internal supply safety for France and for the EU. It evokes the crisis situation faced by the European electricity market, outlines the need to invest in existing nuclear production capacities, the need to stabilize the electric system, and to take better advantage of non-carbon energies (possible future technological advances of the energy sector are evoked)

  7. Fair chance required for nuclear power. Plea of the European Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The first Euroatom European nuclear conference was held in Brussels on November 25/26, 2004 was attended by more than 250 renowned experts, including more than 20 managers of the board from a dozen European countries. They all agreed that the construction of new nuclear power plants will depend on the public opinion, i.e. it will be a political and communication problem rather than a technical problem. A swing of public opinion is difficult as rational arguments do not apply when emotions are high. The economic efficiency of nuclear power was proved again by the new reactor constructed in Finland. (orig.)

  8. Nuclear energy research until 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, L.; Rintamaa, R.; Vanttola, T.

    1994-03-01

    The working group was to assess the need and orientation of nuclear energy research (apart from research on nuclear waste management and fusion technology) up until the year 2000 in Finland and to propose framework schemes and organization guidelines for any forthcoming publicly financed research programmes from 1995 onwards. The main purpose of nuclear energy research is to ensure the safety and continued development of Finland's existing nuclear power plants. Factors necessarily influencing the orientation of research are Parliaments decision of late 1993 against further nuclear capacity in the country, the need to assess reactor safety in the eastern neighbour regions, and Finland's potential membership in the European Union. The working group proposes two new research programmes similar to the current ones but with slightly modified emphasis. Dedicated to reactor safety and structural safety respectively, they would both cover the four years from 1995 to 1998. A separate research project is proposed for automation technology. In addition, environmental research projects should have a joint coordination unit. (9 figs., 4 tabs.)

  9. Evolution of the legal system of nuclear research in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelle, M.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty years after the creation of Euratom, the Treaty establishing it is analysed together with the procedures for setting up joint projects and research programmes. The projects and programmes and their results are described as are the changes in the outlook and objectives of Euratom as compared with its original concept. In view of developments in the nuclear field, from the economic, political and social angles, its legal basis has developed greater flexibility from the institutional point of view, thus enabling closer co-operation between the Member States and the Commission in the setting up of efficient and useful programmes for the Communities. (NEA) [fr

  10. Nuclear power 2005: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 204 power reactors with a gross power of 181,030 MWe and a net power of 171,8479 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2005, no nuclear power plant was commissioned. Two nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2005. In Germany the Obrigheim NPP and in Sweden the Barsebaeck 2 NPP have been permanently shut down due to political decisions. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.6 GW. In late 2005, five nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (3). 148 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25). They had an aggregate gross power of 137,023 MWe and a net power of 130,415 MWe, generating approx. 970 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2005, thus again contributing some 31% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in France (80%), followed by 72% in Lithuania, 55% in the Slovak Republic, 55% in Belgium, and 51% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as a result of electricity imports. (All statistical data in the country report apply to 2004 unless indicated otherwise. This is the year for which sound preliminary data are currently available for the states listed.) (orig.)

  11. Nuclear energy: the European way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The dossier published in this issue deals with the present and future situation of nuclear energy in Europe. What could be the trends of the nuclear development in the Europe of tomorrows. That global question is answered by pointing out the different data related to the present state of european nuclear programmes. Such an overview is followed by a serie of articles dealing with definite items: the actions implemented by the European Communities Commission: the electricity market and EDF policy in the field of european electric grids; the trends of nuclear cycle industry and the perfecting of the future european nuclear reactor

  12. European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, Frans; Safieh, Joseph; Giot, Michel; Mavko, Borut; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schaefer, Anselm; Goethem, Georges van; D'Haeseleer, William

    2005-01-01

    The need to preserve, enhance or strengthen nuclear knowledge is worldwide recognised since a couple of years. Among others, 'networking to maintain nuclear competence through education and training', was recommended in 2001 by an expert panel to the European Commission [EUR, 19150 EN, Strategic issues related to a 6th Euratom Framework Programme (2002-2006). Scientific and Technical Committee Euratom, pp. 14]. It appears that within the European University education and training framework, nuclear engineering is presently still sufficiently covered, although somewhat fragmented. However, it has been observed that several areas are at risk in the very near future including safety relevant fields such as reactor physics and nuclear thermal-hydraulics. Furthermore, in some countries deficiencies have been identified in areas such as the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, waste management and decommissioning. To overcome these risks and deficiencies, it is of very high importance that European countries work more closely together. Harmonisation and improvement of the nuclear education and training have to take place at an international level in order to maintain the knowledge properly and to transfer it throughout Europe for the safe and economic design, operation and dismantling of present and future nuclear systems. To take up the challenges of offering top quality, new, attractive and relevant curricula, higher education institutions should cooperate with industry, regulatory bodies and research centres, and more appropriate funding from public and private sources. In addition, European nuclear education and training should benefit from links with international organisations like IAEA, OECD-NEA and others, and should include worldwide cooperation with academic institutions and research centres. The first and central issue is to establish a European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. The concept envisaged is compatible with the projected harmonised European

  13. Technical Support Organization Knowledge Management for Nuclear Regulatory Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Ramsey, J.; Katsenelenbogen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management awareness has increased through the nuclear industrial and regulatory community leading to better understanding of the handling of critical information. Utilizing, managing and regulating the application of nuclear power require an extensive system of expertise and associated research through established organizations. The long term maintenance of the specific expertise is only viable by using scientific knowledge management principles all through the national nuclear infrastructure involving regulatory, industrial, academic and other research institutions. National governments in countries operating or planning to establish nuclear facilities have instituted regulatory regimes on the use of nuclear materials and facilities to insure a high level of operational safety. (author

  14. European Utility Requirements: European nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komsi, M.; Patrakka, E.

    1997-01-01

    The work procedure and the content of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) concerning the future LWRs is described in the article. European Utility Requirements, produced by utilities in a number of European countries, is a document specifying the details relating to engineered safety, operating performance, reliability and economics of the reactors to be built by manufacturers for the European market

  15. Nuclear data usage for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Yoshihiro; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Amano, Toshio

    1996-01-01

    In the department of research reactor, many neutronics calculations have been performed to construct, to operate and to modify research reactors of JAERI with several kinds of nuclear data libraries. This paper presents latest two neutronic analyses on research reactors. First one is design work of a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor No.4). The other is design of a uranium silicon dispersion type (silicide) fuel of JRR-3M (Japan Research Reactor No.3 Modified). Before starting the design work, to estimate the accuracy of computer code and calculation method, experimental data are calculated with several nuclear data libraries. From both cases of calculations, it is confirmed that JENDL-3.2 gives about 1 %Δk/k higher excess reactivity than JENDL-3.1. (author)

  16. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  17. Nuclear operations summary Engineering organization for Plowshare nuclear operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadman, Gene A [Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1970-05-15

    The availability of nuclear explosives for peaceful projects has given the engineer a new dimension in his thinking. He can now seek methods of adapting Plowshare to a variety of industrial applications. The full potential of the Plowshare Program can only be attained when industry begins to use nuclear explosives on a regular basis, for economically sound projects. It is the purpose of this paper to help the engineer familiarize himself with Plowshare technology to hasten the day when 'Plowsharee goes commercial'. An engineering project utilizing nuclear exposives ordinarily involves three main phases: Phase I (a) The theoretical and empirical analysis of effects. (b) Projected economic and/or scientific evaluation. (c) A safety analysis. Phase II (a) Field construction. (b) Safe detonation of the nuclear explosive. (c) Data acquisition. Phase III The evaluation and/or exploitation of the results. This paper will be restricted to Phase II, referred to collectively as the 'nuclear operation'.

  18. European Learning Initiatives for Nuclear Decommissioning and Environmental Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abousahl, Said; )

    2017-01-01

    Situation nuclear decommissioning in the EU: - Demonstration of decommissioning at an industrial scale, as a 'last but feasible step' of the nuclear life-cycle, is essential for the credibility of the nuclear energy option; - Decommissioning market is in expansion, particularly in Europe; - Currently, an industrial experience exist, however... further attention is necessary for: - Development of the most suitable techniques, with respect to safety, efficiency and waste limitation; - Standardisation and harmonisation (incl. cost estimation); - Offering and promoting dedicated education and training opportunities; - Sharing knowledge and experiences. Offering and promoting dedicated Education and Training (E&T) opportunities: JRC organised jointly with the University of Birmingham in April 2015 a seminar on Education and Training in Nuclear Decommissioning, in an attempt to answer to the questions: •What are the E&T needs ? •What are the opportunities, what does already exist ? •How can we attract young talent ? Outcome of the seminar is published in a joint report with orientations on the way forward to support Education and Training in Nuclear Decommissioning in the EU

  19. Patterns of practice of regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer: results of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) NOdal Radiotherapy (NORA) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacemi, Y; Kaidar-Person, O; Poortmans, P; Ozsahin, M; Valli, M-C; Russell, N; Kunkler, I; Hermans, J; Kuten, A; van Tienhoven, G; Westenberg, H

    2015-03-01

    The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. EurOOHnet-the European research network for out-of-hours primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Linda; Philips, Hilde; Giesen, Paul; Remmen, Roy; Christensen, Morten Bondo; Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi

    2014-09-01

    European countries face similar challenges in the provision of health care. Demographic factors like ageing, population growth, changing patient behaviour, and lack of work force lead to increasing demands, costs, and overcrowding of out-of-hours (OOH) care (i.e. primary care services, emergency departments (EDs), and ambulance services). These developments strain services and imply safety risks. In the last few decades, countries have been re-organizing their OOH primary health care services. AIM AND SCOPE OF THE NETWORK: We established a European research network for out-of-hours primary health care (EurOOHnet), which aims to transfer knowledge, share experiences, and conduct research. Combining research competencies and integrating results can generate a profound information flow to European researchers and decision makers in health policy, contributing towards feasible and high-quality OOH care. It also contributes to a more comparable performance level within European regions. CONDUCTED RESEARCH PROJECTS: The European research network aims to conduct mutual research projects. At present, three projects have been accomplished, among others concerning the diagnostic scope in OOH primary care services and guideline adherence for diagnosis and treatment of cystitis in OOH primary care. Future areas of research will be organizational models for OOH care; appropriate use of the OOH services; quality of telephone triage; quality of medical care; patient safety issues; use of auxiliary personnel; collaboration with EDs and ambulance care; and the role of GPs in OOH care.

  1. Arenas for risk governance in nuclear waste management - The European Union ARGONA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Josefin P.; Wetzel, Carina (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SE-171 16 Stockholm (Sweden)); Andersson, Kjell; Lidberg, Maria (Karita Research AB, Box 6048, SE-187 06 Taeby (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    There is a large knowledge base about governance issues but how to implement the new processes of transparency and participation is not self-evident. In other words there is a common demand for bridging the gap between research and implementation for the governance of nuclear waste management. There are legal, organizational, historical and cultural factors that set conditions which have to be understood for effective implementation. We must also understand how deliberative methods and the transparency approach relate to each other, and to formal decision-making in representative democracy. Therefore, the ARGONA project intends to demonstrate how participation and transparency link to the political and legal systems and how new approaches can be implemented in nuclear waste management programmes. For this purpose, the project includes: Studies of the context within which processes of participation and transparency take place, in order to understand how the processes can be used in the waste management programs. Studies of theory - in order to build participation and transparency on a firm ground; Case studies - to understand how different processes work; Implementation - to make a difference, learn and demonstrate. The project now approaches its finalization and it is foreseen that the reporting, in addition to 25 deliverables to the European Commission, will include a full final report, a summary final report and recommendations with proposed guidelines that can be considered by national actors of nuclear waste programmes as well as the European Commission

  2. Arenas for risk governance in nuclear waste management - The European Union ARGONA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Josefin P.; Wetzel, Carina; Andersson, Kjell; Lidberg, Maria

    2009-12-01

    There is a large knowledge base about governance issues but how to implement the new processes of transparency and participation is not self-evident. In other words there is a common demand for bridging the gap between research and implementation for the governance of nuclear waste management. There are legal, organizational, historical and cultural factors that set conditions which have to be understood for effective implementation. We must also understand how deliberative methods and the transparency approach relate to each other, and to formal decision-making in representative democracy. Therefore, the ARGONA project intends to demonstrate how participation and transparency link to the political and legal systems and how new approaches can be implemented in nuclear waste management programmes. For this purpose, the project includes: Studies of the context within which processes of participation and transparency take place, in order to understand how the processes can be used in the waste management programs. Studies of theory - in order to build participation and transparency on a firm ground; Case studies - to understand how different processes work; Implementation - to make a difference, learn and demonstrate. The project now approaches its finalization and it is foreseen that the reporting, in addition to 25 deliverables to the European Commission, will include a full final report, a summary final report and recommendations with proposed guidelines that can be considered by national actors of nuclear waste programmes as well as the European Commission

  3. International guidelines for fire protection at nuclear installations including nuclear fuel plants, nuclear fuel stores, teaching reactors, research establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines are recommended to designers, constructors, operators and insurers of nuclear fuel plants and other facilities using significant quantities of radioactive materials including research and teaching reactor installations where the reactors generally operate at less than approximately 10 MW(th). Recommendations for elementary precautions against fire risk at nuclear installations are followed by appendices on more specific topics. These cover: fire protection management and organization; precautions against loss during construction alterations and maintenance; basic fire protection for nuclear fuel plants; storage and nuclear fuel; and basic fire protection for research and training establishments. There are numerous illustrations of facilities referred to in the text. (U.K.)

  4. A Request for Planning Funds for a Research and Study Abroad Facility in Geneva, Switzerland in Affiliation with the European Laboratory for Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campbell, myron

    2013-03-31

    To create a research and study abroad program that would allow U.S. undergraduate students access to the world-leading research facilities at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the World Health Organization, various operations of the United Nations and other international organizations based in Geneva.The proposal is based on the unique opportunities currently existing in Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now operational at CERN, data are being collected, and research results are already beginning to emerge. At the same time, a related reduction of activity at U.S. facilities devoted to particle physics is expected. In addition, the U.S. higher-education community has an ever-increasing focus on international organizations dealing with world health pandemics, arms control and human rights, a nexus also centered in Geneva.

  5. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Vallet, Veronique; Molineu, Andrea; Melidis, Christos; Teglas, Vanda; Naudy, Suzanne; Moeckli, Raphael; Followill, David S; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPC PH ). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INST PH ) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPC PH and INST PH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPC PH and INST PH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INST PH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPC PH and INST PH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies

  6. Harmonization of nuclear and radiation safety regulations for nuclear power plants with reference levels of Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojchuk, V.S.; Mikolajchuk, O.A.; Gromov, G.V.; Dibach, O.M.; Godovanyuk, G.M.; Nosovs'kij, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Self-evaluation of the Ukrainian regulations on nuclear and radiation safety that apply to nuclear power plants for compliance with the reference levels of the Western European Nuclear Regulators Association (WENRA) is presented. Proposals on improvement of the regulations upon self-evaluation are provided

  7. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  8. The importance of international collaboration for rare diseases research: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julkowska, D; Austin, C P; Cutillo, C M; Gancberg, D; Hager, C; Halftermeyer, J; Jonker, A H; Lau, L P L; Norstedt, I; Rath, A; Schuster, R; Simelyte, E; van Weely, S

    2017-09-01

    Over the last two decades, important contributions were made at national, European and international levels to foster collaboration into rare diseases research. The European Union (EU) has put much effort into funding rare diseases research, encouraging national funding organizations to collaborate together in the E-Rare program, setting up European Reference Networks for rare diseases and complex conditions, and initiating the International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) together with the National Institutes of Health in the USA. Co-ordination of the activities of funding agencies, academic researchers, companies, regulatory bodies, and patient advocacy organizations and partnerships with, for example, the European Research Infrastructures maximizes the collective impact of global investments in rare diseases research. This contributes to accelerating progress, for example, in faster diagnosis through enhanced discovery of causative genes, better understanding of natural history of rare diseases through creation of common registries and databases and boosting of innovative therapeutic approaches. Several examples of funded pre-clinical and clinical gene therapy projects show that integration of multinational and multidisciplinary expertize generates new knowledge and can result in multicentre gene therapy trials. International collaboration in rare diseases research is key to improve the life of people living with a rare disease.

  9. Status and perspective on the research and development of the chinese decision support system for nuclear emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jingyuan; Cao Jianzhu; Liu Lei; Xue Dazhi; Xi Shuren

    2001-01-01

    The research and development of the Chinese decision support system for nuclear emergency management is now under the way. The framework of the European decision support system for nuclear emergencies is taken as the platform for the development of the Chinese system. The objective of the Chinese project is to provide technical support to decision-makers in the decision-making of protective actions in the event of a major nuclear accident. The author presents the organization, current status and future prospect on the Chinese effort

  10. Proceedings of the European Nuclear Conference - ENC 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The European Nuclear Conference-ENC is the largest international conference of its kind on the European event calendar. This European Nuclear Society-ENS event has a multidisciplinary approach, looking at nuclear science and technology in energy production, non-power industrial and life science applications. ENC 2012 will be a unique networking event for scientists, nuclear industry representatives and policy makers, who can consider and discuss ideas and innovations that will drive the technological developments of the future. The European Nuclear Conference is known for the high standard of papers presented. Key themes of ENC 2012 will include state-of-the-art research and development in areas such as: Reactor technologies, The fuel cycle, Plant operations, New Build, End of Use management, Life science applications, Non-power industrial applications, Education, training and knowledge management, Nuclear in the civil society. (authors)

  11. Research priorities at the European Commission in relation to maintenance optimization and nuclear power plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contri, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of experience in many countries operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) suggests that, while differences in long term operation (LTO) programs are mainly related to the various national regulatory processes, the main features and basic technical requirements are similar. The implementation of these however needs reshaping in an integrated plant life management (PLIM) framework, bearing in mind the specific safety implications of LTO. R and D is essential to support this process, not only for long term extrapolation of the component integrity and behaviour, but also for a proper maintenance system and for an adequate management structure ensuring effective management strategies at plant level, able to address organisational issues, spare part management, staff ageing, component obsolescence, etc. This is recognised by the European Commission, which supports R and D in targeted areas in the framework of the EURATOM programme, both by “direct actions” i.e. projects managed and executed by its Directorate General Joint Research Centers (JRC) and by indirect actions i.e. funding of selected projects, managed by the Directorate General Research (RTD). This paper outlines the JRC's priorities in the current 7th Framework Programme in relation to R and D tasks for maintenance and ISI to support the highest safety level at member's NPPs and appropriate decision-making tools for the optimisation of these programs. A newly developed UE model for PLIM, also integrating maintenance optimisation issues, is presented for further discussion. (author)

  12. Quality assurance programme for the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    The document specifies all aspects of the quality assurance programme for the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor. The programme addresses the organization and responsibilities, basic quality assurance activities, and identification of management, planning, and working documents necessary to implement the programme. (P.A.)

  13. European Research in Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, C.Guedes; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Incecik, A.

    2012-01-01

    An overview is presented of the results obtained in Europe by a network with a large number of research groups in the field of Marine Structures during a period of 6 years. The European Union has funded a project aimed at improving the collaboration among European research groups specialized...... in marine structures, which has led, among other results to a number of benchmark studies organized in 6 main topical areas, namely, Methods and Tools for Loads and Load Effects, Methods and Tools for Strength Assessment, Experimental Analysis of Structures, Materials and Fabrication of Structures, Methods...... and Tools for Structural Design and Optimization and Structural Reliability, Safety and Environmental Protection. This paper presents an overview of various studies performed, which helps identifying the level of consistency and robustness of different numeric tools used in this field....

  14. The European Repository Landscape 2008 Inventory of Digital Repositories for Research Output

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Graaf, Maurits

    2009-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that a common knowledge base for European research is necessary. Research repositories are an important innovation to the scientific information infrastructure. In 2006, digital repositories in the 27 countries of the European we

  15. Dispersion fuel for nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushtym, A.V.; Belash, M.M.; Zigunov, V.V.; Slabospitska, O.O.; Zuyok, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    Designs and process flow sheets for production of nuclear fuel rod elements and assemblies TVS-XD with dispersion composition UO_2+Al are presented. The results of fuel rod thermal calculation applied to Kharkiv subcritical assembly and Kyiv research reactor VVR-M, comparative characteristics of these fuel elements, the results of metallographic analyses and corrosion tests of fuel pellets are given in this paper

  16. 1.6 billion euros for nuclear research through the 'Horizon 2020' program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    The European Union Council has approved the budget for the future European program for research and innovation called 'Horizon 2020'. A global funding of 77 billion euros has been allocated to 'Horizon 2020' for the 2014 to 2020 years. The share for nuclear sciences will reach 1.6 billion euros and will break down as follows: 316 million euros for fundamental research on fission, 728 million euros for fundamental research on fusion (ITER not included) and 560 million euros for the research projects of the European Joint Research Center (JRC). (A.C.)

  17. The role of nuclear research centers for the introduction of a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perovic, B.; Frlec, B.; Kundic, V.

    1977-01-01

    Full development of nuclear energy has imposed a new role on nuclear energy centers. Nuclear technology for different reactor concepts is also now in a phase of high development. Several reactor concepts have been developed for industrial use and electric power production. Development of fast reactors is still under way and needs further research efforts. Having in mind these two main guidelines, research programmes in nuclear energy centers should be geared to the development of the activities vital to the implementation of national nuclear energy programmes. In this respect, national nuclear centers should devote their attention to three major tasks. First, to establish a background for the introduction of nuclear energy into the national energy system and to support a national safety system. Second, to support the national programme by skilled manpower, to provide the basic training in nuclear technology for future staff of nuclear power stations and to assist the universities in establishing the necessary educational programme in nuclear energy. Third, to follow the development of nuclear energy technology for the fast breeder reactor concepts. This paper describes some experience in introducing a new programme to the national nuclear energy centers in Yugoslavia. Recently, Yugoslavia has started building its first nuclear power station. Further introduction of nuclear power stations in the national electric energy system is also planned. This implies the need to reconsider the current nuclear energy programme in the nuclear energy centers. It has been decided to evaluate past experience and further needs for research activities regarding the nuclear power programme. Yugoslavia has three main nuclear energy centers whose activities are devoted to the development of national manpower in the field of nuclear sciences. Besides these three organizations, there are several others whose activities are concentrated on specific tasks in nuclear technology. In the

  18. Design of a dynamic model for nuclear energy management based on European Foundation for Quality Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fam, I. M.; Shekari, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Business excellence model has been developed to improve and promote business levels. In business excellence model such as European Foundation for Quality Management model, the important role of resource management is emphasizes. In this paper, we have tried with consideration to tendency progressive concepts of nuclear energy management; a dynamic model has been presented for energy management within the scope of European Foundation for Quality Management model. Population growth could cause increasing of the level of energy demands. No doubt, the confidence of this developed phenomenon with the limits of environment will create greater challenges for the world and its inhabitants. Considering the shortage of energy supply all over the world, nuclear energy management has been studied with a view to fourth and fifth criterions included in European Foundation for Quality Management model (Partnership and resource and Process criteria's). In addition to it, a dynamic model has been presented for nuclear energy management within the scope of European Foundation for Quality Management model. In this dynamic model, with differential equation definition for each of the presented communications of defined causal model, input variable impacts on output ones have been determined and considered. They can be reviewed, based on six scenario plans, the importance of nuclear energy management of a business has been properly shown, and similarly the rate of investment on systems as a factor affecting the level of attention paid to the future of business enterprises, has been specified. This paper conceives nuclear energy management as an instrument to contribute to the growth and fall of a business. It is therefore, imperative to attach more importance at nuclear energy demand management in the business and an attempt should be made to keep it under our control

  19. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, C.S. do; Andrade, D.A.; Mesquita, R.N. de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  20. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, C.S. do, E-mail: claudio.souza@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, D.A., E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mesquita, R.N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  1. Introducing a European Partnership. First issue of 'European Nuclear Features'. A joint publication of atw, Nuclear Espana, Revue Generale Nucleare (2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    'European Nuclear Features' is a joint publication of the three specialized technical journals, Nuclear Espana (Spain), Revue Generale Nucleaire (France), and atw - International Journal for Nuclear Power (Germany), planned for six issues annually. ENF is to further greatly the international European exchange of information and news about energy and nuclear power. News items, comments, and scientific and technical contributions will cover important aspects of the field. The first issue of ENF contains contributions about these topics, among others: - European Nuclear Society and Foratom: Strengthening the Nuclear Network. - Report: EPR - the European Pressurized Water Reactor. - Finland: Starting Construction of the Fifth Nuclear Power Plant. - Czech Republic: Nuclear Power Report for 2003/2004. - The Decommissioning Project of the Bohunice-1 and -2 Units. - FRM-II: TUM Research Neutron Source Generates Its First Neutrons. (orig.)

  2. Advanced Research Workshop on Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, David; Nuclear Threats and Security Challenges

    2015-01-01

    With the dissolution of the Soviet Union the nuclear threats facing the world are constantly evolving and have grown more complex since the end of the Cold War. The diversion of complete weapon systems or nuclear material to rogue nations and terrorist organizations has increased. The events of the past years have proved the necessity to reevaluate these threats on a level never before considered.  In recognition that no single country possesses all of the answers to the critical scientific, institutional and legal questions associated with combating nuclear and radiological terrorism, the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on “Preparedness for Nuclear and Radiological Threats” and this proceeding was structured to promote wide-ranging, multi-national exploration of critical technology needs and underlying scientific challenges to reducing the threat of nuclear/radiological terrorism; to illustrate through country-specific presentations how resulting technologies were used in national programs; and to outli...

  3. Cooperation of Nuclear Industrial, Academic and Research Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Sun

    1987-01-01

    In 1980's, however, the industry atmosphere has been slowly changing since advanced countries become more protective in high tech releases to economically competing countries like Korea. Meanwhile, Korea itself is in the stage that per-capita income exceeds 2,000 dollars, and starts realizing that the 'technology self-reliance' is the only solution for overcoming the present situation so as to become one of those developed countries. Towards this goal of technology self-reliance, our industries and government bodies are working together to develop an extensive implementation program. Korea is very poor in natural resources and capital. Fortunately, however, Korea has abundant well-educated and disciplined human resources. Therefore, the appropriate utilization of human resources is the only and natural solution for Korea's emerging into an advanced country after the turn of this century. KEPCO is the only utility company in Korea which produces and distributes the electricity. The first priority of the utility company is to provide the consumers with a good quality electricity as economically as possible in timely manner, which requires the safe and reliable operation of power plants

  4. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, whose activities are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states and of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  5. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, the activities of which are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  6. CONCERT-'European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research'; CONCERT-''European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birschwilks, Mandy; Schmitt-Hannig, Annemarie [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Internationale und Nationale Zusammenarbeit im Strahlenschutz; Jung, Thomas [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit

    2016-08-01

    In 2009 the High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on low dose research recommended the development of a scientific platform for low dose radiation research. The foundation of MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) occurred in 2010. In 2015 a new project on radiation protection research was established: CONCERT (European Joint Programme for the Integration at Radiation Protection Research). The aim is the coordination of the already existing scientific platforms MELODI (radiation effects and interactions), ALLIANCE (radioecology), NERIS (nuclear and radiological emergency protection) and EURADOS (radiation dosimetry). With CONCERT an efficient use of this infrastructure for research cooperation and transparency is intended.

  7. European research agenda for career guidance and counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Peter C.; Katsarov, Johannes; Cohen-Scali, Valérie

    2018-01-01

    In a changing world, there is a need to reflect about the research basis of career guidance and counselling (CGC) as a professional practice, considering the contributions of various disciplines and research traditions. This paper outlines a possible European research agenda (ERA) to further...... enhance the knowledge foundation of the CGC practice. The proposed lines of research, which are pronounced in the ERA, are based on a literature review involving 45 researchers concerned with the CGC practice. At three events, approximately 150 researchers from across Europe were engaged in the discussion...

  8. The European nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noon, F [Energy Industries, Canterbury, Kent (United Kingdom)

    1990-06-01

    The Nuclear Industry, both reactor manufacturers and generating companies, have a responsibility to make the case for Nuclear Energy in very positive terms if Western Europe is to avoid the economic trap of serious power deficits in the early part of the next century. Significant progress will not be made without public consent, and the public must be made aware of the real needs for the future: A Commitment to Safe Nuclear Energy Utilising Economical Designs Based Upon Proven Technology. However some re-thinking of accepted energy philosophy is also called for, and the speculation here as to what could happen in Europe over the next thirty years, is one possible scenario. (author)

  9. The European nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noon, F.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Industry, both reactor manufacturers and generating companies, have a responsibility to make the case for Nuclear Energy in very positive terms if Western Europe is to avoid the economic trap of serious power deficits in the early part of the next century. Significant progress will not be made without public consent, and the public must be made aware of the real needs for the future: A Commitment to Safe Nuclear Energy Utilising Economical Designs Based Upon Proven Technology. However some re-thinking of accepted energy philosophy is also called for, and the speculation here as to what could happen in Europe over the next thirty years, is one possible scenario. (author)

  10. The European community and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkhorst, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Full text: Since the inception of the EURATOM Treaty (1957) the use of nuclear power has made an enormous progress. The nuclear sector has become a very important component of the production of energy. Prisoner of its success further development of the use of nuclear energy is confronted with the challenge of ensuring its integration within the framework of modern environment protection concepts. The link between the radiation protection objective and the responsibilities of the State's Authorities in the control of the design and operation of nuclear industrial facilities has become evident. On the other hand, the evolution in the perception of the transfrontier character of the nuclear risk by the population and. the drive for the political integration of Europe have led the Community Member States to an increasing concentration between their nuclear policy-making organs and in particular between their Nuclear Safety Authorities It is quite natural that the Community institutions, the Council of Ministers and the Commission and more recently the European Parliament have become active hosts and catalysts of the concentration of the Member States on the nuclear safety objectives which are at the source of the protection of the population and of the environment. The joint efforts of the Member States and the Commission have led to a reinforcement of the process of harmonisation of safety requirements for nuclear installations at Community level. A parallel concentration effort has been done by Community Member States concerning the back-end of the fuel cycle, in particular radioactive waste management. The European Community meets the conditions to become a key driving force for nuclear safety progress beyond its region because of the advanced stage of nuclear safety in the Community which includes the flexibility and completeness of its fuel cycle and the long experience of Community institutions in the promotion of harmonisation of safety objectives, criteria and

  11. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes `IAEA Handbook`, which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author).

  12. A study on international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Byung Wook; Cho, Il Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Choi, Young Rok; Ko, Han Seok; Ham, Chul Hoon; Lee, Byung Woon

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the current status of international nuclear organizations and conventions in systems perspective and suggest national strategies for utilizing them for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. This study analyzes the current status of international nuclear organizations such as IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency) and international nuclear conventions related to nuclear accidents, nuclear liability, physical protection or nuclear safety. Based on the analysis, this study suggests national strategies, in general and specific terms, to utilize international nuclear organizations and conventions for the globalization of Korean nuclear community. Separately from this report this study publishes 'IAEA Handbook', which contains all about IAEA such as statute, membership, organizational structure, main activities, finance and budget, etc.. 9 tabs., 2 figs., 35 refs. (Author)

  13. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  14. Sustainability management for operating organizations of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibrit, Eduardo; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de, E-mail: ekibrit@ipen.br, E-mail: araquino@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. In a country like Brazil, where nuclear activity is geared towards peaceful purposes, any operating organization of research reactor should emphasize its commitment to social, environmental, economic and institutional aspects. Social aspects include research and development, production and supply of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation safety and special training for the nuclear sector. Environmental aspects include control of the surroundings and knowledge directed towards environment preservation. Economic aspects include import substitution and diversification of production. Institutional aspects include technology, innovation and knowledge. These aspects, if considered in the management system of an operating organization of research reactor, will help with its long-term maintenance and success in an increasingly competitive market scenario. About this, we propose a sustainability management system approach for operating organizations of research reactors. A bibliographical review on the theme is made. A methodology for identifying indicators for measuring sustainability in nuclear research reactors processes is also described. Finally, we propose a methodology for sustainability perception assessment to be applied at operating organizations of research reactors. (author)

  15. Sustainability management for operating organizations of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibrit, Eduardo; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. In a country like Brazil, where nuclear activity is geared towards peaceful purposes, any operating organization of research reactor should emphasize its commitment to social, environmental, economic and institutional aspects. Social aspects include research and development, production and supply of radiopharmaceuticals, radiation safety and special training for the nuclear sector. Environmental aspects include control of the surroundings and knowledge directed towards environment preservation. Economic aspects include import substitution and diversification of production. Institutional aspects include technology, innovation and knowledge. These aspects, if considered in the management system of an operating organization of research reactor, will help with its long-term maintenance and success in an increasingly competitive market scenario. About this, we propose a sustainability management system approach for operating organizations of research reactors. A bibliographical review on the theme is made. A methodology for identifying indicators for measuring sustainability in nuclear research reactors processes is also described. Finally, we propose a methodology for sustainability perception assessment to be applied at operating organizations of research reactors. (author)

  16. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L.; Barysauskas, Constance M.; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Patel, Sagar A.; Royce, Trevor J.; Fletcher, Christopher D.M.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.

  17. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Barysauskas, Constance M. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Raut, Chandrajit P. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Royce, Trevor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fletcher, Christopher D.M. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.

  18. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L; Barysauskas, Constance M; Raut, Chandrajit P; Patel, Sagar A; Royce, Trevor J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Baldini, Elizabeth H

    2017-06-01

    To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Increasing security of supply: The search for stable models of financing for new nuclear build in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffron, Raphael James

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This research assesses models for financing of new nuclear build in European Union (EU) member states to find the most stable form. The countries examined in this study are France, the United Kingdom, Finland and Romania. The results attest that due to various historical, political, competition, and electricity market structural conditions Romania has emerged with the most secure and stable model for financing of new nuclear projects. This paper begins with an assessment of the effects on the nuclear sector from energy, environment and competition legislation in the EU. Then the political and economic climate of the afore mentioned EU member states is completed. Following this an overview of the market structure of the electricity sector in those respective countries is conducted. Then the key research on the models of financing of new nuclear build is explored, contrasted and analysed. The research concludes that there are four main models for financing new nuclear projects in Europe. Each model has transcended from different political and economic forces, and consequently each model has met with varied levels of success. Electricity market structures while operating to the same legal requirements, have been dissimilar in their evolution. The combination of the above factors has led to different models for financing new nuclear build. Upon further analysis it is concluded and demonstrated that the Romanian financing model is the most suitable and provides an example for any new nuclear build aspiring nations in the EU and beyond. (author)

  20. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Regge, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5 th Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5 th and 6 th Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialise the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6 th EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  1. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, D.

    2006-01-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  2. The European Nuclear Education Network Association - ENEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, D. [Institut des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA - Centre de Saclay, Bat. 395, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The temporary network, established through the European 5. Framework Programme project ENEN, was given a more permanent character by the foundation of the European Nuclear Education Network Association, a non-profit-making association according to the French law of 1901, pursuing a pedagogic and scientific aim. Its main objective is the preservation and the further development of higher nuclear education and expertise. This objective is realized through the co-operation between the European universities, involved in education and research in the nuclear engineering field, the nuclear research centres and the nuclear industry. The membership of the ENEN Association now consists of 35 universities members and 6 research centres. The paper briefly describes the history and structure of the ENEN Association and elaborates on the objectives and activities of its five committees during its first two years of operation. Supported by the 5. and 6. Framework Programme of the European Community, the ENEN Association established the delivery of the European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering certificate. In particular, education and training courses have been developed and offered to materialize the core curricula and optional fields of study in a European exchange structure. Pilot editions of those courses and try-outs of training programmes have been successfully organised with a satisfying interest, attendance and performance by the students and the support of nuclear industries and international organisations. The involvement of ENEN in the 6. EC Framework project EUROTRANS will further enlarge its field of activities into a realm of nuclear disciplines. The ENEN Association further contributes to the management of nuclear knowledge within the European Union as well as on a world-wide level, through contacts with its sister Network ANENT in Asia, and by its participation to activities of the World Nuclear University. (author)

  3. European activities on crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena for innovative nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, X., E-mail: xu.cheng@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Batta, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Bandini, G. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA) (Italy); Roelofs, F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) (Netherlands); Van Tichelen, K. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie – Centre d’étude de l’Energie Nucléaire (SCK-CEN) (Belgium); Gerschenfeld, A. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) (France); Prasser, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) (Switzerland); Papukchiev, A. [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS) (Germany); Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR) (Germany); Ma, W.M. [Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan (KTH) (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • This paper serves as a guidance of the special issue. • The technical tasks and methodologies applied to achieve the objectives have been described. • Main results achieved so far are summarized. - Abstract: Thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key scientific subject in the development of innovative reactor systems. In Europe, a consortium is established consisting of 24 institutions of universities, research centers and nuclear industries with the main objectives to identify and to perform research activities on important crosscutting thermal-hydraulic issues encountered in various innovative nuclear systems. For this purpose the large-scale integrated research project THINS (Thermal-Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems) is launched in the 7th Framework Programme FP7 of European Union. The main topics considered in the THINS project are (a) advanced reactor core thermal-hydraulics, (b) single phase mixed convection, (c) single phase turbulence, (d) multiphase flow, and (e) numerical code coupling and qualification. The main objectives of the project are: • Generation of a data base for the development and validation of new models and codes describing the selected crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena. • Development of new physical models and modeling approaches for more accurate description of the crosscutting thermal-hydraulic phenomena. • Improvement of the numerical engineering tools for the design analysis of the innovative nuclear systems. This paper describes the technical tasks and methodologies applied to achieve the objectives. Main results achieved so far are summarized. This paper serves also as a guidance of this special issue.

  4. Reconciling scientific approaches for organic farming research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baars, T.

    2002-01-01

    Part I : Reflection on research methods in organic grassland and animal production at the Louis Bolk Institute, The Netherlands

    Key words: organic agriculture, anthroposophy, methodology, research strategy, experiential science,

  5. Comparison over the nuclear analysis of the HCLL blanket for the European DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: jean-charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiello, Giacomo; Aubert, Julien [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Villari, Rosaria [ENEA, UTFUS-TECN, Via E. Fermi 4, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Fischer, Ulrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A complete nuclear analysis of the DEMO HCLL has been carried out at CEA with the TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code. • The DEMO tokamak model was generated by the CAD import tool McCad. • The HCLL blankets were implemented using a previous MCNP model developed at ENEA. • A good agreement is observed between the results obtained at CEA with TRIPOLI-4 and JEFF-3.1.1 and whose obtained at ENEA with MCNP and FENDL-2.1. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparison over the nuclear analysis of the European DEMO with HCLL blanket carried out with the TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code and the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The MCNP5 analysis was conducted firstly by ENEA with a detailed 3D model describing all the HCLL blanket internal structures. This MCNP5 model was converted into TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} representation for performing the nuclear analysis at CEA with the objective to demonstrate consistency between both analyses. A very good agreement was obtained for all of the relevant nuclear responses (neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, nuclear heating, neutron flux distribution, etc.), validating CEA’s nuclear analysis approach, based on TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo code and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library, for the European DEMO.

  6. Comparison over the nuclear analysis of the HCLL blanket for the European DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaboulay, Jean-Charles; Aiello, Giacomo; Aubert, Julien; Villari, Rosaria; Fischer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A complete nuclear analysis of the DEMO HCLL has been carried out at CEA with the TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code. • The DEMO tokamak model was generated by the CAD import tool McCad. • The HCLL blankets were implemented using a previous MCNP model developed at ENEA. • A good agreement is observed between the results obtained at CEA with TRIPOLI-4 and JEFF-3.1.1 and whose obtained at ENEA with MCNP and FENDL-2.1. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparison over the nuclear analysis of the European DEMO with HCLL blanket carried out with the TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code and the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and with the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The MCNP5 analysis was conducted firstly by ENEA with a detailed 3D model describing all the HCLL blanket internal structures. This MCNP5 model was converted into TRIPOLI-4"® representation for performing the nuclear analysis at CEA with the objective to demonstrate consistency between both analyses. A very good agreement was obtained for all of the relevant nuclear responses (neutron wall loading, tritium breeding ratio, nuclear heating, neutron flux distribution, etc.), validating CEA’s nuclear analysis approach, based on TRIPOLI-4"® Monte Carlo code and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library, for the European DEMO.

  7. Actual questions in Slovak and European nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2010-01-01

    The close cohesion of research and education underlines the development of all research areas and contributes to their sustainability. In the paper, new approaches of European Commission (DG RTD Energy) to nuclear power engineering development (focused on area fission and reactor systems) and applications also for Slovak conditions are discussed in details. Research, education and training increase not only economical factor and technical development, but imply the higher level of safety culture by design or operation of nuclear installations. The paper will be focused on the actual questions in frame of Slovak as well as European nuclear sector.

  8. Patterns of practice of regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer: results of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) NOdal Radiotherapy (NORA) survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Kaidar-Person, O.; Poortmans, P.; Ozsahin, M.; Valli, M.-C.; Russell, N.; Kunkler, I.; Hermans, J.; Kuten, A.; van Tienhoven, G.; Westenberg, H.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting outcome of breast cancer (BC) patients based on sentinel lymph node (SLN) status without axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is an area of uncertainty. It influences the decision-making for regional nodal irradiation (RNI). The aim of the NORA (NOdal RAdiotherapy) survey was to examine

  9. Information report made on the behalf of the European Affairs Commission on European policy for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizet, J.; Sutour, S.

    2011-05-01

    This report aims at defining some perspectives for the evolution of the European general legal framework for nuclear safety. The authors first outline the difficulty for a European policy to emerge. They explain this statement by the importance of the current policy of national states, of their operators and of their national regulation authorities. They evoke the few elements of this legal framework (EURATOM Treaty, jurisprudence) but outline the strong cooperation between national authorities. Then, they discuss some progresses which have been noticed during the past two years (the 'safety' directive, a proposition for a directive on the management of used fuel and radioactive wastes, and the recent works by WENRA), and discuss the consequences of the accident in Fukushima. Propositions are made, notably concerning the support to the 'waste' directive, the perpetuation of strength tests, the rewriting of the 'safety' directive of June 2009

  10. The web-enabled ODIN portal - useful databases for the European Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over, H.H.; Wolfart, E.

    2005-01-01

    Materials databases (MDBs) are powerful tools to store, retrieve and present experimental materials data of various categories adapted to specific needs of users. In combination with analysis tools experimental data are necessary for e.g. mechanical design, construction and lifetime predictions of complex components. The effective and efficient handling of large amounts of generic and detailed materials properties data related to e.g. fabrication processes is one of the basic elements of data administration within ongoing European research projects and networks. Over the last 20 years, the JRC/Institute of Energy of the European Commission at Petten has developed and continuously improved a database for experimental materials properties data (Mat-DB). The Mat-DB database structure is oriented to international material standards and recommendations. The database and associated analysis routines are accessible through a web-enabled interface on the On-line Data Information Network (ODIN: http://odin.jrc.nl). ODIN provides controlled access to Mat-DB and other related databases (e.g. the document database DoMa) and thus allows European R and D projects to securely manage and disseminate their experimental test data as well as any type of supporting documentation (e.g. unfiltered raw data, reports, minutes, etc). Using the Internet project partners can instantly access and evaluate data sets entered and validated by one of the members. This paper describes the structure and functionality of Mat-DB and gives examples how these tools can be used for the benefit of European nuclear R and D community. (author)

  11. Nuclear energy and the Green Paper of the European Commission 'An European strategy for sustainable, competitive and secure energy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metes, Mircea

    2006-01-01

    At present the energy is for European Union officials an issue of top priority. In the beginning of 2006 the natural gas crisis between Russia and Ukraine remembered menacingly to the Europeans that energy supply of the continent depends decisively on importation from other geographic areas and that these importation raise risks of a great variety. In addition to the power problems, disastrous effects on the economy, human life and eco-systems appeared to have the climate changes produced by fossil fuel burning. Consequently, a common energetic policy of Europe should be targeted at three main objectives: sustainability, competitiveness and security of supply. Six directions of action were identified: 1. EU must finalize the construction of internal European gas and electricity market; 2. EU should ensure that its energy market guaranties the security of supply under a solidary policy of the member states; 3. It is necessary that a large debate to have place about different sources of energy including the problems of costs and impact on climatic change, security and supply competitiveness and sustainability; 4. EU should approach the climatic change issues in agreement with the objectives established at Lisbon conference aiming at placing EU in the forefront of technological and scientific progress; 5. A strategic plan concerning the energy technology; 6. A common foreign policy in the field of energy. It is worthy to stress that the present Green Paper of EU has a manifestly different position concerning the nuclear energy with respect to the prior Green Paper of November 2000. While, in 2000 the EU Commission viewed the nuclear energy as being 'in limbo', in the 2006 version the Commission declared the nuclear energy as the most important source of power in Europe without CO 2 emissions. It is stated that all the energy options should be kept open while the Europe states have the right to establish their own energy mix, which they consider optimal, and in which

  12. Causality in Europeanization Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet

    2012-01-01

    to develop discursive institutional analytical frameworks and something that comes close to the formulation of hypothesis on the effects of European Union (EU) policies and institutions on domestic change. Even if these efforts so far do not necessarily amount to substantive theories or claims of causality......Discourse analysis as a methodology is perhaps not readily associated with substantive causality claims. At the same time the study of discourses is very much the study of conceptions of causal relations among a set, or sets, of agents. Within Europeanization research we have seen endeavours......, it suggests that discourse analysis and the study of causality are by no means opposites. The study of Europeanization discourses may even be seen as an essential step in the move towards claims of causality in Europeanization research. This chapter deals with the question of how we may move from the study...

  13. European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H

    2012-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). (physics of our days)

  14. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Towards the European Nuclear Engineering Education Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Giot, M.; Sehgal, B.R.; Goethem, G. Van

    2003-01-01

    Current priorities of the scientific community regarding basic research lie elsewhere than in nuclear sciences. The situation today is significantly different than it was three to four decades ago when much of the present competence base in nuclear sciences was in fact generated. In addition, many of the highly competent engineers and scientists, who helped create the present nuclear industry, and its regulatory structure, are approaching retirement. To preserve nuclear knowledge and expertise through the higher nuclear engineering education in the 5 th framework program of the European Commission the project ENEN (European Nuclear Engineering Education Network) was launched, since the need to keep the university curricula in nuclear sciences and technology alive has been clearly recognized at European level. As the follow up of this project an international nuclear engineering education consortium of universities with partners from the nuclear sector is presently in process of being established This association called ENEN has as founding members: 14 universities and 8 research institutes from 17 European countries. (author)

  16. Nuclear chemistry research for the safe disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghaenel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel is of key importance for the future sustainable development of nuclear energy. Concepts foresee the isolation of the nuclear waste in deep geological formations. The long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste is dominated by plutonium and the minor actinides. Hence it is essential for the performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal to understand the chemical behaviour of actinides in a repository system. The aqueous chemistry and thermodynamics of actinides is rather complex in particular due to their very rich redox chemistry. Recent results of our detailed study of the Plutonium and Neptunium redox - and complexation behaviour are presented and discussed. (author)

  17. French nuclear organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudet, G.

    1993-01-01

    The French nuclear organization is characterized by two main features: the small number of firms involved and the role of the Government. In this text we give the French organization for nuclear industry and the role of Government and public authorities. 7 figs

  18. Organization and management for decommissioning of large nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    For nuclear facilities, decommissioning is the final phase in the life-cycle after siting, design, construction, commissioning and operation. It is a complex process involving operations such as detailed surveys, decontamination and dismantling of plant equipment and facilities, demolition of buildings and structures, and management of resulting waste and other materials, whilst taking into account aspects of health and safety of the operating personnel and the general public, and protection of the environment. Careful planning and management is essential to ensure that decommissioning is accomplished in a safe and cost effective manner. Guidance on organizational aspects may lead to better decision making, reductions in time and resources, lower doses to the workers and reduced impact on public health and the environment. The objective of this report is to provide information and guidance on the organization and management aspects for the decommissioning of large nuclear facilities which will be useful for licensees responsible for discharging these responsibilities. The information contained in the report may also be useful to policy makers, regulatory bodies and other organizations interested in the planning and management of decommissioning. In this report, the term 'decommissioning' refers to those actions that are taken at the end of the useful life of a nuclear facility in withdrawing it from service with adequate regard for the health and safety of workers and members of the public and for the protection of the environment. The term 'large nuclear facilities' involves nuclear power plants, large nuclear research reactors and other fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing plants, fuel conversion, fabrication and enrichment plants, as well as spent fuel storage and waste management plants. Information on the planning and management for decommissioning of smaller research reactors or other small nuclear facilities can be found elsewhere. The report covers

  19. Randomized trial on the efficacy of radiotherapy for cerebral low-grade glioma in the adult: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Study 22845 with the Medical Research Council study BRO4: an interim analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, Abul B.M.F.; Afra, Denes; Cornu, Philippe; Bleehan, Norman; Schraub, Simon; De Witte, Olivier; Darcel, Francois; Stenning, Sally; Pierart, Marianne; Van Glabbeke, Martine

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is no consensus on the treatment strategy for adult patients with cerebral low-grade glioma. The diagnosis and primary treatment are usually undertaken by surgery. Some investigators doubt the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy (RT), whereas others advise routine postoperative RT. We report the primary results of a multicenter randomized trial on this controversy. Methods and Materials: From 24 European centers, 311 adult patients with low-grade glioma were randomized centrally after surgery from March 1986 through September 1997, between the two arms of the trial. The irradiated group received 54 Gy in 6 weeks. The other patients did not receive any treatment after surgery until the tumor showed progression, defined as clinical-neurologic deterioration and evidence of progressive tumor on imaging. Results: Of 290 eligible and assessable patients (93%), the irradiated group showed a significant (log-rank p = 0.02) improvement in time to progression but not in overall survival, with a median follow-up of 5 years. The 5-year estimate was, respectively, 63% vs. 66% (overall survival) and 44% vs. 37% (time to progression) for the treated and control arms. Different treatment modalities, including RT, were undertaken for the 85 controls when a progressive tumor was noted. Conclusion: Early postoperative conventional RT such as that used for this protocol appears to improve the time to progression or progression-free survival, but not overall survival, for patients with low-grade glioma

  20. Nuclear power and European Union enlargement challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Bilegan, C.; Pall, S.; Sandru, P.

    2000-01-01

    In the nuclear power sector, the main concern for the candidate countries entering the European Union, remains the nuclear safety. New standards and regulation will be issued for improving the general quality of life in a sound environment. For the candidate countries entering the European Union, this situation represents a real challenge. Their national legislation must be improved to meet the European standards. The conditions are different from country to country, and more difficult for those, which operate ''non west European reactor type''. The paper also present the actual status of the Romanian legislation related to nuclear power and environment. There are presented the principles, terms and responsibilities contained in this legislation. The authors discuss some aspects related to the possibilities to improve the national legislation to meet the actual European Commission or EURATOM standards. (author)

  1. ANSTO: Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization conducts or is engaged in collaborative research and development in the application of nuclear science and associated technology. Through its Australian radio-isotopes unit, it markets radioisotopes, their products and other services for nuclear medicine industry and research. It also operates national nuclear facilities ( HIFAR and Moata research reactors), promote training, provide advice and disseminates information on nuclear science and technology. The booklet briefly outlines these activities. ills

  2. Research Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, H.

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the ENS Class 1 Topical Meeting on Research facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy include contributions on large research facilities, designed for tests in the field of nuclear energy production. In particular, issues related to facilities supporting research and development programmes in connection to the operation of nuclear power plants as well as the development of new concepts in material testing, nuclear data measurement, code validation, fuel cycle, reprocessing, and waste disposal are discussed. The proceedings contain 63 papers

  3. The European Nuclear Energy Tribunal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, D.

    1977-01-01

    The European Nuclear Energy Tribunal was set up within the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (now the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) on 20th December 1957 under the Convention on Security Control. Seven independent judges are appointed for five years by decision of the Council of the Organisation; if the Tribunal includes no judge of the nationality of a party in a dispute submitted to it, the Government concerned may select an additional judge in that case. The Tribunal is competent in matters of security control, third party liability and activities of one of the Organisation's joint undertakings. At the request of any Government party to the Security Control Convention, to the Eurochemic Convention or to the Paris Convention and Brussels Supplementary Convention it may be convened to resolve any dispute concerning the interpretation or application thereof. While the Tribunal has not yet been called upon to exercise its judgment it is nonetheless an important and necessary instrument for Member States engaged in nuclear activities at international level. (NEA) [fr

  4. About the interest of an agreement for a european passport for workers in european regulated nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, M.; Bailloeuil, C.; Petrequin, A.

    2002-01-01

    The European directive 96/29 applicable to EU member states is, or will be transposed in each country according to national conditions which could prove to be more restrictive than the demands of the directive. Additionally, specific organisations in each country, reinforce the disparities where radioprotection, and medical and dosimetric follow-up are concerned. In April 2001, on the initiative of a group of French company medical officers (EDF CEA COGEMA), a meeting with company medical officers from various member states of the EEC: Great Britain, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Germany, was organised in order to bring to attention the issue of the movement of contract workers in European regulated nuclear installations

  5. Description and Methods of the Automated Document Management System Usage in Scientific Organizational Activities of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (ADS SOA JINR)

    CERN Document Server

    Borisovsky, V F; Kekelidze, M G; Nikonov, E G; Senchenko, V A

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the structure description and user guide for Information program system for automation of a document flow for support of scientific arrangement planning (ADS SOA) which can be used for planning and carrying out seminars, workshops, conferences and other arrangements of research management. This work is intended for automation of scientific research management in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The complex of programs represents the CDS Agenda system used in the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), which is adapted to the conditions of JINR.

  6. An introduction to European intergovernmental organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Cogen, Marc

    2015-01-01

    An Introduction to European Intergovernmental Organizations provides an up-to-date and accessible reference to European intergovernmental organizations other than the European Union. The EU is so dominant that people often overlook the multitude of older and newer, smaller and larger intergovernmental organizations rooted in the history of contemporary Europe which continue to help shape its future. The specialized character of these organizations adds value to cooperation in Europe as a whole, creates permanent channels of communication regardless of EU membership and allows the possibility for non-European involvement through organizations such as the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and NATO. It also allows sub regional groups of states, such as the Nordic countries or the Benelux countries to exist and express their own identity via their own organizations. This book looks at the history of Non-EU organizations, their decision-making characteristics, membership policies, legal powers actio...

  7. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  8. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  9. The operating organization for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  10. Radionuclide metrology research for nuclear site decommissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S. M.; Regan, P. H.

    2017-11-01

    The safe and cost-effective decommissioning of legacy nuclear sites relies on accurate measurement of the radioactivity content of the waste materials, so that the waste can be assigned to the most appropriate disposal route. Such measurements are a new challenge for the science of radionuclide metrology which was established largely to support routine measurements on operating nuclear sites and other applications such as nuclear medicine. In this paper, we provide a brief summary of the international measurement system that is established to enable nuclear site operators to demonstrate that measurements are accurate, independent and fit for purpose, and highlight some of the projects that are underway to adapt the measurement system to meet the changing demands from the industry.

  11. The validation of the standard Chinese version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30 in pre-operative patients with brain tumor in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hong-ying

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health related quality of life (HRQOL has increasingly emphasized on cancer patients. The psychometric properties of the standard Chinese version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30, version 3.0 in brain tumor patients wasn't proven, and there was no baseline HRQOL in brain tumor patients prior to surgery. Methods The questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0 was administered at three time points: T1, the first or the second day that patients were hospitalized after the brain tumor suspected or diagnosed by MRI or CT; T2, 1 to 2 days after T1, (T1 and T2 were both before surgery; T3, the day before discharge. Clinical variables included disease histologic types, cognitive function, and Karnofsky Performance Status. Results Cronbach's alpha coefficients for multi-item scales were greater than .70 and multitrait scaling analysis showed that most of the item-scale correlation coefficients met the standards of convergent and discriminant validity, except for the cognitive functioning scale. All scales and items exhibited construct validity. Score changes over peri-operation were observed in physical and role functioning scales. Compared with mixed cancer patients assessed after surgery but before adjuvant treatment, brain tumor patients assessed pre-surgery presented better function and fewer symptoms. Conclusions The standard Chinese version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 was overall a valid instrument to assess HRQOL in brain tumor patients in China. The baseline HRQOL in brain tumor patients pre-surgery was better than that in mixed cancer patients post-surgery. Future study should modify cognitive functioning scale and examine test-retest reliability and response validity.

  12. Evaluation of knowledge loss risk in nuclear industry and research organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Apostol, Minodora; Balaceanu, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Institutional knowledge is defined as a collective knowledge of all employees in an organization or institution. The necessity to maintain organizational competency for nuclear power has been widely recognized given the nature of the business and the life cycle of 100 years or more. Our paper is intended to perform the first step in the knowledge loss risk assessment in nuclear organizations in Romania. Generally a three step procedure is needed for the evaluation process: - conducting the knowledge loss risk assessment; - determination of the approach needed to capture critical knowledge; - monitoring and evaluation. Taking into account the specificity of problems at organizational/institutional level, the difficulty of finding of a common approach, and the necessity to harmonize different interests at national level, a National Nuclear Knowledge Strategy is compulsory needed. (authors)

  13. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H.

    2007-06-01

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely

  14. Decommissioning Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Kang, Y. A.; Kim, G. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    It is predicted that the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant would happen in Korea since 2020 but the need of partial decommissioning and decontamination for periodic inspection and life extension still has been on an increasing trend and its domestic market has gradually been extended. Therefore, in this project we developed following several essential technologies as a decommissioning R and D. The measurement technology for in-pipe radioactive contamination was developed for measuring alpha/beta/gamma emitting nuclides simultaneously inside a in-pipe and it was tested into the liquid waste transfer pipe in KRR-2. And the digital mock-up system for KRR-1 and 2 was developed for choosing the best scenarios among several scenarios on the basis of various decommissioning information(schedule, waste volume, cost, etc.) that are from the DMU and the methodology of decommissioning cost estimation was also developed for estimating a research reactor's decommissioning cost and the DMU and the decommissioning cost estimation system were incorporated into the decommissioning information integrated management system. Finally the treatment and management technology of the irradiated graphites that happened after decommissioning KRR-2 was developed in order to treat and manage the irradiated graphites safely.

  15. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this safety guide is to provide recommendations for national authorities on the appropriate management system, organization and staffing for the regulatory body responsible for the regulation of nuclear facilities in order to achieve compliance with the applicable safety requirements. This safety guide covers the organization and staffing in relation to nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And radioactive waste management facilities such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This safety guide also covers issues related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation

  16. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors; Instrumentacion nuclear para reactores nucleares de investigacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Unidad de Actividades de Reactores y Centrales Nucleares. Sector Instrumentacion y Control

    1997-10-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70`. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs.

  17. Establishing a code of ethics for nuclear operating organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA Technical Working Group on Training and Qualification of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel (TWG-T and Q) recommended that the IAEA develop a publication on improving the performance of nuclear facility operating organizations through focusing on the ethics and professionalism of personnel at all levels of such organizations. This publication has been prepared in response to that recommendation. The TWG-T and Q made its recommendation based upon an understanding that an organization's code of ethics should apply to behaviours at all levels of the organization; from the Board Room to the working level. The TWG-T and Q also recognized that having the technical competencies related to nuclear technology is not enough to ensure that an operating organization's performance is at the high standards needed for a sustainable nuclear industry. The values and ethics of individuals and organizational units play an equally important role. This publication is addressed primarily to senior managers of operating organizations, as experience has shown that, in order to succeed, such initiatives need to come from and be continually supported by the highest levels of the organization. This publication was developed under an IAEA project in its 2006-7 programme entitled Achieving Excellence in the Performance of Nuclear Power Plant Personnel. The principal objectives of this project were: - To enhance the capability of Member States to utilize proven practices accumulated, developed and transferred by the Agency for improving personnel performance and maintaining high standards, and - To demonstrate how positive attitudes and professionalism, appropriate performance management, adherence to a systematic approach to training, quality management and the use of effective information and knowledge management technologies contribute to the success in achieving organization objectives in a challenging business environment

  18. Nuclear boom - challenge for research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korec, M.; Liska, P.

    2009-01-01

    In this lecture authors present research and development in which VUJE, a. s. has participated. Authors concluded that resume as soon as possible the short-term research and development tasks for the existing SE reactors, both, operational reactors of SE and for shut-downed reactors - JAVYS. (Financing with the contribution from the state but major part from the industry). In cooperation with state institutions, regulatory authorities and investor (would-be operator) and supplier (suppliers) define and prepare tasks focused on issues of new-built Generation III reactors (Financing split between the state and industry in accordance with the characteristics of the tasks). Begin preparing tasks for resolving development problems of Generation IV reactors: - Persuade politicians abut the inevitability of state participation in the process, including financing; - Involve in the process institutions that can significantly contribute to the problems resolving (mainly on technical level, but also on organization and potentially financial level); - Prepare international cooperation agreements in this field (based on the existing agreements, preparation of new agreements); - Define technical areas of cooperation (research infrastructure, experimental and development facilities, simulation tools).

  19. European network infrastructures of observatories for terrestrial Global Change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Bogena, H.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    The earth's climate is significantly changing (e.g. IPCC, 2007) and thus directly affecting the terrestrial systems. The number and intensity hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts, are continually increasing, resulting in major economical and social impacts. Furthermore, the land cover in Europe has been modified fundamentally by conversions for agriculture, forest and for other purposes such as industrialisation and urbanisation. Additionally, water resources are more than ever used for human development, especially as a key resource for agricultural and industrial activities. As a special case, the mountains of the world are of significant importance in terms of water resources supply, biodiversity, economy, agriculture, traffic and recreation but particularly vulnerable to environmental change. The Alps are unique because of the pronounced small scale variability they contain, the high population density they support and their central position in Europe. The Alps build a single coherent physical and natural environment, artificially cut by national borders. The scientific community and governmental bodies have responded to these environmental changes by performing dedicated experiments and by establishing environmental research networks to monitor, analyse and predict the impact of Global Change on different terrestrial systems of the Earths' environment. Several European network infrastructures for terrestrial Global Change research are presently immerging or upgrading, such as ICOS, ANAEE, LifeWatch or LTER-Europe. However, the strongest existing networks are still operating on a regional or national level and the historical growth of such networks resulted in a very heterogeneous landscape of observation networks. We propose therefore the establishment of two complementary networks: The NetwOrk of Hydrological observAtories, NOHA. NOHA aims to promote the sustainable management of water resources in Europe, to support the prediction of

  20. The Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research SIN

    CERN Document Server

    Pritzker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This book tells the story of the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN). The institute was founded in 1968 and became part of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in 1988. Its founding occurred at a time when physics was generally considered the key discipline for technological and social development. This step was unusual for a small country like Switzerland and showed courage and foresight. Equally unusual were the accomplishments of SIN, compared with similar institutes in the rest of the world, as well as its influence on Swiss, and partially also on international politics of science. That this story is now available in a widely understandable form is due to the efforts of some physicists, who took the initiative as long as contemporary witnesses could still be questioned. As is usually the case, official documents always show just an excerpt of what really happened. An intimate portrayal of people who contributed to success requires personal memories. This text relies on both sources. In addition, the e...

  1. Nuclear safety in countries that are candidate for entry to the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this report, experts from countries members of the European Union have wished to give their collective opinion about nuclear safety in countries that are standing for integrating the E.U.. The investigated countries are Bulgaria, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, Rumania, Slovenia and Czech Republic. This report is based on information given in international cooperation programmes such as Phare programmes as well as in bilateral contacts. 2 aspects are considered: regulatory authorities and the level of safety in operating nuclear power plants. This report does not deal with radioactive waste management nor with radiation protection. (A.C.)

  2. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  3. Basis for snubber aging research: Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.; Palmer, G.R.; Werry, E.V.; Blahnik, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a research plan to address the safety concerns of aging in snubbers used on piping and equipment in commercial nuclear power plants. The work is to be performed under Phase 2 of the Snubber Aging Study of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the prime contractor. Research conducted by PNL under Phase 1 provided an initial assessment of snubber operating experience and was primarily based on a review of licensee event reports. The work proposed is an extension of Phase 1 and includes research at nuclear power plants and in test laboratories. Included is technical background on the design and use of snubbers in commercial nuclear power applications; the primary failure modes of both hydraulic and mechanical snubbers are discussed. The anticipated safety, technical, and regulatory benefits of the work, along with concerns of the NRC and the utilities, are also described. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  4. European research project 'Metrology for radioactive waste management'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suran, J.

    2014-01-01

    The three-year European research project M etrology for Radioactive Waste Management' was launched in October 2011 under the EMRP (European Metrology Research Programme). It involves 13 European national metrology institutes and a total budget exceeds four million Euros. The project is coordinated by the Czech Metrology Institute and is divided into five working groups. This poster presents impact, excellence, relevance to EMPR objectives, and implementation and management of this project.(author)

  5. The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy - present state and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is the biggest one within Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and it is a leading complex center for research and application of the nuclear physics in Bulgaria. The year 2003 was the first for the functioning of the new organization structure of INRNE consisting of 26 laboratories and 4 scientific experimental bases joined according their thematic in 7 scientific directions governed by the correspondent Expert Councils and Specialised Seminars. The scientific staff of the Institute has been worked on about 104 problems during the 2003 mainly on our traditional scientific areas, in particular, in the field of: theory of the elementary particles, field theory, atomic nuclei and quantum phenomena; experimental physics of the elementary particles, nuclear reactions, structure of atomic nuclei, cosmic rays and gamma-astrophysics at ultra high energies; neutron interactions and cross sections, physics of the fission; reactor physics, nuclear energy and nuclear safety and security ect. Now the results are already present and, as can been seen, almost half of the developments are connected with the problems of scientific support of the national nuclear energy production, radioactive waste, monitoring and management of the environment. With few exceptions, all these tasks are financially supported by national, foreign and international organizations. The fundamental end applied research results for 2003 have been accepted for publication or published in more than 300 articles in journals and proceeding of many international conferences. Large amount of these results has been obtained in close collaboration with international and foreign research centers, universities and institutions. Essential progress was obtained by the modernization of the scientific experimental bases of INRNE. The technical design project for the reconstruction of the old research reactor IRT 2000 in the new IRT 200 was successfully finished. The

  6. Research and development for Canadian nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Rapid expansion of the successful CANDU reactor system offers immediate substitution for scarce oil and gas, combined with long-term security of energy supplies. A continuing large and vigorous R and D program on nuclear power is essential to achieve these objectives. The program, described here, consists of tactical R and D in support of the current CANDU reactor system, strategic R and D to develop and demonstrate advanced CANDU systems, and exploratory R and D to put Canada in a position to exploit any fusion opportunities. Two support activities, management of radioactive wastes and techniques to safeguard nuclear materials against diversion, although integral components of the nuclear power programs, are identified separately because they are currently of special public interest. (author)

  7. The European Nuclear Safety Training and Tutoring Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The European Nuclear Safety Training and Tutoring Institute, ENSTTI, is an initiative of European Technical Safety Organizations (TSO) in order to provide vocational training and tutoring in the methods and practices required to perform assessment in nuclear safety, nuclear security and radiation protection. ENSTTI calls on TSOs' expertise to maximize the transmission of safety and security knowledge, practical experience and culture. Training, tutoring and courses for specialists are achieved through practical lectures, working group and technical visits and lead to a certificate after knowledge testing. ENSTTI contributes to the harmonization of nuclear safety and security practices and to the networking of today and future nuclear safety experts in Europe and beyond. (A.C.)

  8. Proceedings of national symposium on advanced instrumentation for nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The National Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Nuclear Research was held in Bombay during January 27-29, 1993 at BARC. Progress of modern nuclear research is closely related to the availability of state of the art instruments and systems. With the advancements in experimental techniques and sophisticated detector developments, the performance specifications have become more stringent. State of the art techniques and diverse applications of sophisticated nuclear instrumentation systems are discussed along with indigenous efforts to meet the specific instrumentation needs of research programs in nuclear sciences. Papers of relevance to nuclear science and technology are indexed separately. (original)

  9. Green light for MYRRHA, high technology in nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahim, H.A.; Baeten, P.

    2010-01-01

    During the past years, SCK-CEN has invested in the development, in a European context, of a revolutionary material test reactor. This ground-breaking irradiation facility, called MYRRHA, will be the world's first nuclear reactor driven by a particle accelerator, and in time will replace the BR2 reactor. The aim of MYRRHA is to contribute to the sustainable implementation of nuclear energy and to help develop solutions for important social concerns, such as the management of radioactive waste and the safety of nuclear energy. Following the expert opinion of the international MIRT team in 2009, in early 2010 the federal government gave its blessing to this ambitious project.

  10. Practical decommissioning experience with nuclear installations in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1992-01-01

    Initiated by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), this seminar was jointly organized by the AEA, BNFL and the CEC at Windermere and the sites of Windscale/Sellafield, where the former Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor and the Windscale piles are currently being dismantled. The meeting aimed at gathering a limited number of European experts for the presentation and discussion of operations, results and conclusions on techniques and procedures currently applied in the dismantling of large scale nuclear installations in the European Community

  11. Discussion forum for researchers in nuclear geology. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.

    1986-11-01

    The Atomic Energy Corporation of SA Ltd (AEC) sponsors research in nuclear geology at several South African universities with a view to delineating target areas for uranium prospecting by mining companies. In order to ensure the efficient co-ordination of this research an annual meeting is held where sponsored researchers and other organizations report on their progress during the year. This ensures valuable cross-pollination of ideas, and an input from the mining industry is gained as to which direction future research should take. The results of the researchers reported on at these meetings is not necessarily complete and the abstracts in this volume should therefore not be regarded as conclusive. In this discussion forum uranium in granites and uranium in sedimentory deposits are covered. The geochemical anomalies of uranium as well as the geohydrology and its application in defining uranium are also discussed

  12. Research in artificial intelligence for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The application of artificial intelligence, in the form of expert systems and neural networks, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, artificial intelligence can increase efficiency and effectiveness in a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) and in research facility experiments. Recent work at the University of Tennessee has demonstrated the feasibility of using neural networks to identify six different transients introduced into the simulation of a steam generator of a nuclear power plant. This work is now being extended to utilize data from a nuclear power plant training simulator. In one configuration, the inputs to the neural network are a subset of the quantities that are typical of those available from the safety parameter display system. The outputs of the network represent the various states of the plant (e.g., normal operation, coolant leakage, inadequate core flow, excessive peak fuel temperature, etc.). Training of the neural network is performed by introducing various faults or conditions to be diagnosed into the simulator. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a neural network diagnostic system that could provide advice to the operators in accordance with the emergency operating procedures

  13. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period

  14. Research and development for the nuclear energy of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, P.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of the energy demand increase facing the environment protection, the three main objectives of the research and development for the nuclear energy are developed in this document: to support the today nuclear industry, to answer the public anxiety concerning the sanitary and environmental impact of nuclear activities, to design, evaluate and develop new reactors. (A.L.B.)

  15. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  16. Digital instrumentation system for nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Carvalho, Paulo Vitor R.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a proposal for a system of nuclear instrumentation and safety totally digital for the Argonauta Reactor. The system divides in the subsystems: channel of pulses, channel of current, conventional instrumentation and safety system. The connection of the subsystems is made through redundant double local net, using the protocol modbus/rtu. So much the channel of pulses, the current channel and safety's system use modules operating in triple redundancy. (author)

  17. European atomic (nuclear) law and Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzinger, R.

    2000-05-01

    The dissertation investigates the question, how the Austrian membership in the European Community works out to the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law, which is a simple federal law. By the day of the Austrian accession to the European Community, the whole law of the European Community became part of the Austrian Legal Order. Also part of the primary right, the constitutional law of the European Community, is the contract for founding the European Atomic Energy Community, which also became part of the Austrian Legal Order. In 1978 Austria decided after the plebiscite of November the 5th against the opening of the nuclear power station in Zwentendorf. The result of this plebiscite was the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law, a simple federal law from December the 15th, BGBl 676/1978. To continue their atomic politics, forbidding the use of nuclear powerstations for producing energy, after becoming a member of the European Community, Austria and the members of the European Community signed the Fourth Common Declaration at September the 23rd in 1993 for the use of the contract for founding the European Atomic Energy Community. This Common Declaration is neither a part of the accession of the contract, nor a part of the accessions to the acts of the contract of the European Community, and also not a part of the primary right of the European Community. It is only an agreement between the signatory states, which can be characterized as a part of the context. The sphere of the context, where the Fourth Common Declaration could be important, restrains to the secondary right of the European Community. This means, that the opinion on the rage of application is a decision of the executive bodies of the European Community. Consequently is to say, that the declaration, that the continuance of the Austrian Atomic Nonproliferation Law is save, can't resist an analysis in the law of nations. (author)

  18. Actinide targets for fundamental research in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, K.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Haas, R.; Mokry, Ch.; Runke, J.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Trautmann, N.

    2018-05-01

    Thin actinide layers deposited on various substrates are widely used as calibration sources in nuclear spectroscopy. Other applications include fundamental research in nuclear chemistry and -physics, e.g., the chemical and physical properties of super-heavy elements (SHE, Z > 103) or nuclear reaction studies with heavy ions. For the design of future nuclear reactors like fast-fission reactors and accelerator-driven systems for transmutation of nuclear waste, precise data for neutron absorption as well as neutron-induced fission cross section data for 242Pu with neutrons of different energies are of particular importance, requiring suitable Pu-targets. Another application includes studies of nuclear transitions in 229Th harvested as α-decay recoil product from a thin layer of its 233U precursor. For this, a thin and very smooth layer of 233U is used. We report here on the production of actinide layers mostly obtained by Molecular Plating (MP). MP is currently the only fabrication method in cases where the desired actinide material is available only in very limited amounts or possesses a high specific activity. Here, deposition is performed from organic solution applying a current density of 1-2 mA/cm2. Under these conditions target thicknesses of 500-1000 μg/cm2 are possible applying a single deposition step with deposition yields approaching 100 %. For yield determination α-particle spectroscopy, γ-spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis is routinely used. Layer homogeneity is checked with Radiographic Imaging. As an alternative technique to MP the production of thin lanthanide and actinide layers by the so-called "Drop on Demand"-technique applied e.g., in ink-jet printing is currently under investigation.

  19. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, C.; Croft, J.; Pfeffer, W.; Zeevaert, T.

    1995-01-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe

  20. ALARA in European nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefaure, C. [CEPN, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France); Croft, J. [NRPB, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Pfeffer, W. [GRS, Koeln (Germany); Zeevaert, T. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-03-01

    For over a decade the Commission of the European Community has sponsored research projects on the development and practical implementation of the Optimization principle, or as it is often referred to, ALARA. These projects have given rise to a series of successful international Optimization training courses and have provided a significant input to the periodic European Seminars on Optimization, the last one of which took place in April 1993. This paper reviews the approaches to Optimization that have development within Europe and describes the areas of work in the current project. The on-going CEC research project addresses the problem of ALARA and internal exposures, and tries to define procedures for ALARA implementation, taking account of the perception of the hazard as well as the levels of probability of exposure. The relationships between ALARA and work management, and ALARA and decommissioning of installations appear to be other fruitful research areas. Finally, this paper introduces some software for using ALARA decision aiding techniques and databases containing feed back experience developed in Europe.

  1. Computer Security for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants - Literature Review for Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Central Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, Felicia Angelica [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis Dept.; Waymire, Russell L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis Dept.

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is providing training and consultation activities on security planning and design for the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNPCRI). As part of this effort, SNL performed a literature review on computer security requirements, guidance and best practices that are applicable to an advanced nuclear power plant. This report documents the review of reports generated by SNL and other organizations [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Energy Institute, and International Atomic Energy Agency] related to protection of information technology resources, primarily digital controls and computer resources and their data networks. Copies of the key documents have also been provided to KHNP-CRI.

  2. Computer Security for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants - Literature Review for Korea Hydro Nuclear Power Central Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Felicia Angelica; Waymire, Russell L.

    2013-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is providing training and consultation activities on security planning and design for the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNPCRI). As part of this effort, SNL performed a literature review on computer security requirements, guidance and best practices that are applicable to an advanced nuclear power plant. This report documents the review of reports generated by SNL and other organizations [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Nuclear Energy Institute, and International Atomic Energy Agency] related to protection of information technology resources, primarily digital controls and computer resources and their data networks. Copies of the key documents have also been provided to KHNP-CRI.

  3. The perspective of European researchers of national occupational safety and health institutes for contributing to a European research agenda: a modified Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Diana; Rondinone, Bruna M; Mirabile, Marco; Buresti, Giuliana; Ellwood, Peter; Hery, Michel; Paszkiewicz, Peter; Valenti, Antonio; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2017-06-23

    This study, developed within the frame of the Partnership for European Research on Occupational Safety and Health joint research activities and based on the frame designed by the 2013 European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) study, is the first example of using the points of view of European occupational safety and health (OSH) researchers.The objective is to identify priorities for OSH research that may contribute to the achievement of present and future sustainable growth objectives set by the European strategies. The study was carried out using a modified Delphi method with a two-round survey. Each round involved a panel of about 110 researchers representing the network member institutes was selected according to specific criteria, including the ownership of research expertise in at least one of the four macroareas identified by the reference report developed by EU-OSHA in 2013. The study identified some innovative research topics (for example, 'Emerging technological devices' and 'OSH consequences of markets integration') and research priorities (ie, crowdsourcing, e-work, zero-hours contract s ) that are not reflected in previous studies of this nature.The absence of any reference to violence and harassment at work among the researchers' proposals is a major difference from previous similar studies, while topics related to gender issues and electromagnetic fields show a lower importance. The innovative design of a research priorities identification process, which takes advantage of a large, representative and qualified panel of European researchers allowed the definition of a number of research priorities able to support the inclusion of innovative OSH research issues in the scope of the next European research agenda. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeulemeester, Y.

    2005-01-01

    SCK-CEN co-ordinates a project called European Nuclear Decommissioning Training Facility II (EUNDETRAF II) in the Sixth Framework Programme on Community activities in the field of research, technological development and demonstration for the period 2002 to 2006. This was a continuation of the FP5 project EUNDETRAF. EUNDETRAF II is a consortium of main European decommissioners, such as SCK-CEN, EWN (Energie Werke Nord, Greifswald Germany), Belgatom (Belgium), SOGIN Societa Gestione Impiantio Nucleari, Italy), Universitaet Hannover (Germany), RWE NUKEM (United Kingdom), DECOM Slovakia Slovakia), CEA Centre d'Energie Atomique, France), UKAEA (United Kingdom's Atomic Energy Agency, United Kingdom) and NRG (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group, Netherlands). The primary objective of this project is to bring together this vast skill base and experience; to consolidate it for easy assimilation and to transfer to future generations by organising a comprehensive training programme.Each training course has a one-week theoretical and a one-week practical component. The theoretical part is for a broader audience and consists of lectures covering all the main aspects of a decommissioning. The practical part of the course includes site visits and desk top solutions of anticipated decommissioning problems. Due to operational constraints and safety considerations, the number of participants to this part of the course is strictly limited. The partners intend to organise altogether two two-week EUNDETRAF II training courses over a period of three years. Another goal is to disseminate the existing theory as well as the practical know-how to personnel of the third countries. Finally it is important to bring together the principal decommissioning organisations undertaking various decommissioning activities. The project creates a forum for regular contacts to exchange information and experiences for mutual benefit of these organisations as well as to enhance skill base in Europe to

  5. The European structural integrity research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, C.H.A.; Acker, D.; Laue, H.

    1990-01-01

    A thermal hydraulics evaluation of the European Fast Reactor (EFR) design followed by structural analysis is presented in this article to assess the structural integrity research programme to date. Improved design methods are being achieved as a result of the structural integrity programme for the EFR. Excellent collaboration between the nationally based research organizations and the design and construction companies has been important in achieving these improvements. (UK)

  6. Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Allgulander, Christer; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo; Angst, Jules; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan; Boyer, Patrice; Davies, Simon; dell'Osso, Bernardo; Eriksson, Elias; Fineberg, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Herran, Andres; Maron, Eduard; Metspalu, Andres; Nutt, David; van der Wee, Nic; Luis Vazquez-Barquero, Jose; Zohar, Joseph

    Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative

  7. The perspective of European researchers of national occupational safety and health institutes for contributing to a European research agenda: a modified Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Diana; Rondinone, Bruna M; Mirabile, Marco; Buresti, Giuliana; Ellwood, Peter; Hery, Michel; Paszkiewicz, Peter; Valenti, Antonio; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study, developed within the frame of the Partnership for European Research on Occupational Safety and Health joint research activities and based on the frame designed by the 2013 European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA) study, is the first example of using the points of view of European occupational safety and health (OSH) researchers. The objective is to identify priorities for OSH research that may contribute to the achievement of present and future sustainable growth objectives set by the European strategies. Methods The study was carried out using a modified Delphi method with a two-round survey. Each round involved a panel of about 110 researchers representing the network member institutes was selected according to specific criteria, including the ownership of research expertise in at least one of the four macroareas identified by the reference report developed by EU-OSHA in 2013. Results The study identified some innovative research topics (for example, ‘Emerging technological devices’ and ‘OSH consequences of markets integration’) and research priorities (ie, crowdsourcing, e-work, zero-hours contracts) that are not reflected in previous studies of this nature. The absence of any reference to violence and harassment at work among the researchers’ proposals is a major difference from previous similar studies, while topics related to gender issues and electromagnetic fields show a lower importance. Conclusions The innovative design of a research priorities identification process, which takes advantage of a large, representative and qualified panel of European researchers allowed the definition of a number of research priorities able to support the inclusion of innovative OSH research issues in the scope of the next European research agenda. PMID:28645965

  8. European commission research activities on iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loggia, E. della

    1996-01-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs

  9. European commission research activities on iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loggia, E della [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs.

  10. ENC 2002: European nuclear conference. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    ENC 2002, the European Nuclear Conference took place in Lille, France, on 6-11 October 2002. It provided visible proof of the vitality and 'staying power' of the nuclear energy sector in Europe and other parts of the world. Hundreds of nuclear specialists signed up for this international event that will focus on nuclear in relation to overall energy policy, and on new technological developments, including future reactor types. In parallel, about 140 companies and other organisations showcased at the ENC 2002 industrial exhibition. The ENCs, as they are such large-scale undertakings, are held only once every four years. Due to the revived debate about the future role of nuclear energy, there was an extra dimension to this year's ENC, called 'The European Energy Event'. Organised by FORATOM - the Brussels-based trade association for the nuclear industry in Europe - this new element of the conference took the form of an open and wide-ranging debate on nuclear in the context of energy consumption, sustainable development, security of supply, safety and deregulation. This part of the conference was held on the first full day of ENC 2002 (Monday 7 October), and those taking part included top industrialists from the power generation sector, representatives of the European Commission, politicians, nuclear regulators and Friends of the Earth, the environmental NGO. In addition, a global perspective was given by high-profile speakers from the US, Russia and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  11. The European Repository Landscape 2008 : Inventory of Digital Repositories for Research Output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Graaf, Maurits

    2009-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that a common knowledge base for European research is necessary. The DRIVER project aims towards this. European practices may be harmonised and the development of stateof-the-art technology facilitated. As a first step, a clear picture of the state-of-the-art of the

  12. Large research infrastrucures and networking. Two key factors for maintaining nuclear expertise in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, G.; Iracane, D.

    2004-01-01

    Large research infrastructures are of key importance to improve the efficiency and the safety of nuclear energy production. To support present and coming power reactors and fuel cycle facilities and to develop future systems, it is necessary to optimise these infrastructures and their use by taking into account the networking of existing facilities, the access by the European researchers to conduct their own research projects and the creation of new installations when facing ageing issues. Large infrastructures include material testing reactor, hot laboratories for material and fuel under irradiation studies, fuel cycle researches and facilities dedicated to severe accident studies. For example, the CEA severe accident study platform has been recently used by a Bulgarian team to conduct its own research project with a grant provided by the European Commission. Furthermore, because present European material testing reactors are ageing, renewing the irradiation capability is an important and structuring stake for the fission research in Europe in order to continue safe and optimised operations of existing reactors, to support Generation 4 RTD and to keep alive competences. Considering that, CEA has decided to launch the project Jules Horowitz aiming at building a new research reactor. The access to the CEA facilities, including the Jules Horowitz reactor, combined with equivalent possibilities of access to other European facilities through a specific platform would help to develop a long-term vision, to create a coherent and dynamic strategy, to contribute to the stimulation of a large cooperation on nuclear fission, to enable a common approach of safety issues, to gather competencies, to promote the attractiveness of nuclear research to young scientists and to maintain European nuclear expertise at the highest level. This paper intends to provide a view of the existing and needed infrastructures, discuss the ways of access and finally open the discussion on the

  13. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1991-10-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1991. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  14. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  15. Future plant of basic research for nuclear energy by university researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Toshikazu

    1984-01-01

    National Committee for Nuclear Energy Research, Japan Science Council has completed a future plan for basic nuclear energy research by university researchers. The JSC has recommended the promotion of basic research for nuclear energy based on the plan in 1983. The future plan consists of four main research fields, namely, (1) improvements of reactor safety, (2) down stream, (3) thorium fuel reactors, and (4) applications of research reactor and radioisotopes. (author)

  16. European Bioinformatics Institute: Research Infrastructure needed for Life Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The life science community is an ever increasing source of data from increasing diverse range of instruments and sources. EMBL-EBI has a remit to store and exploit this data, collected and made available openly across the world, for the benefit of the whole research community. The research infrastructure needed to support the big data analysis around this mission encompasses high performance networks, high-throughput computing, and a range of cloud and storage solutions - and will be described in the presentation.

  17. Between the Devil and the Deep Sea : The Netherlands and the Struggle for European Nuclear Order

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellendoorn, E.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation is about the early history of the Netherlands nuclear non-proliferation policy. The book places the development of Dutch policy with regard to NATO nuclear policy, European integration and ultracentrifuge technology in an international perspective. The work moves beyond traditional

  18. Research and career opportunities for chemists in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Two recent publications [Training Requirements for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine, Nuclear Industry, and Related Areas: Report of a Workshop National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1988, and Report of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Manpower Committee, Journal of Nuclear Medicine, January, 1989] have emphasized the opportunities for Chemists in Nuclear Medicine. These opportunities exist in Medical Centers, the Radiopharmaceutical Drug Industry as well as the Ethical Drug Industry of particular importance of the need for organic and inorganic chemists with knowledge and experience in radiochemistry to develop and prepare the radiopharmaceuticals needed for the Nuclear Medicine community. The number of positions available at present and anticipated in the future will be compared and the number of training programs listed. Examples of the types of opportunities in this area will be given

  19. Tunnel Boring Machine for nuclear waste repository research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzon, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    A description is presented of a Tunnel Boring Machine and its intended use on a research project underway in Sweden for demonstrating and testing methods for rock investigation at a suitable depth for a deep repository for nuclear waste

  20. A comparative study of European nuclear energy programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Presas i Puig, Albert [ed.

    2011-07-01

    The report includes the following contributions: Comparative study of European Nuclear Energy Programs. From international cooperation to the failure of a national program: the Austrian case. The ''go-and-stop'' of the Italian civil nuclear programs, among improvisations, ambitions and conspiracy. Nuclear energy in Spain - a research agenda for economic historians. The Portuguese nuclear program: a peripheral experience under dictatorship (1945-1973). The nuclear energy programs in Switzerland. The rise and decline of an independent nuclear power industry in Sweden, 1945-1970. The German fast breeder program, a historical review. Fast reactors as future visions - the case of Sweden. Transnational flows of nuclear knowledge between the U.S. and the U.K. and continental Europe in the 1950/60s. The Carter administration and its non-proliferation policies: the road to INFCE.

  1. A safety decision analysis for Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Abdul-Fattah, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    Establishment of a nuclear research facility should be the first step in planning for introducing the nuclear energy to Saudi Arabia. The fuzzy set decision theory is selected among different decision theories to be applied for this analysis. Four research reactors from USA are selected for the present study. The IFDA computer code, based on the fuzzy set theory is applied. Results reveal that the FNR reactor is the best alternative for the case of Saudi Arabian nuclear research facility, and MITR is the second best. 17 refs

  2. European stress tests for nuclear power plants. The Swedish National Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the Tohoku region in north Honshu, Japan, suffered a severe earthquake with an ensuing tsunami and an accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. Due to the accident the Council of the European Union declared in late March that Member States were prepared to begin reviewing safety at nuclear facilities in the European Union by means of a comprehensive assessment of risk and safety ('stress testing'). On 25 May, SSM ordered the licensees of the nuclear power plants to conduct renewed analyses of the facilities' resilience against different kinds of natural phenomena. They were also to analyse how the facilities would be capable of dealing with a prolonged loss of electrical power, regardless of cause. On 31 October, the licensees reported on their stress tests to SSM. After reviewing these reports, SSM produced a summary stress test report, which was submitted to the Government on the 15 December. The present report is the national report on Swedish stress tests of nuclear power plants. The report will be submit to the European Commission no later than 31 December. Based on the review SSM has drawn the conclusion that the stress tests carried out by Swedish licensees are largely performed in accordance with the specification resolved within the European Union. The scope and depth of these analyses and assessments are essentially in accordance with ENSREG's definition of 'a comprehensive assessment of risk and safety'. The stress tests show that Swedish facilities are robust, but the tests also identify a number of opportunities to further strengthen the facilities' robustness. SSM will order the respective licensees to present an action plan for dealing with the results from the stress tests. The Authority will then examine the plans and adopt a standpoint on proposed measures as well as check that the necessary safety improvements are made. In a number of cases, the stress tests indicate deficiencies in relation to, or alternatively

  3. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EUROPEAN CHARTER FOR RESEARCHERS AND THE CODE OF CONDUCT FOR RECRUITMENT OF RESEARCHERS IN THE SELECTION PROCESS OF HUMAN RESOURCES FOR ROMANIAN ENTITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina GICA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, the Human Resources Management became a very important area of activity, which brought relevant changes to the human resources approach in terms of place and role within the Romanian R&D entities. Also, HR proved its importance through the solutions offered for personnel allocation in order to achieve the entities’ objectives and, meanwhile, it supported the employees’ aspirations. At present, although promoted a series of regulations on the status of the researcher, both, national and European level, as the main human resource in the establishment of RDI, to the research staff are imposed in most cases the general rules of human resources management. Starting with the strengthening of the concept of European Research Area - ERA, the European Commission adopted the "European Charter for Researchers" and the Code of Conduct for the Recruitment of Researchers. These documents are addressed to researchers and to public and private sector employers. Also, are considered key elements of EU policy researchers, to make careers more attractive, being considered vital for economic growth strategy and increase the number of employees of RDI. Human resource development requires good knowledge and understanding of their particular role to the organization. Researchers, regardless of hierarchy or job name, are the key resource of RDI entities (universities, institutes, NGOs, SMEs that ensure their survival, development and competitive success. The evolution of knowledge-based companies needs to improve relations between knowledge and development. Knowledge is a necessary tool to meet economic needs and an important component of sustainable development at European level. European Research Area concept was launched at the Lisbon European Council meeting in March 2000, but true recognition began in 2007 with the launch of the European Commission's Green Paper on ERA. In 2008 the Council set in motion the Ljubljana process to improve

  4. Research organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje; Aagaard, Peter

    in Copenhagen - we argue that a post-rational form of research activity is emerging which revert these features. We term this new type of research "enchanted research", "sciencetainment" and "Mode2-b research". The factors that facilitate this development include the boring style of conventional research......, growing competition for research funds, more project funding compared to institutional funding and a demand for accountability. Countervailing forces also exist, however....

  5. The emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.; Huerlimann, T.

    1977-01-01

    The organization and means of the emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR), the eldest and largest nuclear installation in Switzerland, are described. It consists of a central command group and the following emergency teams: fire brigade, radiation protection, first aid, control, operating teams (reactors, hot laboratory etc.). The radiation protection team is formed by the Health Physics Division and is discussed in detail. A description of the alarm system and the first actions to be taken in case of an emergency is given. The importance of frequent and well-planned exercises and of radio communication between the teams and the command group is stressed and the emergency training programme of the EIR School for Radiation Protection, operated by the Health Physics Division, is presented. A fortunate lack of incidents at EIR is partly compensated for by experience gained from emergency team assistance operations during incidents outside the Institute. (author)

  6. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, Pertti

    1989-03-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1989. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  7. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, P.; Mattila, L.

    1990-08-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1990. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Utilities and industry also contribute to some projects

  8. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, P.

    1988-02-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1988. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  9. EUROPEAN NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Electron machine quest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, initial thinking on the construction of an electron accelerator for nuclear physics in France resulted in an initial plan for a 4 GeV machine with continuous output at 100 microamps. Subsequently a further study recommended a more ambitious European scheme going beyond 10 GeV

  10. Nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The topics 'Large-sized PWR-NPP Safety Techniques Research',and 'The Key Techniques Research on the Safety Supervision and Control for Operation of Nuclear Installations' have been adopted as an apart of 'the National 9th five Year Programs for Tacking the Key Scientific and Technical Topics' which are organized by the State Planning Commission (SPC) and State Science and Technology Commission (SSTC) respectively, and have obtained a financial support from them. To play a better role with the limited fund, the NNSA laid special stress on selecting key sub-topics on nuclear safety, and carefully choosing units which would undertake sub-topics and signing technical contracts with them

  11. Nuclear waste management, a European task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strassburg, W.

    1989-01-01

    The coming into force of the Single European Act on July 1, 1987, which is to stepwise create a truly frontierless internal market of the European Community up to the year 1992, will have an effect also on the nuclear waste management sector. The goals of the energy policy and fuel cycle policy of the FRG, however, will not be changed by this. The contribution in hand discusses in particular some problems encountered at the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, namely nuclear spent fuel reprocessing. Activities in this branch of nuclear industry for more than ten years already have been a joint, European task. Spent fuel elements from West German reactors have been sent for reprocessing to facilities in France and in Great Britain, for example. The task of spent fuel reprocessing in the eyes of the author has a dimension exceeding the scope of the European single market: cooperation in this field for years has been including Switzerland and Sweden, for example, and is likely to include in future some countries of the Eastern Bloc. (orig.) [de

  12. Charities' response to the European Commission call of interest for their involvement in the European Research Area

    CERN Document Server

    Sessano, D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study to investigate what could be the role of the charities concerned with scientific research in the European Research Area (ERA). The analysis particularly concentrates on UK and Italy. The questions on which the exploratory study was developed are: 1. “In what specific areas of the ERA did the European Commission (EC) for the involvement of charities? And could there be other areas in which charities might participate?” 2. “Given the role and situation of charities in UK and Italy, what role, if any, could they be willing to play in the ERA? Is it the same as the one proposed by the Commission or not?” In order to answer these questions, the following discussion will focus at first on a short overview of the charity sector, both at the general level and at the national level in UK and Italy. Then a brief presentation of the European Research Area will be given. The hypotheses of the study will then be presented, followed by a methodological section. Results wi...

  13. Nuclear Security Management for Research Reactors and Related Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    This publication provides a single source guidance to assist those responsible for the implementation of nuclear security measures at research reactors and associated facilities in developing and maintaining an effective and comprehensive programme covering all aspects of nuclear security on the site. It is based on national experience and practices as well as on publications in the field of nuclear management and security. The scope includes security operations, security processes, and security forces and their relationship with the State’s nuclear security regime. The guidance is provided for consideration by States, competent authorities and operators

  14. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  15. Nuclear Medicine Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Asia–Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP), Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM), European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Federation of African Medical Physics Organisations (FAMPO), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, D. L.; Humm, J. L.; Todd-Pokropek, A.; Aswegen, A. van [eds.

    2014-12-15

    This publication provides the basis for the education of medical physicists initiating their university studies in the field of nuclear medicine. The handbook includes 20 chapters and covers topics relevant to nuclear medicine physics, including basic physics for nuclear medicine, radionuclide production, imaging and non-imaging detectors, quantitative nuclear medicine, internal dosimetry in clinical practice and radionuclide therapy. It provides, in the form of a syllabus, a comprehensive overview of the basic medical physics knowledge required for the practice of medical physics in modern nuclear medicine.

  16. Proceedings of the European Nuclear Conference - ENC 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The European Nuclear Conference (ENC) is the get-together for the international nuclear industry and science community. ENC 2014 provides a platform for the nuclear science community to share their experience and to learn about the latest developments going on in nuclear research and their practical applications. It will furthermore exploit synergy among scientists, industry representatives, policy-makers and citizens on wider societal issues that impact upon how the nuclear science community carries out its work. The conference programme covers the following areas: Plant operations and safety; Education, training and knowledge management; The fuel cycle; Reactor technologies; New Build; End of Use management; Life science applications; Non-power applications; Nuclear in the civil society

  17. Nuclear Research and Compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noramly Muslim

    2012-01-01

    In his speech, Professor Noramly stressed on any research conducted in Malaysian Nuclear Agency must be comply with the national and international regulations. This to avoid any problems in the future. Moreover, research conducted in Malaysian Nuclear Agency are based on nuclear matters that seems sensitive to the public communities. In order to attract the publics on the benefit of nuclear technologies in many applications, researcher also must aware about the regulations and must take care on their safety during their experiment and working. This to make the public feels that nuclear are not the bad things and erased the worseness of nuclear technology into public minds. This strategies can be used for Malaysia in embarking for their first nuclear power program and the public feels that nuclear power are not threatened to them and consequently, they will accept that program without any issues. (author)

  18. The nuclear industries in the European community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the nuclear industries within the European Community. The strategic importance of nuclear energy is outlined, along with the economic benefits of nuclear power. The objectives of the Community's nuclear programme are described, and include nuclear requirements in Europe, uranium supplies and management of radioactive waste. (UK)

  19. Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1979-12-01

    Research is presented concerning iodide stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy, self-diffusion of oxygen in hypostoichiometric urania, surface chemistry of epitaxial silicon deposition by thermal cracking of silane, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO 2 , gas laser model for laser induced evaporation, solubility of hydrogen in uranium dioxide, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO 2 , molecular beam studies of atomic hydrogen reduction of oxides, and thermal gradient brine-inclusion migration in salt

  20. A model for nuclear research reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ramin, E-mail: Barati.ramin@aut.ac.ir; Setayeshi, Saeed, E-mail: setayesh@aut.ac.ir

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A thirty-fourth order model is used to simulate the dynamics of a research reactor. • We consider delayed neutrons fraction as a function of time. • Variable fuel and temperature reactivity coefficients are used. • WIMS, BORGES and CITVAP codes are used for initial condition calculations. • Results are in agreement with experimental data rather than common codes. -- Abstract: In this paper, a useful thirty-fourth order model is presented to simulate the kinetics and dynamics of a research reactor core. The model considers relevant physical phenomena that govern the core such as reactor kinetics, reactivity feedbacks due to coolant and fuel temperatures (Doppler effects) with variable reactivity coefficients, xenon, samarium, boron concentration, fuel burn up and thermal hydraulics. WIMS and CITVAP codes are used to extract neutron cross sections and calculate the initial neuron flux respectively. The purpose is to present a model with results similar to reality as much as possible with reducing common simplifications in reactor modeling to be used in different analyses such as reactor control, functional reliability and safety. The model predictions are qualified by comparing with experimental data, detailed simulations of reactivity insertion transients, and steady state for Tehran research reactor reported in the literature and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  1. Nuclear power and European Union enlargement challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor; Bilegan, Constantin

    2001-01-01

    From 1991 through 1996 the European Union signed the Association Agreements with ten East European countries (EE10), namely: Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia, Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Romania. In the period 1994-1996 European Union received membership applications from all ten countries. The paper analyzes the approach of complying the requirements and regulations for European Union accession in the field of the Romanian nuclear power based on the CANDU technology. In this process, the real challenge is represented by the preparation and implementation of new regulations aiming to improve the general business environment by introducing International Accounting Standards simplification of bankruptcy laws, reform of taxation procedures and secureness of financial instruments. A new stand-by agreement with the International Monetary Fund and World Bank was set out in late April 1999 for an one-year loan of 475 million dollars. (authors)

  2. Nr 832 and Nr 833 - Report made on the behalf of the foreign affairs Commission on: - the bill project nr 4 authorizing the approval of the amendment protocol of the convention between the Government of the French Republic and the Swiss Federal Council related to the extension in the French territory of the domain of the European Organisation for Nuclear Research concluded on the 13 September 1965, and - the bill project nr 5 authorizing the approval of the agreement between the Government of the French Republic, the Swiss Federal Council, and the European organisation for nuclear research on the law applicable to companies intervening on the Organisation's domain to provide services with a trans-national character, and Appendix: texts of the Commission of foreign affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This report first presents the European organisation for nuclear research as an example of a European achievement, and as a significant source of fallouts for the French economy. It comments the complex application of territoriality rules in the field of labour law, and notably the fact that the location of work performance prevails for the determination of the applicable law, and that this issue has significant implications for French companies. The third part recalls the long negotiation process and comments the content of both agreements

  3. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klement, A.W. Jr.

    1969-01-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  4. Radiological safety research for nuclear excavation projects - Interoceanic canal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klement, Jr, A W [U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1969-07-01

    The general radiological problems encountered in nuclear cratering and nuclear excavation projects are discussed. Procedures for assessing radiological problems in such projects are outlined. Included in the discussions are source term, meteorology, fallout prediction and ecological factors. Continuing research requirements as well as pre- and post-excavation studies are important considerations. The procedures followed in the current interoceanic canal feasibility studies provide examples of radiological safety problems, current solutions and needed research. (author)

  5. ROMATOM- the Romanian Atomic Forum, a Romanian voice in the choir of the European nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pall, Stefan; Stiopol, Mihaela

    2001-01-01

    The Romanian Atomic Forum-ROMATOM is the national representative of the Romanian nuclear industry in the European forum. The paper presents the scope, objectives and the involvement of the organization in the completion and commissioning of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. The recent activities of ROMATOM are related to actions of lobby, some of cooperation with other organizations (AGIR, AREN, SRRp) in favor of nuclear power development in Romania and development of national nuclear equipment industry. Also, ROMATOM representatives attended the FORATOM working groups dealing with AQ and energy supply security as well as to the organizing committee of European Nuclear Society which held its 4th European Conference in October 2002 at Lile, France. The paper presents a schedule of ROMATOM activities for 2001-2003. Particularly, actions for boosting Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 completion as well as Romanian nuclear industry are mentioned. (authors)

  6. Non-European facilities for elementary particle physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The facilities we now employ in high energy physics cover a broad spectrum of particle energies and intensities and provide therefore a multiplicity of probes with which to study the behavior of elementary particles. In general, the goal has been to achieve ever higher particle energies and intensities, with emphasis on energy, and to develop more versatile and more sensitive detectors with which to study the resultant particle-particle interactions. Most energy regimes that have been explored have yielded new, fundamental information which often becomes clearer and more easily developed when particle energies are further increased. In this talk I shall try to delineate the nature of those facilities in Canada, Japan and the U.S.A. It is useful, I believe, to begin with a brief discussion of the funding and management of facilities in those countries and a short summary of recent history. The main body of the talk concentrates on the present, planned and contemplated facilities of the major non-European accelerator laboratories, and address briefly the status of accelerator development. The concluding section will summarize the salient features of the discussion. (author)

  7. Women in EPOS: the role of women in a large pan-European Research Infrastructure for Solid Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calignano, Elisa; Freda, Carmela; Baracchi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Women are outnumbered by men in geosciences senior research positions, but what is the situation if we consider large pan-European Research Infrastructures? With this contribution we want to show an analysis of the role of women in the implementation of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS): a planned research infrastructure for European Solid Earth sciences, integrating national and transnational research infrastructures to enable innovative multidisciplinary research. EPOS involves 256 national research infrastructures, 47 partners (universities and research institutes) from 25 European countries and 4 international organizations. The EPOS integrated platform demands significant coordination between diverse solid Earth disciplinary communities, national research infrastructures and the policies and initiatives they drive, geoscientists and information technologists. The EPOS architecture takes into account governance, legal, financial and technical issues and is designed so that the enterprise works as a single, but distributed, sustainable research infrastructure. A solid management structure is vital for the successful implementation and sustainability of EPOS. The internal organization relies on community-specific Working Packages (WPs), Transversal WPs in charge of the overall EPOS integration and implementation, several governing, executive and advisory bodies, a Project Management Office (PMO) and the Project Coordinator. Driven by the timely debate on gender balance and commitment of the European Commission to promote gender equality in research and innovation, we decided to conduct a mapping exercise on a project that crosses European national borders and that brings together diverse geoscience disciplines under one management structure. We present an analysis of women representation in decision-making positions in each EPOS Working Package (WP Leader, proxy, legal, financial and IT contact persons), in the Boards and Councils and in the PMO

  8. 30 years of Central Institute for Nuclear Research at Rossendorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, W.; Flach, G.; Hennig, K.; Collatz, S.; Muenze, R.; Baldeweg, F.

    1986-10-01

    A celebration and a scientific colloquium dedicated the 30th anniversary of the foundation of the Central Institute for Nuclear Research (CINR) of the GDR Academy of Sciences were held on January, 23rd and 24th, '86 at Rossendorf. The speaches and lectures given by the president of the GDR Academy of Sciences and by scientists of the CINR dealt with problems of policy of science, history of the CINR, nuclear methods, microelectronics, nuclear energy research, development and production of radioisotopes and scientific instruments. (author)

  9. Action Research in European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2004-01-01

    The article gives an overview of how different Italian and Danish contributions to action research can be viewed in an European perspective.......The article gives an overview of how different Italian and Danish contributions to action research can be viewed in an European perspective....

  10. ERA—European Radiochemists Association: Report on the activities of the Working Party for Nuclear and Radiochemistry of the Federation of European Chemical Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Z. I.; Ware, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Radiochemists Association started almost simultaneously with the appearance of the first issue of the Radiochemistry in Europe newsletter in August 1995. The objective of the European Radiochemists Association (ERA) is to extend and improve communication between radiochemists in Europe through a newsletter. Liaison persons within each country or group exchange details of their activities, set up a diary of relevant international events and exchange details of specialist equipment, facilities and technology. In the year 2000 the Federation of European Chemical Societies decided to form a working party on nuclear and radiochemistry. It is a formalisation of the European Radiochemists Association. Each chemical society is allowed to nominate a member to the Working Party on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Currently we have 12 nominated members plus two invited and one observer. In addition to the ERA aims and objectives it proposes to put together a syllabus of radiochemistry for undergraduate and post-graduate students—this aspect has been a part of our support of the International Atomic Energy Agency initiative. Also the aim of the working party is to support other working parties and divisions, to press the Federation of the European Chemical Societies for financial structure. To this end an Expression of Interest has been tabled with the Framework 6 Programme for networking within radiochemistry in Europe. The WP will liaise with the International Isotope Society and the International Society on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology to seek to communicate and to consider ways of working together.

  11. Main achievements of the european research project NERIS-TP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duranova, T.; Bohunova, J.; Raskop, W.; Schneider, T.; Liland, A.; Andronopoulos, S.; Mustonen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Activities of the NERIS-TP association are described. The NERIS ICRP Workshop, held in Bratislava, Slovak Republic in February 6-8, 2012, was organized by VUJE in cooperation with ICRP aiming to provide a forum for discussion and sharing of experiences on the implementation of the ICRP Recommendations. International, European and national perspectives were presented. 88 specialists from 51 organizations from 26 countries participated in the workshop. The final Dissemination Workshop 'Strengthening the Preparedness at National and Territorial Level Using New Tools and Methods - Stakeholders Experiences', was conducted in Oslo from 22 to 24 January 2014. International organisations such as HERCA, EC DG Research, IAEA, OECD/NEA, and NGOs such as NTW (Nuclear Transparency Watch) and GMF (Group of European Municipalities with Nuclear Facilities) as well as representatives of the OPERRA project participated in the workshop and particular panels. 82 experts and stakeholders participated in the workshop, representing twenty countries. Notably, participants from Japanese organisations provided first feedback from the management of the consequences of the Fukushima accident. (authors)

  12. EPERC: The European Pressure Equipment Research Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlaston, J.; McAllister, S.

    1998-01-01

    The European Pressure Equipment Research Council (EPERC) is a European Network of industries, research laboratories, inspection bodies and governmental institutions set up to foster co-operative research for the greater benefit of the European industry. The concept of a European Research Council originated at the PVRC meeting in Cannes in 1989 and since this time volunteers from the industry, research laboratories and of the European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten have worked together to create a Statute for EPERC. In the context of the pressure equipment industry, the creation of EPERC is extremely pertinent, since in the near future, a Council directive on pressure equipment will replace the existing national regulations. In parallel to this, work is in progress for the elaboration of European Standards. It is useful to recall that ''Harmonised Standards'' will be the privileged means of complying with the Essential Safety Requirements of the directive. (author)

  13. Practical decommissioning experience with nuclear installations in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skupinski, E.

    1993-01-01

    Initiated by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), this seminar was jointly organized by Kernkraftwerke RWE Bayernwerk GmbH (KRB) and the CEC at Gundremmingen-Guenzburg (D), where the former KRB-A BWR is presently being dismantled. The meeting aimed at gathering a limited number of European experts for the presentation and discussion of operations, the results and conclusions on techniques and procedures presently applied in the dismantling of large-scale nuclear installations in the European Community. Besides the four pilot dismantling projects of the presently running third R and D programme (1989-93) of the European Community on decommissioning of nuclear installations (WAGR, BR-3 PWR, KRB-A BWR and AT-1 FBR fuel reprocessing), the organizers selected the presentation of topics on the following facilities which have a significant scale and/or representative features and are presently being dismantled: the Magnox reprocessing pilot plant at Sellafield, the HWGCR EL4 at Monts d'Arree, the operation of an on-site melting furnace for G2/G3 GCR dismantling waste at Marcoule, an EdF confinement conception of shut-down LWRs for deferred dismantling, and the technical aspects of the Greifswald WWER type NPPs decommissioning. This was completed by a presentation on the decommissioning of material testing reactors in the United Kingdom and by an overview on the conception and implementation of two EC databases on tools, costs and job doses. The seminar concluded with a guided visit of the KRB-A dismantling site. This meeting was attended by managers concerned by the decommissioning of nuclear installations within the European Community, either by practical dismantling work or by decision-making functions. Thereby, the organizers expect to have contributed to the achievement of decommissioning tasks under optimal conditions - with respect to safety and economics - by making available a complete and updated insight into on-going dismantling projects and by

  14. Progress report on research of nuclear data and applied nuclear physics at nuclear research institute Viet Nam. For the period January 1 - December 31 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan

    1997-03-01

    This report contains information on activities of nuclear data and applied physics at the Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat, Vietnam for the period January 1st-December 31st 1996. The specific topics covered are the following: Development of filtered neutron beams. Investigation of average characteristics of nuclei in the unresolved enrgy region, Nuclear structure, Nuclear data for applications, Neutron beam utilization for applications, Nuclear analytical techniques and sedimentology

  15. CESAR robotics and intelligent systems research for nuclear environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses expertise and facilities to perform basic and applied research in robotics and intelligent systems in order to address a broad spectrum of problems related to nuclear and other environments. For nuclear environments, research focus is derived from applications in advanced nuclear power stations, and in environmental restoration and waste management. Several programs at CESAR emphasize the cross-cutting technology issues, and are executed in appropriate cooperation with projects that address specific problem areas. Although the main thrust of the CESAR long-term research is on developing highly automated systems that can cooperate and function reliably in complex environments, the development of advanced human-machine interfaces represents a significant part of our research. 11 refs

  16. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  17. Public services in early modern European towns: An agenda for further research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davids, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Starting with a set of key questions formulated by Walter Prevenier in 1984, this article proposes an agenda for future research on urban public services in early modern European towns. The author suggests, first of all, a shift in research strategy toward a greater emphasis on actor-oriented

  18. Bulletin of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    The bulletin consists of two parts. The first part includes General Research Report. The Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology has three engineering divisions such as Energy Engineering, Mass Transmutation Engineering, and System and Safety Engineering. In this part, 17 reports of Energy Engineering division, 8 reports of Mass transmutation Engineering division, 11 reports of System and Safety Engineering division are described as their activities. In addition, 3 reports of Cooperative Researches are also summarized. The second part is Special Issue about COE-INES RESEARCH REPORT 2007. In this part, 3 reports of Innovative Reactor Group, 2 reports of Innovative Nuclear Energy Utilization System Group, 3 reports of Innovative Transmutation/Separation Group, 2 reports of Relationship between Nuclear and Society Group, 1 report of RA Students in the COE-INES Captainship Educational Program are described as results to their researches. (J.P.N.)

  19. Status of Simulations for the Cyclotron Laboratory at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asova, G.; Goutev, N.; Tonev, D.; Artinyan, A.

    2018-05-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy is preparing to operate a high-power cyclotron for production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, research in radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics. The cyclotron is a TR24 produced by ASCI, Canada, capable to deliver proton beams in the energy range of 15 to 24 MeV with current as high as 400 µA. Multiple extraction lines can be fed. The primary goal of the project is the production of PET and SPECT isotopes as 18F, 67,68Ga, 99mTc, etc. This contribution reports the status of the project. Design considerations for the cyclotron vault will be discussed for some of the target radioisotopes.

  20. Training needs for chemists in nuclear medicine research and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    The field Nuclear Medicine has expanded rapidly over the last two decades. Individuals with training in radiochemistry are needed in industry, medical centers and hospitals. Although basic training in organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, biochemistry or pharmacy are required, radiochemistry knowledge is essential for all these individuals. Opportunities and training requirements in these areas will be discussed. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  1. The European Nuclear Science network touches base at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    ENSAR (European Nuclear Science and Applications Research) is an EU-supported project, which aims at fostering cooperation within the European low-energy nuclear physics community through the active sharing of expertise and best practices. The project also includes a transnational access programme to allow a large community of users to access the participating facilities, which include CERN’s ISOLDE. In the last week of April, CERN hosted the General Assembly and Programme Coordination Committee meetings, about 18 months after the project’s kick-off.   Participants in the ENSAR project. ENSAR involves 30 partner institutes, which include the seven large nuclear physics facilities in Europe. A large part of the European nuclear physics community is represented in ENSAR, in particular scientists who are performing research related to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics and applications of nuclear science. In 2010, the project was awarded 8 million euros from the Europe...

  2. LAMPF: a nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, M.S.

    1977-09-01

    A description is given of the recently completed Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) which is now taking its place as one of the major installations in this country for the support of research in nuclear science and its applications. Descriptions are given of the organization of the Laboratory, the Users Group, experimental facilities for research and for applications, and procedures for carrying on research studies

  3. Drug use among adolescents within vocational schools: health promotion, social relations and institutional organization. Abstract. 13th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Adolescence, Island of Spetses, Greece. 29 August – 1 September 2012 (p. 60)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingholt, Liselotte; Sørensen, Betina Bang; Axel, Erik

    Druguse among Adolescents within Vocational Schools: Health Promotion, Social Relations and Institutional Organization. L. Ingholt1, B.B. Sørensen1, E. Axel2, V.A. Frank3 1 National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. 2 The Department of Psychology...... and Educational Studies, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark. 3 Department of Psychology and Behavioural Sciences – Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. Objectives: The paper explores the significance of drug use and peer relations for students’ participation in vocational...... education. Design: From 22 qualitative interviews two girls' case stories are analyzed, one still being in, the other having left vocational education. The paper is rooted in theory of social practice and critical psychology. Key concepts include institutional and personal trajectories of participation...

  4. An accountancy system for nuclear materials control in research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttler, R.; Bueker, H.; Vallee, J.

    1979-01-01

    The Nuclear Accountancy and Control System (NACS) was developed at KFA Juelich in accordance with the requirements of the Non-Proliferation Treaty. The main features are (1) recording of nuclear material in inventory items. These are combined to form batches wherever suitable; (2) extrapolation of accounting data as a replacement for detailed measurement of inventory items data. Recording and control of nuclear material are carried out on two levels with access to a common data bank. The lower level deals with nuclear materials handling plus internal management while on the upper level there is a central control point which is responsible for nuclear safeguarding within the entire research centre. By keeping the organizational and technical infrastructure it was possible to develop a system which is both economical and operator-oriented. In this system the emphasis of nuclear safeguarding is placed on the acquisition of the nuclear material inventory. As much consideration has been given to the interests of the various operational levels and organizational units as to internal and national regulations. Since it is part of the safeguarding and control system, access to the NACS must be restricted to a limited number of users only. Furthermore, it must include facilities for manual control in the form of records. Authorization for access must correspond with the various tasks of different user groups. All necessary data are acquired decentrally in the organizational units and entered via a terminal. It is available to the user groups on both levels through a central data bank. To meet all requirements, the NACS has been designed as an integrated, computer-assisted information system for the automated processing of extensive and multi-level nuclear materials data. As part of the preventive measures entailed with nuclear safeguarding, the accountancy system enables the operator of a nuclear plant to furnish proof of non-diversion of nuclear material. (author)

  5. The European nuclear industry - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berke, Claus

    1994-01-01

    In his talk, the President of Foratom, Dr. Claus Berke, reviews the present state of the nuclear industry in Europe. The European nuclear park is still the largest of any region in the world. In some countries, there has been a moratorium on new construction in recent years. This has made life for the supplying industry very difficult. One positive side-effect o at has been a significant rationalisation of the industry. In the course of this the previous vertical integration within European states has given place to the creation of important new transnational structures. In his talk, Dr. Berke describes some of the most important facets of the 'Europeanisation' of the industry, both in the area of power-plants and of the nuclear fuel-cycle. He also describes the increasing cooperation between utilities and suppliers in Western Europe and the operators of nuclear power plant in Eastern Europe, which is aimed at introducing a safety culture and an institutional framework in the East as close as possible to that which exists in Western Europe. Dr. Berke concludes that, over the coming years, both economic and environmental arguments will start to reverse the present political opposition, in many European countries, to new building programmes, and that the industry is likely be in a healthier state by the end of the decade

  6. Nuclear Capacity Building through Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Four Instruments: •The IAEA has recently developed a specific scheme of services for Nuclear Capacity Building in support of the Member States cooperating research reactors (RR) willing to use RRs as a primary facility to develop nuclear competences as a supporting step to embark into a national nuclear programme. •The scheme is composed of four complementary instruments, each of them being targeted to specific objective and audience: Distance Training: Internet Reactor Laboratory (IRL); Basic Training: Regional Research Reactor Schools; Intermediate Training: East European Research Reactor Initiative (EERRI); Group Fellowship Course Advanced Training: International Centres based on Research Reactors (ICERR)

  7. Conclusions and recommendations of the European ORAMED project for practical interventional radiology and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, Denisa; Fueloep, Marko; Cabanekova, Helena

    2012-01-01

    The results of the recently published doses obtained by medical staff working in pulsed radiation fields, and performing interventional radiology (IR) or interventional cardiology (IC) procedures, as well as applications of radionuclides in nuclear medicine (NM), have shown significantly high levels of exposure, mainly to the hands and other parts of their bodies uncovered by protective equipment. The coordinated project ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff) was set-up by participation of 12 European countries and 34 IR/IC and NM departments, with the 5 main tasks: (i) optimization of radiation protection in IR and IC,with the aim to standardize a unified method of extremities and eye lens doses estimation, for 3 cardiac and 5 interventional diagnostic and therapeutic examinations; (ii) verification of the possibilities to use active personal dosemeters for typical pulsed radiation fields used in IR and IC; (iii) contribution to the extremities and eye lens dose reduction in nuclear medicine; (iv) development and application of a suitable eye lens dosemeter; and (v) elaboration of training materials and guidelines for radiation protection issues at IR, IC and NM workplaces. The present study presents some important results and recommendations for dose reduction and avoidance of some typical failures during work near ionizing radiation sources. (P.A.)

  8. Accounting for and control of nuclear material at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research, Rossendorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidel, S.; Rossbander, W.; Helming, M.

    1983-01-01

    A survey is given of the system of accounting for and control of nuclear material at the Central Institute for Nuclear Research, Rossendorf. It includes 3 material balance areas. Control is implemented at both the institute and the MBA levels on the basis of concepts which are coordinated with the national control authority of the IAEA. The system applied enables national and international nuclear material control to be carried out effectively and economically at a minimum of interference with operational procedures. (author)

  9. Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, D.R.

    1977-12-01

    Research is reported concerning radiation enhancement of stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy, surface chemistry of epitaxial Si deposited by thermal cracking of silane, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO 2 , molecular beam studies of atomic H and reduction of oxides, mass transfer and reduction of UO 2 , kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO 2 , retention and release of water by UO 2 pellets, and solubility of H in UO 2

  10. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blidaru, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the structure, missions and organizational aspects of the CNCAN, the National Commission for the control of nuclear activities in Romania. The paper addresses the following main issues: 1.General aspects; 2.Organizational structure of the NRA in Romania; 3.General description of the Division for Nuclear Safety Assessments; 4.Specific activities; 5.Regulatory approaches and practices. Under the title of 'General aspects' the following three basic statements are highlighted: 1.CNCAN is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and the licensing of nuclear facilities; 2.CNCAN is the national authority competent in exercising the regulatory activity, authorization and control in the nuclear field provided by the law No. 111/ 1996 republished in 1998; 3.The Commission exercises its functions independently of the ministries and other authorities of the public control administration being subordinated to the Romanian Government. The organizational structure is as follows: - President, the Managerial Council and the Advisory Council coordinating the four General Divisions that are responsible for: - Nuclear Safety with Division of Nuclear Safety Assessment and Division of Nuclear Objectives Surveillance; - Radiological Safety with Division of Radiological Safety Assessment and Division of Operational Radiation Protection; - Surveillance of Environmental Radioactivity with Division of Assessment and Analysis and Division of National Network; - Development and Resource with the Division of Economy and Division of Human Resources. In addition under direct coordination of the President operate the Division of Radiation Protection, Transport and Radioactive Waste and the Division of International Cooperation and Communication. Specific activities are listed describing among others the issues of: - Safety of nuclear installation; - Evaluation relating to licensing of nuclear

  11. The high flux reactor Petten, A multi-purpose research and test facility for the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, H.; Duijves, K.; Conrad, R.; Markgraf, J.F.W.; May, R.; Moss, R.L.; Sordon, G.; Tartaglia, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, is owned by the European Commission (EC) and managed by the Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EC. Its operation has been entrusted since 1962 to the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The HFR is one of the most powerful multi-purpose research and test reactors in the world. Together with the ECN hot cells at Petten, it has provided since three decades an integral and full complement of irradiation and examination services as required by current and future research and development for nuclear energy, industry and research organizations. Since 1963, the HFR has recognized record of consistent, reliable and high availability of more than 250 days of operation per year. The HFR has 20 in-core and 12 poolside irradiation positions, plus 12 beam tubes. With a variety of dedicated irradiation devices, and with its long-standing experience in executing small and large irradiation projects, the HFR is particularly suited for fuel, materials and components testing for all reactor lines, including thermonuclear fusion reactors. In addition, processing with neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-based research and inspection services are employed by industry and research, such as activation analysis, boron neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron diffraction. Moreover, in recent years, HFRs' mission has been broadened within the area of radioisotopes production, where, within a few years, the HFR has attained the European leadership in production volume

  12. ENIQ: European Network for Inspection Qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champigny, F.; Crutzen, S.; Lemaitre, P.

    1995-01-01

    Many countries are currently considering their own approach to inspection qualification and are carefully assessing experience to date. ENIQ, which stands for European Network for Inspection Qualification, groups the major part of the utilities in Western Europe. The general objective of ENIQ is to coordinate and manage at European level expertise and resources for the assessment and qualification of NDE inspection techniques and procedures, primarily for nuclear components. Also non-nuclear heavy duty components will be considered. Within ENIQ there is a growing consensus of opinion on the general principles of a European approach towards inspection qualification. In this paper the main activities, organization and actual status of ENIQ will be discussed

  13. For the Anniversary Edition of the Scientific Journal European Researcher. Series A – 110 issue

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Rajović; JelisavkaBulatović

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of the jubilee scientific journal "European Researcher. Series A ", marked at all in 2016 – the sixth anniversary, of regular and of continuous publication. In addition to the history of the newspaper are exposed to the development phase of its program concept. The journal is the period 2010 – 2016 year, profiled in an important factor of development and the formation of professional and scientific thought. Journal “European Research. Series A” is now open forum for p...

  14. A Strategy for Nuclear Energy Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Ralph G.

    2008-01-01

    The United States is facing unprecedented challenges in climate change and energy security. President-elect Obama has called for a reduction of CO2 emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, with a further 80% reduction by 2050. Meeting these aggressive goals while gradually increasing the overall energy supply requires that all non-emitting technologies must be advanced. The development and deployment of nuclear energy can, in fact, help the United States meet several key challenges: (1) Increase the electricity generated by non-emitting sources to mitigate climate change, (2) Foster the safe and proliferation-resistant use of nuclear energy throughout the world, (3) Reduce the transportation sector's dependence on imported fossil fuels, and (4) Reduce the demand on natural gas for process heat and hydrogen production. However, because of the scale, cost, and time horizons involved, increasing nuclear energy's share will require a coordinated research effort-combining the efforts of industry and government, supported by innovation from the research community. This report outlines the significant nuclear energy research and development (R and D) necessary to create options that will allow government and industrial decision-makers to set policies and create nuclear energy initiatives that are decisive and sustainable. The nuclear energy R and D strategy described in this report adopts the following vision: Safe and economical nuclear energy in the United States will expand to address future electric and non-electric needs, significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide energy diversity, while providing leadership for safe, secure and responsible expansion of nuclear energy internationally

  15. Progress report concerning safety research for nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Examination and evaluation of safety research results for nuclear reactor facilities have been performed, as more than a year has elapsed since the plan had been initiated in April, 1976, by the special sub-committee for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities. The research is carried out by being divided roughly into 7 items, and seems to be steadily proceeding, though it does not yet reach the target. The above 7 items include researches for (1) criticality accident, (2) loss of coolant accident, (3) safety for light water reactor fuel, (4) construction safety for reactor facilities, (5) reduction of release of radioactive material, (6) safety evaluation based on the probability theory for reactor facilities, and (7) aseismatic measures for reactor facilities. With discussions on the progress and the results of the research this time, research on the behaviour on fuel in abnormal transients including in-core and out-core experiments has been added to the third item, deleting the power-cooling mismatch experiment in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI. Also it has been decided to add two research to the seventh item, namely measured data collection, classification and analysis, and probability assessment of failures due to an earthquake. For these 7 items, the report describes the concrete contents of research to be performed in fiscal years of 1977 and 1978, by discussing on most rational and suitable contents conceivable at present. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  16. Study of the European market for industrial nuclear power plants for the mixed production of electricity and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The opportunity of developing the mixed production of electricity and steam from nuclear power plants in the nine countries of the European Community is studied. Both public distribution and autonomous production are envisaged. An attempt is made to estimate the potentiel market for district heating and for chemical, agricultural and alimentary, textile, paper, car manufacture and wood industries. The reactors considered are LWR reactors of at least 1000MWth. Suggestions are given to overcome the difficulties and constraints that stand in the way of a nuclear solution [fr

  17. The European water framework directive: A challenge for nearshore, coastal and continental shelf research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Ángel

    2005-09-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) establishes a framework for the protection of groundwater, inland surface waters, estuarine waters, and coastal waters. The WFD constitutes a new view of the water resources management in Europe because, for the first time, water management is: (i) based mainly upon biological and ecological elements, with ecosystems being at the centre of the management decisions; (ii) applied to European water bodies, as a whole; and (iii) based upon the whole river basin, including also the adjacent coastal area. Although the marine water bodies affected by the WFD relate to only 19.8% of the whole of the European continental shelf, its application constitutes a challenge and an opportunity in nearshore, coastal and continental shelf research. This contribution highlights some of the main tasks and the research to be undertaken in the coming years, proposing investigations into: typologies; physico-chemical processes; indicator species; reference conditions; integration of the quality assessment; methodologies in determining ecological status, etc.

  18. The management of financial resources intended for radioactive waste and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities in the european union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatar, F.; Dima, A.; Glodeanu, F.; Miller, B.; Mosmonea, R.

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission has developed policies and made recommendations on how financial resources should be established and managed by Member States for the purpose of radioactive waste management. The manner in which these recommendations have been accepted, and are applied, varies between European countries. To some extent, this variation reflects the maturity of the nuclear programs in each country and whether or not nuclear facilities are largely state or privately owned and operated. This paper reviews the European Commission.s policy on financial resourcing for radioactive waste management and decommissioning and evaluates how financial resources are practically established and managed by Member States. The findings from the review are then used to benchmark the situation in Romania. (authors)

  19. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  20. popscience - European Researchers Night 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Vendredi 26 septembre 2014, le CERN célèbrera la Nuit européenne des chercheurs à Genève et à St-Genis-Pouilly. Le thème de l’édition 2014 est inspiré d’Andy Warhol : « Pop science is for everyone ». On Friday 26 September 2014, CERN will be celebrating European Researchers' Night at three venues in Geneva and St. Genis-Pouilly. Inspired by Andy Warhol, this year's theme is “Pop science is for everyone”.

  1. Strategy for sustainability of the Joint European Research Infrastructure Network for Coastal Observatories - JERICO

    OpenAIRE

    Puillat, Ingrid; Farcy, Patrick; Durand, Dominique; Petihakis, George; Morin, Pascal; Kriegger, Magali; Petersen, Wilhelm; Tintoré, Joaquin; Sorensen, Kai; Sparnocchia, Stefania; Wehde, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The JERICO European research infrastructure (RI) is integrating several platform types i.e. fixed buoys, piles, moorings, drifters, Ferryboxes, gliders, HF radars, coastal cable observatories and the associated technologies dedicated to the observation and monitoring of the European coastal seas. The infrastructure is to serve both the implementation of European marine policies and the elucidation of key scientific questions through dedicated observation and monitoring plans. It includes obse...

  2. Nuclear safety requirements for operation licensing of Egyptian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    From the view of responsibility for health and nuclear safety, this work creates a framework for the application of nuclear regulatory rules to ensure safe operation for the sake of obtaining or maintaining operation licensing for nuclear research reactors. It has been performed according to the recommendations of the IAEA for research reactor safety regulations which clearly states that the scope of the application should include all research reactors being designed, constructed, commissioned, operated, modified or decommissioned. From that concept, the present work establishes a model structure and a computer logic program for a regulatory licensing system (RLS code). It applies both the regulatory inspection and enforcement regulatory rules on the different licensing process stages. The present established RLS code is then applied to the Egyptian Research Reactors, namely; the first ET-RR-1, which was constructed and still operating since 1961, and the second MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2) which is now in the preliminary operation stage. The results showed that for the ET-RR-1 reactor, all operational activities, including maintenance, in-service inspection, renewal, modification and experiments should meet the appropriate regulatory compliance action program. Also, the results showed that for the new MPR research reactor (ET-RR-2), all commissioning and operational stages should also meet the regulatory inspection and enforcement action program of the operational licensing safety requirements. (author)

  3. AIDA – pushing the boundaries of European particle detector research

    CERN Multimedia

    Naomi Gilraen Wyles

    2011-01-01

    AIDA (Advanced European Infrastructures for Detectors at Accelerators), a new project co-funded by the European Union and worth a total of 26 million euros, will be officially launched at CERN next week. The kick-off meeting will take place on 16-18 February, during which Europe-wide detector physicists will come together to begin work on detector infrastructure developments for future particle physics experiments.   Coordinated by CERN, AIDA involves more than 80 institutes and laboratories from 23 countries as beneficiaries or associate partners (the full list can be found here). This four-year project will receive 8 million euros from the European Commission's FP7 Research Infrastructures programme. AIDA will develop facilities covering the four main goals identified by the European Strategy for Particle Physics. These are the LHC upgrade, Linear Colliders, Neutrino facilities and Super-B factories. These facilities will also be available for other researchers in the fields of nuclear and par...

  4. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national

  5. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions

  6. A plan for research by the atmospheric research section in support of Ontario Hydro's nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.; Melo, O.T.

    1984-01-01

    A plan for nuclear studies by the Atmospheric Research Section is presented. The need for research is discussed and research objectives are established. Recommended research activities include the study of fundamental processes governing the fate of emissions released to the atmosphere by Hydro's nuclear facilities and the development of improved transport models describing the fate of these emissions. A Sectional goal of providing technical expertise in the atmospheric sciences in support of Ontario Hydro's present and future nuclear activities is proposed. The plan covers a five-year time frame (1984-1988)

  7. The European Research Agenda for career guidance and counseling - and beyond. ECADOC - Early stage researchers symposium 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie; Weber, Peter C.

    Research in CGC is an expanding field of research still it is important to attract doctoral candidates to commit themselves to participation in scholarly exchange at central conferences. IAEVG is a central conference to the research field of Career Guidance and Counseling. With this symposium we...... to present their research in progress and to open up for discussion on the inclusion process into the research field of CGC. The Early stage researchers symposium 2016 includes work in progress presentations 1) the European Research Agenda 2) recognition in adult education and the role of guidance, 3......) quality in career guidance, 4) an ESR experience of entering the CGC research community. The symposium will support and encourage Early stage researchers participation in the international career guidance research community and allow for symposium participants to hear about the newest research ideas...

  8. The nuclear industry in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasterstaedt, N.

    1990-01-01

    In its reference program of 1984, the Commission presented the guidelines for the objectives in the field of nuclear electricity production within the Community. In addition, the effects have been investigated which concern the realization of these objectives for all persons involved in nuclear energy: local government, utility companies and industry. The question of nuclear energy is part of the general energy policy. Therefore, the reference program of 1984 was one of the elements which has been considered up to 1995 by the Council when defining the objectives for energy economy. The guidelines of the Commission in the reference program of 1984 are still valid today. It is important, however, to check the effects of the completion of the internal market on nuclear industry. Therefore, the Commission announced in its working program of 1989 that it will revise the reference nuclear program with regard to the prospects of the European internal market. The present document fulfills this obligation. The problems of the industry for the design and construction of nuclear power plants are treated intentionally. After the Commission for Economic and Social Affairs has given its statement, the commission will publish the document officially. (orig./UA) [de

  9. Feasibility study for the Nuclear Research Centre of the Nuclear Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study was carried out in order to evaluate the possibility of building a Nuclear Research Centre in Uruguay, which would support a wide range of nuclear related technological activities. A market research was carried out, of the products to be manufactured at the Nuclear Centre, regarding the size of production. A detailed list of the main products considered is enclosed. The siting study was performed through the analysis of the incidental factors, such as environment, technical scope and socio-ecomonic factors. An engineering study for the main installations was done. The investment and financial sources were also studied

  10. From information to participation and self-organization: Visions for European river basin management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Johannes; Heldt, Sonja

    2018-04-15

    The European Union Water Framework Directive (EU WFD, 2000) calls for active inclusion of the public in the governance of waterbodies to enhance the effectiveness and legitimacy of water management schemes across the EU. As complex socio-ecological systems, river basins in western Europe could benefit from further support for inclusive management schemes. This paper makes use of case studies from Germany, England and Spain to explore the potential opportunities and challenges of different participatory management approaches. Grounded in theoretical considerations around participation within ecological management schemes, including Arnstein's Ladder of Participation and commons theories, this work provides an evaluation of each case study based on key indicators, such as inclusivity, representativeness, self-organization, decision-making power, spatial fit and temporal continuity. As investors and the public develop a heightened awareness for long-term sustainability of industrial projects, this analysis supports the suggestion that increased participatory river basin management is both desirable and economically feasible, and should thus be considered a viable option for future projects aiming to move beyond current requirements of the European Union Water Framework Directive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. VI European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics has reached the sixth edition, marking the tenth year's anniversary. The spirit of the school is to provide a very important occasion for a deep education of young researchers about the main topics of experimental nuclear astrophysics. Moreover, it should be regarded as a forum for the discussion of the last-decade research activity. Lectures are focused on various aspects of primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, including novel experimental approaches and detectors, indirect methods and radioactive ion beams. Moreover, in order to give a wide educational offer, some lectures cover complementary subjects of nuclear astrophysics such as gamma ray astronomy, neutron-induced reactions, short-lived radionuclides, weak interaction and cutting-edge facilities used to investigate nuclear reactions of interest for astrophysics. Large room is also given to young researcher oral contributions. Traditionally, particular attention is devoted to the participation of students from less-favoured countries, especially from the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea. The school is organised by the Catania Nuclear Astrophysics research group with the collaboration of Dipartimento di Fisica e Astromomia - Università di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare.

  12. Understanding the infrastructure of European Research Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos; Kropp, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC) are a new form of legal and financial framework for the establishment and operation of research infrastructures in Europe. Despite their scope, ambition, and novelty, the topic has received limited scholarly attention. This article analyses one ER....... It is also a promising theoretical framework for addressing the relationship between the ERIC construct and the large diversity of European Research Infrastructures.......European Research Infrastructure Consortia (ERIC) are a new form of legal and financial framework for the establishment and operation of research infrastructures in Europe. Despite their scope, ambition, and novelty, the topic has received limited scholarly attention. This article analyses one ERIC...... became an ERIC using the Bowker and Star’s sociology of infrastructures. We conclude that focusing on ERICs as a European standard for organising and funding research collaboration gives new insights into the problems of membership, durability, and standardisation faced by research infrastructures...

  13. Nuclear wastes: research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    The management of long-living and high level radioactive wastes in France belongs to the framework of the December 30, 1991 law which defines three ways of research: the separation and transmutation of radionuclides, their reversible storage or disposal in deep geologic formations, and their processing and surface storage during long duration. Research works are done in partnership between public research and industrial organizations in many French and foreign laboratories. Twelve years after its enforcement, the impact of this law has overstepped the simple research framework and has led to a deep reflection of the society about the use of nuclear energy. This short paper presents the main results obtained so far in the three research ways, the general energy policy of the French government, the industrial progresses made in the framework of the 1991 law and the international context of the management of nuclear wastes. (J.S.)

  14. Conference on the research facilities for future nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhangel'skij, N.V.

    1996-01-01

    The activity of the European nuclear society Conference (Belgium, June, 1996) is described. The main topics of 60 presented reports are the following ones: necessity of developing new experimental facilities and their parameters; financing prospects and international cooperation in this field

  15. Nuclear Energy Research in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenkel, Roland; Haas, Didier

    2008-01-01

    The energy situation in Europe is mainly characterized by a growth in consumption, together with increasing import dependence in all energy resources. Assuring security of energy supply is a major goal at European Union level, and this can best be achieved by an adequate energy mix, including nuclear energy, producing now 32 % of our electricity. An increase of this proportion would not only improve our independence, but also reduce greenhouse gases emissions in Europe. Another major incentive in favor of nuclear is its competitiveness, as compared to other energy sources, and above all the low dependence of the electricity price on variation of the price of the raw material. The European Commission has launched a series of initiatives aiming at better coordinating energy policies and research. Particular emphasis in future European research will be given on the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy through the development of fast reactors, and to potential industrial heat applications. (authors)

  16. Recent developments in the European nuclear insurance scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    Despite the development of a strong anti-nuclear feeling in Europe, the nuclear programme in the main European countries has not been stopped. The European insurance market has evolved considerably and the liability limits have been raised in several countries. Insurers must face the twin problem of increased insurance capacity to cover material damage, as well as the higher liability amounts for operators of nuclear installations in certain countries. (NEA) [fr

  17. Towards a common knowledge base for nuclear research: A challenge for the stakeholders community and for the EC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    At the Lisbon 2000 Summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: 'to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010'. Overall, in particular in the nuclear fission community, this EC initiative was well accepted by the main stakeholders. In Europe, the main stakeholders (i.e. suppliers and/or demanders) of nuclear knowledge are actually: the research organisations with mixed public/private funding), the manufacturing industry (or vendors), the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations/TSOs) and the academia. In the nuclear fission research area, under Euratom FP-5 (1998-2002), criticism was raised by a number of 'high level experts' that too many Community efforts were devoted to production (e.g. through execution of shared cost actions) and not enough to dissemination and transfer (e.g. through education and training) and exploitation (e.g. through innovation) of nuclear knowledge. They were also complaining about the wasted resources due to the 'fragmentation' of EU research. As far as production of nuclear fission knowledge is concerned, a variety of poles (or fragments) of scientific research and operational feedback does exist in many countries but there is no clear common strategy on how to integrate these fragments at European level with a long term prospect. As far as dissemination and transfer of nuclear knowledge is concerned, the situation in some EU-25 countries is dramatic: mostly due to a bad public perception of nuclear energy, the lack of teachers and students becomes a serious concern. As far as exploitation of nuclear knowledge is concerned, all stakeholders are concerned about the unfair balance between supply and demand of knowledge, and about the relatively poor impact of research on technological and societal changes. In conclusion, from a EU research point of view, the solutions to the above 'nuclear

  18. International Nuclear Information System: Researchers' Platform for Knowledge Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Samsurdin Ahamad

    2011-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear world. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970, provides the opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia has become a member since 1978, and the first country input was posted in the 1980's. INIS member countries are supervised by a specially appointed liaison officers to monitor and oversee matters related to that. Each issue is associated with 49 subject matter (subject heading) will be checked and recorded by using Win fibre before being sent to the INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be distributed directly to all IAEA member states through the INIS web site and CD distribution to subscribers countries. Today, INIS is still a successful nuclear-related information provider through nearly 3 million data have been recorded including journals, reports, scientific papers, patents, nuclear laws, the web sites contents, and many more. (author)

  19. Testing a CANDU-fueling machine at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, Virgil

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, the Fueling Machine Head no. 4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2 (NPP) was successfully tested at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR). In 2005, the second Fueling Machine (no. 5) has tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate the CANDU technology in Romania. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig has built being available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing activity. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any CANDU Reactor owner

  20. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  1. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromm, Walter

    2012-01-01

    After the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi, the German federal government decided that Germany will give up electricity generation from nuclear power within a decade. The last reactor will be disconnected from the power grid in 2022. Helping to make this opt-out as safe as possible is one of the duties of the Helmholtz Association with its Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area. Also the demolition of nuclear power plants and the repository problem will keep society, and thus also research, busy for a number of decades to come. Giving up electricity production from nuclear power thus must not mean giving up the required nuclear technology competences. In the fields of reactor safety, demolition, final storage, radiation protection, and crisis management, in critical support of international developments, and for competent evaluation of nuclear facilities around Germany, these competences will be in demand far beyond the German opt-out. This is the reason why the final report by the Ethics Committee on 'Safe Energy Supply' emphasizes the importance of nuclear technology research. Close cooperation on national, European and international levels is indispensable in this effort. Also nuclear safety research in the Helmholtz Association is aligned with the challenges posed by the opt-out of the use of nuclear power. It is important that the high competences in the areas of plant safety and demolition, handling of radioactive waste, and safe final storage as well as radiation protection be preserved. The Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area of the Helmholtz Association therefore will continue studying scientific and technical aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste management. These research activities are provident research conducted for society and must be preserved for a long period of time. The work is closely harmonized with the activities of the

  2. White paper of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) on multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Carrio, Ignasi; Cuocolo, Alberto; Knapp, Wolfram; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; McCall, Iain; Reiser, Maximilian; Silberman, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    New multimodality imaging systems bring together anatomical and molecular information and require the competency and accreditation of individuals from both nuclear medicine and radiology. This paper sets out the positions and aspirations of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) working together on an equal and constructive basis for the future benefit of both specialties. EANM and ESR recognise the importance of coordinating working practices for multimodality imaging systems and that undertaking the nuclear medicine and radiology components of imaging with hybrid systems requires different skills. It is important to provide adequate and appropriate training in the two disciplines in order to offer a proper service to the patient using hybrid systems. Training models are proposed with the overall objective of providing opportunities for acquisition of special competency certification in multimodality imaging. Both organisations plan to develop common procedural guidelines and recognise the importance of coordinating the purchasing and management of hybrid systems to maximise the benefits to both specialties and to ensure appropriate reimbursement of these examinations. European multimodality imaging research is operating in a highly competitive environment. The coming years will decide whether European research in this area manages to defend its leading position or whether it falls behind research in other leading economies. Since research teams in the Member States are not always sufficiently interconnected, more European input is necessary to create interdisciplinary bridges between research institutions in Europe and to stimulate excellence. EANM and ESR will work with the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) to develop further research opportunities across Europe. European Union grant-funding bodies should allocate funds to joint research initiatives that encompass clinical research

  3. White paper of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; McCall, Iain; Reiser, Maximilian; Silberman, Bruno; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Carrio, Ignacio; Cuocolo, Alberto; Knapp, Wolfram

    2007-01-01

    New multimodality imaging systems bring together anatomical and molecular information and require the competency and accreditation of individuals from both radiology and nuclear medicine. This paper sets out the positions and aspirations of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) working together on an equal and constructive basis for the future benefit of both specialties. ESR and EANM recognise the importance of coordinating working practices for multimodality imaging systems and that undertaking the radiology and nuclear medicine components of imaging with hybrid systems requires different skills. It is important to provide adequate and appropriate training in the two disciplines in order to offer a proper service to the patient using hybrid systems. Training models are proposed with the overall objective of providing opportunities for acquisition of special competency certification in multimodality imaging. Both organisations plan to develop common procedural guidelines and recognise the importance of coordinating the purchasing and management of hybrid systems to maximise the benefits to both specialties and to ensure appropriate reimbursement of these examinations. European multimodality imaging research is operating in a highly competitive environment. The coming years will decide whether European research in this area manages to defend its leading position or whether it falls behind research in other leading economies. Since research teams in the member states are not always sufficiently interconnected, more European input is necessary to create interdisciplinary bridges between research institutions in Europe and to stimulate excellence. ESR and EANM will work with the European Institute for Biomedical Imaging Research (EIBIR) to develop further research opportunities across Europe. European Union grant-funding bodies should allocate funds to joint research initiatives that encompass clinical research

  4. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Kilpi, K.

    1985-01-01

    This research programme plan for 1985 covers the nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT

  5. Quality assurance for the research and development of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Kim, Young Sea; Lee, In Koo

    1990-01-01

    Quality evaluation was carried to analyze the current status of QA activities in the various projects and to devise a proper measures for the improvement of quality system. KAERI QA program evaluation was also performed in cooperation with foreign QA experts (Nutech International, USA) to study the best QA system for KAERI which is performing various nuclear project ranging from nuclear design, manufacturing to basic researches. The acquisition of N-certificate and stamp from ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) was successfully accomplished for the quality system of power reactor system design. The basic study on the QA in R and D, computerization of quality evaluation system was also performed to upgrade the safety and reliability of nuclear projects by the utilization of these advanced quality technologies. (author)

  6. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    abstract A collaborative consortium, named “TRANSAUTOPHAGY,” has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27046256

  7. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative consortium, named "TRANSAUTOPHAGY," has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  8. SARNET: An European cooperative effort on LWR severe accident research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, Jean-Claude; Van Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Chaumont, Bernard; Adroguer, Bernard; Haste, Tim; Bonnet, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Leonhard; Beraha, David; Trambauer, Klaus; Annunziato, Alessandro; Sehgal, Raj

    2006-01-01

    49 organisations network in SARNET (Severe Accident Research and management NETwork) their capacities of research in order to resolve the most important remaining uncertainties and safety issues for enhancing, in regard of Severe Accidents (SA), the safety of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). This project has been defined bearing in mind the necessity to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups. SARNET tackles the fragmentation that exists between the different R and D national programmes, notably in defining common research programmes and developing common computer tools and methodologies for safety assessment. SARNET comprises most of the actors involved in SA research in Europe. To reach these objectives, all the organizations networked in SARNET contribute to a so-called Joint Programme of Activities (JPA), which can be broken in several elements: - Implementing an advanced communication tool for fostering exchange of information; - Harmonizing and re-orienting the research programmes, and defining commonly new ones; - Analysing commonly the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of concerned phenomena; - Developing ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA), which capitalizes in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET; - Developing Scientific Databases, in which all the results of research programmes are stored; - Developing a common methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of NNPs; - Developing educational courses and text (source) books; - Promoting personnel mobility between the various European organisations. A few organizations are covering a wide range of competences though not complete, whereas others are specialized in very specific areas and thus complementarities are developing. The critical mass of competence for performing experiments needed in the

  9. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, I H; Lee, H S; Jeong, Y H; Sung, K W; Han, J H; Lee, J T; Lee, H K; Kim, S J; Kang, H S; An, D H; Kim, K R; Park, S D; Han, C H; Jung, M K; Oh, Y J; Kim, K H; Kim, S H; Back, J H; Kim, C H; Lim, K S; Kim, Y Y; Na, J W; Ku, J H; Lee, D H

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs.

  10. Basic research for nuclear energy. y Study on the nuclear materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, I. H.; Lee, H. S.; Jeong, Y. H.; Sung, K. W.; Han, J. H.; Lee, J. T.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, S. J.; Kang, H. S.; An, D. H.; Kim, K. R.; Park, S. D.; Han, C. H.; Jung, M. K.; Oh, Y. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. H.; Back, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Lim, K. S.; Kim, Y. Y.; Na, J. W.; Ku, J. H.; Lee, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    A study on the nuclear materials technologies which are necessary to establish the base for alloy development was performed. - The feasibility study on the application of Zircaloy scrap waste for hydrogen storage - The development of metal hydride battery for energy storage system - The establishment of transmission electron microscopy database for nuclear materials - The basic technology for the development of cladding materials for high burnup - The water chemistry technology for secondary system pH control and the photocatalysis technology for decomposition and removal of organics. - Improvement of primary component integrity of PWR by Zinc injection. (author). 175 refs., 58 tabs., 262 figs

  11. Tissue Engineering Organs for Space Biology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Shansky, J.; DelTatto, M.; Lee, P.; Meir, J.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term manned space flight requires a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy resulting from microgravity. Atrophy most likely results from changes at both the systemic level (e.g. decreased circulating growth hormone, increased circulating glucocorticoids) and locally (e.g. decreased myofiber resting tension). Differentiated skeletal myofibers in tissue culture have provided a model system over the last decade for gaining a better understanding of the interactions of exogenous growth factors, endogenous growth factors, and muscle fiber tension in regulating protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Tissue engineering these cells into three dimensional bioartificial muscle (BAM) constructs has allowed us to extend their use to Space flight studies for the potential future development of countermeasures.

  12. IAEA data base system for nuclear research reactors (RRDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipscher, P.

    1986-01-01

    The IAEA Data Base System for Nuclear Research Reactors (RRDB) User's Guide is intended for the user who wishes to understand the concepts and operation of the RRDB system. The RRDB is a computerized system recording administrative, operational and technical data on all the nuclear research reactors currently operating, under construction, planned or shut down in IAEA Member States. The data is received by the IAEA from reactor centres on magnetic tapes or as responses to questionnaires. All the data on research, training, test and radioactive isotope production reactors and critical assemblies is stored on the RRDB system. A full set of RRDB programs (in NATURAL) are contained at the back of this Guide

  13. Organization and targets of the European Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldi, R

    1997-12-01

    After a short historical review of the formation, objectives and organization of the International Geothermal Association (IGA), this paper describes the functions, goals and activities of the IGA European Branch. In particular, the paper illustrates the plan of action established for the periods 1993-`95 and 1996-`98, and the issues dealt with by the European Forum as of August 1996. The last section of the paper outlines the main problems to be faced in the near future in order to facilitate the aggregation of efforts, the amalgamation of promotional initiatives and the coordination of the basic activities needed for the consolidation and growth of the geothermal community in Europe. (orig.)

  14. Research for the safety of existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teschendorff, Victor; Bruna, Giovanni B.; Gelder, Pieter de

    2007-01-01

    The essential role of research for maintaining the high safety standard for the existing nuclear installations is outlined in the context of internationally agreed needs. The three co-authoring Technical Safety Organisations are committed to continued safety research, recognising operational experience and new technologies as the main driving forces. The safety margin concept is introduced and new trends in traditional and new areas of safety research are identified. The importance of a sufficient experimental infrastructure and international co-operation in sustainable networks is highlighted. (orig.)

  15. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  16. FAPIG's activities for public acceptance of nuclear energy. Analytical results of questionnaire executed at organized visits to nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    The First Atomic Power Industry Group (FAPIG) organized eighteenth visit of woman employees to nuclear power stations. They would have few chance of such a visit and to unfamiliar with mechanism of nuclear power generation as well as radiation and radioactivity. Participants were required to have a lecture on energy in general and basic understanding of nuclear energy and then had a visit to nuclear power stations to learn nuclear energy as correct knowledge. They also filled out the same questionnaire before the lecture and after the visit to express their ideas or comments on nuclear energy. This paper described analytical results of the questionnaire and significance of the organized visit for public acceptance of nuclear energy. (T. Tanaka)

  17. Social responsibility (SR) of nuclear research and its practice for pursuing integrity and sustainability of nuclear research with society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsuo, Sawada; Naoki, Yamano; Yoshiko, Aoyama; Akiko, Shioda; Junichi, Mizuo; Yasuhiko, Fujii

    2007-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which includes compliance, engineering and business ethics, safety and security, and corporate governance, is being widely applied not only in the field of business administrations but also in academia and research communities. The basic 3 ideals of CSR are sustainability, stakeholder dialogue (stakeholder include consumers, suppliers, employees, investors and local communities) and triple basic constraints (be environment-friendly, competitive and beneficial for the society as a whole). A typical aspect of this trend is that most electric power company publishes documents such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reports which are the improved version of social-environmental reports. CSR reflects the very expectations from the society that how far the corporations and organizations including universities can resolve the issues in which the society is necessarily involved. The nuclear power generations and related facilities are sorts of societal systems and not merely technological systems. This paper describes the concept of CSR, its basic prerequisites and the framework of the civic forum that is a part of the practices of Nuclear CSR

  18. Common definition for categories of clinical research: a prerequisite for a survey on regulatory requirements by the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Christine; de Andres-Trelles, Fernando; Kuchinke, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    in relation to the wide spectrum of clinical research, the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) developed a multinational survey in ten European countries. However a lack of common classification framework for major categories of clinical research was identified, and therefore reaching...... with cell therapy, etc.); diagnostic studies; clinical research on nutrition; other interventional clinical research (including trials in complementary and alternative medicine, trials with collection of blood or tissue samples, physiology studies, etc.); and epidemiology studies. Our classification...

  19. Current policy and research on radioactive waste management in the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsstroem, H.; Taylor, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Each Member State of the European Union is responsible for the safe management and disposal of the radioactive waste produced on its own territory. This includes setting the policy and taking the necessary steps to ensure that the radioactive waste does not constitute a threat to the health of workers and to the general public. For the practical implementation of the policy, specific waste management organizations have been established. Extensive cooperation, not least in the area of research, is taking place between these organizations and between the regulatory authorities, both bilaterally and through the European Commission. Cooperation takes place through the European Commission by two different mechanisms, the Community Plan of Action in the field of radioactive waste and the EURATOM framework programme on research and training. In view of the future enlargement of the European Union, the Commission is also actively involved in the development of waste management practices in the Central and Eastern European countries. Waste management is also an important aspect of the Tacis and other nuclear safety support programmes to the States of the former Soviet Union. The general policies for waste management in all Member States are in harmony with the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The specific policies are, however, dependent on the specific conditions of that State, e.g. the existence, size and time perspective of the nuclear power programme, the geological formations available for disposal (clay, salt, crystalline rock), etc. The management of short lived waste is an established practice in many Member States and the research needs are consequently low. Most of the policy efforts and research are thus dedicated to the management, treatment, conditioning and geological disposal of long lived waste and spent fuel. Each Member State with a nuclear power programme also has an important

  20. Regional and international integrated telemedicine network for organ transplant (HC 4028 & IN 4028 European Commission DGXIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, S G; Brugal, G; Godo, F; Bercic, B; Nagy, G; Avar, G; Adelh, D; Lagouarde, P

    2000-01-01

    A substantial portion of future medical practice will depend greatly on improved collaboration between the providers throughout the healthcare sector, and effective sharing of data and expertise by different healthcare professionals. In organ transplant it is a rule, donor organs are matched to recipients via national or multinational organ-sharing organizations. Only through close co-operation between transplant surgeons, immunologists, nephrologists, pathologists, radiologists and other physicians could one increase the efficiency of organ transplantation. Information technology (IT) has become an inevitable and inherent part of transplantation medicine. The RETRANSPLANT project interfaces and integrates IT from the European Union Fourth Framework projects to support the development of regional organ transplant information networks in Central Europe.

  1. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Pascual, Thomas N B; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Burchert, Wolfgang; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard; Vitola, João V; Mahmarian, John J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in relation to the best practice quality score. A possible reason for the differences between Europe and the RoW could be the safety culture fostered by actions under the Euratom directives and the implementation of diagnostic reference levels. Stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted activity might be targets for optimization of European nuclear cardiology practice.

  2. Opinion of the Consultative Committee for the EURATOM Research and Training Programme in the Field of Nuclear Energy (Fusion) - CCE-FU - on the European domestic assessment of the ITER-FEAT outline design report. Brussels, 11 July 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The CCE-FU endorses the findings of the FTC on the European Domestic Assessment of the ITER-FEAT Outline Design Review, and expresses the opinion that: The machine, ITER-FEAT, the design of which is presented in the Outline Design Report and accompanying document (Technical Basis for the ITER-FEAT Outline Design) successfully responds, in broad terms, to the requirements set by the Special Working Group, established by the ITER Council, in response to Task No. 1 and adopted by the Council; The parameters chosen represent convergence towards a coherent design, based upon preserving adequate margins within the cost target against the new objectives and yet retaining flexibility to exploit advances in physics understanding; ITER-FEAT can meet its objectives of extended burn in induction operation with power amplification Q>10 at the reference operating values of Ip=15MA, Paux=40MW, thus providing 400 MW of fusion power. The margins to achieve this objective are in the range of 15-25%. The design also has sufficient flexibility to explore hybrid scenarios with long pulse capability (> 2000 seconds), and scenarios aiming at demonstrating steady state operation with the ratio of fusion power to input power for current drive of at least 5, provided further confinement enhancement can be achieved; Although most of the components of ITER-FEAT are still in a preliminary design state, the new design appears suitable to be developed into the final design stage, the new design appears suitable to be developed into the final design of a machine capable of achieving the objectives set by the ITER Council; The target cost for the realisation of ITER-FEAT was set by the ITER Council at about half of the 1998 ITER cost estimates. The present preliminary analysis provides confidence that this target will be reached. By the end of 2000, the detailed cost estimates will be provided from the detailed design specifications and manufacturing studies in the industries of the three Parties

  3. Identification of organization values according to the perception of the employees of the Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupak, Marcia Orrico; Roman, Edson; Perrota, Jose Augusto; Feher, Ana Claudia M.; Magalhaes, Adriana B.V.B.; Massi, Maria Julia Gili; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Maximiano, Antonio Cesar Amaru

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the organizational values, according to the perception of employees of the Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute - IPEN. The instrument used in this research was the 'Organization Values Questionnaire'. This survey contains a list with 38 values, each followed by a parenthetical explanation that clarifies its meaning. Respondents rated each value on a 6-point scale from, less important (0) to very important (6), in response to the question: How important is each values for the organizational life? This evaluation should be done in two levels of perception: REAL plan, and IDEAL plan. The population investigated was constituent by 1000 employees. The total of 553, i.e. 55.3%, questionnaires were turned back. As result, it was identified on REAL plan, values related to coefficient as EFFICIENCY, EFFICACY and MANAGEMENT. On IDEAL plan, they were related to EMPLOYEE VALORIZATION and INOVATION coefficient. As consequence, the institutional commitment is to form working groups, inside the Strategic Planning Revision, in order to elaborate the Core Values, based on the values identified on this research. (author)

  4. The European fusion nuclear technology effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvas, J.

    1989-01-01

    The role of fusion technology in the European fusion development strategy is outlined. The main thrust of the present fusion technology programme is responding to development needs of the Next European Torus. A smaller, but important and growing R and D effort is dealing with problems specific to the Demonstration, or Fusion Power, Reactor. The part of the programme falling under the somewhat arbitrarily defined category of 'fusion nuclear technology' is reviewed and an outlook to future activities is given. The review includes tritium technology, blanket technology and breeder materials development, technology and materials for the protection of the first wall and of other plasma facing components, remote handling technology, and safety and environmental impact studies. A few reflections are offered on the future long-term developments in fusion technology. (orig.)

  5. For the Anniversary Edition of the Scientific Journal European Researcher. Series A – 110 issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Rajović

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is a review of the jubilee scientific journal "European Researcher. Series A ", marked at all in 2016 – the sixth anniversary, of regular and of continuous publication. In addition to the history of the newspaper are exposed to the development phase of its program concept. The journal is the period 2010 – 2016 year, profiled in an important factor of development and the formation of professional and scientific thought. Journal “European Research. Series A” is now open forum for publicizing and stimulating innovative thinking on all aspects of the social sciences, the entire international academic community. In all this we emphasize the infinite persistence, creative energy but also authoring and management merits chief editor and founder of the Journal, DrAleksandrCherkasov for survival and development for this great publishing project.

  6. Nuclear energy and european public opinions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libourne, J.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents four texts related to the crucial question of the attitude towards nuclear energy in the countries of the European Union: the first text comments the results of a European Commission inquiry (2006), and is more especially concerned with a comparison between Germany and France where rather similar public opinions lead to very different political approaches; the second text presents a synthesis of inquiries concerning Germany; the third is a review of the main national studies realized in various european countries; the last text is drawn from a study realized by the Cnrs on the position of the French towards nuclear wastes

  7. The Commission's research action programme on the development of nuclear fission energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    For its 'Framework Programme 1984-1987' the Commission has defined the major goals for a European Scientific and Technical Strategy. One of the means to reduce the energy dependence of the Community, which is an important objective, is to favour the development of nuclear fission energy. As electricity production by nuclear reactors has reached industrial maturity, the Community activities are directed mainly to safety aspects, in order to ensure the protection of workers and the general public, against hazards linked to operations in the nuclear fuel cycle. A description of the main features of the five sub-programmes on nuclear fission energy is given below; these programmes are: reactor safety; nuclear fuels and actinides research; management of radioactive waste; safeguarding and management of fissile materials; decommissioning of nuclear installations. The research and development work is carried out either by the Commission's Joint Research Center or by organizations and companies of the Member Countries, with the Commission's financial support. (author)

  8. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang [University Hospital of the Ruhr University, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana [International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Mercuri, Mathew [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Flotats, Albert [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kitsiou, Anastasia [Sismanoglio Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Athens (Greece); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Vitola, Joao V. [Quanta Diagnostico and Terapia, Curitiba (Brazil); Mahmarian, John J. [Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Karthikeyan, Ganesan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiology, New Delhi (India); Better, Nathan [Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Rehani, Madan M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Collaboration: for the INCAPS Investigators Group

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  9. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang; Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S.R.; Vitola, Joao V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  10. European perspectives on security research

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Europe’s networked societies of today are shaped by a growing interconnection in almost all areas of life. The complexity of our infrastructures and the concurrent accessibility to means of destruction by terrorist groups and individual perpetrators call for innovative security solutions. However, such evolving innovations inevitably raise fundamental questions of concern in our societies. How do we balance the imperatives of securing our citizens and infrastructures on the one hand, and of protecting of our sacredly held civil liberties on the other? The topical network ‘Safety and Security’ of acatech – the German Academy of Science and Engineering – invited experts from the science academies of various European countries to share their perspectives on security research and the aspect of safety during a two-day workshop hosted by the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut in March 2010. This publication is a compilation of contributions made during the workshop.

  11. Research Data Services in European Academic Research Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Tenopir, Carol; Talja, Sanna; Horstmann, Wolfram; Late, Elina; Hughes, Dane; Pollock, Danielle; Schmidt, Birgit; Baird, Lynn; Sandusky, Robert J.; Allard, Suzie

    2017-01-01

    Research data is an essential part of the scholarly record, and management of research data is increasingly seen as an important role for academic libraries. This article presents the results of a survey of directors of the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) academic member libraries to discover what types of research data services (RDS) are being offered by European academic research libraries and what services are planned for the future. Overall, the survey found that librar...

  12. European Neutrons form Parasitic Research to Global Strategy: Realizing Plans for a Transnational European Spallation Source in the Wake of the Cold War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiserfeld, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Studies of Big Science have early on focused on instrumentation and scientific co-operation in large organizations, later on to take into account symbolic values and specific research styles while more recently also involving the relevance of commercial interests and economic development as well as the assimilation of research traditions. In accordance with these transformed practices, this presentation will analyze how an organization with the purpose of realizing a Big-Science facility, The European Spallation Source, has successfully managed to present the project as relevant to different national and international policy-makers, to the community of European neutron researchers as well as to different industrial interests. All this has been achieved in a research-policy environment, which has been the subject to drastic transformations, from calls to engage researchers from the former eastern bloc in the early 1990s via competition with American and Asian researchers at the turn of the century 2000 to intensified demands on business applications. During this process, there has also been fierce competition between different potential sites in the U.K., Germany, Spain, Hungary and Sweden, not once, but twice. The project has in addition been plagued by withdrawals of key actors as well as challenging problems in the field of spallation-source construction. Nevertheless, the European Spallation Source has survived from the early 1990s until today, now initiating the construction process at Lund in southern Sweden. In this presentation, the different measures taken and arguments raised by the European Spallation Source project in order to realize the facility will be analysed. Especially the different designs of the European Spallation Source will be analysed as responses to external demands and threats.

  13. World Health Organization on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A report published by the World Health Organization in cooperation with, and at the instigation of, the Belgian authorities, is summarised. The report was prepared by an international multidisciplinary working group, and concentrated on the somatic and genetic risks from ionising radiation, the environmental effects of nuclear power from the mining of uranium to the disposal of waste and the probability and consequences of accidents, sabotage and theft of nuclear materials. In general positive to nuclear power, the report nevertheless recommends for RESEARCH AND EVALUATION IN SEVERAL SECTORS: The duties of the authorities in providing full and open information on the consequences of the exploitation of nuclear power are emphasised. (JIW)

  14. Thailand's nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamkate, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand, is charged with three main tasks, namely, Nuclear Energy development Plan, Utilization of Nuclear Based technology Plan and Science and Technology Plan. Its activities are centred around the research reactor TRR-1/M1. The main areas of contribution include improvement in agricultural production, nuclear medicine and nuclear oncology, health care and nutrition, increasing industrial productivity and efficiency and, development of cadre competent in nuclear science and technology. The office also has the responsibility of ensuring nuclear safety, radiation safety and nuclear waste management. The office has started a new project in 1997 under which a 10 MWt research reactor, an isotope production facility and a waste processing and storage facility would be set up by General Atomic of USA. OAEP has a strong linkage with the IAEA and has been an active participant in RCA programmes. In the future OAEP will enhance its present capabilities in the use of radioisotopes and radiation and look into the possibility of using nuclear energy as an alternative energy resource. (author)

  15. THE EUROPEAN PUBLIC SYSTEM OF HUMAN RESOURCES. PERFORMANCE IN ORGANIZATIONS AND GOOD PRACTICES FOR ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Călin BEȘLIU

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that recruitment and selection activities are vital in ensuring the human resources flow in every private or public organization sector, the present paper seeks to elaborate a proposal aimed to modernize the recruiting and selection process within the Romanian public service based on best practices models implemented in other European states. From the perspective of providing adequate training skills and abilities needed by the qualified personnel, initial training is very poor. Practical training is not on the same level of quality with theoretical one and the current system of examinations in education units, based predominantly on theoretical assessment, do not motivate learners well enough in order to gain practical skills. Continuous training programs organized by the units do not always take into account the needs of the personnel or are not adapted to the job description, the category and level of specialization of the beneficiaries' functions and the degree of novelty and utility of most of the presented theoretical information is usually low. The costs of selecting one person for the public service are usually very high, including not only the cost of the initial recruiting, but also the long term cost, represented by the continuous training of the employee. Consequently, recruiting human resources is a basic part of both public and private systems.

  16. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)-Web Portal Developments for Interactive Access to Earthquake Data on a European Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, A.; Trani, L.; Rives, S.; Thomy, P.; Euchner, F.; Schorlemmer, D.; Saul, J.; Heinloo, A.; Bossu, R.; van Eck, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES) is European Commission (EC) project whose focus is networking together seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated European infrastructure that provides access to data and data products for research. Seismological institutes and organizations in European and Mediterranean countries maintain large, geographically distributed data archives, therefore this scenario suggested a design approach based on the concept of an internet service oriented architecture (SOA) to establish a cyberinfrastructure for distributed and heterogeneous data streams and services. Moreover, one of the goals of NERIES is to design and develop a Web portal that acts as the uppermost layer of the infrastructure and provides rendering capabilities for the underlying sets of data The Web services that are currently being designed and implemented will deliver data that has been adopted to appropriate formats. The parametric information about a seismic event is delivered using a seismology-specific Extensible mark-up Language(XML) format called QuakeML (https://quake.ethz.ch/quakeml), which has been formalized and implemented in coordination with global earthquake-information agencies. Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) are used to assign identifiers to (1) seismic-event parameters described by QuakeML, and (2) generic resources, for example, authorities, locations providers, location methods, software adopted, and so on, described by use of a data model constructed with the resource description framework (RDF) and accessible as a service. The European-Mediterranean Seismological Center (EMSC) has implemented a unique event identifier (UNID) that will create the seismic event URI used by the QuakeML data model. Access to data such as broadband waveform, accelerometric data and stations inventories will be also provided through a set of Web services that will wrap the middleware used by the

  17. Proceedings of the European Forum on Nuclear Waste governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Electronuclear production is a component of France's and Europe's energy supplies. However, populations remain worried as nuclear electricity produces dangerous radioactive waste for many generations. They are all the more worried so as they are not enough informed and involved in decision-making. After having analysed in 2003 the issue of national choices and their compatibility with a European directive, the European talks' ambition is to clarify the responsibilities of the different stakeholders for a good governance. Indeed, these have to make their strategies for everlasting solutions understood, inform about costs that correspond to an efficient and long-term management of nuclear waste and about their financing. How are roles shared between States, producers, managers, researchers and local entities? The European Talks has organised the dialog between stakeholders from several member States of the EU around two series of questions: - What are industrial and economic actors strategies? In which public framework are they included? How do they anticipate the future? The speakers have analysed their own experiences in order to examine what could an efficient and fair regulation and costs sharing be. - What are nuclear stakeholders commitments on the field? What kind of projects could be initiated? How could these stakeholders become partners for sustainable development? Here again, experiences have been shared in the perspective of mobilizing energies on concrete projects. This document is the proceedings of this second European Forum on this topic. Content: 1 - Opening by Christian Namy, president of the Meuse General Council; Message from Patrick Devedjian, French vice- minister of Industry. 2 - First round table 'The stakeholders strategy and their management of nuclear waste in France and in Europe' (Moderator: Alejo Vidal Quadras Roca, vice-president of the European Parliament, Spain): Speaker: Yves Le Bars, chairman, ANDRA, Discussants: Jozsef Hegyhati

  18. European organic dairy farmers' preference for animal health management within the farm management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, F J S; Mourits, M C M; Hogeveen, H

    2015-11-01

    The expertise and knowledge of veterinary advisors on improving animal health management is key towards a better herd health status. However, veterinary advisors are not always aware of the goals and priorities of dairy farmers. To dairy farmers animal health is only one aspect of farm management and resources may be allocated to other more preferred areas. Veterinary advisors may experience this as non-compliant with their advice. To explore the preferences of European Union (EU) organic dairy farmers for improved animal health management relative to other farm management areas an adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA) was performed. A total of 215 farmers participated originating from organic dairy farms in France (n = 70), Germany (n = 60), Spain (n = 28) and Sweden (n = 57). The management areas udder health and claw health represented animal health management whereas barn, calf and pasture management represented potential conflicting management areas. Results indicate that EU organic dairy farmers differ in their preferences for improved animal health management within the farming system. In general, improved calf management was the most preferred area and improved claw health management was found to be least preferred, the remaining areas were of intermediate interest. Cluster analyses on claw health measures and udder health measures resulted in respectively seven and nine distinct preference profiles. The results indicate a high degree of variation in farmers' preference, which cannot be explained by the typical herd characteristics. With the individual preferences revealed by ACA, a veterinary advisor can now find out whether his intended advice is directed at a favourable or unfavourable management area of the farmer. If the latter is the case the veterinarian should first create awareness of the problem to the farmer. Insights in individual farmers preferences will allow veterinary advisors to better understand why farmers were incompliant with their advice

  19. Preface: Eighth European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudio, Spitaleri; Livio, Lamia; Gianluca, Pizzone Rosario

    2016-01-01

    In this book a collection of the lecture notes given during the Eighth European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics is given. The school, whose first edition was first held in 2003, took place from 13 to 20 of September 2015 in Santa Tecla, a small village about 15 km north of Catania, characterized by its position on the volcanic shores of the Ionian Sea, surrounded by the spectacular “Timpa” area, a green protected park specific for its mediterranean vegetation. 80 young students and researchers from more than 20 countries attended the lectures and were also encouraged to present their work and results. The school, has tried once more to present to the young students the global picture of nuclear astrophysics research in the last years. Thus the scientific program of the school covered a wide range of topics dealing with various aspects of nuclear astrophysics, such as stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, neutrino physics, the Big Bang, direct and indirect methods and radioactive ion beams. Nuclear astrophysics plays a key role in understanding energy production in stars, stellar evolution and the concurrent synthesis of the chemical elements and their isotopes. It is also a fundamental tool to explain the ashes of the early universe, to determine the age of the universe through the study of pristine stellar objects and to predict the evolution of the Sun or Stars. The “bone structure” for the above aspects is based on nuclear reactions, whose rates need to be determined in laboratories. Although impressive progress has been made over the past decades, which was rewarded by Nobel prizes, several open questions are still unsolved, which challenge the basis of the present understanding. A list of the lecture topics is given below: —Big Bang Nucleosynthesis —Stellar evolution and Nucleosynthesis —radioactive ion beams —detector and facilities for nuclear astrophysics —indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics —plasma physics An

  20. A research on threat (hazard) categorization method for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Rongyao; Xu Xiaoxiao; Zhang Jiangang; Zhao Bin; Wang Xuexin

    2011-01-01

    The threat categorization method suggested by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and hazard categorization standard by the Department of Energy of United States (USDOE) for nuclear facilities are compared and discussed in this paper. The research shows the two types of categorization method for nuclear facilities are similar, though each has its own specialty. The categorization method suggested by IAEA for the purpose of emergency planning is quite completed and updated. The categorization method of DOE is advanced in its operability, and fits for safety surveillance. But the dispersible radioactive material thresholds used for categorization need to be updated. The threshold of category 3 is somewhat disputable for many reasons. The recommended categorization method for China is also given in this paper. (author)

  1. Nuclear energy in Europe: union or confusion? (Information report, in the name of the delegation for the European union, on the adequation of the Euratom treaty to the situation and perspectives of nuclear energy in Europe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesquiou, A. de

    2000-05-01

    Following the last expansion of the European Union and the recent nuclear renouncement decision of Germany, the member states frankly favourable to nuclear energy are now a minority among the fifteen states. The French government also has some doubts with respect to this energy source, even if France is the first producer of electric power of nuclear origin. Starting from this statement, the French Senate delegation for the European Union has wondered about the present day situation and the future perspectives of nuclear energy in Europe. This topic is analyzed in its political, diplomatic, economical and legal dimensions threw several questions: what is the situation of this debate in the different member states and in the European public opinion? Are the alternative energy solutions realistic with respect to the European energy needs? What is the competitiveness of nuclear power in the new context of deregulation of the European power market? Is it possible for the European Union to meet its international obligations of CO 2 reduction without the use of nuclear energy? What is the efficiency of the European Community action for the improvement of the safety of nuclear reactors in Eastern Europe? Which importance is given to the nuclear problem in the membership negotiations with central and eastern European countries? Is the legal framework of the Euratom treaty still adapted to the present day situation? (J.S.)

  2. A European roadmap for developing accelerator driven systems (ADS) for nuclear waste incineration. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Technical Working Group on ADS

    2001-01-01

    In 1998 the Research Ministers of France, Italy and Spain, set up a Ministers' Advisors Group on the use of accelerator driven systems (ADS) for nuclear waste transmutation. This led to the establishing of a technical working group under the chairmanship of Prof. Carlo Rubbia to identify the critical technical issues and to prepare a 'Roadmap' for a demonstration programme to be performed within 12 years. In the following Roadmap, the technical working group (consisting of representatives from Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the JRC) has identified the steps necessary to start the construction of an experimental accelerator driven system towards the end of the decade. This is considered as an essential prerequisite to assess the safe and efficient behaviour of such systems for a large-scale deployment for transmutation purposes in the first half of this century. The development and deployment of accelerator driven systems requires three steps: a comprehensive mid- and long-term R and D program, to develop the single elements and components of the system. This includes development of new fuels and fuel cycle systems; planning, design, construction and operation of an Experimental Accelerator Driven System for the demonstration of the concept; planning, design, construction and operation of a large size prototype accelerator driven systems with subsequent large-scale deployment. Following a first phase of R and D focused on the understanding of the basic principles of ADS (already partly underway), the programmes should be streamlined and focused on a practical demonstration of the key issues. These demonstrations should cover high intensity proton accelerators (beam currents in the range 1-20 mA), spallation targets of high power (of power in excess of 1 megawatt), and their effective coupling with a sub-critical core. Cost estimates are taken into account as well as the ADS activities in Japan and USA

  3. NETOUR: A EUROPEAN NETWORK FOR EXCELLENCE IN TOURISM THROUGH ORGANIZATIONS AND UNIVERSITIES IN RUSSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Andrades, Lidia; Dimanche, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Russia is one of the fastest growing tourism markets (+8% growth in 2011) with many resources that are yet untapped. This paper presents NETOUR, a project of European and Russian universities that aims at boosting Russia’s competitiveness as a tourism destination. The purpose of this project, funded by the European Commission through a TEMPUS grant, is to propose a model for cooperation between universities and the main stakeholders in the tourism sector, in order to favour its sustainable de...

  4. Research on artificial intelligence systems for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Minoru

    1992-01-01

    The development and utilization of atomic energy in Japan has be advanced in conformity with the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization decided in 1987. As one of the basic targets, the upbringing of creative and innovative science and technology is put up. Artificial intelligence technology has been positioned as one of the important basic technologies for promoting future atomic energy development. The research and development of artificial intelligence technology have been advanced aiming at making nuclear power stations autonomous, by the guidance of Science and Technology Agency and the cooperation of several research institutes. The upbringing of creative science and technology, the preponderant development of basic technology, the concept of developing the basic technology for atomic energy, the concept of autonomous plants, the standard for autonomy, the approach to autonomous plants, the present state of the researches in respective research institutes on autonomous operation and autonomous maintenance are described. (K.I.)

  5. Welcome from ESARDA (European Safeguards Research and Development Association)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meer, K.

    2015-01-01

    ESARDA, on the one hand being part of that European family and on the other hand working in practice to support peace by the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, can be considered as a perfect representative of that European peace process. Going now from the European to the global perspective, peace should be our motivating force and this is also expressed in the basis of safeguards: the non-proliferation Treaty. Several articles of the Treaty deal with not developing nuclear weapons and not supporting the development of nuclear weapons by other countries, and one article (Article VI) deals with the general and complete nuclear disarmament. What is ESARDA doing in practice- First we provide a forum to exchange scientific information for the benefit of all safeguards stakeholders. The most important forum is the biannual open ESARDA safeguards symposium that will be held next year from 19-21 May in Manchester. Next to the ESARDA symposia, we coordinate European safeguards research via our ESARDA Working Groups. Also non-members are welcome in these WG as observers. JRC Ispra maintains the ESARDA website that also supports exchange of safeguards information

  6. European MSc Programs in Nuclear Sciences - To meet the Need of Stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis; Priest, Nick; Garelick, Hemda; Tamponnet, Christian; Mitchell, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A stakeholder needs assessment, carried out under the EU-EURAC and EU-ENEN II projects, clearly showed that, at the European level, there are a significant and constant need for post-graduates with skills in radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation dosimetry and environmental modelling and a smaller, but still important, demand for radiobiologists and bio-modellers. Most of these needs are from government organizations. If only the nuclear industry is considered, then the largest demand is for radiochemists and radiation protection dosimetrists. Given this spectrum of need and existing capacity in the areas of radiobiology it was concluded that the needs identified would be most efficiently met by three new degree programs: European MSc Radiation Protection European MSc Analytical Radiochemistry European MSc Radioecology. All three master programs would be developed using the framework provided by the Bologna Convention and the lecturing could be shared among specialist Scientists within a network of collaborating universities. Therefore, educational plans have been developed for the above MSc degrees. These plans envisage each degree comprising three modules that are common to all the degrees (3x10 ECTS credits), three specialist modules (3x10 ECTS credits) and a research project (1x60 ECTS credits). The courses should be aimed, not only to fill the identified European postgraduate education gap in radiological sciences, but also to provide a modular structure that is easily accessed by stakeholders for CPD training. It is anticipated that the European Masters will meet the academic training requirements of qualified 'experts', as defined by the European Commission and the IAEA. At the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB) a pilot MSc in Radioecology has successfully been initiated in collaboration with UK and France.

  7. European MSc Programs in Nuclear Sciences-To meet the need of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipperud, L.; Salbu, B.; Priest, N.; Garelick, H.; Tamponnet, C.; Abbott, A.; Mitchell, P.

    2011-01-01

    A stakeholder needs assessment, carried out under the EU-EURAC and EU-ENEN-II projects, clearly showed that, at the European level, there are a significant and constant need for post-graduates with skills in radiochemistry, radioecology, radiation dosimetry and environmental modelling and a smaller, but still important, demand for radiobiologists and bio-modellers. Most of these needs are from government organizations. If only the nuclear industry is considered, then the largest demand is for radio chemists and radiation protection dosimetry experts. Given this spectrum of need and existing capacity in the areas of radiobiology it was concluded that the needs identified would be most efficiently met by three new degree programs: ·European MSc Radiation Protection, ·European MSc Analytical Radiochemistry, ·European MSc Radioecology. All three master programs would be developed using the framework provided by the Bologna Convention and the lecturing could be shared among specialist Scientists within a network of collaborating universities. Therefore, educational plans have been developed for the above MSc degrees. These plans envisage each degree comprising three modules that are common to all the degrees (3 x 10 ECTS credits), three specialist modules (3 x 10 ECTS credits) and a research project (1 x 60 ECTS credits). The courses should be aimed, not only to fill the identified European post-graduate education gap in radiological sciences, but also to provide a modular structure that is easily accessed by stakeholders for CPD training. It is anticipated that the European Masters will meet the academic training requirements of qualified experts', as defined by the European Commission and the IAEA. At the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB) a pilot MSc in Radioecology has successfully been initiated in collaboration with UK and France.

  8. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer-based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions of guidelines; - as a reference in safety cases and demonstrations of safety of software based systems; - as guidance for system design specifications by manufacturers and major I and C suppliers on the international market. The task force decided at an early stage to focus attention on computer based systems used in Nuclear Power Plants for the implementation of safety functions; namely, those systems classified by the IAEA as 'Safety Systems'. Therefore, recommendations of this report - except those of chapter 1.11 - primarily address 'safety systems' and not 'safety related systems'. It was felt that the most difficult aspects of the licensing of digital programmable systems are rooted in the specific properties of the technology. The objective was therefore to delineate practical and technical licensing guidance, rather than discussing or proposing basic principles or requirements. The design requirements and the basic principles of nuclear safety in force in each member state are assumed to remain applicable. This report represents the consensus view achieved by the experts who contributed to the task force. It is the result of what was at the time of its initiation a first attempt at the international level to achieve consensus among nuclear regulators on practical methods for

  9. Status of the support researches for the regulation of nuclear facilities decommissioning in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yusuke; Iguchi, Yukihiro; Kawasaki, Satoru; Kato, Masami

    2011-01-01

    In Japan, 4 nuclear power stations are under decommissioning and some nuclear fuel cycle facilities are expected to be decommissioned in the future. On the other hand, the safety regulation of decommissioning of nuclear facilities was changed by amending act in 2005. An approval system after review process of decommissioning plan was adopted and applied to the power stations above. In this situation, based on the experiences of the new regulatory system, the system should be well established and moreover, it should be improved and enhanced in the future. Nuclear Industry and Safety Agency (NISA) is in charge of regulation of commercial nuclear facilities in Japan and decommissioning of them is included. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) is in charge of technical supports for NISA as a TSO (Technical Support Organization) also in this field. As for decommissioning, based on regulatory needs, JNES has been continuing research activities from October 2003, when JNES has been established. Considering the 'Prioritized Nuclear Safety Research Plan (August 2009)' of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan and the situation of operators facilities, 'Regulatory Support Research Plan between FY 2010-2014' was established in November 2009, which shows the present regulatory needs and a research program. This program consists of researches for 1. review process of decommissioning plan of power reactors, 2. review process of decommissioning plan of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, 3. termination of license at the end of decommissioning and 4. management of decommissioning waste. For the item 1, JNES studied safety assessment methods of dismantling, e.g. obtaining data and analysis of behavior of dust diffusion and risk assessment during decommissioning, which are useful findings for the review process. For the item 2, safety requirements for the decommissioning of nuclear fuel cycle facilities was compiled, which will be used in the future review. For the item 3

  10. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh

    2008-01-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  11. A world class nuclear research reactor complex for South Africa's nuclear future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshaw, Jeetesh [South African Young Nuclear Professional Society, PO Box 9396, Centurion, 0157 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    South Africa recently made public its rather ambitious goals pertaining to nuclear energy developments in a Draft Policy and Strategy issued for public comment. Not much attention was given to an important tool for nuclear energy research and development, namely a well equipped and maintained research reactor, which on its own does not do justice to its potential, unless it is fitted with all the ancillaries and human resources as most first world countries have. In South Africa's case it is suggested to establish at least one Nuclear Energy Research and Development Centre at such a research reactor, where almost all nuclear energy related research can be carried out on par with some of the best in the world. The purpose of this work is to propose how this could be done, and motivate why it is important that it be done with great urgency, and with full involvement of young professionals, if South Africa wishes to face up to the challenges mentioned in the Draft Strategy and Policy. (authors)

  12. Quality assurance for the research and development of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Kim, Young Sea; Lim, Nam Jin

    1991-01-01

    KAERI is carrying out several large nuclear R and D projects to achieve the indigenization of nuclear technology in Korea. In order to accomplish nuclear projects effectively, the KAERI-wide quality assurance system as well as project quality systems has been prepared for the coordination and effective implementation of various quality activities. The revision of KAERI QA Program Plan will help to establish and upgrade the effective and efficient KAERI-wide QA system. Technical support activities to the project QA program were performed in more systematic way. KAERI QA Committee was organized, and the meeting was held periodically to discuss and find out the optimum solution for the critical quality problems. Quality evaluation including internal audits was carried out to analyze the QA activities in the various projects and evlauation results was condensed to quality trend analysis. QA record preserving facility was built and was being used to maintain the QA records. The basic studies on the computer S/W QA, QA in R and D, quality costs analysis were also performed to upgrade the safety and reliability. (Author)

  13. MUPBED: A Pan-European Prototype for Multi-Domain Research Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaeth, Jan; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Foisel, Hans-Martin

    2009-01-01

    Integration and full interoperability are challenging areas of research in wide-area networks today. A European project, MUPBED, has recently concluded and achieved the main result of integrating and demonstrating technologies and network solutions that enable the operation of future European res...

  14. Strategies for the implementation of a European Volcano Observations Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of people on both the continent and adjacent islands. Furthermore, eruptions of "European" volcanoes in overseas territories, such as in the West Indies, an in the Indian and Pacific oceans, can have a much broader impacts, outside Europe. Volcano Observatories (VO), which undertake volcano monitoring under governmental mandate and Volcanological Research Institutions (VRI; such as university departments, laboratories, etc.) manage networks on European volcanoes consisting of thousands of stations or sites where volcanological parameters are either continuously or periodically measured. These sites are equipped with instruments for geophysical (seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, electromagnetic), geochemical (volcanic plumes, fumaroles, groundwater, rivers, soils), environmental observations (e.g. meteorological and air quality parameters), including prototype deployment. VOs and VRIs also operate laboratories for sample analysis (rocks, gases, isotopes, etc.), near-real time analysis of space-borne data (SAR, thermal imagery, SO2 and ash), as well as high-performance computing centres; all providing high-quality information on the current status of European volcanoes and the geodynamic background of the surrounding areas. This large and high-quality deployment of monitoring systems, focused on a specific geophysical target (volcanoes), together with the wide volcanological phenomena of European volcanoes (which cover all the known volcano types) represent a unique opportunity to fundamentally improve the knowledge base of volcano behaviour. The existing arrangement of national infrastructures (i.e. VO and VRI) appears to be too fragmented to be considered as a unique distributed infrastructure. Therefore, the main effort planned in the framework of the EPOS-PP proposal is focused on the creation of services aimed at providing an improved and more efficient access to the volcanological facilities

  15. PERL - European research project on characterization of gaskets for bolted flange connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kockelmann, H.; Hahn, R.

    2004-01-01

    Great progress was observed in the European standardization in the last years in the field of the design of floating type bolted flange connections. New design rules were developed (EN 1591) which include new definitions of gasket characteristics for the calculation of floating type flanged joints. In addition a new gasket testing standard was drafted (prEN 13555) which assures a comprehensive characterization of gaskets for bolted flanged joints. This draft standard contains some new features which were examined and validated within the European research project PERL (Pressure Equipment - Reduction of Leak Rate). The gasket testing strategy laid down in prEN 13555 is presented in this paper. Some testing results highlighten the measuring procedures and the evaluation of the gasket characteristics. (orig.)

  16. Student involvement and research for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear engineering is one of the modern and rapidly advancing technologies. Those already involved in it are continually updating their knowledge to keep abreast of the developments. Of course the sound basic principles of engineering still apply but the scene of application can be transformed in a few years. In fact, because of this, many engineers from more traditional industries often express the view that presently the total range of nuclear engineering is research and development. How can students be trained for such a rapidly advancing technology. Is not the answer early involvement. Effective early involvement for students can only come about by the close co-operation and involvement of the staff of universities and industry. The theme is developed. (author)

  17. Status of nuclear safety research - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Sasajima, Hideo; Umemoto, Michitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Tadao; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Masahito

    2000-11-01

    The nuclear safety research at JAERI is performed in accordance with the long term plan on nuclear research, development and use and the safety research yearly plan determined by the government and under close relationship to the related departments in and around the Nuclear Safety Research Center. The criticality accident having occurred in Tokai-mura in 1999 has been the highest level nuclear accident in Japan and ensuring safety in whole nuclear cycle is severely questioned. The causes of such an accident have to be clarified not only technical points but also organizational points, and it is extremely important to make efforts in preventing recurrence, to fulfill emergency plan and to improve the safety of whole nuclear fuel cycle for restoring the reliability by the people to nuclear energy system. The fields of conducting safety research are engineering safety research on reactor facilities and nuclear fuel cycle facilities including research on radioactive waste processing and disposal and research and development on future technology for safety improvement. Also, multinational cooperation and bilateral cooperation are promoted in international research organizations in the center to internationally share the recognition of world-common issues of nuclear safety and to attain efficient promotion of research and effective utilization of research resources. (author)

  18. The European Social Survey and European research policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kropp, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses the history of the European Social Survey (ESS) and its relationship to changes in European research policy, using Bourdieu’s field-analytical approach. It argues that the success of the ESS relied on three interwoven processes that we can understand theoretically in terms...... of the establishment of homological structures and the formation of conjunctural alliances between the field of European social-scientific research and the field of European policy. The three interwoven processes that I depict are: first, the production of a European field of social research, connected to both...... European and national scientific institutions; second, the establishment of European Union (EU) institutions and organisations that were able to identify and link up with social researchers; and third, the formation of conjunctural alliances between the two fields (social science and EU research policy...

  19. Contributions to radiochemical and nuclear materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    1982-01-01

    Series of talks given during a seminar of the European Institute for Transuranium Elements in april 1981 in honor of R. LINDNER on the occasion of his 60th birth day. The topics include general aspects of research practice and science prognosis, retrospective essays about the discovery of nuclear fission by O. HAHN as well as surveys of actual research activities concerning a radiochemistry and the use of radioactivity in material science

  20. Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional Times. Conference Proceedings of the Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) (7th, Berlin, Germany, September 4-7, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpplinger, Bernd, Ed.; Lichte, Nina, Ed.; Haberzeth, Erik, Ed.; Kulmus, Claudia, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    This book assembles over 50 papers from the 7th Triennial European Research Conference of the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA), which was held from the 4th to the 7th of September 2013 at Humboldt-University in Berlin. The title of the conference was "Changing Configurations of Adult Education in Transitional…

  1. Adjuvant chemotherapy for superficial transitional cell bladder carcinoma : Long-term results of a European organization for research and treatment of cancer randomized trial comparing doxorubicin, ethoglucid and transurethral resection alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurth, K; Tunn, U; Ay, R; Schroder, FH; PavoneMacaluso, M; Debruyne, F; TenKate, F; DePauw, M; Sylvester, R; Essed, E; Caubergh, RV; Hoekstra, JW; deVoogt, HJ; Newling, DWW; deReijke, TM; Mensink, HJA; Groen, JM; Jakse, G; Leisinger, HJ; Richards, B; Adib, RA; Robinson, M; Denis, L; Bouffioux, C; Schulman, C; Carpentier, PJ

    Purpose: We compared the efficacy of transurethral resection alone or transurethral resection followed by bladder instillations of doxorubicin or ethoglucid for 1 year in patients with superficial bladder carcinoma, and followed them long term for the incidence of progression to muscle invasion.

  2. Research on psychological evaluation method for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xiang; He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan

    2007-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative psychology evaluation methods to the nuclear power plant operators were analyzed and discussed in the paper. The comparison analysis to the scope and result of application was carried out between method of outline figure fitted and method of fuzzy synthetic evaluation. The research results can be referenced to the evaluation of nuclear power plant operators. (authors)

  3. A new context for the nuclear research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Pascal Colombani, general administrator of the CEA, develops in this presentation the situation of the nuclear industry to introduce the new orientations of the CEA group. The energy context, the deregulation impacts, the energy dependence and the greenhouse effect project are discussed before the presentation of the research programs and the necessary reorganizing of the nuclear industry. (A.L.B.)

  4. Technical safety Organisations (TSO) contribute to European Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repussard, J.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear safety and radiation protection rely on science to achieve high level prevention objectives, through the analysis of safety files proposed by the licensees. The necessary expertise needs to be exercised so as to ensure adequate independence from nuclear operators, appropriate implementation of state of the art knowledge, and a broad spectrum of analysis, adequately ranking the positive and negative points of the safety files. The absence of a Europe-wide nuclear safety regime is extremely costly for an industry which has to cope with a highly competitive and open international environment, but has to comply with fragmented national regulatory systems. Harmonization is therefore critical, but such a goal is difficult to achieve. Only a gradual policy, made up of planned steps in each of the three key dimensions of the problem (energy policy at EU level, regulatory harmonization, consolidation of Europe-wide technical expertise capability) can be successful to achieve the required integration on the basis of the highest safety levels. TSO's contribute to this consolidation, with the support of the EC, in the fields of research (EURATOM-Programmes), of experience feedback analysis (European Clearinghouse), of training and knowledge management (European Training and Tutoring Institute, EUROSAFE). The TSO's network, ETSON, is becoming a formal organisation, able to enter into formal dialogue with EU institutions. However, nuclear safety nevertheless remains a world wide issue, requiring intensive international cooperation, including on TSO issues. (author)

  5. Responsible decision-making for plant research and breeding innovations in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Ulf Dennis; Chatzopoulou, Sevasti

    2017-01-01

    Plant research and breeding has made substantial technical progress over the past few decades, indicating a potential for tremendous societal impact. Due to this potential, the development of policies and legislation on plant breeding and the technical progress should preferably involve all...... relevant stakeholders. However, we argue here that there is a substantial imbalance in the European Union (EU) regarding the influence of the various stakeholder groups on policy makers. We use evidence from three examples in order to show that the role of science is overlooked: 1) important delays...... in the decision process concerning the authorization of genetically modified (GM) maize events, 2) the significance attributed to non-scientific reasons in new legislation concerning the prohibition of GM events in EU member states, and 3) failure of the European Commission to deliver legal guidance to new plant...

  6. Building a strong European alliance for personality disorder research and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlum, Lars; Bateman, Anthony; Dalewijk, Henk Jan; Doering, Stephan; Kaera, Andres; Moran, Paul Anthony; Renneberg, Babette; Ribaudi, Joaquim Soler; Simonsen, Sebastian; Wilberg, Theresa; Bohus, Martin

    2018-01-01

    People with personality disorders frequently face stigma, ignorance and pessimism regarding the treatability of their disorders. This is despite substantial progress that has been made in developing a number of effective evidence based psychotherapeutic treatments. However, expertise in how to systematically deliver these treatments in a sustainable way throughout Europe is largely lacking. To bridge the gap between evidence based treatments and their implementation in health services, the European Society for the Study of Personality Disorders is currently building a new alliance of experts to promote personality disorder scholarship, and to support the development of clinical expertise and systematic treatment implementation throughout Europe. The aim of this paper is to describe how the Society is currently using its interdisciplinary and international roster of experts to address the specific treatment and research needs of the European personality disorder field, particularly to countries in which expertise in the field is less developed.

  7. Basic research on nuclear track microfilters for gas separation

    CERN Document Server

    Sudowe, R; Ensinger, W; Vetter, J; Penzhorn, R D; Brandt, R

    1999-01-01

    Basic research on nuclear track microfilters, NTMF, made from the polyimide foil UPILEX, has been carried out to investigate the possible use of NTMF for gas separation in an environment containing large amounts of tritium. NTMF with a pore diameter as low as 0.1 mu m have been etched and metal replicas of the pores have been produced to determine the pore shape. An experimental setup for determining the separation factor of a NTMF for a given gas mixture has been constructed, and first experiments have been carried out.

  8. Radiotracer laboratory for agricultural research at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashriyah Mat; Misman Sumin; Maizatul Akmam Mhd Nasir

    2007-01-01

    Radiotracer Laboratory for agricultural research at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency was established since 1990. It accommodates three laboratories, three chemical temporary storage compartments plus one compartment for storage of pressurized gas. This facility is situated in ground floor of Block 44, Agrotechnology and Biosciences Division, Dengkil Complex. Currently it houses a liquid scintillation counter, sample oxidizer, gas liquid chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and auxiliary equipments. A road map for this laboratory will be discussed in relation with present scenario i.e. R and D service, training and consultancy provided by this laboratory; and future requirements and direction. (Author)

  9. National cyclotron centre at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Asova, G.; Artinyan, A.; Demerdjiev, A.; Georgiev, L. S.; Yavahchova, M.; Bashev, V.; Genchev, S. G.; Geleva, E.; Mincheva, M.; Nikolov, A.; Dimitrov, D. T.

    2018-05-01

    An accelerator laboratory is presently under construction in Sofia at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy. The laboratory will use a TR24 type of cyclotron, which provides a possibility to accelerate a proton beam with an energy of 15 to 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. An accelerator with such parameters allows to produce a large variety of radioisotopes for development of radiopharmaceuticals. The most common radioisotopes that can be produced with such a cyclotron are PET isotopes like: 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F, 124I, 64Cu, 68Ge/68Ga, and SPECT isotopes like: 123I, 111In, 67Ga, 57Co, 99mTc. Our aim is to use the cyclotron facility for research in the fields of radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, materials sciences, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including nuclear energy. Presently we perform investigations in the fields of target design for production of radioisotopes, shielding and radioprotection, new ion sources etc.

  10. European Research Reloaded : Cooperation and Integration Among Europeanized States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holzhacker, Ron; Haverland, Markus

    2006-01-01

    European integration has had an ever deepening impact on the member states. The first wave of research concerned the process of institution building and policy developments at the European Union (EU) level. The second wave, on Europeanization used the resulting integration as an explanatory factor

  11. European research platform IPANEMA at the SOLEIL synchrotron for ancient and historical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, L.; Languille, M.A.; Cohen, S.X.; Robinet, L.; Josse, W.; Gervais, C.; Leroy, S.; Bernard, D.; Le Pennec, E.; Doucet, J.; Schoder, S.

    2011-01-01

    IPANEMA, a research platform devoted to ancient and historical materials (archaeology, cultural heritage, palaeontology and past environments), is currently being set up at the synchrotron facility SOLEIL (Saint-Aubin, France; SOLEIL opened to users in January 2008). The new platform is open to French, European and international users. The activities of the platform are centred on two main fields: increased support to synchrotron projects on ancient materials and methodological research. The IPANEMA team currently occupies temporary premises at SOLEIL, but the platform comprises construction of a new building that will comply with conservation and environmental standards and of a hard X-ray imaging beamline today in its conceptual design phase, named PUMA. Since 2008, the team has supported synchrotron works at SOLEIL and at European synchrotron facilities on a range of topics including pigment degradation in paintings, composition of musical instrument varnishes, and provenancing of medieval archaeological ferrous artefacts. Once the platform is fully operational, user support will primarily take place within medium-term research projects for 'hosted' scientists, PhDs and post-docs. IPANEMA methodological research is focused on advanced two-dimensional/ three-dimensional imaging and spectroscopy and statistical image analysis, both optimized for ancient materials. (authors)

  12. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics Research: A New Online Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael Scott

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of a wide range of astrophysical processes depends crucially on nuclear physics data. While new nuclear information is being generated at an ever-increasing rate, the methods to process this information into astrophysical simulations have changed little over the decades and cannot keep pace. Working online, 'cloud computing', may be the methodology breakthrough needed to ensure that the latest nuclear data quickly gets into astrophysics codes. The successes of the first utilization of cloud computing for nuclear astrophysics will be described. The advantages of cloud computing for the broader nuclear data community are also discussed.

  13. KNOWBOT: a self-organizing interface for nuclear data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, A.S.; Koen, B.V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical intelligent associate, KNOWBOT, designed to act as a surrogate for engineers and scientists in accessing nuclear power industry data bases. The nuclear power industry has developed several safety and reliability data bases to facilitate the exchange of significant safety-related data for enhancement of its performance. The nuclear plant reliability data system and the licensee event reports are instances of such data bases. The creation of these data bases has, nevertheless, been paradoxical. They have provided rapid access to the needed data. Yet they have, at the same time, created their own impediments. Two of these problems that are addressed by the design of KNOWBOT are the interface and dimensionality. The interface problem falls in the broader category of man/machine interaction, which deals with the problems involved with this symbiosis. Dimensionality deals with the rapidly increasing sizes of the data bases and their ability to process queries in a timely fashion. Numerous programs have been developed to address the interface problem, but most have proven inadequate in real-time applications. The dimensionality problem has been approached through the development of faster processors and query optimizers. As these data bases continue to expand, the present solutions are reaching their performance limits, and a new approach such as that offered by KNOWBOT is needed

  14. Comments on future tasks for Romanian research related to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrache, I.

    2000-01-01

    Four main research areas are identified: - nuclear safety, - waste management, - fuel cycles and - plant life management. A significant number of tasks are related to each of these areas. Unfortunately, the cost of the needed research is much too high for the current electricity planning of Romania. Up to now, the international co-operation in CANDU field was not very efficient. Canada, India, Korea and Argentina have distinct intentions related to the use of nuclear power potential. Romania is the only European country interested to investigate CANDU reactor problems. Consequently, the author believes that the future Romanian nuclear power research effort must be clearly divided in two main classes: a. CR = 'Concentrated Research' on specific subjects, aimed to a better understanding, and to a complete solving of the associated problems, when possible, and b. CAR = 'Covering Areas Research' to maintain and update the know-how needed in the nuclear power activities. A given research subject may successively pass from one class to another, if needed; however, for a given period of one-to-five years, the class must be stated for each project, from the beginning. No research effort must be planned in the first class, CR, if the needed resources (human, technical and financial) are not ensured. Usually, the power plant leaders and the Institute researchers wish to dedicate their efforts to investigation of the 'hot problems'. Apparently, they are always right. In fact, the allocation of human and financial resources must be based on a very careful evaluation of the 'conditions required for success'. Otherwise, instead of the needed solution, the research will probably offer' a significant number of original methods, successfully applied', 'a more detailed knowledge of phenomena', 'several patents', a few papers 'published or accepted for publication in world over recognized scientific journals' etc. Although valuable, such results are not accepted instead of the needed

  15. Identification, validation, and clinical implementation of tumor-associated biomarkers to improve therapy concepts, survival, and quality of life of cancer patients: tasks of the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Harbeck, N.; Daidone, M.G.; Brynner, N.; Duffy, M.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Guiding principles are provided and discussed on how to inform the physician scientist and cancer researcher about quality control systems to enable a consistent assessment of the clinical value of tumor-associated biomarkers. Next to cancer research itself, the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the

  16. Nuclear science research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Research activities in nuclear science carried out during 1976 are summarized. Research centers around nuclear structure and the application of nuclear techniques to solid state science, materials, engineering, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Reactor and accelerator operations are reported. (E.C.B.)

  17. Activities report 1991-1992: Nuclear Research Center of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This activities report of the Nuclear Research Centre of Strasbourg for the years 1991 and 1992, presents nine research axis: theoretical physics, mechanisms of reactions and nuclear structure, extreme forms of nuclei, exotic nuclei, hot and dense nuclear matter, ultra-relativistic heavy ions, physics of LEP (European Large Electron-Positron storage ring) at 'DELPHI', chemistry and physics of radiations, physics and applications of semi-conductors

  18. Progress of nuclear safety research, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    Since the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was founded as a nonprofit, general research and development organization for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, it has actively pursued the research and development of nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is the primary source of energy in Japan where energy resources are scarce. The safety research is recognized at JAERI as one of the important issues to be clarified, and the safety research on nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle, waste management and environmental safety has been conducted systematically since 1973. As of the end of 1989, 38 reactors were in operation in Japan, and the nuclear electric power generated in 1988 reached 29 % of the total electric power generated. 50 years have passed since nuclear fission was discovered in 1939. The objective of the safety research at JAERI is to earn public support and trust for the use of nuclear energy. The overview of the safety research at JAERI, fuel behavior, reliability of reactor structures and components, reactor thermal-hydraulics during LOCA, safety assessment of nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities, radioactive waste management and environmental radioactivity are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Convective parameters in fuel elements for research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Martinez, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of a prototype for the simulation of fuel elements for research nuclear reactors by natural convection in water is presented in this paper. This project is carry out in the thermofluids laboratory of National Institute of Nuclear Research. The fuel prototype has already been test for natural convection in air, and the first results in water are presented in this work. In chapter I, a general description of Triga Mark III is made, paying special atention to fuel-moderator components. In chapter II and III an approach to convection subject in its global aspects is made, since the intention is to give a general idea of the events occuring around fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. In chapter II, where an emphasis on forced convection is made, some basic concepts for forced convection as well as for natural convection are included. The subject of flow through cylinders is annotated only as a comparative reference with natural convection in vertical cylinders, noting the difference between used correlations and the involved variables. In chapter III a compilation of correlation found in the bibliography about natural convection in vertical cylinders is presented, since its geometry is the more suitable in the analysis of a fuel rod. Finally, in chapter IV performed experiments in the test bench are detailed, and the results are presented in form of tables and graphs, showing the used equations for the calculations and the restrictions used in each case. For the analysis of the prototypes used in the test bench, a constant and uniform flow of heat in the whole length of the fuel rod is considered. At the end of this chapter, the work conclusions and a brief explanation of the results are presented (Author)

  20. A European nuclear sector to face future energy challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.; Thais, F.

    2010-01-01

    Very early Europe chose the way of nuclear energy to produce electricity but progressively different countries followed different policies and now the nuclear landscape of the European Union is various: some countries are full-fledged, some stopped their program a long ago and others are in a phase-out period. The stakes of the climatic change and a framed strategy of the European Union have led to a renewal of the nuclear option. Great-Britain has already launched a program of new power plants. Poland, Bulgaria, Slovenia and Hungary want to develop nuclear energy to be less dependant on Russian oil and gas exports. In other countries like Germany, Austria, Sweden we can notice a positive change in favour of nuclear power of their public opinion. A recent OECD study shows that nuclear power stays largely competitive in Europe despite rising construction costs. The harmonization of the nuclear safety regulations throughout Europe appears clearly as an objective of the European Union. As for the management of radioactive wastes the European Union favors the disposal in deep geological layers, but as for the options: direct storage or reprocessing, a common European policy is out of reach at the moment. (A.C.)

  1. The Utilization of Dalat nuclear research reactor for education and training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, Ba Vien; Nguyen, Nhi Dien; Le, Vinh Vinh; Nguyen, Xuan Hai

    2017-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) with the nominal power of 500 kWt is today the unique one in Vietnam. It was designed for the purposes of radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, basic and applied researches, and nuclear education and training. With the rising demand in development of human resources for utilization of atomic energy in the country, the DNRR has been playing an important role in the nuclear education and training for students from universities and professionals who are interested in reactor engineering. At present, the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) offers two types of training course utilizing the research reactor: an one-week practical training course is applied for undergraduate students and a two-week training course on reactor engineering is applied for the professionals. This paper presents the reactor facility and experiments performed at the DNRR for education and training purposes. In addition, the co-operation between the DNRI with national and international educational organizations for nuclear human resource development for national and regional demands is also mentioned in the paper. (author)

  2. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Hideo [Japan International Cooperation Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  3. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  4. The Eurosafe Forum 2003: Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacronique, Jean-Francois; Repussard, Jacques [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, B.P. 17, F - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Hahn, Lothar [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, GRS, Schwertnergasse 1, D - 50667 Koeln (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    EUROSAFE is an international forum for discussions among experts from technical safety organisations, research institutes, safety authorities, utilities, the industry, public authorities and non-governmental organisations concerning the status of and recent achievements in nuclear installation safety, waste management, radiation safety and nuclear material security. The Eurosafe Forum 2003 - the fifth of its kind - was held at the Palais Brongniart in Paris on November 25 and 26, 2003. This year's theme was: 'Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union: speakers in the various European countries about the environmental scan before enlargement, development and structuring perspectives within the enlarged Europe'. The event brought together 445 experts and researchers from around the world (including 124 from Germany, 184 from France, 88 from Eastern Europe, as well as representatives from Korea, Japan, the United States, Canada, Cuba, and Armenia. The proceedings of the symposium can now be consulted online. The fifth edition of the forum focused on nuclear expertise and the challenge of EU-enlargement and the latest work carried out by GRS, IRSN and their partners from the European Union, Switzerland and Eastern Europe. Nuclear energy contributes approximately one third of European electricity production. A high level of nuclear safety is a priority for the countries of Europe. The technical safety organisations play an important role in contributing to that objective through appropriate approaches to major safety issues as part of their assessments and research activities. The challenges to nuclear safety are increasingly international. Changes in underlying technologies such as instrumentation and control, the impact of electricity market deregulation, demands for improved safety, the ageing of nuclear facilities, waste management, maintaining and improving scientific and technical knowledge and the need for greater transparency

  5. The Eurosafe Forum 2003: Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacronique, Jean-Francois; Repussard, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    EUROSAFE is an international forum for discussions among experts from technical safety organisations, research institutes, safety authorities, utilities, the industry, public authorities and non-governmental organisations concerning the status of and recent achievements in nuclear installation safety, waste management, radiation safety and nuclear material security. The Eurosafe Forum 2003 - the fifth of its kind - was held at the Palais Brongniart in Paris on November 25 and 26, 2003. This year's theme was: 'Nuclear expertise and challenges of the enlargement of the European Union: speakers in the various European countries about the environmental scan before enlargement, development and structuring perspectives within the enlarged Europe'. The event brought together 445 experts and researchers from around the world (including 124 from Germany, 184 from France, 88 from Eastern Europe, as well as representatives from Korea, Japan, the United States, Canada, Cuba, and Armenia. The proceedings of the symposium can now be consulted online. The fifth edition of the forum focused on nuclear expertise and the challenge of EU-enlargement and the latest work carried out by GRS, IRSN and their partners from the European Union, Switzerland and Eastern Europe. Nuclear energy contributes approximately one third of European electricity production. A high level of nuclear safety is a priority for the countries of Europe. The technical safety organisations play an important role in contributing to that objective through appropriate approaches to major safety issues as part of their assessments and research activities. The challenges to nuclear safety are increasingly international. Changes in underlying technologies such as instrumentation and control, the impact of electricity market deregulation, demands for improved safety, the ageing of nuclear facilities, waste management, maintaining and improving scientific and technical knowledge and the need for greater transparency

  6. Fuel operation of EDF nuclear fleet presentation of the centralized organization for operational engineering at the nuclear generation division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    The main feature of EDF Nuclear Fleet is the standardization, with 'series' of homogeneous plants (same equipment, fuel and operation technical documents). For fuel operation, this standardization is related to the concept of 'fuel management scheme' (typical fuel reloads with fixed number and enrichment of fresh assemblies) for a whole series of plants. The context of the Nuclear Fleet lead to the choice of a centralized organization for fuel engineering at the Nuclear Generation Division (DPN), located at UNIPE (National Department for Fleet Operation Engineering) in Lyon. The main features of this organization are the following: - Centralization of the engineering activities for fuel operation support in the Fuel Branch of UNIPE, - Strong real-time link with the nuclear sites, - Relations with various EDF Departments in charge of design, nuclear fuel supply and electricity production optimization. The purposes of the organization are: - Standardization of operational engineering services and products, - Autonomy with independent methods and computing tools, - Reactivity with a technical assistance for sites (24 hours 'hot line'), - Identification of different levels (on site and off site) to solve core operation problems, - Collection, analysis and valorization of operation feedback, - Contribution to fuel competence global management inside EDF. This paper briefly describes the organization. The main figures of annual engineering production are provided. A selection of examples illustrates the contribution to the Nuclear Fleet performance. (authors)

  7. Organizing for change: new priorities for training organization in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammuto, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Traditional training organizations will require a new look in light of the efforts being applied since TMI. the emphasis to incorporate basic educational technology into power plant training and trends of past, present, and future program development, point out the need for change in training philosophy and manpower needs. The functional responsibilities within a typical training organization will be described with an emphasis on interrelationships of each group activity and the effect of the systems approach to training organization and administration

  8. Russian Federation’s plans to deploy nuclear weapons in Crimea: the possible consequences for Ukraine and European security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Vonsovych

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the possible consequences for Ukraine and European security in case of deploying by Russian Federation nuclear weapons in Crimea. It was determined that under current conditions of confrontation between Ukraine and Russia such actions could further complicate the process of resolving the situation in the east of our country and threaten the implementation of peace initiatives regarding the resumption of constructive dialogue. It was found that the reluctance to disclose or hide the real intentions of Russia produces around Ukraine’s borders space of uncertainty and danger. This directly threatens the national security of our state and continue to make use of the power factor in relations with the Russian Federation. It is proved that Ukraine needs to do more emphasis on their own national identity and opportunities to prove its independence with regard to solving such questions. Substantiated the thesis that the European community should now take the necessary measures to prevent the development of the Russian Federation’s plans regarding the deployment of nuclear weapons in Crimea. This will give the opportunity to avoid misunderstandings and create a ground to prevent the destabilization of the European security system.

  9. The 9. European nuclear conference; La 9. conference nucleaire europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D' auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-11-15

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions.

  10. The law for Japan Nuclear Ship Research and Development Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The agency intends to develop and research nuclear ships according to the principles of the atomic energy act and contribute to advance the utilization of atomic energy and the development of ship building and marine transportation. It shall be a juridical person, and its main office shall be in Tokyo Metropolis. Its capital shall be the sum of 100 million yen paid in by the government and the amounts invested by persons other than the government at the time of establishment. The agency may increase, if necessary, its capital with the approval of the competent minister. It shall define the following matters by its articles: object, name, the place of the office, the matters concerning capital, investments and assets, executives, advisers and meeting, business and its execution, finance and accounting, public announcement and the change of the articles. Its executives consist of a chief director, a representative director, directors not more than 3 and an auditor. The chief director and the auditor are appointed by the competent minister after hearing opinions of the Atomic Energy Commission. The representative and other directors are determined by the chief director with approval of the competent minister. The term of office is four years for the chief director, the representative director and other directors, and two years for the auditor. The agency performs business, such as study and research necessary for the development of nuclear ships, design, building and operation of these ships and the training of crew for these nuclear ships, etc. It is under the superintendence of the competent minister. (Okada, K.)

  11. Results on safety research for five years (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000). A field of nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    This safety research carried out by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) for five years ranged from fiscal year 1996 to 2000, was performed according to the safety research basic plan (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000) established on March, 1996 (revised again on May, 2000). This report was arranged on a field on nuclear fuel cycle (all subjects on fields of nuclear fuel facility, environmental radioactivity and radioactive wastes and a subject on nuclear fuel cycle in a field of seismic resistant and probabilistic safety assessment) by combining its research results for five years ranged from 1996 to 2000 fiscal year with general outlines on the safety research basic plan. Here were shown outlines on the safety research basic plan, aims and subjects on safety research at a field of nuclear fuel cycle, a list of survey sheets on safety research result, and survey sheets on safety research results. The survey sheets containing research field, title, organization, researcher name, researching period, names of cooperative organization, using facilities, research outline, research results, established contents, application, and research trends, are ranged to 21 items on nuclear fuel facility, 1 item on seismic resistance, 2 items on probabilistic safety assessment, 8 items on environmental radioactivity, and 20 items on radioactive wastes. (G.K.)

  12. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Sagert, N.H.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Taylor, P.

    1984-04-01

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  13. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar; Cojocaru, Virgil

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  14. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, C.; Cojocaru, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  15. Breaking the Ice: Strategies for Future European Research in the Polar Oceans - The AURORA BOREALIS Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembke-Jene, L.; Biebow, N.; Wolff-Boenisch, B.; Thiede, J.; European Research Icebreaker Consortium

    2011-12-01

    Research vessels dedicated to work in polar ice-covered waters have only rarely been built. Their history began with Fritjof Nansen's FRAM, which he used for his famous first crossing of the Arctic Ocean 1893-1896. She served as example for the first generation of polar research vessels, at their time being modern instruments planned with foresight. Ice breaker technology has developed substantially since then. However, it took almost 80 years until this technical advance also reached polar research, when the Russian AKADEMIK FEDEROV, the German POLARSTERN, the Swedish ODEN and the USCG Cutter HEALY were built. All of these house modern laboratories, are ice-breakers capable to move into the deep-Arctic during the summer time and represent the second generation of dedicated polar research vessels. Still, the increasing demand in polar marine research capacities by societies that call for action to better understand climate change, especially in the high latitudes is not matched by adequate facilities and resources. Today, no icebreaker platform exists that is permanently available to the international science community for year-round expeditions into the central Arctic Ocean or heavily ice-infested waters of the polar Southern Ocean around Antarctica. The AURORA BOREALIS concept plans for a heavy research icebreaker, which will enable polar scientists around the world to launch international research expeditions into the central Arctic Ocean and the Antarctic continental shelf seas autonomously during all seasons of the year. The European Research Icebreaker Consortium - AURORA BOREALIS (ERICON-AB) was established in 2008 to plan the scientific, governance, financial, and legal frameworks needed for the construction and operation of this first multi-nationally owned and operated research icebreaker and polar scientific drilling platform. By collaborating together and sharing common infrastructures it is envisioned that European nations make a major contribution to

  16. Directions for nuclear research in the transplutonium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chasman, R.R.; Friedman, A.M.; Ahmad, I.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the heavy nuclides has played a vital role in our understanding of the alpha decay process, nuclear fission, nuclear binding energies and the limits of nuclear stability. This study has led to the understanding of novel shape degrees of freedom, such as the very large quadrupole deformations associated with the fission isomer process, and the very recently discovered octupole deformation. The existence of these unique phenomena in the heavy element region is not accidental. Fission isomerism is due to the delicate balance between nuclear forces holding the nucleus together and Coulomb forces causing nuclear fission. Octupole deformation arises from the increasing strength of matrix elements with increasing oscillator shell. Both illustrate the unique features of the heavy element region. Fission studies have given us information about large collective aspects in nuclei and the importance that nuclear structural effects can play in altering these macro properties. A new class of atomic studies has become possible with the availability of heavy elements. With these isotopes, we are now able to produce electric fields of such magnitude that it becomes possible to spontaneously create positron-electron pairs in the vacuum. We have organized this presentation into three major sections: nuclear structure, fission studies and atomic studies of supercritical systems. In each we will try to emphasize the new directions which can benefit from the continued availability of isotopes supplied by the Trans-plutonium Production Program. 117 references

  17. Research Projects at Chulalongkorn University for the Master Degree Programme in Nuclear Security and Safeguard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsuwankosit, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, began its master degree programme in nuclear security and safeguard in November 2013 with the support from the CBRN-Center of Excellence, European Union. This programme was planned as a way to raise the awareness of various local agencies in ASEAN countries regarding the threat of CBRN events. In the long run, the programme will also serve as the platform to develop the human resource and to provide the professional assistance required to counter such threat in the region. The programme closely follows the guideline as given by the IAEA and employs its materials as the main source of references. The first batch of 20 students came from countries in the ASEAN community. Due to the nature of the program, each student is required to conduct the research and a thesis based on such research is to be submitted as part of the requirement for the graduation. Currently, the research subjects that are readily available to the students can be classified into 5 categories: 1. subjects with neutron generator, 2. subjects with nuclear electronics and instruments, 3. subjects with industrial applications, 4. subjects with computer simulations, and 5. subjects with policy research. (author)

  18. Nuclear safety research in HGF 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    After the events at the Japanese nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi, the German Federal government decided that Germany will give up electricity generation from nuclear power within a decade. The last reactor will be disconnected from the power grid in 2022. Helping to make this opt-out safe is one of the duties of the Helmholtz Association with its Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area. Also the demolition of nuclear power plants and the repository problem will keep society, and thus also research, busy for a number of decades to come. Giving up electricity production from nuclear power thus must not mean giving up the required nuclear technology competences. In the fields of reactor safety, demolition, final storage, radiation protection, and crisis management, in critical support of international developments, and for competent evaluation of nuclear facilities around Germany, these competences will be in demand far beyond the German opt-out. This is the reason why the final report by the Ethics Committee on 'Safe Energy Supply' emphasizes the importance of nuclear technology research. Close cooperation on national, European and international levels is indispensable in this effort. Also nuclear safety research in the Helmholtz Association is aligned with the challenges posed by the opt-out of the use of nuclear power. It is important that the high competences in the areas of plant safety and demolition, handling of radioactive waste, and safe final storage as well as radiation protection be preserved. The Nuclear Safety Research Program within the Energy Research Area of the Helmholtz Association therefore will continue studying scientific and technical aspects of the safety of nuclear reactors and the safety of nuclear waste management. These research activities are provident research conducted for society and must be preserved for a long period of time. The work is closely harmonized with the activities of the partners in the

  19. Postgraduate education in nuclear engineering: towards an european degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giot, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the postgraduate degree in nuclear engineering jointly organised by four universities of the French Community of Belgium, and its possible evolution towards an European degree. The project includes the location of the programme outside the partner universities at the premises of the SCK.CEN, a modular structure of the curriculum, and an increased co-operation of the teaching staff within small groups of experts including academics, researchers and practitioners from the nuclear industry. This programme would favour the exchange of students and professors through a network of top quality European institutions pursuing the same teaching objectives. (author)

  20. The nuclear safety case for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, A.; Garea, V.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the safety case being used in the licensing of Australia's Replacement Research Reactor. The reactor is a 20 MW pool-type research reactor and is being constructed at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre in Sydney's south. It will be owned and operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and will take over the duties currently performed by HIFAR, a DIDO-type reactor currently operating at the site. The safety case for the RRR considers all aspects of normal operation and anticipated occurrences and will be subject to periodic review and updated in line with evolving methodologies and modifications to plant and procedures. Its scope and degree of detail ensure that the risk posed to members of the public, operators and environment are all adequately low and well in the regulatory limits

  1. Overview of management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes at the Institute for Nuclear Research for to save management of the waste from decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujoreanu, D.; Bujoreanu, L.

    2010-01-01

    The national policy of radioactive waste management fully complies with the international requirements established by 'Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management and with the EURATOM treaty, directives, recommendations and policy of radioactive waste management promoted at the level of the European Union. The Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR) has its own Radwaste Treatment Plant. The object of activity is to treat and condition radioactive waste resulted from the nuclear facility. According to the National Nuclear Program, the institute is the main support for implementation of the methods and technologies for conditioning and disposal of radioactive waste generated by Cernavoda NPP. For all these, in accordance with the Governmental order no. 11/2003, INR shall must prepare and manage the decommissioning projects of its own facilities and to upgrade the facilities for the management of the radioactive waste resulting from decommissioning activities. (authors)

  2. What Perspectives for Crisis Resolution? Which European Diplomacy vis-a-vis Iran's Nuclear Ambitions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovici, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The conduct of European diplomacy on the Iranian dossier raises many geopolitical issues. What are the strategic possibilities for the European Union? Its credibility is at stake and it must now demonstrate that its alternative approach is more efficient than American policy, which seeks to use the Iranian nuclear dispute as an element of struggle against the Iranian regime. However, the multiplicity of decision-making structures of the EU foreign policy make more complex its action and the implementation of its policies, that are articulated between diplomatic efforts and threats of sanctions. Where the United States has chosen containment, the EU chooses the commitment and sees the return to dialogue and stabilization possible

  3. Planning and execution of knowledge management assist missions for nuclear organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-05-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on skilled employees and their know-how. Recent trends such as workforce ageing, declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. These problems are exacerbated by the deregulation of energy markets around the world. The nuclear industry is now required to significantly reduce its costs in order to compete with generators with different technology life cycle profiles. In many countries, government funding has been dramatically reduced or has disappeared altogether, while the profit margins of generators have been severely squeezed. The result has been lower electricity prices but also the loss of expertise as a result of downsizing to reduce salary costs, a loss of research facilities to reduce operating costs and a decline in support to universities to reduce overheads. The above factors have led to a reduction in technical innovation and a potential loss of technical competences, drawing the attention of all concerned parties to the need for effective strategies and policies for Knowledge Management. These issues have been recognized as being of key importance for the IAEA, and the General Conference of the IAEA has adopted resolutions on Nuclear Knowledge that request the IAEA to develop corresponding activities. Current activities in KM aim to further increase the level of attention and awareness given to activities for preserving and enhancing nuclear knowledge; to assist Member States to ensure the preservation of nuclear experience and competence needed for the effective and safe use of nuclear energy; to promote the networking of institutions for nuclear education and training; to evaluate the relevance of current programs and activities regarding nuclear knowledge, and to identify approaches aimed at how best to address the

  4. Consensus Statement of the European Urology Association and the European Urogynaecological Association on the Use of Implanted Materials for Treating Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Christopher R; Cruz, Francisco; Deffieux, Xavier; Milani, Alfredo L; Arlandis, Salvador; Artibani, Walter; Bauer, Ricarda M; Burkhard, Fiona; Cardozo, Linda; Castro-Diaz, David; Cornu, Jean Nicolas; Deprest, Jan; Gunnemann, Alfons; Gyhagen, Maria; Heesakkers, John; Koelbl, Heinz; MacNeil, Sheila; Naumann, Gert; Roovers, Jan-Paul W R; Salvatore, Stefano; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Tarcan, Tufan; Van der Aa, Frank; Montorsi, Francesco; Wirth, Manfred; Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Surgical nonautologous meshes have been used for several decades to repair abdominal wall herniae. Implantable materials have been adopted for the treatment of female and male stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and female pelvic organ prolapse (POP). A consensus review of existing data based on published meta-analyses and reviews. This document summarises the deliberations of a consensus group meeting convened by the European Association of Urology (EAU) and the European Urogynecological Association, to explore the current evidence relating to the use of polypropylene (PP) materials used for the treatment of SUI and POP, with reference to the 2016 EAU guidelines (European Association of Urology 2016), the European Commission's SCENIHR report on the use of surgical meshes (SCENIHR 2015), other available high-quality evidence, guidelines, and national recommendations. Current data suggest that the use of nonautologous durable materials in surgery has well-established benefits but significant risks, which are specific to the condition and location they are used for. Various graft-related complications have been described-such as infection, chronic pain including dyspareunia, exposure in the vagina, shrinkage, erosion into other organs of xenografts, synthetic PP tapes (used in SUI), and meshes (used in POP)-which differ from the complications seen with abdominal herniae. When considering surgery for SUI, it is essential to evaluate the available options, which may include synthetic midurethral slings (MUSs) using PP tapes, bulking agents, colposuspension, and autologous sling surgery. The use of synthetic MUSs for surgical treatment of SUI in both male and female patients has good efficacy and acceptable morbidity. Synthetic mesh for POP should be used only in complex cases with recurrent prolapse in the same compartment and restricted to those surgeons with appropriate training who are working in multidisciplinary referral centres. Synthetic slings can be safely used

  5. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  6. Research activities for nuclear power plant aging promoted by PLEC, JAPEIC, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, N.; Tajima, K.

    2003-01-01

    In order to perform research activity for aging; countermeasure of nuclear power plant effectively, Plant Life Engineering Center (PLEC) was established in Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corporation (JAPEIC) in April 2000 sponsored by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI, called as MITI, at that time). Results of technical survey for research and development for aging phenomena have been summarized in a table (Research Map) categorizing them into 'inspection and monitoring', 'evaluation method for aging' and 'preventive maintenances and refurbishment'. Necessary research themes have been extracted from the Research Map consulting to experts of the specified research area. Medium and long-term research perspective (Research Perspective) has been established which contains prioritized research themes and outlined specification of each theme. Several new research themes proposed by various organizations and selected by PLEC as effective for the regulation activities of METI every year. There are about ten on-going research programs funded by METI. Their progress and performance are evaluated annually to improve their efficiency including their alteration, abolition and integration. This cycle of research is going to be attained successfully. Technology Advisory Committee composed of members from various field of nuclear power including prefectural and municipal governments supervises the PLEC activity to concentrate national wide potentials and to secure transparency, openness and neutrality. This paper also provides an outline of the aging related research projects currently conducted by JAPEIC under the auspices of METI. (author)

  7. Extending Research on the Consequences of Parenting Style for Chinese Americans and European Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ruth K.

    2001-01-01

    Examined effects of parent-adolescent relationships on school performance for Chinese American and European American high school students. Found positive effects of both authoritative parenting and relationship closeness on school performance for European Americans and to some extent second-generation Chinese, but not first-generation Chinese. The…

  8. European Union research in support of environment and health: Building scientific evidence base for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Hoeveler, Arnd; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2017-06-01

    Opinion polls show that the European Union citizens are increasingly concerned about the impact of environmental factors on their health. In order to respond and provide solid scientific evidence for the numerous policies related to the protection of human health and the environment managed at the Union level, the European Union made a substantial investment in research and innovation in the past two decades through its Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development, including the current programme, Horizon 2020, which started in 2014. This policy review paper analysed the portfolio of forty collaborative projects relevant to environment and health, which received a total amount of around 228 million euros from the EU. It gives details on their contents and general scientific trends observed, the profiles of the participating countries and institutions, and the potential policy implications of the results obtained. The increasing knowledge base is needed to make informed policy decisions in Europe and beyond, and should be useful to many stakeholders including the scientific community and regulatory authorities. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A plea for uniform European definitions for organ donor potential and family refusal rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Nichon E; Haase-Kromwijk, Bernadette J J M; van Leiden, Hendrik A; Weimar, Willem; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2009-11-01

    Conversion of potential organ donors to actual donors is negatively influenced by family refusals. Refusal rates differ strongly among countries. Is it possible to compare refusal rates in order to be able to learn from countries with the best practices? We searched in the literature for reviews of donor potential and refusal rates for organ donation in intensive care units. We found 14 articles pertinent to this study. There is an enormous diversity among the performed studies. The definitions of potential organ donors and family refusal differed substantially. We tried to re-calculate the refusal rates. This method failed because of the influence caused by the registered will on donation in the Donor Register. We therefore calculated the total refusal rate. This strategy was also less satisfactory considering possible influence of the legal consent system on the approach of family. Because of lack of uniform definitions, we can conclude that the refusal rates for organ donation can not be used for a sound comparison among countries. To be able to learn from well-performing countries, it is necessary to establish uniform definitions regarding organ donation and registration of all intensive care deaths.